Sample records for objective transparent analyses

  1. Quantitative analyses of damp-heat-induced degradation in transparent conducting oxides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byungwoo

    Quantitative analyses of damp-heat-induced degradation in transparent conducting oxides Jae Ik Kim online 9 January 2014 Keywords: Transparent conducting oxides Al-doped ZnO Damp-heat test Photovoltaics oxides is essential for actual applications in photovoltaic devices or displays requiring long

  2. System of and method for transparent management of data objects in containers across distributed heterogenous resources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Reagan W. (San Diego, CA); Rajasekar, Arcot (Del Mar, CA); Wan, Michael Y. (San Diego, CA)

    2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of and method for maintaining data objects in containers across a network of distributed heterogeneous resources in a manner which is transparent to a client. A client request pertaining to containers is resolved by querying meta data for the container, processing the request through one or more copies of the container maintained on the system, updating the meta data for the container to reflect any changes made to the container as a result processing the request, and, if a copy of the container has changed, changing the status of the copy to indicate dirty status or synchronizing the copy to one or more other copies that may be present on the system.

  3. System of and method for transparent management of data objects in containers across distributed heterogenous resources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Reagan W.; Rajasekar, Arcot; Wan, Michael Y.

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of and method for maintaining data objects in containers across a network of distributed heterogeneous resources in a manner which is transparent to a client. A client request pertaining to containers is resolved by querying meta data for the container, processing the request through one or more copies of the container maintained on the system, updating the meta data for the container to reflect any changes made to the container as a result processing the request, and, if a copy of the container has changed, changing the status of the copy to indicate dirty status or synchronizing the copy to one or more other copies that may be present on the system.

  4. System of and method for transparent management of data objects in containers across distributed heterogenous resources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Reagan W. (San Diego, CA); Rajasekar, Arcot (Del Mar, CA); Wan, Michael Y. (San Diego, CA)

    2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of and method for maintaining data objects in containers across a network of distributed heterogeneous resources in a manner which is transparent to a client. A client request pertaining to containers is resolved by querying meta data for the container, processing the request through one or more copies of the container maintained on the system, updating the meta data for the container to reflect any changes made to the container as a result processing the re quest, and, if a copy of the container has changed, changing the status of the copy to indicate dirty status or synchronizing the copy to one or more other copies that may be present on the system.

  5. Towards Analysing a Class of Object Petri Nets Sea Ling and Heinz W. Schmidt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Heinz

    Towards Analysing a Class of Object Petri Nets Sea Ling and Heinz W. Schmidt Department of Software,hwsg@sd.monash.edu.au Abstract The Petri net theory has been used to specify many types of systems, in particular, concurrent, distributed and non­ deterministic. A class of high­level, object­based Petri nets, OBJSA nets, is being used

  6. 5 Valdes-Sosa, M. et al. (2000) Attention to object files defined by transparent motion. J. Exp. Psychol. Hum. Percept. Perform. 26, 488505

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bremen, Universität

    5 Valdes-Sosa, M. et al. (2000) Attention to object files defined by transparent motion. J. Exp. Psychol. Hum. Percept. Perform. 26, 488­505 6 Fallah, M. et al. (2007) Stimulus-specific competitive motion repulsion. Vision Res. 46, 3651­3658 9 Sa`enz, M. et al. (2003) Global feature-based attention

  7. HIGH LEVEL PETRI NETS BASED APPROACH FOR ANALYSING CONCEPTUAL OBJECTS FOR PRODUCTION SYSTEMS SIMULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    system, formal methods of design are needed. In this work, the selected modelling and verification tool In the development life cycle of manufacturing systems, the verification of analytical models is often addressed via a powerful framework to model and analyse production systems. Indeed, their characteristics, graphical

  8. TRANSPARENCY RECYCLING PROGRAM PROCEDURES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transparencies to be recycled. 2.) SEPARATE the transparencies from ringed binders, plastic or paper folders, envelopes, andor files. 3.) PLACE the transparencies (only) into...

  9. Is Opacity A Basic Feature? It's Not Transparent. Randall S. Birnkrant Jeremy M. Wolfe Hermie Mendoza

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transparent objects and/or vice versa? Stimuli: Transparent bars were created by moving a virtual green filter Mendoza Brigham & Women's Hospital Brigham & Women's Hospital & Harvard Medical School OPAQUE You spotted as a basic feature? TRANSPARENT Exp. 1: Does an opaque object stick out among transparent objects and/or vice

  10. Variability in Proto-Planetary Nebulae: IV. Light Curve Analyses of Four Oxygen-Rich, F Spectral-Type Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hrivnak, Bruce J; Nault, Kristie A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new light curves covering 14 to 19 years of observations of four bright proto-planetary nebulae (PPNs), all O-rich and of F spectral type. They each display cyclical light curves with significant variations in amplitude. All four were previously known to vary in light. Our data were combined with published data and searched for periodicity. The results are as follows: IRAS 19475+3119 (HD 331319; 41.0 days), 17436+5003 (HD 161796; 45.2 days), 19386+0155 (101.8 days), and 18095+2704 (113.3 days). The two longer periods are in agreement with previous studies while the two shorter periods each reveal for the first time reveal a dominant period over these long observing intervals. Multiple periods were also found for each object. The secondary periods were all close to the dominant periods, with P2/P1 ranging from 0.86 to 1.06. The variations in color reveal maximum variations in T(eff) of 400 to 770 K. These variations are due to pulsations in these post-AGB objects. Maximum seasonal light variations a...

  11. Flexible and Transparent Memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KIM, SUNG MIN

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H. Seo and K. L. Wang. , Flexible and Transparent Memory2] S. Kim and J. Lee Flexible Organic Transistor MemoryMemory Transistors for Flexible Sensor Arrays Science, Vol.

  12. Supersymmetric transparent optical intersections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Longhi

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Supersymmetric (SUSY) optical structures provide a versatile platform to manipulate the scattering and localization properties of light, with potential applications to mode conversion, spatial multiplexing and invisible devices. Here we show that SUSY can be exploited to realize broadband transparent intersections between guiding structures in optical networks for both continuous and discretized light. These include transparent crossing of high-contrast-index waveguides and directional couplers, as well as crossing of guiding channels in coupled resonator lattices.

  13. A simple object-oriented and open source model for scientific and policy analyses of the global climate systemHector v1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Schwarber, Adria; Link, Robert P.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple climate models play an integral role in policy and scientific communities. They are used for climate mitigation scenarios within integrated assessment models, complex climate model emulation, and uncertainty analyses. Here we describe Hector, an open source, object-oriented, simple global climate carbon-cycle model. This model runs essentially instantaneously while still representing the most critical global scale earth system processes. Hector has three main carbon pools: an atmosphere, land, and ocean. The models terrestrial carbon cycle includes respiration and primary production, accommodating arbitrary geographic divisions into, e.g., ecological biomes or political units. Hectors actively solves the inorganic carbon system in the surface ocean, directly calculating air-sea fluxes of carbon and ocean pH. Hector reproduces the global historical trends of atmospheric [CO2] and surface temperatures. The model simulates all four Representative Concentration Pathways with high correlations (R >0.7) with current observations, MAGICC (a well-known simple climate model), and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project version 5. Hector is freely available under an open source license, and its modular design will facilitate a broad range of research in various areas.

  14. Transparent Cost Database | Transparent Cost Database

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (Utility Company)Library < TransmissionTransparent

  15. Zinc oxyfluoride transparent conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, Roy G. (Cambridge, MA)

    1991-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent, electrically conductive and infrared-reflective films of zinc oxyfluoride are produced by chemical vapor deposition from vapor mixtures of zinc, oxygen and fluorine-containing compounds. The substitution of fluorine for some of the oxygen in zinc oxide results in dramatic increases in the electrical conductivity. For example, diethyl zinc, ethyl alcohol and hexafluoropropene vapors are reacted over a glass surface at 400.degree. C. to form a visibly transparent, electrically conductive, infrared reflective and ultraviolet absorptive film of zinc oxyfluoride. Such films are useful in liquid crystal display devices, solar cells, electrochromic absorbers and reflectors, energy-conserving heat mirrors, and antistatic coatings.

  16. Product Information Transparent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    , transformers, amplifiers, high voltage resistor packs, and relays; adhesive/encapsulant for solar cellsProduct Information Solar FEATURES · Transparent · Cures to flexible elastomer · Constant cure rate elastomer, which is suited for the protection of electrical/electronic devices in solar applications. HOW

  17. Dynamic, transparent Internet server replication using HYDRANET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dillon, Geoffrey A.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -tolerance through redundancy, since Replicas can continue to function when their Origin Servers are no longer online. HYDRANET accomplishes these objectives by replicating Transport-level Service Access Points (TSAPs) [8] of servers in the operating system of our... modified Repli- cation Server. A modified IP-router provides the client traffic redirection by IP-in-IP tunneling. The use of TSAPs in this scheme allows us to selectively and transpar- ently replicate services from specific hosts without disrupting...

  18. 2011 Annual Health Physics Report for the HEU transparency Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radev, R

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    During the 2008 calendar year, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provided health physics support for the Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Program for external and internal radiation protection. They also provided technical expertise related to BDMS radioactive sources and Russian radiation safety regulatory compliance. For the calendar year 2008, there were 158 person-trips that required dose monitoring of the U.S. monitors. Of the 158 person-trips, 148 person-trips were SMVs and 10 person-trips were Transparency Monitoring Office (TMO) trips. There were 6 monitoring visits by TMO monitors to facilities other than UEIE and 8 to UEIE itself. There were three monitoring visits (source changes) that were back-to-back with a total of 24 monitors. LLNL's Hazard Control Department laboratories provided the dosimetry services for the HEU Transparency monitors. In 2008, the HEU Transparency activities in Russia were conducted in a radiologically safe manner for the HEU Transparency monitors in accordance with the expectations of the HEU Transparency staff, NNSA and DOE. The HEU Transparency now has thirteen years of successful experience in developing and providing health and safety support in meeting its technical objectives.

  19. TRANSPARENT COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatkowski, P.J.; Landis, D.A.

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Todays solar cells are fabricated using metal oxide based transparent conductive coatings (TCC) or metal wires with optoelectronic performance exceeding that currently possible with Carbon Nanotube (CNT) based TCCs. The motivation for replacing current TCC is their inherent brittleness, high deposition cost, and high deposition temperatures; leading to reduced performance on thin substrates. With improved processing, application and characterization techniques Nanofiber and/or CNT based TCCs can overcome these shortcomings while offering the ability to be applied in atmospheric conditions using low cost coating processes At todays level of development, CNT based TCC are nearing commercial use in touch screens, some types of information displays (i.e. electronic paper), and certain military applications. However, the resistivity and transparency requirements for use in current commercial solar cells are more stringent than in many of these applications. Therefore, significant research on fundamental nanotube composition, dispersion and deposition are required to reach the required performance commanded by photovoltaic devices. The objective of this project was to research and develop transparent conductive coatings based on novel nanomaterial composite coatings, which comprise nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructured materials along with binder materials. One objective was to show that these new nanomaterials perform at an electrical resistivity and optical transparency suitable for use in solar cells and other energy-related applications. A second objective was to generate new structures and chemistries with improved resistivity and transparency performance. The materials also included the binders and surface treatments that facilitate the utility of the electrically conductive portion of these composites in solar photovoltaic devices. Performance enhancement venues included: CNT purification and metallic tube separation techniques, chemical doping, CNT patterning and alignment, advances in commercial and research materials and field effect schemes. In addition, Eikos continued to develop improved efficiency coating materials and transfer methods suitable for batch and continuous roll-to-roll fabrication requirements. Finally, Eikos collaborated with NREL and the PV-community at large in fabricating and characterizing Invisicon???® enabled solar cells.

  20. Transparent fluids for 157-nm immersion lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Lawrence, Massachusetts 01843 Abstract. More than 50 fluorocarbon liquids are measured for transpar- ency; transpar- ency; fluorocarbon; fluoroether. Paper 014013 received Aug. 4, 2003; revised manuscript received

  1. Precise Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings for Flat Panel Displays and Photovoltaic Cells Technology available for licensing: New transparent conducting oxide (TCO)...

  2. Jones phase microscopy of transparent and anisotropic samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillette, Martha U.

    with a transparent sample. JPM uses a modified version of the Hilbert phase microscope (HPM) [15,16]. HPM is similar,20], in the sense that it uses spatial modulation to encode the phase information of the object. How- ever, in HPM

  3. Nuclear waste repository transparency technology test bed demonstrations at WIPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BETSILL,J. DAVID; ELKINS,NED Z.; WU,CHUAN-FU; MEWHINNEY,JAMES D.; AAMODT,PAUL

    2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, has stated that one of the nuclear waste legacy issues is ``The challenge of managing the fuel cycle's back end and assuring the safe use of nuclear power.'' Waste management (i.e., the back end) is a domestic and international issue that must be addressed. A key tool in gaining acceptance of nuclear waste repository technologies is transparency. Transparency provides information to outside parties for independent assessment of safety, security, and legitimate use of materials. Transparency is a combination of technologies and processes that apply to all elements of the development, operation, and closure of a repository system. A test bed for nuclear repository transparency technologies has been proposed to develop a broad-based set of concepts and strategies for transparency monitoring of nuclear materials at the back end of the fuel/weapons cycle. WIPP is the world's first complete geologic repository system for nuclear materials at the back end of the cycle. While it is understood that WIPP does not currently require this type of transparency, this repository has been proposed as realistic demonstration site to generate and test ideas, methods, and technologies about what transparency may entail at the back end of the nuclear materials cycle, and which could be applicable to other international repository developments. An integrated set of transparency demonstrations was developed and deployed during the summer, and fall of 1999 as a proof-of-concept of the repository transparency technology concept. These demonstrations also provided valuable experience and insight into the implementation of future transparency technology development and application. These demonstrations included: Container Monitoring Rocky Flats to WIPP; Underground Container Monitoring; Real-Time Radiation and Environmental Monitoring; Integrated level of confidence in the system and information provided. As the world's only operating deep geologic repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) offers a unique opportunity to serve as an international cooperative test bed for developing and demonstrating technologies and processes in a fully operational repository system setting. To address the substantial national security implications for the US resulting from the lack of integrated, transparent management and disposition of nuclear materials at the back-end of the nuclear fuel and weapons cycles, it is proposed that WIPP be used as a test bed to develop and demonstrate technologies that will enable the transparent and proliferation-resistant geologic isolation of nuclear materials. The objectives of this initiative are to: (1) enhance public confidence in safe, secure geologic isolation of nuclear materials; (2) develop, test, and demonstrate transparency measures and technologies for the back-end of nuclear fuel cycle; and (3) foster international collaborations leading to workable, effective, globally-accepted standards for the transparent monitoring of geological repositories for nuclear materials. Test-bed activities include: development and testing of monitoring measures and technologies; international demonstration experiments; transparency workshops; visiting scientist exchanges; and educational outreach. These activities are proposed to be managed by the Department of Energy/Carlsbad Area Office (DOE/CAO) as part of The Center for Applied Repository and Underground Studies (CARUS).

  4. 1 Introduction The perception of motion transparency can arise from physically transparent objects,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaina, Lucia M.

    of efficiencythe ratio of human to model performancereflects changes in how motion stimuli are being processed

  5. Transparent lithium-ion batteries , Sangmoo Jeongb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    voltage window. For example, LiCoO2 and graphite, the most common cathode and anode in Li-ion batteriesTransparent lithium-ion batteries Yuan Yanga , Sangmoo Jeongb , Liangbing Hua , Hui Wua , Seok Woo, and solar cells; however, transparent batteries, a key component in fully integrated transparent devices

  6. The efficiency of depth discrimination for non-transparent and transparent stereoscopic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamassian, Pascal

    The efficiency of depth discrimination for non-transparent and transparent stereoscopic surfaces investigate here how well human observers cope with stereo transparency by comparing their efficiency between transparent and opaque depth judgments. In two experiments, the efficiency measure was computed relative

  7. Energy dependence of color transparency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, B.K. (TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 2A3 (CA) Institute for Nuclear Theory, HN-12, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (USA)); Miller, G.A. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (USA) Institute for Nuclear Theory, HN-12, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (USA))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantum-mechanical approach is used to study high-momentum-transfer reactions in which a nucleon is knocked out of a target nucleus. It is found that the nuclear interactions of the wave packet produced in such a hard interaction may cancel, so that the nuclear medium is transparent. Expressions for the effective wave-packet--nucleon interaction and the corresponding distorted waves are presented. An analysis of existing ({ital p},{ital pp}) data at beam momenta from about 5 to 12 GeV/{ital c} suggests that only the nucleon and Roper resonance components of the wave packet contribute to the scattering amplitude. The ({ital p},{ital pp}) data and our theory imply that color-transparency effects in the ({ital e},{ital e}{prime}{ital p}) reaction may be significant at relatively low-momentum transfers of {ital Q}{sup 2}{approx}3--6 GeV{sup 2}.

  8. Transparent electrode for optical switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

    1984-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates generally to optical switches and techniques for applying a voltage to an electro-optical crystal, and more particularly, to transparent electodes for an optical switch. System architectures for very large inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers require active optical elements with apertures on the order of one meter. Large aperture optical switches are needed for isolation of stages, switch-out from regenerative amplifier cavities and protection from target retroreflections.

  9. Miscellaneous Analyses.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adriance, Duncan; Tilson, P. S.; Harrington, H. H.

    1895-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The am ount o f c lay in the ? black w axy" is shown by tlie con ten t Of alum ina to be greater than that in tlie sandy loam . T lie soil from E l Paso was selected from a field in tended for the grow th of fru it trees. CLAYS. The exam... ination o f these was made for a com pany that expected to ex trac t the m etal a lum inum from clay . Complete analyses were made in on ly a few eases; since the alum ina and lim e were the two principal in ? gred ien ts wanted , other...

  10. The Reactor An ObjectOriented Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Douglas C.

    The Reactor An ObjectOriented Framework for Event Demultiplexing and Event Handler Dispatching Douglas C. Schmidt 1 Overview ffl The Reactor is an objectoriented frame work that encapsulates OS event demul tiplexing mechanisms -- e.g., the Reactor API runs transparently atop both Wait

  11. New York City Benchmarking and Transparency Policy Impact Evaluation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New York City Benchmarking and Transparency Policy Impact Evaluation Report New York City Benchmarking and Transparency Policy Impact Evaluation Report Prepared for the U.S....

  12. Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    light-harvesting material The material could be used in development of transparent solar panels. November 3, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote...

  13. Microsoft Word - Net Requirements Transparency Process_09302014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 As part of its Net Requirements Transparency process, on July 31, 2014 BPA published the SliceBlock and Block customers' FY2013 and forecast FY2015 Total Retail Load (TRL) and...

  14. Beyond transparency : collective engagement in sustainable design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonanni, Leonardo Amerigo, 1977-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a timely answer to the question of sustainability, or how to provide for future generations, there needs to be shared accounting of our social and physical resources. Supply chain transparency makes it possible to map ...

  15. Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gessert, Timothy A.; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber. The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target in the process chamber to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

  16. Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gessert, Timothy A; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target (110) doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber (100). The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target (110) to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

  17. High quality transparent conducting oxide thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gessert, Timothy A. (Conifer, CO); Duenow, Joel N. (Golden, CO); Barnes, Teresa (Evergreen, CO); Coutts, Timothy J. (Golden, CO)

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A transparent conducting oxide (TCO) film comprising: a TCO layer, and dopants selected from the elements consisting of Vanadium, Molybdenum, Tantalum, Niobium, Antimony, Titanium, Zirconium, and Hafnium, wherein the elements are n-type dopants; and wherein the transparent conducting oxide is characterized by an improved electron mobility of about 42 cm.sup.2/V-sec while simultaneously maintaining a high carrier density of .about.4.4e.times.10.sup.20 cm.sup.-3.

  18. Catoptric electrodes: transparent metal electrodes using shaped surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kik, Pieter

    -conductivity top contacts. 2014 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: (310.7005) Transparent conductive coatings

  19. Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

  20. ORISE: Statistical Analyses of Worker Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOENurseResources EnvironmentalStatistical Analyses

  1. Contributing Storage using the Transparent File System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Emery

    Contributing Storage using the Transparent File System JAMES CIPAR and MARK D. CORNER and EMERY D barrier to the adoption of contributory storage systems is that contributing a large quantity of local--all of the currently available space-- without impacting the performance of ordinary file access operations. We show

  2. Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tewari, P.H.; Hunt, A.J.

    1985-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved supercritical drying process for forming transparent silica aerogel arrays is described. The process is of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing aloxides to form alcogels. A subsequent step removes the alcohol to form aerogels. The improvement includes the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent, such as CO/sub 2/, for the alcohol in the alcogels, the solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol. The resulting gels are dried at a supercritical temperature for the selected solvent, such as CO/sub 2/, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced (days-to-hours) time period. The supercritical drying occurs at about 40/sup 0/C instead of at about 270/sup 0/C. The improved process provides increased yields of large scale, structurally sound arrays. The transparent aerogel array, formed in sheets or slabs, as made in accordance with the improved process, can replace the air gap within a double glazed window, for example, to provide a substantial reduction in heat transfer. The thus formed transparent aerogel arrays may also be utilized, for example, in windows of refrigerators and ovens, or in the walls and doors thereof or as the active material in detectors for analyzing high energy elementary particles or cosmic rays.

  3. Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tewari, Param H. (Milpitas, CA); Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved supercritical drying process for forming transparent silica aerogel arrays is described. The process is of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing aloxides to form alcogels. A subsequent step removes the alcohol to form aerogels. The improvement includes the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent, such as CO.sub.2, for the alcohol in the alcogels, the solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol. The resulting gels are dried at a supercritical temperature for the selected solvent, such as CO.sub.2, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced (days-to-hours) time period. The supercritical drying occurs at about 40.degree. C. instead of at about 270.degree. C. The improved process provides increased yields of large scale, structurally sound arrays. The transparent aerogel array, formed in sheets or slabs, as made in accordance with the improved process, can replace the air gap within a double glazed window, for example, to provide a substantial reduction in heat transfer. The thus formed transparent aerogel arrays may also be utilized, for example, in windows of refrigerators and ovens, or in the walls and doors thereof or as the active material in detectors for analyzing high energy elementry particles or cosmic rays.

  4. Deformable Transparent All-Carbon-Nanotube Transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    and organic materials16,17 are candidates for next-generation flexible and transparent electronic devices-carbon-nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT- FETs), making use of the flexible yet robust nature of single than those used in other flexible CNT-FETs allowed our devices to be highly deformable without

  5. Texas Cities in the Era of Government Transparency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bearfield, Domonic; Bowman, Ann O'M

    We are in the Era of Government Transparency. Recently, politicians from President Barack Obama to Texas Governor Rick Perry have touted a commitment to openness and transparency in their respective administrations. Citizens have also embraced...

  6. Electromagnetically induced transparency with broadband laser pulses D. D. Yavuz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yavuz, Deniz

    Electromagnetically induced transparency with broadband laser pulses D. D. Yavuz Department pulses inside an atomic medium using electromag- netically induced transparency. Extending the suggestion.65. k Over the last decade, counterintuitive optical effects using electromagnetically induced

  7. Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    08 Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels Draft Report (May be citedLIFECYCLE ANALYSES OF BIOFUELS Draft manuscript (may belifecycle analysis (LCA) of biofuels for transportation has

  8. Characterization of Light Scattering in Transparent Polycrystalline Laser Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Saurabh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser Media (PLM) .. 4 Bulk Scatteringacross and through the entire PLM regardless of dimensions.42 Characterization of Transparent PLM . 43

  9. Percolation in Transparent and Conducting Carbon Nanotube Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, George

    and chemical sensors9 , field emission devices10,11 , and transparent conductive coatings7 . We12 , and another. Transmission measurements also indicate the usefulness of nanotube network films as a transparent, conductive coating. Avenues for improvement of the network transparency are discussed. KEYWORDS Nanotubes, Networks

  10. Transparent monolithic metal ion containing nanophase aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Risen, W. M., Jr.; Hu, X.; Ji, S.; Littrell, K.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of monolithic and transparent transition metal containing aerogels has been achieved through cooperative interactions of high molecular weight functionalized carbohydrates and silica precursors, which strongly influence the kinetics of gelation. After initial gelation, subsequent modification of the ligating character of the system, coordination of the group VIII metal ions, and supercritical extraction afford the aerogels. The structures at the nanophase level have been probed by photon and electron transmission and neutron scattering techniques to help elucidate the basis for structural integrity together with the small entity sizes that permit transparency in the visible range. They also help with understanding the chemical reactivities of the metal-containing sites in these very high surface area materials. These results are discussed in connection with new reaction studies.

  11. Theory of Dipole Induced Electromagnetic Transparency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puthumpally-Joseph, Raiju; Sukharev, Maxim; Charron, Eric

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed theory describing linear optics of vapors comprised of interacting multi-level quantum emitters is proposed. It is shown both by direct integration of Maxwell-Bloch equations and using a simple analytical model that at large densities narrow transparency windows appear in otherwise completely opaque spectra. The existence of such windows is attributed to overlapping resonances. This effect, first introduced for three-level systems in [R. Puthumpally-Joseph, M. Sukharev, O. Atabek and E. Charron, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 163603 (2014)], is due to strongly enhanced dipole-dipole interactions at high emitters' densities. The presented theory extends this effect to the case of multilevel systems. The theory is applied to the D1 transitions of interacting Rb-85 atoms. It is shown that at high atomic densities, Rb-85 atoms can behave as three-level emitters exhibiting all the properties of dipole induced electromagnetic transparency. Applications including slow light and laser pulse shaping are also propose...

  12. Transparent heat-spreader for optoelectronic applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Minano, Juan Carlos; Benitez, Pablo

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An optoelectronic cooling system is equally applicable to an LED collimator or a photovoltaic solar concentrator. A transparent fluid conveys heat from the optoelectronic chip to a hollow cover over the system aperture. The cooling system can keep a solar concentrator chip at the same temperature as found for a one-sun flat-plate solar cell. Natural convection or forced circulation can operate to convey heat from the chip to the cover.

  13. Transparent conducting oxides: A -doped superlattice approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Valentino R [ORNL; Seo, Sung Seok A. [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Lee, Suyoun [ORNL; Kim, Jun Sung [Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Republic of Korea; Choi, Woo Seok [ORNL; Okamoto, Satoshi [ORNL; Lee, Ho Nyung [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) at the interface of oxide heterostructures have been the subject of recent experiment and theory, due to the intriguing phenomena that occur in confined electronic states. However, while much has been done to understand the origin of 2DEGs and related phenomena, very little has been explored with regards to the control of conduction pathways and the distribution of charge carriers. Using first principles simulations and experimental thin film synthesis methods, we examine the effect of dimensionality on carrier transport in La delta-doped SrTiO3 (STO) superlattices, as a function of the thickness of the insulating STO spacer. Our computed Fermi surfaces and layer-resolved carrier density proles demonstrate that there is a critical thickness of the STO spacer, below which carrier transport is dominated by three-dimensional conduction of interface charges arising from appreciable overlap of the quantum mechanical wavefunctions between neighboring delta-doped layers. We observe that, experimentally, these superlattices remain highly transparent to visible light. Band structure calculations indicate that this is a result of the appropriately large gap between the O 2p and Ti d states. The tunability of the quantum mechanical wavefunctions and the optical transparency highlight the potential for using oxide heterostructures in novel opto-electronic devices; thus providing a route to the creation of novel transparent conducting oxides.

  14. Articulated Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Mohr; Gabriel Zachmann; Ifi-- Impressum; Daniel Mohr; Gabriel Zachmann

    Detection of articulated objects in images, including location and state, is an important and challenging task in many object tracking applications. Image edges have proven to be a key feature, although their quality is influenced by many factors. In this paper, we propose a novel edge gradient-based template matching method for object detection. In contrast to other methods, ours does not perform any binarization or discretization during the online matching. This is facilitated by a new continuous edge gradient similarity measure. Its main components are a novel edge gradient operator, which is applied to query and template images, and the formulation as a convolution, which can be computed very efficiently in Fourier space. Our method consists of a preprocessing stage for the template images, a simple preprocessing of the query image, and our similarity measure between template and query image, which yields a confidence map for the query image. The resulting

  15. analysing partitive objects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    recurrence satisfied by the Stirling numbers of the second kind. Abrams, Aaron; Hower, Valerie 2010-01-01 146 Square Partitions and Catalan Numbers CERN Preprints Summary:...

  16. NPT Transparency Visit | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook

  17. Multiple-scattering series for color transparency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenberg, W.R.; Miller, G.A. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cold transparency (CT) depends on the formation of a wave packet of small spatial extent. It is useful to interpret experimental searches for CT with a multiple-scattering series based on wave-packet--nucleon scattering instead of the standard one using nucleon-nucleon scattering. We develop several new techniques which are valid for differing ranges of energy. These techniques are applied to verify some early approximations, study new forms of the wave-packet--nucleon interaction, examine effects of treating wave packets of nonzero size, and predict the production of [ital N][sup *]'s in electron scattering experiments.

  18. Transparent Cost Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (Utility Company)Library < TransmissionTransparent Cost

  19. atmospheric transparency studies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pressures lower than 0.1 bar, transparency to thermal radiation allows shortwave heating to dominate, creating a stratosphere. At higher pressures, atmospheres become...

  20. Net Requirements Transparency Process for Slice/Block Customers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2012 Net Requirements Transparency Process for SliceBlock Customers Description of Changes and a Response to Comments September 24, 2012 Background and Description of Changes:...

  1. Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Transparent Electrodes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Transparent Electrodes in Organic Solar Cells Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube...

  2. Transparent conducting thin films for spacecraft applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Davis, M.E.; Malave-Sanabria, T.; Hambourger, P.; Rutledge, S.K.; Roig, D.; Degroh, K.K.; Hung, C.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent conductive thin films are required for a variety of optoelectronic applications: automotive and aircraft windows, and solar cells for space applications. Transparent conductive coatings of indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-magnesium fluoride (MgF2) and aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) at several dopant levels are investigated for electrical resistivity (sheet resistance), carrier concentration, optical properties, and atomic oxygen durability. The sheet resistance values of ITO-MgF2 range from 10[sup 2] to 10[sup 11] ohms/square, with transmittance of 75 to 86 percent. The AZO films sheet resistances range from 10[sup 7] to 10[sup 11] ohms/square with transmittances from 84 to 91 percent. It was found that in general, with respect to the optical properties, the zinc oxide (ZnO), AZO, and the high MgF2 content ITO-MgF2 samples, were all durable to atomic oxygen plasma, while the low MgF2 content of ITO-MgF2 samples were not durable to atomic oxygen plasma exposure.

  3. Transparent self-cleaning dust shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Malay K.; Sims, Robert A.; Wilson, James D.

    2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A transparent electromagnetic shield to protect solar panels and the like from dust deposition. The shield is a panel of clear non-conducting (dielectric) material with embedded parallel electrodes. The panel is coated with a semiconducting film. Desirably the electrodes are transparent. The electrodes are connected to a single-phase AC signal or to a multi-phase AC signal that produces a travelling electromagnetic wave. The electromagnetic field produced by the electrodes lifts dust particles away from the shield and repels charged particles. Deposited dust particles are removed when the electrodes are activated, regardless of the resistivity of the dust. Electrostatic charges on the panel are discharged by the semiconducting film. When used in conjunction with photovoltaic cells, the power for the device may be obtained from the cells themselves. For other surfaces, such as windshields, optical windows and the like, the power must be derived from an external source. One embodiment of the invention employs monitoring and detection devices to determine when the level of obscuration of the screen by dust has reached a threshold level requiring activation of the dust removal feature.

  4. Perception-Based Transparency Optimization for Direct Volume Rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wei

    Perception-Based Transparency Optimization for Direct Volume Rendering Ming-Yuen Chan, Student. Perceptual enhancement on transparent layers in direct volume rendered images: a CT head dataset with layered structures (left); layers are enhanced using our proposed rendering optimization method (right). Abstract

  5. DEGRADATION OF TRANSPARENT CONDUCTIVE OXIDES: MECHANISTIC INSIGHTS AND INTERFACIAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    DEGRADATION OF TRANSPARENT CONDUCTIVE OXIDES: MECHANISTIC INSIGHTS AND INTERFACIAL ENGINEERING;Degradation of Transparent Conductive Oxides: Mechanistic insights and Interfacial engineering Case Western;Dedicated to the science and engineering of photovoltaics, in an effort to make a better world. #12;Table

  6. High carrier concentration p-type transparent conducting oxide films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yan, Yanfa; Zhang, Shengbai

    2005-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A p-type transparent conducting oxide film is provided which is consisting essentially of, the transparent conducting oxide and a molecular doping source, the oxide and doping source grown under conditions sufficient to deliver the doping source intact onto the oxide.

  7. Matched slow pulses using double electromagnetically induced transparency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lvovsky, Alexander

    Matched slow pulses using double electromagnetically induced transparency Andrew MacRae,* Geoff, 2008 We implement double electromagnetically induced transparency (DEIT) in rubidium vapor using Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 270.1670, 270.5585, 190.5530. Electromagnetically induced

  8. Eyo: Device-Transparent Personal Storage Jacob Strauss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gummadi, Ramakrishna

    Eyo: Device-Transparent Personal Storage Jacob Strauss Justin Mazzola Paluska Chris Lesniewski on multiple personal devices, each of which typically offers a storage management interface oblivious. This paper presents Eyo, a novel personal storage sys- tem that provides device transparency: a user can

  9. Integrated broadband bowtie antenna on transparent substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xingyu; Subbaraman, Harish; Zhan, Qiwen; Pan, Zeyu; Chung, Chi-jui; Yan, Hai; Chen, Ray T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bowtie antenna is a topic of growing interest in recent years. In this paper, we design, fabricate, and characterize a modified gold bowtie antenna integrated on a transparent glass substrate. We numerically investigate the antenna characteristics, specifically its resonant frequency and enhancement factor. We simulate the dependence of resonance frequency on bowtie geometry, and verify the simulation results through experimental investigation, by fabricating different sets of bowtie antennas on glass substrates utilizing CMOS compatible processes and measuring their resonance frequencies. Our designed bowtie antenna provides a strong broadband electric field enhancement in its feed gap. The far-field radiation pattern of the bowtie antenna is measured, and it shows dipole-like characteristics with large beam width. Such a broadband antenna will be useful for a myriad of applications, ranging from wireless communications to electromagnetic wave detection.

  10. Gravitational Lensing Characteristics of the Transparent Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bijunath Patla; Robert J. Nemiroff

    2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The transparent Sun is modeled as a spherically symmetric and centrally condensed gravitational lens using recent Standard Solar Model (SSM) data. The Sun's minimum focal length is computed to a refined accuracy of 23.5 +/- 0.1 AU, just beyond the orbit of Uranus. The Sun creates a single image of a distant point source visible to observers inside this minimum focal length and to observers sufficiently removed from the line connecting the source through the Sun's center. Regions of space are mapped where three images of a distant point source are created, along with their associated magnifications. Solar caustics, critical curves, and Einstein rings are computed and discussed. Extremely high gravitational lens magnifications exist for observers situated so that an angularly small, unlensed source appears near a three-image caustic. Types of radiations that might undergo significant solar lens magnifications as they can traverse the core of the Sun, including neutrinos and gravitational radiation, are discussed.

  11. Carbon Nanotube Assemblies for Transparent Conducting Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, Matthew P [ORNL] [ORNL; Gerhardt, Rosario [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this chapter is to introduce readers to the fundamental and practical aspects of nanotube assemblies made into transparent conducting networks and discuss some practical aspects of their characterization. Transparent conducting coatings (TCC) are an essential part of electro-optical devices, from photovoltaics and light emitting devices to electromagnetic shielding and electrochromic widows. The market for organic materials (including nanomaterials and polymers) based TCCs is expected to show a growth rate of 56.9% to reach nearly 20.3billionin2015,whilethemarketfortraditionalinorganictransparentelectronicswillexperiencegrowthwithratesof6.7103 billion in 2015. Emerging flexible electronic applications have brought additional requirements of flexibility and low cost for TCC. However, the price of indium (the major component in indium tin oxide TCC) continues to increase. On the other hand, the price of nanomaterials has continued to decrease due to development of high volume, quality production processes. Additional benefits come from the low cost, nonvacuum deposition of nanomaterials based TCC, compared to traditional coatings requiring energy intensive vacuum deposition. Among the materials actively researched as alternative TCC are nanoparticles, nanowires, and nanotubes with high aspect ratio as well as their composites. The figure of merit (FOM) can be used to compare TCCs made from dissimilar materials and with different transmittance and conductivity values. In the first part of this manuscript, we will discuss the seven FOM parameters that have been proposed, including one specifically intended for flexible applications. The approach for how to measure TCE electrical properties, including frequency dependence, will also be discussed. We will relate the macroscale electrical characteristics of TCCs to the nanoscale parameters of conducting networks. The fundamental aspects of nanomaterial assemblies in conducting networks will also be addressed. We will review recent literature on TCCs composed of carbon nanotubes of different types in terms of the FOM.

  12. Integrating Handhelds into Environments of Cooperating Smart Everyday Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of nearby mobile user devices. In our concept, handhelds join a distributed data structure shared by cooperating smart objects, which makes the location where data are stored transparent for applications. Smart, and facilitates the collab- orative processing of sensory data because of the more elaborate storage

  13. Charm Dalitz Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cavoto

    2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of recent experimental results of Dalitz analyses of charmed meson decays into three-body final states is presented. These analyses can help in understanding the strong interaction dynamics leading to the observed light mesons spectrum (low mass scalar $\\sigma$, $f_0(980)$, $a_0(980)$). A model for the decay amplitude into such states is very important for the extraction of the angle $\\gamma$ of the CKM unitarity triangle. Implications for such measurement are discussed.

  14. GROUPE D'ANALYSE ET DE THORIE CONOMIQUE LYON -ST TIENNE WP 1332

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    WP 1332 Utilitarianism and anti-utilitarianism Antoinette Baujard; GATE Groupe d'Analyse et de Thorie conomique Lyon-St tienne 93, chemin economists in public decision are likely to be normatively transparent. JEL Codes: A13,A33,B10,B2, D63 Key

  15. Information sources for transparency measures at sensitive facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanbro, W.D.; Olinger, C.T.; Close, D.A.; Kniss, B.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of transparency stems from a desire to assure other parties that some action such as the dismantlement of a weapons system is taking place while avoiding the intrusiveness, complexity, and lengthy negotiations associated with formal verification measures. By their nature, transparency measures may fall short of providing the degree of confidence associated with arms control treaties, such as INF or START, but can be more quickly and easily implemented. This paper discusses information sources that could form the basis of transparency measures at sensitive facilities.

  16. Information sources for transparency measures at sensitive facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanbro, W.D.; Olinger, C.T.; Close, D.A.; Kniss, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of transparency stems from a desire to assure other parties that some action such as the dismantlement of a weapons system is taking place while avoiding the intrusiveness, complexity, and lengthy negotiations associated with formal verification measures. By their nature, transparency measures may fall short of providing the degree of confidence associated with arms control treaties, such as INF or START, but can be more quickly and easily implemented. This paper discusses information sources that could form the basis of transparency measures at sensitive facilities.

  17. The new geospatial tools: global transparency enhancing safeguards verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pabian, Frank Vincent [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on the importance and potential role of the new, freely available, geospatial tools for enhancing IAEA safeguards and how, together with commercial satellite imagery, they can be used to promote 'all-source synergy'. As additional 'open sources', these new geospatial tools have heralded a new era of 'global transparency' and they can be used to substantially augment existing information-driven safeguards gathering techniques, procedures, and analyses in the remote detection of undeclared facilities, as well as support ongoing monitoring and verification of various treaty (e.g., NPT, FMCT) relevant activities and programs. As an illustration of how these new geospatial tools may be applied, an original exemplar case study provides how it is possible to derive value-added follow-up information on some recent public media reporting of a former clandestine underground plutonium production complex (now being converted to a 'Tourist Attraction' given the site's abandonment by China in the early 1980s). That open source media reporting, when combined with subsequent commentary found in various Internet-based Blogs and Wikis, led to independent verification of the reporting with additional ground truth via 'crowdsourcing' (tourist photos as found on 'social networking' venues like Google Earth's Panoramio layer and Twitter). Confirmation of the precise geospatial location of the site (along with a more complete facility characterization incorporating 3-D Modeling and visualization) was only made possible following the acquisition of higher resolution commercial satellite imagery that could be correlated with the reporting, ground photos, and an interior diagram, through original imagery analysis of the overhead imagery.

  18. Damp-Heat Induced Degradation of Transparent Conducting Oxides for Thin Film Solar Cells (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pern, J.; Noufi, R.; Li, X.; DeHart, C.; To, B.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives are: (1) To achieve a high long-term performance reliability for the thin-film CIGS PV modules with more stable materials, device structure designs, and moisture-resistant encapsulation materials and schemes; (2) to evaluate the DH stability of various transparent conducting oxides (TCOs); (3) to identify the degradation mechanisms and quantify degradation rates; (4) to seek chemical and/or physical mitigation methods, and explore new materials. It's important to note that direct exposure to DH represents an extreme condition that a well-encapsulated thin film PV module may never experience.

  19. Optomechanically-induced-transparency cooling of massive mechanical resonators to the quantum ground state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yong-Chun; Luan, Xingsheng; Wong, Chee Wei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground state cooling of massive mechanical objects remains a difficult task restricted by the unresolved mechanical sidebands. We propose an optomechanically-induced-transparency cooling scheme to achieve ground state cooling of mechanical motion without the resolved sideband condition in a pure optomechanical system with two mechanical modes coupled to the same optical cavity mode. We show that ground state cooling is achievable for sideband resolution $\\omega_{m}/\\kappa$ as low as 0.003. This provides a new route for quantum manipulation of massive macroscopic devices and high-precision measurements.

  20. Directed Social Queries With Transparent User Models Saiph Savage1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    .forbes@cs, holl@cs}.ucsb.edu 2 Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico {rodrigosavage@comunidad, norma?" Computers Music Pets Cooking Transparent Interface Socially Aware Interface "Mexican Food and Salsa Dancing

  1. Acoustical transparency induced by local resonance in Bragg bandgaps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Gaokun; Wang, Xinlong, E-mail: xlwang@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics and Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that sound waves can resonantly transmit through Bragg bandgaps in an acoustical duct periodically attached with an array of Helmholtz resonators, forming within the normally forbidden band a transparency window with group velocity smaller than the normal speed of sound. The transparency occurs for the locally resonant frequency so much close to the Bragg one that both the local-resonance-induced bandgap and the Bragg one heavily overlap with each other. The phenomenon seems an acoustical analog of the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency by quantum interference. Different from the Fano-like interference explanation, we also provide a mechanism for the transparency window phenomenon which makes it possible to extend the phenomenon in general.

  2. Device Transparency: a New Model for Mobile Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Jacob A.

    This paper proposes a new storage model, device transparency, in which users view and manage their entire data collection from any of their devices, even from disconnected storage-limited devices holding only a subset of ...

  3. DMTCP: Transparent Checkpointing for Cluster Computations and the Desktop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arya, Kapil

    DMTCP (Distributed MultiThreaded CheckPointing) is a transparent user-level checkpointing package for distributed applications. Checkpointing and restart is demonstrated for a wide range of over 20 well known applications, ...

  4. alternative transparent electrodes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    large fraction of power incident on a curved primary mirror using an on-axis secondary mirror Kik, Pieter 7 Electrospun Metal Nanofiber Webs as High-Performance Transparent...

  5. al transparent conducting: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Reduction of graphene oxide films on Al foil for hybrid transparent conductive film applications...

  6. Net Requirements Transparency Process for Slice/Block and Block...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 As part of its Net Requirements Transparency process, on July 31, 2013 BPA published the SliceBlock and Block customers' FY2012 and forecast FY2014 Total Retail Load (TRL) and...

  7. Slip casting nano-particle powders for making transparent ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuntz, Joshua D. (Livermore, CA); Soules, Thomas F. (Livermore, CA); Landingham, Richard Lee (Livermore, CA); Hollingsworth, Joel P. (Oakland, CA)

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a transparent ceramic including the steps of providing nano-ceramic powders in a processed or unprocessed form, mixing the powders with de-ionized water, the step of mixing the powders with de-ionized water producing a slurry, sonifing the slurry to completely wet the powder and suspend the powder in the de-ionized water, separating very fine particles from the slurry, molding the slurry, and curing the slurry to produce the transparent ceramic.

  8. Coupled-resonator-induced transparency with a squeezed vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke Di; Changde Xie; Jing Zhang

    2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first experimental observation of quantum fluctuation spectra in two coupled optical cavities with an injected squeezed vacuum light. The quadrature components of the reflected squeezed vacuum spectra are measured by phase sensitive homodyne detector. The experimental results demonstrate coupled-resonator-induced transparency in the quantum regime, in which electromagnetically-induced-transparency-like characteristic of the absorption and dispersion properties of the coupled optical cavities determines the line-shape of the reflected quantum noise spectra.

  9. Realistic hadronic matrix element approach to color transparency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, B.K. (TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada)); Miller, G.A. (Physics Department, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1992-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Color transparency occurs if a small-sized wave packet, formed in a high momentum transfer process, escapes the nucleus before expanding. The time required for the expansion depends on the masses of the baryonic components of the wave packet. Measured proton diffractive dissociation and electron deep inelastic scattering cross sections are used to examine and severely constrain the relevant masses. These constraints allow significant color transparency effects to occur at experimentally accessible momentum transfers.

  10. Color transparency and Landshoff multiple-scattering processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botts, J. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (USA))

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the following, the leading and nonleading contributions to fixed angle hadron-hadron elastic scattering are included in a qualitative analysis of {ital T}({ital s}), the transparency of {ital pN} quasielastic scattering. A simple model is given to predict the center-of-mass energies at which a target nuclei will become transparent to hard- and triple- (Landshoff-) scattered protons.

  11. Budget/Object Codes -REVENUE Budget/Object Codes -REVENUE BUDGET/OBJECT BUDGET/OBJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    Budget/Object Codes -REVENUE Budget/Object Codes - REVENUE BUDGET/OBJECT BUDGET/OBJECT BUDGET CODE DESCRIPTION BUDGET CODE DESCRIPTION 01 30 0101 On-Campus-Full Time 3001 Federal Program 0102 On APPROPRIATIONS #12;Budget/Object Codes -REVENUE Budget/Object Codes - REVENUE BUDGET/OBJECT BUDGET/OBJECT BUDGET

  12. Mesoscale Analyses of Fungal Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Porter, Mason A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a brief application of mesoscopic response functions (MRFs) to a large set of networks of fungi and slime moulds. We construct "structural networks" by estimating cord conductances (which yield edge weights) from experimental data and "functional networks" by calculating edge weights based on how much nutrient traffic is predicted to occur on each edge. Both types of networks have the same topology, and we compute MRFs for both families of networks to illustrate two different ways of constructing taxonomies to compare large sets of fungal and slime-mould networks to each other. We demonstrate that network taxonomies allow objective groupings of networks across species, treatments, and laboratories. We believe that the groupings that we have derived through our structural and functional taxonomic analyses of fungal networks could be of considerable assistance to biologists in their attempts to capture the impact of treatment combinations on network behaviour.

  13. Optimization of transparent and reflecting electrodes for amorphous silicon solar cells. Annual technical report, April 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, R.G.; Sato, H.; Liang, H.; Liu, X.; Thornton, J. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The general objective is to develop methods to deposit materials which can be used to make more efficient solar cells. The work is organized into three general tasks: Task 1. Develop improved methods for depositing and using transparent conductors of fluorine-doped zinc oxide in amorphous silicon solar cells Task 2. Deposit and evaluate titanium oxide as a reflection-enhancing diffusion barrier between amorphous silicon and an aluminum or silver back-reflector. Task 3. Deposit and evaluate electrically conductive titanium oxide as a transparent conducting layer on which more efficient and more stable superstrate cells can be deposited. About one-third of the current project resources are allocated to each of these three objectives.

  14. NEPA Success Stories: Celebrating 40 Years of Transparency and Open Government

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NEPA Success Stories: Celebrating 40 Years of Transparency and Open Government, Environmental Law Institute, 2010.

  15. Nuclear transparency in 90c.m. quasielastic A,,p,2p... reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Nelson

    Nuclear transparency in 90c.m. quasielastic A,,p,2p... reactions J. Aclander,7 J. Alster,7 G Synchrotron of BNL to measure the nuclear transparency of nuclei measured in the A p,2p quasielastic of the energy dependence of the nuclear transparency. In E850 the angular dependence of the nuclear transparency

  16. Nanostructured Transparent Conductors Have Potential for Thin-Film Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Possible alternatives to transparent conductors show promise for enabling new processes and reducing costs.

  17. EEG analyses with SOBI.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glickman, Matthew R.; Tang, Akaysha (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The motivating vision behind Sandia's MENTOR/PAL LDRD project has been that of systems which use real-time psychophysiological data to support and enhance human performance, both individually and of groups. Relevant and significant psychophysiological data being a necessary prerequisite to such systems, this LDRD has focused on identifying and refining such signals. The project has focused in particular on EEG (electroencephalogram) data as a promising candidate signal because it (potentially) provides a broad window on brain activity with relatively low cost and logistical constraints. We report here on two analyses performed on EEG data collected in this project using the SOBI (Second Order Blind Identification) algorithm to identify two independent sources of brain activity: one in the frontal lobe and one in the occipital. The first study looks at directional influences between the two components, while the second study looks at inferring gender based upon the frontal component.

  18. Matched Slow Pulses Using Double Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew MacRae; Geoff Campbell; A. I. Lvovsky

    2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We implement double electromagnetically-induced transparency (double EIT) in rubidium vapor, using a tripod-shaped energy level scheme consisting of hyperfine and magnetic sublevels of the 5S1/2 to 5P1/2 transition. We show experimentally that through the use of double EIT one can control the contrast of transparency windows as well as group velocities of the two signal fields. In particular, the group velocities can be equalized, which holds promise to greatly enhance nonlinear optical interaction between these fields.

  19. advanced transparency framework: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Tesla: A Transparent, Extensible Session-Layer Framework for End-to-end Network Services...

  20. Radiation-transparent windows, method for imaging fluid transfers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Wang, Jin (Burr Ridge, IL)

    2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin, x-ray-transparent window system for environmental chambers involving pneumatic pressures above 40 bar is presented. The window allows for x-ray access to such phenomena as fuel sprays injected into a pressurized chamber that mimics realistic internal combustion engine cylinder operating conditions.

  1. PodBase: Transparent storage management for personal devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Druschel, Peter

    PodBase: Transparent storage management for personal devices Ansley Post Petr Kuznetsov PeterBase, a system that automatically manages the data and storage across a household's personal devices and frees Druschel Max Planck Institute for Software Systems Rice University 1. INTRODUCTION Personal electronic

  2. Device-Transparent Personal Storage Jacob Alo Strauss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gummadi, Ramakrishna

    Device-Transparent Personal Storage by Jacob Alo Strauss S.B., Massachusetts Institute personal devices, each of which typically presents the user with a storage management interface isolated and drift out of sync. This thesis presents Eyo, a novel personal storage system that provides device trans

  3. Compilation of Quality Assurance Documentation for Analyses Performed for the Resumption of Transient Testing Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a companion document to the analyses performed in support of the environmental assessment for the Resumption of Transient Fuels and Materials Testing. It is provided to allow transparency of the supporting calculations. It provides computer code input and output. The basis for the calculations is documented separately in INL (2013) and is referenced, as appropriate. Spreadsheets used to manipulate the code output are not provided.

  4. Transparent and Conductive Carbon Nanotube Multilayer Thin Films Suitable as an Indium Tin Oxide Replacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Yong Tae

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent electrodes made from metal oxides suffer from poor flexibility and durability. Highly transparent and electrically conductive thin films based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were assembled as a potential indium tin oxide (ITO) replacement...

  5. Creating transparency in the Chinese real estate development industry : a case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Feng, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparency issue remains one of the top issues that have discouraged foreign investors to invest China's real estate market. This thesis establishes a framework for Chinese developers to create transparency for their ...

  6. Text-Alternative Version of TAP Webinar: Measuring the Impact of Benchmarking & Transparency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transcript of the June TAP webinar, Measuring the Impact of Benchmarking & Transparency - Methodologies and the NYC Example.

  7. Tesla: A Transparent, Extensible Session-Layer Framework for End-to-end Network Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gummadi, Ramakrishna

    Tesla: A Transparent, Extensible Session-Layer Framework for End-to-end Network Services by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arthur C. Smith Chairman, Department Committee on Graduate Students #12;2 #12;Tesla: A Transparent of these services, we describe Tesla, a transparent and extensible framework that allows session-layer services

  8. TESLA: A Transparent, Extensible Session-Layer Architecture for End-to-end Network Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TESLA: A Transparent, Extensible Session-Layer Architecture for End-to-end Network Services Jon describes TESLA, a transparent and extensible framework allowing session- layer services to be developed using a high-level flow- based abstraction. TESLA services can be deployed transparently using dynamic

  9. Tesla: A Transparent, Extensible Session-Layer Framework for End-to-end Network Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesla: A Transparent, Extensible Session-Layer Framework for End-to-end Network Services by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arthur C. Smith Chairman, Department Committee on Graduate Students #12; 2 #12; Tesla: A Transparent of these services, we describe Tesla, a transparent and extensible framework that allows session-layer services

  10. TESLA: A Transparent, Extensible Session-Layer Architecture for End-to-end Network Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gummadi, Ramakrishna

    TESLA: A Transparent, Extensible Session-Layer Architecture for End-to-end Network Services Jon describes TESLA, a transparent and extensible framework allowing session- layer services to be developed using a high-level ¤ow- based abstraction. TESLA services can be deployed transparently using dynamic

  11. Transparent Incremental State Saving in Time Warp Parallel Discrete Event Robert Rnngren, Michael Liljenstam Johan Montagnat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Transparent Incremental State Saving in Time Warp Parallel Discrete Event Simulation Robert is the state saving mechanism. It should not only allow efficient state saving, but also support efficient is transparent to the user. In this paper we present a method to implement a transparent incremental state saving

  12. Another Look at Confidence Intervals: Proposal for a More Relevant and Transparent Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven D. Biller; Scott M. Oser

    2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The behaviors of various confidence/credible interval constructions are explored, particularly in the region of low statistics where methods diverge most. We highlight a number of challenges, such as the treatment of nuisance parameters, and common misconceptions associated with such constructions. An informal survey of the literature suggests that confidence intervals are not always defined in relevant ways and are too often misinterpreted and/or misapplied. This can lead to seemingly paradoxical behaviours and flawed comparisons regarding the relevance of experimental results. We therefore conclude that there is a need for a more pragmatic strategy which recognizes that, while it is critical to objectively convey the information content of the data, there is also a strong desire to derive bounds on models and a natural instinct to interpret things this way. Accordingly, we attempt to put aside philosophical biases in favor of a practical view to propose a more transparent and self-consistent approach that better addresses these issues.

  13. Transparent runtime parallelization of the R scripting language

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoginath, Srikanth B [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scripting languages such as R and Matlab are widely used in scientific data processing. As the data volume and the complexity of analysis tasks both grow, sequential data processing using these tools often becomes the bottleneck in scientific workflows. We describe pR, a runtime framework for automatic and transparent parallelization of the popular R language used in statistical computing. Recognizing scripting languages interpreted nature and data analysis codes use pattern, we propose several novel techniques: (1) applying parallelizing compiler technology to runtime, whole-program dependence analysis of scripting languages, (2) incremental code analysis assisted with evaluation results, and (3) runtime parallelization of file accesses. Our framework does not require any modification to either the source code or the underlying R implementation. Experimental results demonstrate that pR can exploit both task and data parallelism transparently and overall has better performance as well as scalability compared to an existing parallel R package that requires code modification.

  14. Ultraslow Propagation of Squeezed Vacuum Pulses with Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daisuke Akamatsu; Yoshihiko Yokoi; Manabu Arikawa; Satoshi Nagatsuka; Takahito Tanimura; Akira Furusawa; Mikio Kozuma

    2008-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We have succeeded in observing ultraslow propagation of squeezed vacuum pulses with electromagnetically induced transparency. Squeezed vacuum pulses (probe lights) were incident on a laser cooled 87Rb gas together with an intense coherent light (control light). A homodyne method sensitive to the vacuum state was employed for detecting the probe pulse passing through the gas. A delay of 3.1us was observed for the probe pulse having a temporal width of 10 us.

  15. Nanoantennas for enhanced light trapping in transparent organic solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voroshilov, Pavel M; Belov, Pavel A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a light-trapping structure offering a significant enhancement of photovoltaic absorption in transparent organic solar cells operating at infrared while the visible light transmission keeps sufficiently high. The main mechanism of light trapping is related with the excitation of collective oscillations of the metal nanoantenna arrays, characterized by advantageous field distribution in the volume of the solar cell. It allows more than triple increase of infrared photovoltaic absorption.

  16. Total neutron-nucleus cross sections and color transparency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, B.K. (TRIUMF, Vancouver, V6T2A3 (Canada)); Miller, G.A. (Nuclear Theory Group, Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron-nucleus cross section at Fermi lab energies is computed using Glauber-Gribov multiple scattering theory. The effects of higher moments in the cross section fluctuations are included and their physical origin discussed. The validity of the frozen approximation is critically examined. These studies of the nucleon-nucleus total cross sections provide a test of the [ital pp][r arrow][ital Xp] diffractive amplitudes used in calculations of color transparency effects.

  17. v-Promela: A Visual, Object-Oriented Language for SPIN Stefan Leue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leue, Stefan

    v-Promela: A Visual, Object-Oriented Language for SPIN Stefan Leue Electrical and Computer-RT, ROOM, and Statecharts, but is presented here in a framework that allows us to combine the benefits- signed to be transparent to the SPIN model checker itself, by allowing all central constructs

  18. vPromela: A Visual, ObjectOriented Language for SPIN Stefan Leue \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leue, Stefan

    v­Promela: A Visual, Object­Oriented Language for SPIN Stefan Leue \\Lambda Electrical and Computer­RT, ROOM, and Statecharts, but is presented here in a framework that allows us to combine the benefits­ signed to be transparent to the SPIN model checker itself, by allowing all central constructs

  19. Measurement approaches to support future warhead arms control transparency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, C.T.; Frankle, C.M.; Johnson, M.W.; Poths, J.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparency on warhead stockpiles, warhead dismantlement, and fissile material stockpiles in nuclear weapons states will become increasingly important in the move beyond START II toward lower quantities of warheads. Congressional support for further warhead reductions will likely depend on the degree of irreversibility, or in other words, the rapidity with which warhead inventories could be reconstituted. Whether irreversibility considerations can be satisfied will depend on monitoring dismantlement as well as constraining the available stockpile of fissile materials for possible refabrication into warheads. Measurement techniques designed to address the above problems will need to consider NPT Article 1 obligations as well as Russian and US classification regulations, which prohibit or restrict the transfer of nuclear warhead design information to other states. Classification considerations currently limit the potential completeness of future inspections of weapons materials. Many conventional international safeguards approaches are not currently viable for arms control applications because they would reveal weapons design information. The authors discuss a variety of technical measures that may help to improve transparence of warhead and fissile material stockpiles and may enable limited warhead dismantlement transparency.

  20. Generic Exercise Objectives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume provides additional detail on preparation of exercise objectives. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

  1. Analysing

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR SEPARATION BYAbrasion andArticle) |

  2. Rapid process for producing transparent, monolithic porous glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making transparent porous glass monoliths from gels. The glass is produced much faster and in much larger sizes than present technology for making porous glass. The process reduces the cost of making large porous glass monoliths because: 1) the process does not require solvent exchange nor additives to the gel to increase the drying rates, 2) only moderate temperatures and pressures are used so relatively inexpensive equipment is needed, an 3) net-shape glass monoliths are possible using this process. The process depends on the use of temperature to control the partial pressure of the gel solvent in a closed vessel, resulting in controlled shrinking during drying.

  3. Radio-transparent multi-layer insulation for radiowave receivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, J. [Korea University, Anam-dong Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea University, Anam-dong Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Ishitsuka, H. [Department of Particle and Nuclear Physics, School of High Energy Accelerator Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan)] [Department of Particle and Nuclear Physics, School of High Energy Accelerator Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Mima, S. [Terahertz Sensing and Imaging Team, Terahertz-wave Research Group, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] [Terahertz Sensing and Imaging Team, Terahertz-wave Research Group, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Oguri, S., E-mail: shugo@post.kek.jp [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Takahashi, K. [Terahertz Sensing and Imaging Team, Terahertz-wave Research Group, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan) [Terahertz Sensing and Imaging Team, Terahertz-wave Research Group, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Tajima, O. [Department of Particle and Nuclear Physics, School of High Energy Accelerator Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan) [Department of Particle and Nuclear Physics, School of High Energy Accelerator Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the field of radiowave detection, enlarging the receiver aperture to enhance the amount of light detected is essential for greater scientific achievements. One challenge in using radio transmittable apertures is keeping the detectors cool. This is because transparency to thermal radiation above the radio frequency range increases the thermal load. In shielding from thermal radiation, a general strategy is to install thermal filters in the light path between aperture and detectors. However, there is difficulty in fabricating metal mesh filters of large diameters. It is also difficult to maintain large diameter absorptive-type filters in cold because of their limited thermal conductance. A technology that maintains cold conditions while allowing larger apertures has been long-awaited. We propose radio-transparent multi-layer insulation (RT-MLI) composed from a set of stacked insulating layers. The insulator is transparent to radio frequencies, but not transparent to infrared radiation. The basic idea for cooling is similar to conventional multi-layer insulation. It leads to a reduction in thermal radiation while maintaining a uniform surface temperature. The advantage of this technique over other filter types is that no thermal links are required. As insulator material, we used foamed polystyrene; its low index of refraction makes an anti-reflection coating unnecessary. We measured the basic performance of RT-MLI to confirm that thermal loads are lowered with more layers. We also confirmed that our RT-MLI has high transmittance to radiowaves, but blocks infrared radiation. For example, RT-MLI with 12 layers has a transmittance greater than 95% (lower than 1%) below 200 GHz (above 4 THz). We demonstrated its effects in a system with absorptive-type filters, where aperture diameters were 200 mm. Low temperatures were successfully maintained for the filters. We conclude that this technology significantly enhances the cooling of radiowave receivers, and is particularly suitable for large-aperture systems. This technology is expected to be applicable to various fields, including radio astronomy, geo-environmental assessment, and radar systems.

  4. Is the Universe transparent to TeV photons?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Kluzniak

    1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    If Lorentz invariance is broken at an energy scale Eq, as has recently been suggested in the context of attempts to quantize gravity, the kinematics of photon-photon collisions would be profoundly affected at lower energies. Specifically, electron-positron pair creation on soft photons may be forbidden at photon energies as low as 30 TeV times square root of (Eq/10**17 GeV) and the Universe would then be transparent to high energy photons. The proposition that Lorentz invariance is broken may be falsified by the techniques of TeV astronomy.

  5. Few-cycle self-induced-transparency solitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Yuan Yao; Chen, I-Hong; Lee, Ray-Kuang [Institute of Photonics Technologies, National Tsing Hua University Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We reveal the existence of an optical self-induced-transparency soliton family in a two-level absorbing system down to the few-cycle limit. Based on the few-cycle envelope approximation, we introduce a systematical method of reducing the Maxwell-Bloch equations beyond the slowly varying envelope approximation and characterize the parameter space to achieve slow and fast lights. Verified by direct numerical simulations with full vectorial Maxwell-Bloch equations, we also give the relationships for a number of optical cycles on area theory and pulse group velocity, which demonstrate possible coherent photon-matter interactions.

  6. Electromagnetically induced transparency in mechanical effects of light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, G. S.; Huang, Sumei [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the dynamical behavior of a nanomechanical mirror in a high-quality cavity under the action of a coupling laser and a probe laser. We demonstrate the existence of the analog of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the output field at the probe frequency. Our calculations show explicitly the origin of EIT-like dips as well as the characteristic changes in dispersion from anomalous to normal in the range where EIT dips occur. Remarkably the pump-probe response for the optomechanical system shares all the features of the {Lambda} system as discovered by Harris and collaborators.

  7. Electromagnetically induced transparency with quantized fields in optocavity mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Sumei; Agarwal, G. S. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) using quantized fields in optomechanical systems. The weak probe field is a narrowband squeezed field. We present a homodyne detection of EIT in the output quantum field. We find that the EIT dip exists even though the photon number in the squeezed vacuum is at the single-photon level. The EIT with quantized fields can be seen even at temperatures on the order of 100 mK, thus paving the way for using optomechanical systems as memory elements.

  8. An Efficient Transparent Test Scheme for Embedded Word-Oriented Memories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jin-Fu; Wey, Chin-Long

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Memory cores are usually the densest portion with the smallest feature size in system-on-chip (SOC) designs. The reliability of memory cores thus has heavy impact on the reliability of SOCs. Transparent test is one of useful technique for improving the reliability of memories during life time. This paper presents a systematic algorithm used for transforming a bit-oriented march test into a transparent word-oriented march test. The transformed transparent march test has shorter test complexity compared with that proposed in the previous works [Theory of transparent BIST for RAMs, A transparent online memory test for simultaneous detection of functional faults and soft errors in memories]. For example, if a memory with 32-bit words is tested with March C-, time complexity of the transparent word-oriented test transformed by the proposed scheme is only about 56% or 19% time complexity of the transparent word-oriented test converted by the scheme reported in [Theory of transparent BIST for RAMs] or [A transparent...

  9. Experimental tests of dropwise cooling on infrared-transparent media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarozzi, Luca; Muscio, Alberto; Tartarini, Paolo [Department of Mechanical and Civil Engineering, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese, 905, 41100 Modena (Italy)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work is aimed at analyzing the cooling of hot solid surfaces induced by liquid droplets. In particular, the study is focused on the non-intrusive measurement of the transient contact temperature between impinging droplets and hot solid surfaces. An experimental apparatus was built and set up in order to approach the non-trivial problem of the measurement of a solid-liquid interface temperature after droplet impingement. The solid-liquid interface temperature was monitored from below through a transparent-to-infrared material. That material had been coated with a very thin layer of high-emissivity, opaque paint on its upper side, so that it could effectively respond to the infrared camera located below. The paper reports the main results that have been collected to date, with particular regard to the approaches used to coat the transparent solid. Some considerations are also expressed about the effectiveness of the proposed method and about the improvements that are currently being implemented to get new and more accurate interface temperature measurements. (author)

  10. COMMISSION SCENARIO ANALYSES OF CALIFORNIA'S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PLANT RETIREMENT AND REPLACEMENT COSTS APPENDIX C: IMPACTS ON NATURAL GAS MARKET PRICES OF LOW DEMAND FOR GAS AS A POWER GENERATION FUEL IN THE WEST APPENDIX D: FURTHER MARKET ANALYSES FOR NATURAL GAS #12: PRELIMINARY RESULTS FOR THE 2007 INTEGRATED ENERGY POLICY REPORT SECOND ADDENDUM APPENDICES Staff Draft Report

  11. Thickness influence on surface morphology and ozone sensing properties of nanostructured ZnO transparent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 71004 Heraklion, Crete, Greece Available online 19 January 2006 Abstract Transparent zinc oxide (Zn Keywords: Zinc oxide; PLD; AFM; Ozone 1. Introduction Zinc oxide (ZnO) is an n-type semiconductor devices [3], varistors, planar optical waveguides [4], transparent electrodes [5,6], ultraviolet

  12. Optical storage with electromagnetically induced transparency in a dense cold atomic ensemble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Shengwang

    Optical storage with electromagnetically induced transparency in a dense cold atomic ensemble storage with electromagnetically induced transparency in a dense cold 85 Rb atomic ensemble. By varying the optical depth (OD) from 0 to 140, we observe that the optimal storage effi- ciency has a saturation value

  13. Elastic properties of transparent nano-polycrystalline diamond measured by GHz-ultrasonic interferometry and resonant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobsen, Steven D.

    Elastic properties of transparent nano-polycrystalline diamond measured by GHz-ultrasonic interferometry Sphere resonance Nano-polycrystalline diamond NPD Elastic properties Superhard materials a b s t r a c t The sound velocities and elastic moduli of transparent nano-polycrystalline diamond (NPD) have

  14. Graphene growth on glass 1 Synthesis of conducting transparent few-layer graphene directly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Graphene growth on glass 1 Synthesis of conducting transparent few-layer graphene directly on glass major hurdles that research has to overcome to get graphene out of research laboratories. Here, using transparent graphene layers at temperatures as low as 450 C. Our few-layer graphene grows at the interface

  15. Middleware Transparent Software Development & the MDA Devon Simmonds, Sudipto Ghosh, Robert France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmonds, Devon M.

    Middleware Transparent Software Development & the MDA Devon Simmonds, Sudipto Ghosh, Robert France of middleware technologies and the pervasiveness of distributed systems. The Model Driven Architecture (MDA of the target middleware. To support the MDA vision we have developed an aspect-oriented middleware transparent

  16. Transparent conductive grids via direct writing of silver nanoparticle inks Bok Yeop Ahn,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Jennifer

    . Using this approach, microscale features ($1 mm) in one-dimensional (1D) to three-dimensional (3D transparency and electrical conductivity.6 Recent efforts have focused on printing and other solution routes and co-workers have produced transparent conductive arrays by inkjet printing of dilute silver

  17. On the Benefits of Transparent Compression for Cost-Effective Cloud Data Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    On the Benefits of Transparent Compression for Cost-Effective Cloud Data Storage Bogdan Nicolae of IaaS middleware: excessive storage costs associated with both user data and VM images might make-off resulting from transparently applying data compression to conserve storage space and bandwidth at the cost

  18. ISIS technical report series, Vol. 2002-06 User Transparency: A Fully Sequential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seinstra, Frank J.

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 4 A Sustainable Software Architecture for User Transparent Parallel Image Processing 12 4 to provide such a tool, we have designed a software architecture that allows transparent (i.e., se- quential the software architecture, and gives an assessment of the architecture's effectiveness in providing signif

  19. ISIS technical report series, Vol. 2002-06 User Transparency: A Fully Sequential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seinstra, Frank J.

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 4 A Sustainable Software Architecture for User Transparent Parallel Image Processing 12 4 to provide such a tool, we have designed a software architecture that allows transparent (i.e., se- quential the software architecture, and gives an assessment of the architecture's e#11;ectiveness in providing signif

  20. Infrared transparent frequency selective surface based on metallic meshes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Miao [Key Laboratory of Optical System Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130033 (China) [Key Laboratory of Optical System Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130033 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); Xu, Nianxi; Liu, Hai; Gao, Jinsong, E-mail: gaojs@ciomp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Optical System Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130033 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Optical System Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130033 (China)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an infrared transparent frequency selective surface (ITFSS) based on metallic meshes. In this ITFSS structure, periodic cross-slot units are integrated on square metallic meshes empowered by coating and UV-lithography. A matching condition is proposed to avoid the distortion of units. Experimental results show that this ITFSS possesses a good transmittance of 80% in the infrared band of 35 ?m, and also a stable band-pass behavior at the resonance frequency of 36.4 GHz with transmittance of ?0.56 dB. Theoretical simulations about the ITFSS diffractive characteristics and frequency responses are also investigated. The novel ITFSS will attract renewed interest and be exploited for applications in various fields.

  1. Optically transparent, scratch-resistant, diamond-like carbon coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    He, Xiao-Ming; Lee, Deok-Hyung; Nastasi, Michael A.; Walter, Kevin C.; Tuszewski, Michel G.

    2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma-based method for the deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings is described. The process uses a radio-frequency inductively coupled discharge to generate a plasma at relatively low gas pressures. The deposition process is environmentally friendly and scaleable to large areas, and components that have geometrically complicated surfaces can be processed. The method has been used to deposit adherent 100-400 nm thick DLC coatings on metals, glass, and polymers. These coatings are between three and four times harder than steel and are therefore scratch resistant, and transparent to visible light. Boron and silicon doping of the DLC coatings have produced coatings having improved optical properties and lower coating stress levels, but with slightly lower hardness.

  2. Tunable electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption with dressed superconducting qubits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian, Hou [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Liu, Yu-xi [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute of Microelectronics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tsinghua National Laboratory for Information Science and Technology (TNList), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michagan 48109 (United States)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption (EIT and EIA) are usually demonstrated using three-level atomic systems. In contrast to the usual case, we theoretically study the EIT and EIA in an equivalent three-level system: a superconducting two-level system (qubit) dressed by a single-mode cavity field. In this equivalent system, we find that both the EIT and the EIA can be tuned by controlling the level-spacing of the superconducting qubit and hence controlling the dressed system. This tunability is due to the dressed relaxation and dephasing rates which vary parametrically with the level-spacing of the original qubit and thus affect the transition properties of the dressed qubit and the susceptibility. These dressed relaxation and dephasing rates characterize the reaction of the dressed qubit to an incident probe field. Using recent experimental data on superconducting qubits (charge, phase, and flux qubits) to demonstrate our approach, we show the possibility of experimentally realizing this proposal.

  3. Tunable electromagnetically induced transparency with a coupled superconducting system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin Wang; Hong-rong Li; Wen-xiao Liu; Fu-li Li

    2015-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) has usually been demonstrated by using three-level atomic systems. In this paper, we theoretically proposed an efficient method to realize EIT in microwave regime through a coupled system consisting of a flux qubit and a superconducting LC resonator with relatively high quality factor. In the present composed system, the working levels are the dressed states of a two-level flux qubit and the resonators with a probe pump field. There exits a second order coherent transfer between the dressed states. By comparing the results with those in the conventional atomic system we have revealed the physical origin of the EIT phenomenon in this composed system. Since the whole system is artificial and tunable, our scheme may have potential applications in various domains.

  4. Semi-transparent solar energy thermal storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

    1985-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A visually transmitting solar energy absorbing thermal storage module includes a thermal storage liquid containment chamber defined by an interior solar absorber panel, an exterior transparent panel having a heat mirror surface substantially covering the exterior surface thereof and associated top, bottom and side walls, Evaporation of the thermal storage liquid is controlled by a low vapor pressure liquid layer that floats on and seals the top surface of the liquid. Porous filter plugs are placed in filler holes of the module. An algicide and a chelating compound are added to the liquid to control biological and chemical activity while retaining visual clarity. A plurality of modules may be supported in stacked relation by a support frame to form a thermal storage wall structure.

  5. Semi-transparent solar energy thermal storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

    1986-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A visually transmitting solar energy absorbing thermal storage module includes a thermal storage liquid containment chamber defined by an interior solar absorber panel, an exterior transparent panel having a heat mirror surface substantially covering the exterior surface thereof and associated top, bottom and side walls. Evaporation of the thermal storage liquid is controlled by a low vapor pressure liquid layer that floats on and seals the top surface of the liquid. Porous filter plugs are placed in filler holes of the module. An algicide and a chelating compound are added to the liquid to control biological and chemical activity while retaining visual clarity. A plurality of modules may be supported in stacked relation by a support frame to form a thermal storage wall structure.

  6. Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Slow Light with Optomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safavi-Naeini, Amir H; Chan, Jasper; Eichenfield, Matt; Winger, Martin; Lin, Qiang; Hill, Jeffrey T; Chang, Darrick; Painter, Oskar

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Controlling the interaction between localized optical and mechanical excitations has recently become possible following advances in micro- and nano-fabrication techniques. To date, most experimental studies of optomechanics have focused on measurement and control of the mechanical subsystem through its interaction with optics, and have led to the experimental demonstration of dynamical back-action cooling and optical rigidity of the mechanical system. Converseley, the optical response of these systems is also modified in the presence of mechanical interactions, leading to strong nonlinear optical effects such as Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) and parametric normal-mode splitting. In atomic systems, seminal experiments and proposals to slow and stop the propagation of light, and their applicability to modern optical networks, and future quantum networks, have thrust EIT to the forefront of experimental study during the last two decades. In a similar fashion, here we use the optomechanical nonli...

  7. Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Slow Light with Optomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir H. Safavi-Naeini; Thiago P. Mayer Alegre; Jasper Chan; Matt Eichenfield; Martin Winger; Qiang Lin; Jeffrey T. Hill; Darrick Chang; Oskar Painter

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Controlling the interaction between localized optical and mechanical excitations has recently become possible following advances in micro- and nano-fabrication techniques. To date, most experimental studies of optomechanics have focused on measurement and control of the mechanical subsystem through its interaction with optics, and have led to the experimental demonstration of dynamical back-action cooling and optical rigidity of the mechanical system. Conversely, the optical response of these systems is also modified in the presence of mechanical interactions, leading to strong nonlinear effects such as Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) and parametric normal-mode splitting. In atomic systems, seminal experiments and proposals to slow and stop the propagation of light, and their applicability to modern optical networks, and future quantum networks, have thrust EIT to the forefront of experimental study during the last two decades. In a similar fashion, here we use the optomechanical nonlinearity to control the velocity of light via engineered photon-phonon interactions. Our results demonstrate EIT and tunable optical delays in a nanoscale optomechanical crystal device, fabricated by simply etching holes into a thin film of silicon (Si). At low temperature (8.7 K), we show an optically-tunable delay of 50 ns with near-unity optical transparency, and superluminal light with a 1.4 microseconds signal advance. These results, while indicating significant progress towards an integrated quantum optomechanical memory, are also relevant to classical signal processing applications. Measurements at room temperature and in the analogous regime of Electromagnetically Induced Absorption (EIA) show the utility of these chip-scale optomechanical systems for optical buffering, amplification, and filtering of microwave-over-optical signals.

  8. Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Technical Memorandum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix D Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Technical Memorandum #12;COPYRIGHT DECEMBER Series 2 and Pond Series 3 Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Prepared for Bureau of Reclamation HILL, INC. III Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses

  9. Do More Transparent Corporate Actions Following a Restatement Influence the SEC's Decision to Issue an Enforcement Action?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Files, Rebecca Lynn

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines whether corporate transparency about a restatement influences the Securities and Exchange Commission's (SEC) decision to issue an enforcement action. I consider corporate transparency to be higher when ...

  10. Proceedings Engineering Distributed Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmerich, Wolfgang

    -18, 1999 Edited by Wolfgang Emmerich Volker Gruhn #12;#12;Table of Contents Introduction Wolfgang Emmerich;#12;Engineering Distributed Objects (EDO 99) Introduction Wolfgang Emmerich Dept. of Computer Science University College London London WC1E 6BT United Kingdom w.emmerich@cs.ucl.ac.uk Volker Gruhn Informatik 10 Universit

  11. Functional Objects Matthias Felleisen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strickland, Stevie

    . (1993) Favor immutability. (2001) Use value objects when possible. (2001) #12;The Problem · UFO · an anti-UFO battery · a bunch of shots #12;OO Analysis World of UFOs UFO AUP Shot Shot Shot * * * fire hit Events (Clock, Mouse, Keys) move #12;OO Design UFO World AUP Shot UFO Shot Shot * * * * Events #12;class

  12. PRECLOSURE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSES FOR LICENSE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Tsai

    2005-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiological consequence analyses are performed for potential releases from normal operations in surface and subsurface facilities and from Category 1 and Category 2 event sequences during the preclosure period. Surface releases from normal repository operations are primarily from radionuclides released from opening a transportation cask during dry transfer operations of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in Dry Transfer Facility 1 (DTF 1), Dry Transfer Facility 2 (DTF 2), the Canister Handling facility (CHF), or the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF). Subsurface releases from normal repository operations are from resuspension of waste package surface contamination and neutron activation of ventilated air and silica dust from host rock in the emplacement drifts. The purpose of this calculation is to demonstrate that the preclosure performance objectives, specified in 10 CFR 63.111(a) and 10 CFR 63.111(b), have been met for the proposed design and operations in the geologic repository operations area. Preclosure performance objectives are discussed in Section 6.2.3 and are summarized in Tables 1 and 2.

  13. Leg 163X Cruise Report -Appendix A: XRF analyses Shorebased XRF analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thy, Peter

    Leg 163X Cruise Report - Appendix A: XRF analyses A-1 Appendix A Shorebased XRF analyses #12;Leg 163X Cruise Report - Appendix A: XRF analyses A-2 Appendix A. Shorebased XRF Analyses (Major Elements

  14. Dipole induced transparency in drop-filter cavity-waveguide systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edo Waks; Jelena Vuckovic

    2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a waveguide that is normally opaque due to interaction with a drop-filter cavity can be made transparent when the drop filter is also coupled to a dipole. A transparency condition is derived between the cavity lifetime and vacuum Rabi frequency of the dipole. This condition is much weaker than strong coupling, and amounts to simply achieving large Purcell factors. Thus, we can observe transparency in the weak coupling regime. We describe how this effect can be useful for designing quantum repeaters for long distance quantum communication.

  15. Electromagnetically-induced transparency and light storing of a pair of pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Raczynski; J. Zaremba; S. Zielinska-Kaniasty

    2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromagnetically-induced transparency and light storing are studied in the case of a medium of atoms in a double Lambda configuration, both in terms of dark- and bright-state polatitons and atomic susceptibility. It is proven that the medium can be made transparent simultaneously for two pulses following their self-adjusting so that a condition for an adiabatic evolution has become fulfilled. Analytic formulas are given for the shapes and phases of the transmitted/stored pulses. The level of transparency can be regulated by adjusting the heights and phases of the control fields.

  16. Tunable Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Absorption with Dressed Superconducting Qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou Ian; Yu-xi Liu; Franco Nori

    2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption (EIT and EIA) are usually demonstrated by three-level atomic or atom-like systems. In contrast to the usual case, we theoretically study the EIT and EIA in an equivalent three-level system, which is constructed by dressing a superconducting two-level system (qubit) dressed by a single-mode cavity field. In this equivalent system, we find that both the EIT and the EIA can be tuned by controlling the level-spacing of the superconducting qubit and hence controlling the dressed system. This tunability is due to the dressed relaxation and dephasing rates which vary parametrically with the level-spacing of the original qubit and thus affect the transition properties of the dressed qubit and the susceptibility. These dressed relaxation and dephasing rates characterize the reaction of the dressed qubit to an incident probe field. We also use recent experimental data on superconducting qubits (charge, phase, and flux qubits) to demonstrate our approach and show the possibility of experimentally realizing this proposal.

  17. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, J.C.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project staff are developing mathematical models to be used to estimate the radiation dose that individuals may have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. An uncertainty and sensitivity analyses plan is essential to understand and interpret the predictions from these mathematical models. This is especially true in the case of the HEDR models where the values of many parameters are unknown. This plan gives a thorough documentation of the uncertainty and hierarchical sensitivity analysis methods recommended for use on all HEDR mathematical models. The documentation includes both technical definitions and examples. In addition, an extensive demonstration of the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis process is provided using actual results from the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC). This demonstration shows how the approaches used in the recommended plan can be adapted for all dose predictions in the HEDR Project.

  18. The Origin of Apollo Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perlmutter, Saul

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preprint #17342 The Origin of Apollo Objects Saul Perlmutterfor the creation of the Apollo objects. The collisions ofthe size and orbit of the Apollo objects to account for the

  19. Programmable window : a large-scale transparent electronic display using SPD film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos, Martin (Ramos Rizo-Patron)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research demonstrates that Suspended Particle Device (SPD) film is a viable option for the development of large-scale transparent display systems. The thesis analyzes the SPD film from an architectural display application ...

  20. GC Commits to Transparency on Nuclear Waste Fund Fee Adequacy Decisions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Consistent with the Administration's commitment to transparency, DOE General Counsel Scott Blake Harris has decided that all future determinations as to the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund fee...

  1. Evidence for the Onset of Color Transparency in ?0 Electroproduction off Nuclei

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, L; Hanretty, C; Hicks, K; Holt, R J; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jawalker, S S; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Kheterpal, P; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Laget, J M; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I.D. J; Mao, Y; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McAndrew, J; McKinnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Moreno, B; Moutarde, H; Muneva, E; Nadel-Turonski, P; Ni, A; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Pappalardo, L; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Anefalos Pereira, S; Phelps, E; Pisano, S; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Protopopescu, D; Raue, B A; Reimer, P E; Ricco, G; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatie, F; Saini, M S; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seraydaryan, H; Sharabian, Y G; Smith, E S; Smith, G D; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Taylor, C E; Tedeschi, D J; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Vernarsky, B; Vineyard, M F; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Watts, D; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the nuclear transparency of the incoherent diffractive A(e,e'?0) process in 12C and 56Fe targets relative to 2H using a 5 GeV electron beam. The nuclear transparency, the ratio of the produced {rho}{sup 0}'s on a nucleus relative to deuterium, which is sensitive to ?A interaction, was studied as function of the coherence length (Ic), a lifetime of the hadronic fluctuation of the virtual photon, and the four-momentum transfer squared (Q2). While the transparency for both 12C and 56Fe showed no Ic dependence, a significant Q2 dependence was measured, which is consistent with calculations that included the color transparency effects.

  2. Synthesis of mono-to-multi-layer graphene for transparent electrode applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Minseok

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, mono-to-multilayer graphene for transparent electrode applications was synthesized by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (APCVD) and the key factors that determine the electrical and optical ...

  3. Patternable transparent carbon nanotube films for electrochromic devices Liangbing Hu and George Grunera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, George

    Patternable transparent carbon nanotube films for electrochromic devices Liangbing Hu and George nanotube films on polyethylene terephthalate as flexible electrodes in electrochromic devices using. Electrochromic devices attract much interest due to their potential use in applications such as smart windows

  4. Polymer material selection and testing of resistive wire arrangement for a transparent infant warming blanket

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salazar, Madeline

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ThermoCloud was designed as a portable, scalable, transparent electrical blanket to warm and insulate infants, while permitting hassle-free medical transportation and maximum visualization of a patient's thorax and ...

  5. Evidence for the Onset of Color Transparency in $?^0$ Electroproduction off Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. El Fassi; L. Zana; K. Hafidi; M. Holtrop; B. Mustapha; W. K. Brooks; H. Hakobyan; X. Zheng; K. P. Adhikari; D. Adikaram; M. Aghasyan; M. J. Amaryan; M. Anghinolfi; J. Arrington; H. Avakian; H. Baghdasaryan; M. Battaglieri; V. Batourine; I. Bedlinskiy; A. S. Biselli; C. Bookwalter; D. Branford; W. J. Briscoe; S. Bultmann; V. D. Burkert; D. S. Carman; A. Celentano; S. Chandavar; P. L. Cole; M. Contalbrigo; V. Crede; A. D'Angelo; A. Daniel; N. Dashyan; R. De Vita; E. De Sanctis; A. Deur; B. Dey; R. Dickson; C. Djalali; G. E. Dodge; D. Doughty; R. Dupre; H. Egiyan; A. El Alaoui; L. Elouadrhiri; P. Eugenio; G. Fedotov; S. Fegan; M. Y. Gabrielyan; M. Garcon; N. Gevorgyan; G. P. Gilfoyle; K. L. Giovanetti; F. X. Girod; J. T. Goetz; W. Gohn; E. Golovatch; R. W. Gothe; K. A. Griffioen; M. Guidal; L. Guo; C. Hanretty; D. Heddle; K. Hicks; R. J. Holt; C. E. Hyde; Y. Ilieva; D. G. Ireland; B. S. Ishkhanov; E. L. Isupov; S. S. Jawalkar; D. Keller; M. Khandaker; P. Khetarpal; A. Kim; W. Kim; A. Klein; F. J. Klein; V. Kubarovsky; S. E. Kuhn; S. V. Kuleshov; V. Kuznetsov; J. M. Laget; H. Y. Lu; I. J. D. MacGregor; Y. Mao; N. Markov; M. Mayer; J. McAndrew; B. McKinnon; C. A. Meyer; T. Mineeva; M. Mirazita; V. Mokeev; B. Moreno; H. Moutarde; E. Munevar; P. Nadel-Turonski; A. Ni; S. Niccolai; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; M. Osipenko; A. I. Ostrovidov; L. Pappalardo; R. Paremuzyan; K. Park; S. Park; E. Pasyuk; S. Anefalos Pereira; E. Phelps; S. Pisano; S. Pozdniakov; J. W. Price; S. Procureur; D. Protopopescu; B. A. Raue; P. E. Reimer; G. Ricco; D. Rimal; M. Ripani; B. G. Ritchie; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; F. Sabatie; M. S. Saini; C. Salgado; D. Schott; R. A. Schumacher; H. Seraydaryan; Y. G. Sharabian; E. S. Smith; G. D. Smith; D. I. Sober; D. Sokhan; S. S. Stepanyan; S. Stepanyan; P. Stoler; S. Strauch; M. Taiuti; W. Tang; C. E. Taylor; D. J. Tedeschi; S. Tkachenko; M. Ungaro; B . Vernarsky; M. F. Vineyard; H. Voskanyan; E. Voutier; D. Watts; L. B. Weinstein; D. P. Weygand; M. H. Wood; N. Zachariou; B. Zhao; Z. W. Zhao

    2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the nuclear transparency of the incoherent diffractive $A(e,e'\\rho^0)$ process in $^{12}$C and $^{56}$Fe targets relative to $^2$H using a 5 GeV electron beam. The nuclear transparency, the ratio of the produced $\\rho^0$'s on a nucleus relative to deuterium, which is sensitive to $\\rho A$ interaction, was studied as function of the coherence length ($l_c$), a lifetime of the hadronic fluctuation of the virtual photon, and the four-momentum transfer squared ($Q^2$). While the transparency for both $^{12}$C and $^{56}$Fe showed no $l_c$ dependence, a significant $Q^2$ dependence was measured, which is consistent with calculations that included the color transparency effects.

  6. Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt 2014; published online 14 October 2014) Polyacrylamide hydrogels containing salt as electrolyte have of polyacrylamide hydrogel by introducing highly hydratable salts into the hydrogel. These hydrogels show enhanced

  7. Transparent and Conductive Carbon Nanotube Multilayer Thin Films Suitable as an Indium Tin Oxide Replacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Yong Tae

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    and light-emitting diodes). For these electronic devices, transporting electrons to and from the electrode layer is required. In many cases, this electrode must transmit visible light because it is applied directly onto the surface of a transparent...

  8. Demonstration of a hitless bypass switch using nanomechanical perturbation for high-bitrate transparent networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Rohit

    We demonstrate an optical hitless bypass switch based on nanomechanical proximity perturbation for high-bitrate transparent networks. Embedded in a single-level ?-imbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer, the two ...

  9. Transparent, near-infrared organic photovoltaic solar cells for window and energy-scavenging applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunt, Richard R.

    We fabricate near-infrared absorbing organic photovoltaics that are highly transparent to visible light. By optimizing near-infrared optical-interference, we demonstrate power efficiencies of 1.30.1% with simultaneous ...

  10. Measurement of nuclear transparency from A(e,e'[pi]?) reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clasie, Benjamin Michael Patrick

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The color transparency phenomenon refers to the suppression of final-state interactions of a hadron propagating through the nuclear medium at large momentum transfer when the hadron is produced with small transverse size. ...

  11. Thick and Thin Film Polymer CNT Nanocomposites for Thermoelectric Energy Conversion and Transparent Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Thick and Thin Film Polymer ­ CNT Nanocomposites for Thermoelectric Energy Conversion gradient. Thermoelectric materials harvest electricity from waste heat or any temperature gradient]. The PDDA/(SWNT+DOC) system produced transparent (> 82% visible light transmittance) and electrically

  12. Department of Energy's team's analyses of Soviet designed VVERs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Analysis Team's analyses of Soviet designed VVERs (Water-cooled, Water-moderated Energy Reactor). The principle objective of this undertaking is to provide a basis to better understand the safety related features of the Soviet designed VVERs to be better prepared to respond domestically in the event of an accident at such a unit. The USDOE Team's analyses are presented together with supporting and background information. The report is structured to allow the reader to develop an understanding of safety related features of Soviet designed VVERs (as well as the probable behavior of these units under a variety of off normal conditions), to understand the USDOE Team's analyses of Soviet designed VVERs, and to formulate informed opinions.

  13. Predictive mechanisms and object representations used in object manipulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flanagan, Randy

    in object manipulation tasks. We also consider the relationship between internal models of objects em of the manipulated objects. This involves both feedforward control, based on prediction, and feedback control and internal models Skilled object manipulation requires the ability to estimate, in advance, the motor com

  14. The Object Orientation of Object Petri Nets Charles Lakos,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakos, Charles

    The Object Orientation of Object Petri Nets Charles Lakos, Computer Science Department, University informally introduces Object Petri Nets (OPNs) with a number of examples and discusses how this kind of Petri Net addresses a number of issues pertinent to Concurrent Object­Oriented Programming Languages. OPNs

  15. Color transparency and high-energy ( p ,2 p ) nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, T.H. (Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)); Miller, G.A. (Department of Physics FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictions relevant for exploring color transparency in ({ital p},2{ital p}) nuclear reactions are often made by using simplified treatments of nuclear dynamics. We examine the extent to which the earlier predictions are valid by carrying out calculations using an improved treatment of the proton scattering wave functions, nucleon Fermi motion, and the effects of long- and short-range nuclear correlations. The consequences of two existing models of color transparency are also presented.

  16. Magnetic transparent conducting oxide film and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Windisch Jr., Charles F.; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Sharma, Shiv K.

    2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Cobalt-nickel oxide films of nominal 100 nm thickness, and resistivity as low as 0.06 .OMEGA..multidot.cm have been deposited by spin-casting from both aqueous and organic precursor solutions followed by annealing at 450.degree. C. in air. Films deposited on sapphire substrates exhibit a refractive index of about 1.7 and are relatively transparent in the wavelength region from 0.6 to 10.0 .mu.m. They are also magnetic. The electrical and spectroscopic properties of the oxides have been studied as a function of x=Co/(Co+Ni) ratio. An increase in film resistivity was found upon substitution of other cations (e.g., Zn.sup.2+, Al.sup.3+) for Ni in the spinel structure. However, some improvement in the mechanical properties of the films resulted. On the other hand, addition of small amounts of Li decreased the resistivity. A combination of XRD, XPS, UV/Vis and Raman spectroscopy indicated that NiCo.sub.2 O.sub.4 is the primary conducting component and that the conductivity reaches a maximum at this stoichiometry. When x<0.67, NiO forms leading to an increase in resistivity; when x>0.67, the oxide was all spinel but the increased Co content lowered the conductivity. The influence of cation charge state and site occupancy in the spinel structure markedly affects calculated electron band structures and contributes to a reduction of p-type conductivity, the formation of polarons, and the reduction in population of mobile charge carriers that tend to limit transmission in the infrared.

  17. Transparent building-integrated PV modules. Phase 1: Comprehensive report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This Comprehensive Report encompasses the activities that have been undertaken by Kiss + Cathcart, Architects, in conjunction with Energy Photovoltaics, Incorporated (EPV), to develop a flexible patterning system for thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules for building applications. There are two basic methods for increasing transparency/light transmission by means of patterning the PV film: widening existing scribe lines, or scribing a second series of lines perpendicular to the first. These methods can yield essentially any degree of light transmission, but both result in visible patterns of light and dark on the panel surface. A third proposed method is to burn a grid of dots through the films, independent of the normal cell scribing. This method has the potential to produce a light-transmitting panel with no visible pattern. Ornamental patterns at larger scales can be created using combinations of these techniques. Kiss + Cathcart, Architects, in conjunction with EPV are currently developing a complementary process for the large-scale lamination of thin-film PVs, which enables building integrated (BIPV) modules to be produced in sizes up to 48 in. x 96 in. Flexible laser patterning will be used for three main purposes, all intended to broaden the appeal of the product to the building sector: To create semitransparent thin-film modules for skylights, and in some applications, for vision glazing.; to create patterns for ornamental effects. This application is similar to fritted glass, which is used for shading, visual screening, graphics, and other purposes; and to allow BIPV modules to be fabricated in various sizes and shapes with maximum control over electrical characteristics.

  18. Communiquer dans un monde de normes l 198 Boutaud J-J. (2005), La transparence, nouveau rgime visible , Transparence & communication, MEI, n 22, Paris, L'Harmattan,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    visible », Transparence & communication, MEI, n° 22, Paris, L'Harmattan, pp. 1-7. Debord G. (1967), La communication, Paris, L'Harmattan, pp. 207-225. Introduction La communication proposée s'inscrit dans la

  19. Pawnee Nation Energy Option Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matlock, M.; Kersey, K.; Riding In, C.

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma Energy Option Analyses In 2003, the Pawnee Nation leadership identified the need for the tribe to comprehensively address its energy issues. During a strategic energy planning workshop a general framework was laid out and the Pawnee Nation Energy Task Force was created to work toward further development of the tribes energy vision. The overarching goals of the first steps project were to identify the most appropriate focus for its strategic energy initiatives going forward, and to provide information necessary to take the next steps in pursuit of the best fit energy options. Description of Activities Performed The research team reviewed existing data pertaining to the availability of biomass (focusing on woody biomass, agricultural biomass/bio-energy crops, and methane capture), solar, wind and hydropower resources on the Pawnee-owned lands. Using these data, combined with assumptions about costs and revenue streams, the research team performed preliminary feasibility assessments for each resource category. The research team also reviewed available funding resources and made recommendations to Pawnee Nation highlighting those resources with the greatest potential for financially-viable development, both in the near-term and over a longer time horizon. Findings and Recommendations Due to a lack of financial incentives for renewable energy, particularly at the state level, combined mediocre renewable energy resources, renewable energy development opportunities are limited for Pawnee Nation. However, near-term potential exists for development of solar hot water at the gym, and an exterior wood-fired boiler system at the tribes main administrative building. Pawnee Nation should also explore options for developing LFGTE resources in collaboration with the City of Pawnee. Significant potential may also exist for development of bio-energy resources within the next decade. Pawnee Nation representatives should closely monitor market developments in the bio-energy industry, establish contacts with research institutions with which the tribe could potentially partner in grant-funded research initiatives. In addition, a substantial effort by the Kaw and Cherokee tribes is underway to pursue wind development at the Chilocco School Site in northern Oklahoma where Pawnee is a joint landowner. Pawnee Nation representatives should become actively involved in these development discussions and should explore the potential for joint investment in wind development at the Chilocco site. Financial incentives for project development are generally structured to provide tribes with access to conventional financing mechanisms. Grant funding for project construction is currently difficult to obtain. Substantial new opportunities for bio-fuel development may exist in the next few years with passage of the 2007 Farm Bill, and through opportunities made available through Oklahomas new Bio-energy Center. A review of potential alternatives to Pawnee Nations current electricity supply scenario revealed that a range of options could be viable. These include the following scenarios: business as usual, alternative supply, negotiate lower rates with City of Pawnee, focus on reducing energy usage, develop electric utility organization. Under any circumstances, Pawnee Nation should purse strategies to reduce energy usage, as this is the simplest means of reducing electric costs and environmental impacts. The research team also recommends that Pawnee Nation initiate some focused discussions with the City of Pawnee, with GRDA, and with IEC to discuss its wholesale supply purchase options. These discussions will better inform the Pawnee Energy Team of the specific pros and cons of its wholesale power supply options, and will assist the Teams broader decision-making on utility-related issues. The ultimate path chosen by Pawnee Nation will depend on further consideration of priorities and potential barriers by Pawnee Nations Energy Team.

  20. Object Closure Conversion * Neal Glew

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glew, Neal

    of closure conversion. This paper argues that a direct formulation of object closure conversio* *n Object Closure Conversion * Neal into closed code and auxiliary data* * structures. Closure conversion has been extensively studied

  1. Visualization tools for moving objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vargas Estrada, Aimee

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    start and a goal configuration for a movable object. The workspace is, in traditional robotics and animation applications, composed of one or more objects (called obstacles) that cannot overlap with the robot. As even the simplest motion planning...

  2. HOGgles: Visualizing Object Detection Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vondrick, Carl Martin

    We introduce algorithms to visualize feature spaces used by object detectors. The tools in this paper allow a human to put on 'HOG goggles' and perceive the visual world as a HOG based object detector sees it. We found ...

  3. DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ANALYSES ON MUDLOG GRAPHS Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY...

  4. From Surfaces to Objects: Recognizing Objects Using Surface Information and Object Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher III, Robert B.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes research on recognising partially obscured objects using surface information like Marr's 2 D sketch ([MAR82]) and surface-based geometrical object models. The goal of the recognition proce88 is to ...

  5. From Surfaces to Objects: Recognizing Objects Using Surface Information and Object Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Robert B.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes research on recognizing partially obscured objects using surface information like Marr's 2D sketch ([MAR82]) and surface-based geometrical object models. The goal of the recognition process is to ...

  6. Energy Dependence of Nuclear Transparency in C(p,2p) Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Leksanov; J. Alster; G. Asryan; Y. Averichev; D. Barton; V. Baturin; N. Bukhtoyarova; A. Carroll; S. Heppelmann; T. Kawabata; Y. Makdisi; E. Minina; I. Navon; A. Malki; H. Nicholson; A. Ogawa; Yu. Panebratsev; E. Piasetzky; A. Schetkovsky; S. Shimanskiy; A. Tang; J. W. Watson; H. Yoshida; D. Zhalov

    2001-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The transparency of carbon for (p,2p) quasi-elastic events was measured at beam energies ranging from 6 to 14.5 GeV at 90 degrees c.m. The four momentum transfer squared q*q ranged from 4.8 to 16.9 (GeV/c)**2. We present the observed energy dependence of the ratio of the carbon to hydrogen cross sections. We also apply a model for the nuclear momentum distribution of carbon to normalize this transparency ratio. We find a sharp rise in transparency as the beam energy is increased to 9 GeV and a reduction to approximately the Glauber level at higher energies.

  7. Control of microwave signals using bichromatic electromechanically induced transparency in three-mode circuit electromechanical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng Jiang; Yuanshun Cui; Xiaowei Li

    2014-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically investigate the tunable slowing and advancing of microwave signals based on bichromatic electromechanically induced transparency in a three-mode circuit electromechanical system, where two mechanical oscillators with closely spaced frequencies are independently coupled to a common microwave cavity. In the presence of a strong microwave pump field, we obtain two transparency windows accompanied by steep phase dispersion in the transmitted microwave probe field. The width of the transparency window and the group delay of the probe field can be controlled effectively by the power of the pump field. It is shown that the maximum group delay of 0.12 ms and the advance of 0.27 ms can be obtained in the current experiments.

  8. Performance of Europium-Doped Strontium Iodide, Transparent Ceramics and Bismuth-loaded Polymer Scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cherepy, N J; Payne, S A; Sturm, B W; O'Neal, S P; Seeley, Z M; Drury, O B; Haselhorst, L K; Rupert, B L; Sanner, R D; Thelin, P A; Fisher, S E; Hawrami, R; Shah, K S; Burger, A; Ramey, J O; Boatner, L A

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently discovered scintillators for gamma ray spectroscopy, single crystal SrI{sub 2}(Eu), GYGAG(Ce) transparent ceramic and Bismuth-loaded plastics, offer resolution and fabrication advantages compared to commercial scintillators, such as NaI(Tl) and standard PVT plastic. Energy resolution at 662 keV of 2.7% is obtained with SrI{sub 2}(Eu), while 4.5% is obtained with GYGAG(Ce). A new transparent ceramic scintillator for radiographic imaging systems, GLO(Eu) offers high light yield of 70,000 Photons/MeV, high stopping, and low radiation damage. Implementation of single crystal SrI{sub 2}(Eu), Gd-based transparent ceramics, and Bi-loaded plastic scintillators can advance the state-of-the art in ionizing radiation detection systems.

  9. Transparent ultralow-density silica aerogels prepared by a two-step sol-gel process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tillotson, T.M.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional silica sol-gel chemistry is limited for the production of transparent ultralow-density aerogels because (1) gelation is either slow or unachievable, and (2) even when gelation is achieved, the large pore sizes result in loss of transparency for aerogels <.020 g/cc. We have developed a two-step sol-gel process that circumvents the limitations of the conventional process and allows the formation of ultralow-density gels in a matter of hours. we have found that the gel time is dependent on the catalyst concentration. After supercritical extraction, the aerogels are transparent, uncracked tiles with densities as low as .003 g/cc. 6 figs., 11 refs.

  10. Atomic-Layer-Deposited Transparent Electrodes for Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Demaurex, Benedicte; Seif, Johannes P.; Smit, Sjoerd; Macco, Bart; Kessels, W. M.; Geissbuhler, Jonas; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine damage-free transparent-electrode deposition to fabricate high-efficiency amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells. Such solar cells usually feature sputtered transparent electrodes, the deposition of which may damage the layers underneath. Using atomic layer deposition, we insert thin protective films between the amorphous silicon layers and sputtered contacts and investigate their effect on device operation. We find that a 20-nm-thick protective layer suffices to preserve, unchanged, the amorphous silicon layers beneath. Insertion of such protective atomic-layer-deposited layers yields slightly higher internal voltages at low carrier injection levels. However, we identify the presence of a silicon oxide layer, formed during processing,morebetween the amorphous silicon and the atomic-layer-deposited transparent electrode that acts as a barrier, impeding hole and electron collection.less

  11. Atomic-Layer-Deposited Transparent Electrodes for Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Demaurex, Benedicte; Seif, Johannes P.; Smit, Sjoerd; Macco, Bart; Kessels, W. M.; Geissbuhler, Jonas; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine damage-free transparent-electrode deposition to fabricate high-efficiency amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells. Such solar cells usually feature sputtered transparent electrodes, the deposition of which may damage the layers underneath. Using atomic layer deposition, we insert thin protective films between the amorphous silicon layers and sputtered contacts and investigate their effect on device operation. We find that a 20-nm-thick protective layer suffices to preserve, unchanged, the amorphous silicon layers beneath. Insertion of such protective atomic-layer-deposited layers yields slightly higher internal voltages at low carrier injection levels. However, we identify the presence of a silicon oxide layer, formed during processing, between the amorphous silicon and the atomic-layer-deposited transparent electrode that acts as a barrier, impeding hole and electron collection.

  12. The Use of Large Transparent Ceramics in a High Powered, Diode Pumped Solid State Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, R; Bhachu, B; Cutter, K; Fochs, S; Letts, S; Parks, C; Rotter, M; Soules, T

    2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of large transparent ceramics is one of the key enabling technological advances that have shown that the development of very high average power compact solid state lasers is achievable. Large ceramic neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) amplifier slabs are used in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Solid State Heat Capacity Laser (SSHCL), which has achieved world record average output powers in excess of 67 kilowatts. We will describe the attributes of using large transparent ceramics, our present system architecture and corresponding performance; as well as describe our near term future plans.

  13. Electronic Durability of Flexible Transparent Films from Type-Specific Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J; Iyer, S; Bernhardt, A; Huh, JY; Hudson, S; Fagan, J; Hobbie, E.

    2011-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupling between mechanical flexibility and electronic performance is evaluated for thin films of metallic and semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) deposited on compliant supports. Percolated networks of type-purified SWCNTs are assembled as thin conducting coatings on elastic polymer substrates, and the sheet resistance is measured as a function of compression and cyclic strain through impedance spectroscopy. The wrinkling topography, microstructure and transparency of the films are independently characterized using optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and optical absorption spectroscopy. Thin films made from metallic SWCNTs show better durability as flexible transparent conductive coatings, which we attribute to a combination of superior mechanical performance and higher interfacial conductivity.

  14. Electrode with transparent series resistance for uniform switching of optical modulation devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tench, D. Morgan (Camarillo, CA); Cunningham, Michael A. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Kobrin, Paul H. (Newbury Park, CA)

    2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Switching uniformity of an optical modulation device for controlling the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is improved by use of an electrode comprising an electrically resistive layer that is transparent to the radiation. The resistive layer is preferably an innerlayer of a wide-bandgap oxide sandwiched between layers of indium tin oxide or another transparent conductor, and may be of uniform thickness, or may be graded so as to provide further improvement in the switching uniformity. The electrode may be used with electrochromic and reversible electrochemical mirror (REM) smart window devices, as well as display devices based on various technologies.

  15. Three-terminal resistive switching memory in a transparent vertical-configuration device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ungureanu, Mariana; Llopis, Roger [CIC nanoGUNE Consolider, Donostia - San Sebastian (Spain)] [CIC nanoGUNE Consolider, Donostia - San Sebastian (Spain); Casanova, Flix; Hueso, Luis E. [CIC nanoGUNE Consolider, Donostia - San Sebastian (Spain) [CIC nanoGUNE Consolider, Donostia - San Sebastian (Spain); Ikerbasque, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao (Spain)

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The resistive switching phenomenon has attracted much attention recently for memory applications. It describes the reversible change in the resistance of a dielectric between two non-volatile states by the application of electrical pulses. Typical resistive switching memories are two-terminal devices formed by an oxide layer placed between two metal electrodes. Here, we report on the fabrication and operation of a three-terminal resistive switching memory that works as a reconfigurable logic component and offers an increased logic density on chip. The three-terminal memory device we present is transparent and could be further incorporated in transparent computing electronic technologies.

  16. Sun-tracking optical element realized using thermally activated transparency-switching material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apostoleris, Harry; Lilliu, Samuele; Chiesa, Matteo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a proof of concept demonstration of a novel optical element: a light-responsive aperture that can track a moving light beam. The element is created using a thermally-activated transparency-switching material composed of paraffin wax and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Illumination of the material with a focused beam causes the formation of a localized transparency at the focal spot location, due to local heating caused by absorption of a portion of the incident light. An application is proposed in a new design for a self-tracking solar collector.

  17. Electromagnetically induced transparency from two-phonon processes in quadratically coupled membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Sumei; Agarwal, G. S. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe how electromagnetically induced transparency can arise in quadratically coupled optomechanical systems. Due to quadratic coupling, the underlying optical process involves a two-phonon process in an optomechanical system, and this two-phonon process makes the mean displacement, which plays the role of atomic coherence in traditional electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), zero. We show how the fluctuation in displacement can play a role similar to atomic coherence and can lead to EIT-like effects in quadratically coupled optomechanical systems. We show how such effects can be studied using the existing optomechanical systems.

  18. FAQS Job Task Analyses- Industrial Hygiene

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FAQS Job Task Analyses are performed on the Function Area Qualification Standards. The FAQS Job Task Analyses consists of: Developing a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job such as the duties and responsibilities which include determining their levels of importance and frequency. Identifying and evaluating competencies. Last step is evaluating linkage between job tasks and competencies.

  19. FAQS Job Task Analyses- General Technical Base

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FAQS Job Task Analyses are performed on the Function Area Qualification Standards. The FAQS Job Task Analyses consists of: Developing a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job such as the duties and responsibilities which include determining their levels of importance and frequency. Identifying and evaluating competencies. Last step is evaluating linkage between job tasks and competencies.

  20. FAQS Job Task Analyses- DOE Aviation Manager

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FAQS Job Task Analyses are performed on the Function Area Qualification Standards. The FAQS Job Task Analyses consists of: Developing a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job such as the duties and responsibilities which include determining their levels of importance and frequency. Identifying and evaluating competencies. Last step is evaluating linkage between job tasks and competencies.

  1. FAQS Job Task Analyses- Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FAQS Job Task Analyses are performed on the Function Area Qualification Standards. The FAQS Job Task Analyses consists of: Developing a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job such as the duties and responsibilities which include determining their levels of importance and frequency. Identifying and evaluating competencies. Last step is evaluating linkage between job tasks and competencies.

  2. Photoactive transparent nano-crystalline glass-ceramic for remazole red dye degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gad-Allah, Tarek A., E-mail: tareqabdelshafy@yahoo.ca [Water Pollution Research Department, National Research Centre, Cairo 12311 (Egypt); Margha, Fatma H. [Department of Glass Research, National Research Centre, Cairo 12311 (Egypt)] [Department of Glass Research, National Research Centre, Cairo 12311 (Egypt)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Preparation and characterization of novel transparent nanocrystalline glass-ceramic. ? Precipitation of photoactive phases by using controlled heat-treatment. ? Conservation of transparency along with photoactivity. ? Using the prepared nanocrystalline glass-ceramic in water purification. -- Abstract: Transparent glass ceramic material was prepared from alkali-borosilicate glass containing titania by proper heat treatment scheme. The prepared samples were characterized using differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, selected area electron diffraction and UVvisible spectroscopy. The applied heat treatment program allowed the crystallization of nano-crystalline anatase, rutile, barium titanate, titanium borate and silicate phases while maintaining the transparency. The precipitated nano-crystalline anatase and rutile phases were responsible for the observed high photocatalytic activity of the prepared samples. Samples of 24.29 and 32.39 TiO{sub 2} wt% showed better efficiency for the decolorization of remazole red dye compared with commercial-TiO{sub 2} used in preparation of glass-ceramic. The reuse of prepared glass-ceramic photocatalyst with nearly same efficiency for different times was also proved.

  3. What is the Transparent, Activity-Based Budget System and why is it being done?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    What is the Transparent, Activity-Based Budget System and why is it being done? This project, and systematic way; link budgets to cycles of integrated planning; ensure resources are put behind strategic Planning (PCIP) in financial decision-making; NOT result in zero-based budgeting (zero-based budgeting

  4. Hair Self Shadowing and Transparency Depth Ordering Using Occupancy maps Erik Sintorn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assarsson, Ulf

    approximate visibility function for high frequency semi- transparent geometry such as hair. We can then reconstruct the vis- ibility for any fragment without the expensive compression needed by Deep Shadow Maps cylinders or as line primitives, the two main challenges are the self-shadowing effects within the volume

  5. Synthesis of Oxidation-Resistant Cupronickel Nanowires for Transparent Conducting Nanowire Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathmall, Aaron [Duke University; Nguyen, Minh [Duke University; Wiley, Benjamin J [Duke University

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanowires of copper can be coated from liquids to create flexible, transparent conducting films that can potentially replace the dominant transparent conductor, indium tin oxide, in displays, solar cells, organic light-emitting diodes, and electrochromic windows. One issue with these nanowire films is that copper is prone to oxidation. It was hypothesized that the resistance to oxidation could be improved by coating copper nanowires with nickel. This work demonstrates a method for synthesizing copper nanowires with nickel shells as well as the properties of cupronickel nanowires in transparent conducting films. Time- and temperature-dependent sheet resistance measurements indicate that the sheet resistance of copper and silver nanowire films will double after 3 and 36 months at room temperature, respectively. In contrast, the sheet resistance of cupronickel nanowires containing 20 mol % nickel will double in about 400 years. Coating copper nanowires to a ratio of 2:1 Cu:Ni gave them a neutral gray color, making them more suitable for use in displays and electrochromic windows. These properties, and the fact that copper and nickel are 1000 times more abundant than indium or silver, make cupronickel nanowires a promising alternative for the sustainable, efficient production of transparent conductors.

  6. On-cue detachment of hydrogels and cells from optically transparent electrodesw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revzin, Alexander

    of composition or conformation of self-assembled molecules is to remove these molecules altogether) is optically transparent yet conductive material that is well-suited for cell cultivation and observation was highly significant because it permitted both spatial and temporal control over the release of polymer

  7. Impact of degenerate n-doping on the optical absorption edge in transparent conducting cadmium oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schleife, Andr

    n-type or can be heavily doped. Transparent conductive cadmium oxide (CdO) thin films, for instance devices or modern solar cells, material performance is critically important. A combination of high in the conduction bands of CdO can increase the conductivity up to values desired for technological applications

  8. RemusDB: Transparent High Availability for Database Umar Farooq Minhas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aboulnaga, Ashraf

    system (DBMS). The proposed tech- nique can be applied to any DBMS with little or no customization transparent HA and failover capabilities. We show that while Remus and similar systems can protect a DBMS, database workloads incur a performance overhead of up to 32% as compared to an unprotected DBMS. We

  9. Highly transparent Nb-doped indium oxide electrodes for organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jun Ho; Seong, Tae-Yeon [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Na, Seok-In [Professional Graduate School of Flexible and Printable Electronics, Chonbuk National University, 664-14, Deokjin-dong, Jeongju-si, Jellabuk-do 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Kwun-Bum [Department of Physics, Dankook University, Mt. 29, Anseo-Dong, Chenan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hye-Min; Kim, Han-Ki, E-mail: imdlhkkim@khu.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering for Information and Electronics, Kyung Hee University, 1 Seocheon-dong, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors investigated the characteristics of Nb-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} (INbO) films prepared by co-sputtering of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} for use in transparent anodes for organic solar cells (OSCs). To optimize the Nb dopant composition in the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix, the effect of the Nb doping power on the resistivity and transparency of the INbO films were examined. The electronic structure and microstructure of the INbO films were also investigated using synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction examinations in detail. At the optimized Nb co-sputtering power of 30?W, the INbO film exhibited a sheet resistance of 15??/sq, and an optical transmittance of 86.04% at 550?nm, which are highly acceptable for the use as transparent electrodes in the fabrication of OSCs. More importantly, the comparable power conversion efficiency (3.34%) of the OSC with an INbO anode with that (3.31%) of an OSC with a commercial ITO anode indicates that INbO films are promising as a transparent electrode for high performance OSCs.

  10. Integration of Laser-Welded Ag Nanowire Transparent Conducting Layers on Photovoltaic Devices (DMR-0819860)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Integration of Laser-Welded Ag Nanowire Transparent Conducting Layers on Photovoltaic Devices (DMR conducting layers in applications ranging from organic flexible electronics to rigid photovoltaics. However of a hybrid organic photovoltaic device [1]. The NWs are dispersed on the device and the network is welded

  11. Hematite-based Photo-oxidation of Water Using Transparent Distributed Current Collectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hematite-based Photo-oxidation of Water Using Transparent Distributed Current Collectors Shannon C. Martinson*,, Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center and Department of Chemistry collection of photocurrent from ultrathin coatings of hematite layers, enabling the formation of photoanodes

  12. aerogels isolants transparent-super: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerogels isolants transparent-super First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Recent progress in...

  13. Transparent Triboelectric Nanogenerators and Self-Powered Pressure Sensors Based on Micropatterned Plastic Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    sensors, and artificial skins.9-12 Indeed, building flexible transparent energy con- version and storage process for energy conversion has three important steps: charge generation, charge separation, and charge States State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Department of Chemistry, College

  14. Reconstructing the Surface of Inhomogeneous Transparent Scenes by Scatter-Trace Photography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    . W. Morris Kiriakos N. Kutulakos University of Toronto Abstract We present a new method one or more viewpoints while moving a proxi- mal light source to a 2D or 3D set of positions is that even though light trans- port within a transparent scene's interior can be exceed- ingly complex

  15. Shock-wave generation in transparent media from ultra-fast lasers R. Bernath*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    Shock-wave generation in transparent media from ultra-fast lasers R. Bernath*a , C. G. Browna , J a harmonic of the pump laser frequency. Experiments also include burst-mode operation, where a train of ultra. Aspiotisa , M. Fishera , & M. Richardsona a Laser Plasma Laboratory, College of Optics & Photonics: CREOL

  16. NREL scientists develop robust, high-performance IZO transparent contact for CIGS solar cells.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NREL scientists develop robust, high-performance IZO transparent contact for CIGS solar cells indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) solar cell is zinc oxide (ZnO). The problem is that unprotected Zn is a lifetime-limiting problem that is currently addressed solely through encapsulation. Fundamentally improving

  17. Flexible and transparent supercapacitor based on In2O3 nanowire/carbon nanotube heterogeneous films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    ; accepted 17 December 2008; published online 28 January 2009 In this paper, a supercapacitor which may find applications in heads-up display, automobile wind-shield display, and conformable transparent and/or flexible energy conversion and storage units with high energy storage and power density

  18. Object Closure Conversion Cornell University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glew, Neal

    that a direct formulation of object closure conversion is interesting and gives further insight into generalObject Closure Conversion Neal Glew Cornell University 24 August 1999 Abstract An integral part of implementing functional languages is closure conversion--the process of converting code with free variables

  19. OnObject : programming of physical objects for gestural interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Keywon

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tangible User Interfaces (TUIs) have fueled our imagination about the future of computational user experience by coupling physical objects and activities with digital information. Despite their conceptual popularity, TUIs ...

  20. SCENARIO ANALYSES OF CALIFORNIA'S ELECTRICITY SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ......................................................................................F-12 APPENDIX G: Solar Technology Analyses G-1. Rooftop PV Penetration Assessments.......................................................G-1 G-2. Rooftop PV Production Profiles ................................................................G-2 G-3. Solar Parabolic Production Profiles

  1. SCM Forcing Data Derived from NWP Analyses

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jakob, Christian

    Forcing data, suitable for use with single column models (SCMs) and cloud resolving models (CRMs), have been derived from NWP analyses for the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites of Manus Island and Nauru.

  2. SCENARIO ANALYSES OF CALIFORNIA'S ELECTRICITY SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..................11 Table 2: Levelized System Costs ($2006/MWh) .................................................12CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION SCENARIO ANALYSES OF CALIFORNIA'S ELECTRICITY SYSTEM: PRELIMINARY RESULTS FOR THE 2007 INTEGRATED ENERGY POLICY REPORT ADDENDUM STAFFDRAFTREPORT JULY 2007 CEC-200

  3. The core legion object model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, M.; Grimshaw, A. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Legion project at the University of Virginia is an architecture for designing and building system services that provide the illusion of a single virtual machine to users, a virtual machine that provides secure shared object and shared name spaces, application adjustable fault-tolerance, improved response time, and greater throughput. Legion targets wide area assemblies of workstations, supercomputers, and parallel supercomputers, Legion tackles problems not solved by existing workstation based parallel processing tools; the system will enable fault-tolerance, wide area parallel processing, inter-operability, heterogeneity, a single global name space, protection, security, efficient scheduling, and comprehensive resource management. This paper describes the core Legion object model, which specifies the composition and functionality of Legion`s core objects-those objects that cooperate to create, locate, manage, and remove objects in the Legion system. The object model facilitates a flexible extensible implementation, provides a single global name space, grants site autonomy to participating organizations, and scales to millions of sites and trillions of objects.

  4. Application of Developed APCVD Transparent Conducting Oxides and Undercoat Technologies for Economical OLED Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin Bluhm; James Coffey; Roman Korotkov; Craig Polsz; Alexandre Salemi; Robert Smith; Ryan Smith; Jeff Stricker; Chen Xu; Jasmine Shirazi; George Papakonstantopulous; Steve Carson; Claudia Goldman; Soren Hartmann; Frank Jessen; Bianca Krogmann; Christoph Rickers; Manfred Ruske; Holger Schwab; Dietrich Bertram

    2011-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Economics is a key factor for application of organic light emitting diodes (OLED) in general lighting relative to OLED flat panel displays that can handle high cost materials such as indium tin oxide (ITO) or Indium zinc oxide (IZO) as the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) on display glass. However, for OLED lighting to penetrate into general illumination, economics and sustainable materials are critical. The issues with ITO have been documented at the DOE SSL R&D and Manufacturing workshops for the last 5 years and the issue is being exacerbated by export controls from China (one of the major sources of elemental indium). Therefore, ITO is not sustainable because of the fluctuating costs and the United States (US) dependency on other nations such as China. Numerous alternatives to ITO/IZO are being evaluated such as Ag nanoparticles/nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and other metal oxides. Of these other metal oxides, doped zinc oxide has attracted a lot of attention over the last 10 years. The volume of zinc mined is a factor of 80,000 greater than indium and the US has significant volumes of zinc mined domestically, resulting in the ability for the US to be self-sufficient for this element that can be used in optoelectronic applications. The costs of elemental zinc is over 2 orders of magnitude less than indium, reflecting the relative abundance and availability of the elements. Arkema Inc. and an international primary glass manufacturing company, which is located in the United States, have developed doped zinc oxide technology for solar control windows. The genesis of this DOE SSL project was to determine if doped zinc oxide technology can be taken from the commodity based window market and translate the technology to OLED lighting. Thus, Arkema Inc. sought out experts, Philips Lighting, Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) and National Renewable Research Laboratories (NREL), in OLED devices and brought them into the project. This project had a clear focus on economics and the work plan focused both on doped ZnO process and OLED device structure that would be consistent with the new TCO. The team successfully made 6 inch OLEDs with a serial construction. More process development is required to optimize commercial OLED structures. Feasibility was demonstrated on two different light extraction technologies: 1/4 lambda refractive index matching and high-low-high band pass filter. Process development was also completed on the key precursors for the TCO, which are ready for pilot-plant scale-up. Subsequently, Arkema has developed a cost of ownership model that is consistent with DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing targets as outlined in the DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing 2010 report. The overall outcome of this project was the demonstration that doped zinc oxide can be used for OLED devices without a drop-off in performance while gaining the economic and sustainable benefits of a more readily available TCO. The broad impact of this project, is the facilitation of OLED lighting market penetration into general illumination, resulting in significant energy savings, decreased greenhouse emissions, with no environmental impact issues such as mercury found in Fluorescent technology. The primary objective of this project was to develop a commercially viable process for 'Substrates' (Substrate/ undercoat/ TCO topcoat) to be used in production of OLED devices (lamps/luminaries/modules). This project focused on using Arkema's recently developed doped ZnO technology for the Fenestration industry and applying the technology to the OLED lighting industry. The secondary objective was the use of undercoat technology to improve light extraction from the OLED device. In optical fields and window applications, technology has been developed to mitigate reflection losses by selecting appropriate thicknesses and refractive indices of coatings applied either below or above the functional layer of interest. This technology has been proven and implemented in the fenestration industry for more than 15 years. Successful completion of

  5. Social networks for lonely objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kestner, John Anthony

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Visions of ubiquitous computing describe a network of devices that quietly supports human goals, but this may also add complexity to an already frustrating relationship between humans and their electronic objects. As we ...

  6. Renewable and Recycled Energy Objective

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In March 2007, the North Dakota enacted legislation (H.B. 1506) establishing an ''objective'' that 10% of all retail electricity sold in the state be obtained from renewable energy and recycled...

  7. Motor Vehicle Record Procedure Objective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    Motor Vehicle Record Procedure Objective Outline the procedure for obtaining motor vehicle record (MVR) through Fleet Services. Vehicle Operator Policy 3. Operators with 7 or more points on their motor vehicle record

  8. Detection of a concealed object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keller, Paul E [Richland, WA; Hall, Thomas E [Kennewick, WA; McMakin, Douglas L [Richland, WA

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are systems, methods, devices, and apparatus to determine if a clothed individual is carrying a suspicious, concealed object. This determination includes establishing data corresponding to an image of the individual through interrogation with electromagnetic radiation in the 200 MHz to 1 THz range. In one form, image data corresponding to intensity of reflected radiation and differential depth of the reflecting surface is received and processed to detect the suspicious, concealed object.

  9. Detection of a concealed object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keller, Paul E. (Richland, WA); Hall, Thomas E. (Kennewick, WA); McMakin, Douglas L. (Richland, WA)

    2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are systems, methods, devices, and apparatus to determine if a clothed individual is carrying a suspicious, concealed object. This determination includes establishing data corresponding to an image of the individual through interrogation with electromagnetic radiation in the 200 MHz to 1 THz range. In one form, image data corresponding to intensity of reflected radiation and differential depth of the reflecting surface is received and processed to detect the suspicious, concealed object.

  10. Finite element analyses for seismic shear wall international standard problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two identical reinforced concrete (RC) shear walls, which consist of web, flanges and massive top and bottom slabs, were tested up to ultimate failure under earthquake motions at the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation`s (NUPEC) Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory, Japan. NUPEC provided the dynamic test results to the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development), Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) for use as an International Standard Problem (ISP). The shear walls were intended to be part of a typical reactor building. One of the major objectives of the Seismic Shear Wall ISP (SSWISP) was to evaluate various seismic analysis methods for concrete structures used for design and seismic margin assessment. It also offered a unique opportunity to assess the state-of-the-art in nonlinear dynamic analysis of reinforced concrete shear wall structures under severe earthquake loadings. As a participant of the SSWISP workshops, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) performed finite element analyses under the sponsorship of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). Three types of analysis were performed, i.e., monotonic static (push-over), cyclic static and dynamic analyses. Additional monotonic static analyses were performed by two consultants, F. Vecchio of the University of Toronto (UT) and F. Filippou of the University of California at Berkeley (UCB). The analysis results by BNL and the consultants were presented during the second workshop in Yokohama, Japan in 1996. A total of 55 analyses were presented during the workshop by 30 participants from 11 different countries. The major findings on the presented analysis methods, as well as engineering insights regarding the applicability and reliability of the FEM codes are described in detail in this report. 16 refs., 60 figs., 16 tabs.

  11. Program Objectives | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program Objectives Program Objectives High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas (HEDLP) Program Objectives Support the U.S. scientific...

  12. Program Objectives | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Objectives Program Objectives National Laser Users' Facility Grant Program Objectives The primary purpose of the National Laser Users' Facility (NLUF) is to provide facility time...

  13. Program Objectives | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program Program Objectives Program Objectives Stewardship Science Academic Alliances (SSAA) Program Objectives Support the U.S. scientific...

  14. Development of transparent silica aerogel over a wide range of densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makoto Tabata; Ichiro Adachi; Yoshikazu Ishii; Hideyuki Kawai; Takayuki Sumiyoshi; Hiroshi Yokogawa

    2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We have succeeded in developing hydrophobic silica aerogels over a wide range of densities (i.e. refractive indices). A pinhole drying method was invented to make possible producing highly transparent aerogels with entirely new region of refractive indices of 1.06-1.26. Obtained aerogels are more transparent than conventional ones, and the refractive index is well controlled in the pinhole drying process. A test beam experiment was carried out in order to evaluate the performance of the pinhole-dried aerogels as a Cherenkov radiator. A clear Cherenkov ring was successfully observed by a ring imaging Cherenkov counter. We also developed monolithic and hydrophobic aerogels with a density of 0.01 g/cm^3 (a low refractive index of 1.0026) as a cosmic dust capturer for the first time. Consequently, aerogels with any refractive indices between 1.0026 and 1.26 can be produced freely.

  15. Development of transparent silica aerogel over a wide range of densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabata, Makoto; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Hideyuki; Sumiyoshi, Takayuki; Yokogawa, Hiroshi; 10.1016/j.nima.2010.02.241

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have succeeded in developing hydrophobic silica aerogels over a wide range of densities (i.e. refractive indices). A pinhole drying method was invented to make possible producing highly transparent aerogels with entirely new region of refractive indices of 1.06-1.26. Obtained aerogels are more transparent than conventional ones, and the refractive index is well controlled in the pinhole drying process. A test beam experiment was carried out in order to evaluate the performance of the pinhole-dried aerogels as a Cherenkov radiator. A clear Cherenkov ring was successfully observed by a ring imaging Cherenkov counter. We also developed monolithic and hydrophobic aerogels with a density of 0.01 g/cm^3 (a low refractive index of 1.0026) as a cosmic dust capturer for the first time. Consequently, aerogels with any refractive indices between 1.0026 and 1.26 can be produced freely.

  16. Growth and optical properties of partially transparent Eu doped CaF{sub 2} ceramic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Manoranjan, E-mail: mghosh@barc.gov.in; Sen, Shashwati, E-mail: mghosh@barc.gov.in; Pitale, S. S., E-mail: mghosh@barc.gov.in; Goutam, U. K., E-mail: mghosh@barc.gov.in; Shinde, Seema, E-mail: mghosh@barc.gov.in; Patra, G. D., E-mail: mghosh@barc.gov.in; Gadkari, S. C., E-mail: mghosh@barc.gov.in [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai - 400085 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Partially transparent ceramic of 2 at.% Eu doped CaF{sub 2} have been grown preferentially towards [111] direction. For this purpose, Eu doped CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles (size?12 nm) obtained by a low temperature solution growth method has been pressed at 1000C under vacuum. The preferentially grown ceramic shows 15% transparency within the visible range of spectrum. As confirmed by the X-ray diffraction result, the hot pressed ceramic exhibits reduced lattice volume than the nanopowder. It indicates Eu{sup 3+} as the dominant substituting ions at the Ca{sup 2+} sites of CaF{sub 2} lattice in the hot pressed ceramic material. It is corroborated by the photoluminescence results of hot pressed ceramic which shows strong red emission corresponding to Eu{sup 3+} sites. However, photoluminescence of nanopowder exhibits intense peak in the blue region of the spectrum which is characteristics of Eu2+ sites.

  17. Acoustic Characterization of Mesoscale Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chinn, D; Huber, R; Chambers, D; Cole, G; Balogun, O; Spicer, J; Murray, T

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the science and engineering performed to provide state-of-the-art acoustic capabilities for nondestructively characterizing mesoscale (millimeter-sized) objects--allowing micrometer resolution over the objects entire volume. Materials and structures used in mesoscale objects necessitate the use of (1) GHz acoustic frequencies and (2) non-contacting laser generation and detection of acoustic waves. This effort demonstrated that acoustic methods at gigahertz frequencies have the necessary penetration depth and spatial resolution to effectively detect density discontinuities, gaps, and delaminations. A prototype laser-based ultrasonic system was designed and built. The system uses a micro-chip laser for excitation of broadband ultrasonic waves with frequency components reaching 1.0 GHz, and a path-stabilized Michelson interferometer for detection. The proof-of-concept for mesoscale characterization is demonstrated by imaging a micro-fabricated etched pattern in a 70 {micro}m thick silicon wafer.

  18. Object technology: A white paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, S.R.; Arrowood, L.F.; Cain, W.D.; Stephens, W.M.; Vickers, B.D.

    1992-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Object-Oriented Technology (OOT), although not a new paradigm, has recently been prominently featured in the trade press and even general business publications. Indeed, the promises of object technology are alluring: the ability to handle complex design and engineering information through the full manufacturing production life cycle or to manipulate multimedia information, and the ability to improve programmer productivity in creating and maintaining high quality software. Groups at a number of the DOE facilities have been exploring the use of object technology for engineering, business, and other applications. In this white paper, the technology is explored thoroughly and compared with previous means of developing software and storing databases of information. Several specific projects within the DOE Complex are described, and the state of the commercial marketplace is indicated.

  19. Cavity cooling of a trapped atom using Electromagnetically-Induced Transparency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Bienert; Giovanna Morigi

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooling scheme for trapped atoms is proposed, which combines cavity-enhanced scattering and electromagnetically induced transparency. The cooling dynamics exploits a three-photon resonance, which combines laser and cavity excitations. It is shown that relatively fast ground-state cooling can be achieved in the Lamb-Dicke regime and for large cooperativity. Efficient ground-state cooling is found for parameters of ongoing experiments.

  20. Remote imaging of concealed objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lev, Aner, E-mail: lev@soreq.gov.il; Sfez, Bruno, E-mail: lev@soreq.gov.il [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel)

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical detection of objects hidden behind opaque screening layers is a challenging problem. We demonstrate an optically detected echographic-like method that combines collimated acoustic and laser beams. The acoustic waves cross the screening layers and their back-reflection from the hidden objects is detected through the analysis of a dynamic laser speckle pattern created at the outer surface of the screening layer. Real-time remote detection of moving targets 15 meters away, with a few mm resolutions is demonstrated using a very sensitive camera detection scheme.

  1. Copper and Transparent-Conductor Reflectarray Elements on Thin-Film Solar Cell Panels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dreyer, Philippe; Nicolay, Sylvain; Ballif, Christophe; Perruisseau-Carrier, Julien

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work addresses the integration of reflectarray antennas (RA) on thin film Solar Cell (SC) panels, as a mean to save real estate, weight, or cost in platforms such as satellites or transportable autonomous antenna systems. Our goal is to design a good RA unit cell in terms of phase response and bandwidth, while simultaneously achieving high optical transparency and low microwave loss, to preserve good SC and RA energy efficiencies, respectively. Since there is a trade-off between the optical transparency and microwave surface conductivity of a conductor, here both standard copper and transparent conductors are considered. The results obtained at the unit cell level demonstrates the feasibility of integrating RA on a thin-film SC, preserving for the first time good performance in terms of both SC and RA efficiency. For instance, measurement at X-band demonstrate families of cells providing a phase range larger than 270{\\deg} with average microwave loss of -2.45dB (resp. -0.25dB) and average optical transpa...

  2. Color transparency after the NE18 and E665 experiments: Outllok and perspectives at CEBAF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Nemchik; N. N. Nikolaev; B. G. Zakharov

    1994-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    CEBAF is a high-luminocity factory of virtual photons with variable virtuality $Q^{2}$ and transverse size. This makes CEBAF, in particular after the energy upgrade to (8-12)GeV, an ideal facility for uncovering new phenomena, and opening new windows, at the interface of the perturbative and nonperturbative QCD. We discuss color transparency as the case for a broad program on electroproduction of vector mesons $\\rho^{0},\\,\\omega^{0},\\,\\phi^{0}$ and their radial excitations $\\rho',\\,\\omega',\\,\\phi'$ at CEBAF. We also comment on the second generation of experiments on color transparency in $^{4}He(e,e'p)$ scattering, which are also feasible at CEBAF. In 1994, we can make more reliable projections into future because our understanding of the onset of color transparency has greatly been augmented by two experiments completed in 1993:\\\\ i) no effect of CT was seen in the SLAC NE18 experiment on $A(e,e'p)$ scattering at virtualities of the exchanged photon $Q^{2} \\lsim 7$ GeV$^{2}$, \\\\ ii) strong signal of CT was observed in the FNAL E665 experiment on exclusive $\\rho^{0}$- meson production in deep inelastic scattering in the same range of $Q^{2}$. \\\\ We discuss the impact of these observations on the CEBAF experimental program. We argue they both are good news, both were anticipated theoretically, and both rule in the correct QCD mechanism of the onset of CT.

  3. Remarkable Thermal Stability of Amorphous In-Zn-O Transparent Conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, M. P.; Readey, D. W.; van Hest, M. F. A. M.; Teplin, C. W.; Alleman, J. L.; Dabney, M. S.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Keyes, B. M.; To, B.; Perkins, J. D.; Ginley, D. S.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) are increasingly critical components in photovoltaic cells, low-e windows, flat panel displays, electrochromic devices, and flexible electronics. The conventional TCOs, such as Sn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, are crystalline single phase materials. Here, we report on In-Zn-O (IZO), a compositionally tunable amorphous TCO with some significantly improved properties. Compositionally graded thin film samples were deposited by co-sputtering from separate In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZnO targets onto glass substrates at 100 C. For the metals composition range of 55-84 cation% indium, the as-deposited IZO thin films are amorphous, smooth (R{sub RMS} < 0.4 nm), conductive ({sigma} {approx} 3000 {Omega}{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup -1}), and transparent in the visible (T{sub Vis} > 90%). Furthermore, the amorphous IZO thin films demonstrate remarkable functional and structural stability with respect to heating up to 600 C in either air or argon. Hence, though not completely understood at present, these amorphous materials constitute a new class of fundamentally interesting and technologically important high performance transparent conductors.

  4. Nuclear transparency and effective kaon-nucleon cross section from the A(e,e?K+) reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clasie, Benjamin Michael Patrick

    We have determined the transparency of the nuclear medium to kaons from A(e,e[superscript ?]K+) measurements on [superscript 12]C, [superscript 63]Cu, and [superscript 197]Au targets. The measurements were performed at the ...

  5. Population Analysis, Fall 2005 1 Population Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, William R.

    Population Analysis, Fall 2005 1 Population Analyses EEOB/AEcl 611 Fall Semester 2005 Scheduled Phone: 294-5176 email: wrclark@iastate.edu AEcl 611 is evolving in response to very rapid changes. The emphasis in AEcl 611 is on understanding the statistical basis of various analytical techniques, applying

  6. Uncertainty quantification approaches for advanced reactor analyses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, L. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The original approach to nuclear reactor design or safety analyses was to make very conservative modeling assumptions so as to ensure meeting the required safety margins. Traditional regulation, as established by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission required conservatisms which have subsequently been shown to be excessive. The commission has therefore moved away from excessively conservative evaluations and has determined best-estimate calculations to be an acceptable alternative to conservative models, provided the best-estimate results are accompanied by an uncertainty evaluation which can demonstrate that, when a set of analysis cases which statistically account for uncertainties of all types are generated, there is a 95% probability that at least 95% of the cases meet the safety margins. To date, nearly all published work addressing uncertainty evaluations of nuclear power plant calculations has focused on light water reactors and on large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) analyses. However, there is nothing in the uncertainty evaluation methodologies that is limited to a specific type of reactor or to specific types of plant scenarios. These same methodologies can be equally well applied to analyses for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and to liquid metal reactors, and they can be applied to steady-state calculations, operational transients, or severe accident scenarios. This report reviews and compares both statistical and deterministic uncertainty evaluation approaches. Recommendations are given for selection of an uncertainty methodology and for considerations to be factored into the process of evaluating uncertainties for advanced reactor best-estimate analyses.

  7. Kinematics analyses of Dodekapod Prakash Bande a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Subir Kumar

    Kinematics analyses of Dodekapod Prakash Bande a , Martin Seibt b , Eckart Uhlmann b , S.K. Saha c. Tel.: +91 11 2659 1135; fax: +91 11 2658 2053. E-mail address: saha@mech.iitd.ernet.in (S.K. Saha

  8. Chemical Analyses of Silicon Aerogel Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. van der Werf; F. Palmisano; R. De Leo; S. Marrone

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    After five years of operating, two Aerogel counters: A1 and A2, taking data in Hall A at Jefferson Lab, suffered a loss of performance. In this note possible causes of degradation have been studied. In particular, various chemical and physical analyses have been carried out on several Aerogel tiles and on adhesive tape in order to reveal the presence of contaminants.

  9. Chemical Analyses of Silicon Aerogel Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Werf, I; De Leo, R; Marrone, S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After five years of operating, two Aerogel counters: A1 and A2, taking data in Hall A at Jefferson Lab, suffered a loss of performance. In this note possible causes of degradation have been studied. In particular, various chemical and physical analyses have been carried out on several Aerogel tiles and on adhesive tape in order to reveal the presence of contaminants.

  10. ANALYSE CANONIQUE GNRALISE RGULARISE ET APPROCHE PLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    of generalized canonical correlation analysis for population (GCCA-population) which constitutes a theoretical equations of an optimization problem that we call regularized generalized canonical correlation analysis'algorithme PLS/Gauss-Seidel. Proprits de convergence de l'algorithme PLS/Gauss-Seidel. 1. Analyse canonique

  11. Supporting the President's Arms Control and Nonproliferation Agenda: Transparency and Verification for Nuclear Arms Reductions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meek, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The President's arms control and nonproliferation agenda is still evolving and the details of initiatives supporting it remain undefined. This means that DOE, NNSA, NA-20, NA-24 and the national laboratories can help define the agenda, and the policies and the initiatives to support it. This will require effective internal and interagency coordination. The arms control and nonproliferation agenda is broad and includes the path-breaking goal of creating conditions for the elimination of nuclear weapons. Responsibility for various elements of the agenda will be widely scattered across the interagency. Therefore an interagency mapping exercise should be performed to identify the key points of engagement within NNSA and other agencies for creating effective policy coordination mechanisms. These can include informal networks, working groups, coordinating committees, interagency task forces, etc. It will be important for NA-20 and NA-24 to get a seat at the table and a functional role in many of these coordinating bodies. The arms control and nonproliferation agenda comprises both mature and developing policy initiatives. The more mature elements such as CTBT ratification and a follow-on strategic nuclear arms treaty with Russia have defined milestones. However, recent press reports indicate that even the START follow-on strategic arms pact that is planned to be complete by the end of 2009 may take significantly longer and be more expansive in scope. The Russians called for proposals to count non-deployed as well as deployed warheads. Other elements of the agenda such as FMCT, future bilateral nuclear arms reductions following a START follow-on treaty, nuclear posture changes, preparations for an international nuclear security summit, strengthened international safeguards and multilateral verification are in much earlier stages of development. For this reason any survey of arms control capabilities within the USG should be structured to address potential needs across the near-term (1-4) years and longer-term (5-10) years planning horizons. Some final observations include acknowledging the enduring nature of several key objectives on the Obama Administration's arms control and nonproliferation agenda. The CTBT, FMCT, bilateral nuclear arms reductions and strengthening the NPT have been sought by successive U.S. Administrations for nearly thirty years. Efforts towards negotiated arms control, although de-emphasized by the G.W. Bush Administration, have remained a pillar of U.S. national security strategy for decades and are likely to be of enduring if not increasing importance for decades to come. Therefore revitalization and expansion of USG capabilities in this area can be a positive legacy no matter what near-term arms control goals are achieved over the next four years. This is why it is important to reconstruct integrated bureaucratic, legislative, budgetary and diplomatic strategies to sustain the arms control and nonproliferation agenda. In this endeavor some past lessons must be taken to heart to avoid bureaucratic overkill and keep interagency policy-making and implementation structures lean and effective. On the Technical side a serious, sustained multilateral program to develop, down select and performance test nuclear weapons dismantlement verification technologies and procedures should be immediately initiated. In order to make this happen the United States and Russia should join with the UK and other interested states in creating a sustained, full-scale research and development program for verification at their respective nuc1ear weapons and defense establishments. The goals include development of effective technologies and procedures for: (1) Attribute measurement systems to certify nuclear warheads and military fissile materials; (2) Chain-of-custody methods to track items after they are authenticated and enter accountability; (3) Transportation monitoring; (4) Storage monitoring; (5) Fissile materials conversion verification. The remainder of this paper focuses on transparency and verification for nuclear arms a

  12. Melting Objects M. W. Jones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Mark W.

    both thermal flow and the latent heat during the phase change. The mechanism for energy transfer. The underlying objects are constructed using Volume Graphics modelling techniques (specifically voxelization graphics is to provide methods for creating visually realistic imagery of nat- ural phenomenon. A great

  13. Analysis of the empirical relations between visible solar radiation, the solar altitude and the transparency of the atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia Occhipinti, Antonio

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANALYSIS OF THE EMPIRICAL RELATIONS BETWEEN VISUAL SOLAR RADIATION, THE SOLAR ALTITUDE AND THE TRANSPARENCY OF THE ATMOSPHERE A Thesis A. Garcia Occhipinti Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM Untverstty in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1965 Major Subject: Oceanography ANALYSIS OF THE EMPIRICAL RELATIONS BETWEEN VISIBLE SOLAR RADIATION, THE SOLAR ALTITUDE AND THE TRANSPARENCY OF THE ATMOSPHERE A Thesis A. Garcia Occhipinti...

  14. Department of Energy's team's analyses of Soviet designed VVERs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides Appendices A thru K of this report. The topics discussed respectively are: radiation induced embrittlement and annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels; loss of coolant accident blowdown analyses; LOCA blowdown response analyses; non-seismic structural response analyses; seismic analyses; S'' seal integrity; reactor transient analyses; fire protection; aircraft impacts; and boric acid induced corrosion. (FI).

  15. Modeling the Clustering of Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Salvador-Sole

    1995-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    I review the main steps made so far towards the construction of a (semi) analytical model for describing the growth history of bound virialized objects or haloes in the gravitational instability scenario. I mainly focus on those models relying on the spherical collapse approximation which have led to the most complete description. I insist on the different assumptions of each model and outline their main advantages and shortcomings. The work is divided in two parts: a first one dealing with the theoretical mass function of objects, and a second one dealing with the typical growth times and rates. Particular attention is paid to a new model making the practical distinction between accretion and merger events.

  16. Sensitivity in risk analyses with uncertain numbers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, W. Troy; Ferson, Scott

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensitivity analysis is a study of how changes in the inputs to a model influence the results of the model. Many techniques have recently been proposed for use when the model is probabilistic. This report considers the related problem of sensitivity analysis when the model includes uncertain numbers that can involve both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty and the method of calculation is Dempster-Shafer evidence theory or probability bounds analysis. Some traditional methods for sensitivity analysis generalize directly for use with uncertain numbers, but, in some respects, sensitivity analysis for these analyses differs from traditional deterministic or probabilistic sensitivity analyses. A case study of a dike reliability assessment illustrates several methods of sensitivity analysis, including traditional probabilistic assessment, local derivatives, and a ''pinching'' strategy that hypothetically reduces the epistemic uncertainty or aleatory uncertainty, or both, in an input variable to estimate the reduction of uncertainty in the outputs. The prospects for applying the methods to black box models are also considered.

  17. Synthesis of superconducting magnesium diboride objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Finnemore, Douglas K. (Ames, IA); Canfield, Paul C. (Ames, IA); Bud'ko, Sergey L. (Ames, IA); Ostenson, Jerome E. (Ames, IA); Petrovic, Cedomir (Ames, IA); Cunningham, Charles E. (Ames, IA); Lapertot, Gerard (Grenoble, FR)

    2003-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A process to produce magnesium diboride objects from boron objects with a similar form is presented. Boron objects are reacted with magnesium vapor at a predetermined time and temperature to form magnesium diboride objects having a morphology similar to the boron object's original morphology.

  18. Synthesis Of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride Objects.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Finnemore, Douglas K. (Ames, IA); Canfield, Paul C. (Ames, IA); Bud'ko, Sergey L. (Ames, IA); Ostenson, Jerome E. (Ames, IA); Petrovic, Cedomir (Ames, IA); Cunningham, Charles E. (Ames, IA); Lapertot, Gerard (Grenoble, FR)

    2003-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process to produce magnesium diboride objects from boron objects with a similar form is presented. Boron objects are reacted with magnesium vapor at a predetermined time and temperature to form magnesium diboride objects having a morphology similar to the boron object's original morphology.

  19. A Job Pause Service under LAM/MPI+BLCR for Transparent Fault Tolerance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chao [North Carolina State University; Mueller, Frank [North Carolina State University; Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Scott, Steven L [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Checkpoint/restart (C/R) has become a requirement for long-running jobs in large-scale clusters due to a meantime- to-failure (MTTF) in the order of hours. After a failure, C/R mechanisms generally require a complete restart of an MPI job from the last checkpoint. A complete restart, however, is unnecessary since all but one node are typically still alive. Furthermore, a restart may result in lengthy job requeuing even though the original job had not exceeded its time quantum. In this paper, we overcome these shortcomings. Instead of job restart, we have developed a transparent mechanism for job pause within LAM/MPI+BLCR. This mechanism allows live nodes to remain active and roll back to the last checkpoint while failed nodes are dynamically replaced by spares before resuming from the last checkpoint. Our methodology includes LAM/MPI enhancements in support of scalable group communicationwith fluctuating number of nodes, reuse of network connections, transparent coordinated checkpoint scheduling and a BLCR enhancement for job pause. Experiments in a cluster with the NAS Parallel Benchmark suite show that our overhead for job pause is comparable to that of a complete job restart. A minimal overhead of 5.6% is only incurred in case migration takes place while the regular checkpoint overhead remains unchanged. Yet, our approach alleviates the need to reboot the LAM run-time environment, which accounts for considerable overhead resulting in net savings of our scheme in the experiments. Our solution further provides full transparency and automation with the additional benefit of reusing existing resources. Executing continues after failures within the scheduled job, i.e., the application staging overhead is not incurred again in contrast to a restart. Our scheme offers additional potential for savings through incremental checkpointing and proactive diskless live migration, which we are currently working on.

  20. Slow-light plasmonic metamaterial based on dressed-state analog of electromagnetically-induced transparency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raza, Sren

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a simple configuration for realizing one-dimensional slow-light metamaterials with large bandwidth-delay products using stub-shaped Fabry-Perot resonators as building blocks. Each metaatom gives rise to large group indices due to a classical analog of the dressed-state picture of electromagnetically-induced transparency. By connecting up to eight metaatoms, we find bandwidth-delay products over unity and group indices approaching 100. Our approach is quite general and can be applied to any type of Fabry-Perot resonators and tuned to different operating wavelengths.

  1. Perspectives of Use of Diagnostic Mirrors with Transparent Protection Layer in Burning Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhin, Eugene E.; Razdobarin, Gennadiy T.; Semenov, Vladimir V.; Tolstyakov, Sergey Yu.; Kochergin, Mikhail M.; Kurskiev, Gleb S.; Podushnikova, Klara A. [Department of Plasma Physics, Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical lnstitute, SPb, 194021 (Russian Federation); Andreev, Alexandr N.; Davydov, Denis V.; Rastegaeva, Marina G. [Division of Solid State Physics, A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, SPb, 194021 (Russian Federation); Khimich, Yuriy P.; Gorshkov, Vladimir N.; Nikitin, Dmitriy B. [Research Institute of Optical Design, Federal Research Center Vavilov State Optical Institute, SPb, 199034 (Russian Federation); Litnovsky, Andrej M. [Institute fur Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Julich, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Ass EURATOM-FZ Julich, D-52425 Julich (Germany)

    2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate using of metal mirrors over-coated with transparent protection layer for the in-vessel diagnostic systems in reactor-grade fusion devices. Ideally, these should satisfy the contradictory demands of high reflectivity and small rate degradation when being bombarded by CX atoms. The serious threat to the performance of diagnostic mirrors is surface contamination with carbon-based material eroded from carbon tiles. Via coupling the protective layer to a bulk mirror we can mitigate the deposit infiuence on the reflectance spectra. The regards are given to survivability in plasma environment of protected coated metallic mirrors.

  2. Laser frequency stabilization to highly excited state transitions using electromagnetically induced transparency in a cascade system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. P. Abel; A. K. Mohapatra; M. G. Bason; J. D. Pritchard; K. J. Weatherill; U. Raitzsch; C. S. Adams

    2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate laser frequency stabilization to excited state transitions using cascade electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). Using a room temperature Rb vapor cell as a reference, we stabilize a first diode laser to the D2 transition and a second laser to a transition from the intermediate state to a Rydberg state with principal quantum number n=19 - 70. A combined laser linewidth of 280 kHz over a 0.1 ms time period is achieved. This method may be applied generally to any cascade system and allows laser stabilization to an atomic reference in the absence of strong optical transitions.

  3. Coherent optical detection of highly excited Rydberg states using electromagnetically induced transparency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Mohapatra; T. R. Jackson; C. S. Adams

    2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We observe electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) on the 5s to 5p transition in a room temperature rubidium vapour cell by coupling the 5p state to a Rydberg state (ns or nd with n=26 to 124). We demonstrate that the narrow line-width of the EIT resonance (2 MHz) allows precise measurement of the d state fine structure splitting, and together with the sensitivity of the Rydberg state to electric fields, we are able to detect transient electric fields produced by the dynamics of charges within the cell. Coherent coupling of Rydberg states via EIT could also be used for cross-phase modulation and photon entanglement.

  4. Doping stability and opto-electronic performance of CVD graphene on transparent flexible substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Moon Hyo; Milne, William I.; Cole, Matthew T.

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    with modified graphene anode', Nature photonics, 2012, (6), 2, pp. 105-110 [7] Lee, J., Cole, M. T., Lai, J. C. S., et al.:'An Analysis of Electrode Patterns in Capacitive Touch Screen Panels', Display Technology, Journal of, 2014, (10), 5, pp. 362-366 [8... . C. H., Zhang, D., et al.:'Semitransparent organic solar cells with hybrid monolayer graphene/metal grid as top electrodes', Appl. Phys. Lett., 2013, (102), 11, p. 113303 [10] Park, H., Brown, P. R., Bulovic, V., et al.:'Graphene as transparent...

  5. Amorphous semiconducting and conducting transparent metal oxide thin films and production thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perkins, John (Boulder, CO); Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria (Lakewood, CO); Ginley, David (Evergreen, CO); Taylor, Matthew (Golden, CO); Neuman, George A. (Holland, MI); Luten, Henry A. (Holland, MI); Forgette, Jeffrey A. (Hudsonville, MI); Anderson, John S. (Holland, MI)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal oxide thin films and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a metal oxide thin film may comprise introducing at least two metallic elements and oxygen into a process chamber to form a metal oxide. The method may also comprise depositing the metal oxide on a substrate in the process chamber. The method may also comprise simultaneously controlling a ratio of the at least two metallic elements and a stoichiometry of the oxygen during deposition. Exemplary amorphous metal oxide thin films produced according to the methods herein may exhibit highly transparent properties, highly conductive properties, and/or other opto-electronic properties.

  6. A running coupling explanation of the surprising transparency of the QGP at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Buzzatti; Miklos Gyulassy

    2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The CUJET Monte Carlo Jet Energy loss model is applied to predict the jet flavor, centrality and density dependence of the nuclear modification factor $R_{AA}$ at RHIC and LHC. Running coupling effects due to combined $x$, $k_\\perp$ and $q_\\perp$ evolution are included for the first time in the dynamical DGLV opacity expansion framework and are shown to provide a natural dynamical QCD tomographic solution to the surprising transparency of the quark gluon plasma produced at LHC as suggested by $p_\\perp>10$ GeV $R_{AA}$ data from ALICE, ATLAS, and CMS.

  7. Pulse retrieval and soliton formation in a non-standard scheme for dynamic electromagnetically induced transparency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amy Peng; Mattias Johnsson; Joseph J. Hope

    2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine in detail an alternative method of retrieving the information written into an atomic ensemble of three-level atoms using electromagnetically induced transparency. We find that the behavior of the retrieved pulse is strongly influenced by the relative collective atom-light coupling strengths of the two relevant transitions. When the collective atom-light coupling strength for the retrieval beam is the stronger of the two transitions, regeneration of the stored pulse is possible. Otherwise, we show the retrieval process can lead to creation of soliton-like pulses.

  8. Slow light of an amplitude modulated Gaussian pulse in electromagnetically induced transparency medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenzhuo Tang; Bin Luo; Yu Liu; Hong Guo

    2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The slow light effects of an amplitude modulated Gaussian (AMG) pulse in a cesium atomic vapor are presented. In a single-$\\Lambda$ type electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) medium, more severe distortion is observed for an AMG pulse than a Gaussian one. Using Fourier spectrum analysis, we find that the distortion, as well as the loss, is dominantly caused by linear absorption than dispersion. Accordingly, a compensation method is proposed to reshape the slow light pulse based on the transmission spectrum. In addition, we find a novel way to obtain simultaneous slow and fast light.

  9. A stable frequency comb directly referenced to rubidium electromagnetically induced transparency and two-photon transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Dong; Wu, Jiutao; Zhang, Shuangyou; Ren, Quansheng; Zhang, Zhigang; Zhao, Jianye, E-mail: zhaojianye@pku.edu.cn [Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China)

    2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate an approach to create a stable erbium-fiber-based frequency comb at communication band by directly locking the combs to two rubidium atomic transitions resonances (electromagnetically induced transparency absorption and two-photon absorption), respectively. This approach directly transfers the precision and stability of the atomic transitions to the comb. With its distinguishing feature of compactness by removing the conventional octave-spanning spectrum and f-to-2f beating facilities and the ability to directly control the comb's frequency at the atomic transition frequency, this stable optical comb can be widely used in optical communication, frequency standard, and optical spectroscopy and microscopy.

  10. Remixing physical objects through tangible tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Follmer, Sean (Sean Weston)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document we present new tools for remixing physical objects. These tools allow users to copy, edit and manipulate the properties of one or more objects to create a new physical object. We already have these ...

  11. Runtime verification of object lifetime specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Zev (Zev A.)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis reports on the implementation of a runtime verification system for object lifetime specifications. This system is used to explore and evaluate the expressiveness object lifetime specifications. Object lifetime ...

  12. Labeling, discovering, and detecting objects in images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Bryan Christopher, 1979-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recognizing the many objects that comprise our visual world is a difficult task. Confounding factors, such as intra-class object variation, clutter, pose, lighting, dealing with never-before seen objects, scale, and lack ...

  13. AVNG system objectives and concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macarthur, Duncan W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thron, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Razinkov, Sergey [RFNC-VNIIEF; Livke, Alexander [RFNC-VNIIEF; Kondratov, Sergey [RFNC-VNIIEF

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Any verification measurement performed on potentially classified nuclear material must satisfy two constraints. First and foremost, no classified information can be released to the monitoring party. At the same time, the monitoring party must gain sufficient confidence from the measurement to believe that the material being measured is consistent with the host's declarations concerning that material. The attribute measurement technique addresses both concerns by measuring several attributes of the nuclear material and displaying unclassified results through green (indicating that the material does possess the specified attribute) and red (indicating that the material does not possess the specified attribute) lights. The AVNG that we describe is an attribute measurement system built by RFNC-VNIIEF in Sarov, Russia. The AVNG measures the three attributes of 'plutonium presence,' 'plutonium mass >2 kg,' and 'plutonium isotopic ratio ({sup 240}Pu to {sup 239}Pu) <0.1' and was demonstrated in Sarov for a joint US/Russian audience in June 2009. In this presentation, we will outline the goals and objectives of the AVNG measurement system. These goals are driven by the two, sometimes conflicting, requirements mentioned above. We will describe the conceptual design of the AVNG and show how this conceptual design grew out of these goals and objectives.

  14. The Origin of Apollo Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perlmutter, Saul

    1984-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The source of the Earth-orbit-crossing asteroids has been much debated. (This class of asteroidal bodies includes the Apollo, Aten, and some Amor objects, each with its own orbital characteristics; we shall use the term Apollo objects to mean all Earth-crossers.) It is difficult to find a mechanism which would create new Apollo objects at a sufficient rate to balance the loss due to collision with planets and ejection from the solar system, and thus explain the estimated steady-state number. A likely source is the main asteroid belt, since it has similar photometric characteristics. There are gaps in the main belt which correspond to orbits resonant with the orbits of Jupiter and Saturn, and it has been shown that the resonances can perturb a body into an Earth-crossing orbit. Apollo objects could thus be generated when random collisions between asteroids in the main belt sent fragments into these resonant orbits. Calculations of the creation rate from these random collisions, however, yielcl numbers too low by a factor of four. This rate could be significantly lower given the uncertainty in the efficiency of the resonance mechanism. As an alternative, it was suggested that the evaporation of a comet's volatile mantle as it passes near the sun could provide enough non-gravitational force to move the comet into an orbit with aphelion inside of Jupiter's orbit, and thus safe from ejection from the solar system. The probability of such an event occurring is unknown, although the recent discovery of the 'asteroid' 1983 TB, with an orbit matching that of the Geminid meteor shower, suggests that such a mechanism has occurred at least once. New evidence from paleontology and geophysics, however, suggests a better solution to the problem of the source of the Apollos. M. Davis, P. Hut, and R. A. Muller recently proposed that an unseen companion to the sun passes through the Oort cloud every 28 million years, sending a shower of comets to the Earth; this provides an explanation for the periodicity of the fossil record of extinctions found by D. M. Raup and J. J. Sepkoski. W. Alvarez and R. A. Muller have shown that the craters on the earth have an age distribution with a periodicity and phase consistent with this hypothesis. These periodic comet showers would of course pass through the entire solar system, colliding with other bodies besides the earth. When the target is the asteroid belt, many small comets will have sufficient kinetic energy to disrupt large asteroids. This will generate many more fragments in the resonant orbits than would be generated by random collisions of asteroids with each other, and hence more Apollo objects. In this report, we shall calculate approximately (A) the number of comets per shower which cross the asteroid belt, (B) the probability of collisions with a single asteroid per shower, (C) the number of fragments with radius > 0.5 km which reach Apollo orbits, and (D) the current expected number of Apollos derived from comet/asteroid collisions. Given conservative assumptions, the calculated number is in agreement with observations.

  15. Distributed Reliable Object-Oriented Programming (DROOP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerraoui, Rachid

    Distributed Reliable Object-Oriented Programming (DROOP) P. Eugster November 3, 2003 Abstract with such failures, coining the term Distributed Reliable Object-Oriented Programming (DROOP). 1 SCOOP

  16. Comparison of elastic and inelastic analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D. J.; Heinstein, M. W.; Wellman, G. W.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of inelastic analysis methods instead of the traditional elastic analysis methods in the design of radioactive material (RAM) transport packagings leads to a better understanding of the response of the package to mechanical loadings. Thus, better assessment of the containment, thermal protection, and shielding integrity of the package after a structural accident event can be made. A more accurate prediction of the package response can lead to enhanced safety and also allow for a more efficient use of materials, possibly leading to a package with higher capacity or lower weight This paper will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using inelastic analysis in the design of RAM shipping packages. When using inelastic analysis the entire nonlinear response of the material must be known, including the effects of temperature changes and strain rate. There currently is not an acceptance criteria for this type of analysis that is approved by regulatory agencies. Inelastic analysis acceptance criteria based on failure stress, failure strain, or plastic energy density could be developed. For both elastic and inelastic analyses it is also important to include other sources of stress in the analyses, such as fabrication stresses, thermal stresses, stresses from bolt preloading, and contact stresses at material interfaces.

  17. Used Fuel Management System Interface Analyses - 13578

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, Robert; Busch, Ingrid [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Bldg. 5700, MS-6170, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Bldg. 5700, MS-6170, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Nutt, Mark; Morris, Edgar; Puig, Francesc [Argonne National Laboratory (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Carter, Joe; Delley, Alexcia; Rodwell, Phillip [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States); Hardin, Ernest; Kalinina, Elena [Sandia National Laboratories (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Clark, Robert [U.S. Department of Energy (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy (United States); Cotton, Thomas [Complex Systems Group (United States)] [Complex Systems Group (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary system-level analyses of the interfaces between at-reactor used fuel management, consolidated storage facilities, and disposal facilities, along with the development of supporting logistics simulation tools, have been initiated to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other stakeholders with information regarding the various alternatives for managing used nuclear fuel (UNF) generated by the current fleet of light water reactors operating in the United States. An important UNF management system interface consideration is the need for ultimate disposal of UNF assemblies contained in waste packages that are sized to be compatible with different geologic media. Thermal analyses indicate that waste package sizes for the geologic media under consideration by the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign may be significantly smaller than the canisters being used for on-site dry storage by the nuclear utilities. Therefore, at some point along the UNF disposition pathway, there could be a need to repackage fuel assemblies already loaded and being loaded into the dry storage canisters currently in use. The implications of where and when the packaging or repackaging of commercial UNF will occur are key questions being addressed in this evaluation. The analysis demonstrated that thermal considerations will have a major impact on the operation of the system and that acceptance priority, rates, and facility start dates have significant system implications. (authors)

  18. Waste Stream Analyses for Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. R. Soelberg

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-level study was performed in Fiscal Year 2009 for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) to provide information for a range of nuclear fuel cycle options (Wigeland 2009). At that time, some fuel cycle options could not be adequately evaluated since they were not well defined and lacked sufficient information. As a result, five families of these fuel cycle options are being studied during Fiscal Year 2010 by the Systems Analysis Campaign for the DOE NE Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program. The quality and completeness of data available to date for the fuel cycle options is insufficient to perform quantitative radioactive waste analyses using recommended metrics. This study has been limited thus far to qualitative analyses of waste streams from the candidate fuel cycle options, because quantitative data for wastes from the front end, fuel fabrication, reactor core structure, and used fuel for these options is generally not yet available.

  19. 331ZnO nanostructured transparent thin films by PLD Corresponding author: M. Suchea, e-mail: mirasuchea@iesl.forth.gr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -to-band transitions [1], while it can be used as transparent electrode in solar cells and flat panel displays, grating

  20. Short-pulse cross-phase modulation in an electromagnetically-induced-transparency medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feizpour, Amir; Steinberg, Aephraim M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT) has been proposed as a way to greatly enhance cross-phase modulation, with the possibility of leading to few-photon-level optical nonlinearities. This enhancement grows as the transparency window width, \\Delta_EIT, is narrowed. Decreasing \\Delta_EIT, however, increases the response time of the effect, suggesting that for pulses of a given duration, there could be a fundamental limit to the strength of the nonlinearity. We show that in the regimes of most practical interest - narrow EIT windows perturbed by short signal pulses- the enhancement offered by EIT is not only in the magnitude of the nonlinear phase shift but in fact also in its increased duration. That is, for the case of signal pulses much shorter (temporally) than the inverse EIT bandwidth, the narrow window serves to prolong the effect of the passing signal pulse, leading to an integrated phase shift that grows linearly with \\Delta_EIT even though the peak phase shift may saturate; the continued grow...

  1. Participatory approach, acceptability and transparency of waste management LCAs: Case studies of Torino and Cuneo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blengini, Gian Andrea, E-mail: blengini@polito.it [DIATI - Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructures Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); CNR-IGAG - Institute of Environmental Geology and Geo-Engineering, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fantoni, Moris, E-mail: moris.fantoni@polito.it [DIATI - Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructures Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Busto, Mirko, E-mail: mirko.busto@jrc.ec.europa.eu [European Commission - Joint Research Centre, Via Enrico Fermi 2749, I-21027 Ispra (Italy); Genon, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.genon@polito.it [DIATI - Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructures Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Zanetti, Maria Chiara, E-mail: mariachiara.zanetti@polito.it [DIATI - Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructures Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life Cycle Assessment is still not fully operational in waste management at local scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Credibility of WM LCAs is negatively affected by assumptions and lack of transparency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local technical-social-economic constraints are often not reflected by WM LCAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A participatory approach can increase acceptability and credibility of WM LCAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results of a WM LCA can hardly ever be generalised, thus transparency is essential. - Abstract: The paper summarises the main results obtained from two extensive applications of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to the integrated municipal solid waste management systems of Torino and Cuneo Districts in northern Italy. Scenarios with substantial differences in terms of amount of waste, percentage of separate collection and options for the disposal of residual waste are used to discuss the credibility and acceptability of the LCA results, which are adversely affected by the large influence of methodological assumptions and the local socio-economic constraints. The use of site-specific data on full scale waste treatment facilities and the adoption of a participatory approach for the definition of the most sensible LCA assumptions are used to assist local public administrators and stakeholders showing them that LCA can be operational to waste management at local scale.

  2. Transparency of 0.2% GdCl3 Doped Water in a Stainless Steel Test Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Coleman; A. Bernstein; S. Dazeley; R. Svoboda

    2008-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of neutron and neutrino detection using water Cerenkov detectors doped with gadolinium holds the promise of constructing very large high-efficiency detectors with wide-ranging application in basic science and national security. This study addressed a major concern regarding the feasibility of such detectors: the transparency of the doped water to the ultraviolet Cerenkov light. We report on experiments conducted using a 19-meter water transparency measuring instrument and associated materials test tank. Sensitive measurements of the transparency of water doped with 0.2% GdCl3 at 337nm, 400nm and 420nm were made using this instrument. These measurements indicate that GdCl3 is not an appropriate dopant in stainless steel constructed water Cerenkov detectors.

  3. Presented by Campus Services Object Code Classifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    ) Decrease expense from the wrong object code (From) Example: Expensed a service contract that covered 12

  4. Piles of Objects Shu-Wei Hsu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keyser, John

    Piles of Objects Shu-Wei Hsu Texas A&M University John Keyser Texas A&M University Figure 1: L-shaped objects piling up. This is an image from Example 5--Drop in a Line (see Section 4). Abstract We present a method for directly modeling piles of objects in multi- body simulations. Piles of objects represent some

  5. MOOSE: Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gaston, Derek

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of Idaho National Laboratory's MOOSE: Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment

  6. A NEW VIDEO-OBJECT WATERMARKING SCHEME ROBUST TO OBJECT MANIPULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    A NEW VIDEO-OBJECT WATERMARKING SCHEME ROBUST TO OBJECT MANIPULATION P. Bas and B. Macq presents a watermarking scheme for image or video objects. The watermarking of video objects implies such as Mpeg-4 and Jpeg-2000, the notion of video-object or image- object is more and more widespread [1

  7. Cost objective PLM and CE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Nicolas

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concurrent engineering taking into account product life-cycle factors seems to be one of the industrial challenges of the next years. Cost estimation and management are two main strategic tasks that imply the possibility of managing costs at the earliest stages of product development. This is why it is indispensable to let people from economics and from industrial engineering collaborates in order to find the best solution for enterprise progress for economical factors mastering. The objective of this paper is to present who we try to adapt costing methods in a PLM and CE point of view to the new industrial context and configuration in order to give pertinent decision aid for product and process choices. A very important factor is related to cost management problems when developing new products. A case study is introduced that presents how product development actors have referenced elements to product life-cycle costs and impacts, how they have an idea bout economical indicators when taking decisions during t...

  8. Cost objective PLM and CE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Perry; Alain Bernard

    2010-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Concurrent engineering taking into account product life-cycle factors seems to be one of the industrial challenges of the next years. Cost estimation and management are two main strategic tasks that imply the possibility of managing costs at the earliest stages of product development. This is why it is indispensable to let people from economics and from industrial engineering collaborates in order to find the best solution for enterprise progress for economical factors mastering. The objective of this paper is to present who we try to adapt costing methods in a PLM and CE point of view to the new industrial context and configuration in order to give pertinent decision aid for product and process choices. A very important factor is related to cost management problems when developing new products. A case study is introduced that presents how product development actors have referenced elements to product life-cycle costs and impacts, how they have an idea bout economical indicators when taking decisions during the progression of the project of product development.

  9. 242-A Evaporator/Liquid Effluent Retention Facility data quality objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Von Bargen, B.H.

    1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of data quality objectives (DQO) is to determine the most cost effective methods of gathering the essential data necessary to make decisions to support successful operation of the facility. The essential data is defined by such information as sample amount, sample location, required analyses, and how sampling and analyses are performed. Successful operation is defined as meeting the campaign objectives while operating within established requirements. This DQO document addresses that portion of the system from 242-A Evaporator candidate feed tanks through discharge of process condensate to the Liquid Effluent Retention of Facility (LERF). Later revisions will incorporate and integrate the entire system, including the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF).

  10. Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analyses of a Deeply Embedded Model Reactor SASSI Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie J.; Braverman J.; Costantino, M.

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the SASSI analyses of a deeply embedded reactor model performed by BNL and CJC and Associates, as part of the seismic soil-structure interaction (SSI) simulation capability project for the NEAMS (Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation) Program of the Department of Energy. The SASSI analyses included three cases: 0.2 g, 0.5 g, and 0.9g, all of which refer to nominal peak accelerations at the top of the bedrock. The analyses utilized the modified subtraction method (MSM) for performing the seismic SSI evaluations. Each case consisted of two analyses: input motion in one horizontal direction (X) and input motion in the vertical direction (Z), both of which utilized the same in-column input motion. Besides providing SASSI results for use in comparison with the time domain SSI results obtained using the DIABLO computer code, this study also leads to the recognition that the frequency-domain method should be modernized so that it can better serve its mission-critical role for analysis and design of nuclear power plants.

  11. 335Nanostructured ZnO and ZAO transparent thin films by sputteringsurface characterization Corresponding author: M. Suchea, e-mail: mirasuchea@iesl.forth.gr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as transparent electrode in solar cells and flat panel displays as well as for the fabrication of gratings Abstract. Zinc oxide (ZnO) and aluminum zinc oxide (ZAO) transparent thin films with different thickness Zinc oxide is one of the earliest discovered metal oxide gas sensing materials. It is an n-type semi

  12. Fuel consumption analyses for urban traffic management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowyer, D.P.; Akcelik, R.; Biggs, D.C.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A primary output from the fuel consumption research conducted by the Australian Road Research Board (ARRB) is the ARRB Special Report, Guide to Fuel Consumption Analyses. This article briefly summarizes the background of the guide, describes its major features, and considers its relevance to urban traffic management decision. The guide was a result of a technical audit of studies relating to energy consumption in traffic and transport systems. A brief summary of the audit process and findings is given. The guide is intended primarily as an aid to effective use of fuel consumption models in the design of traffic management schemes. The forms of four interrelated fuel consumption models of the guide are described and their likely transferability to various situations is indicated. Each traffic and fuel consumption model is appropriate to a particular scale of traffic system. This link is shown for several selected traffic models. As an example, a discussion of the importance of accurate fuel consumption estimates for the case of priority control at a particular intersection is given.

  13. How the NDA Provides Transparency and Visibility of the Technical Deliverability of the R and D Programme - 13303

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seed, Ian; James, Paula [Cogentus Consulting (United Kingdom)] [Cogentus Consulting (United Kingdom); Brownridge, Melanie; McMinn, Mervin [Nuclear Decommissioning Authority - NDA (United Kingdom)] [Nuclear Decommissioning Authority - NDA (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) was created under the UK Energy Act 2004 to ensure the UK historic civil public sector nuclear legacy sites are decommissioned safely, securely, cost effectively and in ways that protect the environment. The delivery will involve carrying out many unique projects within a high hazard environment requiring the very highest standards in safety, security and environmental management. Unique problems require unique solutions and there is a substantial amount of research and development required for each project. The NDA's R and D strategic objective is to ensure that delivery of the NDA's mission is technically underpinned by sufficient and appropriate research and development. This drives a requirement to provide transparency and visibility of the technical deliverability of the programme through the technical baseline and accompanying research and development requirements. The NDA need to have confidence in the technical deliverability of the Site License Companies (SLCs) plans, provide overall visibility of R and D across the NDA Estate and ensure that appropriate R and D is being carried out in a timely manner. They need to identify where coordinated R and D programmes may be advantageous as a result of common needs, risks and opportunities and ensure key R and D needs across NDA are identified, prioritised and work programmes are costed and scheduled in the Lifetime Plans for individual sites and SLCs. Evidence of the Site License Company's approach and their corresponding technical underpinning programmes is achieved through submission of a number of outputs collectively known as TBuRDs (Technical Baseline and Underpinning Research and Development Requirements). This paper is a summary of the information generated by an independent review of those TBuRDs. It highlights some of the key messages, synergies and common R and D activities across the estate. It demonstrates the value of a consistent approach to collecting R and D data across multiple Sites with a view to enhancing knowledge transfer and improving delivery efficiency. It will be of interest to all who are running R and D programmes where other programmes may be carrying out similar activities. (authors)

  14. Transparent Conducting Electrodes based on 1D and 2D Ag Nanogratings for Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Beibei; Bartoli, Filbert J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical and electrical properties of optically-thin one-dimensional (1D) Ag nanogratings and two-dimensional (2D) Ag nanogrids are studied, and their use as transparent electrodes in organic photovoltaics are explored. A large broadband and polarization-insensitive optical absorption enhancement in the organic light-harvesting layers is theoretically and numerically demonstrated using either single-layer 2D Ag nanogrids or two perpendicular 1D Ag nanogratings, and is attributed to the excitation of surface plasmon resonances and plasmonic cavity modes. Total photon absorption enhancements of 150% and 200% are achieved for the optimized single-layer 2D Ag nanogrids and double (top and bottom) perpendicular 1D Ag nanogratings, respectively.

  15. Damage mechanisms in thin film solar cells during sputtering deposition of transparent conductive coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan Qihua; Liao Xianbo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States); Deng, Michael [Xunlight Corporation, 3145 Nebraska Avenue, Toledo, Ohio 43607 (United States); Deng Xunming [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States); Xunlight Corporation, 3145 Nebraska Avenue, Toledo, Ohio 43607 (United States)

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) based thin film solar cell grown on flexible stainless steel substrate is one of the most promising energy conversion devices in the future. This type of solar cell uses a transparent conductive oxide (TCO) film as top electrode. It has been a widely accepted opinion that the radio frequency sputtering deposition of the TCO film produces a higher yield than direct current sputtering, and the reason is not clear. Here we show that the damage to the solar cell during the sputtering process is caused by a reverse bias applied to the n-i-p junction. This reverse bias is related to the characteristics of plasma discharge. The mechanism we reveal may significantly affect the solar cell process.

  16. Femtosecond laser ablation of dielectric materials in the optical breakdown regime: Expansion of a transparent shell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Siegel, J., E-mail: j.siegel@io.cfmac.csic.es; Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Solis, J. [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase transition pathways of matter upon ablation with ultrashort laser pulses have been considered to be understood long-since for metals and semiconductors. We provide evidence that also certain dielectrics follow the same pathway, even at high pulse energies triggering optical breakdown. Employing femtosecond microscopy, we observe a characteristic ring pattern within the ablating region that dynamically changes for increasing time delays between pump and probe pulse. These transient Newton rings are related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front surface of the ablating layer with the reflection at the interface of the non-ablating substrate. Analysis of the ring structure shows that the ablation mechanism is initiated by a rarefaction wave leading within a few tens of picoseconds to the formation of a transparent thin shell of reduced density and refractive index, featuring optically sharp interfaces. The shell expands and eventually detaches from the solid material at delays of the order of 100 ps.

  17. Data Mining-Aided Crystal Engineering for the Design of Transparent Conducting Oxides: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suh, C.; Kim, K.; Berry, J. J.; Lee, J.; Jones, W. B.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to accelerate the pace of material discovery processes by systematically visualizing the huge search space that conventionally needs to be explored. To this end, we demonstrate not only the use of empirical- or crystal chemistry-based physical intuition for decision-making, but also to utilize knowledge-based data mining methodologies in the context of finding p-type delafossite transparent conducting oxides (TCOs). We report on examples using high-dimensional visualizations such as radial visualization combined with machine learning algorithms such as k-nearest neighbor algorithm (k-NN) to better define and visualize the search space (i.e. structure maps) of functional materials design. The vital role of search space generated from these approaches is discussed in the context of crystal chemistry of delafossite crystal structure.

  18. Atomic Physics Effects on Convergent, Child-Langmuir Ion Flow between Nearly Transparent Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santarius, John F. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Emmert, Gilbert A. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] [University of Wisconsin-Madison

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Research during this project at the University of Wisconsin Fusion Technology Institute (UW FTI) on ion and neutral flow through an arbitrary, monotonic potential difference created by nearly transparent electrodes accomplished the following: (1) developed and implemented an integral equation approach for atomic physics effects in helium plasmas; (2) extended the analysis to coupled integral equations that treat atomic and molecular deuterium ions and neutrals; (3) implemented the key deuterium and helium atomic and molecular cross sections; (4) added negative ion production and related cross sections; and (5) benchmarked the code against experimental results. The analysis and codes treat the species D0, D20, D+, D2+, D3+, D and, separately at present, He0 and He+. Extensions enhanced the analysis and related computer codes to include He++ ions plus planar and cylindrical geometries.

  19. Electromagnetially-induced-transparency-like ground-state cooling in a double-cavity optomechanical system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yujie Guo; Kai Li; Wenjie Nie; Yong Li

    2014-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to cool a mechanical resonator close to its ground state via an electromagnetically-induced-transparency- (EIT-) like cooling mechanism in a double-cavity optomechanical system, where an additional cavity couples to the original one in the standard optomechanical system. By choosing optimal parameters such that the cooling process of the mechanical resonator corresponds to the maximum value of the optical fluctuation spectrum and the heating process to the minimum one, the mechanical resonator can be cooled with the final mean phonon number less than that at the absence of the additional cavity. And we show the mechanical resonator may be cooled close to its ground state via such an EIT-like cooling mechanism even when the original resolved sideband condition is not fulfilled at the absence of the additional cavity.

  20. Nanosecond-laser plasma-assisted ultradeep microdrilling of optically opaque and transparent solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, Stanley; Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Lyon, Kevin; Allen, Susan D. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Arkansas State University, State University, Arkansas 72467-0419 (United States)

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A mechanism of ultradeep (up to tens of microns per pulse, submillimeter total hole depths) plasma-assisted ablative drilling of optically opaque and transparent materials by high-power nanosecond lasers has been proposed and verified experimentally using optical transmission and contact photoacoustic techniques to measure average drilling rates per laser shot versus laser intensity at constant focusing conditions. The plots of average drilling rates versus laser intensity exhibit slopes which are in good agreement with those predicted by the proposed model and also with other experimental studies. The proposed ultradeep drilling mechanism consists of a number of stages, including ultradeep 'nonthermal' energy delivery into bulk solids by the short-wavelength radiation of the hot ablative plasma, bulk heating and melting, accompanied by subsurface boiling in the melt pool, and resulting melt expulsion from the target.

  1. Investigation of nanostructured transparent conductive films grown by rotational-sequential-sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jong-Hong, E-mail: jonghonglu@mail.mcut.edu.tw; Chen, Bo-Ying; Wang, Chih-Hsuan [Department of Materials Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, 84 Gungjuan Rd., Taishan Dist. New Taipei City 24301, Taiwan and Center for Thin Film Technologies and Applications, Ming Chi University of Technology, 84 Gungjuan Rd., Taishan Dist. New Taipei City 24301, Taiwan (China)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study fabricates three types of nanostructured conductive transparent films using a rotational-sequential-sputtering method. These films include (1) TiO{sub 2}/indium-tin oxide (ITO) and SiO{sub x}/ITO nanomultilayer films, the optical refractive indices of which can be manipulated in the range of 2.421.63 at a wavelength of 550?nm with a controlled resistivity range of 1??10{sup ?3} to 2??10{sup ?4} ?cm. (2) Multilayer ITO films are deposited on polyethylene terephthalate substrates, providing good flexibility and resistivity as low as 5??10{sup ?4} ?cm. Finally, (3) ultrathin ITO films ranging from subnanometer to a few nanometers in thickness enable exploration of ITO film growth and thermal stability. X-ray reflection characterization provides a rapid, non-destructive method to measure the single-layer thicknesses of the nanomultilayer films and ultrathin ITO films at subnanoscale resolution.

  2. Edinburgh Research Explorer Strengthening conceptual foundations: Analysing frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    for ecosystem services and poverty alleviation research Citation for published version: Fisher, JA, Patenaude, G foundations: Analysing frameworks for ecosystem services and poverty alleviation research' Global: Analysing frameworks for ecosystem services and poverty alleviation research Janet A. Fisher a

  3. Dynamic daylight control system implementing thin cast arrays of polydimethylsiloxane-based millimeter-scale transparent louvers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenberg, Joanna

    Dynamic daylight control system implementing thin cast arrays of polydimethylsiloxane: Daylight control system Dynamic window system Energy-efficiency Transparent louvers a b s t r a c in standard office buildings. The development of daylight control systems that maximize the penetration

  4. Experimental determination of transparency current density and estimation of the threshold current of semiconductor quantum well lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, T.R.; Eng, L.E.; Zhuang, Y.H.; Yariv, A. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (US))

    1990-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental method for determining the transparency current density of semiconductor quantum well lasers is demonstrated in a strained-layer InGaAs/GaAs single quantum well laser system. The experimental results are then used as a practical guide to the study of ultralow threshold lasers. A threshold current as low as 0.75 mA is observed.

  5. Transparent Poly(methyl methacrylate)/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube (PMMA/SWNT) Composite Films with Increased

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Julie P.

    Transparent Poly(methyl methacrylate)/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube (PMMA/SWNT) Composite Films to conventional polymer composites due to the stronger interac- tions between polymer and filler phases. Carbon and fast-growing class of materials with nanosized filler domains finely dispersed in a polymer matrix.[1

  6. Tuning the properties of complex transparent conducting oxides: Role of crystal symmetry, chemical composition, and carrier generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medvedeva, Julia E.

    Tuning the properties of complex transparent conducting oxides: Role of crystal symmetry, chemical; revised manuscript received 24 February 2010; published 17 March 2010 The electronic properties of singleO3, , and -Ga2O3, rock salt and wurtzite ZnO, and layered InGaZnO4 reveals the role of the following

  7. Electrical and Optical Properties of Transparent Conducting Homologous Compounds in the IndiumGalliumZinc Oxide System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.

    , smart windows, and solar cells. Tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) is the commercial TCO of choice. ITO thin TRANSPARENT conducting oxides (TCOs) are used in a wide variety of applications, such as flat-panel displays, and lower cost are desired for use in demanding ap- plications such as next-generation flat-panel displays

  8. Yellow-green strained-InGaP quantum-well epitaxial-transparent-substrate light emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yellow-green strained-InGaP quantum-well epitaxial-transparent-substrate light emitting diodes L March 2004 We present a strained-InGaP quantum-well light emitting diode LED operating in the green that InGaP alloys in this composition range are not lattice-matched to any traditional substrate material

  9. Co-sputtered Aluminum Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Film as Transparent Anode for Organic Light-emitting Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Co-sputtered Aluminum Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Film as Transparent Anode for Organic Light and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China ABSTRACT Aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO that MTDATA matches better with AZO than CuPc, which served as hole injection layer. Keywords: Aluminum doped

  10. Materials Science and Engineering Program Objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    Materials Science and Engineering Program Objectives Within the scope of the MSE mission, the objectives of the Materials Engineering Program are to produce graduates who: A. practice materials engineering in a broad range of industries including materials production, semiconductors, medical

  11. Drawing driver's attention to potentially dangerous objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurugl, Orc?un

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drivers often have difficulties noticing potentially dangerous objects due to weather or lighting conditions or when their field of view is restricted. This thesis presents a display method for potentially dangerous objects ...

  12. HOOTS99 Preliminary Version Object Closure Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glew, Neal

    classes is an exam* *ple of closure conversion. This paper argues that a direct formulation of object HOOTS99 Preliminary Version Object Closure Conversion __________________________________________________________________________ Abstract An integral part of implementing functional languages is closure conversion_the process

  13. 1 | FC Objectives Summary | Stephen Bennett | 08/10/2013 Equality and Diversity Objectives Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 | FC Objectives ­ Summary | Stephen Bennett | 08/10/2013 Appendix 2 Equality and Diversity ­ Summary 2 | FC Objectives ­ Summary | Stephen Bennett | 08/10/2013 Summary Table of Objectives ­ Diversity will be This information and analysis is included #12;FC Objectives ­ Summary 3 | FC Objectives ­ Summary | Stephen Bennett

  14. Video Object Segmentation through Spatially Accurate and Temporally Dense Extraction of Primary Object Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Video Object Segmentation through Spatially Accurate and Temporally Dense Extraction of Primary primary object segments in videos in the `object proposal' domain. The extracted primary object regions are then used to build object models for optimized video segmentation. The proposed approach has several

  15. Systems Analyses of Advanced Brayton Cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.D. Rao; D.J. Francuz; J.D. Maclay; J. Brouwer; A. Verma; M. Li; G.S. Samuelsen

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective is to identify and assess advanced improvements to the Brayton Cycle (such as but not limited to firing temperature, pressure ratio, combustion techniques, intercooling, fuel or combustion air augmentation, enhanced blade cooling schemes) that will lead to significant performance improvements in coal based power systems. This assessment is conducted in the context of conceptual design studies (systems studies) that advance state-of-art Brayton cycles and result in coal based efficiencies equivalent to 65% + on natural gas basis (LHV), or approximately an 8% reduction in heat rate of an IGCC plant utilizing the H class steam cooled gas turbine. H class gas turbines are commercially offered by General Electric and Mitsubishi for natural gas based combined cycle applications with 60% efficiency (LHV) and it is expected that such machine will be offered for syngas applications within the next 10 years. The studies are being sufficiently detailed so that third parties will be able to validate portions or all of the studies. The designs and system studies are based on plants for near zero emissions (including CO{sub 2}). Also included in this program is the performance evaluation of other advanced technologies such as advanced compression concepts and the fuel cell based combined cycle. The objective of the fuel cell based combined cycle task is to identify the desired performance characteristics and design basis for a gas turbine that will be integrated with an SOFC in Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC) applications. The goal is the conceptualization of near zero emission (including CO{sub 2} capture) integrated gasification power plants producing electricity as the principle product. The capability of such plants to coproduce H{sub 2} is qualitatively addressed. Since a total systems solution is critical to establishing a plant configuration worthy of a comprehensive market interest, a baseline IGCC plant scheme is developed and used to study how alternative process schemes and power cycles might be used and integrated to achieve higher systems efficiency. To achieve these design results, the total systems approach is taken requiring creative integration of the various process units within the plant. Advanced gas turbine based cycles for Integrated gasification Combined cycle (IGCC) applications are identified by a screening analysis and the more promising cycles recommended for detailed systems analysis. In the case of the IGFC task, the main objective is met by developing a steady-state simulation of the entire plant and then using dynamic simulations of the hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC)/Gas Turbine sub-system to investigate the turbo-machinery performance. From these investigations the desired performance characteristics and a basis for design of turbo-machinery for use in a fuel cell gas turbine power block is developed.

  16. Linearizability: A Correctness Condition for Concurrent Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Andrew C.

    .3 [Programming Techniques]: Concurrent Programming; D.2.1 [Software Engineering]: Requirements/Specifications; DLinearizability: A Correctness Condition for Concurrent Objects MAURICE P. HERLIHY and JEANNETTE M. WING Carnegie Mellon University A concurrent object is a data object shared by concurrent processes

  17. Normality: A Consistency Condition for Concurrent Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Vijay

    Normality: A Consistency Condition for Concurrent Objects Vijay K. GARG \\Lambda Michel RAYNAL ECE for concurrent objects (objects shared by con current processes) that exploits the semantics of abstract data types. It provides the illusion that each operation applied by concurrent processes takes effect

  18. Modeling Business Objectives for Business Process Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Modeling Business Objectives for Business Process Management Matthias Lohrmann and Manfred Reichert quality, business objective models assume the role of formal requirements definitions as in software engi a refined business objective modeling approach. Our approach builds on use case-based effectiveness criteria

  19. 1 Introduction Objectives 1-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagan, Martin

    Objectives 1-1 1 1 Introduction Objectives 1-1 History 1-2 Applications 1-5 Biological Inspiration 1-8 Further Reading 1-10 Objectives As you read these words you are using a complex biological and their training. #12;1 Introduction 1-2 History The history of artificial neural networks is filled with colorful

  20. The Composite OLAP-Object Data Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pourabbas, Elaheh; Shoshani, Arie

    2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we define an OLAP-Object model that combines the main characteristics of OLAP and Object data models in order to achieve their functionalities in a common framework. We classify three different object classes: primitive, regular and composite. Then, we define a query language which uses the path concept in order to facilitate data navigation and data manipulation. The main feature of the proposed language is an anchor. It allows us to fix dynamically an object class (primitive, regular or composite) along the paths over the OLAP-Object data model for expressing queries. The queries can be formulated on objects, composite objects and combination of both. The power of the proposed query language is investigated through multiple query examples. The semantic of different clauses and syntax of the proposed language are investigated.

  1. Planetary and Space Science 55 (2007) 17721792 The Analyser of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA-4)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    , Finland i Finnish Meteorological Institute, Box 503, FIN-00101 Helsinki, Finland j Space Physics Research objective of the ASPERA-4 (Analyser of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms) experiment is to study the solar flux (0.1­60 keV) with no mass and energy resolution but relatively high angular resolution

  2. Method for imaging a concealed object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davidson, James R [Idaho Falls, ID; Partin, Judy K [Idaho Falls, ID; Sawyers, Robert J [Idaho Falls, ID

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for imaging a concealed object is described and which includes a step of providing a heat radiating body, and wherein an object to be detected is concealed on the heat radiating body; imaging the heat radiating body to provide a visibly discernible infrared image of the heat radiating body; and determining if the visibly discernible infrared image of the heat radiating body is masked by the presence of the concealed object.

  3. Parallel object-oriented decision tree system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kamath; Chandrika (Dublin, CA), Cantu-Paz; Erick (Oakland, CA)

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A data mining decision tree system that uncovers patterns, associations, anomalies, and other statistically significant structures in data by reading and displaying data files, extracting relevant features for each of the objects, and using a method of recognizing patterns among the objects based upon object features through a decision tree that reads the data, sorts the data if necessary, determines the best manner to split the data into subsets according to some criterion, and splits the data.

  4. DOE Program/Targets and Workshop Objectives

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nancy Garland DOE Hydrogen Program Fuel Cell Operation at Sub- Freezing Temperatures DOE ProgramTargets and Workshop Objectives Sub-Freezing Temperature Effects on Fuel Cells...

  5. Aligning Utility Interests with Energy Efficiency Objectives...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Interests with Energy Efficiency Objectives: A Review of Recent Efforts at Decoupling and Performance Incentives Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Aligning...

  6. Optimization problems with value function objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    max programming problem and the bilevel optimization problem. In this paper, we ... 1. Introduction. An optimization problem with value function objective is a.

  7. Structural stability of transparent conducting films assembled from length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Harris; G. R. S. Iyer; D. O. Simien; J. A. Fagan; J. Y. Huh; J. Y. Chung; S. D. Hudson; J. Obrzut; J. F. Douglas; C. M. Stafford; E. K. Hobbie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films show significant promise for transparent electronics applications that demand mechanical flexibility, but durability remains an outstanding issue. In this work, thin membranes of length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are uniaxially and isotropically compressed by depositing them on prestrained polymer substrates. Upon release of the strain, the topography, microstructure, and conductivity of the films are characterized using a combination of optical/fluorescence microscopy, light scattering, force microscopy, electron microscopy, and impedance spectroscopy. Above a critical surface mass density, films assembled from nanotubes of well-defined length exhibit a strongly nonlinear mechanical response. The measured strain dependence reveals a dramatic softening that occurs through an alignment of the SWCNTs normal to the direction of prestrain, which at small strains is also apparent as an anisotropic increase in sheet resistance along the same direction. At higher strains, the membrane conductivities increase due to a compression-induced restoration of conductive pathways. Our measurements reveal the fundamental mode of elasto-plastic deformation in these films and suggest how it might be suppressed.

  8. Towards more transparent and reproducible omics studies through a common metadata checklist and data publications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolker, Eugene; Ozdemir, Vural; Martens , Lennart; Hancock, William S.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Anderson, Nathaniel; Aynacioglu, Sukru; Baranova, Ancha; Campagna, Shawn R.; Chen, Rui; Choiniere, John; Dearth, Stephen P.; Feng, Wu-Chun; Ferguson, Lynnette; Fox, Geoffrey; Frishman, Dmitrij; Grossman, Robert; Heath, Allison; Higdon, Roger; Hutz, Mara; Janko, Imre; Jiang, Lihua; Joshi, Sanjay; Kel, Alexander; Kemnitz, Joseph W.; Kohane, Isaac; Kolker, Natali; Lancet, Doron; Lee, Elaine; Li, Weizhong; Lisitsa, Andrey; Llerena, Adrian; MacNealy-Koch, Courtney; Marhsall, Jean-Claude; Masuzzo, Paolo; May, Amanda; Mias, George; Monroe, Matthew E.; Montague, Elizabeth; Monney, Sean; Nesvizhskii, Alexey; Noronha, Santosh; Omenn, Gilbert; Rajasimha, Harsha; Ramamoorthy, Preveen; Sheehan, Jerry; Smarr, Larry; Smith, Charles V.; Smith, Todd; Snyder, Michael; Rapole, Srikanth; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Stanberry, Larissa; Stewart, Elizabeth; Toppo, Stefano; Uetz, Peter; Verheggen, Kenneth; Voy, Brynn H.; Warnich, Louise; Wilhelm, Steven W.; Yandl, Gregory

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological processes are fundamentally driven by complex interactions between biomolecules. Integrated high-throughput omics studies enable multifaceted views of cells, organisms, or their communities. With the advent of new post-genomics technologies omics studies are becoming increasingly prevalent yet the full impact of these studies can only be realized through data harmonization, sharing, meta-analysis, and integrated research,. These three essential steps require consistent generation, capture, and distribution of the metadata. To ensure transparency, facilitate data harmonization, and maximize reproducibility and usability of life sciences studies, we propose a simple common omics metadata checklist. The proposed checklist is built on the rich ontologies and standards already in use by the life sciences community. The checklist will serve as a common denominator to guide experimental design, capture important parameters, and be used as a standard format for stand-alone data publications. This omics metadata checklist and data publications will create efficient linkages between omics data and knowledge-based life sciences innovation and importantly, allow for appropriate attribution to data generators and infrastructure science builders in the post-genomics era. We ask that the life sciences community test the proposed omics metadata checklist and data publications and provide feedback for their use and improvement.

  9. Transparent Conducting ZnO Thin Films Doped with Al and Mo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duenow, J.; Gessert, T.; Wood, D.; Young, D.; Coutts, T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent conducting oxide (TCO) thin films are a vital part of photovoltaic cells, flat-panel displays, and electrochromic windows. ZnO-based TCOs, due to the relative abundance of Zn, may reduce production costs compared to those of the prevalent TCO In2O3:Sn (ITO). Undoped ZnO, ZnO:Al (0.5, 1, and 2 wt.% Al2O3), and ZnO:Mo (2 wt.%) films were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering. Controlled incorporation of H2 in the Ar sputtering ambient increased mobility of undoped ZnO by a factor of ~20 to 48 cm2V-1s-1. H2 also appears to catalyze ionization of dopants. This enabled lightly doped ZnO:Al to provide comparable conductivity to the standard 2 wt.%-doped ZnO:Al while demonstrating reduced infrared absorption. Mo was found to be an n-type dopant of ZnO, though material properties did not match those of ZnO:Al. Scattering mechanisms were investigated using temperature-dependent Hall measurements and the method of four coefficients. This abstract is subject to government rights.

  10. Thin film electronic devices with conductive and transparent gas and moisture permeation barriers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Lin Jay

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin film stack (100, 200) is provided for use in electronic devices such as photovoltaic devices. The stack (100, 200) may be integrated with a substrate (110) such as a light transmitting/transmissive layer. A electrical conductor layer (120, 220) is formed on a surface of the substrate (110) or device layer such as a transparent conducting (TC) material layer (120,220) with pin holes or defects (224) caused by manufacturing. The stack (100) includes a thin film (130, 230) of metal that acts as a barrier for environmental contaminants (226, 228). The metal thin film (130,230) is deposited on the conductor layer (120, 220) and formed from a self-healing metal such as a metal that forms self-terminating oxides. A permeation plug or block (236) is formed in or adjacent to the thin film (130, 230) of metal at or proximate to the pin holes (224) to block further permeation of contaminants through the pin holes (224).

  11. Linear and nonlinear light propagations in a Doppler-broadened medium via electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Liang; Huang Guoxiang [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062, China and Institute of Nonlinear Physics, Zhejiang Normal University, Zhejiang 321004 (China)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a systematic theoretical study to deal with linear and nonlinear light propagations in a Doppler-broadened three-level {Lambda} system via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), with incoherent population exchange between two lower energy levels taken into account. Through a careful analysis of base state and linear excitation, we show that the EIT condition of the system is given by |{Omega}{sub c}|{sup 2{gamma}}{sub 31}>>2{gamma}{sub 21{Delta}{omega}D}{sup 2}, where {Omega}{sub c} is half the Rabi frequency of the control field, {Delta}{omega}{sub D} is the Doppler width, and {gamma}{sub jl} is the decay rate of the coherence between states |j> and |l>. Under this condition, the effect of incoherent population exchange is insignificant, while dephasing dominates the decoherence of the system. This condition also ensures the validity of the weak nonlinear perturbation theory used in this work for solving the Maxwell-Bloch equations with inhomogeneous broadening. We then investigate the nonlinear propagation of the probe field and show that it is possible to form temporal optical solitons in the Doppler-broadened medium. Such solitons have ultraslow propagating velocity and can be generated in very low light power. The possibility of realizing (1+1)-dimensional and (2+1)-dimensional spatial optical solitons in the adiabatic regime of the system is also discussed.

  12. A narrow window of Rabi frequency for competition between electromagnetically induced transparency and Raman absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Ray-Yuan; Fang, Wei-Chia; Lee, Ming-Tsung; He, Zong-Syun; Ke, Bai-Cian [Department of Physics, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yi-Chi [Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Chin-Chun [Department of Physics, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation clarifies the transition phenomenon between the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and Raman absorption in a ladder-type system of Doppler-broadened cesium vapor. A competition window of this transition was found to be as narrow as 2 MHz defined by the probe Rabi frequency. For a weak probe, the spectrum of EIT associated with quantum interference suggests that the effect of the Doppler velocity on the spectrum is negligible. When the Rabi frequency of the probe becomes comparable with the effective decay rate, an electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) dip emerges at the center of the power broadened EIT peak. While the Rabi frequency of the probe exceeds the effective decay rate, decoherence that is generated by the intensified probe field occurs and Raman absorption dominates the interaction process, yielding a pure absorption spectrum; the Doppler velocity plays an important role in the interaction. A theory that is based on density matrix simulation, with or without the Doppler effect, can qualitatively fit the experimental data. In this work, the coherence of atom-photon interactions is created or destroyed using the probe Rabi frequency as a decoherence source.

  13. Ag-Pd-Cu alloy inserted transparent indium tin oxide electrodes for organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyo-Joong; Seo, Ki-Won; Kim, Han-Ki, E-mail: imdlhkkim@khu.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering for Information and Electronics, Kyung-Hee University, 1 Seocheon-dong, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Yong-Jin; Na, Seok-In [Graduate School of Flexible and Printable Electronics, Chonbuk National University, 664-14, Deokjin-dong, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report on the characteristics of Ag-Pd-Cu (APC) alloy-inserted indium tin oxide (ITO) films sputtered on a glass substrate at room temperature for application as transparent anodes in organic solar cells (OSCs). The effect of the APC interlayer thickness on the electrical, optical, structural, and morphological properties of the ITO/APC/ITO multilayer were investigated and compared to those of ITO/Ag/ITO multilayer electrodes. At the optimized APC thickness of 8?nm, the ITO/APC/ITO multilayer exhibited a resistivity of 8.55??10{sup ?5} ? cm, an optical transmittance of 82.63%, and a figure-of-merit value of 13.54??10{sup ?3} ?{sup ?1}, comparable to those of the ITO/Ag/ITO multilayer. Unlike the ITO/Ag/ITO multilayer, agglomeration of the metal interlayer was effectively relieved with APC interlayer due to existence of Pd and Cu elements in the thin region of the APC interlayer. The OSCs fabricated on the ITO/APC/ITO multilayer showed higher power conversion efficiency than that of OSCs prepared on the ITO/Ag/ITO multilayer below 10?nm due to the flatness of the APC layer. The improved performance of the OSCs with ITO/APC/ITO multilayer electrodes indicates that the APC alloy interlayer prevents the agglomeration of the Ag-based metal interlayer and can decrease the thickness of the metal interlayer in the oxide-metal-oxide multilayer of high-performance OSCs.

  14. Investigation of Some Transparent Metal Oxides as Damp Heat Protective Coating for CIGS Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pern, F. J.; Yan, F.; Zaaunbrecher, B.; To, B.; Perkins, J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the protective effectiveness of some transparent metal oxides (TMO) on CIGS solar cell coupons against damp heat (DH) exposure at 85oC and 85% relative humidity (RH). Sputter-deposited bilayer ZnO (BZO) with up to 0.5-um Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer and 0.2-um bilayer InZnO were used as 'inherent' part of device structure on CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG. Sputter-deposited 0.2-um ZnSnO and atomic layer deposited (ALD) 0.1-um Al2O3 were used as overcoat on typical BZO/CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG solar cells. The results were all negative -- all TMO-coated CIGS cells exhibited substantial degradation in DH. Combining the optical photographs, PL and EL imaging, SEM surface micro-morphology, coupled with XRD, I-V and QE measurements, the causes of the device degradations are attributed to hydrolytic corrosion, flaking, micro-cracking, and delamination induced by the DH moisture. Mechanical stress and decrease in crystallinity (grain size effect) could be additional degrading factors for thicker AZO grown on CdS/CIGS.

  15. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR SALTSTONE DISPOSAL UNIT COLUMN DEGRADATION ANALYSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G.

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    PORFLOW related analyses supporting a Sensitivity Analysis for Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) column degradation were performed. Previous analyses, Flach and Taylor 2014, used a model in which the SDU columns degraded in a piecewise manner from the top and bottom simultaneously. The current analyses employs a model in which all pieces of the column degrade at the same time. Information was extracted from the analyses which may be useful in determining the distribution of Tc-99 in the various SDUs throughout time and in determining flow balances for the SDUs.

  16. FAQS Job Task Analyses - Safeguards and Security General Technical...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Base More Documents & Publications FAQS Qualification Card - Safeguards and Security General Technical Base FAQS Job Task Analyses - General Technical Base FAQS Qualification Card...

  17. See-through amorphous silicon solar cells with selectively transparent and conducting photonic crystal back reflectors for building integrated photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yang [The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Room GB254B, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada)] [The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Room GB254B, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); OBrien, Paul G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Room 140, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Room 140, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada); Materials Chemistry Research Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Ozin, Geoffrey A., E-mail: gozin@chem.utoronto.ca, E-mail: kherani@ecf.utoronto.ca [Materials Chemistry Research Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Kherani, Nazir P., E-mail: gozin@chem.utoronto.ca, E-mail: kherani@ecf.utoronto.ca [The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Room GB254B, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Room 140, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada)

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin semi-transparent hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells with selectively transparent and conducting photonic crystal (STCPC) back-reflectors are demonstrated. Short circuit current density of a 135?nm thick a-Si:H cell with a given STCPC back-reflector is enhanced by as much as 23% in comparison to a reference cell with an ITO film functioning as its rear contact. Concurrently, solar irradiance of 295?W/m{sup 2} and illuminance of 3480 lux are transmitted through the cell with a given STCPC back reflector under AM1.5 Global tilt illumination, indicating its utility as a source of space heating and lighting, respectively, in building integrated photovoltaic applications.

  18. Application of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes as Transparent Electrodes in Cu(In,Ga)Se2-Based Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contreras, M.; Barnes, T.; van de Lagemaat, J.; Rumbles, G.; Coutts, T. J.; Weeks, C.; Glatkowski, P.; Levitsky, I.; Peltola, J.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new thin-film solar cell structure in which the traditional transparent conductive oxide electrode (ZnO) is replaced by a transparent conductive coating consisting of a network of bundled single-wall carbon nanotubes. Optical transmission properties of these coatings are presented in relation to their electrical properties (sheet resistance), along with preliminary solar cell results from devices made using CuIn1-xGaxSe2 thin-film absorber materials. Achieving an energy conversion efficiency of >12% and a quantum efficiency of {approx}80% demonstrate the feasibility of the concept. A discussion of the device structures will be presented considering the physical properties of the new electrodes comparing current-voltage results from the new solar cell structure and those from standard ZnO/CdS/Cu(In,Ga)Se2/Mo solar cells.

  19. Infrared-optical spectroscopy of transparent conducting perovskite (La,Ba)SnO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Dongmin; Yu, Kwangnam; Jun Chang, Young; Choi, E. J., E-mail: echoi@uos.ac.kr [Department of Physics, University of Seoul, Seoul 130-743 (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Egon; Hoon Kim, Kee [Center for Novel States of Complex Materials Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed optical transmission, reflection, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and Hall effect measurements on the electron-doped La{sub x}Ba{sub 1x}SnO{sub 3} (x?=?0.04) transparent thin films. From the infrared Drude response and plasma frequency analysis we determine the effective mass of the conducting electron m*?=?0.35m{sub 0}. In the visible-UV region the optical band gap shifts to high energy in (La,Ba)SnO{sub 3} by 0.18?eV compared with undoped BaSnO{sub 3} which, in the context of the Burstein-Moss analysis, is consistent with the infrared-m*. m* of BaSnO{sub 3} is compared with other existing transparent conducting oxides (TCO), and implication on search for high-mobility TCO compounds is discussed.

  20. The longitudinal asymmetry of the (e,e'p) missing momentum distribution as a signal of color transparency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benhar, O; Nikolaev, N N; Speth, J; Usmani, A A; Zakharov, B G

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use multiple scattering theory to evaluate the Q^{2} dependence of the forward-backward asymmetry, A_{z}, of the missing momentum distribution in quasielstic A(e,e'p) scattering, which is expected to be affected by color transparency. The novel features of our analysis are a consistent treatment of the structure of the ejectile state formed after absorption of the virtual photon by the struck proton and a careful evaluation of the background asymmetry induced by the nonvanishing real part of the proton-nucleon scattering amplitude. We find that the absolute magnitude of A_{z} is dominated by this background at the Q^{2}'s attainable at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. However, the Q^{2} dependence of the asymmetry is sensitive to the onset of color transparency, whose observation in high statistics experiments appears to be feasible, particularly using light targets such as ^{12}C or ^{16}O.

  1. The longitudinal asymmetry of the $(e,e'p)$ missing momentum distribution as a signal of color transparency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Benhar; S. Fantoni; N. N. Nikolaev; J. Speth; A. A. Usmani; B. G. Zakharov

    1995-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We use multiple scattering theory to evaluate the $Q^{2}$ dependence of the forward-backward asymmetry, $A_{z}$, of the missing momentum distribution in quasielstic $A(e,e'p)$ scattering, which is expected to be affected by color transparency. The novel features of our analysis are a consistent treatment of the structure of the ejectile state formed after absorption of the virtual photon by the struck proton and a careful evaluation of the background asymmetry induced by the nonvanishing real part of the proton-nucleon scattering amplitude. We find that the absolute magnitude of $A_{z}$ is dominated by this background at the $Q^{2}$'s attainable at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. However, the $Q^{2}$ dependence of the asymmetry is sensitive to the onset of color transparency, whose observation in high statistics experiments appears to be feasible, particularly using light targets such as $^{12}C$ or $^{16}O$.

  2. Self-Induced Transparency and Electromagnetic Pulse Compression in a Plasma or an Electron Beam under Cyclotron Resonance Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Sergeev, A. S. [Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, GSP-120 N. Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on analogy to the well-known process of the self-induced transparency of an optical pulse propagating through a passive two-level medium we describe similar effects for a microwave pulse interacting with a cold plasma or rectilinear electron beam under cyclotron resonance condition. It is shown that with increasing amplitude and duration of an incident pulse the linear cyclotron absorption is replaced by the self-induced transparency when the pulse propagates without damping. In fact, the initial pulse decomposes to one or several solitons with amplitude and duration defined by its velocity. In a certain parameter range, the single soliton formation is accompanied by significant compression of the initial electromagnetic pulse. We suggest using the effect of self-compression for producing multigigawatt picosecond microwave pulses.

  3. Properties of TiO{sub 2}-based transparent conducting oxide thin films on GaN(0001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasai, J.; Nakao, S.; Yamada, N. [Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); Hitosugi, T. [Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); Advanced Institute for Materials Research (WPI-AIMR), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Moriyama, M.; Goshonoo, K. [Toyoda Gosei Co., Ltd., Nishikasugai, Aichi 452-8564 (Japan); Hoang, N. L. H. [Department of Chemistry, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hasegawa, T. [Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Anatase Nb-doped TiO{sub 2} transparent conducting oxide has been formed on GaN(0001) surfaces using a sputtering method. Amorphous films deposited at room temperature were annealed at a substrate temperature of 500 deg. C in vacuum to form single-phase anatase films. Films with a thickness of 170 nm exhibited a resistivity of 8x10{sup -4} {Omega} cm with absorptance less than 5% at a wavelength of 460 nm. Furthermore, the refractive index of the Nb-doped TiO{sub 2} was well matched to that of GaN. These findings indicate that Nb-doped TiO{sub 2} is a promising material for use as transparent electrodes in GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs), particularly since reflection at the electrode/GaN boundary can be suppressed, enhancing the external quantum efficiency of blue LEDs.

  4. Optimization of transparent and reflecting electrodes for amorphous silicon solar cells. Annual subcontract report, April 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, R.G. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent and reflecting electrodes are important parts of the structure of amorphous silicon solar cells. We report improved methods for depositing zinc oxide, deposition of tin nitride as a potential reflection-enhancing diffusion barrier between the a-Si and back metal electrodes. Highly conductive and transparent fluorine-doped zinc oxide was successfully produced on small areas by atmospheric pressure CVD from a less hazardous zinc precursor, zinc acetylacetonate. The optical properties measured for tin nitride showed that the back-reflection would be decreased if tin nitride were used instead of zinc oxide as a barrier layer over silver on aluminum. Niobium-doped titanium dioxide was produced with high enough electrical conductivity so that normal voltages and fill factors were obtained for a-Si cells made on it.

  5. A new architecture as transparent electrodes for solar and IR applications based on photonic structures via soft lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuang, Ping

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Transparent conducting electrodes with the combination of high optical transmission and good electrical conductivity are essential for solar energy harvesting and electric lighting devices. Currently, indium tin oxide (ITO) is used because ITO offers relatively high transparency (>80%) to visible light and low sheet resistance (R{sub s} = 10 ohms/square ({Omega}#2;/?)) for electrical conduction. However, ITO is costly due to limited indium reserves, and it is brittle. These disadvantages have motivated the search for other conducting electrodes with similar or better properties. There has been research on a variety of electrode structures involving carbon nanotube networks, graphene films, nanowire and nanopatterned meshes and grids. Due to their novel characteristics in light manipulation and collection, photonic crystal structures show promise for further improvement. Here, we report on a new architecture consisting of nanoscale high aspect ratio metallic photonic structures as transparent electrodes fabricated via a combination of processes. For (Au) and silver (Ag) structures, the visible light transmission can reach as high as 80%, and the sheet resistance of the structure can be as low as 3.2{Omega}#2;/?. The optical transparency of the high aspect ratio metal structures at visible wavelength range is comparable to that of ITO glass, while their sheet resistance is more than 3 times lower, which indicates a much higher electrical conductivity of the metal structures. Furthermore, the high aspect ratio metal structures have very high infrared (IR) reflection (90%) for the transverse magnetic (TM) mode, which can lead to the development of fabrication of metallic structures as IR filters for heat control applications. Investigations of interdigitated structures based on the high aspect ratio metal electrodes are ongoing to study the feasibility in smart window applications in light transmission modulation.

  6. Object Recognition Using Shape-from-Shading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    This paper investigates whether surface topography information extracted from intensity images using to recognize objects based on their surface topography. We explore two contrasting object recognition that the process plays an important role in the perception and recognition of surface topography [18], [16], [17

  7. Martin Gogolla: Identifying Objects by Declarative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogolla, Martin - Fachbereich 3

    are recorded with their names and population. Branches own a set of cars characterized by a chasis number­called observation term, in order to observe a unique, iden­ tifying property of objects of the corresponding type. 1 property of the object is question. Such an identification number is something which comes from outside

  8. USING ROLES TO SPECIFY BUSINESS OBJECT COLLABORATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Mail: { artur.caetano, rito.silva, jose.tribolet }@dei.ist.utl.pt ABSTRACT Role-based business process modeling semantically richer business process models, and, on the other, designing business objects where behavior the understandability of process models and business object reuse. KEYWORDS Business Process Modeling, Role Modeling

  9. Compact Ultradense Objects in the Solar System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Rafelski; Ch. Dietl; L. Labun

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe properties and gravitational interactions of meteor-mass and greater compact ultra dense objects with nuclear density or greater (CUDO s). We discuss possible enclosure of CUDO s in comets, stability of these objects on impact with the Earth and Sun and show that the hypothesis of a CUDO core helps resolve issues challenging the understanding of a few selected cometary impacts.

  10. Remote Batch Invocation for Compositional Object Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryder, Barbara G.

    Remote Batch Invocation for Compositional Object Services Ali Ibrahim2 , Yang Jiao1 , Eli Tilevich1 Remote Procedure Calls do not compose efficiently, design- ers of distributed object systems use Data Transfer and Remote Facade patterns to create large-granularity interfaces, hard-coded for particular

  11. Tidal deformations of a spinning compact object

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Pani; Leonardo Gualtieri; Andrea Maselli; Valeria Ferrari

    2015-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The deformability of a compact object induced by a perturbing tidal field is encoded in the tidal Love numbers, which depend sensibly on the object's internal structure. These numbers are known only for static, spherically-symmetric objects. As a first step to compute the tidal Love numbers of a spinning compact star, here we extend powerful perturbative techniques to compute the exterior geometry of a spinning object distorted by an axisymmetric tidal field to second order in the angular momentum. The spin of the object introduces couplings between electric and magnetic deformations and new classes of induced Love numbers emerge. For example, a spinning object immersed in a quadrupolar, electric tidal field can acquire some induced mass, spin, quadrupole, octupole and hexadecapole moments to second order in the spin. The deformations are encoded in a set of inhomogeneous differential equations which, remarkably, can be solved analytically in vacuum. We discuss certain subtleties in defining the multipole moments of the central object, which are due to the difficulty in separating the tidal field from the linear response of the object in the solution. By extending the standard procedure to identify the linear response in the static case, we prove analytically that the Love numbers of a Kerr black hole remain zero to second order in the spin. As a by-product, we provide the explicit form for a slowly-rotating, tidally-deformed Kerr black hole to quadratic order in the spin, and discuss its geodesic and geometrical properties.

  12. Learning Object Behaviour Models Neil Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barber, Stuart

    been given where reference has been made to the work of others. #12;Abstract The human visual system, object tracking, gesture recognition, and the generation of realistic object behaviours within animations, virtual worlds, and computer generated film sequences. The utility of the behaviour modelling framework

  13. HOOTS99 Preliminary Version Object Closure Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glew, Neal

    is an example of closure conversion. This paper argues that a direct formulation of object closure conversionHOOTS99 Preliminary Version Object Closure Conversion Neal Glew 1 Department of Computer Science conversion--the process of converting code with free variables into closed code and auxiliary data structures

  14. HOOTS99 Preliminary Version Object Closure Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glew, Neal

    classes is an example of closure conversion. This paper argues that a direct formulation of object closureHOOTS99 Preliminary Version Object Closure Conversion Neal Glew 1 Department of Computer Science conversion---the process of converting code with free variables into closed code and auxiliary data

  15. Automating Object Transformations for Dynamic Software Updating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKinley, Kathryn S.

    - matically remains an open problem. This paper presents a solution called Targeted Object Synthesis (TOS). TOS first executes the same tests on the old and new program ver- sions separately, observing the program heap state at a few corresponding points. Given two corresponding heap states, TOS matches objects

  16. A Theory of Objective Sizing Ricardo Valerdi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    1 A Theory of Objective Sizing Ricardo Valerdi Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA, we build on a concept from psychology known as the moon illusion to develop a theory of objective sizing. This theory has two main benefits: it helps explain why stakeholders have different views

  17. Nuclear transparency and effective kaon-nucleon cross section from the A(e, e'K+) reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuruzzaman; D. Dutta; J. Arrington; R. Asaturyan; F. Benmokhtar; W. Boeglin; P. Bosted; A. Bruell; B. Clasie; M. E. Christy; E. Chudakov; M. M. Dalton; A. Daniel; D. Day; L. El Fassi; R. Ent; H. C. Fenker; J. Ferrer; N. Fomin; H. Gao; K. Garrow; D. Gaskel; C. Gray; T. Horn; G. M. Huber; M. K. Jones; N. Kalantarians; C. E. Keppel; K. Kramer; Y. Li; Y. Liang; A. F. Lung; S. Malace; P. Markowitz; A. Matsumura; D. G. Meekins; T. Mertens; T. Miyoshi; H. Mkrtchyan; R. Monson; T. Navasardyan; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; Y. Okayasu; A. K. Opper; C. Perdrisat; V. Punjabi; X. Qian; A. W. Rauf; V. M. Rodriquez; D. Rohe; J. Seely; E. Segbefia; G. R. Smith; M. Sumihama; V. Tadevosyan; L. Tang; V. Tvaskis; W. F. Vulcan; F. R. Wesselmann; S. A. Wood; L. Yuan; X. C. Zheng

    2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We have determined the transparency of the nuclear medium to kaons from $A(e,e^{'} K^{+})$ measurements on $^{12}$C, $^{63}$Cu, and $^{197}$Au targets. The measurements were performed at the Jefferson Laboratory and span a range in four-momentum-transfer squared Q$^2$=1.1 -- 3.0 GeV$^2$. The nuclear transparency was defined as the ratio of measured kaon electroproduction cross sections with respect to deuterium, ($\\sigma^{A}/\\sigma^{D}$). We further extracted the atomic number ($A$) dependence of the transparency as parametrized by $T= (A/2)^{\\alpha-1}$ and, within a simple model assumption, the in-medium effective kaon-nucleon cross sections. The effective cross sections extracted from the electroproduction data are found to be smaller than the free cross sections determined from kaon-nucleon scattering experiments, and the parameter $\\alpha$ was found to be significantly larger than those obtained from kaon-nucleus scattering. We have included similar comparisons between pion- and proton-nucleon effective cross sections as determined from electron scattering experiments, and pion-nucleus and proton-nucleus scattering data.

  18. analyses defense nuclear: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    analyses defense nuclear First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Global Analyses of Nuclear...

  19. FAQS Job Task Analyses- DOE Aviation Safety Officer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FAQS Job Task Analyses are performed on the Function Area Qualification Standards. The FAQS Job Task Analyses consists of: Developing a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job such as the duties and responsibilities which include determining their levels of importance and frequency. Identifying and evaluating competencies. Last step is evaluating linkage between job tasks and competencies.

  20. FAQS Job Task Analyses- Confinement Ventilation and Process Gas Treatment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FAQS Job Task Analyses are performed on the Function Area Qualification Standards. The FAQS Job Task Analyses consists of: Developing a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job such as the duties and responsibilities which include determining their levels of importance and frequency. Identifying and evaluating competencies. Last step is evaluating linkage between job tasks and competencies.

  1. FAQS Job Task Analyses- Nuclear Explosive Safety Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FAQS Job Task Analyses are performed on the Function Area Qualification Standards. The FAQS Job Task Analyses consists of: Developing a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job such as the duties and responsibilities which include determining their levels of importance and frequency. Identifying and evaluating competencies. Last step is evaluating linkage between job tasks and competencies.

  2. accident sequence analyses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accident sequence analyses First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Analysing Aviation Accidents...

  3. Rapid Radiochemical Analyses in Support of Fukushima Nuclear Accident - 13196

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Building 735-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Building 735-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an increasing need to develop faster analytical methods for emergency response, including emergency soil and air filter samples [1, 2]. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed analyses on samples received from Japan in April, 2011 as part of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to provide assistance to the government of Japan, following the nuclear event at Fukushima Daiichi, resulting from the earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Of particular concern was whether it was safe to plant rice in certain areas (prefectures) near Fukushima. The primary objectives of the sample collection, sample analysis, and data assessment teams were to evaluate personnel exposure hazards, identify the nuclear power plant radiological source term and plume deposition, and assist the government of Japan in assessing any environmental and agricultural impacts associated with the nuclear event. SRNL analyzed approximately 250 samples and reported approximately 500 analytical method determinations. Samples included soil from farmland surrounding the Fukushima reactors and air monitoring samples of national interest, including those collected at the U.S. Embassy and American military bases. Samples were analyzed for a wide range of radionuclides, including strontium-89, strontium-90, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes. Technical aspects of the rapid soil and air filter analyses will be described. The extent of radiostrontium contamination was a significant concern. For {sup 89,90}Sr analyses on soil samples, a rapid fusion technique using 1.5 gram soil aliquots to enable a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of <1 pCi {sup 89,90}Sr /g of soil was employed. This sequential technique has been published recently by this laboratory for actinides and radiostrontium in soil and vegetation [3, 4]. It consists of a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion, pre-concentration steps using iron hydroxide and calcium fluoride precipitations, followed by Sr-Resin separation and gas flow proportional counting. To achieve a lower detection limit for analysis of some of the Japanese soil samples, a 10 gram aliquot of soil was taken, acid-leached and processed with similar preconcentration chemistry. The MDA using this approach was ?0.03 pCi/g (1.1 mBq/g)/, which is less than the 0.05-0.10 pCi/g {sup 90}Sr levels found in soil as a result of global fallout. The chemical yields observed for the Japanese soil samples was typically 75-80% and the laboratory control sample (LCS) and matrix spike (MS) results looked very good for this work Individual QC results were well within the 25% acceptable range and the average of these results does not show significant bias. Additional data for a radiostrontium in soil method for 50 gram samples will also be presented, which appears to be a significant step forward based on looking at the current literature, with higher chemical yields for even larger sample aliquots and lower MDA [5, 6, 7] Hou et al surveyed a wide range of separation methods for Pu in waters and environmental solid samples [8]. While there are many actinide methods in the scientific literature, few would be considered rapid due to the tedious and time-consuming steps involved. For actinide analyses in soil, a new rapid method for the determination of actinide isotopes in soil samples using both alpha spectrometry and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry was employed. The new rapid soil method utilizes an acid leaching method, iron/titanium hydroxide precipitation, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a rapid column separation process with TEVA Resin. The large soil matrix is removed easily and rapidly using these two simple precipitations with high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. [9, 10] Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates were used to reduce analytical time. Challenges associated with the mineral content in the volcanic soil will be discussed. Air filter samples were reported within twenty-four (24) hours of receipt using rapid te

  4. RAPID RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES IN SUPPORT OF FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR ACCIDENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an increasing need to develop faster analytical methods for emergency response, including emergency soil and air filter samples. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed analyses on samples received from Japan in April, 2011 as part of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to provide assistance to the government of Japan, following the nuclear event at Fukushima Daiichi, resulting from the earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Of particular concern was whether it was safe to plant rice in certain areas (prefectures) near Fukushima. The primary objectives of the sample collection, sample analysis, and data assessment teams were to evaluate personnel exposure hazards, identify the nuclear power plant radiological source term and plume deposition, and assist the government of Japan in assessing any environmental and agricultural impacts associated with the nuclear event. SRNL analyzed approximately 250 samples and reported approximately 500 analytical method determinations. Samples included soil from farmland surrounding the Fukushima reactors and air monitoring samples of national interest, including those collected at the U.S. Embassy and American military bases. Samples were analyzed for a wide range of radionuclides, including strontium-89, strontium-90, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes. Technical aspects of the rapid soil and air filter analyses will be described. The extent of radiostrontium contamination was a significant concern. For {sup 89,90}Sr analyses on soil samples, a rapid fusion technique using 1.5 gram soil aliquots to enable a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of <1 pCi {sup 89,90} Sr /g of soil was employed. This sequential technique has been published recently by this laboratory for actinides and radiostrontium in soil and vegetation. It consists of a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion, pre-concentration steps using iron hydroxide and calcium fluoride precipitations, followed by Sr-Resin separation and gas flow proportional counting. To achieve a lower detection limit for analysis of some of the Japanese soil samples, a 10 gram aliquot of soil was taken, acid-leached and processed with similar preconcentration chemistry. The MDA using this approach was ~0.03 pCi/g (1.1 mBq/g)/, which is less than the 0.05-0.10 pCi/g {sup 90}Sr levels found in soil as a result of global fallout. The chemical yields observed for the Japanese soil samples was typically 75-80% and the laboratory control sample (LCS) and matrix spike (MS) results looked very good for this work Individual QC results were well within the 25% acceptable range and the average of these results does not show significant bias. Additional data for a radiostrontium in soil method for 50 gram samples will also be presented, which appears to be a significant step forward based on looking at the current literature, with higher chemical yields for even larger sample aliquots and lower MDA. Hou et al surveyed a wide range of separation methods for Pu in waters and environmental solid samples. While there are many actinide methods in the scientific literature, few would be considered rapid due to the tedious and time-consuming steps involved. For actinide analyses in soil, a new rapid method for the determination of actinide isotopes in soil samples using both alpha spectrometry and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry was employed. The new rapid soil method utilizes an acid leaching method, iron/titanium hydroxide precipitation, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a rapid column separation process with TEVA Resin. The large soil matrix is removed easily and rapidly using these two simple precipitations with high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates were used to reduce analytical time. Challenges associated with the mineral content in the volcanic soil will be discussed. Air filter samples were reported within twenty-four (24) hours of receipt using rapid techniques published previously. The r

  5. Description of Transmutation Library for Fuel Cycle System Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Edward A. Hoffman

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the Transmutation Library that is used in Fuel Cycle System Analyses. This version replaces the 2008 version.[Piet2008] The Transmutation Library has the following objectives: Assemble past and future transmutation cases for system analyses. For each case, assemble descriptive information such as where the case was documented, the purpose of the calculation, the codes used, source of feed material, transmutation parameters, and the name of files that contain raw or source data. Group chemical elements so that masses in separation and waste processes as calculated in dynamic simulations or spreadsheets reflect current thinking of those processes. For example, the CsSr waste form option actually includes all Group 1A and 2A elements. Provide mass fractions at input (charge) and output (discharge) for each case. Eliminate the need for either fission product other or actinide other while conserving mass. Assessments of waste and separation cannot use fission product other or actinide other as their chemical behavior is undefined. Catalog other isotope-specific information in one place, e.g., heat and dose conversion factors for individual isotopes. Describe the correlations for how input and output compositions change as a function of UOX burnup (for LWR UOX fuel) or fast reactor (FR) transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR) for either FR-metal or FR-oxide. This document therefore includes the following sections: Explanation of the data set information, i.e., the data that describes each case. In no case are all of the data presented in the Library included in previous documents. In assembling the Library, we return to raw data files to extract the case and isotopic data, into the specified format. Explanation of which isotopes and elements are tracked. For example, the transition metals are tracked via the following: two Zr isotopes, Zr-other, Tc99, Tc-other, two Mo-Ru-Rh-Pd isotopes, Mo-Ru-Rh-Pd-other, four other specific TM isotopes, and TM-other. Mo-Ru-Rh-Pd are separated because their content constrains the loading of waste in glass, so we have to know the mass of those elements independent of others. Rules for collapsing long lists of isotopes (~1000) to the 81 items in the library. For each tracked isotope, we define which short-lived isotopes mass (at t=0) is included with the mass of the tracked isotope at t=0, which short-lived radioactive progeny must be accounted for when the tracked isotope decays, and to which of the other 80 items the mass of the tracked isotope goes when it decays. Explanation of where raw data files can be found on the fuel cycle data portal. Explanation of generic cross section sets Explanation of isotope-specific parameters such as heat and dose conversion factors Explanation of the LWR UOX burnup and FR TRU CR correlations.

  6. Using Enhanced Spherical Images for Object Representation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, David A.

    1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The processes involved in vision, manipulation, and spatial reasoning depend greatly on the particular representation of three-dimensional objects used. A novel representation, based on concepts of differential geometry, ...

  7. Parallel object-oriented data mining system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kamath, Chandrika; Cantu-Paz, Erick

    2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A data mining system uncovers patterns, associations, anomalies and other statistically significant structures in data. Data files are read and displayed. Objects in the data files are identified. Relevant features for the objects are extracted. Patterns among the objects are recognized based upon the features. Data from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST) sky survey was used to search for bent doubles. This test was conducted on data from the Very Large Array in New Mexico which seeks to locate a special type of quasar (radio-emitting stellar object) called bent doubles. The FIRST survey has generated more than 32,000 images of the sky to date. Each image is 7.1 megabytes, yielding more than 100 gigabytes of image data in the entire data set.

  8. Agricultural Centers AGRICULTURAL CENTER PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Agricultural Centers AGRICULTURAL CENTER PROGRAM OBJECTIVES: Conduct research related to the prevention of occu- pational disease and injury of agricultural workers and their families. Develop, implement, and evaluate educational and outreach programs for promoting health and safety for agricultural

  9. Objectives : The Multimedia Products and Services Master's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeanjean, Louis

    Objectives : The Multimedia Products and Services Master's Degree consists in four semesters, each of multimedia. This core curriculum is composed of units such as Multimedia Foundations, Storyboarding & Multimedia Scripting, Multimedia communication, Conception and development for multimedia, Ergonomy

  10. Are BL Lacertae Objects Beamed QSO Remnants?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. F. Borra

    1994-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper considers the hypothesis that BL Lacertae objects (BLLs) are the beamed remnants of Quasi Stellar Objects. The hypothesis explains why BLLs do not undergo the strong evolution seen in other active galactic nuclei since it naturally predicts that the space density of BLLs should increase with cosmic time, as shown by recent observations. Numerical models reproduce, with reasonable parameters, the known redshift and magnitude counts of BL Lac objects. It is assumed that radio-quiet as well as radio-loud quasars are capable of generating jets but that jets are snuffed in young radio-quiet objects and only emerge in aged ones. I argue that the observations allow this assumption.

  11. Storied objects: design thinking with time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyun-Yeul.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The traditional approach to the design of everyday objects is articulated by form and function. This thesis aims to model an approach to design thinking that extends the praxis of form and function to include the expression ...

  12. Renewable, Recycled and Conserved Energy Objective

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In February 2008, South Dakota enacted legislation (HB 1123) establishing an objective that 10% of all retail electricity sales in the state be obtained from renewable and recycled energy by 2015....

  13. An Empirical Model for Heterogeneous Translucent Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand, Frdo

    scatter- ing in heterogeneous translucent objects. Motivated by the exponential fall-off of scattered in the marble example (Figure 3). Figure 3: The marble example. Left: Modulation texture and diffusely lit

  14. Scale in object and process ontologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reitsma, Femke; Bittner, Thomas

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scale is of great importance to the analysis of real world phenomena, be they enduring objects or perduring processes. This paper presents a new perspective on the concept of scale by considering it within two complementary ...

  15. Slow speed object detection for haul trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Caterpillar integrates radar technology with its current camera based system. Caterpillar has developed the Integrated Object Detection System, a slow speed object detection system for mining haul trucks. Object detection is a system that aids the truck operator's awareness of their surroundings. The system consists of a color touch screen display along with medium- and short-range radar as well as cameras, harnesses and mounting hardware. It is integrated into the truck's Work Area Vision System (WAVS). After field testing in 2007, system commercialization began in 2008. Prototype systems are in operation in Australia, Utah and Arizona and the Integrated Object Detection System will be available in the fourth quarter of 2009 and on production trucks 785C, 789C, 793D and 797B. The article is adapted from a presentation by Mark Richards of Caterpillar to the Haulage & Loading 2009 conference, May, held in Phoenix, AZ. 1 fig., 5 photos.

  16. Multi-objective stochastic path planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Sumantra

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of multiple objectives and stochastic edge parameters. 2. Identify candidate constraints where clustering based multi-level programming can be applied to eliminate infeasible edges. 3. Provide an exact O (V.E) algorithm for building redundant shortest paths. 4...

  17. A study of binary Kuiper Belt objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kern, Susan Diane

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About 105 bodies larger than 100km in diameter (Jewitt 1998) reside in the Kuiper Belt, beyond the orbit of Neptune. Since 1992 observational surveys have discovered over one thousand of these objects, believed to be fossil ...

  18. Multi-objective stochastic path planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Sumantra

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present research formulates the path planning as an optimization problem with multiple objectives and stochastic edge parameters. The first section introduces different variants of the PP problem and discusses existing ...

  19. Herschel Hi-GAL imaging of massive young stellar objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olguin, F A; Wheelwright, H E; Clay, S J; de Wit, W -J; Rafiq, I; Pezzuto, S; Molinari, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We used Herschel Hi-GAL survey data to determine whether massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) are resolved at 70$\\mu$m and to study their envelope density distribution. Our analysis of three relatively isolated sources in the l=30{\\deg} and l=59{\\deg} Galactic fields show that the objects are partially resolved at 70$\\mu$m. The Herschel Hi-GAL survey data have a high scan velocity which makes unresolved and partially resolved sources appear elongated in the 70$\\mu$m images. We analysed the two scan directions separately and examine the intensity profile perpendicular to the scan direction. Spherically symmetric radiative transfer models with a power law density distribution were used to study the circumstellar matter distribution. Single dish sub-mm data were also included to study how different spatial information affects the fitted density distribution. The density distribution which best fits both the 70$\\mu$m intensity profile and SED has an average index of ~0.5. This index is shallower than expected an...

  20. Object Stereo --Joint Stereo Matching and Object Segmentation Michael Bleyer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Tae-Kyun

    model is formulated as an energy function that is op- timized via fusion moves. We show high surfaces with complex geometry, and assign disconnected surface patches to the same object. For Cones, our objects. Each object is characterized by three dif- ferent aspects: a color model, a 3D plane

  1. IP for Smart Objects Internet Protocol for Smart Objects (IPSO) Alliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunkels, Adam

    , smart cities, structural health management systems, smart grid and energy management, and transportationIP for Smart Objects Internet Protocol for Smart Objects (IPSO) Alliance White paper #1 Adam, Cisco Systems September 2008 Executive Summary The emerging application space for smart objects requires

  2. Problems with Objective Probability for Conditionals What Bennett Means by Objective Probability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    Problems with Objective Probability for Conditionals What Bennett Means by Objective Probability Objective probability is any sort of probability which demands inter- subjective agreement. Bennett Bennett introduces this as a three place relation, R(P,Q,n), between a proposition P, body of evidence Q

  3. analysing production technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    analysing production technology First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Information...

  4. H2A Delivery Scenario Model and Analyses

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    H2A Delivery Scenario Model and Analyses Marianne Mintz and Jerry Gillette DOE Hydrogen Delivery Analysis and High Pressure Tanks R&D Project Review Meeting February 8, 2005 2...

  5. Insects in urban brownfields Analyses of species occurrences,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleyer, Michael

    Insects in urban brownfields Analyses of species occurrences, community composition, and trait brownfields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.4 Habitat models forces for insects in urban brownfields 41 4.1 Introduction

  6. Solution-Processable Transparent Conductive Hole Injection Electrode for OLED SSL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An interconnected network of silver nanowires has been used as transparent anode in OLED devices. This layer was deposited by spin-coating and slot-die coating from an aqueous nanowire suspension. The sheet resistance of the film was 10ohms/sq with a transmission (including the glass substrate) of higher than 85%. The first phase of the project focused on the implementation of this nanowire layer with a hole-injection-layer (HIL) which has been developed at Plextronics and has been shown to provide good stability and efficiency in conventional OLED devices. We modified the HIL solution such that it coated reasonably well with suitable surface morphology so that actual devices can be manufactured. During the second phase we investigated the hole-injection and stability of hole-onlydevices. We determined that the use of the nanowire network as anode does not introduce an additional degradation mechanism since the observed device characteristics did not differ from those made with ITO anode. We then proceeded to make actual OLED devices with this nanowire / HIL stack and achieved device characteristics similar state-of-the-art OLED devices with a single junction. In order to gain traction with potential OLED manufacturers, we decided to contract Novaled to prepare large-area demonstrators for us. For these devices, we used an allevaporated stack, i.e. we did use Novaled??s HIL material instead of Plextronics??. We successfully fabricated demonstrators with an area of 25cm2 with a double or triple junction stack. Minor stack optimizations were necessary to achieve efficacies and lifetime equivalent with ITO devices made with the same devices stack. Due to the reduced microcavity effect, the color of the emitted light is significantly more stable with respect to the viewing angle compared to ITO devices. This fact in conjunction with the promise of lower production cost due to the elimination of the ITO sputtering process and the direct patterning of the anode layer are the obvious advantages of this technology. The project has shown that this nanowire technology is a viable option to achieve OLED devices with good lifetime and efficiency and we are currently working with manufacturers to utilize this technology in a production setting.

  7. Buried object detection in GPR images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paglieroni, David W; Chambers, David H; Bond, Steven W; Beer, W. Reginald

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes the return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  8. Laser scanning system for object monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Timothy James [Knoxville, TN; Maxey, Lonnie Curtis [Powell, TN; Chiaro, Jr; John, Peter [Clinton, TN

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser scanner is located in a fixed position to have line-of-sight access to key features of monitored objects. The scanner rapidly scans pre-programmed points corresponding to the positions of retroreflecting targets affixed to the key features of the objects. The scanner is capable of making highly detailed scans of any portion of the field of view, permitting the exact location and identity of targets to be confirmed. The security of an object is verified by determining that the cooperative target is still present and that its position has not changed. The retroreflecting targets also modulate the reflected light for purposes of returning additional information back to the location of the scanner.

  9. Elimination of Glass Artifacts and Object Segmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katyal, Vini; Srivastava, Deepesh

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many images nowadays are captured from behind the glasses and may have certain stains discrepancy because of glass and must be processed to make differentiation between the glass and objects behind it. This research paper proposes an algorithm to remove the damaged or corrupted part of the image and make it consistent with other part of the image and to segment objects behind the glass. The damaged part is removed using total variation inpainting method and segmentation is done using kmeans clustering, anisotropic diffusion and watershed transformation. The final output is obtained by interpolation. This algorithm can be useful to applications in which some part of the images are corrupted due to data transmission or needs to segment objects from an image for further processing.

  10. The Formation of Primordial Luminous Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuele Ripamonti; Tom Abel

    2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In these lecture notes we review the current knowledge about the formation of the first luminous objects. We start from the cosmological context of hierarchical models of structure formation, and discuss the main physical processes which are believed to lead to primordial star formation, i.e. the cooling processes and the chemistry of molecules (especially H2) in a metal-free gas. We then describe the techniques and results of numerical simulations, which indicate that the masses of the first luminous objects are likely to be much larger than that of present-day stars. Finally, we discuss the scenario presented above, exposing some of the most interesting problems which are currently being investigated, such as that of the feedback effects of these objects.

  11. Fabrication of highly transparent diamond-like carbon anti-reflecting coating for Si solar cell application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Amit, E-mail: erdd@iacs.res.in; Das, Debajyoti, E-mail: erdd@iacs.res.in [Nano-Science Group, Energy Research Unit, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata-700032 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    ARC grade highly transparent unhydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were produced, directly from a-C target, using RF magnetron sputtering deposition technique, for optoelectronic applications. Optical band gap, transmittance, reflectance, sp{sup 3} fraction, I{sub D}/I{sub G}, density, and refractive index of the films have been estimated with the help of optical tools like Uv-vis spectrophotometer, ellipsometer and micro-Raman. Optimum ARC-qualities have been identified in low-temperature grown DLC films at an Ar pressure of 4 mTorr in the reactor, accomplishing its key requirements for use in silicon solar cells.

  12. NESC-VII: Fracture Mechanics Analyses of WPS Experiments on Large-scale Cruciform Specimen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Shengjun [ORNL; Williams, Paul T [ORNL; Bass, Bennett Richard [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes numerical analyses performed to simulate warm pre-stress (WPS) experiments conducted with large-scale cruciform specimens within the Network for Evaluation of Structural Components (NESC-VII) project. NESC-VII is a European cooperative action in support of WPS application in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) integrity assessment. The project aims in evaluation of the influence of WPS when assessing the structural integrity of RPVs. Advanced fracture mechanics models will be developed and performed to validate experiments concerning the effect of different WPS scenarios on RPV components. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA contributes to the Work Package-2 (Analyses of WPS experiments) within the NESCVII network. A series of WPS type experiments on large-scale cruciform specimens have been conducted at CEA Saclay, France, within the framework of NESC VII project. This paper first describes NESC-VII feasibility test analyses conducted at ORNL. Very good agreement was achieved between AREVA NP SAS and ORNL. Further analyses were conducted to evaluate the NESC-VII WPS tests conducted under Load-Cool-Transient- Fracture (LCTF) and Load-Cool-Fracture (LCF) conditions. This objective of this work is to provide a definitive quantification of WPS effects when assessing the structural integrity of reactor pressure vessels. This information will be utilized to further validate, refine, and improve the WPS models that are being used in probabilistic fracture mechanics computer codes now in use by the NRC staff in their effort to develop risk-informed updates to Title 10 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G.

  13. Multi-objective branch-and-bound. Application to the bi-objective ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    stochastic shortest path problems, as well as by ? to evaluate the quality of an .... While the single-objective minimum spanning tree problem is easily solved, the...

  14. Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    description of the complete inputs see "Model Documentation for the MiniCAM" (Brenkert, Smith, Kim, and Pitcher, 2003). Case Studies Examples of how Object-Oriented Energy,...

  15. Object-oriented Reengineering Patterns An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ducasse, Stphane

    collection of these patterns that have been mined over several years of experience with object available. Second, the process for implementing changes ceases to be effective. Simple changes take too long. A continuous stream of bug fixes is common. Maintenance dependencies make it difficult to implement changes

  16. MACHO (MAssive Compact Halo Objects) Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The primary aim of the MACHO Project is to test the hypothesis that a significant fraction of the dark matter in the halo of the Milky Way is made up of objects like brown dwarfs or planets: these objects have come to be known as MACHOs, for MAssive Compact Halo Objects. The signature of these objects is the occasional amplification of the light from extragalactic stars by the gravitational lens effect. The amplification can be large, but events are extremely rare: it is necessary to monitor photometrically several million stars for a period of years in order to obtain a useful detection rate. For this purpose MACHO has a two channel system that employs eight CCDs, mounted on the 50 inch telescope at Mt. Stromlo. The high data rate (several GBytes per night) is accommodated by custom electronics and on-line data reduction. The Project has taken more than 27,000 images with this system since June 1992. Analysis of a subset of these data has yielded databases containing light curves in two colors for 8 million stars in the LMC and 10 million in the bulge of the Milky Way. A search for microlensing has turned up four candidates toward the Large Magellanic Cloud and 45 toward the Galactic Bulge. The web page for data provides links to MACHO Project data portals and various specialized interfaces for viewing or searching the data. (Specialized Interface)

  17. Homodyne impulse radar hidden object locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An electromagnetic detector is designed to locate an object hidden behind a separator or a cavity within a solid object. The detector includes a PRF generator for generating 2 MHz pulses, a homodyne oscillator for generating a 2 kHz square wave, and for modulating the pulses from the PRF generator. A transmit antenna transmits the modulated pulses through the separator, and a receive antenna receives the signals reflected off the object. The receiver path of the detector includes a sample and hold circuit, an AC coupled amplifier which filters out DC bias level shifts in the sample and hold circuit, and a rectifier circuit connected to the homodyne oscillator and to the AC coupled amplifier, for synchronously rectifying the modulated pulses transmitted over the transmit antenna. The homodyne oscillator modulates the signal from the PRF generator with a continuous wave (CW) signal, and the AC coupled amplifier operates with a passband centered on that CW signal. The present detector can be used in several applications, including the detection of metallic and non-metallic objects, such as pipes, studs, joists, nails, rebars, conduits and electrical wiring, behind wood wall, ceiling, plywood, particle board, dense hardwood, masonry and cement structure. The detector is portable, light weight, simple to use, inexpensive, and has a low power emission which facilitates the compliance with Part 15 of the FCC rules. 15 figs.

  18. Object-Oriented Logic Programming with OBJECTLOG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinenghi, Davide

    of Computer Science Technical University of Denmark Supervisor Professor Jørgen Fischer Nilsson May 1998 #12 are replaced with object-structured terms with an accompanying data type specificational structure. The data types constitute an algebraic lattice which provides multiple inheritance of attributes. The project

  19. Camera Calibration with One-Dimensional Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    Camera Calibration with One-Dimensional Objects Zhengyou Zhang, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--Camera calibration has been studied extensively in computer vision and photogrammetry and the proposed techniques features (self-calibration using unknown scene points). Yet, this paper proposes a new calibration

  20. Detecting concealed objects at a checkpoint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMakin, Douglas L. (Richland, WA); Hall, Thomas E. (Kennewick, WA); Sheen, David M. (Richland, WA); Severtsen, Ronald H. (Richland, WA)

    2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are systems, methods, devices, and apparatus to interrogate a clothed individual with electromagnetic radiation to determine if a concealed object is being carried. This determination includes establishing data corresponding to an image of the individual with a pair of opposed, semi-cylindrical array panels each configured to interrogate the individual with electromagnetic radiation in the 200 MHz to 1 THz range.

  1. The Japan Scotland Association Scholarship 1. Objective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Tony

    The Japan Scotland Association Scholarship 1. Objective To assist Japanese students at Master society. 2. Background This scholarship scheme was set up to help improve links between Japan and Scotland (one of the aims of the Japan Scotland Association). Planned to commence September 2013. 3. Number

  2. Accelerated Learning without Semantic Similarity: Indirect Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Nir

    types. Transfer apparently facilitates the learning of this type of information from the input1 Accelerated Learning without Semantic Similarity: Indirect Objects ANAT NINIO* Abstract The hypothesis was tested that transfer and facilitation of learning in early syntactic development does not rely

  3. Outdating Outdated Objects Holger Riedel \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scholl, Marc H.

    transactions present in engineering applications to describe complex changes like the construction of an engine shrinks quite rapidly; 2. the costs of its maintenance increase for updating and querying current objects amount of historical data in a temporal database. Up to now, only ideas are presented how to design

  4. Detection and tracking of moving objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Woo-Sung

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the magnitude of the fast Fourier transform on a circle of radius r. To decide the matching of two objects, the mean square error for the difference value the figure of meri t is compared to a preassigned threshold value. Computer simulation are made...

  5. Object Oriented Artificial Neural Network Implementations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    1 Object Oriented Artificial Neural Network Implementations W. Curt Lefebvre Jose C. Principe Neuro artificial neural networks (ANNs). The conven- tion for ANN simulation has been a direct implementation to develop a graphical artificial neural network simulation environment motivated towards the pro- cessing

  6. OBJECTIVES OF THE EDINBURGH KNOWLEDGE ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    OBJECTIVES OF THE EDINBURGH KNOWLEDGE ENVIRONMENT PARTNERSHIP The University of Edinburgh, Heriot and natural environment. The Edinburgh Knowledge Environment Partnership will thus provide a unique research between key stakeholders in the built and natural environment and to reach out in assisting

  7. Evolution towards, in, and beyond Object Databases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scholl, Marc H.

    Evolution towards, in, and beyond Object Databases Marc H. Scholl and Markus Tresch Faculty ``evolution'' in the database arena. This paper tries to categorize some of these into a unique framework of ``external services'' to enrich DBMS functionalities. The following are presented in more detail: first, we

  8. Computer Note A Prototype Object Database for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neigel, Joseph E.

    Computer Note A Prototype Object Database for Mitochondrial DNA Variation J. E. NEIGEL AND P preserved. We hope to prevent further loss by establishing a community database for population genetic surveys. We explored the feasibility of a population genetics database by developing a prototype

  9. Oil To Biofuels Case Study Objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auerbach, Scott M.

    Oil To Biofuels Case Study Objectives - Critically evaluate the nature of certain societal", and the consequences of various sources. - How could this diagram be modified through the use of biofuels? Research. - What are biomass and biofuels? How are they used, what are their benefits and negative consequences

  10. Homodyne impulse radar hidden object locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electromagnetic detector is designed to locate an object hidden behind a separator or a cavity within a solid object. The detector includes a PRF generator for generating 2 MHz pulses, a homodyne oscillator for generating a 2 kHz square wave, and for modulating the pulses from the PRF generator. A transmit antenna transmits the modulated pulses through the separator, and a receive antenna receives the signals reflected off the object. The receiver path of the detector includes a sample and hold circuit, an AC coupled amplifier which filters out DC bias level shifts in the sample and hold circuit, and a rectifier circuit connected to the homodyne oscillator and to the AC coupled amplifier, for synchronously rectifying the modulated pulses transmitted over the transmit antenna. The homodyne oscillator modulates the signal from the PRF generator with a continuous wave (CW) signal, and the AC coupled amplifier operates with a passband centered on that CW signal. The present detector can be used in several applications, including the detection of metallic and non-metallic objects, such as pipes, studs, joists, nails, rebars, conduits and electrical wiring, behind wood wall, ceiling, plywood, particle board, dense hardwood, masonry and cement structure. The detector is portable, light weight, simple to use, inexpensive, and has a low power emission which facilitates the compliance with Part 15 of the FCC rules.

  11. From Analog Objects to Digital Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    of light, light as wave disturbance and light as quanta of energy. We introduce the concept of light as a wave disturbance to explain the imaging process in a microscope. It shows that the finite aperture of a lens system produces an upper limit to the frequency content of the imaged object. The quantum nature

  12. On the possibility to grow zinc oxide-based transparent conducting oxide films by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abrutis, Adulfas, E-mail: adulfas.abrutis@chf.vu.lt; Silimavicus, Laimis; Kubilius, Virgaudas; Murauskas, Tomas; Saltyte, Zita; Kuprenaite, Sabina; Plausinaitiene, Valentina [Faculty of Chemistry, Vilnius University, Naugarduko 24, LT-03225 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HW-CVD) was applied to grow zinc oxide (ZnO)-based transparent conducting oxide (TCO) films. Indium (In)-doped ZnO films were deposited using a cold wall pulsed liquid injection CVD system with three nichrome wires installed at a distance of 2?cm from the substrate holder. The wires were heated by an AC current in the range of 010 A. Zn and In 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionates dissolved in 1,2-dimethoxyethane were used as precursors. The hot wires had a marked effect on the growth rates of ZnO, In-doped ZnO, and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films; at a current of 610 A, growth rates were increased by a factor of ?1020 compared with those of traditional CVD at the same substrate temperature (400?C). In-doped ZnO films with thickness of ?150?nm deposited on sapphire-R grown at a wire current of 9?A exhibited a resistivity of ?2??10{sup ?3} ?cm and transparency of >90% in the visible spectral range. These initial results reveal the potential of HW-CVD for the growth of TCOs.

  13. Self-induced transparency, compression, and stopping of electromagnetic pulses interacting with beams of unexcited classical oscillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Zotova, I. V., E-mail: zotova@appl.sci-nnov.ru; Sergeev, A. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Physics (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The self-induced transparency effects that emerge when short (on the relaxation time scale) light pulses propagate in a two-level noninverted medium are well known in optics. The interaction of microwave pulses with an initially rectilinear electron beam under cyclotron resonance conditions can serve as a classical analog of the described effects. In this case, at a certain intensity of the input signal, the cyclotron absorption is replaced by self-induced transparency when the input pulse propagates almost without any change of its profile, forming a soliton whose amplitude and duration are rigidly related to its velocity. In a certain domain of parameters, this process is accompanied by significant two- or threefold compression of the initial pulse, which is of practical interest for the generation of multigigawatt picosecond microwave pulses. Since the soliton velocity lies between the unperturbed group velocity of the radiation and the translational velocity of the particles, another nontrivial effect in the case of interaction with a counterpropagating electron beam is the possibility of a significant deceleration or full stopping of the electromagnetic pulse.

  14. Application of Developed APCVD Transparent Conducting Oxides and Undercoat Technologies for Economical OLED Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Silverman; Bluhm, Martin; Coffey, James; Korotkov, Roman; Polsz, Craig; Salemi, Alexandre; Smith, Robert; Smith, Ryan; Stricker, Jeff; Xu,Chen; Shirazi, Jasmine; Papakonstantopulous, George; Carson, Steve Philips Lighting GmbH Goldman, Claudia; Hartmann, Sren; Jessen, Frank; ,; Krogmann, Bianca; Rickers, Christoph; Ruske, Manfred, Schwab, Holger; Bertram, Dietrich

    2011-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Economics is a key factor for application of organic light emitting diodes (OLED) in general lighting relative to OLED flat panel displays that can handle high cost materials such as indium tin oxide (ITO) or Indium zinc oxide (IZO) as the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) on display glass. However, for OLED lighting to penetrate into general illumination, economics and sustainable materials are critical. The issues with ITO have been documented at the DOE SSL R&D and Manufacturing workshops for the last 5 years and the issue is being exaserbated by export controls from China (one of the major sources of elemental indium). Therefore, ITO is not sustainable because of the fluctuating costs and the United States (US) dependency on other nations such as China. Numerous alternatives to ITO/IZO are being evaluated such as Ag nanoparticles/nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and other metal oxides. Of these other metal oxides, doped zinc oxide has attracted a lot of attention over the last 10 years. The volume of zinc mined is a factor of 80,000 greater than indium and the US has significant volumes of zinc mined domestically, resulting in the ability for the US to be self-sufficient for this element that can be used in optoelectonic applications. The costs of elemental zinc is over 2 orders of magnitude less than indium, reflecting the relative abundance and availablility of the elements. Arkema Inc. and an international primary glass manufacturing company, which is located in the United States, have developed doped zinc oxide technology for solar control windows. The genesis of this DOE SSL project was to determine if doped zinc oxide technology can be taken from the commodity based window market and translate the technology to OLED lighting. Thus, Arkema Inc. sought out experts, Philips Lighting, Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) and National Renewable Research Laboratories (NREL), in OLED devices and brought them into the project. This project had a clear focus on economics and the work plan focused both on doped ZnO process and OLED device structure that would be consistent with the new TCO. The team successfully made 6 inch OLEDs with a serial construction. More process development is required to optimize commercial OLED structures. Feasibility was demonstrated on two different light extraction technologies: 1/4 lambda refractive index matching and high-low-high band pass filter. Process development was also completed on the key precursors for the TCO, which are ready for pilot-plant scale-up. Subsequently, Arkema has developed a cost of ownership model that is consistent with DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing targets as outlined in the DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing 2010 report. The overall outcome of this project was the demonstration that doped zinc oxide can be used for OLED devices without a drop-off in performance while gaining the economic and sustainable benefits of a more readily available TCO. The broad impact of this project, is the facilitation of OLED lighting market penetration into general illumination, resulting in significant energy savings, decreased greenhouse emissions, with no environmental impact issues such as mercury found in Fluorescent technology.

  15. Finite element analyses of a linear-accelerator electron gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iqbal, M., E-mail: muniqbal.chep@pu.edu.pk, E-mail: muniqbal@ihep.ac.cn [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 45590 (Pakistan); Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wasy, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Changwon National University, Changwon 641773 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Changwon National University, Changwon 641773 (Korea, Republic of); Islam, G. U. [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 45590 (Pakistan)] [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 45590 (Pakistan); Zhou, Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)] [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermo-structural analyses of the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider (BEPCII) linear-accelerator, electron gun, were performed for the gun operating with the cathode at 1000?C. The gun was modeled in computer aided three-dimensional interactive application for finite element analyses through ANSYS workbench. This was followed by simulations using the SLAC electron beam trajectory program EGUN for beam optics analyses. The simulations were compared with experimental results of the assembly to verify its beam parameters under the same boundary conditions. Simulation and test results were found to be in good agreement and hence confirmed the design parameters under the defined operating temperature. The gun is operating continuously since commissioning without any thermal induced failures for the BEPCII linear accelerator.

  16. Optimization of transparent and reflecting electrodes for amorphous-silicon solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 May 1991--30 April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, R.G.; Hu, J.; Lacks, D.; Musher, J.; Thornton, J.; Liang, H. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluorine-doped zinc oxide was shown to have the lowest absorption loss of any of the known transparent conductors. An apparatus was constructed to deposit textured, transparent, conductive, fluorine-doped zinc oxide layers with uniform thickness over a 10 cm by 10 cm area, using inexpensive, high-productivity atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition. Amorphous silicon solar cells grown on these textured films show very high peak quantum efficiencies (over 90%). However, a significant contact resistance develops at the interface between the amorphous silicon and the zinc oxide. Transparent, conductive gallium-doped zinc oxide films were grown by APCVD at a low enough temperature (260{degree}C) to be deposited on amorphous silicon as a final conductive back contact to solar cells. A quantum-mechanical theory of bonding was developed and applied to some metal oxides; it forms a basis for understanding TCO structures and the stability of their interfaces with silicon.

  17. Wavelet analyses using parallel computing for plasma turbulence studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujisawa, A.; Inagaki, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Itoh, S.-I. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics and Itoh Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Kasuga-kouen, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Shimizu, A.; Itoh, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi 509-52 (Japan); Nagashima, Y.; Yamada, T. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The wavelet analyses have been carried out, using a cluster of personal computer, on the signal of electric field fluctuations measured with heavy ion beam probes in the compact helical system stellarator. The results have revealed the intermittent characteristics of turbulence and of the nonlinear couplings between elemental waves of turbulence. The usage of parallel computing is found to successfully reduce the calculation time as inversely proportional to the CPU number used the cluster, which shows the nature of 'embarrassingly parallel computation'. The present example of the wavelet analyses clearly demonstrates the importance of the advanced analyzing methods and the parallel computation for the modern studies of plasma turbulence.

  18. Designing and recasting LHC analyses with MadAnalysis 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Conte; Branger Dumont; Benjamin Fuks; Chris Wymant

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an extension of the expert mode of the MadAnalysis 5 program dedicated to the design or reinterpretation of high-energy physics collider analyses. We detail the predefined classes, functions and methods available to the user and emphasize the most recent developments. The latter include the possible definition of multiple sub-analyses and a novel user-friendly treatment for the selection criteria. We illustrate this approach by two concrete examples: a CMS search for supersymmetric partners of the top quark and a phenomenological analysis targeting hadronically decaying monotop systems.

  19. Efficient data exchange: Integrating a vector GIS with an object-oriented, 3-D visualization system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, J.; Ayers, A.; Johnson, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Tolbert-Smith, M. [USDOE Germantown, Maryland (United States). Office of Program Integration

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A common problem encountered in Geographic Information System (GIS) modeling is the exchange of data between different software packages to best utilize the unique features of each package. This paper describes a project to integrate two systems through efficient data exchange. The first is a widely used GIS based on a relational data model. This system has a broad set of data input, processing, and output capabilities, but lacks three-dimensional (3-D) visualization and certain modeling functions. The second system is a specialized object-oriented package designed for 3-D visualization and modeling. Although this second system is useful for subsurface modeling and hazardous waste site characterization, it does not provide many of the, capabilities of a complete GIS. The system-integration project resulted in an easy-to-use program to transfer information between the systems, making many of the more complex conversion issues transparent to the user. The strengths of both systems are accessible, allowing the scientist more time to focus on analysis. This paper details the capabilities of the two systems, explains the technical issues associated with data exchange and how they were solved, and outlines an example analysis project that used the integrated systems.

  20. Environmental management system objectives & targets results summary :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vetter, Douglas Walter

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexicos (SNL/NM) Environmental Management System is the integrated approach for members of the workforce to identify and manage environmental risks. Each Fiscal Year (FY) SNL/NM performs an analysis to identify environmental aspects, and the environmental programs associated with them are charged with the task of routinely monitoring and measuring the objectives and targets that are established to mitigate potential impacts of SNL/NMs operations on the environment. An annual summary of the results achieved towards meeting established Sandia Corporation and SNL/NM Site-specific objectives and targets provides a connection to, and rational for, annually revised environmental aspects. The purpose of this document is to summarize the results achieved and documented in FY2013.

  1. Chemistry of Low Mass Substellar Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katharina Lodders; Bruce Fegley, Jr

    2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    "Brown dwarfs" is the collective name for objects more massive than giant planets such as Jupiter but less massive than M dwarf stars. This review gives a brief description of the classification and chemistry of low mass dwarfs. The current spectral classification of stars includes L and T dwarfs that encompass the coolest known stars and substellar objects. The relatively low atmospheric temperatures and high total pressures in substellar dwarfs lead to molecular gas and condensate chemistry. The chemistry of elements such as C, N, O, Ti, V, Fe, Cr, and the alkali elements play a dominant role in shaping the optical and infrared spectra of the "failed" stars. Chemical diagnostics for the subclassifications are described.

  2. Evidence of a slight nuclear transparency in the alpha-nucleus systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rossi, Jr., E. S.; Chamon, L. C.; Gasques, L. R.; Nobre, G. P. A.; deBoer, R. J.; Seymour, C.; Wiescher, M.; Kiss, G. G.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In earlier works, we proposed a model for the nuclear potential of the ? + ? and ? + C systems. This theoretical model successfully described data related to the elastic and inelastic scattering processes as well as resonances that correspond to the capture reaction channel. In the present work, we extend the same model to obtain bare nuclear potentials for several ?-nucleus systems. We adopt this parameter-free interaction to analyse fusion, elastic, and inelastic scattering data within the context of the coupled-channel formalism. Our results indicate that, for these systems, the absorption of flux of the elastic channel atmoreinternal distances of interaction is not complete. In addition, we present new experimental angular distributions for the 2? inelastic target excitation of ? on ?,?Te.less

  3. Vehicle for carrying an object of interest

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W.T.; Ferrante, T.A.

    1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A vehicle for carrying an object of interest across a supporting surface including a frame having opposite first and second ends; a first pair of wheels fixedly mounted on the first end of the frame; a second pair of wheels pivotally mounted on the second end of the frame; and a pair of motors borne by the frame, each motor disposed in driving relation relative to one of the pairs of wheels, the motors propelling the vehicle across the supporting surface. 8 figs.

  4. Vehicle for carrying an object of interest

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W. Thor (Idaho Falls, ID); Ferrante, Todd A. (Westerville, OH)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vehicle for carrying an object of interest across a supporting surface including a frame having opposite first and second ends; a first pair of wheels fixedly mounted on the first end of the frame; a second pair of wheels pivotally mounted on the second end of the frame; and a pair of motors borne by the frame, each motor disposed in driving relation relative to one of the pairs of wheels, the motors propelling the vehicle across the supporting surface.

  5. Infrared system for monitoring movement of objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valentine, K.H.; Falter, D.D.; Falter, K.G.

    1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for monitoring moving objects, such as the flight of honeybees and other insects, using a pulsed laser light source. This system has a self-powered micro-miniaturized transmitting unit powered, in the preferred embodiment, with an array of solar cells. This transmitting unit is attached to the object to be monitored. These solar cells provide current to a storage energy capacitor to produce, for example, five volts for the operation of the transmitter. In the simplest embodiment, the voltage on the capacitor operates a pulse generator to provide a pulsed energizing signal to one or more very small laser diodes. The pulsed light is then received at a receiving base station using substantially standard means which converts the light to an electrical signal for processing in a microprocessor to create the information as to the movement of the object. In the case of a unit for monitoring honeybees and other insects, the transmitting unit weighs less than 50 mg, and has a size no larger than 1[times]3[times]5 millimeters. Also, the preferred embodiment provides for the coding of the light to uniquely identify the particular transmitting unit that is being monitored. A wake-up' circuit is provided in the preferred embodiment whereby there is no transmission until the voltage on the capacitor has exceeded a pre-set threshold. Various other uses of the motion-detection system are described. 4 figures.

  6. Infrared system for monitoring movement of objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valentine, Kenneth H. (San Diego, CA); Falter, Diedre D. (Knoxville, TN); Falter, Kelly G. (Knoxville, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for monitoring moving objects, such as the flight of honeybees and other insects, using a pulsed laser light source. This system has a self-powered micro-miniaturized transmitting unit powered, in the preferred embodiment, with an array solar cells. This transmitting unit is attached to the object to be monitored. These solar cells provide current to a storage energy capacitor to produce, for example, five volts for the operation of the transmitter. In the simplest embodiment, the voltage on the capacitor operates a pulse generator to provide a pulsed energizing signal to one or more very small laser diodes. The pulsed light is then received at a receiving base station using substantially standard means which converts the light to an electrical signal for processing in a microprocessor to create the information as to the movement of the object. In the case of a unit for monitoring honeybees and other insects, the transmitting unit weighs less than 50 mg, and has a size no larger than 1.times.3.times.5 millimeters. Also, the preferred embodiment provides for the coding of the light to uniquely identify the particular transmitting unit that is being monitored. A "wake-up" circuit is provided in the preferred embodiment whereby there is no transmission until the voltage on the capacitor has exceeded a pre-set threshold. Various other uses of the motion-detection system are described.

  7. Objective analysis of toolmarks in forensics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grieve, Taylor N. [Ames Laboratory

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 1993 court case of Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc. the subjective nature of toolmark comparison has been questioned by attorneys and law enforcement agencies alike. This has led to an increased drive to establish objective comparison techniques with known error rates, much like those that DNA analysis is able to provide. This push has created research in which the 3-D surface profile of two different marks are characterized and the marks cross-sections are run through a comparative statistical algorithm to acquire a value that is intended to indicate the likelihood of a match between the marks. The aforementioned algorithm has been developed and extensively tested through comparison of evenly striated marks made by screwdrivers. However, this algorithm has yet to be applied to quasi-striated marks such as those made by the shear edge of slip-joint pliers. The results of this algorithms application to the surface of copper wire will be presented. Objective mark comparison also extends to comparison of toolmarks made by firearms. In an effort to create objective comparisons, microstamping of firing pins and breech faces has been introduced. This process involves placing unique alphanumeric identifiers surrounded by a radial code on the surface of firing pins, which transfer to the cartridges primer upon firing. Three different guns equipped with microstamped firing pins were used to fire 3000 cartridges. These cartridges are evaluated based on the clarity of their alphanumeric transfers and the clarity of the radial code surrounding the alphanumerics.

  8. Optical inspection system for cylindrical objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brenden, Byron B. (Richland, WA); Peters, Timothy J. (Richland, WA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the inspection of cylindrical objects, particularly O-rings, the object is translated through a field of view and a linear light trace is projected on its surface. An image of the light trace is projected on a mask, which has a size and shape corresponding to the size and shape which the image would have if the surface of the object were perfect. If there is a defect, light will pass the mask and be sensed by a detector positioned behind the mask. Preferably, two masks and associated detectors are used, one mask being convex to pass light when the light trace falls on a projection from the surface and the other concave, to pass light when the light trace falls on a depression in the surface. The light trace may be either dynamic, formed by a scanned laser beam, or static, formed by such a beam focussed by a cylindrical lens. Means are provided to automatically keep the illuminating receiving systems properly aligned.

  9. Propagation of two short laser pulse trains in a $\\Lambda$-type three-level medium under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buica, Gabriela

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the dynamics of a pair of short laser pulse trains propagating in a medium consisting of three-level $\\Lambda$-type atoms by numerically solving the Maxwell-Schr\\"odinger equations for atoms and fields. By performing propagation calculations with different parameters, under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency, we compare the propagation dynamics by a single pair of probe and coupling laser pulses and by probe and coupling laser pulse trains. We discuss the influence of the coupling pulse area, number of pulses, and detunings on the probe laser propagation and realization of electromagnetically induced transparency conditions, as well on the formation of a dark state.

  10. The Future of Democracy in Europe Trends, Analyses and Reforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franz, Sven Oliver

    1 The Future of Democracy in Europe Trends, Analyses and Reforms A Green Paper for the Council-level accountability Mechanisms for direct citizen consultation Part III. Recommendations for reform Introduction Guidelines Our "wish list" of recommended reforms 1. Universal citizenship 2. Discretionary voting 3

  11. Analyse de l'architecture GPU Tesla Sylvain Collange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Analyse de l'architecture GPU Tesla Sylvain Collange DALI, ELIAUS, Universit´e de Perpignan sylvain comprise. Nous pr´esentons ici une description du fonctionnement de l'architecture Tesla de NVIDIA et de;2 Tesla Nous nous pencherons dans cet article sur l'architecture des GPU NVIDIA d´ebut´ee avec le G80 (Ge

  12. Engineering analyses of large precision cathode strip chambers for GEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horvath, J.A.; Belser, F.C.; Pratuch, S.M.; Wuest, C.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Mitselmakher, G. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States)] [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Gordeev, A. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Johnson, C.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Polychronakos, V.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Golutvin, I.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)] [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1993-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural analyses of large precision cathode strip chambers performed up to the date of this publication are documented. Mechanical property data for typical chamber materials are included. This information, originally intended to be an appendix to the {open_quotes}CSC Structural Design Bible,{close_quotes} is presented as a guide for future designers of large chambers.

  13. automatic cough analyser: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    automatic cough analyser First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Cough CiteSeer Summary:...

  14. Chemical analyses of selected thermal springs and wells in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heasler, H.P.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic chemical data for 27 selected thermal well and springs in Wyoming are presented. The samples were gathered from 1979 through 1982 in an effort to define geothermal resources in Wyoming. The basic data for the 27 analyzed samples generally include location, temperature, flow, date analyzed, and a description of what the sample is from. The chemical analyses for the sample are listed.

  15. Analysing viewpoints in design through the argumentation process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    at analysing the use of viewpoints in an industrial Concurrent Engineering context. Our focus/integration. Keywords : Concurrent Engineering, viewpoint, constraints, design, assessment, argumentation 1 Purpose context is a Concurrent Engineering process. This framework seemed to us to be the most relevant

  16. Deviational analyses for validating regulations on real systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Tim

    Deviational analyses for validating regulations on real systems Fiona Polack, Thitima Srivatanakul to the validation of reg- ulations, in the sense of their application of regulations to real systems. Keyword: deviational analysis, dependability, regulation validation 1 Background Regulations are intended to control

  17. ERDC TN-EMRRP-EBA-8 Hydrologic Analyses for Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDC TN-EMRRP-EBA-8 March 2011 Hydrologic Analyses for Stream Restoration Design by J. Craig quantified element in stream restoration, working across and governing multiple disciplines and system, and management decisions to be made (Federal Interagency Stream Restoration Working Group (FISRWG) 1998). Figure

  18. Admitting that admitting verb sense into corpus analyses makes sense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elman, Jeff

    be addressed to Mary Hare, Department of Psychology, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403Admitting that admitting verb sense into corpus analyses makes sense Mary Hare Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH, USA Ken McRae University of Western Ontario, London, Canada Jeffrey L. Elman

  19. 2010 oil spill: trajectory projections based on ensemble drifter analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 oil spill: trajectory projections based on ensemble drifter analyses Yu-Lin Chang & Leo Oey # Springer-Verlag 2011 Abstract An accurate method for long-term (weeks to months) projections of oil spill released at the northern Gulf of Mexico spill site is demonstrated during the 2010 oil spill

  20. Contribution l'analyse multi chelle du comportement mcanique non

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    Contribution l'analyse multi chelle du comportement mcanique non linaire matriau des Impact Comportement non linaire matriau des structures composites DtailstructuralEprouvettelmentaire - Caractrisation - Lois de comportement (1D, 2D, 3D) - Micro-Mso-Macro - Dveloppement d'outils, mthodes

  1. TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FORECASTS AND ANALYSES FOR THE 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page Manager FOSSIL FUELS OFFICE Mike Smith Deputy Director FUELS AND TRANSPORTATION DIVISION Melissa, Weights and Measurements/Gary Castro, Allan Morrison, John Mough, Ed Williams Clean Energy FuelsCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FORECASTS AND ANALYSES FOR THE 2009 INTEGRATED

  2. Analysing PET scans data for predicting response to chemotherapy in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sleeman, Derek

    (CT1, CT2,. . .) and PET scans (PT1 to PT4). cancer cells tend to grow more rapidly than other tissueAnalysing PET scans data for predicting response to chemotherapy in breast cancer patients Elias the use of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) [11, 13]. PET scans can be used to visualise

  3. Journal self-citations -analysing the JIF mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    1 Journal self-citations - analysing the JIF mechanism Tove Faber Frandsen1 tff@db.dk Department investigates the mechanism of the Journal Impact Factor (JIF). Although created as a journal selection tool the indicator is probably the central quantitative indicator for measuring journal quality. The focus is journal

  4. Minimum Resource Characterization of Biochemical Analyses for Digital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akella, Srinivas

    ;2 Lingzhi Luo and Srinivas Akella 1 Introduction Low-cost, portable lab-on-a-chip systems capable of rapid versatile, yet low cost systems. Hence it is important to iden- tify the class of biochemical analyses requirements, towards the design of cost and space-efficient biochips. Mixers and storage units are two primary

  5. The Formation of Primordial Luminous Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ripamonti, Emanuele; /Kapteyn Astron. Inst., Groningen; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The scientific belief that the universe evolves in time is one of the legacies of the theory of the Big Bang. The concept that the universe has an history started to attract the interest of cosmologists soon after the first formulation of the theory: already Gamow (1948; 1949) investigated how and when galaxies could have been formed in the context of the expanding Universe. However, the specific topic of the formation (and of the fate) of the first objects dates to two decades later, when no objects with metallicities as low as those predicted by primordial nucleosynthesis (Z {approx}< 10{sup -10} {approx} 10{sup -8}Z{sub {circle_dot}}) were found. Such concerns were addressed in two seminal papers by Peebles & Dicke (1968; hereafter PD68) and by Doroshkevich, Zel'Dovich & Novikov (1967; hereafter DZN67), introducing the idea that some objects could have formed before the stars we presently observe. (1) Both PD68 and DZN67 suggest a mass of {approx} 10{sup 5} M{sub {circle_dot}} for the first generation of bound systems, based on the considerations on the cosmological Jeans length (Gamow 1948; Peebles 1965) and the possible shape of the power spectrum. (2) They point out the role of thermal instabilities in the formation of the proto-galactic bound object, and of the cooling of the gas inside it; in particular, PD68 introduces H{sub 2} cooling and chemistry in the calculations about the contraction of the gas. (3) Even if they do not specifically address the occurrence of fragmentation, these papers make two very different assumptions: PD68 assumes that the gas will fragment into ''normal'' stars to form globular clusters, while DZN67 assumes that fragmentation does not occur, and that a single ''super-star'' forms. (4) Finally, some feedback effects as considered (e.g. Peebles & Dicke considered the effects of supernovae). Today most of the research focuses on the issues when fragmentation may occur, what objects are formed and how they influence subsequent structure formation. In these notes we will leave the discussion of feedback to lecture notes by Ferrara & Salvaterra and by Madau & Haardt in this same book and focus only on the aspects of the formation of the first objects. The advent of cosmological numerical hydrodynamics in particular allow a fresh new look at these questions. Hence, these notes will touch on aspects of theoretical cosmology to chemistry, computer science, hydrodynamics and atomic physics. For further reading and more references on the subject we refer the reader to other relevant reviews such as Barkana & Loeb 2001, and more recently Ciardi & Ferrara 2004, Glover 2004 and Bromm & Larson 2004. In these notes, we try to give a brief introduction to only the most relevant aspects. We will start with a brief overview of the relevant cosmological concepts in section 2, followed by a discussion of the properties of primordial material (with particular emphasis to its cooling and its chemistry) in section 3. We will then review the technique and the results of numerical simulations in sections 4 and 5: the former will deal with detailed 3D simulations of the formation of gaseous clouds which are likely to transform into luminous objects, while the latter will examine results (mostly from 1D codes) about the modalities of such transformation. Finally, in section 6 we will critically discuss the results of the previous sections, examining their consequences and comparing them to our present knowledge of the universe.

  6. Clearing a Pile of Unknown Objects using Interactive Perception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Dov

    Clearing a Pile of Unknown Objects using Interactive Perception Dov Katz, Moslem Kazemi, J. Andrew of clearing a pile of unknown objects using an autonomous interactive perception approach. Our robot hypothesizes the boundaries of objects in a pile of unknown objects (object segmentation) and verifies its

  7. Enabling Detailed Energy Analyses via the Technology Performance Exchange: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studer, D.; Fleming, K.; Lee, E.; Livingood, W.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the key tenets to increasing adoption of energy efficiency solutions in the built environment is improving confidence in energy performance. Current industry practices make extensive use of predictive modeling, often via the use of sophisticated hourly or sub-hourly energy simulation programs, to account for site-specific parameters (e.g., climate zone, hours of operation, and space type) and arrive at a performance estimate. While such methods are highly precise, they invariably provide less than ideal accuracy due to a lack of high-quality, foundational energy performance input data. The Technology Performance Exchange was constructed to allow the transparent sharing of foundational, product-specific energy performance data, and leverages significant, external engineering efforts and a modular architecture to efficiently identify and codify the minimum information necessary to accurately predict product energy performance. This strongly-typed database resource represents a novel solution to a difficult and established problem. One of the most exciting benefits is the way in which the Technology Performance Exchange's application programming interface has been leveraged to integrate contributed foundational data into the Building Component Library. Via a series of scripts, data is automatically translated and parsed into the Building Component Library in a format that is immediately usable to the energy modeling community. This paper (1) presents a high-level overview of the project drivers and the structure of the Technology Performance Exchange; (2) offers a detailed examination of how technologies are incorporated and translated into powerful energy modeling code snippets; and (3) examines several benefits of this robust workflow.

  8. Secret Objective Standoff: International Safeguards Educational Exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okowita, Samantha L [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Safeguards Regime, being so multi-faceted, can be overwhelming to those first introduced to its many components. The organizers and lecturers of workshops and courses on nonproliferation often provide a series of independent lectures and must somehow demonstrate the cohesive and effective nature of the system. An exercise titled The Secret Objective Standoff was developed to complement lectures with hands-on learning to assist participants in bringing all the many components (IAEA agreements, export controls, treaty obligations, international diplomacy, etc.) of the International Safeguards Regime together. This exercise divides participants into teams that are assigned the role of either a country or the IAEA and asks that they fully immerse themselves in their roles. The teams are then randomly assigned three unique and secret objectives that are intended to represent realistic and current geopolitical scenarios. Through construction, trading, or hoarding of four resources (experts, technology, money, and uranium), the teams have a finite number of turns to accomplish their objectives. Each turn has three phases random dispersal of resources, a timed discussion where teams can coordinate and strategize with others, and an action phase. During the action phase, teams inform the moderator individually and secretly what they will be doing that turn. The exercise has been tested twice with Oak Ridge National Laboratory personnel, and has been conducted with outside participants twice, in each case the experience was well received by both participants and instructors. This exercise provides instructors the ability to modify the exercise before or during game play to best fit their educational goals. By offering a range of experiences, from an in-depth look at specific components to a generalized overview, this exercise is an effective tool in helping participants achieve a full understanding the International Safeguards Regime.

  9. Object-oriented software development effort prediction using design patterns from object interaction analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adekile, Olusegun

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Software project management is arguably the most important activity in modern software development projects. In the absence of realistic and objective management, the software development process cannot be managed in an effective way. Software...

  10. Modern testing meets wide range of objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlig-Economides, C.A.; Hegeman, P. (Schlumberger Oilfield Services, Houston, TX (United States)); Clark, G. (Schlumberger Oilfield Services, Aberdeen (United Kingdom))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing sequences in two very different wells illustrate the wide range of objectives that are met with modern testing procedures. The first example is a drill stem test in an exploration well. The second test is in an established producing well. The exploration well test incorporated tubing-conveyed perforating, fluid sampling, production logging, and matrix stimulation to evaluate and properly treat near-well bore damage, as well as to investigate reservoir volume and characterize boundaries. The test on the established producer evaluated whether a workover could remedy lower than expected productivity. Production logging was combined with stationary transient measurements.

  11. Kinetic bounding volume hierarchies for deformable objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel Zachmann; Tu Clausthal

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present novel algorithms for updating bounding volume hierarchies of objects undergoing arbitrary deformations. Therefore, we introduce two new data structures, the kinetic AABB tree and the kinetic BoxTree. The event-based approach of the kinetic data structures framework enables us to show that our algorithms are optimal in the number of updates. Moreover, we show a lower bound for the total number of BV updates, which is independent of the number of frames. We used our kinetic bounding volume hierarchies for collision detection and performed a comparison with the classical bottomup update method. The results show that our algorithms perform up to ten times faster in practically relevant scenarios.

  12. Hungarian object agreement with personal pronouns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brny, Andrs

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the external argument. Bjar & Rezac (2009:46) suggest that their person licensing constraint (PLC) rules out derivations in which the external argument does not enter into an Agree relation. More generally, the PLC states that a feature F in a feature... -? see-3SG.SUBJ tged. you.SG.ACC S/he sees you. (27) raises a question, however: if the subject has to enter an Agree relation (cf. the PLC), why does this not hold for the object? Bjar & Rezac (2009) (among others) relate their person licensing...

  13. Attachment to Objects as a Compensatory Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keefer, Lucas Allen

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    their five most valued possessions and to justify their selections (1991). One important function of these valued commodities is to give us new social groups with which to identify (e.g. BMW owners, people who like crunchy peanut butter) (Dittmar, 1994.../drives a BMW requires the application of a certain object-related stereotype to perceive the self (Dittmar, 1994). For this stereotype to be a stereotype in the first place, what is true of a particular BMW-owner must be true of all BMW owners. In other...

  14. Goals & Objectives Chart | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: CongestionDevelopment of a downholeReactorsgoal and objectives

  15. Help:SubObjects | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarms AHefei Sungrow PowersourceSubObjects Jump to:

  16. Journal of Systems and Software, Vol. 82(1) pp. 131-143 (January 2009). http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2008.06.036 CoRAL: A Transparent Fault-Tolerant Web Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamir, Yuval

    .jss.2008.06.036 CoRAL: A Transparent Fault-Tolerant Web Service Navid Aghdaie1 and Yuval Tamir * Concurrent is increasingly used for critical applications and services. We present a client-transparent mechanism, called CoRAL, that provides high reliability and availability for Web service. CoRAL provides fault tolerance even

  17. Slow light propagation and amplification via electromagnetically induced transparency and four-wave mixing in an optically dense atomic vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. B. Phillips; A. V. Gorshkov; I. Novikova

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally and theoretically analyze the propagation of weak signal field pulses under the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in hot Rb vapor, and study the effects of resonant four-wave mixing (FWM). In particular, we demonstrate that in a double-$\\Lambda$ system, formed by the strong control field with the weak resonant signal and a far-detuned Stokes field, both continuous-wave spectra and pulse propagation dynamics for the signal field depend strongly on the amplitude of the seeded Stokes field, and the effect is enhanced in optically dense atomic medium. We also show that the theory describing the coupled propagation of the signal and Stokes fields is in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  18. Super-water-repellent Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating films with high transparency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tadanaga, Kiyoharu; Katata, Noriko; Minami, Tsutomu [Osaka Prefecture Univ., Sakai, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Applied Materials Science

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have prepared transparent, super-water-repellent coating films of alumina on glass plates by a combination of geometric and chemical approaches. The contact angle for water in the films was 165{degree} and the transmittance for visible light was higher than 92%. A roughness of 20 to 50 nm was obtained, which is too small to scatter visible light, while the degree of roughness was great enough to enhance the water-repellent properties together with the chemical effect of a fluorine-containing agent and gave a super-water-repellent surface. The coatings have great potential for practical applications such as eyeglasses, cover glasses for solar cells, windshields of automobiles, and so on.

  19. Electromagnetically induced transparency and four-wave mixing in a cold atomic ensemble with large optical depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Geng; G. T. Campbell; J. Bernu; D. Higginbottom; B. M. Sparkes; S. M. Assad; W. P. Zhang; N. P. Robins; P. K. Lam; B. C. Buchler

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the delay of optical pulses using electromagnetically induced transparency in an ensemble of cold atoms with an optical depth exceeding 500. To identify the regimes in which four-wave mixing impacts on EIT behaviour, we conduct the experiment in both rubidium 85 and rubidium 87. Comparison with theory shows excellent agreement in both isotopes. In rubidium 87, negligible four-wave mixing was observed and we obtained one pulse-width of delay with 50% efficiency. In rubidium 85, four-wave-mixing contributes to the output. In this regime we achieve a delay-bandwidth product of 3.7 at 50% efficiency, allowing temporally multimode delay, which we demonstrate by compressing two pulses into the memory medium.

  20. Methods of forming aluminum oxynitride-comprising bodies, including methods of forming a sheet of transparent armor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Henry Shiu-Hung [Idaho Falls, ID; Lillo, Thomas Martin [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes methods of forming an aluminum oxynitride-comprising body. For example, a mixture is formed which comprises A:B:C in a respective molar ratio in the range of 9:3.6-6.2:0.1-1.1, where "A" is Al.sub.2O.sub.3, "B" is AlN, and "C" is a total of one or more of B.sub.2O.sub.3, SiO.sub.2, Si--Al--O--N, and TiO.sub.2. The mixture is sintered at a temperature of at least 1,600.degree. C. at a pressure of no greater than 500 psia effective to form an aluminum oxynitride-comprising body which is at least internally transparent and has at least 99% maximum theoretical density.

  1. RF-compass: Robot object manipulation using RFIDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jue

    Modern robots have to interact with their environment, search for objects, and move them around. Yet, for a robot to pick up an object, it needs to identify the object's orientation and locate it to within centimeter-scale ...

  2. Neutronic Analyses for HEU to LEU fuel conversion of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, E. H.; Newton, T. H.; Bergeron, A.; Horelik, N.; Stevens, J. G (Nuclear Engineering Division); ( NS)

    2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) reactor (MITR-II), based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is a research reactor designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on a mixture of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of compact high performance reactors like the MITR-II. This report presents the results of steady state neutronic safety analyses for conversion of MITR-II from the use of HEU fuel to the use of U-Mo LEU fuel. The objective of this work was to demonstrate that the safety analyses meet current requirements for an LEU core replacement of MITR-II.

  3. Time-resolved electron thermal conduction by probing of plasma formation in transparent solids with high power subpicosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vu, B.T.V.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation work includes a series of experimental measurements in a search for better understanding of high temperature (10{sup 4}-10{sup 6}K) and high density plasmas (10{sup 22}-10{sup 24}cm{sup {minus}3}) produced by irradiating a transparent solid target with high intensity (10{sup 13} - 10{sup 15}W/cm{sup 2}) and subpicosecond (10{sup {minus}12}-10{sup {minus}13}s) laser pulses. Experimentally, pump and probe schemes with both frontside (vacuum-plasma side) and backside (plasma-bulk material side) probes are used to excite and interrogate or probe the plasma evolution, thereby providing useful insights into the plasma formation mechanisms. A series of different experiments has been carried out so as to characterize plasma parameters and the importance of various nonlinear processes. Experimental evidence shows that electron thermal conduction is supersonic in a time scale of the first picosecond after laser irradiation, so fast that it was often left unresolved in the past. The experimental results from frontside probing demonstrate that upon irradiation with a strong (pump) laser pulse, a thin high temperature ({approximately}40eV) super-critical density ({approximately}10{sup 23}/cm{sup 3}) plasma layer is quickly formed at the target surface which in turn becomes strongly reflective and prevents further transmission of the remainder of the laser pulse. In the bulk region behind the surface, it is also found that a large sub-critical ({approximately}10{sup 18}/cm{sup 3}) plasma is produced by inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption and collisional ionization. The bulk underdense plasma is evidenced by large absorption of the backside probe light. A simple and analytical model, modified from the avalanche model, for plasma evolution in transparent materials is proposed to explain the experimental results. Elimination of the bulk plasma is then experimentally illustrated by using targets overcoated with highly absorptive films.

  4. Barium Titanate and Bismuth Oxide Nanocomposites Barium titanate, BaTiO3, and bismuth oxide Bi2O3 are transparent materials with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Julie P.

    Barium Titanate and Bismuth Oxide Nanocomposites Barium titanate, BaTiO3, and bismuth oxide Bi2O3 that are lead-free. If we cannot shield effectively at nanofiller levels where transparency is maintained, we, Condensed Matter, Vol. 15, 8927 (2003). 21. "Highly Nonlinear Bismuth-Oxide Fiber for Smooth Supercontinuun

  5. Optically transparent superhydrophobic silica-based films H.M. Shang*, Y. Wang, S.J. Limmer, T.P. Chou, K. Takahashi, G.Z. Cao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    Optically transparent superhydrophobic silica-based films H.M. Shang*, Y. Wang, S.J. Limmer, T superhydrophobic silica-based films were obtained by means of solgel processing and self-assembly (SA). Desired and superhydrophobicity are required, in addition to low temperature processing. In addition, such films can be made

  6. Description of Wyoming coal fields and seam analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, G.B.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introductory material describe coal-bearing areas, coal-bearing rocks, and the structural geology of coal-bearing areas, discussing coal rank, proximate analyses, sulfur content, heat value, trace elements, carbonizing properties, coking coal, coking operations, in-situ gasification, coal mining, and production. The paper then gives descriptions of the coal seams with proximate analyses, where available, located in the following areas: Powder River coal basin, Green River region, Hanna field, Hams Fork coal region, and Bighorn coal basin. Very brief descriptions are given of the Wind River coal basin, Jackson Hole coal field, Black Hills coal region, Rock Creek coal field, and Goshen Hole coal field. Finally coal resources, production, and reserves are discussed. 76 references.

  7. Contribution of thermo-fluid analyses to the LHC experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasser, G

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The big amount of electrical and electronic equipment that will be installed in the four LHC experiments will cause important heat dissipation into the detectors volumes. This is a major issue for the experimental groups, as temperature stability is often a fundamental requirement for the different sub-detectors to be able to provide a good measurement quality. The thermofluid analyses that are carried out in the ST/CV group are a very efficient tool to understand and predict the thermal behaviour of the detectors. These studies are undertaken according to the needs of the experimental groups; they aim at evaluate the thermal stability for a proposed design, or to compare different technical solutions in order to choose the best one for the final design. The usual approach to carry out these studies is first presented and then, some practical examples of thermo-fluid analyses are presented focusing on the main results in order to illustrate their contribution.

  8. Interactive Correspondence Analysis in a Dynamic Object-Oriented Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jason Bond; George Michailides

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the other moments. h=1 INTERACTIVE CORRESPONDENCE ANALYSISINTERACTIVE CORRESPONDENCE ANALYSIS IN A DYNAMIC OBJECT-A BSTRACT . A highly interactive, user-friendly object-

  9. application project objectives: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    retrieves serialized objects for which the class has changed, it may have to cope, schema evolution, type converter. 1 Introduction In object-oriented applications, serializing...

  10. Future Power Systems 20: The Smart Enterprise, its Objective...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0: The Smart Enterprise, its Objective and Forecasting. Future Power Systems 20: The Smart Enterprise, its Objective and Forecasting. Future Power Systems 20: The Smart Enterprise,...

  11. The Importance of Attention and Object Representation for Visual Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Julie J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the object-based theory definition of a preattentive objectthe UCR object theory is the definition of a preattentivebase attention theories provide an a priori definition of a

  12. Analyses of Commercial Fertilizers Sold During 1953-54.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fudge, J. F.; Ogier, T. L.

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyses of Sold During 1953-54 TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS, DIRECTOR. COLLEGE STATION. TEXAS DIGEST This is the 52nd annual report of the operation of the Texas fertilizer law, and CQYJYS- the period from September 1..., 1953 through August 31, 1954. Fertilizers and fertilizer materials sold during the fertilizer year beginning July 1, 1953, amounted to 560,405 tons, which was a 2 percent decrease over the tonnage sold during the preceding year. Grades of the 1...

  13. Analyse morphomtrique des abeilles Quinze chantillons d'abeilles provenant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Analyse morphométrique des abeilles d'Uruguay Quinze échantillons d'abeilles provenant d'Uruguay venant d'Uruguay, d'Europe et d'Afri- que, montre une similitude étroite entre l'abeille ibérique (Apis mellifera iberica) et les échantillons d'Uruguay. L'autre, basé sur la méthode de Daly et Balling (1978) et

  14. Analyses of Oxyanion Materials by Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Richard B; Perry, D.L.; English, G.A.; Firestone, R.B.; Leung, K.-N.; Garabedian, G.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay, Zs.

    2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) has been used to analyze metal ion oxyanion materials that have multiple applications, including medicine, materials, catalysts, and electronics. The significance for the need for accurate, highly sensitive analyses for the materials is discussed in the context of quality control of end products containing the parent element in each material. Applications of the analytical data for input to models and theoretical calculations related to the electronic and other properties of the materials are discussed.

  15. The role of SEA in integrating and balancing high policy objectives in European cohesion funding programmes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiricka, Alexandra, E-mail: alexandra.jiricka@boku.ac.at; Proebstl, Ulrike, E-mail: ulrike.proebstl@boku.ac.at

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Funding programmes for European cohesion policy are a crucial tool to support the sustainability goals of the European Union and national policies of its member states. All these funding programmes require a Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) to enhance sustainable development. This article compares five first SEA applications at cohesion policy level to discuss challenges, limitations and benefits of this instrument. In order to support the SEA-process a 'Handbook on SEA for Cohesion Policy 2007-13' (GRDP 2006) was developed. The paper examines the special requirements and challenges at the programme level given the special conditions for stakeholder involvement, integration of SEA in the programme development process and strategies to cope with uncertainties to ensure real compatibility with policy goals. Using action research and in-depth interviews with SEA planners and programme managers enabled us to analyse the suitability of the methodology proposed by the handbook. The results show that some recommendations of the handbook should be changed in order to increase the transparency and to enhance the standard and comparability of the SEA-documents. Overall the SEA proved to be a rather successful tool for the integration of sustainability goals at the EU and national policy levels. Its particular strengths emerged as the process makes uncertainties visible and leads to possible redefinitions while maintaining actual policy goals. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparing five case studies of first applications of SEA at cohesion policy level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overall the SEA proved to be a rather successful tool for the integration of sustainability goals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study makes uncertainties visible and shows how SEA could lead to possible redefinitions.

  16. Magnetic levitation system for moving objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, R.F.

    1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Repelling magnetic forces are produced by the interaction of a flux-concentrated magnetic field (produced by permanent magnets or electromagnets) with an inductively loaded closed electric circuit. When one such element moves with respect to the other, a current is induced in the circuit. This current then interacts back on the field to produce a repelling force. These repelling magnetic forces are applied to magnetically levitate a moving object such as a train car. The power required to levitate a train of such cars is drawn from the motional energy of the train itself, and typically represents only a percent or two of the several megawatts of power required to overcome aerodynamic drag at high speeds. 7 figs.

  17. Magnetic levitation system for moving objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Repelling magnetic forces are produced by the interaction of a flux-concentrated magnetic field (produced by permanent magnets or electromagnets) with an inductively loaded closed electric circuit. When one such element moves with respect to the other, a current is induced in the circuit. This current then interacts back on the field to produce a repelling force. These repelling magnetic forces are applied to magnetically levitate a moving object such as a train car. The power required to levitate a train of such cars is drawn from the motional energy of the train itself, and typically represents only a percent or two of the several megawatts of power required to overcome aerodynamic drag at high speeds.

  18. UFO: "Unidentified" Floating Object Driven by Thermocapillarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yuejun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this fluid dynamics video, we show thermocapillary actuation of a binary drop of water and heptanol where the binary drop in motion takes on a UFO-like shape. On a parylene-coated silicon surface subjected to a linear temperature gradient, a pure heptanol droplet quickly moves to the cold side by the Marangoni stress, while a pure water droplet remains stuck due to a large contact angle hysteresis. When the water droplet was encapsulated by a thin layer of heptanol and thermally actuated, the binary droplet takes on a peculiar shape resembling an UFO, i.e. an "unidentified" floating object as the mechanism is not yet completely understood. Our finding suggests that pure liquid droplets (e.g. aqueous solutions) that are not conducive to thermocapillary actuation can be made so by encapsulating them with another judiciously chosen liquid (e.g. heptanol).

  19. Transparent Cost Database | Transparent Cost Database

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    et al., 2012 Goodrich et al., 2012 GPRA 2007 GPRA 2009 GTW 2007 IEA PV 2010 IPCC 2011 Kaplan 2008 Lazard 2010 Lazard 2014 Logan et al., 2008 Mai et al., 2012 McCalley et al.,...

  20. P 3.2 OBJECTIVE ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSES AND CONVECTIVE MODES FOR U.S. TROPICAL CYCLONE TORNADOES FROM 2003-2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FROM 2003-2008 Roger Edwards 1 , Andrew R. Dean, Richard L. Thompson and Bryan T. Smith Storm hurricane, a trend documented in multiple climatologies from Hill et al. (1966) to Edwards (2010), especially near and before TC landfall. First, although a hurricane's winds increase with proximity to center

  1. ADDITIONAL STRESS AND FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSES OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL NOZZLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, Matthew [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc.; Yin, Shengjun [ORNL; Stevens, Gary [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Sommerville, Daniel [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc.; Palm, Nathan [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA; Heinecke, Carol [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP) Conferences. This work is also relevant to the ongoing efforts of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code, Section XI, Working Group on Operating Plant Criteria (WGOPC) efforts to incorporate nozzle fracture mechanics solutions into a revision to ASME B&PV Code, Section XI, Nonmandatory Appendix G.

  2. Numerically Estimating Internal Models of Dynamic Virtual Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekuler, Robert

    human subjects to manipulate a computer-animated virtual object. This virtual object (vO) was a high, human cognition, human information processing, ideal performer, internal model, virtual object, virtual, specifically how humans acquire an internal model of a dynamic virtual object. Our methodology minimizes

  3. Fast object detection for use onboard satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Bange; Stefan Jordan; Michael Biermann; Thomas Kaempke; R alf-Dieter Scholz

    2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose an object detection algorithm which is efficient and fast enough to be used in (almost) real time with the limited computer capacities onboard satellites. For stars below the saturation limit of the CCD detectors it is based on a four neighbourhood local maximum criterion in order to find the centre of a stellar image. For saturated stars it is based on the assumption that the image is increasing monotonically towards the centre in the unsaturated part of the image. The algorithm also calculates approximate stellar magnitudes and efficiently rejects most of the cosmics which would otherwise lead to a large number of false detections. The quality of the algorithm was evaluated with the help of a large set of simulated data for the DIVA satellite mission; different assumptions were made for the noise level, and the presence of cosmics or for a variable sky background. We could show that our algorithm fulfills the requirements for DIVA; only in the case of simulated images which included the bright galaxy M31 some fainter stars could not be detected in the galaxy's vicinity. Since stellar images contain large areas without any stars, we propose an additional block-skipping algorithm which can be coded on special-purpose hardware.

  4. 1 | FC Objectives EA Required? | Stephen Bennett | 08/10/2013 Forestry Commission Objectives When is Equality Analysis Required?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 | FC Objectives ­ EA Required? | Stephen Bennett | 08/10/2013 Appendix 1 Forestry Commission or customers. #12;FC Objectives ­ EA Required? 2 | FC Objectives ­ EA Required | Stephen Bennett | 08? 3 | FC Objectives ­ EA Required | Stephen Bennett | 08/10/2013 Forestry Commission Cross Border

  5. Titanate nanotube thin films with enhanced thermal stability and high-transparency prepared from additive-free sols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koroesi, Laszlo, E-mail: korosi@enviroinvest.hu [Supramolecular and Nanostructured Materials Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Aradi vertanuk tere 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Department of Biotechnology, Nanophage Therapy Center, Enviroinvest Corporation, Kertvaros utca 2, H-7632 Pecs (Hungary); Papp, Szilvia [Supramolecular and Nanostructured Materials Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Aradi vertanuk tere 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Department of Biotechnology, Nanophage Therapy Center, Enviroinvest Corporation, Kertvaros utca 2, H-7632 Pecs (Hungary); Hornok, Viktoria [Supramolecular and Nanostructured Materials Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Aradi vertanuk tere 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Oszko, Albert [Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Szeged, Aradi vertanuk tere 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Petrik, Peter; Patko, Daniel; Horvath, Robert [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science MFA, Research Center for Natural Sciences, Konkoly-Thege ut 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Dekany, Imre [Supramolecular and Nanostructured Materials Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Aradi vertanuk tere 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanate nanotubes were synthesized from TiO{sub 2} in alkaline medium by a conventional hydrothermal method (150 Degree-Sign C, 4.7 bar). To obtain hydrogen titanates, the as-prepared sodium titanates were treated with either HCl or H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} aqueous solutions. A simple synthesis procedure was devised for stable titanate nanotube sols without using any additives. These highly stable ethanolic sols can readily be used to prepare transparent titanate nanotube thin films of high quality. The resulting samples were studied by X-ray diffraction, N{sub 2}-sorption measurements, Raman spectroscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The comparative results of using two kinds of acids shed light on the superior thermal stability of the H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-treated titanate nanotubes (P-TNTs). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that P-TNTs contains P in the near-surface region and the thermal stability was enhanced even at a low ({approx}0.5 at%) concentration of P. After calcination at 500 Degree-Sign C, the specific surface areas of the HCl- and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-treated samples were 153 and 244 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, respectively. The effects of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} treatment on the structure, morphology and porosity of titanate nanotubes are discussed. - Graphical Abstract: TEM picture (left) shows P-TNTs with diameters about 5-6 nm. Inset shows a stable titanate nanotube sol illuminated by a 532 nm laser beam. Due to the presence of the nanoparticles the way of the light is visible in the sol. Cross sectional SEM picture (right) as well as ellipsometry revealed the formation of optical quality P-TNT films with thicknesses below 50 nm. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} treatment led to TNTs with high surface area even after calcination at 500 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-treated TNTs preserved their nanotube morphology up to 500 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable TNT sols can be prepared by the peptization of TNT gels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-transparency TNT thin films of high quality were fabricated.

  6. Seismic response analyses for reactor facilities at Savannah River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.A. Costantino, C.J. (City Univ. of New York, NY (USA)); Xu, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactor facilities at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) were designed during the 1950's. The original seismic criteria defining the input ground motion was 0.1 G with UBC (uniform building code) provisions used to evaluate structural seismic loads. Later ground motion criteria have defined the free field seismic motion with a 0.2 G ZPA (free field acceleration) and various spectral shapes. The spectral shapes have included the Housner spectra, a site specific spectra, and the US NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) Reg. Guide 1.60 shape. The development of these free field seismic criteria are discussed in the paper. The more recent seismic analyses have been of the following type: fixed base response spectra, frequency independent lumped parameter soil/structure interaction (SSI), frequency dependent lumped parameter SSI, and current state of the art analyses using computer codes such as SASSI. The results from these computations consist of structural loads and floor response spectra (used for piping and equipment qualification). These results are compared in the paper and the methods used to validate the results are discussed. 14 refs., 11 figs.

  7. Finite element analyses of tool stresses in metal cutting processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kistler, B.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we analytically predict and examine stresses in tool tips used in high speed orthogonal machining operations. Specifically, one analysis was compared to an existing experimental measurement of stresses in a sapphire tool tip cutting 1020 steel at slow speeds. In addition, two analyses were done of a carbide tool tip in a machining process at higher cutting speeds, in order to compare to experimental results produced as part of this study. The metal being cut was simulated using a Sandia developed damage plasticity material model, which allowed the cutting to occur analytically without prespecifying the line of cutting/failure. The latter analyses incorporated temperature effects on the tool tip. Calculated tool forces and peak stresses matched experimental data to within 20%. Stress contours generally agreed between analysis and experiment. This work could be extended to investigate/predict failures in the tool tip, which would be of great interest to machining shops in understanding how to optimize cost/retooling time.

  8. Preparation of environmental analyses for synfuel and unconventional gas technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, R.M. (ed.)

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Government agencies that offer financial incentives to stimulate the commercialization of synfuel and unconventional gas technologies usually require an analysis of environmental impacts resulting from proposed projects. This report reviews potentially significant environmental issues associated with a selection of these technologies and presents guidance for developing information and preparing analyses to address these issues. The technologies considered are western oil shale, tar sand, coal liquefaction and gasification, peat, unconventional gas (western tight gas sands, eastern Devonian gas shales, methane from coal seams, and methane from geopressured aquifers), and fuel ethanol. Potentially significant issues are discussed under the general categories of land use, air quality, water use, water quality, biota, solid waste disposal, socioeconomics, and health and safety. The guidance provided in this report can be applied to preparation and/or review of proposals, environmental reports, environmental assessments, environmental impact statements, and other types of environmental analyses. The amount of detail required for any issue discussed must, by necessity, be determined on a case-by-case basis.

  9. 3-D Finite Element Analyses of the Egan Cavern Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klamerus, E.W.; Ehgartner, B.L.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed for the two gas-filled storage caverns at the Egan field, Jennings dome, Louisiana. The effects of cavern enlargement on surface subsidence, storage loss, and cavern stability were investigated. The finite element model simulated the leaching of caverns to 6 and 8 billion cubic feet (BCF) and examined their performance at various operating conditions. Operating pressures varied from 0.15 psi/ft to 0.9 psi/ft at the bottom of the lowest cemented casing. The analysis also examined the stability of the web or pillar of salt between the caverns under differential pressure loadings. The 50-year simulations were performed using JAC3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasistatic solids. A damage criterion based on onset of dilatancy was used to evaluate cavern instability. Dilation results from the development of microfractures in salt and, hence, potential increases in permeability onset occurs well before large scale failure. The analyses predicted stable caverns throughout the 50-year period for the range of pressures investigated. Some localized salt damage was predicted near the bottom walls of the caverns if the caverns are operated at minimum pressure for long periods of time. Volumetric cavern closures over time due to creep were moderate to excessive depending on the salt creep properties and operating pressures. However, subsidence above the cavern field was small and should pose no problem, to surface facilities.

  10. Tracking target objects orbiting earth using satellite-based telescopes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Vries, Willem H; Olivier, Scot S; Pertica, Alexander J

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for tracking objects that are in earth orbit via a constellation or network of satellites having imaging devices is provided. An object tracking system includes a ground controller and, for each satellite in the constellation, an onboard controller. The ground controller receives ephemeris information for a target object and directs that ephemeris information be transmitted to the satellites. Each onboard controller receives ephemeris information for a target object, collects images of the target object based on the expected location of the target object at an expected time, identifies actual locations of the target object from the collected images, and identifies a next expected location at a next expected time based on the identified actual locations of the target object. The onboard controller processes the collected image to identify the actual location of the target object and transmits the actual location information to the ground controller.

  11. Determining root correspondence between previously and newly detected objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paglieroni, David W.; Beer, N Reginald

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A system that applies attribute and topology based change detection to networks of objects that were detected on previous scans of a structure, roadway, or area of interest. The attributes capture properties or characteristics of the previously detected objects, such as location, time of detection, size, elongation, orientation, etc. The topology of the network of previously detected objects is maintained in a constellation database that stores attributes of previously detected objects and implicitly captures the geometrical structure of the network. A change detection system detects change by comparing the attributes and topology of new objects detected on the latest scan to the constellation database of previously detected objects.

  12. Dynamics of slow light and light storage in a Doppler-broadened electromagnetically-induced-transparency medium: A numerical approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Shih-Wei; Chen, Yi-Hsin; Yu, Ite A. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Gou, Shih-Chuan [Department of Physics, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua 50058, Taiwan (China); Horng, Tzyy-Leng [Department of Applied Mathematics, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40074, Taiwan (China)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a numerical scheme to study the dynamics of slow light and light storage in an electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) medium at finite temperatures. Allowing for the motional coupling, we derive a set of coupled Schroedinger equations describing a boosted closed three-level EIT system according to the principle of Galilean relativity. The dynamics of a uniformly moving EIT medium can thus be determined by numerically integrating the coupled Schroedinger equations for atoms plus one ancillary Maxwell-Schroedinger equation for the probe pulse. The central idea of this work rests on the assumption that the loss of ground-state coherence at finite temperatures can be ascribed to the incoherent superposition of density matrices representing the EIT systems with various velocities. Close agreements are demonstrated in comparing the numerical results with the experimental data for both slow light and light storage. In particular, the distinct characters featuring the decay of ground-state coherence can be well verified for slow light and light storage. This warrants that the current scheme can be applied to determine the decaying profile of the ground-state coherence as well as the temperature of the EIT medium.

  13. Effect of ellipticity on Hanle electromagnetically induced absorption and transparency resonances with longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ram, Nibedita; Pattabiraman, M.; Vijayan, C. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of incident light field ellipticity on the electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) resonances has been studied experimentally and computationally in Hanle configuration with longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields. We identify the Zeeman coherences that influence the resonance profile and study the role of coherence-transfer from excited to ground state via spontaneous emission as a function of ellipticity for the F{sub g}=2{yields}F{sub e}=3 transition of {sup 87}Rb. The EIT resonance observed with the light field locked on the F{sub g}=1{yields}F{sub e}=2 transition of {sup 87}Rb is an influence of the nearby F{sub g}=1{yields}F{sub e}=0 closed and F{sub g}=1{yields}F{sub e}=1 open transitions. With increase in ellipticity the observed EIA and EIT resonances diminish in amplitude for a longitudinal magnetic field and are enhanced for a transverse magnetic field. We computationally account for these observations and discuss the factors that influence the EIA and EIT resonance amplitudes as a function of ellipticity and show that for a transverse field scan the ellipticity dependence of the EIA resonance amplitude can be accounted for without invoking the Doppler effect unlike for a longitudinal field scan. We also show that the maximum in the EIA resonance amplitude obtained for nonzero ellipticities with a longitudinal magnetic field depends on the closedness of the atomic system.

  14. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/12: ENTNEA: A Concept for Enhancing Nuclear Transparency for Confidence Building in Northeast Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, Man-Kwon; Shin, Sung-Tack

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear energy continues to be a strong and growing component of economic development in Northeast Asia. A broad range of nuclear energy systems already exists across the region and vigorous growth is projected. Associated with these capabilities and plans are various concerns about operational safety, environmental protection, and accumulation of spent fuel and other nuclear materials. We consider cooperative measures that might address these concerns. The confidence building measures suggested here center on the sharing of information to lessen concerns about nuclear activities or to solve technical problems. These activities are encompassed by an Enhanced Nuclear Transparency in Northeast Asia (ENTNEA) concept that would be composed of near-term, information-sharing activities and an eventual regional institution. The near-term activities would address specific concerns and build a tradition of cooperation; examples include radiation measurements for public safety and emergency response, demonstration of safe operations at facilities and in transportation, and material security in the back end of the fuel cycle. Linkages to existing efforts and organizations would be sought to maximize the benefits of cooperation. In the longer term, the new cooperative tradition might evolve into an ENTNEA institution. In institutional form, ENTNEA could combine the near-term activities and new cooperative activities, which might require an institutional basis, for the mutual benefit and security of regional parties.

  15. Electromagnetically induced transparency in a five-level {Lambda} system dominated by two-photon resonant transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan Dong [College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); School of Science, Changchun University, Changchun 130022 (China); Gao Jinwei; Bao Qianqian; Yang Hong; Wang Heng; Wu Jinhui [College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the steady optical response of a five-level atomic system in the parametric region where resonant two-photon transitions are much stronger than far-detuned single-photon transitions. We find that the concurrent absorption of two weak probe fields can be well suppressed in a narrow spectral region to attain electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) via quantum destructive interference between different two-photon transition pathways. To gain a deeper insight into relevant physics, we adiabatically reduce this five-level system with trivial single-photon transitions into a three-level system with vanishing single-photon transitions by deriving an effective Hamiltonian. The two systems have almost the same two-photon absorption spectra exhibiting typical EIT features but are a little different in fine details. This means that most characteristics of two-photon quantum destructive interference are reserved after the adiabatic elimination approximation. In addition, we verify by numerical calculations that the two-photon EIT spectra are insensitive to the dipole-dipole interaction of cold Rydberg atoms when the uppermost level has a high principle quantum number.

  16. The RACER (risk analysis, communication, evaluation, and reduction) stakeholder environmental data transparency project for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echohawk, John Chris [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dorries, Alison M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eberhart, Craig F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Werdel, Nancy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The RACER (Risk Analysis, Communication, Evaluation, and Reduction) project was created in 2003, as an effort to enhance the Los Alamos National Laboratory's ability to effectively communicate the data and processes used to evaluate environmental risks to the public and the environment. The RACER project staff consists of members of Risk Assessment Corporation, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). RACER staff worked closely with members of the community, tribal governments, and others within NMED and LANL to create innovative tools and a process that could provide information to regulators, LANL and the community about the sources of public health risk and ecological impact from LAN L operations. The RACER Data Analysis Tool (DA T) provides the public with webbased access to environmental measurement data collected in and around the LANL site. Its purpose is to provide a 'transparent' view to the public of all data collected by LANL and NMED regarding the LANL site. The DAT is available to the public at 'www.racernm.com'.

  17. Object-Oriented Perl Object-Oriented PERL & BioPerl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    Object Model Input/Output Graphic Rendering Single sequence Bio::Seq Bio::SeqIO Bio::Graphics Aligned sequences Bio::SimpleAlign Bio::AlignIO Bio::Align::Graphics Homology search Bio::Search Bio::SearchIO Bio::Graphics perldoc /data/yoda/b/bio425/bioperl-live/Bio/Seq.pm perldoc Bio::SeqIO # if in a standard location

  18. Break modeling for RELAP5 analyses of ISP-27 Bethsy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petelin, S.; Gortnar, O.; Mavko, B.; Parzer, I.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents pre- and posttest analyses of International Standard Problem (ISP) 27 on the Bethsy facility and separate RELAP5 break model tests considering the measured boundary condition at break inlet. This contribution also demonstrates modifications which have assured the significant improvement of model response in posttest simulations. Calculations were performed using the RELAP5/MOD2/36.05 and RELAP5/MOD3.5M5 codes on the MicroVAX, SUN, and CONVEX computers. Bethsy is an integral test facility that simulates a typical 900-MW (electric) Framatome pressurized water reactor. The ISP-27 scenario involves a 2-in. cold-leg break without HPSI and with delayed operator procedures for secondary system depressurization.

  19. Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses Of The LS-VHTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cliff B. Davis; Grant L. Hawkes

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal-hydraulic analyses were performed to evaluate the safety characteristics of the Liquid-Salt-Cooled Very High-Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR). A one-dimensional model of the LS-VHTR was developed using the RELAP5-3D computer program. The thermal calculations from the one-dimensional model of a fuel block were benchmarked against a multi-dimensional finite element model. The RELAP5-3D model was used to simulate a transient initiated by loss of forced convection in which the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) passively removed decay heat. Parametric calculations were performed to investigate the effects of various parameters, including bypass flow fraction, coolant channel diameter, and the coolant outlet temperature. Additional parametric calculations investigated the effects of an enhanced RVACS design, failure to scram, and radial/axial conduction in the core.

  20. Analyses of femtosecond laser ablation of Ti, Zr, Hf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grojo, D; Bruneau, S; Itina, T

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Femtosecond laser ablation of Ti, Zr and Hf has been investigated by means of in-situ plasma diagnostics. Fast plasma imaging with the aid of an intensified charged coupled device (ICCD) camera was used to characterise the plasma plume expansion on a nanosecond time scale. Time- and spaceresolved optical emission spectroscopy was employed to perform time-of-flight measurements of ions and neutral atoms. It is shown that two plasma components with different expansion velocities are generated by the ultra-short laser ablation process. The expansion behaviour of these two components has been analysed as a function of laser fluence and target material. The results are discussed in terms of mechanisms responsible for ultra-short laser ablation.