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  1. Andy Oare | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Andy Oare About Us Andy Oare - Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Andy Oare Andy Oare joined the Energy Department as a member of the Recovery Act team where he led new media production and messaging efforts around the Department's Recovery Act activities. He then transitioned to the Office of Public Affairs where his background with state and local governmental programs through his Recovery Act work served well as his work focused on energy efficiency and energy economy

  2. O.A.R. 345-020 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Page Edit with form History O.A.R. 345-020 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- ResolutionResolution: O.A.R. 345-020Legal Abstract...

  3. O.A.R. 660-033 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    O.A.R. 660-033 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- ResolutionResolution: O.A.R. 660-033Legal Abstract Land Conservation and...

  4. O.A.R. 345-021 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: O.A.R. 345-021Legal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2014 Legal Citation O.A.R....

  5. O.A.R. 660-006 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    O.A.R. 660-006 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- ResolutionResolution: O.A.R. 660-006Legal Abstract Land Conservation and...

  6. OAR 340-209 - Department of Environmental Quality Public Participation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regulation providing for public participation in Department of Environmental Quality decision making process. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2013 Legal Citation OAR...

  7. OAR - Division 100-Wildlife Diversity Plan | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    availability: http:crossref.org Citation Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleOAR-Division100-WildlifeDiversityPlan&oldid792434" Feedback Contact...

  8. OAR 340-105 - DEQ Hazardous Management Facility Permits | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: OAR 340-105 - DEQ Hazardous Management Facility PermitsLegal Abstract Establishes basic permitting requirements for...

  9. OAR 345 - Department of Energy, Energy Facility Siting Council...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5 - Department of Energy, Energy Facility Siting Council Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: OAR 345 -...

  10. OAR 340-216 - Air Contaminant Discharge Permits | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OAR 340-216 - Air Contaminant Discharge PermitsLegal Abstract Regulations for air contaminant discharge permits issued by the Department of Environmental Quality....

  11. O.A.R. 345-015 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- ResolutionResolution: O.A.R. 345-015Legal Abstract Department of Energy, Energy Siting Council: Procedures...

  12. OAR 736-051 - Archaeological Permits | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Archaeological PermitsLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 1994 Legal Citation OAR 736-051 (1994) DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org...

  13. OAR 632-020 - Geothermal Regulations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Geothermal RegulationsLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 1972 Legal Citation OAR 632-020 (1972) DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org...

  14. OAR 340-048 - Certification of Compliance with Water Quality...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Procedures for processing applications for certification pursuant to Section 401 of the Clean Water Act. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 1985 Legal Citation OAR 340-048...

  15. OAR 340-106 - DEQ Permitting Procedures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    6 - DEQ Permitting Procedures Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: OAR 340-106 - DEQ Permitting ProceduresLegal...

  16. OAR 690 Standards and Procedures for Low-temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    90 Standards and Procedures for Low-temperature Geothermal Production Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: OAR...

  17. OAR 340-120 - Additional Siting and Permitting Requirements for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OAR 340-120 - Additional Siting and Permitting Requirements for Hazardous Waste and PCB Treatment and Disposal Facilities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  18. OAR 340-073 - Department of Environmental Quality Construction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3 - Department of Environmental Quality Construction Standards Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: OAR 340-073...

  19. OAR 340-071 - On Site Wastewater Treatment Systems Definitions...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1 - On Site Wastewater Treatment Systems Definitions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: OAR 340-071 - On Site...

  20. OAR 635-415 - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OAR 635-415 - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: OAR 635-415 -...

  1. SU-E-J-59: Effective Adaptive DMLC Gated Radiotherapy with OAR Sparing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y; Wu, H; Zhou, Z; Sandison, MinGeorge

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Patient respiratory motion degrades the effectiveness of cancer radiation treatment. Advanced respiratory gating delivers radiation dose accurately yet with elongated treatment time. The goal of this research is to propose a novel adaptive dMLC dynamic gating with high delivery efficiency and precision. Methods: The dose delivery of dMLC is aided by simultaneous tracking of tumor and organ at risk (OAR). The leaf opening/closing will follow the motion trajectory of the tumor while sparing the OAR. The treatment beam turns on only when there is no overlapping between OAR and tumor in BEV. A variety of evaluation metrics were considered and calculated, including duty cycle, beam toggling rate, and direct irradiation avoidance to OAR, under various combinations of different tumor margins and the distance between the centers of the tumor and OAR in BEV (expressed as dx). Results: Retrospective simulation was performed to investigate the feasibility and superiority of this technique using four groups of synchronized tumor and OAR motion data. The simulation results indicate that the tumor and OAR motion patterns and their relative positions are the dominant influential factors. The duty cycle can be greater than 96.71% yet can be as low as 6.69% depending different motion groups. This proposed technique provides good OAR protection, especially for such cases with low duty cycle for which as high as 77.71% maximal direct irradiation to OAR can be spared. Increasing dx improves the duty cycle (treatment efficiency) and provides better OAR volume sparing, whereas, that of the tumor margins has the opposite influence. Conclusion: This real-time adaptive dMLC gated radiation treatment with synchronous tumor and OAR tracking has inherent accurate dose delivery to tumor with reduced treatment time. In addition, the OAR protection capability make it an outstanding potential treatment strategy for mobile tumors.

  2. O.A.R. 141-122 - Rules for Granting Easements on Trust and Non...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: O.A.R. 141-122 - Rules for Granting Easements on Trust and Non-Trust LandLegal Abstract...

  3. O.A.R. 141-083 - Rules for Granting Easements for Fiber Optic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: O.A.R. 141-083 - Rules for Granting Easements for Fiber Optic and Other CablesLegal...

  4. O.A.R. 340-045 - Regulations Pertaining to NPDES and WPCF Permits...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: O.A.R. 340-045 - Regulations Pertaining to NPDES and WPCF PermitsLegal Abstract These...

  5. O.A.R. 245-023 - Need Standard for Non-generating Facilities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: O.A.R. 245-023 - Need Standard for Non-generating FacilitiesLegal Abstract These...

  6. O.A.R. 345-015 - Energy Facility Siting Council Site Certification...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: O.A.R. 345-015 - Energy Facility Siting Council Site Certification ProceduresLegal...

  7. O.A.R. 345-021 - Application for Site Certification | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: O.A.R. 345-021 - Application for Site CertificationLegal Abstract These administrative...

  8. O.A.R. 345-020 - Notice of Intent | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: O.A.R. 345-020 - Notice of IntentLegal Abstract These administrative rules outline the...

  9. OAR 340-150 - DEQ Underground Storage Tank Rules | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    150 - DEQ Underground Storage Tank Rules Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: OAR 340-150 - DEQ Underground...

  10. OAR 660-015 - Land Use Planning Statewide Planning Goals | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    60-015 - Land Use Planning Statewide Planning Goals Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: OAR 660-015 - Land Use...

  11. Oregon - OAR 860-025-0030 - Petition for CPCN for Construction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OAR 860-025-0030 - Petition for CPCN for Construction of Overhead Transmission Lines Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  12. A proposal for positive cooperativity in anion-cation binding in yttrium and lutetium complexes based on o-amino-substituted phenolate ligands. On the way to coordination polymers by self-assembly. Molecular structures of [ClLu(OAr){sub 3}Na] (X-ray) and [ClY(OAr{prime}){sub 3}Y(OAr{prime}){sub 3}Na] (X-ray and {sup 89}Y-NMR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogerheide, M.P.; Ringelberg, S.N.; Grove, D.M.

    1996-02-28

    The authors prepared the hetero(poly)metallic complexes [ClM(OAr){sub 3}Na] (M = Lu (3a), Y (3b)) and [ClY(OAr`){sub 3}Y(OAR`){sub 3}Na] (4) (OAr = OC{sub 6}H{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}-2,6,Me-4; OAr` = OC{sub 6}H{sub 4}(CH{sub 2}NMe{sub 2})-2). Structural analysis was afforded by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The structures show evidence for anion-cation cooperativity in bonding and are discussed in detail for the compounds in both the solid state and in solution.

  13. From Volvo to a Career in Virginia's Weatherization Industry...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Virginia ... The new facility, which opened in January, trains Virginia workers in green-collar jobs, ...

  14. Oa$RBbdxgeEOperatlons Oar; Ridge, Tennessee 37830 National Lead...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    the material at the storage site, transportation to the FMC, and storage at the lNX. We expect to receive funding (75,000) for this activity in the June 1979 financial plan. ...

  15. OAR 635-100 - Wildlife Diversity Plans | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Wildlife Diversity Plans used to guide the State of Oregon's Department of Fish and Wildlife when managing non-game wildlife. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect...

  16. Are You a Smart Grid Champion? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs You've heard it a million times -- knowledge ... Watch this video from Con Edison of New York (recipient of ...

  17. Energy 101: Concentrating Solar Power | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Concentrating Solar Power Energy 101: Concentrating Solar Power August 6, 2010 - 12:58pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs How does ...

  18. Interested Parties - ARPA-E / National Association of Manufacturers |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 111109_andy_oare.pdf More Documents & Publications Interested Parties - Broydrick & Associates

  19. OAR 340-045 - Regulations Pertaining to NPDES and WPCF Permits...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract Prescribe limitations on discharge of wastes and the requirements and procedures for obtaining NPDES and WPCF permits from the Department of Environmental Quality....

  20. O.A.R. 734-055 - Pole Lines, Buried Cables, Pipe lines, Signs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rules outline the requirements for location, installation, construction, maintenance and use of pole lines, buried cables, pipe lines, signs miscellaneous operations...

  1. O.A.R. 734-051 - Highway Approaches, Access Control, Spacing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1 - Highway Approaches, Access Control, Spacing Standards and Medians Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation:...

  2. OAR 340-044 - Construction and Use of Waste Disposal Wells or...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4 - Construction and Use of Waste Disposal Wells or Other Underground Injection Activities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  3. Ningbo Andy Optoelectronic | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yuyao City, Zhejiang Province, China Zip: 315400 Product: A wholly-foreign-owned LED packaging company and a maker of LED-application products. References: Ningbo Andy...

  4. Sandia Energy - SSLS Scientist Andy Armstrong Receives 2013 Employee...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SSLS Scientist Andy Armstrong Receives 2013 Employee Recognition Award Home Energy Solid-State Lighting Events News EC Energy Efficiency News & Events SSLS Scientist Andy Armstrong...

  5. Mr. Andy Wall0 The Aerospace Corporation

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    'k.f' :, , j '"; ,,' DEC 5 1984 Mr. Andy Wall0 The Aerospace Corporation suite 4000 955 L'Enfant Plaza, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20024 Dear Mr. Wallo: The Divisfon of Remedial Action Projects staff has reviewed the authority review documents for Gardinler, Inc., Tampa, Florida; Conserv (formerly Virginia-Carolina Chemical Co.), Nichols, Florida; and Blockson Chemical co., Joliet, Illinois. Based on the content therein and in consultation with Mr. Steve Miller, Office of General Counsel

  6. This Month's Feature on .EDU Connections: Central Carolina Community

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    College | Department of Energy Central Carolina Community College This Month's Feature on .EDU Connections: Central Carolina Community College January 13, 2011 - 3:36pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs The work of students at Central Carolina Community College (CCCC) is powering the school -- literally. Students are constructing a testing plant to produce biofuels, which will fuel college vehicles and equipment. CCCC offers a variety of

  7. The Future of Electric Vehicles and Arizona State University's MAIL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Battery | Department of Energy The Future of Electric Vehicles and Arizona State University's MAIL Battery The Future of Electric Vehicles and Arizona State University's MAIL Battery August 11, 2010 - 4:26pm Addthis Cody Friesen and his team at Arizona State University | Photo Credit Arizona State University Cody Friesen and his team at Arizona State University | Photo Credit Arizona State University Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this

  8. This Month's Feature on .EDUconnections: University of Wisconsin-Madison |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy This Month's Feature on .EDUconnections: University of Wisconsin-Madison This Month's Feature on .EDUconnections: University of Wisconsin-Madison April 15, 2011 - 3:10pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs This month, .EDUconnections, puts the spotlight on the University of Wisconsin. UW-Madison ranks as one of the most prolific research universities in the world, providing a learning environment where faculty, staff and

  9. Whistleblower Information | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy While Summer Heats Up, Birmingham Community Centers Cool Down While Summer Heats Up, Birmingham Community Centers Cool Down July 22, 2010 - 4:14pm Addthis Birmingham Mayor William A. Bell, Sr., City officials, and DOE representatives at Monday's groundbreaking. Birmingham Mayor William A. Bell, Sr., City officials, and DOE representatives at Monday's groundbreaking. Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Birmingham received

  10. This document, concerning general service lamps is an action issued by the Depar

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    College | Department of Energy This Month's Feature on .EDU Connections: Central Carolina Community College This Month's Feature on .EDU Connections: Central Carolina Community College January 13, 2011 - 3:36pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs The work of students at Central Carolina Community College (CCCC) is powering the school -- literally. Students are constructing a testing plant to produce biofuels, which will fuel college vehicles and

  11. The INL Seismic Risk Assessment Project: Requirements for Addressing DOE

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Battery | Department of Energy The Future of Electric Vehicles and Arizona State University's MAIL Battery The Future of Electric Vehicles and Arizona State University's MAIL Battery August 11, 2010 - 4:26pm Addthis Cody Friesen and his team at Arizona State University | Photo Credit Arizona State University Cody Friesen and his team at Arizona State University | Photo Credit Arizona State University Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this

  12. America's Home Energy Education Challenge | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Registration is open now for school principals and teachers until September 30, 2011. From September through December, energy data will be measured, and the awards will be announced in January 2012. Let's be honest. Many of us probably had trouble paying attention one or two times in middle school science class. While the occasional frog dissection and "potato-volt" experiments were cool,

  13. Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion: Heavy-Duty Optical-Engine Research |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy This page contains information on the recently released BioPower engines. PDF icon analysis_saab2007.pdf More Documents & Publications Enabling High Efficiency Ethanol Engines Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice, Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) (Fact Sheet) The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on "E85" Engine Optimization

    Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this

  14. General Assembly of the National Industrial Association (ANDI...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    General Assembly of the National Industrial Association (ANDI) General Assembly of the ... between the United States and Colombia in all areas - but especially on energy. ...

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - 9_ANDY_IMBODEN_NMMSS_2014_Powerpoint_Waste...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NRC's Waste Confidence Rulemaking Andy Imboden, NRC, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards Outline Schedule Completed Activities Public Participation ...

  16. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Assessment of Construction at the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility (OAR EA-HANFORD-2015-09-09)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    EA-HANFORD-2015-09-09 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Assessment of Construction at the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Dates of Activity: 09/15/15 Onsite 11/30/15 Records Review Report Preparer: Joseph J. Lenahan Activity Description/Purpose: The purpose of this activity was to perform a quarterly assessment of the construction activities at the Hanford K-West Annex Facility. The office of Enterprise Assessments (EA) performed the following activities during this review. 1. Reviewed the status

  17. The IMPACCT of Innovation on Carbon Capture and Storage | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy IMPACCT of Innovation on Carbon Capture and Storage The IMPACCT of Innovation on Carbon Capture and Storage August 19, 2010 - 11:57am Addthis Team member at GE Global Research Team member at GE Global Research Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Last week the Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) released a report evaluating the barriers to the wide-scale deployment of CCS. While the report indicates that CCS can be a viable

  18. This Month's Feature on .EDU Connections: Iowa State University |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Iowa State University This Month's Feature on .EDU Connections: Iowa State University February 2, 2011 - 11:23am Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Iowa State University's vision is to lead the world in advancing the land-grant ideas of putting science, technology and human creativity to work. Its mission is to create, share and apply knowledge to make Iowa and the world a better place. This month, ISU is being featured on

  19. Call For Abstracts (Student Research Forum) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Caithness Shephards Flat: The Largest Wind Farm Project in the World Caithness Shephards Flat: The Largest Wind Farm Project in the World October 12, 2010 - 5:04pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Wind farm project is projected to employ over 400 people in construction phase. It is expected to produce 845 megawatt wind-powered electrical generation, or enough wind energy to supply 235,000 homes.

  20. Faces of the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Faces of the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site Faces of the Recovery Act: Jobs at Savannah River Site October 30, 2009 - 3:35pm Addthis The Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina has been able to create/save thousands of jobs through the Recovery Act. These are the stories of just a few of their new hires. Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Hear from some of the Recovery Act hires at the Energy Department's Savannah River Site in

  1. Fuel Economy on the Fly | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economy on the Fly Fuel Economy on the Fly January 19, 2011 - 5:06pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Fuel Economy information at your fingertips Cross Post from the Energy Savers Blog. Written by Shannon Brescher Shea. With the North American International Auto Show in Detroit kicking off the auto-show circuit last week, manufacturers are unveiling their future models. If you're inspired and in the market for a new

  2. LED Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LED Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! LED Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! December 2, 2010 - 4:34pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Ed. Note cross posted from the Energy Savers Blog. Written by Allison Casey This week brings a day that many people look forward to all year -- and I'm not talking about Thanksgiving, or Black Friday. I'm talking about that magical day when it's finally okay to drag the dusty boxes from the

  3. The "God Particle": Have Your Cake and Eat It Too! | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The "God Particle": Have Your Cake and Eat It Too! The "God Particle": Have Your Cake and Eat It Too! August 31, 2010 - 4:04pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Sometimes called the "God's Particle," the Higgs boson is believed to be the key to the origin of particle mass, and there is a worldwide race to be the first to "discover" it experimentally. Phycisists at Fermilab found out

  4. The Facts On Electric Vehicles: Interview with Pat Davis | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy The Facts On Electric Vehicles: Interview with Pat Davis The Facts On Electric Vehicles: Interview with Pat Davis December 22, 2010 - 2:25pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Electric vehicles have been an extremely hot topic lately and no stranger to the Energy Blog. When the first public curbside electric vehicle charging station rolled out in Washington DC, we covered it. And when Secretary Chu got a first-hand look at the Nissan Leaf

  5. LED Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LED Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! LED Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! December 2, 2010 - 4:34pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Ed. Note cross posted from the Energy Savers Blog. Written by Allison Casey This week brings a day that many people look forward to all year -- and I'm not talking about Thanksgiving, or Black Friday. I'm talking about that magical day when it's finally okay to drag the dusty boxes from the

  6. Looking Ahead with a Look Back at the 2nd Annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summit | Department of Energy Looking Ahead with a Look Back at the 2nd Annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Looking Ahead with a Look Back at the 2nd Annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit March 3, 2011 - 10:01am Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Yesterday, we wrapped up 2nd Annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit, an event that featured some of today's most cutting-edge clean energy technologies. Over the past three days, the Summit hosted

  7. 8th Annual Nebraska Wind and Solar Conference and Exhibition | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    800,000 Jobs by 2012 800,000 Jobs by 2012 August 16, 2010 - 6:21pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? ZBB Energy is a clean energy manufacturing company specializing in the production of advanced zinc bromide flow batteries and intelligent power control platforms for renewable energy storage. It's also a prime example of how the Recovery Act is helping new clean energy industries bolster the manufacturing economies of

  8. America's Home Energy Education Challenge | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    America's Home Energy Education Challenge America's Home Energy Education Challenge June 6, 2011 - 12:41pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Editor's Note: This entry has been cross-posted from DOE's Energy Blog. Let's be honest. Many of us probably had trouble paying attention one or two times in middle school science class. While the occasional frog dissection and "potato-volt" experiments were cool, not all of us got up in the morning,

  9. The Impacts of Commercial Electric Utility Rate Structure Elements on the

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy The IMPACCT of Innovation on Carbon Capture and Storage The IMPACCT of Innovation on Carbon Capture and Storage August 19, 2010 - 11:57am Addthis Team member at GE Global Research Team member at GE Global Research Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Last week the Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) released a report evaluating the barriers to the wide-scale deployment of CCS. While the report indicates that CCS can be a

  10. A Look Inside 1366 and Sun Catalytix, Two "Game-Changing" Innovation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Projects | Department of Energy 1366 and Sun Catalytix, Two "Game-Changing" Innovation Projects A Look Inside 1366 and Sun Catalytix, Two "Game-Changing" Innovation Projects February 3, 2011 - 1:53pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What will the project do? These six innovative technology recipients received a combined $23.6 million in funding from the Recovery Act, an iIn a little over a year, they have generated an

  11. President Requests $520.7 Million for Fossil Energy Programs | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Now" | Department of Energy in North Carolina: "Our Generation's Sputnik Moment is Now" President Obama in North Carolina: "Our Generation's Sputnik Moment is Now" December 6, 2010 - 4:53pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Ed. Note cross posted from the White House Blog. As America fights to recover from the economic catastrophe that began almost three years ago, it's important to remember that America had already been

  12. President Obama in North Carolina: "Our Generation's Sputnik Moment is

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Now" | Department of Energy in North Carolina: "Our Generation's Sputnik Moment is Now" President Obama in North Carolina: "Our Generation's Sputnik Moment is Now" December 6, 2010 - 4:53pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Ed. Note cross posted from the White House Blog. As America fights to recover from the economic catastrophe that began almost three years ago, it's important to remember that America had already been

  13. Changing the Climate: Looking Towards a More Cost Effective, Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Advanced Energy Manufacturing Game in America's Heartland Changing the Advanced Energy Manufacturing Game in America's Heartland December 16, 2010 - 9:32am Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Clean energy manufacturing is expanding across the Midwest. This was spurred in large part by the Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit, also known as 48C, which was part of the Recovery Act. The $2.3

  14. 200,000 Homes Weatherized Under the Recovery Act -- Video from Cathy Zoi |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 0,000 Homes Weatherized Under the Recovery Act -- Video from Cathy Zoi 200,000 Homes Weatherized Under the Recovery Act -- Video from Cathy Zoi August 26, 2010 - 4:51pm Addthis Cathy Zoi, Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, shares her thoughts on reaching the 200,000 weatherized homes milestone. Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Today Vice President Biden announced that 200,000 homes have been

  15. 800,000 Jobs by 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    800,000 Jobs by 2012 800,000 Jobs by 2012 August 16, 2010 - 6:21pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? ZBB Energy is a clean energy manufacturing company specializing in the production of advanced zinc bromide flow batteries and intelligent power control platforms for renewable energy storage. It's also a prime example of how the Recovery Act is helping new clean energy industries bolster the manufacturing economies of

  16. Berkeley Lab Technology Spawns Successful Start-up Companies | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Berkeley Lab Technology Spawns Successful Start-up Companies Berkeley Lab Technology Spawns Successful Start-up Companies October 25, 2010 - 10:58am Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Three start-up companies using Berkeley-developed technology have either had highly successful launches or closed major deals in the last several months. Ed. Note cross posted from Berkeley Lab News Center, written by Julie Chao.

  17. Caithness Shephards Flat: The Largest Wind Farm Project in the World |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Caithness Shephards Flat: The Largest Wind Farm Project in the World Caithness Shephards Flat: The Largest Wind Farm Project in the World October 12, 2010 - 5:04pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Wind farm project is projected to employ over 400 people in construction phase. It is expected to produce 845 megawatt wind-powered electrical generation, or enough wind energy to supply 235,000 homes.

  18. Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and Exhaust

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Clean energy manufacturing is expanding across the Midwest. This was spurred in large part by the Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit, also known as 48C, which was part of the Recovery Act. The $2.3 billion in tax credits received by 183 projects is being matched by nearly $5.4 billion in private capital. One of the big reasons we became a global economic leader is

  19. Fact #856 January 19, 2015 Plug-in and Hybrid Cars Receive High Scores for

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy The Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina has been able to create/save thousands of jobs through the Recovery Act. These are the stories of just a few of their new hires. Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Hear from some of the Recovery Act hires at the Energy Department's Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. These are just a few of the jobs funded by the Recovery Act to accelerate the cleanup of the former nuclear weapons

  20. ANDY: A general, fault-tolerant tool for database searching oncomputer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    clusters (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect ANDY: A general, fault-tolerant tool for database searching oncomputer clusters Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ANDY: A general, fault-tolerant tool for database searching oncomputer clusters Summary: ANDY (seArch coordination aND analYsis) is a set ofPerl programs and modules for distributing large biological databasesearches, and in general any sequence of commands, across the nodes of aLinux computer cluster. ANDY is compatible with

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - 6_Andy IMboden_Presentation to 2013 NMMSS...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Waste Confidence Activities Andy Imboden, Branch Chief Waste Confidence Directorate, U.S. NRC Agenda What is Waste Confidence? Brief History 2012 Court of Appeals...

  2. Small Wind Turbines Taking Off: Q&A with Andy Kruse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    We caught up with Andy Kruse in Dallas to learn about mass production for small wind turbines, who is buying these systems, and what lies ahead for the small wind industry.

  3. ANDY: A general, fault-tolerant tool for database searching on

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ANDY: A general, fault-tolerant tool for database searching on computer clusters Running head: ANDY: database searching on computer clusters Andrew Smith 1,2,3,4 , John-Marc Chandonia 2 , and Steven E. Brenner 1,2 Address for correspondence: Steven E. Brenner Department of Plant and Microbial Biology 461A Koshland Hall University of California Berkeley, CA 94720-3102 email: brenner@compbio.berkeley.edu Affiliations: 1 - Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California,

  4. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Review of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low-Activity Waste Facility Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis Change Package for the Effluent Management Facility (OAR # EA-WTP-LAW-2016-01-25)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Policy Statement: Off Mode Standards for CAC/HP Enforcement Policy Statement: Off Mode Standards for CAC/HP July 8, 2014 DOE will not seek civil penalties for violation of the off mode electrical power consumption standard for central air conditioners or central air conditioning heat pumps (CAC/HP) until 180 days following publication of a final rule establishing a test method for measuring off mode electrical power consumption for CAC/HP. PDF icon Enforcement Policy: Off Mode

  5. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Review of the WTP Low-Activity Waste Facility Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis Change Package for the Effluent Management Facility (OAR # EA-WTP-LAW-2016-01-25)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Operational Awareness Record for the Review of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low-Activity Waste Facility Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis Change Package for the Effluent Management Facility

  6. Andy Armstrong

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Armstrong - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - 9_ANDY_IMBODEN_NMMSS_2014_Powerpoint_Waste Confidence Update Imboden.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Update on NRC's Waste Confidence Rulemaking Andy Imboden, NRC, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards Outline  Schedule  Completed Activities  Public Participation  Public Input to Policy Issues  Path Forward 2 Schedule 3 2012 2012 2013 2013 2014 2014 Scoping for GEIS (Generic Environmental Impact Statement) Develop Draft GEIS and Proposed Rule Public Comment Develop Final GEIS and Final Rule Completed Activities  EIS scoping October 25, 2012 - January 2, 2013 

  8. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hanford K-West Annex Facility OAR EA-HANFORD-2014-09 thru 2015-06 Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Review of the Hanford K-West Annex Facility OAR ...

  9. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effluent Management Facility (OAR EA-WTP-LAW-2016-01-25) Enterprise Assessments ... Effluent Management Facility (OAR EA-WTP-LAW-2016-01-25) March 2016 Operational ...

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... This Operational Assessment Report (OAR) will delineate the policies, procedures, and ... Financial Management (Section 5) and Risk Management (Section 7) are carried out using ...

  11. Andy Freeberg | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Information Resources » Analytical Tools Analytical Tools The Bioenergy Technologies Office and its national lab partners provide a variety of online tools to help analyze data and facilitate decision making. This page links to several of them and includes a widget that calculates the potential volume of ethanol produced from biomass feedstocks. Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF): The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF) facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to

  12. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Assessment of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Construction at the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility (OAR EA-HANFORD-2015-09-09) | Department of Energy Assessment of Construction at the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility (OAR EA-HANFORD-2015-09-09) Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Assessment of Construction at the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility (OAR EA-HANFORD-2015-09-09) February 2016 Operational Awareness Record for the Assessment of Construction at the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility The purpose of

  13. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Follow-Up

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review of the Idaho Site Fire Protection Program as Implemented for the IMCL and the AMWTP, OAR # EA-ID-2015-10-22 | Department of Energy Follow-Up Review of the Idaho Site Fire Protection Program as Implemented for the IMCL and the AMWTP, OAR # EA-ID-2015-10-22 Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Follow-Up Review of the Idaho Site Fire Protection Program as Implemented for the IMCL and the AMWTP, OAR # EA-ID-2015-10-22 December 2015 Enterprise Assessments Operational

  14. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Review of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant High-Level Waste Facility Concentrate Receipt/Melter Feed/Glass Formers Reagent Hazards Analysis Event Tables … June 2015

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Hanford K-West Annex Facility OAR EA-HANFORD-2014-09 thru 2015-06 | Department of Energy for the Review of the Hanford K-West Annex Facility OAR EA-HANFORD-2014-09 thru 2015-06 Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Review of the Hanford K-West Annex Facility OAR EA-HANFORD-2014-09 thru 2015-06 September 2015 Operational Awareness Record for the Review of the Hanford K-West Annex Facility The Department of Energy independent Office of Enterprise Assessments' Office of

  15. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Review of the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hanford K-West Annex Facility OAR EA-HANFORD-2014-09 thru 2015-06 | Department of Energy Hanford K-West Annex Facility OAR EA-HANFORD-2014-09 thru 2015-06 Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Review of the Hanford K-West Annex Facility OAR EA-HANFORD-2014-09 thru 2015-06 September 2015 Operational Awareness Record for the Review of the Hanford K-West Annex Facility The Department of Energy independent Office of Enterprise Assessments' Office of Environment, Safety and

  16. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Assessment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site K-West Annex Facility (OAR EA-HANFORD-2015-09-09) Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Assessment of Construction at the Hanford Site K-West Annex ...

  17. 0. Y, ooopw

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    oar- bonmdullwbee1mrmbara6a3. Ontkyl8, aaae rhort plooer ofrod 2 um indhokr wro poundrtok prollaimry to oladdlzgdth atao Onyhy 25, ' 01110 S foottubm W I-. l oourotely ground et...

  18. RAPID/Roadmap/3-OR-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    potential, geologic and geophysical test data, and other information of a factual nature. See OAR 141-075-0525. 3-OR-d.3 - Notice of bidding The Oregon Department of State...

  19. Oregon Fire Marshall Letter

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    and E85 fuel ethanol fuel specification, dispensers, and dispenser labeling requirements This is a summary of Oregon's biofuel (biodiesel, biodiesel blends, and E85 fuel ethanol) regulations and dispenser labeling requirements. Please refer to OAR 603-027-0410 thru OAR 603-027-0490 for the complete regulation. In addition, we try to answer some common questions about dispensers permitted for use with biofuels. Due to the unique characteristics of these fuels, certain precautions must be taken.

  20. SU-E-T-86: Comparison of Two Commercially Available Programs for the Evaluation of Delivered Daily Dose Using Cone Beam CT (CBCT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuohy, R; Bosse, C; Mavroidis, P; Shi, Z; Crownover, R; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this study, two commercially available programs were compared for the evaluation of delivered daily dose using cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods: Thirty (n=30) patients previously treated in our clinic (10 prostate, 10 SBRT lung and 10 abdomen) were used in this study. The patients' plans were optimized and calculated using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. The daily CBCT scans were imported into Velocity and RayStation along with the corresponding planning CTs, structure sets and 3D dose distributions for each patient. The organs at risk (OAR) were contoured on each CBCT by the prescribing physician and were included in the evaluation of the daily delivered dose. Each CBCT was registered to the planning CT, once with rigid registration and then again, separately, with deformable registration. After registering each CBCT, the dose distribution from the planning CT was overlaid and the dose volume histograms (DVH) for the OAR and the planning target volumes (PTV) were calculated. Results: For prostate patients, we observed daily volume changes for the OARs. The DVH analysis for those patients showed variation in the sparing of the OARs while PTV coverage remained virtually unchanged using both Velocity and RayStation systems. Similar results were observed for abdominal patients. In contrast, for SBRT lung patients, the DVH for the OARs and target were comparable to those from the initial treatment plan. Differences in organ volume and organ doses were also observed when comparing the daily fractions using deformable and rigid registrations. Conclusion: By using daily CBCT dose reconstruction, we proved PTV coverage for prostate and abdominal targets is adequate. However, there is significant dosimetric change for the OARs. For lung SBRT patients, the delivered daily dose for both PTV and OAR is comparable to the planned dose with no significant differences.

  1. SU-E-T-357: Semi-Automated Knowledge-Based Radiation Therapy (KBRT) Planning for Head-And-Neck Cancer (HNC): Can KBRT Plans Achieve Better Results Than Manual Planning?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutzky, C; Grzetic, S; Lo, J; Das, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Knowledge Based Radiation Therapy Treatment (KBRT) planning can be used to semi-automatically generate IMRT plans for new patients using constraints derived from previously manually-planned, geometrically similar patients. We investigate whether KBRT plans can achieve greater dose sparing than manual plans using optimized, organspecific constraint weighting factors. Methods: KBRT planning of HNC radiotherapy cases geometrically matched each new (query) case to one of the 105 clinically approved plans in our database. The dose distribution of the planned match was morphed to fit the querys geometry. Dose-volume constraints extracted from the morphed dose distribution were used to run the IMRT optimization with no user input. In the first version, all constraints were multiplied by a weighting factor of 0.7. The weighting factors were then systematically optimized (in order of OARs with increasing separation from the target) to maximize sparing to each OAR without compromising other OARs. The optimized, second version plans were compared against the first version plans and the clinically approved plans for 45 unilateral/bilateral target cases using the dose metrics: mean, median and maximum (brainstem and cord) doses. Results: Compared to the first version, the second version significantly reduced mean/median contralateral parotid doses (>2Gy) for bilateral cases. Other changes between the two versions were not clinically meaningful. Compared to the original clinical plans, both bilateral and unilateral plans in the second version had lower average dose metrics for 5 of the 6 OARs. Compared to the original plans, the second version achieved dose sparing that was at least as good for all OARs and better for the ipsilateral parotid (bilateral) and oral cavity (bilateral/unilateral). Differences in planning target volume coverage metrics were not clinically significant. Conclusion: HNC-KBRT planning generated IMRT plans with at least equivalent dose sparing to manually generated plans; greater dose sparing was achieved in selected OARs.

  2. Consideration of Dose Limits for Organs at Risk of Thoracic Radiotherapy: Atlas for Lung, Proximal Bronchial Tree, Esophagus, Spinal Cord, Ribs, and Brachial Plexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Feng-Ming; Ritter, Timothy; Quint, Douglas J.; Senan, Suresh; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Hurkmans, Coen W.; Timmerman, Robert; Bezjak, Andrea; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Movsas, Benjamin; Marsh, Lon; Okunieff, Paul; Choy, Hak; Curran, Walter J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To review the dose limits and standardize the three-dimenional (3D) radiographic definition for the organs at risk (OARs) for thoracic radiotherapy (RT), including the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: The present study was performed by representatives from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Soutwestern Oncology Group lung cancer committees. The dosimetric constraints of major multicenter trials of 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT were reviewed and the challenges of 3D delineation of these OARs described. Using knowledge of the human anatomy and 3D radiographic correlation, draft atlases were generated by a radiation oncologist, medical physicist, dosimetrist, and radiologist from the United States and reviewed by a radiation oncologist and medical physicist from Europe. The atlases were then critically reviewed, discussed, and edited by another 10 radiation oncologists. Results: Three-dimensional descriptions of the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus are presented. Two computed tomography atlases were developed: one for the middle and lower thoracic OARs (except for the heart) and one focusing on the brachial plexus for a patient positioned supine with their arms up for thoracic RT. The dosimetric limits of the key OARs are discussed. Conclusions: We believe these atlases will allow us to define OARs with less variation and generate dosimetric data in a more consistent manner. This could help us study the effect of radiation on these OARs and guide high-quality clinical trials and individualized practice in 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT.

  3. Retrospective evaluation of dosimetric quality for prostate carcinomas treated with 3D conformal, intensity modulated and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, Scott B; Kairn, Tanya; Middlebrook, Nigel; Hill, Brendan; Christie, David R H; Knight, Richard T; Kenny, John; Langton, Christian M; Trapp, Jamie V

    2013-12-15

    This study examines and compares the dosimetric quality of radiotherapy treatment plans for prostate carcinoma across a cohort of 163 patients treated across five centres: 83 treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), 33 treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 47 treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Treatment plan quality was evaluated in terms of target dose homogeneity and organs at risk (OAR), through the use of a set of dose metrics. These included the mean, maximum and minimum doses; the homogeneity and conformity indices for the target volumes; and a selection of dose coverage values that were relevant to each OAR. Statistical significance was evaluated using two-tailed Welch's T-tests. The Monte Carlo DICOM ToolKit software was adapted to permit the evaluation of dose metrics from DICOM data exported from a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system. The 3DCRT treatment plans offered greater planning target volume dose homogeneity than the other two treatment modalities. The IMRT and VMAT plans offered greater dose reduction in the OAR: with increased compliance with recommended OAR dose constraints, compared to conventional 3DCRT treatments. When compared to each other, IMRT and VMAT did not provide significantly different treatment plan quality for like-sized tumour volumes. This study indicates that IMRT and VMAT have provided similar dosimetric quality, which is superior to the dosimetric quality achieved with 3DCRT.

  4. MO-C-17A-10: Comparison of Dose Deformable Accumulation by Using Parallel and Serial Approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Z; Li, M; Wong, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The uncertainty of dose accumulation over multiple CT datasets with deformable fusion may have significant impact on clinical decisions. In this study, we investigate the difference of two dose summation approaches involving deformable fusion. Methods: Five patients, four external beam and one brachytherapy(BT), were chosen for the study. The BT patient was treated with CT-based HDR. The CT image sets acquired in the imageguidance process (8-11 CTs/patient) were used to determine the dose delivered to the four external beam patients. (prostate, pelvis, lung and head and neck). For the HDR patient (cervix), five CT image sets and the corresponding BT plans were used. In total 44 CT datasets and RT dose/plans were imported into the image fusion software MiM (6.0.4) for analysis.For each of the five clinical cases, the dose from each fraction was accumulated into the primary CT dataset by using both Parallel and Serial approaches. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) for CTV and selected organs-at-risks (OAR) were generated. The D95(CTV), OAR(mean) and OAR(max) for the four external beam cases the D90(CTV), and the max dose to bladder and rectum for the BT case were compared. Results: For the four external beam patients, the difference in D95(CTV) were <1.2% PD between the parallel and the serial approaches. The differences of the OAR(mean) and the OAR(max ) range from 0 to 3.7% and <1% PD respectively. For the HDR patient, the dose difference for D90 is 11% PD while that of the max dose to bladder and rectum were 11.5% and 23.3% respectively. Conclusion: For external beam treatments, the parallel and serial approaches have <5% difference probably because tumor volume and OAR have less changes from fraction to fraction. For the brachytherapy case, >10% dose difference between the two approaches was observed as significant volume changes of tumor and OAR were observed among treatment fractions.

  5. TU-C-BRE-05: Clinical Implications of AAA Commissioning Errors and Ability of Common Commissioning ' Credentialing Procedures to Detect Them

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McVicker, A; Oldham, M; Yin, F; Adamson, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To test the ability of the TG-119 commissioning process and RPC credentialing to detect errors in the commissioning process for a commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS). Methods: We introduced commissioning errors into the commissioning process for the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) within the Eclipse TPS. We included errors in Dosimetric Leaf Gap (DLG), electron contamination, flattening filter material, and beam profile measurement with an inappropriately large farmer chamber (simulated using sliding window smoothing of profiles). We then evaluated the clinical impact of these errors on clinical intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans (head and neck, low and intermediate risk prostate, mesothelioma, and scalp) by looking at PTV D99, and mean and max OAR dose. Finally, for errors with substantial clinical impact we determined sensitivity of the RPC IMRT film analysis at the midpoint between PTV and OAR using a 4mm distance to agreement metric, and of a 7% TLD dose comparison. We also determined sensitivity of the 3 dose planes of the TG-119 C-shape IMRT phantom using gamma criteria of 3% 3mm. Results: The largest clinical impact came from large changes in the DLG with a change of 1mm resulting in up to a 5% change in the primary PTV D99. This resulted in a discrepancy in the RPC TLDs in the PTVs and OARs of 7.1% and 13.6% respectively, which would have resulted in detection. While use of incorrect flattening filter caused only subtle errors (<1%) in clinical plans, the effect was most pronounced for the RPC TLDs in the OARs (>6%). Conclusion: The AAA commissioning process within the Eclipse TPS is surprisingly robust to user error. When errors do occur, the RPC and TG-119 commissioning credentialing criteria are effective at detecting them; however OAR TLDs are the most sensitive despite the RPC currently excluding them from analysis.

  6. SU-E-T-221: Investigation of Lower Energy (< 6 MV) Photon Beams for Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y; Ming, X; Feng, Y; Zhou, L; Ahmad, M; Deng, J; Nguyen, K; Griffin, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the potential applications of the lower energy (< 6MV) photon beams in the radiotherapeutic management of pediatric cancer and lung cancer patients. Methods: Photon beams of 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6MV were first simulated with EGS4/BEAM and then used for Monte-Carlo dose calculations. For four pediatric patients with abdominal and brain lesions, six 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) plans were generated using single photon energy (2 to 6MV) or mixed energies (3 and 6MV). Furthermore, a virtual machine of 3 and 6MV was commissioned in a treatment planning system (TPS) based on Monte-Carlo simulated data. Three IMRT plans of a lung cancer patient were generated on this virtual machine. All plans were normalized to D95% of target dose for 6MV plan and then compared in terms of integral dose and OAR sparing. Results: For the four pediatric patients, the integral dose for the 2, 3, 4 and 5MV plans increased by 9%, 5%, 3.5%, 1.7%, respectively as compared to 6MV. Almost all OARs in the 2MV plan received more than 10% more doses than 6MV. Mixed energy 3DCRT plans were of the same quality as 6MV plans. For the lung IMRT plans, both the 3MV plan and the mixed beam plan showed better OAR sparing in comparison to 6MV plan. Specifically, the maximum and mean doses to the spinal cord in the mixed energy plan were lower by 21% and 16%, respectively. Conclusion: Single lower energy photon beam was found to be inferior to 6MV in the radiotherapy of pediatric patients and lung cancer patients when the integral doses and the doses to the OARs were considered. However, mixed energy plans combining low with high energy beams showed significant OAR sparing while maintaining the same PTV coverage. Investigation with more patient data is ongoing for further confirmation.

  7. A dosimetric evaluation of dose escalation for the radical treatment of locally advanced vulvar cancer by intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloemers, Monique C.W.M.; Portelance, Lorraine; Ruo, Russell; Parker, William; Souhami, Luis

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this planning study was to determine whether intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) reduces the radiation dose to organs at risk (OAR) when compared with 3D conventional radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in patients with vulvar cancer treated by irradiation. This study also investigated the use of sequential IMRT boost (seq-IMRT) and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-IMRT) for dose escalation in the treatment of locally advanced vulvar cancer. Five vulvar cancer patients treated in the postoperative setting and 5 patients treated with definitive intent (def-group) were evaluated. For the postoperative group, 3D-CRT and IMRT plans to a total dose (TD) of 45 Gy were generated. For the def-group, 4 plans were generated: a 3D-CRT and an IMRT plan to a TD of 56.4 Gy, a SIB-IMRT plan to a TD of 56 Gy, and a SIB-IMRT with dose escalation (SIB-IMRT-esc): TD of 67.2 Gy. Mean dose and dose-volume histograms were compared using Student's t-test. IMRT significantly (all p < 0.05) reduced the D{sub mean}, V30, and V40 for all OAR in the adjuvant setting. The V45 was also significantly reduced for all OAR except the bladder. For patients treated in the def-group, all IMRT techniques significantly reduced the D{sub mean}, V40, and V45 for all OAR. The mean femur doses with SIB-IMRT and SIB-IMRT-esc were 47% and 49% lower compared with 3D-CRT. SIB-IMRT-esc reduced the doses to the OAR compared with seq-3D-CRT but increased the D{sub max.} for the small bowel, rectum, and bladder. IMRT reduces the dose to the OAR compared with 3D-CRT in patients with vulvar cancer receiving irradiation to a volume covering the vulvar region and nodal areas without compromising the dosimetric coverage of the target volume. IMRT for vulvar cancer is feasible and an attractive option for dose escalation studies.

  8. Clinical experience transitioning from IMRT to VMAT for head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studenski, Matthew T.; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Siglin, Joshua; Cognetti, David; Curry, Joseph; Tuluc, Madalina; Harrison, Amy S.

    2013-07-01

    To quantify clinical differences for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in terms of dosimetric endpoints and planning and delivery time, twenty head and neck cancer patients have been considered for VMAT using Nucletron Oncentra MasterPlan delivered via an Elekta linear accelerator. Differences in planning time between IMRT and VMAT were estimated accounting for both optimization and calculation. The average delivery time per patient was obtained retrospectively using the record and verify software. For the dosimetric comparison, all contoured organs at risk (OARs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were evaluated. Of the 20 cases considered, 14 had VMAT plans approved. Six VMAT plans were rejected due to unacceptable dose to OARs. In terms of optimization time, there was minimal difference between the two modalities. The dose calculation time was significantly longer for VMAT, 4 minutes per 358 degree arc versus 2 minutes for an entire IMRT plan. The overall delivery time was reduced by 9.2 3.9 minutes for VMAT (51.4 15.6%). For the dosimetric comparison of the 14 clinically acceptable plans, there was almost no statistical difference between the VMAT and IMRT. There was also a reduction in monitor units of approximately 32% from IMRT to VMAT with both modalities demonstrating comparable quality assurance results. VMAT provides comparable coverage of target volumes while sparing OARs for the majority of head and neck cases. In cases where high dose modulation was required for OARs, a clinically acceptable plan was only achievable with IMRT. Due to the long calculation times, VMAT plans can cause delays during planning but marked improvements in delivery time reduce patient treatment times and the risk of intra-fraction motion.

  9. SU-E-T-371: Validation of Organ Doses Delivered During Craniospinal Irradiation with Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Andujar, A; Chen, J; Garcia, A; Haas-Kogan, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: New techniques have been developed to deliver more conformal treatments to the craniospinal axis. One concern, however, is the widespread low dose delivered and implications for possible late effects. The purpose of this work is for the first time to validate the organ doses calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS), including out-of-field doses for a pediatric craniospinal treatment (CSI). Methods: A CSI plan prescribed to 23.4 Gy and a posterior fossa boost plan to 30.6 Gy (total dose 54.0 Gy) was developed for a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom representing a 13 yearold- child. For the CSI plan, the planning target volumes (PTV) consisted of the brain and spinal cord with 2 mm and 5 mm expansions, respectively. Organs at risk (OAR) were contoured and included in the plan optimization. The plans were delivered on a helical tomotherapy unit. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the dose at 54 positions within the PTV and OARs. Results: For the CSI treatment, the mean percent difference between TPS dose calculations and measurements was 5% for the PTV and 10% for the OARs. For the boost, the average was 3% for the PTV. The percent difference for the OARs, which lie outside the field and received a small fraction of the prescription dose, varied from 15% to 200%. However in terms of absolute dose, the average difference between measurement and TPS per treatment Gy was 2 cGy/Gy and 3 mGy/Gy for the CSI and boost plans, respectively. Conclusion: There was good agreement between doses calculated by the TPS and measurements for the CSI treatment. Higher percent differences were observed for out-of-field doses in the boost plan, but absolute dose differences were very small compared to the prescription dose. These findings can help in the estimation of late effects after radiotherapy for pediatric patients.

  10. ORISE Resources: Equal Access Initiative Computer Grants Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Equal Access Initiative Computer Grants Program The Equal Access Initiative Computer Grants Program is sponsored by the National Minority AIDS Council (NMAC) and the National Institutes of Health's Office of AIDS Research (OAR), to help community organizations build technological capacity with the goal of enhancing their ability to provide HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment information for their clients and communities. Each year, qualified faith-/community-based organizations in the United

  11. Radiation Therapy Planning for Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: Experience of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maraldo, Maja V.; Dabaja, Bouthaina S.; Filippi, Andrea R.; Illidge, Tim; Tsang, Richard; Ricardi, Umberto; Petersen, Peter M.; Schut, Deborah A.; Garcia, John; Headley, Jayne; Parent, Amy; Guibord, Benoit; Ragona, Riccardo; Specht, Lena

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rare disease, and the location of lymphoma varies considerably between patients. Here, we evaluate the variability of radiation therapy (RT) plans among 5 International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) centers with regard to beam arrangements, planning parameters, and estimated doses to the critical organs at risk (OARs). Methods: Ten patients with stage I-II classic HL with masses of different sizes and locations were selected. On the basis of the clinical information, 5 ILROG centers were asked to create RT plans to a prescribed dose of 30.6 Gy. A postchemotherapy computed tomography scan with precontoured clinical target volume (CTV) and OARs was provided for each patient. The treatment technique and planning methods were chosen according to each center's best practice in 2013. Results: Seven patients had mediastinal disease, 2 had axillary disease, and 1 had disease in the neck only. The median age at diagnosis was 34 years (range, 21-74 years), and 5 patients were male. Of the resulting 50 treatment plans, 15 were planned with volumetric modulated arc therapy (1-4 arcs), 16 with intensity modulated RT (3-9 fields), and 19 with 3-dimensional conformal RT (2-4 fields). The variations in CTV-to-planning target volume margins (5-15 mm), maximum tolerated dose (31.4-40 Gy), and plan conformity (conformity index 0-3.6) were significant. However, estimated doses to OARs were comparable between centers for each patient. Conclusions: RT planning for HL is challenging because of the heterogeneity in size and location of disease and, additionally, to the variation in choice of treatment techniques and field arrangements. Adopting ILROG guidelines and implementing universal dose objectives could further standardize treatment techniques and contribute to lowering the dose to the surrounding OARs.

  12. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Significant Decadal Brightening over the Continental United States Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., NOAA Global Monitoring Division/CIRES Dutton, E. G., NOAA/OAR/ESRL Augustine, J., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Wild, M., Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science - ETH Zurich McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Flynn, C. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes

  13. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Global Dimming and Brightening: an Update Beyond 2000 Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., NOAA Global Monitoring Division/CIRES Wild, M., Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science - ETH Zurich Truessel, B., Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science - ETH Zurich Ohmura, A., Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Koenig-Langlo, G., Alfred Wegener Institute Dutton, E. G., NOAA/OAR/ESRL Tsvetkov, A. V., World Radiation Data Centre Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working

  14. Sci—Thur PM: Planning and Delivery — 06: Real-Time Interactive Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Q; Mestrovic, A; Otto, K

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To describe and evaluate a novel system for generalized Real-Time Interactive Planning (RTIP) applied to head and neck (H and N) VMAT. Methods: The clinician interactively manipulates dose distributions using DVHs, isodoses, or rate of dose fall-off, which may be subjected to user-defined constraints. Dose is calculated using a fast Achievable Dose Estimate (ADE) algorithm, which simulates the limits of what can be achieved during treatment. After each manipulation contributing fluence elements are modified and the dose distribution updates in effectively real-time. For H and N VMAT planning, structure sets for 11 patients were imported into RTIP. Each dose distribution was interactively modified to minimize OAR dose while constraining target DVHs. The resulting RTIP DVHs were transferred to the Eclipse™ VMAT optimizer, and conventional VMAT optimization was performed. Results: Dose calculation and update times for the ADE algorithm ranged from 2.4 to 22.6 milliseconds, thus facilitating effectively real-time manipulation of dose distributions. For each of the 11 H and N VMAT cases, the RTIP process took ∼2–10 minutes. All RTIP plans exhibited acceptable PTV coverage, mean dose, and max dose. 10 of 11 RTIP plans achieved substantially improved sparing of one or more OARs without compromising dose to targets or other OARs. Importantly, 10 of the 11 RTIP plans required only one or two post-RTIP optimizations. Conclusions: RTIP is a novel system for manipulating and updating achievable dose distributions in real-time. H and N VMAT plans generated using RTIP demonstrate improved OAR sparing and planning efficiency. Disclosures: One author has a commercial interest in the presented materials.

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - CLOWD.RPWG.final.ppt [Compatibility Mode...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CLOWD Overview CLOWD Overview CLOWD Overview Andy Vogelmann & Dave Turner Andy Vogelmann & Dave Turner Andy Vogelmann & Dave Turner Andy Vogelmann & Dave Turner Jennifer ...

  16. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Comparison of Four Consensus Guidelines and Dosimetric Evaluation of 3D-CRT Versus Tomotherapy IMRT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, Shawn; Croke, Jennifer; Roustan-Delatour, Nicolas; Belanger, Eric; Avruch, Leonard; Malone, Colin; Morash, Christopher; Kayser, Cathleen; Underhill, Kathryn; Li Yan; Malone, Kyle; Nyiri, Balazs; Spaans, Johanna

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Despite the benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy, approximately one-half of patients relapse. Four consensus guidelines have been published (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group, Princess Margaret Hospital, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group) with the aim of standardizing the clinical target volume (CTV) delineation and improve outcomes. To date, no attempt has been made to compare these guidelines in terms of treatment volumes or organ at risk (OAR) irradiation. The extent to which the guideline-derived plans meet the dosimetric constraints of present trials or of the Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) trial is also unknown. Our study also explored the dosimetric benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients treated with postoperative RT were included. The three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plans were applied to cover the guideline-generated planning target volumes (66 Gy in 33 fractions). Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed for CTV/planning target volume coverage and to evaluate OAR irradiation. The OAR DVHs were compared with the constraints proposed in the QUANTEC and Radiotherapy and Androgen Deprivation In Combination After Local Surgery (RADICALS) trials. 3D-CRT plans were compared with the tomotherapy plans for the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group planning target volume to evaluate the advantages of IMRT. Results: The CTV differed significantly between guidelines (p < 0.001). The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-CTVs were significantly smaller than the other CTVs (p < 0.001). Differences in prostate bed coverage superiorly accounted for the major volumetric differences between the guidelines. Using 3D-CRT, the DVHs rarely met the QUANTEC or RADICALS rectal constraints, independent of the guideline used. The RADICALS bladder constraints were met most often by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer consensus guideline (14 of 20). The tomotherapy IMRT plans resulted in significant OAR sparing compared with the 3D-CRT plans; however, the RADICALS and QUANTEC criteria were still missed in a large percentage of cases. Conclusion: Treatment volumes using the current consensus guidelines differ significantly. For the four CTV guidelines, the rectal and bladder DVH constraints proposed in the QUANTEC and RADICALS trials are rarely met with 3D-CRT. IMRT results in significant OAR sparing; however, the RADICALS dose constraints are still missed for a large percentage of cases. The rectal and bladder constraints of RADICALS should be modified to avoid a reduction in the CTVs.

  17. SU-D-19A-06: The Effect of Beam Parameters On Very High-Energy Electron Radiotherapy: A Planning Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palma, B; Bazalova, M; Qu, B; Loo, B; Maxim, P; Hardemark, B; Hynning, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the effect of very high-energy electron (VHEE) beam parameters on the planning of a lung cancer case by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: We simulated VHEE radiotherapy plans using the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc-DOSXYZnrc code. We selected a lung cancer case that was treated with 6MV photon VMAT to be planned with VHEE. We studied the effect of beam energy (80 MeV, 100 MeV, and 120 MeV), number of equidistant beams (16 or 32), and beamlets sizes (3 mm, 5 mm or 7 mm) on PTV coverage, sparing of organs at risk (OARs) and dose conformity. Inverse-planning optimization was performed in a research version of RayStation (RaySearch Laboratories AB) using identical objective functions and constraints for all VHEE plans. Results: Similar PTV coverage and dose conformity was achieved by all the VHEE plans. The 100 MeV and 120 MeV VHEE plans were equivalent amongst them and were superior to the 80 MeV plan in terms of OARs sparing. The effect of using 16 or 32 equidistant beams was a mean difference in average dose of 2.4% (0%7.7%) between the two plans. The use of 3 mm beamlet size systematically reduced the dose to all the OARs. Based on these results we selected the 100MeV-16beams-3mm-beamlet-size plan to compare it against VMAT. The selected VHEE plan was more conformal than VMAT and improved OAR sparing (heart and trachea received 125% and 177% lower dose, respectively) especially in the low-dose region. Conclusion: We determined the VHEE beam parameters that maximized the OAR dose sparing and dose conformity of the actually delivered VMAT plan of a lung cancer case. The selected parameters could be used for the planning of other treatment sites with similar size, shape, and location. For larger targets, a larger beamlet size might be used without significantly increasing the dose. B Palma: None. M Bazalova: None. B Hardemark: Employee, RaySearch Americas. E Hynning: Employee, RaySearch Americas. B Qu: None. B Loo Jr.: Research support, RaySearch, Varian. P Maxim: Research support, RaySearch, Varian.

  18. Anterior Myocardial Territory May Replace the Heart as Organ at Risk in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan Wenyong; Liu Dong; Xue Chenbin; Xu Jiaozhen; Li Beihui; Chen Zhengwang; Hu Desheng; Wang Xionghong

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether the heart could be replaced by the anterior myocardial territory (AMT) as the organ at risk (OAR) in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of the breast for patients with left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients with left-sided breast cancer who received postoperative radiation after breast-conserving surgery were studied. For each patient, we generated five IMRT plans including heart (H), left ventricle (LV), AMT, LV+AMT, and H+LV as the primary OARs, respectively, except both lungs and right breast, which corresponded to IMRT(H), IMRT(LV), IMRT(AMT), IMRT(LV+AMT), and IMRT(H+LV). For the planning target volumes and OARs, the parameters of dose-volume histograms were compared. Results: The homogeneity index, conformity index, and coverage index were not compromised significantly in IMRT(AMT), IMRT(LV) and IMRT(LV+ AMT), respectively, when compared with IMRT(H). The mean dose to the heart, LV, and AMT decreased 5.3-21.5% (p < 0.05), 19.9-29.5% (p < 0.05), and 13.3-24.5% (p < 0.05), respectively. Similarly, the low (e.g., V5%), middle (e.g., V20%), and high (e.g., V30%) dose-volume of the heart, LV, and AMT decreased with different levels. The mean dose and V10% of the right lung increased by 9.2% (p < 0.05) and 27.6% (p < 0.05), respectively, in IMRT(LV), and the mean dose and V5% of the right breast decreased significantly in IMRT(AMT) and IMRT(LV+AMT). IMRT(AMT) was the preferred plan and was then compared with IMRT(H+LV); the majority of dose-volume histogram parameters of OARs including the heart, LV, AMT, both lungs, and the right breast were not statistically different. However, the low dose-volume of LV increased and the middle dose-volume decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in IMRT(AMT). Also, those of the right lung (V10%, V15%) and right breast (V5%, V10%) decreased significantly (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The AMT may replace the heart as the OAR in left-sided breast IMRT after breast-conserving surgery to decrease the radiation dose to the heart.

  19. Dosimetric comparison of different multileaf collimator leaves in treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Shichao; Ai, Ping; Xie, Li; Xu, Qingfeng; Bai, Sen; Lu, You; Li, Ping; Chen, Nianyong

    2013-01-01

    To study the effect of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf widths (standard MLC [sMLC] width of 10 mm and micro-MLC [mMLC] width of 4 mm) on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer. Between January 2010 and August 2010, a retrospective analysis was conducted on 12 patients with cervical cancer. The treatment plans for all patients were generated with the same machine setup parameters and optimization methods in a treatment planning system (TPS) based on 2 commercial Elekta MLC devices. The dose distribution for the planning tumor volume (PTV), the dose sparing for organs at risk (OARs), the monitor units (MUs), and the number of IMRT segments were evaluated. For the delivery efficiency, the MUs were significantly higher in the sMLC-IMRT plan than in the mMLC-IMRT plan (802 ± 56.9 vs 702 ± 56.7; p < 0.05). The number of segments in the plans were 58.75 ± 1.8 and 59 ± 1.04 (p > 0.05). For the planning quality, the conformity index (CI) between the 2 paired IMRT plans with the mMLC and the sMLC did not differ significantly (average: 0.817 ± 0.024 vs 0.810 ± 0.028; p > 0.05). The differences of the homogeneity index (HI) between the 2 paired plans were statistically significant (average: 1.122 ± 0.010 vs 1.132 ± 0.014; p < 0.01). For OARs, the rectum, bladder, small intestine, and bony pelvis were evaluated in terms of V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 40}, percentage of contoured OAR volumes receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy, respectively, and the mean dose (D{sub mean}) received. The IMRT plans with the mMLC protected the OARs better than the plans with the sMLC. There were significant differences (p < 0.05) in evaluated parameters between the 2 paired IMRT plans, except for V{sub 30} and V{sub 40} of the rectum and V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 40}, and D{sub mean} of the bladder. IMRT plans with the mMLC showed advantages over the plans with the sMLC in dose homogeneity for targets, dose sparing of OARs, and fewer MUs in cervical cancer.

  20. ANDY: A general, fault-tolerant tool for database searching oncomputer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Smith, Andrew ; Chandonia, John-Marc ; Brenner, Steven E. Publication Date: 2005-12-21 OSTI Identifier: 903042 Report Number(s): LBNL--59252 R&D Project: 864D2D; BnR: ...

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - Andy Ronald.Finger Lakes NGL Storage Providence...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of pipeline - 80 Bcf natural gas storage capacity (2) * NGL and Crude Oil - Eight ... expansion projects (2) Total storage ... results in higher prices for consumers * ...

  2. Dosimetrically Triggered Adaptive Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Karen; Stewart, James; Kelly, Valerie; Xie, Jason; Brock, Kristy K.; Moseley, Joanne; Cho, Young-Bin; Fyles, Anthony; Lundin, Anna; Rehbinder, Henrik; Lf, Johan; Jaffray, David A.; Milosevic, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: The widespread use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer has been limited by internal target and normal tissue motion. Such motion increases the risk of underdosing the target, especially as planning margins are reduced in an effort to reduce toxicity. This study explored 2 adaptive strategies to mitigate this risk and proposes a new, automated method that minimizes replanning workload. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with cervical cancer participated in a prospective clinical study and underwent pretreatment and weekly magnetic resonance (MR) scans over a 5-week course of daily external beam radiation therapy. Target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were contoured on each of the scans. Deformable image registration was used to model the accumulated dose (the real dose delivered to the target and OARs) for 2 adaptive replanning scenarios that assumed a very small PTV margin of only 3mm to account for setup and internal interfractional motion: (1)a preprogrammed, anatomy-driven midtreatment replan (A-IMRT); and (2) a dosimetry-triggered replan driven by target dose accumulation over time (D-IMRT). Results: Across all 30 patients, clinically relevant target dose thresholds failed for 8 patients (27%) if 3-mm margins were used without replanning. A-IMRT failed in only 3 patients and also yielded an additional small reduction in OAR doses at the cost of 30 replans. D-IMRT assured adequate target coverage in all patients, with only 23 replans in 16 patients. Conclusions: A novel, dosimetry-triggered adaptive IMRT strategy for patients with cervical cancer can minimize the risk of target underdosing in the setting of very small margins and substantial interfractional motion while minimizing programmatic workload and cost.

  3. Poster — Thur Eve — 64: Preliminary investigation of arc configurations for optimal sparing of normal tissue in hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HF-SRT) of multiple brain metastases using a 5mm interdigitating micro-multileaf collimator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leavens, C; Wronski, M; Lee, YK; Ruschin, M; Soliman, H; Sahgal, A

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate normal tissue sparing in intra-cranial HF-SRT, comparing various arc configurations with the Synergy Beam Modulator (SynBM) and Agility linacs, the latter incorporating leaf interdigitation and backup jaws. Methods: Five patients with multiple brain metastases (BMs), (5 BMs (n=2), 3 BMs (n=3)) treated with HF-SRT using 25 Gy (n=2) or 30 Gy (n=3) in 5 fractions, were investigated. Clinical treatment plans used the SynBM. Each patient was retrospectively re-planned on Agility, employing three planning strategies: (A) one isocenter and dedicated arc for each BM; (B) a single isocenter, centrally placed with respect to BMs; (C) the isocenter and arc configuration used in the SynBM plan, where closely spaced (<5cm) BMs used a dedicated isocenter and arcs. Agility plans were normalized for PTV coverage and heterogeneity. Results and Conclusion: Strategy A obtained the greatest improvements over the SynBM plan, where the maximum OAR dose, and mean dose to normal brain (averaged for all patients) were reduced by 55cGy and 25cGy, respectively. Strategy B was limited by having a single isocenter, hence less jaw shielding and increased MLC leakage. The maximum OAR dose was reduced by 13cGy, however mean dose to normal brain increased by 84cGy. Strategy C reduced the maximum OAR dose and mean dose to normal brain by 32cGy and 9cGy, respectively. The results from this study indicate that, for intra-cranial HF-SRT of multiple BMs, Agility plans are equal or better than SynBM plans. Further planning is needed to investigate dose sparing using Strategy A and the SynBM.

  4. SU-E-T-398: Feasibility of Automated Tools for Robustness Evaluation of Advanced Photon and Proton Techniques in Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H; Liang, X; Kalbasi, A; Lin, A; Ahn, P; Both, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Advanced radiotherapy (RT) techniques such as proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) and photon-based volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) have dosimetric advantages in the treatment of head and neck malignancies. However, anatomic or alignment changes during treatment may limit robustness of PBS and VMAT plans. We assess the feasibility of automated deformable registration tools for robustness evaluation in adaptive PBS and VMAT RT of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods: We treated 10 patients with bilateral OPC with advanced RT techniques and obtained verification CT scans with physician-reviewed target and OAR contours. We generated 3 advanced RT plans for each patient: proton PBS plan using 2 posterior oblique fields (2F), proton PBS plan using an additional third low-anterior field (3F), and a photon VMAT plan using 2 arcs (Arc). For each of the planning techniques, we forward calculated initial (Ini) plans on the verification scans to create verification (V) plans. We extracted DVH indicators based on physician-generated contours for 2 target and 14 OAR structures to investigate the feasibility of two automated tools (contour propagation (CP) and dose deformation (DD)) as surrogates for routine clinical plan robustness evaluation. For each verification scan, we compared DVH indicators of V, CP and DD plans in a head-to-head fashion using Student's t-test. Results: We performed 39 verification scans; each patient underwent 3 to 6 verification scan. We found no differences in doses to target or OAR structures between V and CP, V and DD, and CP and DD plans across all patients (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Automated robustness evaluation tools, CP and DD, accurately predicted dose distributions of verification (V) plans using physician-generated contours. These tools may be further developed as a potential robustness screening tool in the workflow for adaptive treatment of OPC using advanced RT techniques, reducing the need for physician-generated contours.

  5. The Residual Setup Errors of Different IGRT Alignment Procedures for Head and Neck IMRT and the Resulting Dosimetric Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graff, Pierre; Radiation-Oncology, Alexis Vautrin Cancer Center, Vandoeuvre-Les-Nancy; Doctoral School BioSE , Nancy ; Kirby, Neil; Weinberg, Vivian; Department of Biostatistics, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California ; Chen, Josephine; Yom, Sue S.; Lambert, Louise; Radiation-Oncology, Montreal University Centre, Montreal ; Pouliot, Jean

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To assess residual setup errors during head and neck radiation therapy and the resulting consequences for the delivered dose for various patient alignment procedures. Methods and Materials: Megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) scans from 11 head and neck patients who underwent intensity modulated radiation therapy were used to assess setup errors. Each MVCBCT scan was registered to its reference planning kVCT, with seven different alignment procedures: automatic alignment and manual registration to 6 separate bony landmarks (sphenoid, left/right maxillary sinuses, mandible, cervical 1 [C1]-C2, and C7-thoracic 1 [T1] vertebrae). Shifts in the different alignments were compared with each other to determine whether there were any statistically significant differences. Then, the dose distribution was recalculated on 3 MVCBCT images per patient for every alignment procedure. The resulting dose-volume histograms for targets and organs at risk (OARs) were compared to those from the planning kVCTs. Results: The registration procedures produced statistically significant global differences in patient alignment and actual dose distribution, calling for a need for standardization of patient positioning. Vertically, the automatic, sphenoid, and maxillary sinuses alignments mainly generated posterior shifts and resulted in mean increases in maximal dose to OARs of >3% of the planned dose. The suggested choice of C1-C2 as a reference landmark appears valid, combining both OAR sparing and target coverage. Assuming this choice, relevant margins to apply around volumes of interest at the time of planning to take into account for the relative mobility of other regions are discussed. Conclusions: Use of different alignment procedures for treating head and neck patients produced variations in patient setup and dose distribution. With concern for standardizing practice, C1-C2 reference alignment with relevant margins around planning volumes seems to be a valid option.

  6. Evaluation of the dosimetric impact of applying flattening filter-free beams in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for early-stage upper thoracic carcinoma of oesophagus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wuzhe; Lin, Zhixiong; Yang, Zhining; Fang, Weisheng; Lai, Peibo; Lu, Jiayang; Wu, Vincent WC

    2015-06-15

    Flattening filter-free (FFF) radiation beams have recently become clinically available on modern linear accelerators in radiation therapy. This study aimed to evaluate the dosimetric impact of using FFF beams in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for early-stage upper thoracic oesophageal cancer. Eleven patients with primary stage upper thoracic oesophageal cancer were recruited. For each patient, two IMRT plans were computed using conventional beams (Con-P) and FFF beams (FFF-P), respectively. Both plans employed a five-beam arrangement and were prescribed with 64 Gy to (planning target volume) PTV1 and 54 Gy to PTV2 in 32 fractions using 6 MV photons. The dose parameters of the target volumes and organs at risks (OARs), and treatment parameters including the monitor units (MU) and treatment time (TT) for Con-P and FFF-P were recorded and compared. The mean D{sub 5} of PTV1 and PTV2 were higher in FFF-P than Con-P by 0.4 Gy and 0.3 Gy, respectively. For the OARs, all the dose parameters did not show significant difference between the two plans except the mean V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the lung in which the FFF-P was lower (46.7% vs. 47.3% and 39.1% vs. 39.6%, respectively). FFF-P required 54% more MU but 18.4% less irradiation time when compared to Con-P. The target volume and OARs dose distributions between the two plans were comparable. However, FFF-P was more effective in sparing the lung from low dose and reduced the mean TT compared with Con-P. Long-term clinical studies are suggested to evaluate the radiobiological effects of FFF beams.

  7. Critical dose and toxicity index of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Analyzing the calculated effects of modified dose fractionation in nonsmall cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedicini, Piernicola; Strigari, Lidia; Benassi, Marcello; Caivano, Rocchina; Fiorentino, Alba; Nappi, Antonio; Salvatore, Marco; Storto, Giovanni

    2014-04-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many schemes of dose fractionation were assessed by a new toxicity index (I), which allows one to choose the fractionation schedules that produce less toxic treatments. Thirty-two patients affected by non resectable NSCLC were treated by standard 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with a strategy of limited treated volume. Computed tomography datasets were employed to re plan by simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The dose distributions from plans were used to test various schemes of dose fractionation, in 3DCRT as well as in IMRT, by transforming the dose-volume histogram (DVH) into a biological equivalent DVH (BDVH) and by varying the overall treatment time. The BDVHs were obtained through the toxicity index, which was defined for each of the organs at risk (OAR) by a linear quadratic model keeping an equivalent radiobiological effect on the target volume. The less toxic fractionation consisted in a severe/moderate hyper fractionation for the volume including the primary tumor and lymph nodes, followed by a hypofractionation for the reduced volume of the primary tumor. The 3DCRT and IMRT resulted, respectively, in 4.7% and 4.3% of dose sparing for the spinal cord, without significant changes for the combined-lungs toxicity (p < 0.001). Schedules with reduced overall treatment time (accelerated fractionations) led to a 12.5% dose sparing for the spinal cord (7.5% in IMRT), 8.3% dose sparing for V{sub 20} in the combined lungs (5.5% in IMRT), and also significant dose sparing for all the other OARs (p < 0.001). The toxicity index allows to choose fractionation schedules with reduced toxicity for all the OARs and equivalent radiobiological effect for the tumor in 3DCRT, as well as in IMRT, treatments of NSCLC.

  8. Strategies for automatic online treatment plan reoptimization using clinical treatment planning system: A planning parameters study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Taoran; Wu, Qiuwen; Zhang, You; Vergalasova, Irina; Lee, W. Robert; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Q. Jackie

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Adaptive radiation therapy for prostate cancer using online reoptimization provides an improved control of interfractional anatomy variations. However, the clinical implementation of online reoptimization is currently limited by the low efficiency of current strategies and the difficulties associated with integration into the current treatment planning system. This study investigates the strategies for performing fast (?2 min) automatic online reoptimization with a clinical fluence-map-based treatment planning system; and explores the performance with different input parameters settings: dose-volume histogram (DVH) objective settings, starting stage, and iteration number (in the context of real time planning).Methods: Simulated treatments of 10 patients were reoptimized daily for the first week of treatment (5 fractions) using 12 different combinations of optimization strategies. Options for objective settings included guideline-based RTOG objectives, patient-specific objectives based on anatomy on the planning CT, and daily-CBCT anatomy-based objectives adapted from planning CT objectives. Options for starting stages involved starting reoptimization with and without the original plan's fluence map. Options for iteration numbers were 50 and 100. The adapted plans were then analyzed by statistical modeling, and compared both in terms of dosimetry and delivery efficiency.Results: All online reoptimized plans were finished within ?2 min with excellent coverage and conformity to the daily target. The three input parameters, i.e., DVH objectives, starting stage, and iteration number, contributed to the outcome of optimization nearly independently. Patient-specific objectives generally provided better OAR sparing compared to guideline-based objectives. The benefit in high-dose sparing from incorporating daily anatomy into objective settings was positively correlated with the relative change in OAR volumes from planning CT to daily CBCT. The use of the original plan fluence map as the starting stage reduced OAR dose at the mid-dose region, but increased the monitor units by 17%. Differences of only 2cc or less in OAR V50%/V70Gy/V76Gy were observed between 100 and 50 iterations.Conclusions: It is feasible to perform automatic online reoptimization in ?2 min using a clinical treatment planning system. Selecting optimal sets of input parameters is the key to achieving high quality reoptimized plans, and should be based on the individual patient's daily anatomy, delivery efficiency, and time allowed for plan adaptation.

  9. U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Offlce Procurement and Cantrads Division

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Oak Ridge Operations Offlce Procurement and Cantrads Division P.O. BOX 2001 Oak Ridge. TN 37831 SOLICITATION, OFFER AND AWARD Dlrect Del very Adotess' U S Deoanmenl of Energy Oar R doe Ooerat ons Ofice ~ r m u r e i e n t s n d Contracts Division ,200 Administration Road, ATTN: Ballard A. Jackson Jr Oak Ridse. TN 37830 I . THIS CONTRACT IS ARATED ORDER UNDER DPAS (15 CFR 700) I NOTE: In sealed bid solicitations "offer" and "offeror" mean "bid" and

  10. Automated treatment planning for a dedicated multi-source intra-cranial radiosurgery treatment unit accounting for overlapping structures and dose homogeneity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghobadi, Kimia; Ghaffari, Hamid R.; Aleman, Dionne M.; Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Ontario M5T 3M6; Techna Institute, University Health Network, Ontario M5G 1P5 ; Jaffray, David A.; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9; Institute of Biomaterial and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Ontario M5S 2J7; Techna Institute, University Health Network, Ontario M5G 1P5; Ontario Cancer Institute, Ontario M5G 0A3 ; Ruschin, Mark; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to advance the two-step approach for Gamma Knife{sup } Perfexion (PFX) optimization to account for dose homogeneity and overlap between the planning target volume (PTV) and organs-at-risk (OARs).Methods: In the first step, a geometry-based algorithm is used to quickly select isocentre locations while explicitly accounting for PTV-OARs overlaps. In this approach, the PTV is divided into subvolumes based on the PTV-OARs overlaps and the distance of voxels to the overlaps. Only a few isocentres are selected in the overlap volume, and a higher number of isocentres are carefully selected among voxels that are immediately close to the overlap volume. In the second step, a convex optimization is solved to find the optimal combination of collimator sizes and their radiation duration for each isocentre location.Results: This two-step approach is tested on seven clinical cases (comprising 11 targets) for which the authors assess coverage, OARs dose, and homogeneity index and relate these parameters to the overlap fraction for each case. In terms of coverage, the mean V{sub 99} for the gross target volume (GTV) was 99.8% while the V{sub 95} for the PTV averaged at 94.6%, thus satisfying the clinical objectives of 99% for GTV and 95% for PTV, respectively. The mean relative dose to the brainstem was 87.7% of the prescription dose (with maximum 108%), while on average, 11.3% of the PTV overlapped with the brainstem. The mean beam-on time per fraction per dose was 8.6 min with calibration dose rate of 3.5 Gy/min, and the computational time averaged at 205 min. Compared with previous work involving single-fraction radiosurgery, the resulting plans were more homogeneous with average homogeneity index of 1.18 compared to 1.47.Conclusions: PFX treatment plans with homogeneous dose distribution can be achieved by inverse planning using geometric isocentre selection and mathematical modeling and optimization techniques. The quality of the obtained treatment plans are clinically satisfactory while the homogeneity index is improved compared to conventional PFX plans.

  11. SU-E-J-250: A Methodology for Active Bone Marrow Protection for Cervical Cancer Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Using 18F-FLT PET/CT Image

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, C; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare a radiation therapy treatment planning that would spare active bone marrow and whole pelvic bone marrow using 18F FLT PET/CT image. Methods: We have developed an IMRT planning methodology to incorporate functional PET imaging using 18F FLT/CT scans. Plans were generated for two cervical cancer patients, where pelvicactive bone marrow region was incorporated as avoidance regions based on the range: SUV>2., another region was whole pelvic bone marrow. Dose objectives were set to reduce the volume of active bone marrow and whole bone marraw. The volumes of received 10 (V10) and 20 (V20) Gy for active bone marrow were evaluated. Results: Active bone marrow regions identified by 18F FLT with an SUV>2 represented an average of 48.0% of the total osseous pelvis for the two cases studied. Improved dose volume histograms for identified bone marrow SUV volumes and decreases in V10(average 18%), and V20(average 14%) were achieved without clinically significant changes to PTV or OAR doses. Conclusion: Incorporation of 18F FLT/CT PET in IMRT planning provides a methodology to reduce radiation dose to active bone marrow without compromising PTV or OAR dose objectives in cervical cancer.

  12. SciFri AM: Mountain 05: Unified Optimization and Delivery of Intensity-modulated Radiation Therapy and Volume-modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J; Hoover, D; MacFarlane, M; Wong, E

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of a unified intensity-modulated arc therapy (UIMAT) that combines IMRT and VMAT optimization and delivery in order to produce efficient and superior radiation treatment plans. Methods: Inverse planning for UIMAT was prototyped on the Pinnacle treatment planning system (Philips Medical Systems). UIMAT integrates IMRT and VMAT delivery in the same arc where IMRT was delivered with gantry speed close to zero. Optimal gantry angles for the IMRT phases were selected automatically by the inverse optimization algorithm. Optimization of the VMAT phases and IMRT phases were done simultaneously using Pinnacle's direct machine parameter optimization algorithm. Five treatment plans each for prostate, head and neck, and lung were generated using our unified technique and compared with clinical VMAT or IMRT plans. Delivery verification was performed on an ArcCheck phantom (Sun Nuclear) and delivered in clinical mode on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator. Results: In this prototype implementation, compared to the VMAT or IMRT plans, with the plans normalized to the same dose coverage to the planning target volumes, the UIMAT plans produced improved OAR sparing for head and neck cases, while for lung and prostate cases, the dosimetric improvements for OARs were not as significant. In this proof-of-concept work, we demonstrated that a novel radiation therapy delivery technique combining VMAT and IMRT delivery in the same arc is feasible. Initial results showed UIMAT has the potential to be superior to either standard IMRT or VMAT.

  13. Video-rate optical dosimetry and dynamic visualization of IMRT and VMAT treatment plans in water using Cherenkov radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glaser, Adam K. E-mail: Brian.W.Pogue@dartmouth.edu; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Davis, Scott C.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Pogue, Brian W. E-mail: Brian.W.Pogue@dartmouth.edu; Fox, Colleen J.; Gladstone, David J.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A novel technique for optical dosimetry of dynamic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans was investigated for the first time by capturing images of the induced Cherenkov radiation in water. Methods: A high-sensitivity, intensified CCD camera (ICCD) was configured to acquire a two-dimensional (2D) projection image of the Cherenkov radiation induced by IMRT and VMAT plans, based on the Task Group 119 (TG-119) C-Shape geometry. Plans were generated using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) and delivered using 6 MV x-rays from a Varian TrueBeam Linear Accelerator (Linac) incident on a water tank doped with the fluorophore quinine sulfate. The ICCD acquisition was gated to the Linac target trigger pulse to reduce background light artifacts, read out for a single radiation pulse, and binned to a resolution of 512 × 512 pixels. The resulting videos were analyzed temporally for various regions of interest (ROI) covering the planning target volume (PTV) and organ at risk (OAR), and summed to obtain an overall light intensity distribution, which was compared to the expected dose distribution from the TPS using a gamma-index analysis. Results: The chosen camera settings resulted in 23.5 frames per second dosimetry videos. Temporal intensity plots of the PTV and OAR ROIs confirmed the preferential delivery of dose to the PTV versus the OAR, and the gamma analysis yielded 95.9% and 96.2% agreement between the experimentally captured Cherenkov light distribution and expected TPS dose distribution based upon a 3%/3 mm dose difference and distance-to-agreement criterion for the IMRT and VMAT plans, respectively. Conclusions: The results from this initial study demonstrate the first documented use of Cherenkov radiation for video-rate optical dosimetry of dynamic IMRT and VMAT treatment plans. The proposed modality has several potential advantages over alternative methods including the real-time nature of the acquisition, and upon future refinement may prove to be a robust and novel dosimetry method with both research and clinical applications.

  14. SU-E-T-199: How Number of Control Points Influences the Dynamic IMRT Plan Quality and Deliverability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, S; Manigandan, D; Chander, S; Subramani, V; Julka, P; Rath, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the influence of number of control points on plan quality and deliverability. Methods: Five previously treated patients of carcinoma of rectum were selected. Planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) i.e. bladder and bowel were contoured. Dynamic IMRT plans (6MV, 7-fields, 45Gy/25 fractions and prescribed at 95% isodose) were created in Eclipse (Varian medical system, Palo Alto, CA) treatment planning system (TPS) for Varian CL2300C/D linear-accelerator. Base plan was calculated with 166 control points, variable mode (Eclipse Default). For generating other plans, all parameters were kept constant, only number of control points (Fixed mode) was varied as follows: 100, 166 and 200. Then, plan quality was analyzed in terms of maximum and mean dose received by the PTV and OARs. For plan deliverability, TPS calculated fluence was verified with ImatriXX (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) array and compared with TPS dose-plane using gamma index criteria of 3% dose difference and 3mm distance to agreement (DTA). Total number of monitor units (MU) required to deliver a plan was also noted. Results: The maximum variation for the PTV maximum with respect to eclipse default control point (166) was 0.28% (0.14Gy). Similarly, PTV mean varied only up to 0.22 %( 0.11Gy). Bladder maximum and bladder mean varied up to 0.51% (0.24Gy) and 0.16% (0.06Gy). The variation for the bowel maximum and bowel mean was also only 0.39% (0.19Gy) and 0.33% (0.04Gy). Total MU was within 0.32 % (4MU). Average gamma pass rate using different control points for five patients are 98.750.33%, 99.370.09%, 99.290.12%, 98.140.13% and 99.250.14% respectively. Conclusion: Slight variation (<1%) in PTV and OARs maximum and mean doses was observed with varying number of control points. Monitor unit was also not varied much. Reducing number of control points did not showed any comprise in plan deliverability in terms of gamma index pass rate.

  15. Volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy for pancreatic malignancies: Dosimetric comparison with sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nabavizadeh, Nima Simeonova, Anna O.; Waller, Joseph G.; Romer, Jeanna L.; Monaco, Debra L.; Elliott, David A.; Tanyi, James A.; Fuss, Martin; Thomas, Charles R.; Holland, John M.

    2014-10-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) is an iteration of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), both of which deliver highly conformal dose distributions. Studies have shown the superiority of VMAT and IMRT in comparison with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in planning target volume (PTV) coverage and organs-at-risk (OARs) sparing. This is the first study examining the benefits of VMAT in pancreatic cancer for doses more than 55.8 Gy. A planning study comparing 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT was performed in 20 patients with pancreatic cancer. Treatments were planned for a 25-fraction delivery of 45 Gy to a large field followed by a reduced-volume 8-fraction external beam boost to 59.4 Gy in total. OARs and PTV doses, conformality index (CI) deviations from 1.0, monitor units (MUs) delivered, and isodose volumes were compared. IMRT and VMAT CI deviations from 1.0 for the large-field and the boost plans were equivalent (large field: 0.032 and 0.046, respectively; boost: 0.042 and 0.037, respectively; p > 0.05 for all comparisons). Both IMRT and VMAT CI deviations from 1.0 were statistically superior to 3D-CRT (large field: 0.217, boost: 0.177; p < 0.05 for all comparisons). VMAT showed reduction of the mean dose to the boost PTV (VMAT: 61.4 Gy, IMRT: 62.4 Gy, and 3D-CRT: 62.3 Gy; p < 0.05). The mean number of MUs per fraction was significantly lower for VMAT for both the large-field and the boost plans. VMAT delivery time was less than 3 minutes compared with 8 minutes for IMRT. Although no statistically significant dose reduction to the OARs was identified when comparing VMAT with IMRT, VMAT showed a reduction in the volumes of the 100% isodose line for the large-field plans. Dose escalation to 59.4 Gy in pancreatic cancer is dosimetrically feasible with shorter treatment times, fewer MUs delivered, and comparable CIs for VMAT when compared with IMRT.

  16. Management of the baseline shift using a new and simple method for respiratory-gated radiation therapy: Detectability and effectiveness of a flexible monitoring system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tachibana, Hidenobu; Kitamura, Nozomi; Ito, Yasushi; Kawai, Daisuke; Nakajima, Masaru; Tsuda, Akihisa; Shiizuka, Hisao

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: In respiratory-gated radiation therapy, a baseline shift decreases the accuracy of target coverage and organs at risk (OAR) sparing. The effectiveness of audio-feedback and audio-visual feedback in correcting the baseline shift in the breathing pattern of the patient has been demonstrated previously. However, the baseline shift derived from the intrafraction motion of the patient's body cannot be corrected by these methods. In the present study, the authors designed and developed a simple and flexible system. Methods: The system consisted of a web camera and a computer running our in-house software. The in-house software was adapted to template matching and also to no preimage processing. The system was capable of monitoring the baseline shift in the intrafraction motion of the patient's body. Another marker box was used to monitor the baseline shift due to the flexible setups required of a marker box for gated signals. The system accuracy was evaluated by employing a respiratory motion phantom and was found to be within AAPM Task Group 142 tolerance (positional accuracy <2 mm and temporal accuracy <100 ms) for respiratory-gated radiation therapy. Additionally, the effectiveness of this flexible and independent system in gated treatment was investigated in healthy volunteers, in terms of the results from the differences in the baseline shift detectable between the marker positions, which the authors evaluated statistically. Results: The movement of the marker on the sternum [1.599 {+-} 0.622 mm (1 SD)] was substantially decreased as compared with the abdomen [6.547 {+-} 0.962 mm (1 SD)]. Additionally, in all of the volunteers, the baseline shifts for the sternum [-0.136 {+-} 0.868 (2 SD)] were in better agreement with the nominal baseline shifts than was the case for the abdomen [-0.722 {+-} 1.56 mm (2 SD)]. The baseline shifts could be accurately measured and detected using the monitoring system, which could acquire the movement of the marker on the sternum. The baseline shift-monitoring system with the displacement-based methods for highly accurate respiratory-gated treatments should be used to make most of the displacement-based gating methods. Conclusions: The advent of intensity modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated radiation therapy facilitates margin reduction for the planning target volumes and the OARs, but highly accurate irradiation is needed to achieve target coverage and OAR sparing with a small margin. The baseline shifts can affect treatment not only with the respiratory gating system but also without the system. Our system can manage the baseline shift and also enables treatment irradiation to be undertaken with high accuracy.

  17. H O

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  18. SU-E-J-137: Incorporating Tumor Regression Into Robust Plan Optimization for Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, P; Hu, J; Tyagi, N; Mageras, G; Lee, N; Hunt, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a robust planning paradigm which incorporates a tumor regression model into the optimization process to ensure tumor coverage in head and neck radiotherapy. Methods: Simulation and weekly MR images were acquired for a group of head and neck patients to characterize tumor regression during radiotherapy. For each patient, the tumor and parotid glands were segmented on the MR images and the weekly changes were formulated with an affine transformation, where morphological shrinkage and positional changes are modeled by a scaling factor, and centroid shifts, respectively. The tumor and parotid contours were also transferred to the planning CT via rigid registration. To perform the robust planning, weekly predicted PTV and parotid structures were created by transforming the corresponding simulation structures according to the weekly affine transformation matrix averaged over patients other than him/herself. Next, robust PTV and parotid structures were generated as the union of the simulation and weekly prediction contours. In the subsequent robust optimization process, attainment of the clinical dose objectives was required for the robust PTV and parotids, as well as other organs at risk (OAR). The resulting robust plans were evaluated by looking at the weekly and total accumulated dose to the actual weekly PTV and parotid structures. The robust plan was compared with the original plan based on the planning CT to determine its potential clinical benefit. Results: For four patients, the average weekly change to tumor volume and position was ?4% and 1.2 mm laterally-posteriorly. Due to these temporal changes, the robust plans resulted in an accumulated PTV D95 that was, on average, 2.7 Gy higher than the plan created from the planning CT. OAR doses were similar. Conclusion: Integration of a tumor regression model into target delineation and plan robust optimization is feasible and may yield improved tumor coverage. Part of this research is supported by Varian Medical System.

  19. SU-E-T-577: Commissioning of a Deterministic Algorithm for External Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, T; Finlay, J; Mesina, C; Liu, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We report commissioning results for a deterministic algorithm for external photon beam treatment planning. A deterministic algorithm solves the radiation transport equations directly using a finite difference method, thus improve the accuracy of dose calculation, particularly under heterogeneous conditions with results similar to that of Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. Methods: Commissioning data for photon energies 6 15 MV includes the percentage depth dose (PDD) measured at SSD = 90 cm and output ratio in water (Spc), both normalized to 10 cm depth, for field sizes between 2 and 40 cm and depths between 0 and 40 cm. Off-axis ratio (OAR) for the same set of field sizes was used at 5 depths (dmax, 5, 10, 20, 30 cm). The final model was compared with the commissioning data as well as additional benchmark data. The benchmark data includes dose per MU determined for 17 points for SSD between 80 and 110 cm, depth between 5 and 20 cm, and lateral offset of up to 16.5 cm. Relative comparisons were made in a heterogeneous phantom made of cork and solid water. Results: Compared to the commissioning beam data, the agreement are generally better than 2% with large errors (up to 13%) observed in the buildup regions of the FDD and penumbra regions of the OAR profiles. The overall mean standard deviation is 0.04% when all data are taken into account. Compared to the benchmark data, the agreements are generally better than 2%. Relative comparison in heterogeneous phantom is in general better than 4%. Conclusion: A commercial deterministic algorithm was commissioned for megavoltage photon beams. In a homogeneous medium, the agreement between the algorithm and measurement at the benchmark points is generally better than 2%. The dose accuracy for a deterministic algorithm is better than a convolution algorithm in heterogeneous medium.

  20. SU-E-T-138: Dosimetric Verification For Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Cranio-Spinal Irradiation Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goksel, E; Bilge, H; Yildiz, Yarar

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric feasibility of cranio-spinal irradiation with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT-CSI) technique in terms of dose distribution accuracy was investigated using a humanlike phantom. Methods: The OARs and PTV volumes for the Rando phantom were generated on supine CT images. Eclipse (version 8.6) TPS with AAA algorithm was used to create the treatment plan with VMAT-CSI technique. RapidArc plan consisted of cranial, upper spinal (US) and lower spinal (LS) regions that were optimized in the same plan. US field was overlapped by 3cm with cranial and LS fields. Three partial arcs for cranium and 1 full arc for each US and LS region were used. The VMAT-CSI dose distribution inside the Rando phantom was measured with thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) and film dosimetry, and was compared to the calculated doses of field junctions, target and OARs. TLDs were placed at 24 positions throughout the phantom. The measured TLD doses were compared to the calculated point doses. Planar doses for field junctions were verified with Gafchromic films. Films were analyzed in PTW Verisoft application software using gamma analysis method with the 4 mm distance to agreement (DTA) and 4% dose agreement criteria. Results: TLD readings demonstrated accurate dose delivery, with a median dose difference of -0.3% (range: -8% and 12%) when compared with calculated doses for the areas inside the treatment portal. The maximum dose difference was 12% higher in testicals that are outside the treatment region and 8% lower in lungs where the heterogeinity was higher. All planar dose verifications for field junctions passed the gamma analysis and measured planar dose distributions demonstrated average 97% agreement with calculated doses. Conclusion: The dosimetric data verified with TLD and film dosimetry shows that VMAT-CSI technique provides accurate dose distribution and can be delivered safely.

  1. Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated Arc therapy, step-and-shoot, and sliding window IMRT for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnell, Erich; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Young, Julie; Hildebrand, Kim; Algan, Ozer; Syzek, Elizabeth; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2012-10-23

    This study aims to evaluate treatment plans generated by Step-and-Shoot (SS), Sliding Window (SW) and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) in order to assess the differences in dose volume histograms of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR), conformity indices, radiobiological evaluations, and plan quality for prostate cancer cases. Six prostate cancer patients treated in our center were selected for this retrospective study. Treatment plans were generated with Eclipse version 8.9 using 10 MV photon beams. For VMAT, Varian Rapid Arc with 1 or 2 arcs, and for SS and SW IMRT, 7-9 fields were used. Each plan had three PTVs with prescription doses of 81, 59.4, and 45 Gy to prostate, to prostate and lymph nodes, and to pelvis, respectively. Doses to PTV and OAR and the conformal indices (COIN) were compared among three techniques. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD), tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were calculated and compared. The mean doses to the PTV prostate on average were 83 Gy and the percent differences of mean dose among all techniques were below 0.28. For bladder and rectum, the percent differences of mean dose among all techniques were below 2.2. The COIN did not favour any particular delivery method over the other. The TCP was higher with SS and SW for four patients and higher with VMAT for two patients. The NTCP for the rectum was the lowest with VMAT in five out of the six patients. The results show similar target coverage in general.

  2. SU-E-T-28: A Treatment Planning Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Vs. Proton Therapy for Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, M; Zhang, R; Sanders, M; Newhauser, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The delivery of post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) can be challenging for patients with left-sided breast cancer due to the PTV size and proximity to critical organs. This study investigates the use of protons for PMRT in a clinically-representative cohort of patients, and quantitatively compares volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to proton therapy to have an evidence-based rationale for selecting a treatment modality for these patients. Methods: Eight left-sided PMRT patients previously treated at our clinic with VMAT were identified for the study. PTVs included the chest wall and regional lymph nodes. Passively scattered (PS) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans were constructed using the Eclipse proton planning system. The resulting plans were compared to the original VMAT plan on the basis of PTV coverage; dose homogeneity index (DHI) and conformity index (CI); dose to organs at risk (OAR); tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and secondary cancer complication probability (SCCP). Differences were tested for significance using the paired Student's t-test (p<0.01). Results: All modalities produced clinically acceptable PMRT plans. The comparison demonstrated proton treatment plans provide significantly lower NTCP values for the heart and the lung while maintaining significantly better CI and DHI. At a prescribed dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in the PTV, the calculated mean NTCP value for the patients decreased from 1.3% to 0.05% for the whole heart (cardiac mortality) and from 3.8% to 1.1% for the lungs (radiation pneumonitis) for both proton therapy plans from VMAT plans. Both proton modalities showed a significantly lower SCCP for the contralateral breast compared to VMAT. Conclusion: All three plans (VMAT, PS, and IMPT) provide acceptable treatment plans for PMRT. However, proton therapy shows a significant advantage over VMAT with regards to sparing OARs and may be more advantageous for patients with unfavorable anatomy.

  3. Poster Thur Eve 36: Implementation of constant dose rate and gantry speed arc therapy(CDR-CAS-IMAT) for thoracic esophageal carcinoma on Varian 23EX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ruohui; Fan, Xiaomei; Bai, Wenwen; Han, Chun

    2014-08-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to propose an alternative planning approach for VMAT using constant dose rate and gantry speed arc therapy(CDR-CAS-IMAT) implementation on conventional Linac Varian 23EX and used IMRT as a benchmark to evaluate the performance. Methods and materials: Eighteen patients with thoracic esophageal carcinoma who were previously treated with IMRT on Varian 23EX were retrospectively planned for CDR-CAS-IMAT plans. Dose prescription was set to 60 Gy to PTVs in 30 fractions. The planning objectives for PTVs and OAR were corresponding with the IMRT plans. Dose to the PTVs and OAR were compared to IMRT with respect to plan quality, MU, treatment time and delivery accuracy. Results: CDR-CAS-IMAT plans led to equivalent or superior plan quality as compared to IMRT, PTV's CI relative increased 16.2%, while small deviations were observed on minimum dose for PTV. Volumes in the cord receiving 40Gy were increased from 3.6% with IMRT to 7.0%. Treatment times were reduced significantly with CDR-CAS-IMAT(mean 85.7s vs. 232.1s, p < .05), however, MU increased by a factor of 1.3 and lung V10/5/3.5/aver were relative increase 6.7%,12%,17.9%,4.2%, respectively. And increased the E-P low dose area volume decreased the hight dose area. There were no significant difference in Delta4 measurements results between both planning techniques. Conclusion: CDR-CAS-IMAT plans can be implemented smoothly and quickly into a busy cancer center, which improved PTV CI and reduces treatment time but increased the MU and low dose irradiated area. An evaluation of weight loss must be performed during treatment for CDR-CAS-IMAT patients.

  4. SU-E-T-157: Evaluation and Comparison of Doses to Pelvic Lymph Nodes and to Point B with 3D Image Guided Treatment Planning for High Dose Brachytherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhandare, N.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate and compare the doses received by the obturator, external and internal iliac lymph nodes and point Methods: CT-MR fused image sets of 15 patients obtained for each of 5 fractions of HDR brachytherapy using tandem and ring applicator, were used to generate treatment plans optimized to deliver a prescription dose to HRCTV-D90 and to minimize the doses to organs at risk (OARs). For each set of image, target volume (GTV, HRCTV) OARs (Bladder, Rectum, Sigmoid), and both left and right pelvic lymph nodes (obturator, external and internal iliac lymph nodes) were delineated. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were generated for pelvic nodal groups (left and right obturator group, internal and external iliac chains) Per fraction DVH parameters used for dose comparison included dose to 100% volume (D100), and dose received by 2cc (D2cc), 1cc (D1cc) and 0.1 cc (D0.1cc) of nodal volume. Dose to point B was compared with each DVH parameter using 2 sided t-test. Pearson correlation were determined to examine relationship of point B dose with nodal DVH parameters. Results: FIGO clinical stage varied from 1B1 to IIIB. The median pretreatment tumor diameter measured on MRI was 4.5 cm (2.7 6.4cm).The median dose to bilateral point B was 1.20 Gy 0.12 or 20% of the prescription dose. The correlation coefficients were all <0.60 for all nodal DVH parameters indicating low degree of correlation. Only 2 cc of obturator nodes was not significantly different from point B dose on t-test. Conclusion: Dose to point B does not adequately represent the dose to any specific pelvic nodal group. When using image guided 3D dose-volume optimized treatment nodal groups should be individually identified and delineated to obtain the doses received by pelvic nodes.

  5. Predictive Treatment Management: Incorporating a Predictive Tumor Response Model Into Robust Prospective Treatment Planning for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Yorke, Ellen; Hu, Yu-Chi; Mageras, Gig; Rimner, Andreas; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: We hypothesized that a treatment planning technique that incorporates predicted lung tumor regression into optimization, predictive treatment planning (PTP), could allow dose escalation to the residual tumor while maintaining coverage of the initial target without increasing dose to surrounding organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: We created a model to estimate the geometric presence of residual tumors after radiation therapy using planning computed tomography (CT) and weekly cone beam CT scans of 5 lung cancer patients. For planning purposes, we modeled the dynamic process of tumor shrinkage by morphing the original planning target volume (PTV{sub orig}) in 3 equispaced steps to the predicted residue (PTV{sub pred}). Patients were treated with a uniform prescription dose to PTV{sub orig}. By contrast, PTP optimization started with the same prescription dose to PTV{sub orig} but linearly increased the dose at each step, until reaching the highest dose achievable to PTV{sub pred} consistent with OAR limits. This method is compared with midcourse adaptive replanning. Results: Initial parenchymal gross tumor volume (GTV) ranged from 3.6 to 186.5 cm{sup 3}. On average, the primary GTV and PTV decreased by 39% and 27%, respectively, at the end of treatment. The PTP approach gave PTV{sub orig} at least the prescription dose, and it increased the mean dose of the true residual tumor by an average of 6.0 Gy above the adaptive approach. Conclusions: PTP, incorporating a tumor regression model from the start, represents a new approach to increase tumor dose without increasing toxicities, and reduce clinical workload compared with the adaptive approach, although model verification using per-patient midcourse imaging would be prudent.

  6. SU-E-T-500: Dose Escalation Strategy for Lung Cancer Patients Using a Biologically- Guided Target Definition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shusharina, N; Khan, F; Choi, N; Sharp, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dose escalation strategy for lung cancer patients can lead to late symptoms such as pneumonitis and cardiac injury. We propose a strategy to increase radiation dose for improving local tumor control while simultaneously striving to minimize the injury of organs at risk (OAR). Our strategy is based on defining a small, biologically-guided target volume for receiving additional radiation dose. Methods: 106 patients with lung cancer treated with radiotherapy were selected for patients diagnosed with stage II and III disease. Previous research has shown that 50% of the maximum SUV threshold in FDG-PET imaging is appropriate for delineation of the most aggressive part of a tumor. After PET- and CT-derived targets were contoured, an IMRT treatment plan was designed to deliver 60 Gy to the GTV as delineated on a 4D CT (Plan 1). A second plan was designed with additional dose of 18 Gy to the PET-derived volume (Plan 2). A composite plan was generated by the addition of Plan 1 and Plan 2. Results: Plan 1 was compared to the composite plan and increases in OAR dose were assessed. For seven patients on average, lung V5 was increased by 1.4% and V20 by 4.2% for ipsilateral lung and by 13.5% and 7% for contralateral lung. For total lung, V5 and V20 were increased by 4.5% and 4.8% respectively. Mean lung dose was increased by 9.7% for the total lung. The maximum dose to the spinal cord increased by 16% on average. For the heart, V20 increased by 4.2% and V40 by 5.2%. Conclusion: It seems feasible that an additional 18 Gy of radiation dose can be delivered to FDG PET-derived subvolume of the CT-based GTV of the primary tumor without significant increase in total dose to the critical organs such as lungs, spinal cord and heart.

  7. SU-E-T-56: Brain Metastasis Treatment Plans for Contrast-Enhanced Synchrotron Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obeid, L; Adam, J; Tessier, A; Vautrin, M; Benkebil, M; Sihanath, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Iodine-enhanced radiotherapy is an innovative treatment combining the selective accumulation of an iodinated contrast agent in brain tumors with irradiations using monochromatic medium energy x-rays. The aim of this study is to compare dynamic stereotactic arc-therapy and iodineenhanced SSRT. Methods: Five patients bearing brain metastasis received a standard helical 3D-scan without iodine. A second scan was acquired 13 min after an 80 g iodine infusion. Two SSRT treatment plans (with/without iodine) were performed for each patient using a dedicated Monte Carlo (MC) treatment planning system (TPS) based on the ISOgray TPS. Ten coplanar beams (6×6 cm2, shaped with collimator) were simulated. MC statistical error objective was less than 5% in the 50% isodose. The dynamic arc-therapy plan was achieved on the Iplan Brainlab TPS. The treatment plan validation criteria were fixed such that 100% of the prescribed dose is delivered at the beam isocentre and the 70% isodose contains the whole target volume. The comparison elements were the 70% isodose volume, the average and maximum doses delivered to organs at risk (OAR): brainstem, optical nerves, chiasma, eyes, skull bone and healthy brain parenchyma. Results: The stereotactic dynamic arc-therapy remains the best technique in terms of dose conformation. Iodine-enhanced SSRT presents similar performances to dynamic arc-therapy with increased brainstem and brain parenchyma sparing. One disadvantage of SSRT is the high dose to the skull bone. Iodine accumulation in metastasis may increase the dose by 20–30%, allowing a normal tissue sparing effect at constant prescribed dose. Treatment without any iodine enhancement (medium-energy stereotactic radiotherapy) is not relevant with degraded HDVs (brain, parenchyma and skull bone) comparing to stereotactic dynamic arc-therapy. Conclusion: Iodine-enhanced SSRT exhibits a good potential for brain metastasis treatment regarding the dose distribution and OAR criteria.

  8. Impacts of Multileaf Collimators Leaf Width on Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Analysis of Two Commercial Elekta Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Shichao; Gong Youling; Xu Qingfeng; Bai Sen; Lu You; Jiang Qingfeng; Chen Nianyong

    2011-07-01

    We compared the impacts of multileaf collimator (MLC) widths (standard MLC width of 10 mm [SMLC] and micro-MLC width of 4 mm [MMLC]) on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten patients with NPC were recruited in this study. In each patient's case, plans were generated with the same machine setup parameter and optimizing methods in a treatment planning system according to 2 commercial Elekta MLC devices. All of the parameters were collected from dose-volume histograms of paired plans and evaluated. The average conformity index (CI) and homogeneous index (HI) for the planning gross target volume in IMRT plans with MMLC were 0.790 {+-} 0.036 and 1.062 {+-} 0.011, respectively. Data in plans with SMLC were 0.754 {+-} 0.038 and 1.070 {+-} 0.010, respectively. The differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Compared with CI and HI for planning target volume in paired plans, data with MMLC obviously were better than those with SMLC (CI: 0.858 {+-} 0.026 vs. 0.850 {+-} 0.021, p < 0.05; and HI: 1.185 {+-} 0.011 vs. 1.195 {+-} 0.011, p < 0.05). However, there was no statistical significance between evaluated parameters (Dmean, Dmax, D{sub 5}, gEUD, or NTCP) for organs at risk (OARs) in the 2 paired IMRT plans. According to these two kinds of Elekta MLC devices, IMRT plans with the MMLC have significant advantages in dose coverage for the targets, with more efficiency in treatment for NPC but fail to improve dose sparing of the OARs.

  9. Tumor histology and location predict deep nuclei toxicity: Implications for late effects from focal brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plaga, Alexis; Shields, Lisa B.E.; Sun, David A.; Vitaz, Todd W.; Spalding, Aaron C.

    2012-10-01

    Normal tissue toxicity resulting from both disease and treatment is an adverse side effect in the management of patients with central nervous system malignancies. We tested the hypothesis that despite these improvements, certain tumors place patients at risk for neurocognitive, neuroendocrine, and neurosensory late effects. Defining patient groups at risk for these effects could allow for development of preventive strategies. Fifty patients with primary brain tumors underwent radiation planning with magnetic resonance imaging scan and computed tomography datasets. Organs at risk (OAR) responsible for neurocognitive, neuroendocrine, and neurosensory function were defined. Inverse-planned intensity-modulated radiation therapy was optimized with priority given to target coverage while penalties were assigned to exceeding normal tissue tolerances. Tumor laterality, location, and histology were compared with OAR doses, and analysis of variance was performed to determine the significance of any observed correlation. The ipsilateral hippocampus exceeded dose limits in frontal (74%), temporal (94%), and parietal (100%) lobe tumor locations. The contralateral hippocampus was at risk in the following tumor locations: frontal (53%), temporal (83%), or parietal (50%) lobe. Patients with high-grade glioma were at risk for ipsilateral (88%) and contralateral (73%) hippocampal damage (P <0.05 compared with other histologies). The pituitary gland and hypothalamus exceeded dose tolerances in patients with pituitary tumors (both 100%) and high-grade gliomas (50% and 75%, P <0.05 compared with other histologies), respectively. Despite application of modern radiation therapy, certain tumor locations and histologies continue to place patients at risk for morbidity. Patients with high-grade gliomas or tumors located in the frontal, temporal, or parietal lobes are at risk for neurocognitive decline, likely because of larger target volumes and higher radiation doses. Data from this study may help to stratify patients at risk for late effects to develop strategies to reduce frequency and severity of radiation sequelae.

  10. Imaging dose in breast radiotherapy: does breast size affect the dose to the organs at risk and the risk of secondary cancer to the contralateral breast?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batumalai, Vikneswary; Quinn, Alexandra; Jameson, Michael; Delaney, Geoff; Holloway, Lois

    2015-03-15

    Correct target positioning is crucial for accurate dose delivery in breast radiotherapy resulting in utilisation of daily imaging. However, the radiation dose from daily imaging is associated with increased probability of secondary induced cancer. The aim of this study was to quantify doses associated with three imaging modalities and investigate the correlation of dose and varying breast size in breast radiotherapy. Planning computed tomography (CT) data sets of 30 breast cancer patients were utilised to simulate the dose received by various organs from a megavoltage computed tomography (MV-CT), megavoltage electronic portal image (MV-EPI) and megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). The mean dose to organs adjacent to the target volume (contralateral breast, lungs, spinal cord and heart) were analysed. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to determine the relationship between imaging dose and primary breast volume and the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of induced secondary cancer was calculated for the contralateral breast. The highest contralateral breast mean dose was from the MV-CBCT (1.79 Gy), followed by MV-EPI (0.22 Gy) and MV-CT (0.11 Gy). A similar trend was found for all organs at risk (OAR) analysed. The primary breast volume inversely correlated with the contralateral breast dose for all three imaging modalities. As the primary breast volume increases, the likelihood of a patient developing a radiation-induced secondary cancer to the contralateral breast decreases. MV-CBCT showed a stronger relationship between breast size and LAR of developing a radiation-induced contralateral breast cancer in comparison with the MV-CT and MV-EPI. For breast patients, imaging dose to OAR depends on imaging modality and treated breast size. When considering the use of imaging during breast radiotherapy, the patient's breast size and contralateral breast dose should be taken into account.

  11. Intensity modulated radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy for whole breast irradiation: a comparative dosimetric study and introduction of a novel qualitative index for plan evaluation, the normal tissue index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yim, Jackie; Suttie, Clare; Bromley, Regina; Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian

    2015-09-15

    We report on a retrospective dosimetric study, comparing 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy (hIMRT). We evaluated plans based on their planning target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, dose to organs at risk (OARs) and exposure of normal tissue to radiation. The Homogeneity Index (HI) was used to assess the dose homogeneity in the target region, and we describe a new index, the normal tissue index (NTI), to assess the dose in the normal tissue inside the tangent treatment portal. Plans were generated for 25 early-stage breast cancer patients, using a hIMRT technique. These were compared with the 3DCRT plans of the treatment previously received by the patients. Plan quality was evaluated using the HI, NTI and dose to OARs. The hIMRT technique was significantly more homogenous than the 3DCRT technique, while maintaining target coverage. The hIMRT technique was also superior at minimising the amount of tissue receiving D{sub 105%} and above (P < 0.0001). The ipsilateral lung and contralateral breast maximum were significantly lower in the hIMRT plans (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005), but the 3DCRT technique achieved a lower mean heart dose in left-sided breast cancer patients (P < 0.05). Hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy plans achieved improved dose homogeneity compared to the 3DCRT plans and superior outcome with regard to dose to normal tissues. We propose that the addition of both HI and NTI in evaluating the quality of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) breast plans provides clinically relevant comparators which more accurately reflect the new paradigm of treatment goals and outcomes in the era of breast IMRT.

  12. Dose planning objectives in anal canal cancer IMRT: the TROG ANROTAT experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Elizabeth; Cray, Alison; Haworth, Annette; Chander, Sarat; Lin, Robert; Subramanian, Brindha; Ng, Michael

    2015-06-15

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is ideal for anal canal cancer (ACC), delivering high doses to irregular tumour volumes whilst minimising dose to surrounding normal tissues. Establishing achievable dose objectives is a challenge. The purpose of this paper was to utilise data collected in the Assessment of New Radiation Oncology Treatments and Technologies (ANROTAT) project to evaluate the feasibility of ACC IMRT dose planning objectives employed in the Australian situation. Ten Australian centres were randomly allocated three data sets from 15 non-identifiable computed tomography data sets representing a range of disease stages and gender. Each data set was planned by two different centres, producing 30 plans. All tumour and organ at risk (OAR) contours, prescription and dose constraint details were provided. Dose–volume histograms (DVHs) for each plan were analysed to evaluate the feasibility of dose planning objectives provided. All dose planning objectives for the bone marrow (BM) and femoral heads were achieved. Median planned doses exceeded one or more objectives for bowel, external genitalia and bladder. This reached statistical significance for bowel V30 (P = 0.04), V45 (P < 0.001), V50 (P < 0.001), external genitalia V20 (P < 0.001) and bladder V35 (P < 0.001), V40 (P = 0.01). Gender was found to be the only significant factor in the likelihood of achieving the bowel V50 (P = 0.03) and BM V30 constraints (P = 0.04). The dose planning objectives used in the ANROTAT project provide a good starting point for ACC IMRT planning. To facilitate clinical implementation, it is important to prioritise OAR objectives and recognise factors that affect the achievability of these objectives.

  13. SciSat AM: Stereo 01: 3D Pre-treatment Dose Verification for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asuni, G; Beek, T van; Van Utyven, E; McCowan, P; McCurdy, B.M.C.

    2014-08-15

    Radical treatment techniques such as stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are becoming popular and they involve delivery of large doses in fewer fractions. Due to this feature of SBRT, a high-resolution, pre-treatment dose verification method that makes use of a 3D patient representation would be appropriate. Such a technique will provide additional information about dose delivered to the target volume(s) and organs-at-risk (OARs) in the patient volume compared to 2D verification methods. In this work, we investigate an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based pre-treatment QA method which provides an accurate reconstruction of the 3D-dose distribution in the patient model. Customized patient plans are delivered in air and the portal images are collected using the EPID in cine mode. The images are then analysed to determine an estimate of the incident energy fluence. This is then passed to a collapsed-cone convolution dose algorithm which reconstructs a 3D patient dose estimate on the CT imaging dataset. To date, the method has been applied to 5 SBRT patient plans. Reconstructed doses were compared to those calculated by the TPS. Reconstructed mean doses were mostly within 3% of those in the TPS. DVHs of target volumes and OARs compared well. The Chi pass rates using 3%/3mm in the high dose region are greater than 97% in all cases. These initial results demonstrate clinical feasibility and utility of a robust, efficient, effective and convenient pre-treatment QA method using EPID. Research sponsored in part by Varian Medical Systems.

  14. SU-E-J-193: Feasibility of MRI-Only Based IMRT Planning for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prior, P; Botros, M; Chen, X; Paulson, E; Erickson, B; Li, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: With the increasing use of MRI simulation and the advent of MRI-guided delivery, it is desirable to use MRI only for treatment planning. In this study, we assess the dosimetric difference between MRI- and CTbased IMRT planning for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Planning CTs and MRIs acquired for a representative pancreatic cancer patient were used. MRI-based planning utilized forced relative electron density (rED) assignment of organ specific values from IRCU report 46, where rED = 1.029 for PTV and a rED = 1.036 for non-specified tissue (NST). Six IMRT plans were generated with clinical dose-volume (DV) constraints using a research Monaco planning system employing Monte Carlo dose calculation with optional perpendicular magnetic field (MF) of 1.5T. The following five plans were generated and compared with the planning CT: 1.) CT plan with MF and dose recalculation without optimization; 2.) MRI (T2) plan with target and OARs redrawn based on MRI, forced rED, no MF, and recalculation without optimization; 3.) Similar as in 2 but with MF; 4.) MRI plan with MF but without optimization; and 5.) Similar as in 4 but with optimization. Results: Generally, noticeable differences in PTV point doses and DV parameters (DVPs) between the CT-and MRI-based plans with and without the MF were observed. These differences between the optimized plans were generally small, mostly within 2%. Larger differences were observed in point doses and mean doses for certain OARs between the CT and MRI plan, mostly due to differences between image acquisition times. Conclusion: MRI only based IMRT planning for pancreatic cancer is feasible. The differences observed between the optimized CT and MRI plans with or without the MF were practically negligible if excluding the differences between MRI and CT defined structures.

  15. SU-E-T-510: Mathematical Analysis of Approximate Biological Effective Dose (BED) Calculation for Multi-Phase Radiotherapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kauweloa, K; Gutierrez, A; Bergamo, A; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N; Mavroidis, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is growing interest about biological effective dose (BED) and its application in treatment plan evaluation due to its stronger correlation with treatment outcome. An approximate biological effective dose (BEDA) equation was introduced to simplify BED calculations by treatment planning systems in multi-phase treatments. The purpose of this work is to reveal its mathematical properties relative to the true, multi-phase BED (BEDT) equation. Methods: The BEDT equation was derived and used to reveal the mathematical properties of BEDA. MATLAB (MathWorks, Natick, MA) was used to simulate and analyze common and extreme clinical multi-phase cases. In those cases, percent error (Perror) and Bland-Altman analysis were used to study the significance of the inaccuracies of BEDA for different combinations of total doses, numbers of fractions, doses per fractions and ? over ? values. All the calculations were performed on a voxel-basis in order to study how dose distributions would affect the accuracy of BEDA. Results: When the voxel dose-per-fractions (DPF) delivered by both phases are equal, BEDA and BEDT are equal. In heterogeneous dose distributions, which significantly vary between the phases, there are fewer occurrences of equal DPFs and hence the imprecision of BEDA is greater. It was shown that as the ? over ? ratio increased the accuracy of BEDA would improve. Examining twenty-four cases, it was shown that the range of DPF ratios for a 3 Perror varied from 0.32 to 7.50Gy, whereas for Perror of 1 the range varied from 0.50 to 2.96Gy. Conclusion: The DPF between the different phases should be equal in order to render BEDA accurate. OARs typically receive heterogeneous dose distributions hence the probability of equal DPFs is low. Consequently, the BEDA equation should only be used for targets or OARs that receive uniform or very similar dose distributions by the different treatment phases.

  16. Limitations of the planning organ at risk volume (PRV) concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stroom, Joep C. [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: j.stroom@nki.nl; Heijmen, Ben J.M. [Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: Previously, we determined a planning target volume (PTV) margin recipe for geometrical errors in radiotherapy equal to M{sub T} = 2{sigma} + 0.7{sigma}, with {sigma} and {sigma} standard deviations describing systematic and random errors, respectively. In this paper, we investigated margins for organs at risk (OAR), yielding the so-called planning organ at risk volume (PRV). Methods and Materials: For critical organs with a maximum dose (D{sub max}) constraint, we calculated margins such that D{sub max} in the PRV is equal to the motion averaged D{sub max} in the (moving) clinical target volume (CTV). We studied margins for the spinal cord in 10 head-and-neck cases and 10 lung cases, each with two different clinical plans. For critical organs with a dose-volume constraint, we also investigated whether a margin recipe was feasible. Results: For the 20 spinal cords considered, the average margin recipe found was: M{sub R} = 1.6{sigma} + 0.2{sigma} with variations for systematic and random errors of 1.2{sigma} to 1.8{sigma} and -0.2{sigma} to 0.6{sigma}, respectively. The variations were due to differences in shape and position of the dose distributions with respect to the cords. The recipe also depended significantly on the volume definition of D{sub max}. For critical organs with a dose-volume constraint, the PRV concept appears even less useful because a margin around, e.g., the rectum changes the volume in such a manner that dose-volume constraints stop making sense. Conclusion: The concept of PRV for planning of radiotherapy is of limited use. Therefore, alternative ways should be developed to include geometric uncertainties of OARs in radiotherapy planning.

  17. A single-gradient junction technique to replace multiple-junction shifts for craniospinal irradiation treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Austin; Ding, George X.

    2014-01-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) requires abutting fields at the cervical spine. Junction shifts are conventionally used to prevent setup errorinduced overdosage/underdosage from occurring at the same location. This study compared the dosimetric differences at the cranial-spinal junction between a single-gradient junction technique and conventional multiple-junction shifts and evaluated the effect of setup errors on the dose distributions between both techniques for a treatment course and single fraction. Conventionally, 2 lateral brain fields and a posterior spine field(s) are used for CSI with weekly 1-cm junction shifts. We retrospectively replanned 4 CSI patients using a single-gradient junction between the lateral brain fields and the posterior spine field. The fields were extended to allow a minimum 3-cm field overlap. The dose gradient at the junction was achieved using dose painting and intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning. The effect of positioning setup errors on the dose distributions for both techniques was simulated by applying shifts of 3 and 5 mm. The resulting cervical spine doses across the field junction for both techniques were calculated and compared. Dose profiles were obtained for both a single fraction and entire treatment course to include the effects of the conventional weekly junction shifts. Compared with the conventional technique, the gradient-dose technique resulted in higher dose uniformity and conformity to the target volumes, lower organ at risk (OAR) mean and maximum doses, and diminished hot spots from systematic positioning errors over the course of treatment. Single-fraction hot and cold spots were improved for the gradient-dose technique. The single-gradient junction technique provides improved conformity, dose uniformity, diminished hot spots, lower OAR mean and maximum dose, and one plan for the entire treatment course, which reduces the potential human error associated with conventional 4-shifted plans.

  18. Cloud Properties Working Group Low Clouds Update

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    Cloud Properties Working Group Low Clouds Update Low Clouds Update Jennifer Comstock Jennifer Comstock Dave Turner Dave Turner Andy Andy Vogelmann Vogelmann Instruments Instruments ...

  19. Slide 1

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    Microwave Spectroscopy Microwave Spectroscopy Validation Experiment Validation Experiment Andy Vogelmann, BNL Andy Vogelmann, BNL Dave Turner, University of Wisconsin Dave Turner, ...

  20. MWRRET (Microwave Radiometer Retrievals)

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    Plus Plus Andy Vogelmann, Dave Turner Andy Vogelmann, Dave Turner & Jennifer Comstock & Jennifer Comstock Min Min Susanne Crewell Susanne Crewell Ulrich L Ulrich L rnard ...

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    Scherpelz, Peter (2) Guo, Hanqi (1) Kharitonov, Maxim (1) Murray, Andy (1) Pellin, Michael ... Scherpelz, Peter ; Padavi, Karmela ; Murray, Andy ; Glatz, Andreas ; Aranson, Igor S. ...

  4. Knowledge-based prediction of plan quality metrics in intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiraishi, Satomi; Moore, Kevin L.; Tan, Jun; Olsen, Lindsey A.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work was to develop a comprehensive knowledge-based methodology for predicting achievable dose–volume histograms (DVHs) and highly precise DVH-based quality metrics (QMs) in stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) plans. Accurate QM estimation can identify suboptimal treatment plans and provide target optimization objectives to standardize and improve treatment planning. Methods: Correlating observed dose as it relates to the geometric relationship of organs-at-risk (OARs) to planning target volumes (PTVs) yields mathematical models to predict achievable DVHs. In SRS, DVH-based QMs such as brain V{sub 10Gy} (volume receiving 10 Gy or more), gradient measure (GM), and conformity index (CI) are used to evaluate plan quality. This study encompasses 223 linear accelerator-based SRS/SRT treatment plans (SRS plans) using volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), representing 95% of the institution’s VMAT radiosurgery load from the past four and a half years. Unfiltered models that use all available plans for the model training were built for each category with a stratification scheme based on target and OAR characteristics determined emergently through initial modeling process. Model predictive accuracy is measured by the mean and standard deviation of the difference between clinical and predicted QMs, δQM = QM{sub clin} − QM{sub pred}, and a coefficient of determination, R{sup 2}. For categories with a large number of plans, refined models are constructed by automatic elimination of suspected suboptimal plans from the training set. Using the refined model as a presumed achievable standard, potentially suboptimal plans are identified. Predictions of QM improvement are validated via standardized replanning of 20 suspected suboptimal plans based on dosimetric predictions. The significance of the QM improvement is evaluated using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: The most accurate predictions are obtained when plans are stratified based on proximity to OARs and their PTV volume sizes. Volumes are categorized into small (V{sub PTV} < 2 cm{sup 3}), medium (2 cm{sup 3} < V{sub PTV} < 25 cm{sup 3}), and large (25 cm{sup 3} < V{sub PTV}). The unfiltered models demonstrate the ability to predict GMs to ∼1 mm and fractional brain V{sub 10Gy} to ∼25% for plans with large V{sub PTV} and critical OAR involvements. Increased accuracy and precision of QM predictions are obtained when high quality plans are selected for the model training. For the small and medium V{sub PTV} plans without critical OAR involvement, predictive ability was evaluated using the refined model. For training plans, the model predicted GM to an accuracy of 0.2 ± 0.3 mm and fractional brain V{sub 10Gy} to 0.04 ± 0.12, suggesting highly accurate predictive ability. For excluded plans, the average δGM was 1.1 mm and fractional brain V{sub 10Gy} was 0.20. These δQM are significantly greater than those of the model training plans (p < 0.001). For CI, predictions are close to clinical values and no significant difference was observed between the training and excluded plans (p = 0.19). Twenty outliers with δGM > 1.35 mm were identified as potentially suboptimal, and replanning these cases using predicted target objectives demonstrates significant improvements on QMs: on average, 1.1 mm reduction in GM (p < 0.001) and 23% reduction in brain V{sub 10Gy} (p < 0.001). After replanning, the difference of δGM distribution between the 20 replans and the refined model training plans was marginal. Conclusions: The results demonstrate the ability to predict SRS QMs precisely and to identify suboptimal plans. Furthermore, the knowledge-based DVH predictions were directly used as target optimization objectives and allowed a standardized planning process that bettered the clinically approved plans. Full clinical application of this methodology can improve consistency of SRS plan quality in a wide range of PTV volume and proximity to OARs and facilitate automated treatment planning for this critical treatment site.

  5. Optimization of leaf margins for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy using a flattening filter-free beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakai, Nobuhide; Sumida, Iori; Otani, Yuki; Suzuki, Osamu; Seo, Yuji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Hasegawa, Masatoshi

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The authors sought to determine the optimal collimator leaf margins which minimize normal tissue dose while achieving high conformity and to evaluate differences between the use of a flattening filter-free (FFF) beam and a flattening-filtered (FF) beam. Methods: Sixteen lung cancer patients scheduled for stereotactic body radiotherapy underwent treatment planning for a 7 MV FFF and a 6 MV FF beams to the planning target volume (PTV) with a range of leaf margins (?3 to 3 mm). Forty grays per four fractions were prescribed as a PTV D95. For PTV, the heterogeneity index (HI), conformity index, modified gradient index (GI), defined as the 50% isodose volume divided by target volume, maximum dose (Dmax), and mean dose (Dmean) were calculated. Mean lung dose (MLD), V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for the lung (defined as the volumes of lung receiving at least 20 and 5 Gy), mean heart dose, and Dmax to the spinal cord were measured as doses to organs at risk (OARs). Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: HI was inversely related to changes in leaf margin. Conformity index and modified GI initially decreased as leaf margin width increased. After reaching a minimum, the two values then increased as leaf margin increased (V shape). The optimal leaf margins for conformity index and modified GI were ?1.1 0.3 mm (mean 1 SD) and ?0.2 0.9 mm, respectively, for 7 MV FFF compared to ?1.0 0.4 and ?0.3 0.9 mm, respectively, for 6 MV FF. Dmax and Dmean for 7 MV FFF were higher than those for 6 MV FF by 3.6% and 1.7%, respectively. There was a positive correlation between the ratios of HI, Dmax, and Dmean for 7 MV FFF to those for 6 MV FF and PTV size (R = 0.767, 0.809, and 0.643, respectively). The differences in MLD, V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for lung between FFF and FF beams were negligible. The optimal leaf margins for MLD, V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for lung were ?0.9 0.6, ?1.1 0.8, and ?2.1 1.2 mm, respectively, for 7 MV FFF compared to ?0.9 0.6, ?1.1 0.8, and ?2.2 1.3 mm, respectively, for 6 MV FF. With the heart inside the radiation field, the mean heart dose showed a V-shaped relationship with leaf margins. The optimal leaf margins were ?1.0 0.6 mm for both beams. Dmax to the spinal cord showed no clear trend for changes in leaf margin. Conclusions: The differences in doses to OARs between FFF and FF beams were negligible. Conformity index, modified GI, MLD, lung V20 Gy, lung V5 Gy, and mean heart dose showed a V-shaped relationship with leaf margins. There were no significant differences in optimal leaf margins to minimize these parameters between both FFF and FF beams. The authors results suggest that a leaf margin of ?1 mm achieves high conformity and minimizes doses to OARs for both FFF and FF beams.

  6. Forward treatment planning for modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) employing Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henzen, D. Manser, P.; Frei, D.; Volken, W.; Born, E. J.; Lssl, K.; Aebersold, D. M.; Fix, M. K.; Neuenschwander, H.; Stampanoni, M. F. M.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: This paper describes the development of a forward planning process for modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT). The approach is based on a previously developed electron beam model used to calculate dose distributions of electron beams shaped by a photon multi leaf collimator (pMLC). Methods: As the electron beam model has already been implemented into the Swiss Monte Carlo Plan environment, the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) can be included in the planning process for MERT. In a first step, CT data are imported into Eclipse and a pMLC shaped electron beam is set up. This initial electron beam is then divided into segments, with the electron energy in each segment chosen according to the distal depth of the planning target volume (PTV) in beam direction. In order to improve the homogeneity of the dose distribution in the PTV, a feathering process (Gaussian edge feathering) is launched, which results in a number of feathered segments. For each of these segments a dose calculation is performed employing the in-house developed electron beam model along with the macro Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm. Finally, an automated weight optimization of all segments is carried out and the total dose distribution is read back into Eclipse for display and evaluation. One academic and two clinical situations are investigated for possible benefits of MERT treatment compared to standard treatments performed in our clinics and treatment with a bolus electron conformal (BolusECT) method. Results: The MERT treatment plan of the academic case was superior to the standard single segment electron treatment plan in terms of organs at risk (OAR) sparing. Further, a comparison between an unfeathered and a feathered MERT plan showed better PTV coverage and homogeneity for the feathered plan, with V{sub 95%} increased from 90% to 96% and V{sub 107%} decreased from 8% to nearly 0%. For a clinical breast boost irradiation, the MERT plan led to a similar homogeneity in the PTV compared to the standard treatment plan while the mean body dose was lower for the MERT plan. Regarding the second clinical case, a whole breast treatment, MERT resulted in a reduction of the lung volume receiving more than 45% of the prescribed dose when compared to the standard plan. On the other hand, the MERT plan leads to a larger low-dose lung volume and a degraded dose homogeneity in the PTV. For the clinical cases evaluated in this work, treatment plans using the BolusECT technique resulted in a more homogenous PTV and CTV coverage but higher doses to the OARs than the MERT plans. Conclusions: MERT treatments were successfully planned for phantom and clinical cases, applying a newly developed intuitive and efficient forward planning strategy that employs a MC based electron beam model for pMLC shaped electron beams. It is shown that MERT can lead to a dose reduction in OARs compared to other methods. The process of feathering MERT segments results in an improvement of the dose homogeneity in the PTV.

  7. Beamlet based direct aperture optimization for MERT using a photon MLC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henzen, D. Manser, P.; Frei, D.; Volken, W.; Born, E. J.; Joosten, A.; Lssl, K.; Aebersold, D. M.; Chatelain, C.; Fix, M. K.; Neuenschwander, H.; Stampanoni, M. F. M.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: A beamlet based direct aperture optimization (DAO) for modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) using photon multileaf collimator (pMLC) shaped electron fields is developed and investigated. Methods: The Swiss Monte Carlo Plan (SMCP) allows the calculation of dose distributions for pMLC shaped electron beams. SMCP is interfaced with the Eclipse TPS (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) which can thus be included into the inverse treatment planning process for MERT. This process starts with the import of a CT-scan into Eclipse, the contouring of the target and the organs at risk (OARs), and the choice of the initial electron beam directions. For each electron beam, the number of apertures, their energy, and initial shape are defined. Furthermore, the DAO requires dosevolume constraints for the structures contoured. In order to carry out the DAO efficiently, the initial electron beams are divided into a grid of beamlets. For each of those, the dose distribution is precalculated using a modified electron beam model, resulting in a dose list for each beamlet and energy. Then the DAO is carried out, leading to a set of optimal apertures and corresponding weights. These optimal apertures are now converted into pMLC shaped segments and the dose calculation for each segment is performed. For these dose distributions, a weight optimization process is launched in order to minimize the differences between the dose distribution using the optimal apertures and the pMLC segments. Finally, a deliverable dose distribution for the MERT plan is obtained and loaded back into Eclipse for evaluation. For an idealized water phantom geometry, a MERT treatment plan is created and compared to the plan obtained using a previously developed forward planning strategy. Further, MERT treatment plans for three clinical situations (breast, chest wall, and parotid metastasis of a squamous cell skin carcinoma) are created using the developed inverse planning strategy. The MERT plans are compared to clinical standard treatment plans using photon beams and the differences between the optimal and the deliverable dose distributions are determined. Results: For the idealized water phantom geometry, the inversely optimized MERT plan is able to obtain the same PTV coverage, but with an improved OAR sparing compared to the forwardly optimized plan. Regarding the right-sided breast case, the MERT plan is able to reduce the lung volume receiving more than 30% of the prescribed dose and the mean lung dose compared to the standard plan. However, the standard plan leads to a better homogeneity within the CTV. The results for the left-sided thorax wall are similar but also the dose to the heart is reduced comparing MERT to the standard treatment plan. For the parotid case, MERT leads to lower doses for almost all OARs but to a less homogeneous dose distribution for the PTV when compared to a standard plan. For all cases, the weight optimization successfully minimized the differences between the optimal and the deliverable dose distribution. Conclusions: A beamlet based DAO using multiple beam angles is implemented and successfully tested for an idealized water phantom geometry and clinical situations.

  8. Impact of Immobilization on Intrafraction Motion for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Winnie; Sahgal, Arjun; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario ; Foote, Matthew; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Jaffray, David A.; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario ; Letourneau, Daniel; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) involves tight planning margins and steep dose gradients to the surrounding organs at risk (OAR). This study aimed to assess intrafraction motion using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for spine SBRT patients treated using three immobilization devices. Methods and Materials: Setup accuracy using CBCT was retrospectively analyzed for 102 treated spinal metastases in 84 patients. Thoracic and lumbar spine patients were immobilized with either an evacuated cushion (EC, n = 24) or a semirigid vacuum body fixation (BF, n = 60). For cases treated at cervical/upper thoracic (thoracic [T]1-T3) vertebrae, a thermoplastic S-frame (SF) mask (n = 18) was used. Patient setup was corrected by using bony anatomy image registration and couch translations only (no rotation corrections) with shifts confirmed on verification CBCTs. Repeat imaging was performed mid- and post-treatment. Patient translational and rotational positioning data were recorded to calculate means, standard deviations (SD), and corresponding margins {+-} 2 SD for residual setup errors and intrafraction motion. Results: A total of 355 localizations, 333 verifications, and 248 mid- and 280 post-treatment CBCTs were analyzed. Residual translations and rotations after couch corrections (verification scans) were similar for all immobilization systems, with SDs of 0.6 to 0.9 mm in any direction and 0.9 Degree-Sign to 1.6 Degree-Sign , respectively. Margins to encompass residual setup errors after couch corrections were within 2 mm. Including intrafraction motion, as measured on post-treatment CBCTs, SDs for total setup error in the left-right, cranial-caudal, and anterior-posterior directions were 1.3, 1.2, and 1.0 mm for EC; 0.9, 0.7, and 0.9 mm for BF; and 1.3, 0.9, and 1.1 mm for SF, respectively. The calculated margins required to encompass total setup error increased to 3 mm for EC and SF and remained within 2 mm for BF. Conclusion: Following image guidance, residual setup errors for spine SBRT were similar across three immobilization systems. The BF device resulted in the least amount of intrafraction motion, and based on this device, we justify a 2-mm margin for the planning OAR and target volume.

  9. SU-E-T-481: Dosimetric Comparison of Acuros XB and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm with Commercial Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculation Algorithm for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, M; Tenn, S; Lee, C; Yang, Y; Lamb, J; Agazaryan, N; Lee, P; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate performance of three commercially available treatment planning systems for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer using the following algorithms: Boltzmann transport equation based algorithm (AcurosXB AXB), convolution based algorithm Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA); and Monte Carlo based algorithm (XVMC). Methods: A total of 10 patients with early stage non-small cell peripheral lung cancer were included. The initial clinical plans were generated using the XVMC based treatment planning system with a prescription of 54Gy in 3 fractions following RTOG0613 protocol. The plans were recalculated with the same beam parameters and monitor units using AAA and AXB algorithms. A calculation grid size of 2mm was used for all algorithms. The dose distribution, conformity, and dosimetric parameters for the targets and organs at risk (OAR) are compared between the algorithms. Results: The average PTV volume was 19.6mL (range 4.247.2mL). The volume of PTV covered by the prescribed dose (PTV-V100) were 93.972.00%, 95.072.07% and 95.102.97% for XVMC, AXB and AAA algorithms, respectively. There was no significant difference in high dose conformity index; however, XVMC predicted slightly higher values (p=0.04) for the ratio of 50% prescription isodose volume to PTV (R50%). The percentage volume of total lungs receiving dose >20Gy (LungV20Gy) were 4.032.26%, 3.862.22% and 3.852.21% for XVMC, AXB and AAA algorithms. Examination of dose volume histograms (DVH) revealed small differences in targets and OARs for most patients. However, the AAA algorithm was found to predict considerable higher PTV coverage compared with AXB and XVMC algorithms in two cases. The dose difference was found to be primarily located at the periphery region of the target. Conclusion: For clinical SBRT lung treatment planning, the dosimetric differences between three commercially available algorithms are generally small except at target periphery. XVMC and AXB algorithms are recommended for accurate dose estimation at tissue boundaries.

  10. SU-E-T-606: A Novel Integrated VMAT/IMRT Technique For the Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, N; Yang, R; Wang, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate a novel Integrated VMAT/IMRT technique which combines volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: 2 partial arcs VMAT, 5-field IMRT and Integrated VMAT/IMRT plans were created for 17 patients with NSCLC. The Integrated VMAT/IMRT technique consisted of 2 partial VMAT arcs and 5 IMRT fields. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) for Integrated VMAT/IMRT was compared with IMRT and VMAT. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. For each plan, a dry run was performed to assess the dosimetric accuracy with MatriXX from IBA. Results: Integrated VMAT/IMRT significantly improved the target conformity and homogeneity. The V30 of normal lung for Integrated plans was significantly lower than IMRT plans (8.4% vs 9.2%; p<0.05). The V5 and mean lung dose (MLD) of normal lung for Integrated plans were 9.8% and 4.6% lower than VMAT plans (p<0.05). The maximum dose of spinal cord for Integrated plans was 4.9 Gy lower than IMRT plans (p<0.05). The mean delivery time of IMRT, VMAT and Integrated plans was 280 s, 114 s, and 327 s, respectively. The mean MUs needed for IMRT, VMAT and Integrated plans were 933, 512, and 737, respectively. The gamma pass rates were beyond 90% at the 3%/3 mm criteria when the gantry angles were set to 0 for pretreatment verification. Conclusion: Integrated VMAT/IMRT technique significantly reduced V5, V10 and MLD of normal lung compared with VMAT, and the irradiated volume of the OARs receiving medium to high dose with fewer MUs compared with IMRT. Integrated VMAT/IMRT technique can be a feasible radiotherapy technique with better plan quality and accurately delivered on the linear accelerator. Ruijie Yang was funded by the grant project: National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 81071237). Other authors have no competing interest for this work.

  11. SU-E-T-489: Plan Comparisons of Re-Irradiation Treatment of Three Intensity Modulated Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lian, J; Tang, X; Liu, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There have been controversial reports on the comparison of dosimetric quality of TomoTherapy (Tomo), VMAT and IMRT. One of the main reasons is the sampled cases are often not dosimetrically challenging enough to test the limit of optimization/delivery modalities. We chose difficult re-irradiation cases when certain organ at risk (OAR) requires extremely low dose to examine the ability of OAR sparing of three main intensity modulated techniques. Methods: Three previous treated patients with disease site on head and neck (HN), brain and lung are planned for reirradiation treatment. The Tomo planning used jaw 2.5cm and pitch 0.3. VMAT and IMRT were planned on Pinnacle for a Varian 21iX Linac with MLC leaf width 5mm. VMAT plan used 2 Arcs and IMRT plan had beams 11–13. The dosimetric endpoints and treatment time were compared for each technique of each patient. Results: Plans of three techniques cover PTV similarly. The HN case requires PTV dose 60Gy but to limit dose of cord which is 8mm away <12Gy. The cord dose of Tomo, VMAT and IMRT plan is 11.6Gy, 11.3Gy and 11.0Gy, respectively. The brain case has PTV prescription 50.4 Gy while requiring the dose of brainstem < 28Gy. Tomo, VMAT and IMRT plan generate brainstem dose 27.6Gy, 27.6Gy and 27.1Gy respectively. For the lung case, PTV was prescribed 42.5Gy but cord dose constraint was 22.5Gy. The cord dose is optimized to 22.3Gy, 20.8Gy and 21.4Gy by Tomo, VMAT and IMRT, respectively. The delivery time if normalized to Tomo is 47.0%/145.6% (VMAT/IMRT), 33.3%/106.3% and 74.1%/245.4% for HN, brain and lung case, respectively. Conclusion: Difficult re-irradiation cases were used to test the limit of three intensity modulated techniques. Tomo, VMAT and IMRT show similar dosimetry while VMAT is the most efficient one and IMRT is the least.

  12. A Dosimetric Comparison of Tomotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in the Treatment of High-Risk Prostate Cancer With Pelvic Nodal Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasquier, David; Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille; Centre Galilee, Clinique de la Louviere, Lille ; Cavillon, Fabrice; Faculte Libre de Medecine, Lille ; Lacornerie, Thomas; Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille ; Touzeau, Claire; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Lartigau, Eric; Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric results of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) in the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer with pelvic nodal radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Plans were generated for 10 consecutive patients treated for high-risk prostate cancer with prophylactic whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) using VMAT and HT. After WPRT, a sequential boost was delivered to the prostate. Plan quality was assessed according to the criteria of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 83 report: the near-minimal (D98%), near-maximal (D2%), and median (D50%) doses; the homogeneity index (HI); and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Beam-on time, integral dose, and several organs at risk (OAR) dosimetric indexes were also compared. Results: For WPRT, HT was able to provide a higher D98% than VMAT (44.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy and 43.9 {+-} 0.5 Gy, respectively; P=.032) and a lower D2% than VMAT (47.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy and 49.1 {+-} 0.7 Gy, respectively; P=.005), leading to a better HI. The DSC was better for WPRT with HT (0.89 {+-} 0.009) than with VMAT (0.80 {+-} 0.02; P=.002). The dosimetric indexes for the prostate boost did not differ significantly. VMAT provided better rectum wall sparing at higher doses (V70, V75, D2%). Conversely, HT provided better bladder wall sparing (V50, V60, V70), except at lower doses (V20). The beam-on times for WPRT and prostate boost were shorter with VMAT than with HT (3.1 {+-} 0.1 vs 7.4 {+-} 0.6 min, respectively; P=.002, and 1.5 {+-} 0.05 vs 3.7 {+-} 0.3 min, respectively; P=.002). The integral dose was slightly lower for VMAT. Conclusion: VMAT and HT provided very similar and highly conformal plans that complied well with OAR dose-volume constraints. Although some dosimetric differences were statistically significant, they remained small. HT provided a more homogeneous dose distribution, whereas VMAT enabled a shorter delivery time.

  13. Cutting Edge Building Technologies – Join the fun!

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenters: Andy Mitchell, U.S. Department of Energy; Roberto Nunez, New York Presbyterian Hospital; Udi Meriav, enVerid

  14. Benchmarking of Competitive Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory * National Renewable Energy Laboratory * ORNL Team Members - Steve Campbell, Chester Coomer - Andy Wereszczak, Materials Science and Technology Division Partners ...

  15. NFPA 45- 2015 Edition Changes and Issues Related to Energy Conservation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Andy Minister, P.E., Chief Fire Protection Engineer - Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  16. Infrared spectroscopy of Sc{sup +}(H{sub 2}O) and Sc{sup 2+}(H{sub 2}O) via argon complex predissociation: The charge dependence of cation hydration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnegie, P. D.; Bandyopadhyay, B.; Duncan, M. A.

    2011-01-07

    Singly and doubly charged scandium-water ion-molecule complexes are produced in a supersonic molecular beam by laser vaporization. These ions are mass analyzed and size selected in a specially designed reflectron time-of-flight spectrometer. To probe their structure, vibrational spectroscopy is measured for these complexes in the O-H stretching region using infrared laser photodissociation and the method of rare gas atom predissociation, also known as ''tagging.'' The O-H stretches in these systems are shifted to lower frequency than those for the free water molecule, and the intensity of the symmetric stretch band is strongly enhanced relative to the asymmetric stretch. These effects are more prominent for the doubly charged ions. Partially resolved rotational structure for the Sc{sup +}(H{sub 2}O)Ar complex shows that the H-O-H bond angle is larger than it is in the free water molecule. Fragmentation and spectral patterns indicate that the coordination of the Sc{sup 2+} ion is filled with six ligands (one water and five argons).

  17. Feasibility study of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate for endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Ruijie; Wang, Junjie; Xu, Feng; Li, Hua; Zhang, Xile

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the feasibility, efficiency, and delivery accuracy of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate (VMAT-CDR) for whole-pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) of endometrial cancer. The nine-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), VMAT with variable dose-rate (VMAT-VDR), and VMAT-CDR plans were created for 9 patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs), and normal tissue (NT) were compared. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. For each VMAT-CDR plan, a dry run was performed to assess the dosimetric accuracy with MatriXX from IBA. Compared with IMRT, the VMAT-CDR plans delivered a slightly greater V{sub 20} of the bowel, bladder, pelvis bone, and NT, but significantly decreased the dose to the high-dose region of the rectum and pelvis bone. The MUs decreased from 1105 with IMRT to 628 with VMAT-CDR. The delivery time also decreased from 9.5 to 3.2 minutes. The average gamma pass rate was 95.6% at the 3%/3 mm criteria with MatriXX pretreatment verification for 9 patients. VMAT-CDR can achieve comparable plan quality with significant shorter delivery time and smaller number of MUs compared with IMRT for patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. It can be accurately delivered and be an alternative to IMRT on the linear accelerator without VDR capability.

  18. SU-E-T-617: A Feasibility Study of Navigation Based Multi Criteria Optimization for Advanced Cervical Cancer IMRT Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study aims to validate multi-criteria optimization (MCO) against standard intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization for advanced cervical cancer in RayStation (v2.4, RaySearch Laboratories, Sweden). Methods: 10 advanced cervical cancer patients IMRT plans were randomly selected, these plans were designed with step and shoot optimization, new plans were then designed with MCO based on these plans,while keeping optimization conditions unchanged,comparison was made between both kinds of plans including the dose volume histogram parameters of PTV and OAR,and were analysed by pairing-t test. Results: We normalize the plan so that 95% volume of PTV achieved the prescribed dose(50Gy). The volume of radiation 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy of the rectum were reduced by 14.7%,26.8%,21.1%,10.5% respectively(P?0.05). The mean dose of rectum were reduced by 7.2Gy(P?0.05). There were no significant differences for the dosimetric parameters for the bladder. Conclusion: In comparision with standard IMRT optimization, MCO reduces the dose of organs at risk with the same PTV coverage,but the result needs further clinical evalution.

  19. SU-E-T-575: Isocenter Shifts in Treatment Planning and Its Clinical Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, Y; Damiani, S; Cao, Y; Jamshidi, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate causes of isocenter shifts in treatment planning and its clinical impact on patient treatment efficiency and safety. Methods/Materials: Treatment planning data of 340 patients under treatment over 8 weeks period were gathered to identify isocenter shifts according to site of the treatment, types of treatment plan or types of the machine used. Treatment plans included inversed and forward IMRT, as well as 3D plans. Treatment sites included pelvis, chest, abdomen, breasts, head and necks and extremities. Re-planning were performed without the isocenter shift for pelvis and chest plans, the dosimetric parameters such as PTV coverage, and dose sparing of OARs of these plans were analyzed and compared. Results/Discussions: Results showed that the isocenter shift was always necessary for some of sites such as breasts, two or more distinctive PTVs, or special cases such as large PTV treated with enhanced dynamic wedge. Many other cases, the re-planning results indicated 53% of the plans that the same quality of the plan can be achieved without the shift of the isocenter. Repositioning patients on a daily basis demanded unambiguous instructions for therapists for patient setups, and additional time to perform the shifts before treatment. Opportunities for error propagation exist during the communication and hand-over of such plans. Conclusion: Isocenter shifts demanded unambiguous instructions and times for therapists for daily patient setups, therefore it impacted both safety and efficiency of the patient treatment. Based on the analysis, the isocenter shifts were unavoidable for cases such as treatment of multiple sites, overcoming limitations of treatment machines, and/or sometime better dosimetry. However, we found many initially proposed shifts may have been eliminated either by careful planning or by improved CT simulation process such as detailed review of the images and localization of the PTV during simulation.

  20. SU-E-T-413: Experience-Based VMAT Plan Quality Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, K; Kalach, N; Wolthuis, B; Tai, C; Kravchuk, A; Bernstein, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify VMAT plan quality using a retrospective study of over 200 clinical treated VMAT plans created using the Eclipse Treatment Planning System to create benchmarks of plan quality for a few categories of treatment sites. Methods: Using a controlled phantom geometry, various dosimetric indices were investigated to quantify dosimetric plan quality as a function of isocenter displacement from center of mass, average path length, number of arcs and PTV proximity to critical structures. Beginning with published dosimetry indices from SRS and SBRT evaluations, UDI (Unified Dosimetry Index) and modified UDI were tested before creating a new factor VMAT-DI. VMAT-DI was developed within boundaries of this project and it includes renormalized factors of conformity index, coverage index, modified gradient index and homogeneity index as well as indices based on routine clinical practice such as absolute dose max index. The plans were then evaluated using the VMAT-DI such that benchmarks for planning could be created. Results: The majority of the plans evaluated could be assigned VMAT-DI values within a range for each treatment site. However, the outliers were results of difficult planning parameters such as very irregular targets, inhomogeneities or difficult to achieve critical structure constraints. To effectively use VMAT-DI for guidance, especially for prediction of the plan quality for body sites new to the practice, VMATDI database needs to be subdivided by target complexity and by body site index/average path length factor. Conclusion: An experienced-based VMAT-DI database can be used to help analyze plans before evaluation by the physician to show that it adheres to the clinical standards of previously treated VMAT plans which will make a guideline for concluding the optimization. The introduction of institution-wide clinical planning protocols, standardizing OAR naming and constraints will make it possible to incorporate a cumulative critical structure dosimetry index such as NTCP.

  1. SU-E-T-593: Clinical Evaluation of Direct Aperture Optimization in Head/Neck and Prostate IMRT Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosini, M; GALAL, M; Emam, I; Kamal, G; Algohary, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the planning and dosimetric advantages of direct aperture optimization (DAO) over beam-let optimization in IMRT treatment of head and neck (H/N) and prostate cancers. Methods: Five Head and Neck as well as five prostate patients were planned using the beamlet optimizer in Elekta-Xio ver 4.6 IMRT treatment planning system. Based on our experience in beamlet IMRT optimization, PTVs in H/N plans were prescribed to 70 Gy delivered by 7 fields. While prostate PTVs were prescribed to 76 Gy with 9 fields. In all plans, fields were set to be equally spaced. All cases were re-planed using Direct Aperture optimizer in Prowess Panther ver 5.01 IMRT planning system at same configurations and dose constraints. Plans were evaluated according to ICRU criteria, number of segments, number of monitor units and planning time. Results: For H/N plans, the near maximum dose (D2) and the dose that covers 95% D95 of PTV has improved by 4% in DAO. For organs at risk (OAR), DAO reduced the volume covered by 30% (V30) in spinal cord, right parotid, and left parotid by 60%, 54%, and 53% respectively. This considerable dosimetric quality improvement achieved using 25% less planning time and lower number of segments and monitor units by 46% and 51% respectively. In DAO prostate plans, Both D2 and D95 for the PTV were improved by only 2%. The V30 of the right femur, left femur and bladder were improved by 35%, 15% and 3% respectively. On the contrary, the rectum V30 got even worse by 9%. However, number of monitor units, and number of segments decreased by 20% and 25% respectively. Moreover the planning time reduced significantly too. Conclusion: DAO introduces considerable advantages over the beamlet optimization in regards to organs at risk sparing. However, no significant improvement occurred in most studied PTVs.

  2. Poster Thur Eve 19: Performance assessment of a 160-leaf beam collimation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, E. S. M.; La Russa, D. J.; Vandervoort, E.

    2014-08-15

    In this study, the performance of the new beam collimation system with 160 leaves, each with a 5 mm leaf width projected at isocenter, is evaluated in terms of positional accuracy and plan/delivery quality. Positional accuracy was evaluated using a set of static and dynamic MLC/jaw delivery patterns at different gantry angles, dose rates, and MLC/jaw speeds. The impact on IMRT plan quality was assessed by comparing against a previous generation collimation system using the same optimization parameters, while delivery quality was quantified using a combination of patient-specific QA measurements with ion chambers, film, and a bi-planar diode array. Positional accuracy for four separate units was comparable. The field size accuracy, junction width, and total displacement over 16 cm leaf travel are 0.3 0.2 mm, 0.4 0.3 mm, and 0.5 0.2 mm, respectively. The typical leaf minor offset is 0.05 0.04 mm, and MLC hysteresis effects are 0.2 0.1 mm over 16 cm travel. The dynamic output is linear with MU and MLC/jaw speed, and is within 0.7 0.3 % of the planning system value. Plan quality is significantly improved both in terms of target coverage and OAR sparing due, in part, to the larger allowable MLC and jaw speeds. ?-index pass rates for the patient-specific QA measurements exceeded 97% using criteria of 2%/2 mm. In conclusion, the performance of the Agility system is consistent among four separate installations, and is superior to its previous generations of collimation systems.

  3. SU-F-BRF-12: Investigating Dosimetric Effects of Inter-Fraction Deformation in Lung Cancer Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, J; Tian, Z; Gu, X; Yan, H; Jia, X; Jiang, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We studied dosimetric effects of inter-fraction deformation in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), in order to investigate the necessity of adaptive re-planning for lung SBRT treatments. Methods: Six lung cancer patients with different treatment fractions were retrospectively investigated. All the patients were immobilized and localized with a stereotactic body frame and were treated under cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance at each fraction. We calculated the actual delivered dose of the treatment plan using the up-to-date patient geometry of each fraction, and compared the dose with the intended plan dose to investigate the dosimetric effects of the inter-fraction deformation. Deformable registration was carried out between the treatment planning CT and the CBCT of each fraction to obtain deformed planning CT for more accurate dose calculations of the delivered dose. The extent of the inter-fraction deformation was also evaluated by calculating the dice similarity coefficient between the delineated structures on the planning CT and those on the deformed planning CT. Results: The average dice coefficients for PTV, spinal cord, esophagus were 0.87, 0.83 and 0.69, respectively. The volume of PTV covered by prescription dose was decreased by 23.78% on average for all fractions and all patients. For spinal cord and esophagus, the volumes covered by the constraint dose were increased by 4.57% and 3.83%. The maximum dose was also increased by 4.11% for spinal cord and 4.29% for esophagus. Conclusion: Due to inter-fraction deformation, large deterioration was found in both PTV coverage and OAR sparing, which demonstrated the needs for adaptive re-planning of lung SBRT cases to improve target coverage while reducing radiation dose to nearby normal tissues.

  4. SU-E-T-317: The Development of a DIBH Technique for Left Sided Breast Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy Utilizing Varians RPM System in a Community Hospital

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasson, B; Young, M; Workie, D; Geraghty, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop and implement a Deep Inhalation Breath Hold program (DIBH) for treatment of patients with Left-sided breast cancer in a community hospital. Methods: All patients with left sided breast cancer underwent a screening free breathing CT. Evaluation of the conventional tangent treatment fields and the heart was conducted. If the heart would not be excluded using tangents, the patient then received DIBH breathe coaching. The patients returned for a 4D CT simulation. The patients breathing cycle was monitored using the Varian Real-Time position ManagementTM (RPM) system to assess duration of DIBH, amplitude, phase and recovery time to normal breathing. Then a DIBH CT was obtained at the desired amplitude. Duplicate plans were developed for both free breathing and DIBH on the Eclipse planning system and comparison DVH's were created. The plan that provided the prescribed treatment coverage and the least doses to the OAR (heart, Lt. Lung) was determined. Those patients selected to receive treatment with DIBH were set up for treatment, and breathing was monitored using the RPM system. Practice trials were used to confirm that the amplitude, phase and recovery were consistent with findings from simulation. Results: 10 patients have been treated using the DIBH procedure in our clinic. The DIBH patients had an average increase of 80% lung volume on DIBH, decreased lung volume receiving 50% of the dose, and decreases in the V20 dose. Significant reduction in the maximum and mean dose to the heart, as well as the dose to 1CC of the volume for the DIBH plans. Conclusion: Using the RPM system already available in the clinic, staff training, and patient coaching a simple DIBH program was setup. The use of DIBH has shown promise in reducing doses to the critical organs while maintaining PTV coverage for left sided breast treatments.

  5. SU-E-T-131: Dosimetric Impact and Evaluation of Different Heterogenity Algorithm in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plan for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Lung Treatment with the Flattening Filter Free Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, J; Kim, J; Lee, J; Kim, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate the dosimetric impacts of the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) and the Acuros XB (AXB) plan for lung stereotactic ablative radiation therapy using flattening filter-free (FFF) beam. We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. The dosimetric parameters for the target and organs at risk (OARs) from the treatment plans calculated with these dose calculation algorithms were compared. The technical parameters, such as the computation times and the total monitor units (MUs), were also evaluated. Results: A comparison of DVHs from AXB and AAA showed that the AXB plan produced a high maximum PTV dose by average 4.40% with a statistical significance but slightly lower mean PTV dose by average 5.20% compared to the AAA plans. The maximum dose to the lung was slightly higher in the AXB compared to the AAA. For both algorithms, the values of V5, V10 and V20 for ipsilateral lung were higher in the AXB plan more than those of AAA. However, these parameters for contralateral lung were comparable. The differences of maximum dose for the spinal cord and heart were also small. The computation time of AXB was found fast with the relative difference of 13.7% than those of AAA. The average of monitor units (MUs) for all patients was higher in AXB plans than in the AAA plans. These results indicated that the difference between AXB and AAA are large in heterogeneous region with low density. Conclusion: The AXB provided the advantages such as the accuracy of calculations and the reduction of the computation time in lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) with using FFF beam, especially for VMAT planning. In dose calculation with the media of different density, therefore, the careful attention should be taken regarding the impacts of different heterogeneity correction algorithms. The authors report no conflicts of interest.

  6. A dosimetric comparison of proton and photon therapy in unresectable cancers of the head of pancreas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Reid F.; Zhai, Huifang; Both, Stefan; Metz, James M.; Plastaras, John P.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Mayekar, Sonal U.; Apisarnthanarax, Smith

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Uncontrolled local growth is the cause of death in ?30% of patients with unresectable pancreatic cancers. The addition of standard-dose radiotherapy to gemcitabine has been shown to confer a modest survival benefit in this population. Radiation dose escalation with three-dimensional planning is not feasible, but high-dose intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been shown to improve local control. Still, dose-escalation remains limited by gastrointestinal toxicity. In this study, the authors investigate the potential use of double scattering (DS) and pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy in limiting dose to critical organs at risk. Methods: The authors compared DS, PBS, and IMRT plans in 13 patients with unresectable cancer of the pancreatic head, paying particular attention to duodenum, small intestine, stomach, liver, kidney, and cord constraints in addition to target volume coverage. All plans were calculated to 5500 cGy in 25 fractions with equivalent constraints and normalized to prescription dose. All statistics were by two-tailed paired t-test. Results: Both DS and PBS decreased stomach, duodenum, and small bowel dose in low-dose regions compared to IMRT (p < 0.01). However, protons yielded increased doses in the mid to high dose regions (e.g., 23.653.8 and 34.952.4 Gy for duodenum using DS and PBS, respectively; p < 0.05). Protons also increased generalized equivalent uniform dose to duodenum and stomach, however these differences were small (<5% and 10%, respectively; p < 0.01). Doses to other organs-at-risk were within institutional constraints and placed no obvious limitations on treatment planning. Conclusions: Proton therapy does not appear to reduce OAR volumes receiving high dose. Protons are able to reduce the treated volume receiving low-intermediate doses, however the clinical significance of this remains to be determined in future investigations.

  7. Beyond Scheme F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, C.J.; Fisher, H.; Pepin, J.; Gillmann, R.

    1996-07-01

    Traffic classification techniques were evaluated using data from a 1993 investigation of the traffic flow patterns on I-20 in Georgia. First we improved the data by sifting through the data base, checking against the original video for questionable events and removing and/or repairing questionable events. We used this data base to critique the performance quantitatively of a classification method known as Scheme F. As a context for improving the approach, we show in this paper that scheme F can be represented as a McCullogh-Pitts neural network, oar as an equivalent decomposition of the plane. We found that Scheme F, among other things, severely misrepresents the number of vehicles in Class 3 by labeling them as Class 2. After discussing the basic classification problem in terms of what is measured, and what is the desired prediction goal, we set forth desirable characteristics of the classification scheme and describe a recurrent neural network system that partitions the high dimensional space up into bins for each axle separation. the collection of bin numbers, one for each of the axle separations, specifies a region in the axle space called a hyper-bin. All the vehicles counted that have the same set of in numbers are in the same hyper-bin. The probability of the occurrence of a particular class in that hyper- bin is the relative frequency with which that class occurs in that set of bin numbers. This type of algorithm produces classification results that are much more balanced and uniform with respect to Classes 2 and 3 and Class 10. In particular, the cancellation of errors of classification that occurs is for many applications the ideal classification scenario. The neural network results are presented in the form of a primary classification network and a reclassification network, the performance matrices for which are presented.

  8. SU-E-T-421: Feasibility Study of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy with Constant Dose Rate for Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, R; Wang, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility, efficiency, and delivery accuracy of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate (VMAT-CDR) for whole-pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) of endometrial cancer. Methods: The nine-Field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), VMAT with variable dose-rate (VMAT-VDR), and VMAT-CDR plans were created for 9 patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs), and normal tissue (NT) were compared. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. For each VMAT-CDR plan, a dry Run was performed to assess the dosimetric accuracy with MatriXX from IBA. Results: Compared with IMRT, the VMAT-CDR plans delivered a slightly greater V20 of the bowel, bladder, pelvis bone, and NT, but significantly decreased the dose to the high-dose region of the rectum and pelvis bone. The MUs Decreased from 1105 with IMRT to 628 with VMAT-CDR. The delivery time also decreased from 9.5 to 3.2 minutes. The average gamma pass rate was 95.6% at the 3%/3 mm criteria with MatriXX pretreatment verification for 9 patients. Conclusion: VMAT-CDR can achieve comparable plan quality with significant shorter delivery time and smaller number of MUs compared with IMRT for patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. It can be accurately delivered and be an alternative to IMRT on the linear accelerator without VDR capability. This work is supported by the grant project, National Natural; Science Foundation of China (No. 81071237)

  9. Preconversion catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubiak, C.P.

    1992-11-01

    Aryl carbon-oxygen bond cleavage is a chemical transformation of importance in coal liquefaction and the upgrading of coal liquids as well as in the synthesis of natural products. There have been numerous attempts to discover general methods for the cleavage of aryl carbon-oxygen bonds. All the stoichiometric organic methods for phenol deoxygenation have limited applications and involve expensive reagents. Catalytic method, for the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of phenols involve supported transition metal oxides, such as Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni-MO/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2}. Typical phenol hydrodeoxygenation conditions involve hydrogen pressures in excess of 100 atm and temperatures in excess of 200{degrees}C. Under these conditions arene ring hydrogenation is generally found to compete with phenol deoxygenation; and the coproduct water is found to impair the activity of the catalysts. This proposed research offers the possibility of effecting the selective catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups using CO. The deoxygenation of phenols by carbon monoxide mediated by Ir(triphos)OAr has provided us with a catalytic Phenol deoxygenation pathway, through the elimination of CO{sub 2} and formation of a benzyne intermediate. Although the [Pt(triphos)(O-Ph-Me)]PF{sub 6} system is not expected to be as efficient a catalyst as some of the other transition metals systems we are currently exploring, it will provide more information about the deoxygenation mechanism in these triphos complexes. This is due to the presence of the structurally sensitive {sup 3l}P--{sup 195}Pt coupling constant and comparisons to the extensively studied Pt(dppe)(O-Ph){sub 2} systems.

  10. Clinical Application of High-Dose, Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayley, Andrew, E-mail: Andrew.Bayley@rmp.uhn.on.c [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Rosewall, Tara; Craig, Tim; Bristow, Rob; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility and early toxicity of dose-escalated image-guided IMRT to the pelvic lymph nodes (LN), prostate (P), and seminal vesicles (SV). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 high-risk prostate cancer patients received two-phase, dose-escalated, image-guided IMRT with 3 years of androgen deprivation therapy. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) were delineated using computed tomography/magnetic resonance co-registration and included the prostate, portions of the SV, and the LN. Planning target volume margins (PTV) used were as follows: P (10 mm, 7 mm posteriorly), SV (10 mm), and LN (5 mm). Organs at risk (OaR) were the rectal and bladder walls, femoral heads, and large and small bowel. The IMRT was planned with an intended dose of 55.1 Gy in 29 fractions to all CTVs (Phase 1), with P+SV consecutive boost of 24.7 Gy in 13 fractions. Daily online image guidance was performed using bony landmarks and intraprostatic markers. Feasibility criteria included delivery of intended doses in 80% of patients, 95% of CTV displacements incorporated within PTV during Phase 1, and acute toxicity rate comparable to that of lower-dose pelvic techniques. Results: A total of 91 patients (88%) received the total prescription dose. All patients received at least 72 Gy. In Phase 1, 63 patients (61%) received the intended 55.1 Gy, whereas 87% of patients received at least 50 Gy. Dose reductions were caused by small bowel and rectal wall constraints. All CTVs received the planned dose in >95% of treatment fractions. There were no Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicities greater than Grade 3, although there were five incidences equivalent to Grade 3 within a median follow-up of 23 months. Conclusion: These results suggest that dose escalation to the PLN+P+SV using IMRT is feasible, with acceptable rates of acute toxicity.

  11. Underwriters Laboratories now accepting certification investigation...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    ... 20 percent of gasoline consumption within a decade by commercializing cost-effective biofuels nationwide," said Andy Karsner, U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for ...

  12. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CLOWD BBHRP Retrieval Algorithm Intercomparison Jennifer Comstock David Turner Andy ... cloud layers Figure courtesy David Turner All methods might not have been tested on ...

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - LIQUID_CLOUD_SUMMARY.final.amv.ppt [Compatibili...

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    Dave Turner and Andy Vogelmann ( p ) ( p ) Cloud Property Working Group Breakout Session ... Measurements and Retrievals g p g p Turner Turner - - Combined AERI and MWR ...

  14. Energy Investment Partnerships

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Feldman, Bryan Garcia, Mark Glick, Karen Hamilton, Ben Healey, Andy Holzhauser, Chris ... York (GJGNY) Contact Information: Karen Hamilton, keh@nyserda.ny.gov Year Established: ...

  15. U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bruce Hamilton, Principal Investigator Lindsay Battenberg Mark Bielecki Charlie Bloch Terese Decker Lisa Frantzis Aris Karcanias Birger Madsen Jay Paidipati Andy Wickless Feng Zhao ...

  16. Passive Solar Building Design and Solar Thermal Space Heating Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Webinar of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Senior Engineer Andy Walker's presentation about passive solar building design and solar thermal space heating technologies and applications.

  17. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Some new things Power to the People Steering Committee Andy Vogelmann, Greg McFarquhar, John Ogren, Dave Turner, Jennifer Comstock, Graham Feingold, Chuck Long AVP Technical &...

  18. ARM - Meetings and Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    528K) Jennifer Comstock, Chaomei Lo, Tim Shippert, Sally McFarlane, Eli Mlawer, David Turner, Andy Vogelmann, and Mandy Khaiyer RACORO: Routine ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) Clouds...

  19. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    effort...many thanks to Andy Vogelmann, RSC, PI's, Sherman Beus, Debbie Ronfeld, John Hubbe, and Tonya Martin RACORO Wiki Sneak Peak 17 RACORO Wiki Sneak Peak 18...

  20. LFRG Charter

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Section 3 1 16 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense ... Alternate - Ed Regnier, HS David Michlewicz, SC Altemate - ... - Andy Griffith, NE Richard Bonczek, PPPO Alternate - ...

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    Ann Fridlind and Andy Ackerman, NASA GISS Acknowledgments Christian Jakob, Tim Hume, and ... DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program NASA Radiation Sciences Program Model ...

  2. bin.dvi

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    Ann Fridlind and Andy Ackerman, NASA GISS DOE ARM Science Team Meeting Albuquerque, New ... Acknowledgments * Funding DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program NASA ...

  3. ORISE: Mosley selected as ORISE director of employee relations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to her new role at ORAU," said ORAU President and CEO Andy Page. "Her knowledge of strategic planning, diversity management systems, as well as internal and external...

  4. Session Name: Workflows Co-Chairs: Shreyas Cholia, Kevin Harms

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    * Jeff Long long6@llnl.gov * Norbert Podhorszki pnorbert@ornl.gov * Andy Wilson atwilso@sandia.gov * Rudy Garcia rudgarc@sandia.gov * Laura Biven ...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Related Articles Connecting the Americas 2022 General Assembly of the National Industrial Association (ANDI) U.S. and Colombia to Collaborate on First Solar Decathlon in Latin ...

  6. COLLOQUIUM: Initial Observations from the New Horizons Flyby...

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    Initial Observations from the New Horizons Flyby of Pluto Dr. Andy Cheng Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory Colloquium Committee: The Princeton Plasma...

  7. Students to Race Solar-Powered Model Cars

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    ... Car and name: 17 1937 Firebird Team members: Karen Johnson, Megan Reinertsen, Katie ... ZAMM Team members: Andy Simonsen, Zach Leonard, Matt Nordman, Marshall Reynolds Car ...

  8. PowerPoint Presentation

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    Comstock) 4:00 - 5:00 RACORO Update * Overview (Andy Vogelmann) * Synoptic Summary (Daniel Hartsock) * Operations (Jason Tomlinson) * Data QC & Observations (John Hubbe) *...

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    Resources Blumenfeld, Andy Arch Coal, Inc. Lewandowski, David Clean Energy James, Revis Electric Power ... U.S. DOE: National Energy Technology Laboratory Balash, Peter U.S. ...

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    John Morrison Nick Nagy Randal Rheinheimer Norbert Seifert Randy Smith Bob Tomlinson Philip Ulibarri Mark Vernon Andy White ... Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... to the public comment component of NEPA as a piece of "good government architecture." ... Andy Lawrence (left), Director, Offce of Environmental, Sustainability and Corporate ...

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    Budget Barriers & Targets Partners * Remy * ANL * NREL * ORNL Team members - Steven Campbell - Chester Coomer - Zhenxian Liang - Andy Wereszczak * Materials Science and ...

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    * John Ahearne * Dana Christensen * Tom Cochran * Mike Corradini * Dave Hill * Hussein Khalil * Andy Klein * Paul Murray * John Sackett, chair Subcommittee Objectives * The ...

  15. BPA 2002 Annual Report

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    STATEMENTS 2002 Annual Report of the Bonneville Power Administration Cover photo BPA fish biologist Andy Thoms (upper right) works with students from H.B. Lee Middle School...

  16. Teacher and Students Bring Renewables to Utah

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    The light bulb went off for high school teacher Andy Swapp in 1999 when he realized he could do something good with Milford, Utah's powerful wind.

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentation prepared by Andy Abele for the DOE Hydrogen Manufacturing R&D Workshop. PDF icon mfgwkshpabele.pdf More Documents & Publications High Pressure Hydrogen Tank ...

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    Science Goal 8: Science Serving Sustainability LANL takes opportunities to engage the ... ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY GOALS at LANL Community involvement: Andy Erickson and Duncan ...

  19. Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy

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    with the Enrico Fermi Award Learn more about 2013 Enrico Fermi Award winners Dr. Allen Bard and Dr. Andy Sessler and their contributions to science, technology and human...

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    Accident Investigations Andy Lawrence Andrew.lawrence@hq.doe.gov (202) 586-6740 Administrative Review (Clearance eligibility determinations) Robert Lingan Robert.lingan@hq.doe.gov ...

  1. ORISE: Leadership Team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership Team Andy Page Andy Page Director, ORISE Phil Andrews Phil Andrews Director, Business Support Operations Ivan Boatner Ivan Boatner General Counsel Donna Cragle Donna Cragle Director; Health, Energy and Environment David Duncan David Duncan Director, Scientific Assessment and Workforce Development David Hackemeyer David Hackemeyer Director, National Security

  2. SU-E-J-229: Quantitative Assessment for Timely Adaptive Re-Planning Using Weekly Dose Monitoring for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shang, Q; Liu, H; Greskovich, J; Koyfman, S; Xia, P; Li, Z

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: For patients with head and neck (HN) cancer, mid-course adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is a common practice in our institution to accommodate anatomic changes. The aim of the study is to evaluate whether dose re-calculation on weekly verification images can provide quantitative assessment for timely adaptive re-planning with daily image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: We retrospectively selected sixty daily verification images acquired on CT-on-rail/CBCT from ten HN patients. These image sets were typically a week apart. Among these patients, six patients received a mid-course ART. Contours of the tumors and organ-at-risks (OARs) were manually delineated by a physician on each verification CT. After placing the treatment iso-center on the verification CTs according to the recorded clinical shifts, daily dose was re-calculated with the same beam configuration as the original plan. For the purpose of this study, electron densities for both verification CTs and planning CTs were set to 1.0 g/cm3. Results: Two patients had D99 of the CTV < 97% of the planned dose for more than three fractions due to remarkable tumor volume shrinkages. D-max of the spinal cord exceeded a tolerance of 45 Gy for four fractions in additional two patients. D-mean of the parotid increased within 25% of the planned value. D-max of the brainstem and D-mean of the oral cavity did not show significant variation. If the re-planning criteria included D99 of the CTV < 97% of the planned dose and D-max of the spinal cord > 45 Gy, two out ten patients required ART at week 2 and two patients required ART at week 3, respectively. Conclusion: Weekly dose monitoring with re-calculation on verification images can provide quantitative dose guidance for timely adaptive re-planning. Future work will include accumulative dose analysis for the decision of adaptive re-planning. The study is supported in part by Siemens Medical Solutions.

  3. SU-E-T-183: Feasibility of Extreme Dose Escalation for Glioblastoma Multiforme Using 4? Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, D; Rwigema, J; Yu, V; Kaprealian, T; Kupelian, P; Selch, M; Low, D; Sheng, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: GBM recurrence primarily occurs inside or near the high-dose radiation field of original tumor site requiring greater than 100 Gy to significantly improve local control. We utilize 4? non-coplanar radiotherapy to test the feasibility of planning target volume (PTV) margin expansions or extreme dose escalations without incurring additional radiation toxicities. Methods: 11 GBM patients treated with VMAT to a prescription dose of 59.4 Gy or 60 Gy were replanned with 4?. Original VMAT plans were created with 2 to 4 coplanar or non-coplanar arcs using 3 mm hi-res MLC. The 4? optimization, using 5 mm MLC, selected and inverse optimized 30 beams from a candidate pool of 1162 beams evenly distributed through 4? steradians. 4? plans were first compared to clinical plans using the same prescription dose. Two more studies were then performed to respectively escalate the GTV and PTV doses to 100 Gy, followed by a fourth plan expanding the PTV by 5 mm and maintaining the prescription dose. Results: The standard 4? plan significantly reduced (p<0.01) max and mean doses to critical structures by a range of 47.098.4% and 61.099.2%, respectively. The high dose PTV/high dose GTV/expanded PTV studies showed a reduction (p<0.05) or unchanged* (p>0.05) maximum dose of 72.1%/86.7%/77.1% (chiasm), 7.2%*/27.7%*/30.7% (brainstem), 39.8%*/84.2%/51.9%* (spinal cord), 69.0%/87.0%/66.9% (L eye), 76.2%/88.1%/84.1% (R eye), 95.0%/98.6%/97.5% (L lens), 93.9%/98.8%/97.6% (R lens), 74.3%/88.5%/72.4% (L optical nerve), 80.4%/91.3%/75.7% (R optical nerve), 64.8%/84.2%/44.9%* (L cochlea), and 85.2%/93.0%/78.0% (R cochlea), respectively. V30 and V36 for both brain and (brain - PTV) were reduced for all cases except the high dose PTV plan. PTV dose coverage increased for all 4? plans. Conclusion: Extreme dose escalation or further margin expansion is achievable using 4?, maintaining or reducing OAR doses. This study indicates that clinical trials employing 4? delivery using prescription doses up to 100 Gy are feasible. Funding support partially contributed by Varian.

  4. SU-E-T-74: Commissioning of the Elekta VersaHD Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y; Ding, K; Hobbs, R; McNutt, T; Wang, K; Liang, X; Zhu, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To present the commissioning process of recently-released Elekta VersaHD linear accelerator, equipped with Agility 160-leaf multileaf collimator and flattening-filter free (FFF) photon modes. Methods: In addition to routine QA procedures, we adopted an EPID-based method to perform the table rotation and Winston-Lutz tests, and a novel multiradiation isocenter alignment check. The beam data acquired include photon percent-depth dose (PDD) of 6X, 6XFFF, 10X, 10XFFF, and 15X in the field size from 22 to 4040cm{sup 2}, profiles, collimator and phantom scatter factors (Sc and Sp), wedge factor, electron (6, 9, 12, and 15MeV) PDD and profiles, cone and cutout factors, and virtual SSD. Validation measurements were carried out in water tank to evaluate the accuracy of beam modeling by the Pinnacle planning system. End-to-End test and IMRT QA were performed to validate the overall delivery accuracy. A theoretical model has also been used to extract the primary dose ratio and off-axis beam softening effects by fitting photon beam profile measurements. Results: The PDDs of FFF beams with field size 1010cm{sup 2} at 10cm depth, 100cm SSD were intentionally adjusted within 1% of the non-FFF beams. The photon profiles of 3030cm{sup 2} at 10cm depth between non-FFF and FFF beams are very different, OAR(10)=0.74 and 0.63, respectively, for 6XFFF and 10XFFF. The collimator and phantom scatter factors of FFF beam demonstrated smaller variation with field sizes. The EPID-based method demonstrated the maximum deviation between the table rotation axis and radiation isocenter is within 1mm, and the radiation isocenters are within 0.4mm relative to that of 6X. The validation measurement shows less than 2% deviation between the measurement and Pinnacle modeling for most of the test conditions. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the Elekta VersaHD commissioning experience, which can be a valuable reference for the radiotherapy community.

  5. MO-C-17A-13: Uncertainty Evaluation of CT Image Deformable Registration for H and N Cancer Adaptive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, A; Yan, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate uncertainties of organ specific Deformable Image Registration (DIR) for H and N cancer Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART). Methods: A commercial DIR evaluation tool, which includes a digital phantom library of 8 patients, and the corresponding “Ground truth Deformable Vector Field” (GT-DVF), was used in the study. Each patient in the phantom library includes the GT-DVF created from a pair of CT images acquired prior to and at the end of the treatment course. Five DIR tools, including 2 commercial tools (CMT1, CMT2), 2 in-house (IH-FFD1, IH-FFD2), and a classic DEMON algorithms, were applied on the patient images. The resulting DVF was compared to the GT-DVF voxel by voxel. Organ specific DVF uncertainty was calculated for 10 ROIs: Whole Body, Brain, Brain Stem, Cord, Lips, Mandible, Parotid, Esophagus and Submandibular Gland. Registration error-volume histogram was constructed for comparison. Results: The uncertainty is relatively small for brain stem, cord and lips, while large in parotid and submandibular gland. CMT1 achieved best overall accuracy (on whole body, mean vector error of 8 patients: 0.98±0.29 mm). For brain, mandible, parotid right, parotid left and submandibular glad, the classic Demon algorithm got the lowest uncertainty (0.49±0.09, 0.51±0.16, 0.46±0.11, 0.50±0.11 and 0.69±0.47 mm respectively). For brain stem, cord and lips, the DVF from CMT1 has the best accuracy (0.28±0.07, 0.22±0.08 and 0.27±0.12 mm respectively). All algorithms have largest right parotid uncertainty on patient #7, which has image artifact caused by tooth implantation. Conclusion: Uncertainty of deformable CT image registration highly depends on the registration algorithm, and organ specific. Large uncertainty most likely appears at the location of soft-tissue organs far from the bony structures. Among all 5 DIR methods, the classic DEMON and CMT1 seem to be the best to limit the uncertainty within 2mm for all OARs. Partially supported by research grant from Elekta.

  6. Computed Tomography Number Changes Observed During Computed Tomography–Guided Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Mei; Yang, Cungeng; Chen, Xiaojian; Xu, Shouping; Moraru, Ion; Lang, Jinyi; Schultz, Christopher; Li, X. Allen

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate CT number (CTN) changes in gross tumor volume (GTV) and organ at risk (OAR) according to daily diagnostic-quality CT acquired during CT-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography scans acquired using a CT-on-rails during daily CT-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for 15 patients with stage II to IVa squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were analyzed. The GTV, parotid glands, spinal cord, and nonspecified tissue were generated on each selected daily CT. The changes in CTN distributions and the mean and mode values were collected. Pearson analysis was used to assess the correlation between the CTN change, organ volume reduction, and delivered radiation dose. Results: Volume and CTN changes for GTV and parotid glands can be observed during radiation therapy delivery for HNC. The mean (±SD) CTNs in GTV and ipsi- and contralateral parotid glands were reduced by 6 ± 10, 8 ± 7, and 11 ± 10 Hounsfield units, respectively, for all patients studied. The mean CTN changes in both spinal cord and nonspecified tissue were almost invisible (<2 Hounsfield units). For 2 patients studied, the absolute mean CTN changes in GTV and parotid glands were strongly correlated with the dose delivered (P<.001 and P<.05, respectively). For the correlation between CTN reductions and delivered isodose bins for parotid glands, the Pearson coefficient varied from −0.98 (P<.001) in regions with low-dose bins to 0.96 (P<.001) in high-dose bins and were patient specific. Conclusions: The CTN can be reduced in tumor and parotid glands during the course of radiation therapy for HNC. There was a fair correlation between CTN reduction and radiation doses for a subset of patients, whereas the correlation between CTN reductions and volume reductions in GTV and parotid glands were weak. More studies are needed to understand the mechanism for the radiation-induced CTN changes.

  7. SU-D-9A-07: Imaging Dose and Cancer Risk in Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Cancers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, L; Bai, S; Zhang, Y; Ming, X; Zhang, Y; Deng, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To systematically evaluate the imaging doses and cancer risks associated with various imaging procedures involving ionizing radiation during image-guided radiotherapy of an increasingly large number of cancer patients. Methods: 141 patients (52 brain cases, 47 thoracic cases, 42 abdominal cases, aged 3 to 91 years old) treated between October 2009 and March 2010 were included in this IRB-approved retrospective study. During the whole radiotherapy course, each patient underwent at least one type of imaging procedures, i.e., kV portal, MV portal and kVCBCT, besides CT simulations. Based on Monte Carlo modeling and particle transport in human anatomy of various dimensions, the correlations between the radiation doses to the various organs-at-risk (OARs) at the head, the thoracic and the abdominal regions and one's weight, circumference, scan mAs and kVp have been obtained and used to estimate the radiation dose from a specific imaging procedure. The radiation-induced excess relative risk (ERR) was then estimated with BEIR VII formulism based on one's gender, age and radiation dose. 1+ ERR was reported in this study as relative cancer risk. Results: For the whole cohort of 141 patients, the mean imaging doses from various imaging procedures were 8.3 cGy to the brain, 10.5 cGy to the lungs and 19.2 cGy to the red bone marrow, respectively. Accordingly, the cancer risks were 1.140, 1.369 and 2.671, respectively. In comparison, MV portal deposited largest doses to the lungs while kVCBCT delivered the highest doses to the red bone marrow. Conclusion: The compiled imaging doses to a patient during his/her treatment course were patient-specific and site-dependent, varying from 1.2 to 263.5 cGy on average, which were clinically significant and should be included in the treatment planning and overall decision-making. Our results indicated the necessity of personalized imaging to maximize its clinical benefits while reducing the associated cancer risks. Sichuan University Scholarship.

  8. SU-E-T-215: Interactive Dose Shaping: Proof of Concept Study for Six Prostate Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamerling, CP [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Ziegenhein, P; Oelfke, U [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Sterzing, F [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To provide a proof of concept study for IMRT treatment planning through interactive dose shaping (IDS) by utilising the respective tools to create IMRT treatment plans for six prostate patients. Methods: The IDS planning paradigm aims to perform interactive local dose adaptations of an IMRT plan without compromising already established valuable dose features in real-time. Various IDS tools are available in our in-house treatment planning software Dynaplan and were utilised to create IMRT treatment plans for six patients with an adeno-carcinoma of the prostate. The sequenced IDS treatment plans were compared to conventionally optimised clinically approved plans (9 beams, co-planar). The starting point consisted of open fields. The IDS tools were utilised to sculpt dose out of the rectum and bladder. For each patient, several IDS plans were created, with different trade-offs between organ sparing and target coverage. The reference dose distributions were imported into Dynaplan. For each patient, the IDS treatment plan with a similar or better trade-off between target coverage and OAR sparing was selected for plan evaluation, guided by a physician. Pencil beam dose calculation was performed on a grid with a voxel size of 1.951.952.0 mm{sup 3}. D98%, D2%, mean dose and dose-volume indicators as specified by Quantec were calculated for plan evaluation. Results: It was possible to utilise the software prototype to generate treatment plans for prostate patient geometries in 1545 minutes. Individual local dose adaptations could be performed in less than one second. The average differences compared to the reference plans were for the mean dose: 0.0 Gy (boost) and 1.2 Gy (CTV), for D98%: ?1.1 Gy and for D2%: 1.1 Gy (both target volumes). The dose-volume quality indicators were well below the Quantec constraints. Conclusion: Real-time treatment planning utilising IDS is feasible and has the potential to be implemented clinically. Research at The Institute of Cancer Research is supported by Cancer Research UK under Programme C46/A10588.

  9. MO-A-BRD-08: Radiosurgery Beyond Cancer: Real-Time Target Localization and Treatment Planning for Cardiac Radiosurgery Under MRI Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ipsen, S; Blanck, O; Oborn, B; Bode, F; Liney, G; Keall, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, affecting >2.5M Americans and >4.5M Europeans. AF is usually treated with minimally-invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. Radiosurgery of the pulmonary veins (PV) has been proposed for AF treatment, however is challenging due to the complex respiratory and cardiac motion patterns. We hypothesize that an MRI-linac could solve the difficult real-time targeting and adaptation problem. In this study we quantified target motion ranges on cardiac MRI and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time MRI tracking was applied. Methods: For the motion study, four human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion on coronal and axial cine planes was analyzed using a template matching algorithm. For the planning study, an ablation line at each PV antrum was defined as target on an AF patient scheduled for catheter ablation. Various safety margins ranging from 0mm (perfect tracking) to 8mm (untracked motion) were added to the target defining the PTV. 30Gy single fraction IMRT plans were then generated. Finally, the influence of a 1T magnetic field on treatment beam delivery was calculated using the Geant4 Monte Carlo algorithm to simulate the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance. Results: The motion study showed the mean respiratory motion of the target area on MRI was 8.4mm (SI), 1.7mm (AP) and 0.3mm (LR). Cardiac motion was small (<2mm). The planning study showed that with increasing safety margins to encompass untracked motion, dose tolerances for OARs such as the esophagus and airways were exceeded by >100%. The magnetic field had little impact on the dose distribution. Conclusion: Our results indicate that real-time MRI tracking of the PVs seems feasible. Accurate image guidance for high-dose AF radiosurgery is essential since safety margins covering untracked target motion will result in unacceptable treatment plans.

  10. Thermochemical Interface

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (BETO) Project Peer Review 1.3.4.101 Thermochemical Interface PNNL-SA-109025 DATE MARCH 24, 2015 TECHNOLOGY AREA REVIEW: ALGAE DAN ANDERSON DOUG ELLIOTT, ANDY SCHMIDT, KARL ...

  11. HTL Model Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1.3.4.100 HTL Model Development MARCH 24, 2015 ALGAE Sue Jones Yunhua Zhu, Lesley Snowden-Swan, Dan Anderson, Rich Hallen, Karl Albrecht, Doug Elliott, Andy Schmidt Pacific ...

  12. ARM - 2003 Science Team Meeting Pictures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Janet Inrieri discuss Dave and Tom's poster. ARM Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman, Dave Turner, and Janet Inrieri discuss Dave and Tom's poster. K.N. Liou and Andy Lacis discuss...

  13. Attendees final.xlsx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    In Person 1 Albitz, Richard FBP 2 Aly, Alaa INTERA 3 Ayres, Jeff Washington State Ecology Dept 4 Bernhard, David Nez ... Andy Vanderbilt 21 Goldston, W. T. (Sonny) Energy Solutions ...

  14. The Thermodynamics of Pizza The Thermodynamics of Pizza ES Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    equilibrium because of something called entropy; The Third Law says that there is a ... Greenhouse Effect....A Bad Andy How do you keep the atmosphere from losing energy? A giant ...

  15. Microsoft Word - 2007hsn-infocom-paper-lehman-etal.doc

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    for Multi-Service, Multi-Layer, Multi- Domain Hybrid Networks Tom Lehman 1 , Xi Yang 1 , Chin P. Guok 2 , Nageswara S. V. Rao 3 , Andy Lake 4 , John Vollbrecht 4 , Nasir...

  16. Science on the Screen: The Martian | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a daring rescue mission. THE MARTIAN, a 2015 American science fiction film directed by Ridley Scott and starring Matt Damon, is based on Andy Weir's 2011 novel of the same name...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Zheng, Zhong (2) Aquila, Andy (1) Attwood, David (1) Attwood, David T. (1) Celia, Michael A. (1) Chang Zenghu (1) Christov, C. I. (1) Christov, Ivan C Los Alamos National ...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Attwood, David T. (1) Celia, Michael A. (1) Chang Zenghu (1) Christov, C. I. (1) Christov, ... Coherent x-ray generation at 2.7nm using 25fs laser pulses Rundquist, Andy ; Chang Zenghu ...

  19. Mr. Andrew Wallo The Aerospace'Corporaticn

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    . Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20545 OCT 28 1985 Mr. Andrew Wallo The Aerospace'Corporaticn Suite 4000 955 L'Enfant Plaza, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20024 Dear Andy: The...

  20. Cafe Scientifique

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cafe Scientifique Cafe Scientifique WHEN: Mar 05, 2015 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM WHERE: Los Alamos Research Park 4201 W. Jemez Road, Second Floor SPEAKER: Andy Wolfsberg, Los Alamos...

  1. Organization Amount Volunteer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R andi --- 5 00 Nadeau, K enneth --- 5 00 Wilson, S andra ( Auxilliary) --- 5 0 American N ... D el O so E lementary School PTA 500 Wilson, J ennifer --- 5 00 Atomic C ity R unners ...

  2. Combining THz laser excitation with resonant soft X-ray scattering...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... We would especially like to thank Greg Stewart for his help with the figures and Andy Freeberg for his photography. The SXR instrument is funded by a consortium whose membership ...

  3. Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems 2010 Peer Review Presentatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Andy McCown, LANL.pdf PDF icon CEDS 2010 Peer Review - Sophia Proof of Concept - Gordon Rueff, INL.pdf PDF icon CEDS 2010 Peer Review - Hallmark Cryptographic Serial ...

  4. Measuring Strong Nanostructures

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Andy Minor

    2010-01-08

    Andy Minor of Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy explains measuring stress and strain on nanostructures with the In Situ Microscope. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-relea...

  5. Seventy Five Years of Particle Accelerators (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sessler, Andy

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Andy Sessler, Berkeley Lab director from 1973 to 1980, sheds light on the Lab's nearly eight-decade history of inventing and refining particle accelerators, which continue to illuminate the nature of the universe.

  6. November 3-5, 2015, Federal Technical Capability Program Face...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... to participate on STSM CT Working Group: Mike Brown Mike Mikolanis Dan Sigg Andy De La Paz Patrick Smith Shari Crandall Susan Morris Jim Todd Paul Jenkins Ray Phifer Barry Mellor ...

  7. FEMP Offers Training on Distributed-Scale Renewable Energy Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The course instructor is Andy Walker, PhD, principal engineer at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Dr. Walker is an author, teacher, and expert in engineering and economic ...

  8. Carbon Capture Innovation: Making an IMPACCT on Coal | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Capture Innovation: Making an IMPACCT on Coal Carbon Capture Innovation: Making an IMPACCT on Coal February 16, 2012 - 4:48pm Addthis The ICES team from Alliant Techsystems and ACENT Laboratories (L to R): Fred Gregory, Andy Robertson, Tony Castrogiovanni, Florin Girlea, Vincenzo Verrelli, Bon Calayag, Vladimir Balepin, Kirk Featherstone. | Courtesy of the ICES team. The ICES team from Alliant Techsystems and ACENT Laboratories (L to R): Fred Gregory, Andy Robertson, Tony Castrogiovanni, Florin

  9. Caustic Recovery Technology

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Capture Innovation: Making an IMPACCT on Coal Carbon Capture Innovation: Making an IMPACCT on Coal February 16, 2012 - 4:48pm Addthis The ICES team from Alliant Techsystems and ACENT Laboratories (L to R): Fred Gregory, Andy Robertson, Tony Castrogiovanni, Florin Girlea, Vincenzo Verrelli, Bon Calayag, Vladimir Balepin, Kirk Featherstone. | Courtesy of the ICES team. The ICES team from Alliant Techsystems and ACENT Laboratories (L to R): Fred Gregory, Andy Robertson, Tony Castrogiovanni, Florin

  10. Lab scientists recognized for economic development efforts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scientists recognized for economic development efforts Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Lab scientists recognized for economic development efforts Program provides regional businesses with expert assistance December 1, 2013 Winner of the 2013 Principal Investigator Award is Andy McCown Winner of a 2013 Principal Investigator Award is Andy McCown (at right, with pie), of Energy

  11. Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Capture Innovation: Making an IMPACCT on Coal Carbon Capture Innovation: Making an IMPACCT on Coal February 16, 2012 - 4:48pm Addthis The ICES team from Alliant Techsystems and ACENT Laboratories (L to R): Fred Gregory, Andy Robertson, Tony Castrogiovanni, Florin Girlea, Vincenzo Verrelli, Bon Calayag, Vladimir Balepin, Kirk Featherstone. | Courtesy of the ICES team. The ICES team from Alliant Techsystems and ACENT Laboratories (L to R): Fred Gregory, Andy Robertson, Tony Castrogiovanni,

  12. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, FY 2011 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Ann E; Bland, Arthur S Buddy; Hack, James J; Barker, Ashley D; Boudwin, Kathlyn J.; Kendall, Ricky A; Messer, Bronson; Rogers, James H; Shipman, Galen M; Wells, Jack C; White, Julia C

    2011-08-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) continues to deliver the most powerful resources in the U.S. for open science. At 2.33 petaflops peak performance, the Cray XT Jaguar delivered more than 1.5 billion core hours in calendar year (CY) 2010 to researchers around the world for computational simulations relevant to national and energy security; advancing the frontiers of knowledge in physical sciences and areas of biological, medical, environmental, and computer sciences; and providing world-class research facilities for the nation's science enterprise. Scientific achievements by OLCF users range from collaboration with university experimentalists to produce a working supercapacitor that uses atom-thick sheets of carbon materials to finely determining the resolution requirements for simulations of coal gasifiers and their components, thus laying the foundation for development of commercial-scale gasifiers. OLCF users are pushing the boundaries with software applications sustaining more than one petaflop of performance in the quest to illuminate the fundamental nature of electronic devices. Other teams of researchers are working to resolve predictive capabilities of climate models, to refine and validate genome sequencing, and to explore the most fundamental materials in nature - quarks and gluons - and their unique properties. Details of these scientific endeavors - not possible without access to leadership-class computing resources - are detailed in Section 4 of this report and in the INCITE in Review. Effective operations of the OLCF play a key role in the scientific missions and accomplishments of its users. This Operational Assessment Report (OAR) will delineate the policies, procedures, and innovations implemented by the OLCF to continue delivering a petaflop-scale resource for cutting-edge research. The 2010 operational assessment of the OLCF yielded recommendations that have been addressed (Reference Section 1) and where appropriate, changes in Center metrics were introduced. This report covers CY 2010 and CY 2011 Year to Date (YTD) that unless otherwise specified, denotes January 1, 2011 through June 30, 2011. User Support remains an important element of the OLCF operations, with the philosophy 'whatever it takes' to enable successful research. Impact of this center-wide activity is reflected by the user survey results that show users are 'very satisfied.' The OLCF continues to aggressively pursue outreach and training activities to promote awareness - and effective use - of U.S. leadership-class resources (Reference Section 2). The OLCF continues to meet and in many cases exceed DOE metrics for capability usage (35% target in CY 2010, delivered 39%; 40% target in CY 2011, 54% January 1, 2011 through June 30, 2011). The Schedule Availability (SA) and Overall Availability (OA) for Jaguar were exceeded in CY2010. Given the solution to the VRM problem the SA and OA for Jaguar in CY 2011 are expected to exceed the target metrics of 95% and 90%, respectively (Reference Section 3). Numerous and wide-ranging research accomplishments, scientific support, and technological innovations are more fully described in Sections 4 and 6 and reflect OLCF leadership in enabling high-impact science solutions and vision in creating an exascale-ready center. Financial Management (Section 5) and Risk Management (Section 7) are carried out using best practices approved of by DOE. The OLCF has a valid cyber security plan and Authority to Operate (Section 8). The proposed metrics for 2012 are reflected in Section 9.

  13. Radiobiologic comparison of helical tomotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and conformal radiotherapy in treating lung cancer accounting for secondary malignancy risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komisopoulos, Georgios; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Rodriguez, Salvador; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Nikiforidis, Georgios C.; Sakellaropoulos, Georgios C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the importance of using measures to predict the risk of inducing secondary malignancies in association with the clinical effectiveness of treatment plans in terms of tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities. This is achieved by using radiobiologic parameters and measures, which may provide a closer association between clinical outcome and treatment delivery. Overall, 4 patients having been treated for lung cancer were examined. For each of them, 3 treatment plans were developed based on the helical tomotherapy (HT), multileaf collimator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT) modalities. The different plans were evaluated using the complication-free tumor control probability (p{sub +}), the overall probability of injury (p{sub I}), the overall probability of control/benefit (p{sub B}), and the biologically effective uniform dose (D{sup }). These radiobiologic measures were used to develop dose-response curves (p-D{sup } diagram), which can help to evaluate different treatment plans when used in conjunction with standard dosimetric criteria. The risks for secondary malignancies in the heart and the contralateral lung were calculated for the 3 radiation modalities based on the corresponding dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient. Regarding the overall evaluation of the different radiation modalities based on the p{sub +} index, the average values of the HT, IMRT, and CRT are 67.3%, 61.2%, and 68.2%, respectively. The corresponding average values of p{sub B} are 75.6%, 70.5%, and 71.0%, respectively, whereas the average values of p{sub I} are 8.3%, 9.3%, and 2.8%, respectively. Among the organs at risk (OARs), lungs show the highest probabilities for complications, which are 7.1%, 8.0%, and 1.3% for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities, respectively. Similarly, the biologically effective prescription doses (D{sub B}{sup }) for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities are 64.0, 60.9, and 60.8 Gy, respectively. Regarding the risk for secondary cancer, for the heart, the lowest average risk is produced by IMRT (0.10%) compared with the HT (0.17%) and CRT (0.12%) modalities, whereas the 3 radiation modalities show almost equivalent results regarding the contralateral lung (0.8% for HT, 0.9% for IMRT, and 0.9% for CRT). The use of radiobiologic parameters in the evaluation of different treatment plans and estimation of their expected clinical outcome is shown to provide very useful clinical information. The radiobiologic analysis of the response probabilities showed that different radiation modalities appear to be more effective in different patient geometries and target sizes and locations. Furthermore, there is not a clear pattern between the plans that appear to be more effective for the treatment and the risk of secondary malignancy. It seems that radiobiologically based treatment planning taking into account the risk of secondary cancer can be established as an effective clinical tool for a more clinically relevant treatment optimization.

  14. CNG in OKC: Improving Efficiency at the Pump and on the Road | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy CNG in OKC: Improving Efficiency at the Pump and on the Road CNG in OKC: Improving Efficiency at the Pump and on the Road March 8, 2012 - 4:02pm Addthis Andy Mitchell, Public Works Project Manager for the City of Oklahoma City, refills a vehicle at the new fast-fill CNG fueling station located at the city's main maintenance facility. | Courtesy of the City of Oklahoma City. Andy Mitchell, Public Works Project Manager for the City of Oklahoma City, refills a vehicle at the new

  15. CNG-Hybrid: A Practical Path to "Net Zero Emissions" in Commuter Rail |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy Andy Mitchell, Public Works Project Manager for the City of Oklahoma City, refills a vehicle at the new fast-fill CNG fueling station located at the city's main maintenance facility. | Courtesy of the City of Oklahoma City. Andy Mitchell, Public Works Project Manager for the City of Oklahoma City, refills a vehicle at the new fast-fill CNG fueling station located at the city's main maintenance facility. | Courtesy of the City of Oklahoma City. Jennifer Holman Project Officer,

  16. Seventy Five Years of Particle Accelerators

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Andy Sessler

    2013-06-11

    Andy Sessler, Berkeley Lab director from 1973 to 1980, sheds light on the Lab's nearly eight-decade history of inventing and refining particle accelerators, which continue to illuminate the nature of the universe. His talk was presented July 26, 2006.

  17. Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monitoring the US ATLAS Network Infrastructure with perfSONAR-PS For the ATLAS Collaboration, Shawn McKee 1 , Andrew Lake 2 , Philippe Laurens 3 , Horst Severini 4 , Tomasz Wlodek 5 , Stephen Wolff 6 and Jason Zurawski 6 1 University of Michigan Physics Department 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 3 Michigan State University Physics and Astronomy Department 4 University of Oklahoma, Physics/IT 5 Brookhaven National Laboratory 6 Internet2 E-mail: smckee@umich.edu, andy@es.net,

  18. NNSA honors Los Alamos in 2014 Sustainability Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration deputy administrator travels to Ukraine Thursday, April 14, 2016 - 10:02am From left, NNSA Director of Strategic Planning/Integration Andy Hood, STCU Executive Director Curtis Bjelajac, NNSA Deputy Administrator Anne Harrington, and NNSA Assistant Deputy Administrator Pete Hanlon. Earlier this month, Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Anne Harrington traveled to Ukraine to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Science and Technology Center in Ukraine

  19. 10th Anniversary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Barbara Lee presenting Paul Alivisatos with Congressional Record honoring his service as Berkeley Lab's director Rep. Barbara Lee congratulating Mike Witherell on becoming director of Berkeley Lab Dinner Panel with Vik Bajaj and Jeff Neaton Dinner Panel with Paul Alivisatos and Ambika Bumb Dinner Panel with Steve Chu and Vik Bajaj Ambika Bumb, Don Medley and Rep. Barbara Lee Jim Schuck Jeff Bokor, Roger Falcone, Jeff Neaton Steve Louie Alison Hatt, Branden Brough and Meg Holm Jim Ciston and Andy

  20. 10th Anniversary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Foundry Director Jeff Neaton Paul Alivisatos, former Director of Berkeley Lab and founding Director of the Molecular Foundry Brian Schowengerdt, co-founder of Magic Leap, an industry user of the Molecular Foundry Mike Witherell, Director of Berkeley Lab Representative Mike Honda (D-CA), co-author of the Nanotechnology Research and Development Act Molecular Foundry Facility Directors, Andy Minor and David Prendergast Session 1 Speaker's Panel, Alex Zettl, Jeff Grossman and Jim DeYoreo

  1. The Current State of Technology for Cellulosic Ethanol | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy The Current State of Technology for Cellulosic Ethanol The Current State of Technology for Cellulosic Ethanol At the February 12, 2009 joint Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Andy Aden (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) discussed the current state of technology for cellulosic ethanol - How close are we? PDF icon aden_20090212.pdf More Documents & Publications Integrated Biorefinery Process Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of

  2. Department of Energy Management Principles, May 2011

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Achieves Goal of 200 Energy Savings Assessments Department of Energy Achieves Goal of 200 Energy Savings Assessments March 2, 2007 - 10:28am Addthis Over 50 Trillion Btus of Natural Gas Savings Found AUSTIN, TX - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Andy Karsner today announced the completion of Energy Savings Assessments (ESAs) at 200 of the largest industrial facilities in the nation, identifying opportunities to

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    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    superfluids (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Generic equilibration dynamics of planar defects in trapped atomic superfluids « Prev Next » Title: Generic equilibration dynamics of planar defects in trapped atomic superfluids Authors: Scherpelz, Peter ; Padavić, Karmela ; Murray, Andy ; Glatz, Andreas ; Aranson, Igor S. ; Levin, K. Publication Date: 2015-03-18 OSTI Identifier: 1179955 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review A Additional Journal Information: Journal

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    Inverter Ground Fault Overvoltage Testing Andy Hoke, Austin Nelson, and Sudipta Chakraborty National Renewable Energy Laboratory Justin Chebahtah, Trudie Wang, and Michael McCarty SolarCity Corporation Technical Report NREL/TP-5D00-64173 August 2015 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

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    Million for Solar Energy Projects | Department of Energy Official in Newark, Delaware, to Highlight $168 Million for Solar Energy Projects Department of Energy Official in Newark, Delaware, to Highlight $168 Million for Solar Energy Projects March 16, 2007 - 12:00pm Addthis Funding will help further President Bush's Solar America Initiative NEWARK, DE - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Andy Karsner today highlighted DOE's

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    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Builders' Show International Builders' Show February 14, 2008 - 11:29am Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you, Andy, and thank you all for being here. The world has reached an energy crossroads. Rising global energy demand and the need for more environmentally-responsible energy production and consumption have presented us with a number of global challenges that require global solutions. Every American has a role to play in meeting these challenges. And that's

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    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Passive Solar Building Design and Solar Thermal Space Heating Webinar Passive Solar Building Design and Solar Thermal Space Heating Webinar Watch a recording of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Senior Engineer Andy Walker's Nov. 30, 2010, presentation about passive solar building design, and solar thermal space heating technologies and applications. It's one in a series of Webinars to support state and local projects funded by Sustainable Energy Resources for

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    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Weatherization Assistance Program » Pilot Projects » Solar Water Heating Webinar Solar Water Heating Webinar Watch a recording of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Senior Engineer Andy Walker's Nov. 16, 2010, presentation about residential solar water heating technologies and applications. It's one in a series of Webinars to support state and local projects funded by Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Grants. You can also read a transcript of the Webinar. More Information For

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    Universities DE-AC05-06OR23100 Modification 0515 PART III LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J - LIST OF ATTACHMENTS ATTACHMENT F - KEY PERSONNEL (Revised 1/30/2015) NAME TITLE Harry A. (Andy) Page ORISE Director Donna L. Cragle Director, Health, Energy, and Environment David Hackemeyer Director, National Security Dean M. Evasius Director, Scientific Assessment and Workforce Development J. Phil Andrews Director, Business Operations and Chief Financial Officer Ivan A.

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fuel Cycle Subcommittee Recommendations Subcommittee Chair: Alfred Sattleberger Recommendations 2012-2014 Report to the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Meeting December 11, 2015 John W. Herczeg, Deputy Assistant Secretary Andy Griffith, Associate Deputy Assistant Secretary Office of Fuel Cycle Technologies U.S. Department of Energy NE-5 Organization Structure * Used Fuel Disposal R&D * Deep Boreholes * High Burnup Fuel Demonstration * Advanced Fuels * Materials Protection, Accounting, and

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    Energy Savers [EERE]

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    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 www.pjm.com 2011 EIA Energy Conference Intelligent Electric Systems Andy Ott Senior Vice President - Markets April 26, 2011 PJM©2011 2 Smart Grid www.pjm.com Transmission Distribution Energy Users Network Operations Energy Providers Consumer Devices PJM©2011 3 Network Operations Generation and Demand Resource Control www.pjm.com PJM©2011 4 Future SynchroPhasor Applications * Use recorded data * Verification of operations * Analyze dynamic performance * System model maintenance * Situational

  20. Accelerated Commercialization of Federally-Sponsored Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Technologies, May 2007.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accelerated Commercialization of Federally-Sponsored Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Technologies May 2007 Introduction: The State Energy Advisory Board (STEAB) recently met with the DOE Assistant Secretary of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (ASEE), Mr. Alexander A. (Andy) Karsner, and discussed the imperative for achieving dramatic increases in adoption of federally-funded and researched technologies through creative thinking and out-of-the-box approaches. STEAB agrees with this

  1. NREL Helps Federal Agencies Reach New Efficiency Targets - News Feature |

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    NREL NREL Helps Federal Agencies Reach New Efficiency Targets August 19, 2015 Three people stand in front of solar panels on top of the NREL parking garage. NREL researchers, from left, Andy Walker, a principal engineer in the Integrated Applications Center's Engineering and Modeling Group; Kate Anderson, manager of the Engineering and Modeling Group; and Marguerite Kelly, manager of the Market Partnerships and Tools Group, are working to help federal agencies become more energy efficient as

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    Participants Participants Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences A DOE Technical Program Review October 8-9, 2013 Front row, from left: Yun Liu, Dave Goodwin, Eliane Lessner, Jack Deslippe, Nick Woodward, Carl Steefel, Ceren Susut, Katie Antypas, Richard Gerber. Back row, from left: Scott French, Jeff Neaton, Sudip Dosanjh, Harvey Wasserman, Jim Davenport, David Skinner, Andy Felmy, Jacqueline Chen, Sotiris Xantheas, Greg Newman, Mark Pederson. Organizers and

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    News Releases Publications Media Contacts & Resources Events Video Image Gallery Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Top Archive Annual Report Environmental Reports Fact Sheets Labs Accomplishments Lab News Archive Partnerships Annual Report Research Magazine HPC Annual Reports Search Sandia Publications Strategic Plan News Archive October 2, 2015 Lab News - The Martian author Andy Weir's path to success began at Sandia; and more. September 18, 2015 Lab News - Understanding materials is

  4. Generic equilibration dynamics of planar defects in trapped atomic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    superfluids (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Generic equilibration dynamics of planar defects in trapped atomic superfluids Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Generic equilibration dynamics of planar defects in trapped atomic superfluids Authors: Scherpelz, Peter ; Padavić, Karmela ; Murray, Andy ; Glatz, Andreas ; Aranson, Igor S. ; Levin, K. Publication Date: 2015-03-18 OSTI Identifier: 1179955 Type: Publisher's Accepted

  5. Department of Energy Achieves Goal of 200 Energy Savings Assessments |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Achieves Goal of 200 Energy Savings Assessments Department of Energy Achieves Goal of 200 Energy Savings Assessments March 2, 2007 - 10:28am Addthis Over 50 Trillion Btus of Natural Gas Savings Found AUSTIN, TX - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Andy Karsner today announced the completion of Energy Savings Assessments (ESAs) at 200 of the largest industrial facilities in the nation, identifying opportunities to

  6. Department of Energy Official in Newark, Delaware, to Highlight $168

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Million for Solar Energy Projects | Department of Energy Official in Newark, Delaware, to Highlight $168 Million for Solar Energy Projects Department of Energy Official in Newark, Delaware, to Highlight $168 Million for Solar Energy Projects March 16, 2007 - 12:00pm Addthis Funding will help further President Bush's Solar America Initiative NEWARK, DE - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Andy Karsner today highlighted DOE's

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    information contact Andrew Vogelmann (vogelmann@bnl.gov) https://www.bnl.gov/envsci/bio/vogelmann-andy.php Funding provided by the DOE Office of Science Biological and Environmental Research Program through its Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Facility. References Li, Z. et al. (2015): Development of fine-resolution analyses and expanded large-scale forcing properties: 1. Methodology and evaluation, J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 120 (2), 654-666, doi:10.1002/2014JD022245. Wu, W. et al. (2012),

  8. Solar Water Heating Webinar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Weatherization Assistance Program » Pilot Projects » Solar Water Heating Webinar Solar Water Heating Webinar Watch a recording of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Senior Engineer Andy Walker's Nov. 16, 2010, presentation about residential solar water heating technologies and applications. It's one in a series of Webinars to support state and local projects funded by Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Grants. You can also read a transcript of the Webinar. More Information For

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    February 24, 2016, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG AUDITORIUM COLLOQUIUM: New Horizons at Pluto Dr. Andy Cheng Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory Pluto and its five known moons have been transformed from mysterious, barely resolved or unresolved points of light, only dimly viewed from very far away, to astonishing worlds of unimagined complexity by the recent visit of the small interplanetary probe called New Horizons. Pluto, with its icy plains, mountains, flowing glaciers, and

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geoengineering: Plan B Remedy for Global Warming y g Andy Lacis Aerosol Working Group 26 March 2007 Some Radiative Aspects of Proposed Geoengineering Countermeasures to Global Warming (submitted to PNAS) g ( ) Andrew A. Lacis, Jennifer L. Alltop, Solomon M. Hsiang, Kirk D. Knobelspiesse, Jing Li, Cindy B. Pearl Accelerated melting of Greenland ice due to global warming . . . How can aerosols be used to counteract global warming? * Injection of sulfur into the lower stratosphere * Injection of

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regimes within the First Regimes within the First Aerosol Indirect Effect Mark A. Miller, Maureen Dunn Mary Jane Bartholomew Pavlos Kollias Mary Jane Bartholomew, Pavlos Kollias Brookhaven National Laboratory Thanks: Pete Daum, Mike Jensen, Andy Vogelmann, Christine Chiu, Dave Turner Dave Turner Theory of the First Aerosol Theory of the First Aerosol Indirect Effect * In an adiabatic ascent, an increase in the droplet number concentration at constant liquid water mixing ratio results in a liquid

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    New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge 26th New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge Aspen Elementary, Los Alamos Middle School students take top award in 26th New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge Andy Corliss, Phillip Ionkov and Ming Lo of Aspen Elementary, and Max Corliss of Los Alamos Middle School won first place in the New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge. April 27, 2016 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop

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    Aircraft Workshop 10/14/2008 1 Instrumentation for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Fred J. Brechtel, Andy Corless, Chris Marquis, Fred P. Brechtel, Sandeep Rai, Brechtel Mfg. Inc. (fredj@brechtel.com) Tim Bates & Trish Quinn, Atmospheric Chemistry Group, NOAA PMEL Christian Meinig & Scott Stalin, Engineering Dev. Division, NOAA PMEL Intro & Motivation for the development Introduction to each UAS instrument Other aircraft-deployable systems Power plant plume case study OUTLINE: SBIR

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    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DRAFT Report 6/8/2015 Subcommittee members: John Ahearne, Dana Christensen, Tom Cochran, Mike Corradini, Dave Hill, Hussein Khalil, Andy Klein, Paul Murray, John Sackett (chair) Teams from the NEAC Facilities Subcommittee visited Argonne National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to assess the state and availability of nuclear facilities appropriate to further development of nuclear technology. In addition, a survey was conducted of nuclear facility

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    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Report Presentation to the NEAC Committee 12/11/2015 John I. Sackett Facilities Subcommittee Members * John Ahearne * Dana Christensen * Tom Cochran * Mike Corradini * Dave Hill * Hussein Khalil * Andy Klein * Paul Murray * John Sackett, chair Subcommittee Objectives * The objective of our deliberations has been to help DOE-NE develop a means to identify, prioritize and make available those facilities important to Nuclear Energy Research and Development. - All facilities have been considered,

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    Visualization/In-situ Analysis Co-Chairs: Laura Monroe, David Karelitz Scribe: Prabhat Approved for Unlimited Release: SAND2014-15984O 1 Contributors * Kevin Harms, ANL * Laura Monroe, LANL * Bob Kares, LANL * Ming Jiang, LLNL * Jeff Long, LLNL * Wes Bethel, LBL * Prabhat, LBL * Doug Fuller * David Karelitz, Sandia * Andy Wilson, Sandia 2 Top Findings * Computational Steering * Connecting experiments to simulations * High Fidelity Analysis Opportunities * Domain science involvement * Ability to

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    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    EIA Conference 2009 Session 1: The Future for Transport Demand Listen to Session: Audio of Session 1 from 2009 EIA Conference Full Session Transcript PDF Icon pdf Moderator: Andy Kydes (EIA) Speakers: Lew Fulton (International Energy Agency) David Greene (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Lee Schipper (Precourt Institute, Stanford University) Note: Concurrent sessions used a variety of presentation and round table discussion formats. All available presentations have been posted. Moderator and

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    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Murray, Andy" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis/Dissertation Subject: Identifier Numbers: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium,

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    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    February 1, 2016 MEMORANDUM TO: John Conti Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis Jim Diefenderfer Director, Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis FROM: Coal and Uranium Analysis Team SUBJECT: Notes from the First AEO2016 Coal Working Group Meeting workshop held on December 1, 2015 Attendees (47) Name Affiliation Ross, Joey Alliance Resource Partners, L.P. Alfaro, Jose L. Alpha Natural Resources Blumenfeld, Andy Arch Coal, Inc. Lewandowski, David Clean Energy James,

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    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

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    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electronic Commerce EC-Web Project Plan May 1997 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Assistant Secretary for Human Resources and Administration Office of Procurement Operations Office of Information Management i May 1997 Title Page Document Name: EC-Web Project Plan Publication Date: May 1997 Contract Number: DE-AC01-95AD34277 Project Number: 5004 Prepared by: Jill Schwartz Kevin Shaver Approval: Andy Yocke, HR-43.1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Assistant Secretary for Human Resources and Administration

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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    Energy Savers [EERE]

    GovEnergy 2007 Conference GovEnergy 2007 Conference August 8, 2007 - 3:16pm Addthis Prepared Remarks for Secretary Bodman Thanks very much, Andy, and thank you all. I want to congratulate you --- both the organizers and the participants of GovEnergy 2007. In no small feat, we have drawn a record crowd of over 1,800 to this 10th GovEnergy conference. I am proud to be a part of this remarkable event. This year, GovEnergy is cosponsored by five federal agencies in addition to the Department of

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  13. DOE Announces $30 Million for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Projects |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Projects DOE Announces $30 Million for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Projects June 12, 2008 - 1:30pm Addthis Adds Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle to Department's Fleet WASHINGTON - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Andy Karsner today announced up to $30 million in funding over three years for three cost-shared Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) demonstration and development

  14. EIA Energy Conferences & Presentations, April 7, 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1: "The Future for Transport Demand" Dr. Kydes: Why don't we begin. Good morning, thank you for attending, and welcome to our session entitled The Future of Transport Demand. My name is Andy Kydes. I'm the only one at the table without a table name tag; it shows the importance of the people here; it turns out I'm the Senior Technical Advisor to the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Now why is this topic important? I'm going, in the interest of time, to skip over a number

  15. GovEnergy 2007 Conference | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GovEnergy 2007 Conference GovEnergy 2007 Conference August 8, 2007 - 3:16pm Addthis Prepared Remarks for Secretary Bodman Thanks very much, Andy, and thank you all. I want to congratulate you --- both the organizers and the participants of GovEnergy 2007. In no small feat, we have drawn a record crowd of over 1,800 to this 10th GovEnergy conference. I am proud to be a part of this remarkable event. This year, GovEnergy is cosponsored by five federal agencies in addition to the Department of

  16. Session: Pre-development project risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curry, Richard; Linehan, Andy

    2004-09-01

    This second session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The focus of the presentations was on the practices and methodologies used in the wind energy industry for assessing risk to birds and bats at candidate project sites. Presenters offered examples of pre-development siting evaluation requirements set by certain states. Presentation one was titled ''Practices and Methodologies and Initial Screening Tools'' by Richard Curry of Curry and Kerlinger, LLC. Presentation two was titled ''State of the Industry in the Pacific Northwest'' by Andy Linehan, CH2MHILL.

  17. Microsoft Word - Agenda_SSAB_Chairs_6-15-11.FINAL

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Functional Area Points of Contact Listing by AU Office Director Page 1 of 11 Integrated AU-1.2, -10, -20, -50 - August 21, 2014 Function/Subject Director Email Phone Accident Investigations Andy Lawrence Andrew.lawrence@hq.doe.gov (202) 586-6740 Administrative Review (Clearance eligibility determinations) Robert Lingan Robert.lingan@hq.doe.gov (202) 586-1461 Annual Report to Congress on Special Nuclear Material Robert Lingan Robert.lingan@hq.doe.gov (202) 586-1461 Annual Site Environmental

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - STM-Plenary-Wisco_2007.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report ARM Science Team Meeting 2007 Warren Wiscombe Brookhaven ARM Chief Scientist Team Mark Miller Ric Cederwall Andy Vogelmann Mar 2007 ARM Plenary 2 Sharon Zuhoski Yangang Liu Your Chief Scientist taking sonde-launch training in TWP-ICE g W E What do What do I do now? Mar 2007 ARM Plenary 3 Send me your... Send me your... science highlights science highlights poster PDFs (esp if you win CS Design Award) ideas! Mar 2007 ARM Plenary 4 News * this is a proposal year * Gordon Conference, Rad

  19. Underground house book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, S.

    1980-01-01

    Aesthetics, attitudes, and acceptance of earth-covered buildings are examined initially, followed by an examination of land, money, water, earth, design, heat, and interior factors. Contributions made by architect Frank Lloyd Wright are discussed and reviewed. Contemporary persons, mostly designers, who contribute from their experiences with underground structures are Andy Davis; Rob Roy; Malcolm Wells; John Barnard, Jr.; Jeff Sikora; and Don Metz. A case study to select the site, design, and prepare to construct Earthtech 6 is described. Information is given in appendices on earth-protected buildings and existing basements; financing earth-sheltered housing; heating-load calculations and life-cycle costing; and designer names and addresses. (MCW)

  20. Proton Radiography at Los Alamos National Laboratory (pRad)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

    pRad at LANL P-Division | LANSCE >> pRad Home About News Movies Proposals Contacts Team Leader Dale Tupa 505.665.1820 Project Leader Andy Saunders 505.665.3090 Area Manager (interim) Eron Kerstiens 505.667.3618 Fesseha Mariam 505.667.3546 Christopher Morris 505.667.5652 Frans Trouw 505.665.7575 pRad User Program pRad-uo@lanl.gov P-25 Group Leader Melynda Brooks 505.667.6909 P-25 Deputy Group Leader Frans Trouw 505.665.7575 P-25 Subatomic Physics P-Division LANSCE pRad logo Los Alamos

  1. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    . ' I 4f7, k 8. :..; . & . I- . .." . Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20545 // ' /$;c" OCT 28 1985 Hr. Andrew Wallo The Aerospace Corporation Suite 4000 955 L'Enfant Plaza, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20024 Dear Andy: 3A- ' 1 CT. 1s ok-i:33 The comments and authority decision from the following sites are set out m-l I below. No additional comments are included; therefore, a careful l ditorialIL./z review of these documents should be made when the documents are finalized. IL.5 L 1.

  2. May 5, 2016, FTCP Face to Face Meeting Presentation - Revision OF FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY (DOE O 426.1 Chg. 1)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    REVISION OF FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY (DOE O 426.1 Chg. 1) Pat Worthington Jeanette Yarrington May 5, 2016 Writing Team * Pat Worthington, EHSS * Jeanette Yarrington, EHSS * David Chaney, NNSA * Paul Jenkins, NNSA * Karen Boardman, FTCP Chair * Vic Callahan, ORP * Andy Delapaz, SC * Mark Brown, NE-ID Additional Support * Ricky Hyson, ORP * Julie Finup, NE-ID * Al MacDougall and Jeannie Lozoya, NTC Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security Status * DOE O 426.1 Chg. 1 serves as DOE's

  3. HEC-DPSSL 2012 Workshop, Agenda: National Ignition Facility & Photon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Agenda TEXT SIZE Workshops About Organizing Committee Agenda Deadlines Abstract Submission Venue NIF Tour Directions Lake Tahoe Workshop Sign-up Agenda - Click to Download Time Session Title First Name Last Name Talk Title 9/12/2012 8:00 Registration / Breakfast 9:00 Welcome Andy Bayramian 9:15 Introduction Mike Dunne 9:30 Overview session Paul Mason DiPOLE - An Efficient and Scalable HEC-DPSSL System 10:00 Marco Hornung Status of the POLARIS laser system 10:30 Mathias Siebold

  4. ARM STM Plenary: CS Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 ARM Science Team Meeting 2008 Warren Wiscombe ARM Chief Scientist Brookhaven National Lab Mar 2008 ARM Plenary 2 ARM Chief Scientist Team ARM Chief Scientist Team Ric Cederwall Andy Vogelmann Sharon Zuhoski Yangang Liu Pavlos Kollias Mar 2008 ARM Plenary 3 Submit your... Submit your... science highlights (www.arm.gov) poster PDFs (esp if you win CS Design Award) feedback in text boxes on ARM web pages Also... vote for People's Choice Poster talk to our Thu morning speakers Mar 2008 ARM Plenary

  5. Update on the Albany/FELIX First Order Stokes Solver and the CISM-Albany and MPAS-Albany Dycores

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on the Albany/FELIX First Order Stos(tm)=20i5-0478cver and the CISM-Albany and MPAS-Albany Dycores Irina Kalashnikova, Mauro Perego, Andy Salinger, Ray Tuminaro, Steve Price Sandia s Role in the PISCEES Project: Albany/FELIX, CISM-Albany, MPAS-Albany PISCEES = "Predicting Climate and Evolution at Extreme Scales" (SciDAC application partnership b/w DOE's BER + ASCR Divisions, began June 2012, 5 years). * Sandia's Role in PISCEES: to develop and support a production-ready robust &

  6. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassov's research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herring's group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  7. Fall 2012 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 C STEC W orking G roup S chedule Thrust I --- s elected Thursdays; M SE C onference R oom ( 3062 H H D ow) October 1 1 Dylan B ayerl ( Kioupakis g roup) 3:00---4:00pm November 1 Andy M artin ( Millunchick g roup) 2:00---3:00pm December 1 3 Brian R oberts ( Ku g roup) 2:00---3:00pm Thrust II --- s elected T hursdays, 3 :30---4:30pm; M SE C onference R oom ( 3062 H H D ow) September 2 7 Hang C hi ( Uher g roup) October 1 8 Reddy g roup November 2 9 Gunho Kim (Pipe group) Thrust III --- s elected

  8. 2010-2011 Working Groups website

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010---2011 Inorganic P V Sept. 2 7 MSE c onf. r oom - 3 062A D ow Jamie P hillips l eading Oct. 1 8 POD r oom - 3 158 D ow Simon H uang ( Goldman) p resenting Nov. 1 ChemE C onf. r oom - 3 074 D ow Sung J oo ( Pan) p resenting Nov. 1 5 ChemE C onf. r oom - 3 074 D ow Andy M artin ( Mirecki---Millunchick) p resenting Dec. 1 3 ChemE C onf. r oom - 3 074 D ow Larry A agesen ( Thornton) p resenting Feb. 1 3062A Dow ( MSE c onf), 9 :30am Jamie P hillip's g roup p resenting Feb. 2 2 3158 D ow ( POD r

  9. Microsoft Word - FG2_scoping transcript_Jacksonville06092011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 FUTUREGEN 2.0 PROGRAM 10 PUBLIC SCOPING MEETING 11 12 13 JACKSONVILLE, ILLINOIS 14 15 16 JUNE 9, 2011 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Page 2 1 I N D E X 2 MAIN SPEAKERS: PAGE 3 Cliff Whyte 5 4 Jeff Hoffmann 11 5 Mike Long 16 6 Ken Humphreys 20 7 Cliff Whyte 31 8 PUBLIC: 9 Brad Zeller 37 10 Kelly Hall 39 11 Andy Davenport 40/98 12 David Davenport 49 13 Jeffrey Niemann 56 14 Elizabeth Niemann 62 15 Richard Johnson 68 16 William Hawks 69 17 Catherine Edmiston 72 18 Patty Rykhus 77/101 19

  10. BSDF Viewer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-02-01

    BSDF Viewer is a java application created with processing(http://processing.org/) that allows users to load a LBNL Window BSDF XML file and explore the data visually. BSDF Viewer only supports the full Klems BSDF for now. BSDF Viewer Web Applet: You can use the web applet of BSDF Viewer without downloading anything to your computer: http://gaia.lbl.gov/people/andy/public/BSDF_Viewer/webapplet/ When using the web applet you'll be asked permission to allow gaia.lbl.gov to access your computer. This is necessary formore » you to load BSDF files from your computer. I've self-signed the applet, so it won't be able to verify the digital signature. If you don't trust me (and why should you) you can deny access to your computer and proceed to the applet but you wont be able to load a BSDF file. BSDF Viewer Program Download: You can download stand alone versions BSDF viewer to your computer: BSDF Viewer for Mac OSX BSDF Viewer for Linux BSDF Viewer for Windows Account Number I3227« less

  11. Improvement in Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System/Surface and Atmosphere Radiation Budget Dust Aerosol Properties, Effects on Surface Validation of Clouds and Radiative Swath

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutan, D.; Rose, F.; Charlock, T.P.

    2005-03-18

    Within the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) science team (Wielicki et al. 1996), the Surface and Atmospheric Radiation Budget (SARB) group is tasked with calculating vertical profiles of heating rates, globally, and continuously, beneath CERES footprint observations of Top of Atmosphere (TOA) fluxes. This is accomplished using a fast radiative transfer code originally developed by Qiang Fu and Kuo-Nan Liou (Fu and Liou 1993) and subsequently highly modified by the SARB team. Details on the code and its inputs can be found in Kato et al. (2005) and Rose and Charlock (2002). Among the many required inputs is characterization of the vertical column profile of aerosols beneath each footprint. To do this SARB combines aerosol optical depth information from the moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument along with aerosol constituents specified by the Model for Atmosphere and Chemical Transport (MATCH) of Collins et al. (2001), and aerosol properties (e.g. single scatter albedo and asymmetry parameter) from Tegen and Lacis (1996) and OPAC (Hess et al. 1998). The publicly available files that include these flux profiles, called the Clouds and Radiative Swath (CRS) data product, available from the Langley Atmospheric Sciences Data Center (http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/). As various versions of the code are completed, publishable results are named ''Editions.'' After CRS Edition 2A was finalized it was found that dust aerosols were too absorptive. Dust aerosols have subsequently been modified using a new set of properties developed by Andy Lacis and results have been released in CRS Edition 2B. This paper discusses the effects of changing desert dust aerosol properties, which can be significant for the radiation budget in mid ocean, a few thousand kilometers from the source regions. Resulting changes are validated via comparison of surface observed fluxes from the Saudi Solar Village surface site (Myers et al. 1999), and the E13 site at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM), Southern Great Plains (SGP) central facility.

  12. Final Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-03ER25579; Development of High-Order Accurate Interface Tracking Algorithms and Improved Constitutive Models for Problems in Continuum Mechanics with Applications to Jetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puckett, Elbridge Gerry; Miller, Gregory Hale

    2012-10-14

    Much of the work conducted under the auspices of DE-FG02-03ER25579 was characterized by an exceptionally close collaboration with researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). For example, Andy Nonaka, one of Professor Miller's graduate students in the Department of Applied Science at U. C. Davis (UCD) wrote his PhD thesis in an area of interest to researchers in the Applied Numerical Algorithms Group (ANAG), which is a part of the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) at LBNL. Dr. Nonaka collaborated closely with these researchers and subsequently published the results of this collaboration jointly with them, one article in a peer reviewed journal article and one paper in the proceedings of a conference. Dr. Nonaka is now a research scientist in the Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE), which is also part of the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) at LBNL. This collaboration with researchers at LBNL also included having one of Professor Puckett's graduate students in the Graduate Group in Applied Mathematics (GGAM) at UCD, Sarah Williams, spend the summer working with Dr. Ann Almgren, who is a staff scientist in CCSE. As a result of this visit Sarah decided work on a problem suggested by the head of CCSE, Dr. John Bell, for her PhD thesis. Having finished all of the coursework and examinations required for a PhD, Sarah stayed at LBNL to work on her thesis under the guidance of Dr. Bell. Sarah finished her PhD thesis in June of 2007. Writing a PhD thesis while working at one of the University of California (UC) managed DOE laboratories is long established tradition at UC and Professor Puckett has always encouraged his students to consider doing this. Another one of Professor Puckett's graduate students in the GGAM at UCD, Christopher Algieri, was partially supported with funds from DE-FG02-03ER25579 while he wrote his MS thesis in which he analyzed and extended work originally published by Dr. Phillip Colella, the head of ANAG, and some of his colleagues. Chris Algieri is now employed as a staff member in Dr. Bill Collins' Climate Science Department in the Earth Sciences Division at LBNL working with computational models of climate change. Finally, it should be noted that the work conducted by Professor Puckett and his students Sarah Williams and Chris Algieri and described in this final report for DOE grant # DE-FC02-03ER25579 is closely related to work performed by Professor Puckett and his students under the auspices of Professor Puckett's DOE SciDAC grant DE-FC02-01ER25473 An Algorithmic and Software Framework for Applied Partial Differential Equations: A DOE SciDAC Integrated Software Infrastructure Center (ISIC). Dr. Colella was the lead PI for this SciDAC grant, which was comprised of several research groups from DOE national laboratories and five university PI's from five different universities. In theory Professor Puckett tried to use funds from the SciDAC grant to support work directly involved in implementing algorithms developed by members of his research group at UCD as software that might be of use to Puckett's SciDAC CoPIs. (For example, see the work reported in Section 2.2.2 of this final report.) However, since there is considerable lead time spent developing such algorithms before they are ready to become `software' and research plans and goals change as the research progresses, Professor Puckett supported each member of his research group partially with funds from the SciDAC APDEC ISIC DE-FC02-01ER25473 and partially with funds from this DOE MICS grant DE-FC02-03ER25579. This has necessarily resulted in a significant overlap of project areas that were funded by both grants. In particular, both Sarah Williams and Chris Algieri were supported partially with funds from grant # DE-FG02-03ER25579, for which this is the final report, and in part with funds from Professor Puckett's DOE SciDAC grant # DE-FC02-01ER25473. For example, Sarah Williams received support from DE-FC02- 01ER25473 and DE-FC02-03ER25579, both while at UCD taking cla