Sample records for nymex confidence interval

  1. Multiplicative scale uncertainties in the unified approach for constructing confidence intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. S. Smith

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated how uncertainties in the estimation of the detection efficiency affect the 90% confidence intervals in the unified approach for constructing confidence intervals. The study has been conducted for experiments where the number of detected events is large and can be described by a Gaussian probability density function. We also assume the detection efficiency has a Gaussian probability density and study the range of the relative uncertainties $\\sigma_\\epsilon$ between 0 and 30%. We find that the confidence intervals provide proper coverage over a wide signal range and increase smoothly and continuously from the intervals that ignore scale uncertainties with a quadratic dependence on $\\sigma_\\epsilon$.

  2. ON CONFIDENCE INTERVALS ASSOCIATED WITH THE USUAL AND ADJUSTED LIKELIHOODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Nancy

    and Mukerjee (1994) on higher order power shed light on the power properties of the associated confidence. Highest posterior density regions, with approximate frequentist validity, are also included in the study. Keywords: Bartlett correction; expected length; highest posterior density region; likeli­ hood ratio

  3. CJS Profile Likelihood Confidence Intervals in The CJS Estimates in SURPH 3 provide point estimates for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    CJS Profile Likelihood Confidence Intervals in SURPH 3 The CJS Estimates in SURPH 3 provide point based on profile likelihoods provide a non-parametric alternative. In most instances there will be close that the profile likelihood confidence intervals should be used. The theory behind profile likelihood confidence

  4. Confidence Intervals for OD Demand Estimation Yingying Chen, Fernando Ordo~nez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ordóñez, Fernando

    Confidence Intervals for OD Demand Estimation Yingying Chen, Fernando Ord´o~nez , and Kurt Palmer Representative origin-destination (OD) demand tables are a crucial part of making many transportation models relevant to practice. However estimating these OD tables is a challenging problem, even more so determining

  5. ESTIMATING BEDROCK AND SURFACE LAYER BOUNDARIES AND CONFIDENCE INTERVALS IN ICE SHEET RADAR IMAGERY USING MCMC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menczer, Filippo

    ESTIMATING BEDROCK AND SURFACE LAYER BOUNDARIES AND CONFIDENCE INTERVALS IN ICE SHEET RADAR IMAGERY and Computing Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana USA ABSTRACT Climate models that predict polar ice sheet behavior require accurate measurements of the bedrock-ice and ice-air bound- aries in ground

  6. Another Look at Confidence Intervals: Proposal for a More Relevant and Transparent Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven D. Biller; Scott M. Oser

    2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The behaviors of various confidence/credible interval constructions are explored, particularly in the region of low statistics where methods diverge most. We highlight a number of challenges, such as the treatment of nuisance parameters, and common misconceptions associated with such constructions. An informal survey of the literature suggests that confidence intervals are not always defined in relevant ways and are too often misinterpreted and/or misapplied. This can lead to seemingly paradoxical behaviours and flawed comparisons regarding the relevance of experimental results. We therefore conclude that there is a need for a more pragmatic strategy which recognizes that, while it is critical to objectively convey the information content of the data, there is also a strong desire to derive bounds on models and a natural instinct to interpret things this way. Accordingly, we attempt to put aside philosophical biases in favor of a practical view to propose a more transparent and self-consistent approach that better addresses these issues.

  7. The use of latin hypercube sampling for the efficient estimation of confidence intervals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grabaskas, D.; Denning, R.; Aldemir, T. [Ohio State Univ., 201 W 19th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Nakayama, M. K. [New Jersey Inst. of Technology, 218 Central Ave, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) has long been used as a way of assuring adequate sampling of the tails of distributions in a Monte Carlo analysis and provided the framework for the uncertainty analysis performed in the NUREG-1150 risk assessment. However, this technique has not often been used in the performance of regulatory analyses due to the inability to establish confidence levels on the quantiles of the output distribution. Recent work has demonstrated a method that makes this possible. This method is compared to the procedure of crude Monte Carlo using order statistics, which is currently used to establish confidence levels. The results of several statistical examples demonstrate that the LHS confidence interval method can provide a more accurate and precise solution, but issues remain when applying the technique generally. (authors)

  8. Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas price forecasts with contemporaneous natural gas pricesreference-case natural gas price forecast, and that have notof AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures

  9. Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas Price Forecast W ith natural gas prices significantlyof AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futurescase long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO

  10. Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas price forecasts with contemporaneous natural gas pricesreference-case natural gas price forecast, and that have notof AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures

  11. Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the base-case natural gas price forecast, but to alsogas price forecasts with contemporaneous natural gas pricesof AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures

  12. Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural Gas Price Forecast Although natural gas prices areof AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futurescase long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO

  13. Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    market-based forward price projections argues for furtherAEO 2008 and NYMEX price projections. Nominal /kWh (at 7000that exceed the AEO price projection) described above. If

  14. Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    revisions to the EIAs natural gas price forecasts in AEOsolely on the AEO 2005 natural gas price forecasts willComparison of AEO 2005 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX

  15. Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    late January 2008, extend its natural gas futures strip anComparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXs reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from

  16. Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXs reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts fromAEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be

  17. Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to estimate the base-case natural gas price forecast, but toComparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXs reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from

  18. Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXs reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts fromAEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be

  19. Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEXs reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts fromAEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be

  20. Confidence Intervals Laboratory Project #5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kofman, Ilya

    concerning the amount of soda in some soda bottles. The Pepsi Bottling Plant in Astoria Queens produces a huge number of half gallon, plastic Diet Pepsi bottles. The company claims that, due to manufacturing we had ALL the data on Pepsi's Astoria soda bottles. This is the same as assuming we know everything

  1. Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

    2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 14, 2009, the reference-case projections from Annual Energy Outlook 2010 were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables can play in itigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO reference-case gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings.

  2. Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX FuturesPrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 5, 2006, the reference case projections from 'Annual Energy Outlook 2007' (AEO 2007) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk (see, for example, http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf). As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past six years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past six years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable-price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are 'biased' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2007. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past six AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2006), we once again find that the AEO 2007 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. Specifically, the NYMEX-AEO 2007 premium is $0.73/MMBtu levelized over five years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $0.73/MMBtu more than the AEO 2007 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation (or other forms of generation whose costs are not tied to the price of natural gas). Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years.

  3. Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX FuturesPrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 12, 2005, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2006'' (AEO 2006) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk (see, for example, http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf). As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past five years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past five years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2006. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past five AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2005), we once again find that the AEO 2006 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEX-AEO 2006 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$2.3/MMBtu levelized over five years--that we have seen over the last six years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $2.3/MMBtu more than the AEO 2006 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation (or other forms of generation whose costs are not tied to the price of natural gas). Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years.

  4. Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 9, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO 2005)'' were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. As some of you may be aware, we at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past four years, forward natural gas contracts (e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past four years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation (presuming that long-term price stability is valued). In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2005. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or, more recently (and briefly), http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past four AEO releases (AEO 2001-AE0 2004), we once again find that the AEO 2005 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEXAEO 2005 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$1.11/MMBtu levelized over six years--that we have seen over the last five years. In other words, on average, one would have to pay $1.11/MMBtu more than the AEO 2005 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming six years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation. Fixed-price renewables obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of six years.

  5. Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 17, 2008, the reference-case projections from Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO 2009) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables can play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO reference-case gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. Note that this memo pertains only to natural gas fuel price risk (i.e., the risk that natural gas prices might differ over the life of a gas-fired generation asset from what was expected when the decision to build the gas-fired unit was made). We do not take into consideration any of the other distinct attributes of gas-fired and renewable generation, such as dispatchability (or lack thereof), differences in capital costs and O&M expenses, or environmental externalities. A comprehensive comparison of different resource types--which is well beyond the scope of this memo--would need to account for differences in all such attributes, including fuel price risk. Furthermore, our analysis focuses solely on natural-gas-fired generation (as opposed to coal-fired or nuclear generation, for example), for several reasons: (1) price volatility has been more of a concern for natural gas than for other fuels used to generate power; (2) for environmental and other reasons, natural gas has, in recent years, been the fuel of choice among power plant developers; and (3) natural gas-fired generators often set the market clearing price in competitive wholesale power markets throughout the United States. That said, a more-complete analysis of how renewables mitigate fuel price risk would also need to consider coal, uranium, and other fuel prices. Finally, we caution readers about drawing inferences or conclusions based solely on this memo in isolation: to place the information contained herein within its proper context, we strongly encourage readers interested in this issue to read through our previous, more-detailed studies, available at http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf.

  6. Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 12, 2007, the reference-case projections from Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO 2008) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables can play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO reference-case gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. Note that this memo pertains only to natural gas fuel price risk (i.e., the risk that natural gas prices might differ over the life of a gas-fired generation asset from what was expected when the decision to build the gas-fired unit was made). We do not take into consideration any of the other distinct attributes of gas-fired and renewable generation, such as dispatchability (or lack thereof) or environmental externalities. A comprehensive comparison of different resource types--which is well beyond the scope of this memo--would need to account for differences in all such attributes, including fuel price risk. Furthermore, our analysis focuses solely on natural-gas-fired generation (as opposed to coal-fired generation, for example), for several reasons: (1) price volatility has been more of a concern for natural gas than for other fuels used to generate power; (2) for environmental and other reasons, natural gas has, in recent years, been the fuel of choice among power plant developers (though its appeal has diminished somewhat as prices have increased); and (3) natural gas-fired generators often set the market clearing price in competitive wholesale power markets throughout the United States. That said, a more-complete analysis of how renewables mitigate fuel price risk would also need to consider coal and other fuel prices. Finally, we caution readers about drawing inferences or conclusions based solely on this memo in isolation: to place the information contained herein within its proper context, we strongly encourage readers interested in this issue to read through our previous, more-detailed studies, available at http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf.

  7. Estimating DEA Confidence Intervals for Canadian Urban Paratransit Agencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    focuses on performance measurement. John M. Gleason, Creighton University (jgleason's true efficiency. Second, it uses Panel Data Analysis methodology, a set of statistical procedures method of identifying and adjusting for environmental effects that has more power than conventional

  8. Subjective Risk, Confidence, and Ambiguity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traeger, Christian P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper 1103) Subjective Risk, Confidence, and Ambiguityby author(s). Subjective Risk, Con?dence, and Ambiguity ?567. Ellsberg, D. (1961), Risk, ambiguity and the savage

  9. NYMEX Futures Prices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota PriusNSR KeyNUG NUCLEARNX » NX

  10. Acceleration of the Greenland ice sheet mass loss as observed by GRACE: Confidence and sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acceleration of the Greenland ice sheet mass loss as observed by GRACE: Confidence and sensitivity: Greenland mass loss acceleration confidence intervals GRACE a b s t r a c t We examine the scale and spatial distribution of the mass change acceleration in Greenland and its statistical significance, using processed

  11. Dynamics of Confident Voting D. Volovik1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redner, Sidney

    of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA Abstract. We introduce the confident voter two substates that correspond to different confidence levels in the opinion. The basic variables

  12. Interval Linear Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy; Florentin Smarandache

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this book we use only special types of intervals and introduce the notion of different types of interval linear algebras and interval vector spaces using the intervals of the form [0, a] where the intervals are from Zn or Z+ \\cup {0} or Q+ \\cup {0} or R+ \\cup {0}. A systematic development is made starting from set interval vector spaces to group interval vector spaces. Vector spaces are taken as interval polynomials or interval matrices or just intervals over suitable sets or semigroups or groups. Main feature of this book is the authors have given over 350 examples. This book has six chapters. Chapter one is introductory in nature. Chapter two introduces the notion of set interval linear algebras of type one and two. Set fuzzy interval linear algebras and their algebras and their properties are discussed in chapter three. Chapter four introduces several types of interval linear bialgebras and bivector spaces and studies them. The possible applications are given in chapter five. Chapter six suggests nearly 110 problems of all levels.

  13. CONFIDENCE MEASURE BASED MODELADAPTATION FOR SPEAKER VERIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dupont, Stéphane

    Polytechnique de Mons ­ Multitel Research Center Avenue Copernic, 1, 7000 Mons Belgium Abstract Confidence

  14. Calibration Trumps Confidence as a Basis for Witness Credibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tenney, Elizabeth R.; MacCoun, Robert J.; Spellman, Barbara A.; Hastie, Reid

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human Behavior, 4, Calibration Trumps Confidence Hatvany,Applied Psychology, 66, Calibration Trumps Confidence Wells,Calibration Trumps Confidence Calibration Trumps Confidence

  15. Confidence Measures for Evaluating Pronunciation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Gethin; Renals, Steve

    In this paper, we investigate the use of confidence measures for the evaluation of pronunciation models and the employment of these evaluations in an automatic baseform learning process. The confidence measures and ...

  16. HERS experiment cause for confidence.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavallo, J. D.; Energy Systems

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At last April's Affordable Comfort conference, I conducted a small HERS (home energy ratings) experiment to examine the relative variability of ratings in new and older homes. The experiment grew out of discussions with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Senior Researcher Mark Ternes and EPA Energy Specialist Mia South about how good the HERS tools currently employed in the new homes market are at identifying cost-effective conservation measures in existing homes. Older homes present challenges for raters that may not generally exist in new construction. These include the absence of blueprints, the inability to interview the builder, the difficulty of identifying the operating efficiency of installed equipment, and different envelope characteristics within the home caused by partial remodels over the years. For precisely these reasons, the need for accurate ratings of older homes is acute. The efficacy of ratings in existing homes hinges on two questions: How accurate are the ratings in existing homes? and, How much does accuracy matter to the selection of conservation measures? A small experiment was organized to test the variability of ratings. Two homes were chosen to represent the very broad spectra that raters can find in the new-construction and existing-home housing stock. The new home in Park Ridge, Illinois, is typical in size and layout of the homes being built in the suburbs around Chicago. This four-bedroom, two-story house with finished basement measures slightly more than 4,000 ft{sup 2}, including the basement. The older home is located in Elgin, Illinois, and was built before 1940, probably sometime in the '20s or '30s. This two-bedroom house has a basement in which the furnace, water heater, clothes washer, and dryer are located. The raters disagreed as to whether the basement should be considered part of the conditioned space. Excluding the basement area, the house measurement approximately 1,000 ft{sup 2}. The rating process included a site visit to measure the homes features, inspection of the blueprints for the new home (none existed for the Elgin home), and a blower door test. After the raters completed their analysis, I examined the effect that the variability of ratings for the Elgin home had on choices for energy conservation measures. Although the sample was small, the results of this experiment are valuable. They may be summarized as follows: First, the ratings that different analysts estimated varied more widely for the older home than they did for the new home. Second, for the older home, the identification of cost-effective energy conservation measures was insensitive to the variation in ratings. Clearly, these findings need to be verified in further experiments. But it is noteworthy that the separate ratings of the new home were in such good agreement, and that cost-effective efficiency recommendations can be arrived at even when divergences exist in the absolute rating value. These findings also suggest that it is appropriate to have confidence in ratings as a tool for identifying cost-effective energy measures in older housing stock.

  17. Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota1Resourceloading new table

  18. Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20Year Jan Feb Mar682009 2010

  19. Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20Year Jan Feb Mar682009

  20. Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20Year Jan Feb

  1. Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400,Information Administration22)May661.Data MonthlyYearJan-15

  2. PCA-based bootstrap confidence interval tests for gene-disease association involving multiple SNPs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Qianqian; Zhao, Jinghua; Xue, Fuzhong

    2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    2005, 77:567-581. 23. Kallberg H, Padyukov L, Plenge RM, Ronnelid J, Gregersen PK, Helm-van Mil van der AHM, Toes REM, Huizinga TW, Klareskog L, Alfredsson L, et al: Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions involving HLA-DRB1, PTPN22, and smoking...

  3. Resource Allocation with Time Intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Keywords: resource allocation, proper intervals, unsplittable flow ... be positioned within a larger time interval) and call admission control, see [4] and [8] for...

  4. Surveillance test interval optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cepin, M.; Mavko, B. [Institut Jozef Stefan, Ljublijana (Slovenia)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical specifications have been developed on the bases of deterministic analyses, engineering judgment, and expert opinion. This paper introduces our risk-based approach to surveillance test interval (STI) optimization. This approach consists of three main levels. The first level is the component level, which serves as a rough estimation of the optimal STI and can be calculated analytically by a differentiating equation for mean unavailability. The second and third levels give more representative results. They take into account the results of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) calculated by a personal computer (PC) based code and are based on system unavailability at the system level and on core damage frequency at the plant level.

  5. Experimental uncertainty estimation and statistics for data having interval uncertainty.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreinovich, Vladik (Applied Biomathematics, Setauket, New York); Oberkampf, William Louis (Applied Biomathematics, Setauket, New York); Ginzburg, Lev (Applied Biomathematics, Setauket, New York); Ferson, Scott (Applied Biomathematics, Setauket, New York); Hajagos, Janos (Applied Biomathematics, Setauket, New York)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the characterization of measurements that include epistemic uncertainties in the form of intervals. It reviews the application of basic descriptive statistics to data sets which contain intervals rather than exclusively point estimates. It describes algorithms to compute various means, the median and other percentiles, variance, interquartile range, moments, confidence limits, and other important statistics and summarizes the computability of these statistics as a function of sample size and characteristics of the intervals in the data (degree of overlap, size and regularity of widths, etc.). It also reviews the prospects for analyzing such data sets with the methods of inferential statistics such as outlier detection and regressions. The report explores the tradeoff between measurement precision and sample size in statistical results that are sensitive to both. It also argues that an approach based on interval statistics could be a reasonable alternative to current standard methods for evaluating, expressing and propagating measurement uncertainties.

  6. Florida consumer confidence holds steady in May

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    . Consumer confidence held steady at 68 in May after dropping for three months since Feb. 1 when gasoline prices began shooting up, according to a new survey. But Floridians' perceptions of their own finances.8 from a revised 66 in April on worries about jobs and inflation for groceries and gasoline. The survey

  7. Random selection as a confidence building tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macarthur, Duncan W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hauck, Danielle [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langner, Diana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thron, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Morag [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Any verification measurement performed on potentially classified nuclear material must satisfy two seemingly contradictory constraints. First and foremost, no classified information can be released. At the same time, the monitoring party must have confidence in the veracity of the measurement. The first concern can be addressed by performing the measurements within the host facility using instruments under the host's control. Because the data output in this measurement scenario is also under host control, it is difficult for the monitoring party to have confidence in that data. One technique for addressing this difficulty is random selection. The concept of random selection can be thought of as four steps: (1) The host presents several 'identical' copies of a component or system to the monitor. (2) One (or more) of these copies is randomly chosen by the monitors for use in the measurement system. (3) Similarly, one or more is randomly chosen to be validated further at a later date in a monitor-controlled facility. (4) Because the two components or systems are identical, validation of the 'validation copy' is equivalent to validation of the measurement system. This procedure sounds straightforward, but effective application may be quite difficult. Although random selection is often viewed as a panacea for confidence building, the amount of confidence generated depends on the monitor's continuity of knowledge for both validation and measurement systems. In this presentation, we will discuss the random selection technique, as well as where and how this technique might be applied to generate maximum confidence. In addition, we will discuss the role of modular measurement-system design in facilitating random selection and describe a simple modular measurement system incorporating six small {sup 3}He neutron detectors and a single high-purity germanium gamma detector.

  8. Prediction Intervals in Generalized Linear Mixed Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Cheng-Hsueh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3.1. BLP Based Prediction Intervals..3.2. BP Based Prediction Intervals....4.1.1. BLP Based Prediction Interval. 4.1.2.

  9. Diagnosing Anomalous Network Performance with Confidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL; Hodson, Stephen W [ORNL; Kuehn, Jeffery A [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variability in network performance is a major obstacle in effectively analyzing the throughput of modern high performance computer systems. High performance interconnec- tion networks offer excellent best-case network latencies; how- ever, highly parallel applications running on parallel machines typically require consistently high levels of performance to adequately leverage the massive amounts of available computing power. Performance analysts have usually quantified network performance using traditional summary statistics that assume the observational data is sampled from a normal distribution. In our examinations of network performance, we have found this method of analysis often provides too little data to under- stand anomalous network performance. Our tool, Confidence, instead uses an empirically derived probability distribution to characterize network performance. In this paper we describe several instances where the Confidence toolkit allowed us to understand and diagnose network performance anomalies that we could not adequately explore with the simple summary statis- tics provided by traditional measurement tools. In particular, we examine a multi-modal performance scenario encountered with an Infiniband interconnection network and we explore the performance repeatability on the custom Cray SeaStar2 interconnection network after a set of software and driver updates.

  10. Sample sizes for confidence limits for reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darby, John L.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We recently performed an evaluation of the implications of a reduced stockpile of nuclear weapons for surveillance to support estimates of reliability. We found that one technique developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under-estimates the required sample size for systems-level testing. For a large population the discrepancy is not important, but for a small population it is important. We found that another technique used by SNL provides the correct required sample size. For systems-level testing of nuclear weapons, samples are selected without replacement, and the hypergeometric probability distribution applies. Both of the SNL techniques focus on samples without defects from sampling without replacement. We generalized the second SNL technique to cases with defects in the sample. We created a computer program in Mathematica to automate the calculation of confidence for reliability. We also evaluated sampling with replacement where the binomial probability distribution applies.

  11. Confidence measures for hybrid HMM/ANN speech recognition.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Gethin; Renals, Steve

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we introduce four acoustic confidence measures which are derived from the output of a hybrid HMM/ANN large vocabulary continuous speech recognition system. These confidence measures, based on local posterior probability estimates...

  12. High resolution time interval meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  13. Interval Computations Interval-Valued Inference in Medical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearfott, R. Baker

    CLINAID Ladislav J. Kohout and Isabel Stabile In a series of papers and a monograph [21], we have] - Clinaid. Clinaid - . c L. J. Kohout, I. Stabile, 1993 #12;Interval-Valued Inference substra- #12;90 L. J. Kohout, I. Stabile tum): 1. Diagnostic Unit (comprised of several parallel

  14. Bootstrap Prediction Intervals for Time Series /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Li

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.5 Joint Prediction intervals . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.6 Generalized Bootstrap prediction1.8.1 Bootstrap Prediction Intervals Based on Studentized

  15. Empirical Prediction Intervals for County Population Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rayer, Stefan; Smith, Stanley K.; Tayman, Jeff

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the determination and prediction of population forecastperformance of empirical prediction intervals? Table 5 shows26, 163184. Empirical Prediction Intervals for County

  16. INTERVAL METHODS IN REMOTE SENSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    INTERVAL METHODS IN REMOTE SENSING: RELIABLE SUBDIVISION OF GEOLOGICAL AREAS David D. Coblentz, G of the locations which weren't that thoroughly analyzed. 1 #12; 2 The subdivision of a geological zone TOPOGRAPHIC INFORMATION One reason for subjectivity of the geological subdivision is the fact

  17. NYMEX Coal Futures - Energy Information Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota PriusNSR KeyNUG NUCLEARNX » NX FAQ

  18. Informatively optimal levels of confidence for measurement uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David

    2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    expanded uncertainty of measurement as a historical artifact, and not as a strictly substantiated value. .... where ?o(?) = 1.5 is true for the most uncertain classification situation (50% confidence) about allowing or ..... as a power of exponent (n).

  19. Using Subjective Confidence to Improve Metacognitive Monitoring Accuracy and Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Tyler

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    USING SUBJECTIVE CONFIDENCE TO IMPROVE METACOGNITIVE MONITORING ACCURACY AND CONTROL A Dissertation by TYLER MICHAEL MILLER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Michael Miller USING SUBJECTIVE CONFIDENCE TO IMPROVE METACOGNITIVE MONITORING ACCURACY AND CONTROL A Dissertation by TYLER MICHAEL MILLER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  20. Revisiting Interval Graphs for Network Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loe, Chuan Wen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vertices of an interval graph represent intervals over a real line where overlapping intervals denote that their corresponding vertices are adjacent. This implies that the vertices are measurable by a metric and there exists a linear structure in the system. The generalization is an embedding of a graph onto a multi-dimensional Euclidean space and it was used by scientists to study the multi-relational complexity of ecology. However the research went out of fashion in the 1980s and was not revisited when Network Science recently expressed interests with multi-relational networks known as multiplexes. This paper studies interval graphs from the perspective of Network Science.

  1. Expression equivalence checking using interval analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghodrat, Mohammad Ali; Givargis, Tony; Nicolau, Alex

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Z. Zhou and W. Burleson, Equivalence checking of datapathsusing combinational equivalence for extensible processor,et al. : EXPRESSION EQUIVALENCE CHECKING USING INTERVAL

  2. Bootstrap prediction intervals for Markov processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Li; Politis, Dimitris

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and William R Schucany. Bootstrap prediction intervals forWolf and Dan Wunderli. Bootstrap joint prediction regions.intuitive to construct bootstrap procedures that run forward

  3. The effect of terrorism on public confidence : an exploratory study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, M. S.; Baldwin, T. E.; Samsa, M. E.; Ramaprasad, A.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A primary goal of terrorism is to instill a sense of fear and vulnerability in a population and to erode confidence in government and law enforcement agencies to protect citizens against future attacks. In recognition of its importance, the Department of Homeland Security includes public confidence as one of the metrics it uses to assess the consequences of terrorist attacks. Hence, several factors--including a detailed understanding of the variations in public confidence among individuals, by type of terrorist event, and as a function of time--are critical to developing this metric. In this exploratory study, a questionnaire was designed, tested, and administered to small groups of individuals to measure public confidence in the ability of federal, state, and local governments and their public safety agencies to prevent acts of terrorism. Data were collected from the groups before and after they watched mock television news broadcasts portraying a smallpox attack, a series of suicide bomber attacks, a refinery bombing, and cyber intrusions on financial institutions that resulted in identity theft and financial losses. Our findings include the following: (a) the subjects can be classified into at least three distinct groups on the basis of their baseline outlook--optimistic, pessimistic, and unaffected; (b) the subjects make discriminations in their interpretations of an event on the basis of the nature of a terrorist attack, the time horizon, and its impact; (c) the recovery of confidence after a terrorist event has an incubation period and typically does not return to its initial level in the long-term; (d) the patterns of recovery of confidence differ between the optimists and the pessimists; and (e) individuals are able to associate a monetary value with a loss or gain in confidence, and the value associated with a loss is greater than the value associated with a gain. These findings illustrate the importance the public places in their confidence in government and law enforcement and also indicate that the level of importance is clearly of a magnitude on the order of other major terrorist event consequences, such as loss of human life and impacts to the economy.

  4. Simultaneous confidence bands in curve prediction applied to load curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Simultaneous confidence bands in curve prediction applied to load curves J.M. Azais1, S. Bercu2, J, load curve. 1 Introduction In curve prediction, one is generally interested in deriving simultaneous this technique in the numerical context of load curve pre- diction: power producers like EDF, the electrical

  5. STATISTICS OF PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN TRENDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    this situation (e. g., "extRemes" package in open source statistical programming language R) Maximum likelihood1 STATISTICS OF PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN TRENDS Rick Katz Institute in Causes of Trends #12;4 (1) Introduction Extreme value analysis under stationarity -- Statistical theory

  6. Interval Arithmetic Kalman Filtering Steven Reece

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Stephen

    Interval Arithmetic Kalman Filtering Steven Reece Abstract The problem of robust estimation. The Kalman filter, which is probably the most popular modelbased data fusion method, is extended filter (BDF), is proposed which combines interval arithmetic with statistical Kalman filter estimation

  7. Calibration intervals at Bendix Kansas City

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, R.T.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The calibration interval evaluation methods and control in each calibrating department of the Bendix Corp., Kansas City Division is described, and a more detailed description of those employed in metrology is provided.

  8. Inter-Korean military confidence building after 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tae-woo, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Littlefield, Adriane C.; Vannoni, Michael Geoffrey; Sang-beom, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Koelm, Jennifer Gay; Olsen, John Norman; Myong-jin, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Sung-tack, Shin (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea)

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tensions on the Korean Peninsula remain high despite a long-term strategy by South Korea to increase inter-Korean exchanges in economics, culture, sports, and other topics. This is because the process of reconciliation has rarely extended to military and security topics and those initiatives that were negotiated have been ineffective. Bilateral interactions must include actions to reduce threats and improve confidence associated with conventional military forces (land, sea, and air) as well as nuclear, chemical, and biological activities that are applicable to developing and producing weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The purpose of this project is to develop concepts for inter-Korean confidence building measures (CBMs) for military and WMD topics that South Korea could propose to the North when conditions are right. This report describes the historical and policy context for developing security-related CBMs and presents an array of bilateral options for conventional military and WMD topics within a consistent framework. The conceptual CBMs address two scenarios: (1) improved relations where construction of a peace regime becomes a full agenda item in inter-Korean dialogue, and (2) continued tense inter-Korean relations. Some measures could be proposed in the short term under current conditions, others might be implemented in a series of steps, while some require a higher level of cooperation than currently exists. To support decision making by political leaders, this research focuses on strategies and policy options and does not include technical details.

  9. Bootstrap prediction intervals for linear, nonlinear, and nonparametric autoregressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Li; Politis, Dimitris N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    intervals in arch models: bootstrap versus parametricRomo, and Esther Ruiz. Bootstrap predictive inference for35] Jonathan J. Reeves. Bootstrap prediction intervals for

  10. Multiply Connected Topological Economics, Confidence Relation and Political Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fang Chang

    2010-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the similar formulas of the preference relation and the utility function, we propose the confidence relations and the corresponding influence functions that represent various interacting strengths of different families, cliques and systems of organization. Since they can affect products, profit and prices, etc., in an economic system, and are usually independent of economic results, therefore, the system can produce a multiply connected topological economics. If the political economy is an economy chaperoned polity, it will produce consequentially a binary economy. When the changes of the product and the influence are independent one another, they may be a node or saddle point. When the influence function large enough achieves a certain threshold value, it will form a wormhole with loss of capital. Various powers produce usually the economic wormhole and various corruptions.

  11. Single Interval Rnyi Entropy At Low Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Chen; Jie-qiang Wu

    2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we calculate the R\\'enyi entropy of one single interval on a circle at finite temperature in 2D CFT. In the low temperature limit, we expand the thermal density matrix level by level in the vacuum Verma module, and calculate the first few leading terms in $e^{-\\pi/TL}$ explicitly. On the other hand, we compute the same R\\'enyi entropy holographically. After considering the dependence of the R\\'enyi entropy on the temperature, we manage to fix the interval-independent constant terms in the classical part of holographic R\\'enyi entropy. We furthermore extend the analysis in Xi Dong's paper to higher orders and find exact agreement between the results from field theory and bulk computations in the large central charge limit. Our work provides another piece of evidence to support holographic computation of R\\'enyi entropy in AdS$_3$/CFT$_2$ correspondence, even with thermal effect.

  12. Deterministic Kalman Filtering on Semi-infinite Interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonid Faybusovich

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 28, 2011 ... Abstract: We relate a deterministic Kalman filter on semi-infinite interval to linear-

  13. GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF PIPE NETWORKS BY THE INTERVAL ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF PIPE NETWORKS. BY THE INTERVAL ANALYSIS APPROACH: THE BELGIUM NETWORK CASE. J. FRDRIC BONNANS...

  14. Quantum Statistics Basis, Thermodynamic Analogies and the Degree of Confidence for Maximum Entropy Restoration and Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soffer, Bernard H; Kikuchi, Ryoichi

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Confidence for Maximum Entropy Restoration and EstimationApril 3, 1992) The Maximum Entropy method, using physicalare discussed. Maximum Entropy (ME) estimation has been

  15. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF WORKS ON INTERVAL COMPUTATIONS PUBLISHED IN RUSSIAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearfott, R. Baker

    the The Editorial Board of "Interval Computations". The Editorial Board of the International Journal "Interval/1993 of the journal "Interval Computations". In this version we keep numbering of references. All corrections methods for the synthesis of regulators. Coll. of scien. proc.", Saratov Polytechnic Institute, Saratov

  16. Preliminaries Conserved Interval Distance between Non-trivial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blin, Guillaume

    Outline Preliminaries Results Conclusion Conserved Interval Distance between Non-trivial Genomes.Rizzi@unitn.it August the 16th Guillaume Blin, Romeo Rizzi Conserved Interval Distance between Non-trivial Genomes #12 Guillaume Blin, Romeo Rizzi Conserved Interval Distance between Non-trivial Genomes #12;Outline

  17. Frequency domain design of interval controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Wunyong

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [0. 9, 1. 1], n& C [0 1, 0. 2], dp C [1. 9, 2. 1], dg E [1. 8, 2. 0], ds C [0. 9, 1. 0]. Then we can construct a set of four Kharitonov polynomials associated with interval polynomials as follows: K?'(s) = 0. 9 + 0. 1s K?(s) = 0 9+ 0 2s K... & in Pop(s) E P(s) is found to be nrf'l(s) 0. 9s + 1. 9 rff l(g) 0. 9s + l. lss + 4. 1s 53 I 2 locus(n ? rh~SS03 Fig. 19. Stability margin of the controller in example 10 (*): Now we use the Tsypkin gl: Polyak locus to get stability margin...

  18. Measurable Maximal Energy and Minimal Time Interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eiman Abou El Dahab; Abdel Nasser Tawfik

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of finding the measurable maximal energy and the minimal time interval is discussed in different quantum aspects. It is found that the linear generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) approach gives a non-physical result. Based on large scale Schwarzshild solution, the quadratic GUP approach is utilized. The calculations are performed at the shortest distance, at which the general relativity is assumed to be a good approximation for the quantum gravity and at larger distances, as well. It is found that both maximal energy and minimal time have the order of the Planck time. Then, the uncertainties in both quantities are accordingly bounded. Some physical insights are addressed. Also, the implications on the physics of early Universe and on quantized mass are outlined. The results are related to the existence of finite cosmological constant and minimum mass (mass quanta).

  19. Volatility return intervals analysis of the Japanese market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Woo-Sung; Havlin, Shlomo; Kaizoji, Taisei; Moon, Hie-Tae; Stanley, H Eugene

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate scaling and memory effects in return intervals between price volatilities above a certain threshold $q$ for the Japanese stock market using daily and intraday data sets. We find that the distribution of return intervals can be approximated by a scaling function that depends only on the ratio between the return interval $\\tau$ and its mean $$. We also find memory effects such that a large (or small) return interval follows a large (or small) interval by investigating the conditional distribution and mean return interval. The results are similar to previous studies of other markets and indicate that similar statistical features appear in different financial markets. We also compare our results between the period before and after the big crash at the end of 1989. We find that scaling and memory effects of the return intervals show similar features although the statistical properties of the returns are different.

  20. Confidence Valuation in a Public-Key Infrastructure based on Uncertain Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer, Ueli

    Confidence Valuation in a Public-Key Infrastructure based on Uncertain Evidence Reto Kohlas Ueli an uncertain piece of evidence and have proposed ad hoc methods, sometimes referred to as trust management and the valuation of confidence values in the general context of reasoning based on uncertain evidence. Second, we

  1. Confidence Valuation in a PublicKey Infrastructure based on Uncertain Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer, Ueli

    Confidence Valuation in a PublicKey Infrastructure based on Uncertain Evidence Reto Kohlas Ueli an uncertain piece of evidence and have proposed ad hoc methods, sometimes referred to as trust management and the valuation of confidence values in the general context of reasoning based on uncertain evidence. Second, we

  2. Role of IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) safeguards in confidence building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustson, R.H.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, I will examine some attributes of confidence building and connect them with how the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) interacts with its member states in carrying out its safeguards function. These interactions and the structure set up to define them help maintain and strengthen confidence between the IAEA and the member states and among these states. 3 refs.

  3. Hydrologic studies in wells open through large intervals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes and summarizes activities, data, and preliminary data interpretation from the INEL Oversight Program R D-1 project titled Hydrologic Studies In Wells Open Through Large Intervals.'' The project is designed to use a straddle-packer system to isolate, hydraulically test, and sample specific intervals of monitoring wells that are open (uncased, unscreened) over large intervals of the Snake River Plain aquifer. The objectives of the project are to determine and compare vertical variations in water quality and aquifer properties that have previously only been determined in an integrated fashion over the entire thickness of the open interval of the observation wells.

  4. Report of the First Confidence Building Exercise For Biomedical Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H

    2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We participated in the first exercise to build confidence in the analysis of biomedical samples for trace levels of CW agents and/or their degradation, reaction or metabolites.

  5. Dynamics of Confident Voting D. Volovik 1 and S. Redner 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redner, Sidney

    and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA Abstract. We introduce two substates that correspond to di#erent confidence levels in the opinion. The basic variables

  6. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/18: Maritime Cooperation Between India and Pakistan: Building Confidence at Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIDDIQA-AGHA,AYESHA

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses ways in which the navies of both India and Pakistan can cooperate on issues of maritime and naval significance. Although the militaries and navies of the two countries have traditionally seen each other as rivals, international economic developments make cooperation imperative. South Asia requires an approach that can alter the existing hostile images and perceptions. This can be achieved through developing an incremental approach towards confidence building that would allow consistency and help build confidence gradually. The aim is to make confidence building a sustainable activity that would help transform hostile images and build cooperative and nonhostile relationships. This paper proposes a five-step model to suggest what the two navies can do jointly to build confidence, with the ultimate goal of naval arms control. The steps include (1) the Signaling Stage to initiate communication between the two navies, (2) the Warming-Up Stage to build confidence through nonmilitary joint ventures, (3) the Handshake Stage to build confidence between the two navies through military joint ventures, (4) the Problem-Solving Stage to resolve outstanding disputes, and (5) the Final Nod Stage to initiate naval arms control. This model would employ communication, navigation, and remote sensing technologies to achieve success.

  7. MODELLING OF HEAT TRANSFER IN BIOLOGICAL TISSUE BY INTERVAL FEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pownuk, Andrzej

    and the comparison operators and some collection of standard transcendental functions (like sin, cos, power, etc of real function, one can transform system of linear equation into system of linear interval equation K value, one can use interval global optimization [39] or other global optimization method (solon

  8. Scaling and memory in volatility return intervals in financial markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    markets, we study the return intervals between the daily volatilities of the price changes that are above.federal- reserve.gov releases H10 hist. We choose to study daily data records because there are intraday trendsScaling and memory in volatility return intervals in financial markets Kazuko Yamasaki* , Lev

  9. Horizontal velocities in the central and eastern United States from GPS surveys during the 1987-1996 interval

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snay, R.A.; Strange, W.E.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Geodetic Survey and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission jointly organized GPS surveys in 1987, 1990, 1993, and 1996 to search for crustal deformation in the central and eastern United States (east of longitude 108{degrees}W). We have analyzed the data of these four surveys in combination with VLBI data observed during the 1979-1995 interval and GPS data for 22 additional surveys observed during the 1990-1996 interval. These latter GPS surveys served to establish accurately positioned geodetic marks in various states. Accordingly, we have computed horizontal velocities for 64 GPS sites and 12 VLBI sites relative to a reference frame for which the interior of the North American plate is considered fixed on average. None of our derived velocities exceeds 6 mm/yr in magnitude. Moreover, the derived velocity at each GPS site is statistically zero at the 95% confidence level except for the site BOLTON in central Ohio and the site BEARTOWN in southeastern Pennsylvania. However, as statistical theory would allow approximately 5% of the 64 GPS sites to fall our zero-velocity hypothesis, we are uncertain whether or not these estimated velocities for BOLTON and BEARTOWN reflect actual motion relative to the North American plate. We also computed horizontal strain rates for the cells formed by a 1{degrees} by 1{degrees} grid spanning the central and eastern United States. Corresponding shearing rates are everywhere less than 60 nanoradians/yr in magnitude, and no shearing rate differs statistically from zero at the 95% confidence level except for a grid cell near BEARTOWN whose rate is 57 {+-} 26 nanoradians/yr. Also corresponding areal dilatation rates are everywhere less than 40 nanostrain/yr in magnitude, and no dilatation rate differs statistically from zero at the 95% confidence level.

  10. Method and system for assigning a confidence metric for automated determination of optic disc location

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karnowski, Thomas P. (Knoxville, TN); Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN); Muthusamy Govindasamy, Vijaya Priya (Knoxville, TN); Chaum, Edward (Memphis, TN)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for assigning a confidence metric for automated determination of optic disc location that includes analyzing a retinal image and determining at least two sets of coordinates locating an optic disc in the retinal image. The sets of coordinates can be determined using first and second image analysis techniques that are different from one another. An accuracy parameter can be calculated and compared to a primary risk cut-off value. A high confidence level can be assigned to the retinal image if the accuracy parameter is less than the primary risk cut-off value and a low confidence level can be assigned to the retinal image if the accuracy parameter is greater than the primary risk cut-off value. The primary risk cut-off value being selected to represent an acceptable risk of misdiagnosis of a disease having retinal manifestations by the automated technique.

  11. Approach and development strategy for an agent-based model of economic confidence.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprigg, James A.; Pryor, Richard J.; Jorgensen, Craig Reed

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are extending the existing features of Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool, and introducing new features to simulate the role of confidence in economic activity. The new model is built from a collection of autonomous agents that represent households, firms, and other relevant entities like financial exchanges and governmental authorities. We simultaneously model several interrelated markets, including those for labor, products, stocks, and bonds. We also model economic tradeoffs, such as decisions of households and firms regarding spending, savings, and investment. In this paper, we review some of the basic principles and model components and describe our approach and development strategy for emulating consumer, investor, and business confidence. The model of confidence is explored within the context of economic disruptions, such as those resulting from disasters or terrorist events.

  12. Differences in radar derived rainfall amounts due to sampling intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zdenek, David James

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DIFFERENCES IN RADAR DERIVED RAINFALL AMOUNTS DUE TO SAMPLING INTERVALS A Thesis by DAVID JAMES ZDENEK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1986 Major Subject: Meteorology DIFFERENCES IN RADAR DERIVED RAINFALL AMOUNTS DUE TO SAMPLING INTERVALS A Thesis by DAVID JAMES ZDENEK Approved as to style and content by: eorge L. Huebner (Chairman of Committee) CP~ CG~& Robert C...

  13. The committee says that although public confidence in agriculture is at an all-time low

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    The committee says that although public confidence in agriculture is at an all-time low out that civil departments, such as the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF million research programme. Peter Rosen, head of the high energy and nuclear physics office

  14. Using Classification to Evaluate the Output of Confidence-Based Association Rule Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Eibe

    Using Classification to Evaluate the Output of Confidence-Based Association Rule Mining Stefan, New Zealand {mhall, eibe}@cs.waikato.ac.nz Abstract. Association rule mining is a data mining concerning both running time and size of rule sets. 1 Introduction Association rule mining is a widely

  15. Using Classification to Evaluate the Output of ConfidenceBased Association Rule Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Eibe

    Using Classification to Evaluate the Output of ConfidenceBased Association Rule Mining Stefan Hamilton, New Zealand {mhall, eibe}@cs.waikato.ac.nz Abstract. Association rule mining is a data mining concerning both running time and size of rule sets. 1 Introduction Association rule mining is a widely

  16. Confidence Levels for CVaR Risk Measures and Minimax Limits*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Page 1 ... In practice it may not be easy to determine what value of confidence level should be .... Now we find that as ? approaches 1 the problem approaches the ...... argument of this formulation can be explained as follows: we don't know the.

  17. Profile-Supported Confidence Estimation for Load-Value-Prediction Martin Burtscher and Benjamin G. Zorn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burtscher, Martin

    Profile-Supported Confidence Estimation for Load-Value-Prediction Martin Burtscher and Benjamin G}@cs.colorado.edu Abstract Due to their occasional very long latency, load instruc- tions are among the slowest instructions the execution of its dependent instructions, which can significantly affect system performance. Load value

  18. A Component-Based Approach for Constructing High-confidence Distributed Real-time and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuceryan, Mihran

    the entire software life-cycle. 1 Introduction As the complexity of Distributed Real-Time Embedded (DRE development cost, but also facilitate high-confidence DRE system construction using different formalisms over implementations of the same functional component with different run-time features (e.g., battery consumption

  19. A Component-Based Approach for Constructing High-Confidence Distributed Real-Time and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey G.

    the entire software life-cycle. 1 Introduction As the complexity of Distributed Real-Time Embedded (DRE development cost, but also facilitate high-confidence DRE system construction using different formalisms over with different run-time features (e.g., battery consumption versus throughput). Addition- ally, two components

  20. Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in tropical algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchener, Paul

    Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in tropical algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in fuzzy algebra Tolerance interval eigenvectors in tropical and fuzzy algebra Martin Workshop Birmingham, May 16, 2013 #12;Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance

  1. Interval estimation in calibration problems: an alternate approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quaino, Oscar Rodolfo

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    measurement of the dependent varia- ble. This interval will depend upon the dependent variable and also on the outcome of the calibration experiment. For each unknown a state- ment is made in the sense that it belongs to the interval. Then he searches... is computed as 2 n , 1(yi ? y) Ss n ? 2 and will also be denoted by NSE. (2. 2) In the calibration problem, the classical estimator of x* given an obsezvation y* is y* ? b 0 x* bl Under the normality assumption x" is the NLE of x* (Graybill 1976...

  2. Interval estimation in calibration problems: an alternate approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quaino, Oscar Rodolfo

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    measurement of the dependent varia- ble. This interval will depend upon the dependent variable and also on the outcome of the calibration experiment. For each unknown a state- ment is made in the sense that it belongs to the interval. Then he searches... is computed as 2 n , 1(yi ? y) Ss n ? 2 and will also be denoted by NSE. (2. 2) In the calibration problem, the classical estimator of x* given an obsezvation y* is y* ? b 0 x* bl Under the normality assumption x" is the NLE of x* (Graybill 1976...

  3. Scenario development for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Building confidence in the assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galson, D.A. [Galson Sciences Limited, (United Kingdom); Swift, P.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scenario developments is part of the iterative performance assessment (PA) process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Scenario development for the WIPP has been the subject of intense external review, and is certain to be the subject of continued scrutiny as the project proceeds toward regulatory compliance. The principal means of increasing confidence is this aspect of the PA will be through the use of a systematic and thorough procedure toward developing the scenarios and conceptual models on which the assessment is to be based. Early and ongoing interaction with project reviewers can assist with confidence building. Quality of argument and clarity of presentation in PA will be of key concern. Appropriate tools are required for documenting and tracking assumptions, through a single assessment phase, and between iterative assessment phases. Risks associated with future human actions are of particular concern to the WIPP project, and international consensus on the principles for incorporation of future human actions in assessments would be valuable.

  4. On the Dynamics of Total Preorders: Revising Abstract Interval Orders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Tommie

    of iterated belief revision [5­7]. In the problem of belief set revision, the tpo can be thought of as extraOn the Dynamics of Total Preorders: Revising Abstract Interval Orders Richard Booth1 and Thomas) are often used in belief revision to encode an agent's strategy for revising its belief set in response

  5. Use of Utility Interval Meters in an Industrial Energy Audit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a unique approach to an energy audit of a large tank farm. The audit was unusual in that it was located out-of-doors and the energy-using equipment was made up almost entirely of pumps. The auditors used the utility interval...

  6. Towards Reliable SubDivision of Geological Areas: Interval Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Towards Reliable SubDivision of Geological Areas: Interval Approach David D. Coblentz 1;2 , Vladik difficult to produce a reliable subdivision. The subdivision of a geological zone into segments is often, and often, we do not have a statistically sufficient amount of thoroughly analyzed geological samples

  7. Towards Reliable SubDivision of Geological Areas: Interval Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Towards Reliable SubDivision of Geological Areas: Interval Approach David D. Coblentz 1;2 , Vladik Difficult to Produce a Reliable Subdivision The subdivision of a geological zone into segments is often the area, and often, we do not have a statistically sufficient amount of thoroughly analyzed geological

  8. Proton aurora related to intervals of pulsations of diminishing periods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Proton aurora related to intervals of pulsations of diminishing periods A. G. Yahnin,1 T. A are generated because of a cyclotron instability of the anisotropic distribution of ring current ions. Proton precipitation produced by the cyclotron instability can be responsible for proton aurora. Indeed

  9. Neurocomputing 6566 (2005) 371378 Energy-efficient interspike interval codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, William B.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neurocomputing 6566 (2005) 371378 Energy-efficient interspike interval codes Patrick Crotty making it possible to determine whether the information processing is at an energy-efficient optimum between successive spikes. We compare the frequency and energy-efficiency results to those obtained

  10. Range Sidelobe Suppression in a Desired Doppler Interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pezeshki, Ali

    is sensitive to Doppler effect. Off the zero- Doppler axis the ambiguity function of Golay pairs of phase codedRange Sidelobe Suppression in a Desired Doppler Interval Yuejie Chi,1 Ali Pezeshki,2 Robert--We present a novel method of constructing a Doppler resilient pulse train of Golay complementary waveforms

  11. Towards Adding Probabilities and Correlations to Interval Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    or impossible to measure directly. Examples of such quantities are the distance to a star and the amount of oil the interval of possible values of the desired quantity. For example, if we did not detect any pollution, the pollution value v can be anywhere between 0 and the sensor's detection limit DL. In other words, the only

  12. Comparing Bacterial Genomes by Searching their Common Intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fertin, Guillaume

    Comparing Bacterial Genomes by Searching their Common Intervals S´ebastien Angibaud, Damien. Comparing bacterial genomes implies the use of a dedicated measure. It relies on comparing circular genomes genomes that takes into account duplications. Its application on a concrete case, comparing E. coli and V

  13. Interval Finite Element Methods: New Directions Rafi Muhanna1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Interval Finite Element Methods: New Directions Rafi Muhanna1 , Vladik Kreinovich2 , Pavel Sol´in2 advanced numerical methods to tackle these problems, such as finite element methods (FEM). Lately, new advanced version of these methods have appeared, such as hierarchic higher-order finite element methods (hp

  14. GMM Estimation of a Maximum Entropy Distribution with Interval Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    GMM Estimation of a Maximum Entropy Distribution with Interval Data Ximing Wu* and Jeffrey M estimate it using a simple yet flexible maximum entropy density. Our Monte Carlo simulations show that the proposed maximum entropy density is able to approximate various distributions extremely well. The two

  15. Single Interval R\\'enyi Entropy At Low Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Bin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we calculate the R\\'enyi entropy of one single interval on a circle at finite temperature in 2D CFT. In the low temperature limit, we expand the thermal density matrix level by level in the vacuum Verma module, and calculate the first few leading terms in $e^{-\\pi/TL}$ explicitly. On the other hand, we compute the same R\\'enyi entropy holographically. After considering the dependence of the R\\'enyi entropy on the temperature, we manage to fix the interval-independent constant terms in the classical part of holographic R\\'enyi entropy. We furthermore extend the analysis in Xi Dong's paper to higher orders and find exact agreement between the results from field theory and bulk computations in the large central charge limit. Our work provides another piece of evidence to support holographic computation of R\\'enyi entropy in AdS$_3$/CFT$_2$ correspondence, even with thermal effect.

  16. Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAM Revised DOEDepartment ofFossilFredFrequent-Interval

  17. Earning public trust and confidence: Requisites for managing radioactive wastes. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Task Force on Radioactive Waste Management was created in April 1991 by former Secretary James D. Watkins, who asked the group to analyze the critical institutional question of how the Department of Energy (DOE) might strengthen public trust and confidence in the civilian radioactive waste management program. The panel met eight times over a period of 27 months and heard formal presentations from nearly 100 representatives of state and local governments, non-governmental organizations, and senior DOE Headquarters and Field Office managers. The group also commissioned a variety of studies from independent experts, contracted with the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Public Administration to hold workshops on designing and leading trust-evoking organizations, and carried out one survey of parties affected by the Department`s radioactive waste management activities and a second one of DOE employees and contractors.

  18. Confidence building measures at sea:opportunities for India and Pakistan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vohra, Ravi Bhushan Rear Admiral (; ); Ansari, Hasan Masood Rear Admiral (; )

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sea presents unique possibilities for implementing confidence building measures (CBMs) between India and Pakistan that are currently not available along the contentious land borders surrounding Jammu and Kashmir. This is due to the nature of maritime issues, the common military culture of naval forces, and a less contentious history of maritime interaction between the two nations. Maritime issues of mutual concern provide a strong foundation for more far-reaching future CBMs on land, while addressing pressing security, economic, and humanitarian needs at sea in the near-term. Although Indian and Pakistani maritime forces currently have stronger opportunities to cooperate with one another than their counterparts on land, reliable mechanisms to alleviate tension or promote operational coordination remain non-existent. Therefore, possible maritime CBMs, as well as pragmatic mechanisms to initiate and sustain cooperation, require serious examination. This report reflects the unique joint research undertaking of two retired Senior Naval Officers from both India and Pakistan, sponsored by the Cooperative Monitoring Center of the International Security Center at Sandia National Laboratories. Research focuses on technology as a valuable tool to facilitate confidence building between states having a low level of initial trust. Technical CBMs not only increase transparency, but also provide standardized, scientific means of interacting on politically difficult problems. Admirals Vohra and Ansari introduce technology as a mechanism to facilitate consistent forms of cooperation and initiate discussion in the maritime realm. They present technical CBMs capable of being acted upon as well as high-level political recommendations regarding the following issues: (1) Delimitation of the maritime boundary between India and Pakistan and its relationship to the Sir Creek dispute; (2) Restoration of full shipping links and the security of ports and cargos; (3) Fishing within disputed areas and resolution of issues relating to arrest and repatriation of fishermen from both sides; and (4) Naval and maritime agency interaction and possibilities for cooperation.

  19. Parametric Bootstrap Interval Approach to Inference for Fixed Effects in the Mixed Linear Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staggs, Vincent

    2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    approximation of the test statistic distribution by some known distribution, and may not perform well under small samples. The parametric bootstrap interval is presented as an alternative to standard methods of inference. Several parametric bootstrap intervals...

  20. Scar sarcoidosis with a 50-year interval between an accident and onset of lesions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jr, Hiram Larangeira de Almeida; Fiss, Roberto Coswig

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    year interval between an accident and onset of lesions Hiramreported in scars of accidents [ 2 ], herpes zoster [ 1 ],

  1. On the need and use of models to explore the role of economic confidence:a survey.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprigg, James A.; Paez, Paul J. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Hand, Michael S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Empirical studies suggest that consumption is more sensitive to current income than suggested under the permanent income hypothesis, which raises questions regarding expectations for future income, risk aversion, and the role of economic confidence measures. This report surveys a body of fundamental economic literature as well as burgeoning computational modeling methods to support efforts to better anticipate cascading economic responses to terrorist threats and attacks. This is a three part survey to support the incorporation of models of economic confidence into agent-based microeconomic simulations. We first review broad underlying economic principles related to this topic. We then review the economic principle of confidence and related empirical studies. Finally, we provide a brief survey of efforts and publications related to agent-based economic simulation.

  2. The effects of two situational variables on the self-confidence of males and females in achievement settings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Susan Marilyn Hartman

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - ~uivocal feedback on individuals' abilities, women do not have lower self-confidence than men. Feather and. Simon (1971) found no sex differences in conf1dence of passing a subsequent anagruns test when the subjects had been given feedback in the form oi..., 94 ) I ? 5. 28, yg . 01. A Scheffe's comparison of means revealed that subjects who were given clear feedback were significantly more conf1dent in same-sex competition (X= 4. 26) and less confident in oppos1te-sex competition (X= 2. 71), g g . 05...

  3. The effects of two situational variables on the self-confidence of males and females in achievement settings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Susan Marilyn Hartman

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - ~uivocal feedback on individuals' abilities, women do not have lower self-confidence than men. Feather and. Simon (1971) found no sex differences in conf1dence of passing a subsequent anagruns test when the subjects had been given feedback in the form oi..., 94 ) I ? 5. 28, yg . 01. A Scheffe's comparison of means revealed that subjects who were given clear feedback were significantly more conf1dent in same-sex competition (X= 4. 26) and less confident in oppos1te-sex competition (X= 2. 71), g g . 05...

  4. Extending Sensor Calibration Intervals in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Shumaker, Brent; Hashemian, Hash

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently in the USA, sensor recalibration is required at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in UK, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors which require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors which need it. The US NRC accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This project addresses key issues in advanced recalibration methodologies and provides the science base to enable adoption of best practices for applying online monitoring, resulting in a public domain standardized methodology for sensor calibration interval extension. Research to develop this methodology will focus on three key areas: (1) quantification of uncertainty in modeling techniques used for calibration monitoring, with a particular focus on non-redundant sensor models; (2) accurate determination of acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and (3) the use of virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity.

  5. A.Ferrand Conferencia Facultad de Ciencias Polticas y Sociologa, Madrid, Avril 2004 1 RELATIONS SOCIALE, SECRET, CONFIDENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    SOCIALE, SECRET, CONFIDENCES Confrence prsente le Mardi 20 Avril 2004 la Facultad de Ciencias relationnelles influencent leur capacit ne pas transmettre de l'information, c'est--dire crer du secret (Simmel, 1906 ; Petitat, 1998). 1.2 LA GENERALITE ET L'IMPORTANCE DU SECRET COMME ENJEU SOCIAL Le secret

  6. Multi-target Linear-quadratic control problem: semi-infinite interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider multi-target linear-quadratic control problem on semi- infinite interval. We show that the problem can be reduced to a simple convex optimization...

  7. Multi-target Linear-quadratic control problem: semi-infinite interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Faybusovich

    2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 12, 2011 ... Multi-target Linear-quadratic control problem: semi-infinite interval. L. Faybusovich (leonid.faybusovich.1 ***at*** nd.edu) T Mouktonglang...

  8. Hydrologic studies in wells open through large intervals. Annual report, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes and summarizes activities, data, and preliminary data interpretation from the INEL Oversight Program R&D-1 project titled ``Hydrologic Studies In Wells Open Through Large Intervals.`` The project is designed to use a straddle-packer system to isolate, hydraulically test, and sample specific intervals of monitoring wells that are open (uncased, unscreened) over large intervals of the Snake River Plain aquifer. The objectives of the project are to determine and compare vertical variations in water quality and aquifer properties that have previously only been determined in an integrated fashion over the entire thickness of the open interval of the observation wells.

  9. Effects of perceptual load on startle reflex modification at a long lead interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of perceptual load on startle reflex modification at a long lead interval GARY L. THORNE Abstract Inhibition of the startle eyeblink response at long lead intervals has been hypothesized to occur the lead and startle stimuli are in different modalities under conditions of high perceptual load

  10. Scaling and memory of intraday volatility return intervals in stock markets Fengzhong Wang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    Scaling and memory of intraday volatility return intervals in stock markets Fengzhong Wang,1 Kazuko interval between price volatilities that are above a certain threshold q for 31 intraday data sets Yamasaki,1,2 Shlomo Havlin,1,3 and H. Eugene Stanley1 1 Center for Polymer Studies and Department

  11. 286 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTERS, VOL. 44, NO. 2. FEBRUARY 1995 Interval Availability Analysis Using Denumerable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sericola, Bruno

    286 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTERS, VOL. 44, NO. 2. FEBRUARY 1995 Interval Availability Analysis Gerard0 Rubino and Bruno Sericola Abstiact-Interval availability is a dependability measure de- fined availability level is high enough. The system is assumed to be modeled as a Markov process with countable state

  12. Convergence Properties of an Interval Probabilistic Approach to System Reliability Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    by the values of the corresponding parameters x = x(1), x(2), . . . , x(n) ; for example, for a nuclear reactor, interval analysis, reliability analysis, Dempster-Shafer evidence theory, random sets, random intervals of these parameters, the system exhibits certain characteristics y = y(1), y(2), . . . , y(m) ; e.g., for a nuclear

  13. LYAPUNOV AND SACKER-SELL SPECTRAL INTERVALS LUCA DIECI AND ERIK S. VAN VLECK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Vleck, Erik S.

    LYAPUNOV AND SACKER-SELL SPECTRAL INTERVALS LUCA DIECI AND ERIK S. VAN VLECK Abstract­ the Lyapunov spectral intervals. Since any bounded and continuous coeficient matrix function can be smoothly/or continuous Lyapunov spectrum. Key words. Exponential dichotomy, Sacker-Sell spectrum, Lyapunov exponents

  14. Confidence building on the Korean Peninsula: A conceptual development for the cooperative monitoring of limited-force deployment zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vannoni, M.; Duggan, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Cooperative Monitoring Center; Nam, M.K.; Moon, K.K.; Kim, M.J. [Korea Inst. for Defense Analyses, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Arms Control Research Center

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Confidence building measures (CBMs), particularly military ones, that address the security needs of North and South Korea could decrease the risk of conflict on the Korean Peninsula and help create an environment in which to negotiate a peace regime. The Korea Institute for Defense Analyses (KIDA) and the Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) of Sandia National Laboratories collaborated to identify potential CBMs and define associated monitoring. The project is a conceptual analysis of political and technical options for confidence building that might be feasible in Korea at some future time. KIDA first analyzed current security conditions and options for CBMs. Their conclusions are presented as a hypothetical agreement to strengthen the Armistice Agreement by establishing Limited Force Deployment Zones along the Military Demarcation Line. The goal of the hypothetical agreement is to increase mutual security and build confidence. The CMC then used KIDA`s scenario to develop a strategy for cooperative monitoring the agreement. Cooperative monitoring is the collecting, analyzing and sharing of agreed information among parties to an agreement and typically relies on the use of commercially available technology. A cooperative monitoring regime must be consistent with the agreement`s terms; the geographic, logistic, military, and political factors in the Korean setting; and the capabilities of monitoring technologies. This report describes the security situation on the Korean peninsula, relevant precedents from other regions, the hypothetical agreement for reducing military tensions, a monitoring strategy for the hypothetical Korean agreement, examples of implementation, and a description of applicable monitoring technologies and procedures.

  15. AUSTRALIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE-IN-CONFIDENCE The closing date for nomination of a Candidate for Ordinary Election is 31 July each year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kheifets, Anatoli

    AUSTRALIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE-IN-CONFIDENCE The closing date for nomination of a Candidate for Ordinary Election is 31 July each year Page 1 Certificate revision June 2014 AUSTRALIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE will not be circulated by the candidate #12;AUSTRALIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE-IN-CONFIDENCE The closing date for nomination

  16. Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as opposed to coal-fired generation, for example), forprojects much more coal-fired generation (and consequently

  17. Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Energy Information Administrations (EIA) web site. Wein the past, compared the EIAs reference-case long-termfuel price projection from the EIA or some other long-term

  18. Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Energy Information Administrations (EIA) web site. Wein the past, compared the EIAs reference-case long-termfuel price projection from the EIA or some other long-term

  19. Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Energy Information Administrations (EIA) web site. Wein the past, compared the EIAs reference-case long-termfuel price projection from the EIA or some other long-term

  20. Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Energy Information Administrations (EIA) web site. Wein the past, compared the EIAs reference case long-termgas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded

  1. Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas Price Forecast With natural gas prices significantlyto the EIAs natural gas price forecasts in AEO 2004 and AEOon the AEO 2005 natural gas price forecasts will likely once

  2. Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 2 for 5-year price projections), the EIA has, in AEOgenerators to the same price projections from AEO 2001-2006.Strip to AEO 2007 Gas Price Projection Picking the Correct

  3. Comparison of AEO 2010 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    range of different plausible price projections, using eitherreference-case fuel price projection from the EIA or someprices and the AEO gas price projections over the past two

  4. Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    range of different plausible price projections, using eitherreference-case fuel price projection from the EIA or someHenry Hub to the same price projections from AEO 2007-2008.

  5. Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to electricity generators to the same price projections fromPrices Delivered to Electricity Generators, Nominal $/MMBtu Each AEO projection

  6. Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to electricity generators to the same price projections fromPrices Delivered to Electricity Generators, Nominal $/MMBtu Each AEO projection

  7. NYMEX Central Appalachian coal futures near-month contract final settlement

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400,Information Administration22)May661. NOIlVdlSINIWGprice

  8. Computing Best Possible Pseudo-Solutions to Interval Linear Systems of Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearfott, R. Baker

    . Panyukov South Ural State University, Chelyabinsk, Russia a_panyukov@mail.ru Valentin A. Golodov South Ural State University, Chelyabinsk, Russia avaksa@gmail.com Abstract In the paper, we consider interval

  9. Fast Algorithms for Computing Statistics Under Interval and Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Their Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    engineering applications, we are interested in computing statistics. For example, in environmental analysis, a reasonable statistic for estimating the mean value of a probability distribution is the population average EFast Algorithms for Computing Statistics Under Interval and Fuzzy Uncertainty

  10. The maximum time interval of time-lapse photography for monitoring construction operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Ji Won

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and productivity. In order to accomplish the research goal, brickwork of five different construction sites was videotaped. Various interval time-lapse photographs were generated from each video. Worker?s activity in these photographs was examined and graded...

  11. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xinchen

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate ...

  12. Adult Age Differences in the Forgetting of Verbal Material Over Extended Time Intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Selliers, Sophie

    2009-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    . The role of semantic organization on forgetting rates was also examined. Rate of forgetting was measured as a percentage of words initially recalled, at time intervals of 30 minutes, 24 hours, and seven days. Results showed that older participants forgot...

  13. Case Studies in Using Whole Building Interval Data to Determine Annualized Electrical Savings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effinger, M.; Anthony, J.; Webster, L.

    1 Copyright ? 2005 by ASME CASE STUDIES IN USING WHOLE BUILDING INTERVAL DATA TO DETERMINE ANNUALIZED ELECTRICAL SAVINGS Mark Effinger James Anthony Lia Webster Engineer Engineer Senior Engineer Portland Energy Conservation, Inc... Portland, OR USA ABSTRACT Whole building interval analysis to determine savings from energy reduction measures is addressed in several guidelines. The whole building method has typically focused on measured savings where baseline regression...

  14. Calculating Confidence, Uncertainty, and Numbers of Samples When Using Statistical Sampling Approaches to Characterize and Clear Contaminated Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Matzke, Brett D.; Sego, Landon H.; Amidan, Brett G.

    2013-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the methodology, formulas, and inputs needed to make characterization and clearance decisions for Bacillus anthracis-contaminated and uncontaminated (or decontaminated) areas using a statistical sampling approach. Specifically, the report includes the methods and formulas for calculating the number of samples required to achieve a specified confidence in characterization and clearance decisions confidence in making characterization and clearance decisions for a specified number of samples for two common statistically based environmental sampling approaches. In particular, the report addresses an issue raised by the Government Accountability Office by providing methods and formulas to calculate the confidence that a decision area is uncontaminated (or successfully decontaminated) if all samples collected according to a statistical sampling approach have negative results. Key to addressing this topic is the probability that an individual sample result is a false negative, which is commonly referred to as the false negative rate (FNR). The two statistical sampling approaches currently discussed in this report are 1) hotspot sampling to detect small isolated contaminated locations during the characterization phase, and 2) combined judgment and random (CJR) sampling during the clearance phase. Typically if contamination is widely distributed in a decision area, it will be detectable via judgment sampling during the characterization phrase. Hotspot sampling is appropriate for characterization situations where contamination is not widely distributed and may not be detected by judgment sampling. CJR sampling is appropriate during the clearance phase when it is desired to augment judgment samples with statistical (random) samples. The hotspot and CJR statistical sampling approaches are discussed in the report for four situations: 1. qualitative data (detect and non-detect) when the FNR = 0 or when using statistical sampling methods that account for FNR > 0 2. qualitative data when the FNR > 0 but statistical sampling methods are used that assume the FNR = 0 3. quantitative data (e.g., contaminant concentrations expressed as CFU/cm2) when the FNR = 0 or when using statistical sampling methods that account for FNR > 0 4. quantitative data when the FNR > 0 but statistical sampling methods are used that assume the FNR = 0. For Situation 2, the hotspot sampling approach provides for stating with Z% confidence that a hotspot of specified shape and size with detectable contamination will be found. Also for Situation 2, the CJR approach provides for stating with X% confidence that at least Y% of the decision area does not contain detectable contamination. Forms of these statements for the other three situations are discussed in Section 2.2. Statistical methods that account for FNR > 0 currently only exist for the hotspot sampling approach with qualitative data (or quantitative data converted to qualitative data). This report documents the current status of methods and formulas for the hotspot and CJR sampling approaches. Limitations of these methods are identified. Extensions of the methods that are applicable when FNR = 0 to account for FNR > 0, or to address other limitations, will be documented in future revisions of this report if future funding supports the development of such extensions. For quantitative data, this report also presents statistical methods and formulas for 1. quantifying the uncertainty in measured sample results 2. estimating the true surface concentration corresponding to a surface sample 3. quantifying the uncertainty of the estimate of the true surface concentration. All of the methods and formulas discussed in the report were applied to example situations to illustrate application of the methods and interpretation of the results.

  15. A Comparison of Education, Business, and Engineering Undergraduate Students Internet Use and their Experience, Confidence, and Competence in Using New Literacies of the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Su Yeon

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This study explored beginning and advanced pre-service teachers Internet use and their experience, confidence, and competence in using new literacies of the Internet. In addition, this study compared the pre-service teachers to same-aged business...

  16. Interval to Biochemical Failure Predicts Clinical Outcomes in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated by Combined-Modality Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shilkrut, Mark; McLaughlin, P. William [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Merrick, Gregory S. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States)] [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To validate the prognostic value of interval to biochemical failure (IBF) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (HiRPCa) treated with combined-modality radiation therapy (CMRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of HiRPCa (prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL, Gleason score [GS] 8-10, or clinical T stage T3-T4) treated with either dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or CMRT. Interval to biochemical failure was classified as ?18 or >18 months from the end of all therapy to the date of biochemical failure (BF). Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to evaluate the prognostic value of IBF ?18 months for distant metastasis (DM) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Results: Of 958 patients with a median follow-up of 63.2 months, 175 patients experienced BF. In those with BF, there were no differences in pretreatment clinical characteristics between the EBRT and CMRT groups, except for a higher proportion of patients with GS 8-10 in the CMRT group (70% vs 52%, P=.02). Median IBF after all therapy was 24.0 months (interquartile range 9.6-46.0) in the EBRT group and 18.9 months (interquartile range 9.2-34.5) in the CMRT group (P=.055). On univariate analysis, IBF ?18 months was associated with increased risk of DM and PCSM in the entire cohort and the individual EBRT and CMRT groups. On multivariate analysis, only GS 9-10 and IBF ?18 months, but not the radiation therapy regimen or ADT use, predicted DM (hazard ratio [HR] 3.7, P<.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-10.3 for GS 9-10; HR 3.9, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-6.5 for IBF ?18 months) and PCSM (HR 14.8, P<.009, 95% CI 2.0-110 for GS 9-10; HR 4.4, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-8.1 for IBF ?18 months). Conclusions: Short IBF was highly prognostic for higher DM and PCSM in patients with HiRPCa. The prognostic value of IBF for DM and PCSM was not affected by the radiation therapy regimen or ADT use.

  17. Distribution of Primes and of Interval Prime Pairs Based on $?$ Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yifang Fan; Zhiyu Li

    2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    $\\Theta$ function is defined based upon Kronecher symbol. In light of the principle of inclusion-exclusion, $\\Theta$ function of sine function is used to denote the distribution of composites and primes. The structure of Goldbach Conjecture has been analyzed, and $\\Xi$ function is brought forward by the linear diophantine equation; by relating to $\\Theta$ function, the interval distribution of composite pairs and prime pairs (i.e. the Goldbach Conjecture) is thus obtained. In the end, Abel's Theorem (Multiplication of Series) is used to discuss the lower limit of the distribution of the interval prime pairs.

  18. Relativistic velocity addition and the relativity of space and time intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. Field

    2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A thought experiment first proposed by Sartori is analysed using the parallel velocity addition formula of special relativity. The distances and proper-time intervals between some similarly defined spatial coincidence events are found to be widely different in different inertial frames. This relativity of space and time intervals is quite distinct from the well-known time-dilatation and length contraction effects of special relativity. Sartori's claimed derivation of the parallel velocity addition formula, assuming relativistic time dilatation, based on the thought experiment, is shown to be fortuitous.

  19. Investor Confidence Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Actionable Data ESL-KT-13-12-38 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Near-Term: Not Enough Deal-Flow High Transaction Costs Lack of Viable Origination Channels Highly Variable Performance Complex... Custom Projects ESL-KT-13-12-38 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Long-Term: High Cost of Capital More equity than debt Not enough volume to securitize Insufficient actuarial data...

  20. Waste Confidence Discussion

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads|of Energy Washington SuccessWhen Life GivesLong-Term

  1. MonteCarloType Techniques for Processing Interval Uncertainty, and Their Geophysical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    MonteCarloType Techniques for Processing Interval Uncertainty, and Their Geophysical contact email vladik@cs.utep.edu Abstract To determine the geophysical structure of a region, we measure are independently normally distributed. Problem: the resulting accuracies are not in line with geophysical intuition

  2. Monte-Carlo-Type Techniques for Processing Interval Uncertainty, and Their Geophysical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Monte-Carlo-Type Techniques for Processing Interval Uncertainty, and Their Geophysical contact email vladik@cs.utep.edu Abstract To determine the geophysical structure of a region, we measure are independently normally distributed. Problem: the resulting accuracies are not in line with geophysical intuition

  3. Physiologically realistic modelling of a mechanism for neural representation of intervals of time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukai, Tomoki

    -8610, Japan c CREST, Japan Science and Technology (JST), Saitama 332-0012, Japan Abstract A model, Fuji Xerox Co. Ltd., 430 Sakai, Nakai-machi, Ashigarakami-gun, Kanagawa 259-0157, Japan b Department as well as the difference stated above, will lead us to the idea that an interval of time, T

  4. Optimal interval clustering: Application to Bregman clustering and statistical mixture learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Frank

    clustering of n scalar elements into k pairwise disjoint intervals. This case includes 1D Euclidean k-means- hood. Index Terms--Clustering, dynamic programming, k-means, Bregman divergences, statistical mixtures is the celebrated k-means [1] that seeks to minimize the sum of intra-cluster variances by prescribing beforehand

  5. Batch self-organizing maps based on city-block distances for interval variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    methods [14, 18]. K-means algorithm and fuzzy c-means are the most famous partitional approaches learning strategy which has both clustering and visualization properties. Different from K-means, SOM uses interval-valued data sets, in comparison with batch SOM algorithms based on adaptive and non

  6. Modeling Effects of Rhythmic Context on Perceived Duration: A Comparison of Interval and Entrainment Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    Jones Ohio State University Relative merits of interval and entrainment conceptions of the internal. Research on timing and time perception has a long, well- established history in experimental psychology, 2001b; Killeen & Weiss, 1987). This is perhaps not surprising, because arguably all human behaviors

  7. Robust control for a class of interval model: application to the force control of piezoelectric cantilevers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    the second one on force [4][5]. In order to synthesize a controller for the manipulation force, a model is necessary. However, it is known that the model linking this manipulation force and the input controlRobust control for a class of interval model: application to the force control of piezoelectric

  8. STRONG NEGATION: ITS RELATION TO INTERVALS AND ITS USE IN EXPERT SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Mexico State University Environmental and Earth Studies) Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA University of Texas of Electrical Engineering Nghia­Do, Tu­Liem Czech Technical University Institute of Information Technology, Vietnam email navara@cmp.felk.cvut.cz email nhphuong@bdvn.vnmail.vnd.net I. INTERVALS IN DIFFERENT LOGICS

  9. Interval Methods in Remote Sensing: Reliable SubDivision of Geological Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Interval Methods in Remote Sensing: Reliable SubDivision of Geological Areas David D. Coblentz, G. The subdivision of a geological zone into segments is often a controversial issue, with different evidence of the geological subdivision is the fact that the existing subdivision is often based on the chemical and physical

  10. Estimation of shear-wave interval attenuation from mode-converted data Bharath Shekar1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    Tsvankin1 ABSTRACT Interval attenuation measurements provide valuable infor- mation for reservoir characterization and lithology discrimi- nation. We extend the attenuation layer-stripping method of Behura of the material (Prasad and Nur, 2003), the pre- sence of aligned fluid-filled fractures (Chapman, 2003; Batzle et

  11. VARIABILITY OF SOLAR RADIATION DATA OVER SHORT TIME INTERVALS Frank Vignola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    VARIABILITY OF SOLAR RADIATION DATA OVER SHORT TIME INTERVALS Frank Vignola Department of Physics ra- diation. This article examines at the variability of beam and global solar radiation over short solar radiation values with ground-based data. 1. INTRODUCTION It is difficult to evaluate solar

  12. A Genealogy for Finite Kneading Sequences of Bimodal Maps on the Interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ringland; Charles Tresser

    1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We generate all the finite kneading sequences of one of the two kinds of bimodal map on the interval, building each sequence uniquely from a pair of shorter ones. There is a single pair at generation 0, with members of length 1. Concomitant with this genealogy of kneading sequences is a unified genealogy of all the periodic orbits. (6/93)

  13. Modal Transition Systems with Weight Intervals , Kim G. Larsen, Jiri Srba1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srba, Jiri

    Modal Transition Systems with Weight Intervals Line Juhl , Kim G. Larsen, Jiri Srba1 Aalborg weighted modal transition systems, an extension to the well-studied specification formalism of modal transition systems that allows to express both required and optional behaviours of their intended

  14. Prediction Intervals for NAR Model Structures Using a Bootstrap De Brabanter J.,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prediction Intervals for NAR Model Structures Using a Bootstrap Method De Brabanter J structure. Our approach relies on the external bootstrap procedure [1]. This method is contrasted. In this paper, an external bootstrap method will be proposed for this purpose. The bootstrap is a computer

  15. Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines: Oil samples can be collected during oil changes. Follow manufacturers recommendations on frequency (hours, mileage, etc) of oil changes. Capture a sample from the draining oil while the oil is still hot

  16. Estimation of neutral lipid and carbohydrate quotas in microalgae using adaptive interval observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    , uncertain systems, microalgae biofuel, neu- tral lipid. 1 Introduction Microalgae are a promising sourceEstimation of neutral lipid and carbohydrate quotas in microalgae using adaptive interval observers stress conditions, microalgae are known to accumulate large amounts of neutral lipids and carbohydrates

  17. Original Research Article First Birth Interval, An Indicator of Energetic Status, Is a Predictor of Lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummaa, Virpi

    by a shorter waiting time to the first birth (first birth interval, FBI), are able to afford higher costs was divided into tertiles based on the length of FBI. Results: Women with the shortest FBI had a higher number.06). Women who had ever given birth to twins had shorter FBI than women of singletons (20.1 and 26.1 months

  18. Sustainable distributed biodiesel manufacturing under uncertainty: An interval-parameter-programming-based approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yinlun

    Sustainable distributed biodiesel manufacturing under uncertainty: An interval A sophisticated biodiesel manufacturing study demonstrated methodological efficacy. a r t i c l e i n f o Article Simulation Uncertainty a b s t r a c t Biodiesel, a clean-burning alternative fuel, can be produced using

  19. LYAPUNOV SPECTRAL INTERVALS: THEORY AND COMPUTATION LUCA DIECI y AND ERIK S. VAN VLECK z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Vleck, Erik S.

    LYAPUNOV SPECTRAL INTERVALS: THEORY AND COMPUTATION #3; LUCA DIECI y AND ERIK S. VAN VLECK z dichotomy of Sacker and Sell and the spectrum de#12;ned in terms of upper and lower Lyapunov exponents information. Finally, we discuss the algorithms we have used to approximate the Lyapunov and Sacker

  20. Estimation of interval anisotropy parameters using velocity-independent layer stripping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    by VILS in the shale layer above the reservoir are more plausible and less influenced by noise than those Wang1 and Ilya Tsvankin1 ABSTRACT Moveout analysis of long-spread P-wave data is widely used it to interval parameter estimation in orthorhombic media using wide-azimuth, long- spread data

  1. PRA In Design: Increasing Confidence in Pre-operational Assessments of Risks (Results of a Joint NASA/ NRC Workshop)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Youngblood

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In late 2009, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) jointly organized a workshop to discuss technical issues associated with application of risk assessments to early phases of system design. The workshop, which was coordinated by the Idaho National Laboratory, involved invited presentations from a number of PRA experts in the aerospace and nuclear fields and subsequent discussion to address the following questions: (a) What technical issues limit decision-makers confidence in PRA results, especially at a preoperational phase of the system life cycle? (b) What is being done to address these issues? (c) What more can be done? The workshop resulted in participant observations and suggestions on several technical issues, including the pursuit of non-traditional approaches to risk assessment and the verification and validation of risk models. The workshop participants also identified several important non-technical issues, including risk communication with decision makers, and the integration of PRA into the overall design process.

  2. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/12: ENTNEA: A Concept for Enhancing Nuclear Transparency for Confidence Building in Northeast Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, Man-Kwon; Shin, Sung-Tack

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear energy continues to be a strong and growing component of economic development in Northeast Asia. A broad range of nuclear energy systems already exists across the region and vigorous growth is projected. Associated with these capabilities and plans are various concerns about operational safety, environmental protection, and accumulation of spent fuel and other nuclear materials. We consider cooperative measures that might address these concerns. The confidence building measures suggested here center on the sharing of information to lessen concerns about nuclear activities or to solve technical problems. These activities are encompassed by an Enhanced Nuclear Transparency in Northeast Asia (ENTNEA) concept that would be composed of near-term, information-sharing activities and an eventual regional institution. The near-term activities would address specific concerns and build a tradition of cooperation; examples include radiation measurements for public safety and emergency response, demonstration of safe operations at facilities and in transportation, and material security in the back end of the fuel cycle. Linkages to existing efforts and organizations would be sought to maximize the benefits of cooperation. In the longer term, the new cooperative tradition might evolve into an ENTNEA institution. In institutional form, ENTNEA could combine the near-term activities and new cooperative activities, which might require an institutional basis, for the mutual benefit and security of regional parties.

  3. Interval Data Analysis with the Energy Charting and Metrics Tool (ECAM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taasevigen, Danny J.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Koran, William

    2011-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyzing whole building interval data is an inexpensive but effective way to identify and improve building operations, and ultimately save money. Utilizing the Energy Charting and Metrics Tool (ECAM) add-in for Microsoft Excel, building operators and managers can begin implementing changes to their Building Automation System (BAS) after trending the interval data. The two data components needed for full analyses are whole building electricity consumption (kW or kWh) and outdoor air temperature (OAT). Using these two pieces of information, a series of plots and charts and be created in ECAM to monitor the buildings performance over time, gain knowledge of how the building is operating, and make adjustments to the BAS to improve efficiency and start saving money.

  4. Genetic and interval mapping of the bovine X chromosome for quantitative trait loci using microsatellite markers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Chen-Chen

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mapping MATERIALS AND METHODS . 16 16 17 18 19 20 20 22 22 23 25 Animals . Microsatellite markers Polymerase chain reaction Genetic/Linkage map QTL detection Phenotypic data Statistical analysis . 25 28 31 31 32 33 35 RESULTS... AND DISCUSSION 36 Microsatellite scoring . Linkage analysis . QTL analysis . Interval mapping . 36 37 51 52 CONCLUSIONS LITERATURE CITED 65 VITA 85 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page A summary of bovine X-linked traits . 12 Structure and breed composition...

  5. Z .International Journal of Psychophysiology 32 1999 239 250 Attentional modulation of short-and long-lead-interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - and long-lead-interval modification of the acoustic startle eyeblink response: comparing auditory that modification of startle by lead stimuli with short- and long-lead-intervals is modulated by stimulus significance. The significant stimulus in a tone duration judgement task generates enhanced short-lead

  6. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/13: Cooperative monitoring for confidence building: A case study of the Sino-Indian border areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIDHU,WAHEGURU PAL SINGH; YUAN,JING-DONG; BIRINGER,KENT L.

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This occasional paper identifies applicable cooperative monitoring techniques and develops models for possible application in the context of the border between China and India. The 1993 and 1996 Sino-Indian agreements on maintaining peace and tranquility along the Line of Actual Control (LAC) and establishing certain confidence building measures (CBMs), including force reductions and limitation on military exercises along their common border, are used to examine the application of technically based cooperative monitoring in both strengthening the existing terms of the agreements and also enhancing trust. The paper also aims to further the understanding of how and under what conditions technology-based tools can assist in implementing existing agreements on arms control and confidence building. The authors explore how cooperative monitoring techniques can facilitate effective implementation of arms control agreements and CBMS between states and contribute to greater security and stability in bilateral, regional, and global contexts.

  7. Short-interval multi-laser Thomson scattering measurements of hydrogen pellet ablation in LHD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasuhara, R., E-mail: yasuhara@nifs.ac.jp; Sakamoto, R.; Yamada, I.; Motojima, G.; Hayashi, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 3226 Oroshi-cho, Toki 5095292 (Japan)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Thomson scattering forms an important aspect of measuring the electron density and temperature profiles of plasmas. In this study, we demonstrate Thomson scattering measurements obtained over a short interval (<1 ms) by using an event triggering system with a multi-laser configuration. We attempt to use our system to obtain the electron temperature and density profiles before and immediately after pellet injection into the large helical device. The obtained profiles exhibit dramatic changes after pellet injection as per our shot-by-shot measurements. We believe that this measurement technique will contribute towards a better understanding of the physics of the pellet deposition.

  8. Is walking a random walk? Evidence for long-range correlations in stride interval of human gait

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    interval of 10 healthy young men was measured as they walked for 9 min at their usual rate. From these time, and the basal ganglia, as well as feedback from visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive sensors. Under healthy

  9. Energy Consumption Estimation for Room Air-conditioners Using Room Temperature Simulation with One-Minute Intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, F.; Yoshida, H.; Matsumoto, K.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the purpose of developing optimized control algorithm for room air-conditioners to ensure their energy efficiency, a short time interval (i.e., one minute) simulation of building thermal performance is necessary because the sampling time...

  10. Clastic facies and diagenesis, Lewis-Evans interval in Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleaves, A.W.; Bat, D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface maps of the Lewis and Evans sandstone-facies tracts (Chester Group) on the northern shelf of the Black Warrior basin document two distinct deltaic depositional systems, each having a source area from the Mid-Dontinent interior. Within the Lewis genetic interval, six dip-elongate, river-dominated, cratonic delta lobes comprise the principal coarse-grained clastic units. However, in the higher Evans interval, five strike-elongate (cuspate) wave-dominated lobes are present on the northwestern rim of the basin. Petrographic evidence from four Mississippi cores associated with delta-plain and delta-front facies in the two sandstone unites indicates a dominance of monocrystalline quartz and chert rock fragments and a relative absence of orogenic indicators such as polycrystalline quartz, muscovite, and metamorphic rock fragments. Porosity development results largely from the formation of moldic secondary porosity and enlarged intergranular porosity. Primary porosity is occluded by the precipitation of quartz overgrowths and early calcite cement. Secondary moldic porosity was generated through the dissolution of feldspars and shale fragments. Enlarged intergranular porosity resulted from the dissolution of detrital illite matrix. Secondary porosity itself is partially occluded by authigenic kaolinite and illite, as well as by late-stage pyrite and dolomite.

  11. Scaling and memory of intraday volatility return intervals in stock market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, F; Stanley, H E; Yamasaki, K; Havlin, Shlomo; Wang, Fengzhong; Yamasaki, Kazuko

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the return interval $\\tau$ between price volatilities that are above a certain threshold $q$ for 31 intraday datasets, including the Standard & Poor's 500 index and the 30 stocks that form the Dow Jones Industrial index. For different threshold $q$, the probability density function $P_q(\\tau)$ scales with the mean interval $\\bar{\\tau}$ as $P_q(\\tau)={\\bar{\\tau}}^{-1}f(\\tau/\\bar{\\tau})$, similar to that found in daily volatilities. Since the intraday records have significantly more data points compared to the daily records, we could probe for much higher thresholds $q$ and still obtain good statistics. We find that the scaling function $f(x)$ is consistent for all 31 intraday datasets in various time resolutions, and the function is well approximated by the stretched exponential, $f(x)\\sim e^{-a x^\\gamma}$, with $\\gamma=0.38\\pm 0.05$ and $a=3.9\\pm 0.5$, which indicates the existence of correlations. We analyze the conditional probability distribution $P_q(\\tau|\\tau_0)$ for $\\tau$ following a certa...

  12. The Entanglement Renyi Entropies of Disjoint Intervals in AdS/CFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Faulkner

    2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study entanglement Renyi entropies (EREs) of 1+1 dimensional CFTs with classical gravity duals. Using the replica trick the EREs can be related to a partition function of n copies of the CFT glued together in a particular way along the intervals. In the case of two intervals this procedure defines a genus n-1 surface and our goal is to find smooth three dimensional gravitational solutions with this surface living at the boundary. We find two families of handlebody solutions labelled by the replica index n. These particular bulk solutions are distinguished by the fact that they do not spontaneously break the replica symmetries of the boundary surface. We show that the regularized classical action of these solutions is given in terms of a simple numerical prescription. If we assume that they give the dominant contribution to the gravity partition function we can relate this classical action to the EREs at leading order in G_N. We argue that the prescription can be formulated for non-integer n. Upon taking the limit n -> 1 the classical action reproduces the predictions of the Ryu-Takayanagi formula for the entanglement entropy.

  13. APIC'95, El Paso, Extended Abstracts, A Supplement to the international journal of Reliable Computing 1 Fuzzy IntervalValued Inference System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    . Kohout Many­valued logic based interval reasoning plays increasingly important role in fuzzy and other

  14. Robust stabilizer synthesis for interval plants using H-Infinity methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Saikat

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the polynomial P;(s). Let F be the family of all such possible m-tuples. Now let us define a family of m4 segments as follows: For any fixed integer I between 1 and m, let P;(s) = K, "(s), for i g I and for some k = I, 2, 3, 4, and for i = I, let Pi(s) vary..., stabilizing the finite set K is not sufficient when the polynomials Q, (s) do not satisfy the restrictions specified in part 2. The proof of the above is dealt with in [5]. In case of a SISO system with an interval plant, we have rn = 2 and Pi(s) and Pz...

  15. Temperatures and interval geothermal-gradient determinations from wells in National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, D.C.; Tailleur, I.L.

    1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature and related records from 28 wells in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA) although somewhat constrained from accuracy by data gathering methods, extrapolate to undisturbed formation temperatures at specific depths below permafrost, and lead to calculated geothermal graidents between these depths. Tabulation of the results show that extrapolated undisturbed temperatures range from a minimum of 98/sup 0/F (37/sup 0/C) at 4000 feet (1220 m) to a maximum of 420/sup 0/F (216/sup 0/C) at 20,260 feet (6177 m) and that geothermal gradients range from 0.34/sup 0/F/100' (6/sup 0/C/km) between 4470 feet to 7975 feet (Lisburne No. 1) and 3.15/sup 0/F/100' (57/sup 0/C/km) between 6830 feet to 7940 feet (Drew Point No. 1). Essential information needed for extrapolations consists of: time-sequential bottom-hole temperatures during wire-line logging of intermediate and deep intervals of the borehole; the times that circulating drilling fluids had disturbed the formations; and the subsequent times that non-circulating drilling fluids had been in contact with the formation. In several wells presumed near direct measures of rock temperatures recorded from formation fluids recovered by drill stem tests (DST) across thin (approx. 10-20 foot) intervals are made available. We believe that the results approach actual values close enough to serve as approximations of the thermal regimes in appropriate future investigations. Continuous temperature logs obtained at the start and end of final logging operations, conductivity measurements, and relatively long-term measurements of the recovery from disturbance at shallow depths in many of the wells will permit refinements of our values and provide determination of temperatures at other depths. 4 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  16. Interval-parameter semi-infinite fuzzy-stochastic mixed-integer programming approach for environmental management under multiple uncertainties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, P., E-mail: guoping@iseis.or [College of Water Conservancy and Civil Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Huang, G.H., E-mail: gordon.huang@uregina.c [Environmental Systems Engineering Program, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S 0A2 (Canada); College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, an interval-parameter semi-infinite fuzzy-chance-constrained mixed-integer linear programming (ISIFCIP) approach is developed for supporting long-term planning of waste-management systems under multiple uncertainties in the City of Regina, Canada. The method improves upon the existing interval-parameter semi-infinite programming (ISIP) and fuzzy-chance-constrained programming (FCCP) by incorporating uncertainties expressed as dual uncertainties of functional intervals and multiple uncertainties of distributions with fuzzy-interval admissible probability of violating constraint within a general optimization framework. The binary-variable solutions represent the decisions of waste-management-facility expansion, and the continuous ones are related to decisions of waste-flow allocation. The interval solutions can help decision-makers to obtain multiple decision alternatives, as well as provide bases for further analyses of tradeoffs between waste-management cost and system-failure risk. In the application to the City of Regina, Canada, two scenarios are considered. In Scenario 1, the City's waste-management practices would be based on the existing policy over the next 25 years. The total diversion rate for the residential waste would be approximately 14%. Scenario 2 is associated with a policy for waste minimization and diversion, where 35% diversion of residential waste should be achieved within 15 years, and 50% diversion over 25 years. In this scenario, not only landfill would be expanded, but also CF and MRF would be expanded. Through the scenario analyses, useful decision support for the City's solid-waste managers and decision-makers has been generated. Three special characteristics of the proposed method make it unique compared with other optimization techniques that deal with uncertainties. Firstly, it is useful for tackling multiple uncertainties expressed as intervals, functional intervals, probability distributions, fuzzy sets, and their combinations; secondly, it has capability in addressing the temporal variations of the functional intervals; thirdly, it can facilitate dynamic analysis for decisions of facility-expansion planning and waste-flow allocation within a multi-facility, multi-period and multi-option context.

  17. Depositional facies, textural characteristics, and reservoir properties of dolomites in Frobisher-Alida interval in southwest North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petty, D.M.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mississippian Frobisher-Alida interval is an upward-shoaling cycle that began with open-marine sedimentation and culminated with the deposition of a widespread sabkha-salina evaporite. This cycle is the most prolific oil-producing interval in the North Dakota portion of the Williston basin. Most Frobisher-Alida production in the southern Williston basin is from dolomite reservoirs. The six major facies defined in this paper are lithologic suites that represent sediments and precipitates deposited in similar environments. 20 figures, 5 tables.

  18. A Spatial Odyssey of the Interval Algebra: 1. Directed Intervals To appear in: Proceedings of the 17th International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI'01), Seattle, WA, August 2001.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renz, Jochen

    as the underlying line. There are several differences of temporal and spatial intervals which have to be considered to the underlying line. We de- velop an algebra for qualitative spatial representa- tion and reasoning about of influence (such as safety margin, braking dis- tance, or reaction distance) could be represented

  19. Intra-Set Rest Intervals in Hypertrophic Training: Effects on Hypertrophy, Strength, Power, and Myosin Heavy Chain Composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Jonathan

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of intra-set rest intervals (ALT) and traditional resistance (STD) training in hypertrophic resistance training. 22 males (25 +/- 5yrs, 179.71 +/- 5.0cm, 82.1 +/- 10.6kg, 13.6 +/- 4.3% fat, 6...

  20. Interval Set Clustering of Web Users using Modified Kohonen Self-Organizing Maps based on the Properties of Rough Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Interval Set Clustering of Web Users using Modified Kohonen Self-Organizing Maps based, 121 35 Prague 2, Czech Republic Abstract Web usage mining involves application of data mining techniques to discover usage patterns from the web data. Clustering is one of the important functions in web

  1. Interval Finite Element Methods: New Directions Rafi Muhanna 1 , Vladik Kreinovich 2 , Pavel Sol'in 2 ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Interval Finite Element Methods: New Directions Rafi Muhanna 1 , Vladik Kreinovich 2 , Pavel Ÿ Sol advanced numerical methods to tackle these problems, such as finite element methods (FEM). Lately, new advanced version of these methods have appeared, such as hierarchic higher­order finite element methods (hp

  2. ARM: W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Widener, Kevin; Nelson, Dan; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Lindenmaier, Iosif [Andrei; Johnson, Karen

    W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  3. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Widener, Kevin; Nelson, Dan; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Lindenmaier, Iosif [Andrei; Johnson, Karen

    X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  4. ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bharadwaj, Nitin; Widener, Kevin

    Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  5. APIC'95, El Paso, Extended Abstracts, A Supplement to the international journal of Reliable Computing 1 Interval Fuzzy Data Processing: Case When

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    an interval [0; 0:3] of possible values of d(A&B). This idea was proposed and used by L. Kohout. ffl Even

  6. Eliminating livelock by assigning the same priority state to each message that is inputted into a flushable routing system during N time intervals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faber, Vance (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Livelock-free message routing is provided in a network of interconnected nodes that is flushable in time T. An input message processor generates sequences of at least N time intervals, each of duration T. An input register provides for receiving and holding each input message, where the message is assigned a priority state p during an nth one of the N time intervals. At each of the network nodes a message processor reads the assigned priority state and awards priority to messages with priority state (p-1) during an nth time interval and to messages with priority state p during an (n+1) th time interval. The messages that are awarded priority are output on an output path toward the addressed output message processor. Thus, no message remains in the network for a time longer than T.

  7. Eliminating livelock by assigning the same priority state to each message that is input into a flushable routing system during N time intervals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faber, V.

    1994-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Livelock-free message routing is provided in a network of interconnected nodes that is flushable in time T. An input message processor generates sequences of at least N time intervals, each of duration T. An input register provides for receiving and holding each input message, where the message is assigned a priority state p during an nth one of the N time intervals. At each of the network nodes a message processor reads the assigned priority state and awards priority to messages with priority state (p-1) during an nth time interval and to messages with priority state p during an (n+1) th time interval. The messages that are awarded priority are output on an output path toward the addressed output message processor. Thus, no message remains in the network for a time longer than T. 4 figures.

  8. Evaluation of Cross-Hole Seismic Tomography for Imaging Low Resistance Intervals and Associated Carbonate Sediments in Coastal Plain Sequences on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cumbest, R. J.

    1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the pilot study were to investigate the limitations of the technique for imaging the presence, extent, and boundaries of the low-resistance intervals and associated carbonate sediments.

  9. Power law burst and inter-burst interval distributions in the solar wind: turbulence or dissipative SOC ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. P. Freeman; N. W. Watkins; D. J. Riley

    2000-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate for the first time the probability density functions (PDFs) P of burst energy e, duration T and inter-burst interval tau for a known turbulent system in nature. Bursts in the earth-sun component of the Poynting flux at 1 AU in the solar wind were measured using the MFI and SWE experiments on the NASA WIND spacecraft. We find P(e) and P(T) to be power laws, consistent with self-organised criticality (SOC). We find also a power law form for P(tau) that distinguishes this turbulent cascade from the exponential P(tau) of ideal SOC, but not from some other SOC-like sandpile models. We discuss the implications for the relation between SOC and turbulence.

  10. 16.5.2007 Risiken und Modelle im Energiehandel G. Petritsch INFORM-Seminar "Finanzmathematik"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulmek, Markus

    Halbjahresraster (NYMEX Brent, WTI) Call/Put-Optionen auf Futures im Monatsraster Swaps #12;16.5.2007 Risiken

  11. Cancer risk in childhood-onset systemic lupus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    phoma, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The firstALL: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia; CI: Confidence interval;

  12. SIAM J. ScI. STAT. COMPUT. Vol. 7, No. 2, April 1986

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    Mathematics OO9 CONFIDENCE INTERVALS FOR INEQUALITY-CONSTRAINED LEAST SQUARES PROBLEMS, WITH APPLICATIONS

  13. Distributions of the Hardness Ratio of short and Long Gamma-Ray Bursts in Different Time Intervals within the First 2 Seconds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun-Ming Dong; Yi-Ping Qin

    2005-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper, we investigated the distribution of hardness ratio (HR) for short and long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in different time scales for the first two seconds. After including and subtracting the background count, we performed a Kolmogorov--Smirnov (K-S) test to the HR distributions of the two classes of GRBs in each time interval. Our analysis shows that the probabilities of the KS test to the distributions are very small, suggesting that the two classes of bursts are unlikely to arise from the same HR distributions, and indicating that they probably originate from the different physical processes and central engine. In addition, we found that the hardness ratio of short bursts within the time interval of 0$-$0.96 seconds changes hard-to-soft, on the other hand long bursts do not. The two kinds of bursts have different characteristics in the first 2 seconds which might be associated with different physical mechanisms.

  14. Water and gas coning: two and three phase system correlations for the critical oil production rate and optimum location of the completion interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Francisco Manuel

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WATER AND GAS COMING: TWO AND THREE PHASE SYSTEM CORRELATIONS FOR THE CRITICAL OIL PRODUCTION RATE AND OPTIMUM LOCATION OF THE COMPLETION INTERVAL A Thesis by FRANCISCO MANUEL GONZALEZ, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering WATER AND GAS CONING: TWO AND THREE PHASE SYSTEM CORRELATIONS FOR THE CRITICAL OIL PRODUCTION RATE AND OPTIMUM...

  15. Building Confidence in LLW Performance Assessments - 13386

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rustick, Joseph H.; Kosson, David S.; Krahn, Steven L.; Clarke, James H. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Nashville, Tennessee, 37235 (United States)] [Vanderbilt University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Nashville, Tennessee, 37235 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance assessment process and incorporated input assumptions for four active and one planned DOE disposal sites were analyzed using a systems approach. The sites selected were the Savannah River E-Area Slit and Engineered Trenches, Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility, Idaho Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Oak Ridge Environmental Management Waste Management Facility, and Nevada National Security Site Area 5. Each disposal facility evaluation incorporated three overall system components (1) site characteristics (climate, geology, geochemistry, etc.), (2) waste properties (waste form and package), and (3) engineered barrier designs (cover system, liner system). Site conceptual models were also analyzed to identity the main risk drivers and risk insights controlling performance for each disposal facility. (authors)

  16. NIFES Consulting Group COMMERCIAL IN CONFIDENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An energy audit has been carried out at Hollings Campus ­ Manchester Metropolitan University. This report: UKE1520 MMU Hollings Energy Audit/SE/Rel 1 Date: December 2008 NIFES Consulting Group, NIFES House.3 Brief Description of the Site 6 1.4 Acknowledgement 7 2.0 ENERGY AUDIT 8 2.1 Site Configuration 8 2

  17. NIFES Consulting Group COMMERCIAL IN CONFIDENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Couzens House 29 Davenport 31 Delany 34 Frances Wood 36 Halfway House 38 Harley Building 40 Laurence 41 APPENDIX 2 GAS PROFILE APPENDIX 3 WATER PROFILE APPENDIX 4 OIL PROFILE APPENDIX 5 DEGREE DAY ANALYSIS. The energy consumption of the site for the period, May 2007 to April 2008, is detailed as follows: Energy Use

  18. Anniversary Giving High School Students the Confidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Stephen L.

    (RS) · Stream dynamics: velocity, depth, width, character, discharge, etc. · Stream flora, fauna, erosion, etc. · Stewardship/service projects: Hawaiian fishpond restoration, native habitat restoration

  19. Examining Anomalous Network Performance with Confidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL] [ORNL; Hodson, Stephen W [ORNL] [ORNL; Kuehn, Jeffery A [ORNL] [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variability in network performance is a major obstacle in effectively analyzing the throughput of modern high performance computer systems. High performance interconnection networks offer excellent best-case network latencies; however, highly parallel applications running on parallel machines typically require consistently high levels of performance to adequately leverage the massive amounts of available computing power. Performance analysts have usually quantified network performance using traditional summary statistics that assume the observational data is sampled from a normal distribution. In our examinations of network performance, we have found this method of analysis often provides too little data to understand anomalous network performance. In particular, we examine a multi-modal performance scenario encountered with an Infiniband interconnection network and we explore the performance repeatability on the custom Cray SeaStar2 interconnection network after a set of software and driver updates.

  20. Diagnosing Anomalous Network Performance with Confidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL] [ORNL; Hodson, Stephen W [ORNL] [ORNL; Kuehn, Jeffery A [ORNL] [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variability in network performance is a major obstacle in effectively analyzing the throughput of modern high performance computer systems. High performance interconnection networks offer excellent best-case network latencies; however, highly parallel applications running on parallel machines typically require consistently high levels of performance to adequately leverage the massive amounts of available computing power. Performance analysts have usually quantified network performance using traditional summary statistics that assume the observational data is sampled from a normal distribution. In our examinations of network performance, we have found this method of analysis often provides too little data to understand anomalous network performance. In particular, we examine a multi-modal performance scenario encountered with an Infiniband interconnection network and we explore the performance repeatability on the custom Cray SeaStar2 interconnection network after a set of software and driver updates.

  1. Waste Confidence Discussion | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium TransferonUS-IndiaVALUE STUDY4, 2009DepartmentCharacterization

  2. The CASL vision is to confidently predict

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed Donat AboutTextiles (2010 MECS)Thanksart

  3. An evaluation of the B&W Owners Group BAW-10182 topical report: Justification for increasing the engineered safety features actuation system on-line test intervals. Technical evaluation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C.L.; Hansen, J.L.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Evaluation Report provides an evaluation of the Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group (B&WOG) Technical Specifications Committee Topical Report BAW-10182, entitled, ``Justification for Increasing Engineered Safety Features Actuation System (ESFAS) On-Line Test Intervals.`` This evaluation was performed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in support of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The BAW-10182 report presents justification for the extension of on-line test intervals from the existing one-month interval to a three-month interval for the ESFAS system. In the BAW-10182 report, the B&WOG stated that ``{hor_ellipsis}the B&WOG proposes to increase the ESFAS test interval from one to three months and concludes that the effect on plant risk is insignificant.`` The proposed extension was based upon risk-based [i.e., probabilistic risk assessment (PRA)] methods such as reliability block diagrams, uncertainty analyses, and time-dependent system availability analyses. This use of PRA methods requires a detailed evaluation to determine whether the chosen methods and their application are valid in the context of the proposed test interval extension. The results of the evaluation agreed that the effect on plant risk is small if the ESFAS test interval is extended to three months for the ESFAS designs that were evaluated.

  4. Optimization Online Digest -- June 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Individual confidence intervals for true solutions to stochastic variational ... A polyhedral study of the diameter constrained minimum spanning tree problem

  5. UTILIZATION OF TWO-STAGE SINGLE-PASS ELECTROFISHING TO ESTIMATE ABUNDANCE AND DEVELOP RECOVERY-MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    River, Bertrand Creek, Pepin Creek, and Fishtrap Creek were 2,763 fish (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1

  6. The Influence of Wealth and Race in Four-Year College Attendance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su Jin Jez

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tics of NLSY:97 s ample 95% confidence M ean Family wealth Family income a a SE interval Parental education (

  7. Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PE NPH Engineering Manager, DOE-SR Motivation The seismic piezocone penetration test (SCPTu) utilized at SRS because it provides rapid and thorough site characterization....

  8. Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd9-32.pdf28v1.pdf1.pdf8.pdfEnergyCost3Department

  9. Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Associates, citing NYMEX natural gas bid-offer spreadAnalysis of the Market for Natural Gas Futures. The Energyas a Physical Hedge Against Natural Gas Price Movements.

  10. The Effect of Dose-Volume Parameters and Interfraction Interval on Cosmetic Outcome and Toxicity After 3-Dimensional Conformal Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, Kara Lynne, E-mail: karalynne.kerr@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hepel, Jaroslaw T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Hiatt, Jessica R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Dipetrillo, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Price, Lori Lyn [Department of Biostatistics Research Center, Institute of Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics Research Center, Institute of Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wazer, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate dose-volume parameters and the interfraction interval (IFI) as they relate to cosmetic outcome and normal tissue effects of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Eighty patients were treated by the use of 3D-CRT to deliver APBI at our institutions from 2003-2010 in strict accordance with the specified dose-volume constraints outlined in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 (NSABP-B39/RTOG 0413) protocol. The prescribed dose was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions delivered twice daily. Patients underwent follow-up with assessment for recurrence, late toxicity, and overall cosmetic outcome. Tests for association between toxicity endpoints and dosimetric parameters were performed with the chi-square test. Univariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of interfraction interval (IFI) with these outcomes. Results: At a median follow-up time of 32 months, grade 2-4 and grade 3-4 subcutaneous fibrosis occurred in 31% and 7.5% of patients, respectively. Subcutaneous fibrosis improved in 5 patients (6%) with extended follow-up. Fat necrosis developed in 11% of women, and cosmetic outcome was fair/poor in 19%. The relative volume of breast tissue receiving 5%, 20%, 50%, 80%, and 100% (V5-V100) of the prescribed dose was associated with risk of subcutaneous fibrosis, and the volume receiving 50%, 80%, and 100% (V50-V100) was associated with fair/poor cosmesis. The mean IFI was 6.9 hours, and the minimum IFI was 6.2 hours. The mean and minimum IFI values were not significantly associated with late toxicity. Conclusions: The incidence of moderate to severe late toxicity, particularly subcutaneous fibrosis and fat necrosis and resulting fair/poor cosmesis, remains high with continued follow-up. These toxicity endpoints are associated with several dose-volume parameters. Minimum and mean IFI values were not associated with late toxicity.

  11. Introduction Nested common intervals on permutations Nested common intervals on sequences Conclusion Finding Nested Common Intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blin, Guillaume

    Conclusion Comparing genomes Genomes evolved from a common ancestor tend to share the same varieties of gene clusters used in genomes comparison. . . . seeking for gene clusters between their genomes. A gene cluster = a set of genes appearing, in spatial proximity along the chromosome, in at least two genomes. G. Blin

  12. The Interval to Biochemical Failure Is Prognostic for Metastasis, Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality, and Overall Mortality After Salvage Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Skyler, E-mail: Skylerjohn3101@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Jackson, William; Li, Darren; Song, Yeohan; Foster, Corey; Foster, Ben; Zhou, Jessica; Vainshtein, Jeffrey; Feng, Felix; Hamstra, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the utility of the interval to biochemical failure (IBF) after salvage radiation therapy (SRT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer as a surrogate endpoint for distant metastasis (DM), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), and overall mortality (OM). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 575 patients treated with SRT after RP from a single institution. Of those, 250 patients experienced biochemical failure (BF), with the IBF defined as the time from commencement of SRT to BF. The IBF was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models for its association with DM, PCSM, and OM. Results: The median follow-up time was 85 (interquartile range [IQR] 49.8-121.1) months, with a median IBF of 16.8 (IQR, 8.5-37.1) months. With a cutoff time of 18 months, as previously used, 129 (52%) of patients had IBF ?18 months. There were no differences among any clinical or pathologic features between those with IBF ? and those with IBF >18 months. On logrank analysis, IBF ?18 months was prognostic for increased DM (P<.0001, HR 4.9, 95% CI 3.2-7.4), PCSM (P<.0001, HR 4.1, 95% CI 2.4-7.1), and OM (P<.0001, HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.7-4.1). Cox proportional hazards models with adjustment for other clinical variables demonstrated that IBF was independently prognostic for DM (P<.001, HR 4.9), PCSM (P<.0001, HR 4.0), and OM (P<.0001, HR 2.7). IBF showed minimal change in performance regardless of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) use. Conclusion: After SRT, a short IBF can be used for early identification of patients who are most likely to experience progression to DM, PCSM, and OM. IBF ?18 months may be useful in clinical practice or as an endpoint for clinical trials.

  13. 23 23.2 23.4 23.6 23.8 24 24.2 (24) (3-minute) reference gas intervals: 450 ppm co2, sf=10 Hz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, Eric

    23 23.2 23.4 23.6 23.8 24 24.2 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 (24) (3-minute) reference gas intervals: 450 ppm co2, sf=10 Hz co2 day of year 2006 licormotionmodel.m, licormotionmodel.pdf, 15-Jun-2006, 14:16:6 #12;0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 x 10 4 440 450 460 (24) concatenated (3-minute

  14. Confidence Sets for Network Structure Edoardo M. Airoldi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Needleman, Daniel

    Received 2 November 2010; revised 4 June 2011; accepted 26 July 2011 DOI:10.1002/sam.10136 Published online, and school year as covariates. We employ a stochastic expectation-maximization algorithm to fit a logistic regression model that includes these explanatory variables as well as a latent stochastic blockmodel

  15. Determining Confidence When Integrating Contributions from Multiple Agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corkill, Daniel

    on the typical assumption of independence among contribu- tions and the effect that unaccounted-for dependencies

  16. Informatively optimal levels of confidence for mesurement uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Kisets

    2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 13, 2011 ... netvision.net.il) ... "Informatively optimal combining, expanding, and establishing traceability in evaluating measurement uncertainties".

  17. Watchdog: Confident Event Detection in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Gang

    surveillance, human health monitoring, and obstacle detection in autonomous vehicles impose stringent detection accuracy during runtime while significantly reducing energy consumption. Through evaluation capability to runtime observations to save energy. Therefore, we are motivated to propose Watchdog

  18. Confidence regions for maximum response and associated design optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Norbert Alfred

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) ) . '~? . J (5v &3 thi. . . ) (5y 1. ) (5e?) (5)4) (3g1) (3e?) (4~3) (6 eh r(?il F (4?1 F(4?2 + rr(5, 6) + r-r(6, 5) + FF( 3, '3) + l=F(6, 6) + r &-' ( 1 y 6 ) + '-I (2, ( ) ) ) ) t FF(?, ? ) + F"'(C~i) + Fl(( i2) 6 lF(J~I) + Dt?~(rt)?D(2s...'?J) ? I'(1sIvl)?D(3~3~J) XZL = X2S +, X2SP X2U = X2L + 10. 0 SCIN = . 2 EE ? ~ 0 0 I) 0 01 N = 4 NX = 1 X 1 = X 1(. 21 E(1) = A(1) E(2) = A(2) + A(3)~XI E(3) = A(4) + h(5)+XI + A(6)+XI+XI E(4) = A(7) + A(H)+XI + A(9)+XI+XI + A(10)+(XI++3) E(5) = A...

  19. 1COMMERCIAL IN CONFIDENCE DEVICE prICEBOOk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    's changed What's gone ·Samsung Tab 4 10" ·Sony XperiaTM M2 ·BlackBerry® Q10 ·BlackBerry® Q5 ·Motorola G2 ·Nokia Lumia 625 ·Sony XperiaTM Z1 Compact ·Sony XperiaTM Z2 ·Samsung Tab 3 8" ·HTC One ·Sony XperiaTM M ·Sony XperiaTM Z1 ·Samsung Galaxy Fame EE Kestrel Sony XperiaTM M2 WHat'S HOt FOr May · 4GEE enabled

  20. EU 'confident' of star power site By Jo Twist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from 2007 to 2013. Fusion powers stars and is seen as a cleaner approach to energy production than, and holds the record for fusion energy production. Based at Culham in Oxfordshire, it is a collaboration

  1. LARGE VOCABULARY DECODING AND CONFIDENCE ESTIMATION USING WORD POSTERIOR PROBABILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    likelihood plm (W ): p(q; X) = pacc(Xjq) 1 plm (W ) (2) Here it is important not to scale up the language

  2. LARGE VOCABULARY DECODING AND CONFIDENCE ESTIMATION USING WORD POSTERIOR PROBABILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hain, Thomas

    likelihood plm(W): p(q, X) = pacc(X|q) 1 plm(W) (2) Here it is important not to scale up the language model

  3. Calibration Trumps Confidence as a Basis for Witness Credibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tenney, Elizabeth R.; MacCoun, Robert J.; Spellman, Barbara A.; Hastie, Reid

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a 2x2 between-subject factorial design with two levels ofin a 2x2 within-subject factorial design, with two levels of

  4. Status Update: Extended Storage and Transportation Waste Confidence |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon the Passing of Admiral James D. Watkins StatementDepartment

  5. Pathogen-Host Associations and Predicted Range Shifts of Human Monkeypox in Response to Climate Change in Central Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program on Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security.Agriculture (http://ccafs-climate.org/ Ac- cessed September 2010) [44]. As the confidence intervals around climate change

  6. Interval Analysis and Reliability in Robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    be highly reliable (i.e. for a robot used in surgical applications). The sources of uncertainties will restrict ourself in this paper to industrial robot. These type of robots have a base that is attached the mechanism motion). There are two main classes of industrial robots mechani- cal architecture: serial

  7. Parallel Interval Continuous Global Optimization Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    abdeljalil benyoub

    2002-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 19, 2002 ... Abstract: We theorically study, on a distributed memory architecture, the parallelization of Hansen's algorithm for the continuous global...

  8. Lyapunov Spectral Intervals: Theory and Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dieci, Luca; Van Vleck, Erik

    2002-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    exponents in stability theory. Important results on stability of Lyapunov exponents that we use are due to Bylov [6], Bylov et al. [5], Bylov and Izobov [7], and Millionshchikov [24, 25]. An alternative to the spectrum of Lyapunov is based upon defining a... School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (evanvlec@mines.edu). 516 D ow nl oa de d 09 /2 9/ 14 to 1 29 .2 37 .4 6. 10 0. R ed ist rib ut io n su bje ct to SIA M lic en se or co py rig ht; se e h ttp ://w ww .si am .or g/j ou rna ls/ ojs a.p hp...

  9. Bootstrap Prediction Intervals for Time Series /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Li

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Local Bootstrap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.6 Generalized Bootstrap predictionSieve/PRR Bootstrap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  10. Neural circuitry for recognizing interspike interval sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abarbanel, HDI; Talathi, Sachin S

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PRL 96, 148104 (2006) PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS week ending 14American Physical Society PRL 96, 148104 (2006) (a) PHYSICAL1 at t 0 and t 1 t 0 T 0 are PRL 96, 148104 (2006) PHYSICAL

  11. Interval Analysis for Unknown Dependencies and Genetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Power Systems Engineering Research Center Cornell University 428 Phillips Hall Ithaca, New York 14853 given to MidAmerican Energy for its support of this project. Thanks are also given to our industry advisors: O. Dale Stevens, II, MidAmerican Energy Co. John Thomas Chatelain, MidAmerican Energy Co. #12

  12. Interval Data Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInterias Solar Energy Jump to:IESInterval Data Systems Inc Jump to:

  13. On the representation of even numbers as the sum and difference of two primes and the representation of odd numbers as the sum of an odd prime and an even semiprime and the distribution of primes in short intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan-Guang Tan

    2014-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The representation of even numbers as the sum of two primes and the distribution of primes in short intervals were investigated and a main theorem was given out and proved, which states: For every number $n$ greater than a positive number $n_{0}$, let $q$ be an odd prime number smaller than $\\sqrt{2n}$ and $d=2n-q$, then there is always at least an odd number $d$ which does not contain any prime factor smaller than $\\sqrt{2n}$ and must be an odd prime number greater than $2n-\\sqrt{2n}$. Then it was proved that for every number $n$ greater than 1, there are always at least a pair of primes $p$ and $q$ which are symmetrical about the number $n$ so that even numbers greater than 2 can be expressed as the sum of two primes. Hence, the Goldbach's conjecture was proved. Also theorems of the distribution of primes in short intervals were given out and proved. By these theorems, the Legendre's conjecture, the Oppermann's conjecture, the Hanssner's conjecture, the Brocard's conjecture, the Andrica's conjecture, the Sierpinski's conjecture and the Sierpinski's conjecture of triangular numbers were proved and the Mills' constant can be determined. The representation of odd numbers as the sum of an odd prime number and an even semiprime was investigated and a main theorem was given out and proved, which states: For every number $n$ greater than a positive number $n_{0}$, let $q$ be an odd prime number smaller than $\\sqrt{2n}$ and $d=2n+1-2q$, then there is always at least an odd number $d$ which does not contain any odd prime factor smaller than $\\sqrt{2n}$ and must be a prime number greater than $2n+1-2\\sqrt{2n}$. Then it was proved that for every number $n$ greater than 2, there are always at least a pair of primes $p$ and $q$ so that all odd integers greater than 5 can be represented as the sum of an odd prime number and an even semiprime. Hence, the Lemoine's conjecture was proved.

  14. Unified approach to the classical statistical analysis of small signals Gary J. Feldman*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, Gary

    -sided intervals leads to intervals which are not confidence intervals if the choice is based on the data. We apply and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 Received 21 November 1997; published 6 led the Particle Data Group PDG 2 to describe procedures for Bayesian interval construction

  15. ARE Update Volume 11, Number 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Wit, Joeri; Smith, Aaron; Kovacs, Kent; Simon, Leo K.; Stratton, Susan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in crude oil and wholesale gasoline markets? We answer thisof physical barrels of oil in world markets, and how do theyNYMEX operates a futures market in crude oil, among other

  16. Microsoft Word - summer.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    with last year at this time appear to be applying downward price pressure on the NYMEX natural gas future contracts leading up to and into the early winter months. Last year, the...

  17. Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and generally cooler temperatures in the South reducing electric utility air-conditioning load. The NYMEX futures contract for November delivery, which settled on Monday at 5.352...

  18. Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Associates, citing NYMEX natural gas bid-offer spreadAnalysis of the Market for Natural Gas Futures. The EnergyProfiles of Renewable and Natural Gas Electricity Contracts:

  19. Coherent structures and aeolian saltation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Jean Taylor

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    map designate regions that are significant at the 5% level (95% confidence interval)................................................ 59 5-12 Results from the continuous wavelet transform using the Morlet wavelet base (top) of the demeaned... map designate regions that are significant at the 5% level (95% confidence interval) ..................................................................... 60 5-13 Wavelet map using the Mexican hat (top) and Morlet (bottom) wavelet bases...

  20. Online Selection of Intervals and t-Intervals Unnar Th. Bachmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shachnai, Hadas

    by Kolen et al. [16], operations management has undergone a "transition in the last decennia from resource

  1. Online Selection of Intervals and t-Intervals Unnar Th. Bachmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halldrsson, Magns M.

    by Kolen et al. [12], operations management has undergone a "transition in the last decennia from resource

  2. alleviate asthma symptoms: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    speech incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.15; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.051.25, cough (IRR 1.10; 95 % CI, 1.021.18), and nocturnal symptoms (IRR 1.09; Nadia N....

  3. LUMINESCENCE LIFETIME INSTRUMENTATION DEVELOPMENT FOR MULTI-DYE ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadfan, Adam

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Start Time of Window 4 ?1 Shorter Lifetime in Two Dye System ?2 Longer Lifetime in Two Dye System LED Light Emitting Diode PMT Photomultiplier Tube DAQ Data Acquisition Board SD Standard Deviation 95% CI 95% Confidence Interval SNR Signal...

  4. Sensitivity to Growth over Time in Pre-Post Norm-Referenced Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Wole

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    .............................................................................................. 9 Test Level ................................................................................................. 10 Reliable Change ....................................................................................... 10 Research Questions... ....................................................................................................... 40 Test Sensitivity: Reliable Change Within One Norm Table .................... 40 Confidence Interval .................................................................................. 41 Test Sensitivity: Reliable Change With Two Norm Tables...

  5. LUMINESCENCE LIFETIME INSTRUMENTATION DEVELOPMENT FOR MULTI-DYE ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadfan, Adam

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Start Time of Window 4 ?1 Shorter Lifetime in Two Dye System ?2 Longer Lifetime in Two Dye System LED Light Emitting Diode PMT Photomultiplier Tube DAQ Data Acquisition Board SD Standard Deviation 95% CI 95% Confidence Interval SNR Signal...

  6. ambulatory cancer patients: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    confidence interval, 1.005 to 1.420). This J Korean; Soc Coloproctol; Ryung Ah Lee 43 New Knowledge. AT THE UCONN CANCER CENTER, patients can benefit from the latest medical...

  7. anemic cancer patients: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    confidence interval, 1.005 to 1.420). This J Korean; Soc Coloproctol; Ryung Ah Lee 31 New Knowledge. AT THE UCONN CANCER CENTER, patients can benefit from the latest medical...

  8. advanced cancer patients: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    confidence interval, 1.005 to 1.420). This J Korean; Soc Coloproctol; Ryung Ah Lee 65 New Knowledge. AT THE UCONN CANCER CENTER, patients can benefit from the latest medical...

  9. Evaluation of dietary factors associated with spontaneous pancreatitis in dogs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lem, Kristina Yvonne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    dogs through a telephone questionnaire conducted from November 2006 through January 2007. Descriptive statistics were calculated, tabular analyses performed, and logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI...

  10. Variation in human gait intervals on a treadmill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrams, Mark Alan

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to produce a map with uniform distribution. A fractal return map has a non-homogeneous distribution. There are regions with high concentrations of data points and regions containing no data points (even with large sample sizes). The data collection..., and four behavior is indicated by clusters of one, two, or four points. The return maps produced from the chaotically dripping faucet have a definite fractal structure. A random signal would not produce a map with a fractal structure, but would tend...

  11. An Interval Partitioning Approach for Continuous Constrained Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csendes, Tibor

    -linear relationships among variables are defined by problem constraints resulting in non-convex feasible sets a new subdivision direction selection method as well as an adaptive search tree framework where nodes (boxes defining different variable domains) are explored using a restricted hybrid depth-first and best

  12. Ecient Object-Relational Interval Management and Beyond ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arge, Lars

    of the SQL layer of any relational database server|was proposed as a way to design easy to implement indexes model in a large database requires ecient index support for its language features. In their pioneering Foundation through ESS grant EIA{9870734, RI grant EIA{9972879, CAREER grant CCR{9984099, and ITR grant EIA

  13. aware interval caching: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in a wide range of devices, starting from mobile take a high-level view of the architecture and neglect micro-architectural features such as caches modeling of the processor...

  14. Multiple Imputation for Threshold-Crossing Data with Interval Censoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fredierick J. Dorey; Roderick J.A. Little; Nathaniel Schenker

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lines between the prosthesis and the cement interface.magnitude indicate that the prosthesis has begun to loosenwith insertion of a new prosthesis. The crossing of this

  15. Gauge Theories on an Interval: Unitarity Without a Higgs Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csaki, Csaba; Grojean, Christophe; Murayama, Hitoshi; Luigi, Pilo; Terning, John

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    breaking without a Higgs boson. Gauge Theories on anscattering amplitude. The Higgs boson is localized at y = ?Rreal scalar ?eld, the Higgs boson. At tree level, the

  16. Lattices which can be represented as lattices of intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaggelis Felouzis

    2006-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate lattices that can be represented as sublattices of the lattice of all convex subsets of a linearly ordered set $(X, \\leq)$ and as lattices of convex subsets of $(X, \\leq)$. A representation theory for general lattices is presented and also some applications in general topology are given.

  17. Exact Bounds for Interval Functions Under Monotonicity Constraints,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    to Paleontology Emil Platon Energy & Geoscience Institute University of Utah 423 Wakara Way, Suite 300 Salt Lake that are the closest to the surface are the least disturbed by drilling. In both cases, for the selected fossil, we

  18. Exact Bounds for Interval Functions Under Monotonicity Constraints,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    to Paleontology Emil Platon Energy & Geoscience Institute University of Utah 423 Wakara Way, Suite 300 Salt Lake the fossils that are the closest to the surface are the least disturbed by drilling. In both cases

  19. Towards Combining Probabilistic, Interval, Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Constraints: On the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    resources such as the oil in the Middle East. However, nowadays, most easy­to­access mineral resources have resources and in the search for natural resources, it is very important to determine Earth structure. Our civilization greatly depends on the things we extract from the Earth, such as fossil fuels (oil, coal, natural

  20. Towards Combining Probabilistic, Interval, Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Constraints: On the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    resources such as the oil in the Middle East. However, nowadays, most easy-to-access mineral resources have resources and in the search for natural resources, it is very important to determine Earth structure. Our civilization greatly depends on the things we extract from the Earth, such as fossil fuels (oil, coal, natural

  1. Combining Interval, Probabilistic, and Fuzzy Uncertainty: Foundations, Algorithms,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    National Laboratories as part of the Department of Energy Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI, by NSF grants EAR-0112968, EAR-0225670, and EIA-0321328, by NIH grant 3T34GM008048-20S1, and by the Army Conference on Fuzzy Systems, Neural Networks, and Genetic Algorithms FNG'05 (Tijuana, Mexico, October 13

  2. Measurement and interpretation of electrocardiographic QT intervals in murine hearts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yanmin; Wu, JingJing; King, James H.; Huang, Christopher L.-H.; Fraser, James A.

    2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    /dark cycles. All procedures were performed in institutional premises, approved under the UK Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act (1986), under UK Home Office project licence PPL number 80/1974, approved by a university Ethics Review Board. Accordingly, proce...

  3. Exact Bounds for Interval and Fuzzy Functions Under Monotonicity Constraints,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    of fossil species in samples recovered from a well that penetrates an undisturbed sequence of sedimentary the environment in which rocks have accumulated: for example, a coral is an unambiguous indication of a warm ocean that in a normal sequence the age increases with the depth in the well that penetrates that sequence. So

  4. Making Adaptive an Interval Constraint Propagation Algorithm Exploiting Monotonicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    domains such as robotics design [10], dynamic systems in robust control or robot localization [8], robust([v]) := v - v denotes the size, or diameter, of [v]. A box [V ] = ([v1], ..., [vn]) represents the Cartesian

  5. Weibull Prediction Intervals for a Future Number of Failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that transfer energy from the reactor to steam turbines. Such exchangers typically have 10,000 to 1 #12;2 20,000 stainless steel tubes that conduct the ow of steam. Due to stress and corrosion, the tubes develop cracks

  6. Weibull Prediction Intervals for a Future Number of Failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that transfer energy from the reactor to steam turbines. Such exchangers typically have 10,000 to 1 #12; 2 20,000 stainless steel tubes that conduct the flow of steam. Due to stress and corrosion, the tubes develop cracks

  7. Exploiting Heterogeneous Channel Coherence Intervals for Blind Interference Alignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jafar, Syed Ali

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the degrees of freedom of MISO broadcast channels withtrend, are listed below. 1. MISO BC with no CSIT for onemultiple input single output (MISO) broadcast channel (BC)

  8. Interval-Valued Fuzzy Control in Space Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    . Kohout. Before we proceed to explain how to use them in fuzzy control, let us first explain why we need

  9. Towards Adding Probabilities and Correlations to Interval Computations #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    #cult or impossible to measure directly. Examples of such quantities are the distance to a star and the amount of oil not detect any pollution, the pollution value v can be anywhere between 0 and the sensor's detection limit DL: to study the e#ect of a pollutant on the fish, we check on the fish daily; if a fish was alive on Day 5

  10. Integrity Zone Computation using Interval Analysis Vincent Drevelle, Philippe Bonnifait,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    department. His current research interests are in In- telligent Vehicles and Advanced Driving Assistance to a decision linked to safety. The snapshot GNSS localization problem consists in inverting a non-linear pseudo-range observation function, with often redundant measurements. This is generally solved as a non-linear Least

  11. An Assessment of Interval Data and Their Potential Application to

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment ActivitiesAge Refining Air1,D O E / E I A -Year

  12. Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California The Mammoth geothermal field is a singlephase, liquiddominated field with a 40 MW power plant.

  13. HISTOGRAM OF CONFIDENCES FOR PERSON DETECTION Lee Middleton, James R. Snowdon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for this work. Typical industrial environments are harsh for image processing. They suffer from rapid lighting This paper focuses on the problem of person detection in harsh industrial environments. Different image work we adapt a previously trained classifier to improve its performance in the industrial environment

  14. Using designer confidence and a dynamic Monte Carlo simulation tool to evaluate uncertainty in system models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Jeffrey M. (Jeffrey Michael), 1973-

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the use of distributed engineering models becomes more prevalent, engineers need tools to evaluate the quality of these models and understand how subsystem uncertainty affects predictions of system behavior. This thesis ...

  15. Key challenges to model-based design : distinguishing model confidence from model validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flanagan, Genevieve (Genevieve Elise Cregar)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model-based design is becoming more prevalent in industry due to increasing complexities in technology while schedules shorten and budgets tighten. Model-based design is a means to substantiate good design under these ...

  16. Constructing Confidence Regions of Optimal Expected Size Chad M. Schafer and Philip B. Stark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contract W-7405-Eng-48. The authors thank the referees for many helpful comments. 1 #12;1 Introduction

  17. A Learning-based Approach to Confident Event Detection in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Gang

    energy consumption. Watchdog can use different machine learning techniques to learn the sensing Publications Dept., ACM, Inc., 2 Penn Plaza, Suite 701, New York, NY 10121-0701 USA, fax +1 (212) 869 KEALLY, College of William and Mary GANG ZHOU, College of William and Mary GUOLIANG XING, Michigan State

  18. Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for high-level nuclear waste. Journal of Contaminantfor a Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository at YuccaHeat Flow Near High-Level Nuclear Waste Packages Emplaced in

  19. New Prototype Safeguards Technology Offers Improved Confidence and Automation for Uranium Enrichment Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brim, Cornelia P.

    2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An important requirement for the international safeguards community is the ability to determine the enrichment level of uranium in gas centrifuge enrichment plants and nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. This is essential to ensure that countries with nuclear nonproliferation commitments, such as States Party to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, are adhering to their obligations. However, current technologies to verify the uranium enrichment level in gas centrifuge enrichment plants or nuclear fuel fabrication facilities are technically challenging and resource-intensive. NNSAs Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) supports the development, testing, and evaluation of future systems that will strengthen and sustain U.S. safeguards and security capabilitiesin this case, by automating the monitoring of uranium enrichment in the entire inventory of a fuel fabrication facility. One such system is HEVAhybrid enrichment verification array. This prototype was developed to provide an automated, nondestructive assay verification technology for uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders at enrichment plants.

  20. Selecting high-confidence predictions from ordinary differential equation models of biological networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bever, Caitlin Anne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many cellular processes are governed by large and highly-complex networks of chemical interactions and are therefore difficult to intuit. Computational modeling provides a means of encapsulating information about these ...

  1. Model-Based Methodology for Building Confidence in a Dynamic Measuring System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reese, Isaac Mark

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    of several proposed design changes. The findings suggest that the dynamic measurement system has a maximum velocity of 28 fps, and that this maximum velocity is unaffected by the track length or the mass of the moving carriage....

  2. Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal System: the Cerro Prieto Field, Baja California,Numerical modeling of the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field,personal communication). Cerro Prieto, Mexico The Cerro

  3. New Prototype Safeguards Technology Offers Improved Confidence and Automation for Uranium Enrichment Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brim, Cornelia P.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important requirement for the international safeguards community is the ability to determine the enrichment level of uranium in gas centrifuge enrichment plants and nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. This is essential to ensure that countries with nuclear nonproliferation commitments, such as States Party to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, are adhering to their obligations. However, current technologies to verify the uranium enrichment level in gas centrifuge enrichment plants or nuclear fuel fabrication facilities are technically challenging and resource-intensive. NNSAs Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) supports the development, testing, and evaluation of future systems that will strengthen and sustain U.S. safeguards and security capabilitiesin this case, by automating the monitoring of uranium enrichment in the entire inventory of a fuel fabrication facility. One such system is HEVAhybrid enrichment verification array. This prototype was developed to provide an automated, nondestructive assay verification technology for uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders at enrichment plants.

  4. Challenging government: institutional arrangements, policy shocks, and no-confidence motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Laron Kenneth

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    makes governments more likely to be targeted by other states in international conflicts. In the conclusion I summarize the key findings, present the broad implications for the study of parliamentary decision making, and discuss avenues for future...

  5. Skin tone of targets, lineup type, and confidence levels in cross-racial identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, Jessica Lynne

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The current experiment investigated facial recognition memory for own and other-race faces. Two variations (light-skin and dark-skin) were presented for the Black targets. The purpose of this experiment was to observe the effect of skin variations...

  6. Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2002-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulation of geothermal reservoirs is useful and necessary in understanding and evaluating reservoir structure and behavior, designing field development, and predicting performance. Models vary in complexity depending on processes considered, heterogeneity, data availability, and study objectives. They are evaluated using computer codes written and tested to study single and multiphase flow and transport under nonisothermal conditions. Many flow and heat transfer processes modeled in geothermal reservoirs are expected to occur in anthropogenic thermal (AT) systems created by geologic disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste. We examine and compare geothermal systems and the AT system expected at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and their modeling. Time frames and spatial scales are similar in both systems, but increased precision is necessary for modeling the AT system, because flow through specific repository locations will affect long-term ability radionuclide retention. Geothermal modeling experience has generated a methodology, used in the AT modeling for Yucca Mountain, yielding good predictive results if sufficient reliable data are available and an experienced modeler is involved. Codes used in geothermal and AT modeling have been tested extensively and successfully on a variety of analytical and laboratory problems.

  7. Defining a Technical Basis for Confidence in PV Investments - A Pathway to Service Life Prediction (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kempe, M.; Bosco, N.; Hacke, P.; Jordan, D.; Miller, D.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four levels of accelerated test standards for PV modules are described in the context of how the community can most quickly begin using these.

  8. Increased confidence in concept design through trade space exploration and multiobjective optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odegard, Ryan Glenn

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growing size, complexity and demands of engineering systems requires paying greater attention to the initial design of the system concept. To improve the process by which concept design is carried out, this thesis ...

  9. A METHOD FOR ESTIMATING THE CONFIDENCE IN THE IDENTIFICATION OF NUCLEAR TRANSIENTS BY A BAGGED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . In this respect, a large number of diagnostic methods have been proposed in the past decade for application to NPP identification, which has been proposed by the authors in a previous work [11]. Bagging [12] is used to construct

  10. SAFETY MARGINS CONFIDENCE ESTIMATION FOR A PASSIVE RESIDUAL HEAT REMOVAL SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , Italy enrico.zio@polimi.it 2 INET, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology Tsinghua University, Beijing,100084, China ABSTRACT For licensing purposes, safety cases of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) must are traditionally performed for the verification of the safety performance of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) under

  11. Process for estimating likelihood and confidence in post detonation nuclear forensics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darby, John L.; Craft, Charles M.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical nuclear forensics (TNF) must provide answers to questions of concern to the broader community, including an estimate of uncertainty. There is significant uncertainty associated with post-detonation TNF. The uncertainty consists of a great deal of epistemic (state of knowledge) as well as aleatory (random) uncertainty, and many of the variables of interest are linguistic (words) and not numeric. We provide a process by which TNF experts can structure their process for answering questions and provide an estimate of uncertainty. The process uses belief and plausibility, fuzzy sets, and approximate reasoning.

  12. A Confident Majority Voting Strategy for Parallel and Modular Support Vector Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Bao-Liang

    special cases, and avoid over-fitting. However, most of ex- isting machine learning methods are hard monolithic SVMs. The first is that parallel SVMs can be b

  13. Method for Confidence Metric in Optic Disk Location in Retinal Images -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from aRodMIT-HarvardEnergy Innovation Portal Method

  14. The measurement of attenuation from vertical seismic profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Francis Erwin

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the calcareous content or the shales. Slightly to non-calcareous shales exhibrted the highest attenuation values. Calcareous to very calcareous shales; low porosity, cemented andstones; and limestones exhibited the lowest attenuatior values. No correlation... aligned on trough. VSP3 . . . 81 Figure 40. Cumulative attenuation and 90% confidence intervals. Downhole data. VSP3 83 Figure 41. Cumulative attenuation and 90% confidence intervals. Synthetic data. VSP3 85 Figure 42. Cumulative attenuation and 90...

  15. The measurement of attenuation from vertical seismic profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Francis Erwin

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the calcareous content or the shales. Slightly to non-calcareous shales exhibrted the highest attenuation values. Calcareous to very calcareous shales; low porosity, cemented andstones; and limestones exhibited the lowest attenuatior values. No correlation... aligned on trough. VSP3 . . . 81 Figure 40. Cumulative attenuation and 90% confidence intervals. Downhole data. VSP3 83 Figure 41. Cumulative attenuation and 90% confidence intervals. Synthetic data. VSP3 85 Figure 42. Cumulative attenuation and 90...

  16. FURTHER INVESTIGATION OF THE TIME DELAY, MAGNIFICATION RATIOS, AND VARIABILITY IN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hewitt, Jacqueline H.

    with independent measurements carried out at the same epoch (Biggs et al. 1999), lending confidence in a confidence intervals that are somewhat larger than those of Biggs et al., probably because we adopt a more in relation to the lens mass model of Biggs et al., our best­fit time delay implies a Hubble constant of H o

  17. December 2009 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Greenhouse gas) NPV New Present Value ST Solar Thermal Energy NYMEX New York Mercantile Exchange OECD Abbreviations 3 ..................... 1.1 Introduction 6 ..................... 1.2 Overview of Proposed Energy- Cost Projections and Energy Production D- BioFuel Discussion, Modern Carbon versus Fossil Carbon E

  18. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -hour NYMEX New York Mercantile Exchange O&M operation and maintenance PJM Pennsylvania-New JerseyNREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

  19. Estimation of Volatility The values of the parameters r, t, St, T, and K used to price a call op-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Privault, Nicolas

    is the price of light sweet crude oil futures traded on the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), basedChapter 7 Estimation of Volatility The values of the parameters r, t, St, T, and K used to price the historical, implied, and local volatility models, and refer to [26] for stochastic volatility models. 7

  20. An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins: Part 1: Evaluation of Phase 2 CO{sub 2} Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2: Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Bowersox; John Hickman; Hannes Leetaru

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO{sub 2} in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO{sub 2} storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO{sub 2} were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO{sub 2} was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole â?? including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite â?? at 1152â??2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO{sub 2} was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter. Operations in the Phase 2 testing program commenced with retrieval of the bridge plug and long-term pressure gauges, followed by mechanical isolation of the Gunter by plugging the wellbore with cement below the injection zone at 1605.7 m, then cementing a section of a 14-cm casing at 1470.4â??1535.6. The resultant 70.1-m test interval at 1535.6â??1605.7 m included nearly all of the Gunter sandstone facies. During the Phase 2 injection, 333 tonnes of CO{sub 2} were injected into the thick, lower sand section in the sandy member of the Gunter. Following the completion of testing, the injection zone below casing at 1116 m in the Marvin Blan No. 1 well, and wellbore below 305 m was permanently abandoned with cement plugs and the wellsite reclaimed. The range of most-likely storage capacities found in the Knox in the Marvin Blan No. 1 is 1000 tonnes per surface hectare in the Phase 2 Gunter interval to 8685 tonnes per surface hectare if the entire Knox section were available including the fractured interval near the base of the Copper Ridge. By itself the Gunter lacks sufficient reservoir volume to be considered for CO{sub 2} storage, although it may provide up to 18% of the reservoir volume available in the Knox. Regional extrapolation of CO{sub 2} storage potential based on the results of a single well test can be problematic, although indirect evidence of porosity and permeability can be demonstrated in the form of active saltwater-disposal wells injecting into the Knox. The western Kentucky region suitable for CO{sub 2} storage in the Knox is limited updip, to the east and south, by the depth at which the base of the Maquoketa shale lies above the depth required to ensure storage of CO{sub 2} in its supercritical state and the deepest a commercial well might be drilled for CO{sub 2} storage. The resulting prospective region has an area of approximately 15,600 km{sup 2}, beyond which it is unlikely that suitable Knox reservoirs may be developed. Faults in the subsurface, which serve as conduits for CO{sub 2} migration and compromise sealing strata, may mitigate the area with Knox reservoirs suitable for CO{sub 2} storage. The results of the injection tes

  1. A survey of education and confidence level among graduating anesthesia residents with regard to selected peripheral nerve blocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Tiffany; Lim, Eunjung; Kinjo, Sakura

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proficiency in interscalene anesthesia-how many blocks areJE: A survey of exposure to regional anesthesia techniquesin American anesthesia residency training programs. Reg

  2. Driving confidence and in-vehicle telematics : a study of technology adoption patterns of the 50+ driving population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, Thomas E. (Thomas Ely), 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-vehicle telematics is a term that encompasses a wide range of technologies, which aid the driving function through features assisting in safety and service tasks. These technologies are designed to give the operator and ...

  3. Coev2Net: a computational framework for boosting confidence in high-throughput protein-protein interaction datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosur, Raghavendra

    Improving the quality and coverage of the protein interactome is of tantamount importance for biomedical research, particularly given the various sources of uncertainty in high-throughput techniques. We introduce a ...

  4. Uniform Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings and Increasing Electric Utility Confidence in Reported Savings Now Available

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has published protocols for estimating energy savings for residential and commercial energy efficiency programs and measures through the recently released The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures.

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - 9_ANDY_IMBODEN_NMMSS_2014_Powerpoint_Waste Confidence Update Imboden.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysis and Feedback on

  6. Dechlorination of PCE by mixtures of green rust and zero-valent iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchal, Fabienne

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H for the reductive dechlorination of 0. 246 mM PCE in 0. 007g/g GRso4 suspension. Error bars for k represent 95% confidence intervals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Initial reductive capacity of GRso4 for PCE as a function of pH. Error... bars for the reductive capacities represent 95% confidence intervals. . . . . . . . . 21 Reductive dechlorination of 0. 246 mM PCE by non-treated ZVI at pH 8, 9, and 10. Some errors bars are smaller than the symbols...

  7. The INTERVAL Trial to determine whether intervals between blood donations can be safely and acceptably decreased to optimise blood supply: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Carmel; Sambrook, Jennifer; Walker, Matthew; Tolkien, Zoe; Kaptoge, Stephen; Allen, David; Mehenny, Susan; Mant, Jonathan; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Thompson, Simon G.; Ouwehand, Willem; Roberts, David J.; Danesh, John

    2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    , and reproducibility). J Orthop Sci 2011, 16:713. 20. Hirsch JD, Lee SJ, Terkeltaub R, Khanna D, Singh J, Sarkin A, Harvey J, Kavanaugh A: Evaluation of an instrument assessing influence of gout on health-related quality of life. J Rheumatol 2008, 35:24062414. 21... Sci 2011, 16:713. 20. Hirsch JD, Lee SJ, Terkeltaub R, Khanna D, Singh J, Sarkin A, Harvey J, Kavanaugh A: Evaluation of an instrument assessing influence of gout on health-related quality of life. J Rheumatol 2008, 35...

  8. Fourier Analytic Approach to Phase Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroshi Imai; Masahito Hayashi

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    For a unified analysis on the phase estimation, we focus on the limiting distribution. It is shown that the limiting distribution can be given by the absolute square of the Fourier transform of $L^2$ function whose support belongs to $[-1,1]$. Using this relation, we study the relation between the variance of the limiting distribution and its tail probability. As our result, we prove that the protocol minimizing the asymptotic variance does not minimize the tail probability. Depending on the width of interval, we derive the estimation protocol minimizing the tail probability out of a given interval. Such an optimal protocol is given by a prolate spheroidal wave function which often appears in wavelet or time-limited Fourier analysis. Also, the minimum confidence interval is derived with the framework of interval estimation that assures a given confidence coefficient.

  9. Dose-response studies on the spermatogonial stem cells of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) after X irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Alphen, M.M.; van de Kant, H.J.; Davids, J.A.; Warmer, C.J.; Bootsma, A.L.; de Rooij, D.G. (State Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of the dose response of the spermatogonial stem cells in the rhesus monkey were performed at intervals of 130 and 160 days after graded doses of X irradiation. The D0 of the spermatogonial stem cells was established using the total numbers of the type A spermatogonia that were present at 130 and 160 days after irradiation and was found to be 1.07 Gy; the 95% confidence interval was 0.90-1.34 Gy.

  10. Worried About High N Prices? Keith A Kelling and Larry G Bundy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    .S. natural gas prices · Record increase in world nitrogen capacity · China's ban on urea imports · Collapse Nitrate Nitric AcidAmmonia Natural Gas Anhydrous Ammonia (NH3) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Liquid Urea (UR) Prill gas prices NYMEX Natural Gas Prices 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Jan-99 Apr-99 Jul-99 O ct-99 Jan-00 Apr

  11. Table 1. Annual estimates, uncertainty, and change Figure 1. Area of timberland and forest land by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    errors/bars provided in figures and tables represent 68 percent confidence intervals 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4/American elm/red maple White oak/red oak/hickory Area (1,000 acres) Small Medium Large #12;Table 2. Top 10

  12. BOOK REVIEWS 143 attention to covariate-conditioned average and quantile effects, along with as-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamoorthy, Kalimuthu

    confidence intervals and testing hypotheses. Their method is applied to a study of the impact of crude oil prices on gasoline prices. Hendry developed the general-to-specific (GETS) procedure for model se, for example, asset prices, whose marginal distributions display strong nonnormal features such as skewness and

  13. pdf file

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marron

    2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Page 1 ... ations, it is seen that the popular Support Vector Machine suffers from ..... only difference is that now the direction w is determined by the SVM. The top panel ...... in the sense that 3 of the 5 pairs of confidence intervals don't overlap). .... to compare the resulting discrimination rules, but our choice provides what we.

  14. Epidemiologic and Economic Analysis of Avian Influenza in Nepal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karki, Surendra

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    , Nepal. The estimated true prevalence of AI viruses (AIV) antibodies was 27.2% [95% Confidence Interval (CI): 24.6- 29.5]. Age of the ducks was identified as the only risk factor for AIV seropositivity. Ducks older than one year were more likely...

  15. A Bootstrap Approach to Computing Uncertainty in Inferred Oil and Gas Reserve Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attanasi, Emil D. [US Geological Survey MS 956 (United States)], E-mail: attanasi@usgs.gov; Coburn, Timothy C. [Abilene Christian University, Department of Management Science (United States)

    2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study develops confidence intervals for estimates of inferred oil and gas reserves based on bootstrap procedures. Inferred reserves are expected additions to proved reserves in previously discovered conventional oil and gas fields. Estimates of inferred reserves accounted for 65% of the total oil and 34% of the total gas assessed in the U.S. Geological Survey's 1995 National Assessment of oil and gas in US onshore and State offshore areas. When the same computational methods used in the 1995 Assessment are applied to more recent data, the 80-year (from 1997 through 2076) inferred reserve estimates for pre-1997 discoveries located in the lower 48 onshore and state offshore areas amounted to a total of 39.7 billion barrels of oil (BBO) and 293 trillion cubic feet (TCF) of gas. The 90% confidence interval about the oil estimate derived from the bootstrap approach is 22.4 BBO to 69.5 BBO. The comparable 90% confidence interval for the inferred gas reserve estimate is 217 TCF to 413 TCF. The 90% confidence interval describes the uncertainty that should be attached to the estimates. It also provides a basis for developing scenarios to explore the implications for energy policy analysis.

  16. ModuleModuleModuleModule NameNameNameName : Biostatistics Module NumberModule NumberModule NumberModule Number : 210235

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the above types of confidence intervals and tests. Contribution to Program Learning Outcomes). Learning Outcomes:Learning Outcomes:Learning Outcomes:Learning Outcomes: On completing this module, student:Contribution to Program Learning Outcomes:Contribution to Program Learning Outcomes:Contribution to Program Learning

  17. Optimal Deployment of Direction-finding Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Suhwan

    2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    of this dissertation have been or will be published in refereed journals, which will hold the associated copyrights. vi NOMENCLATURE AOI Area of Interest CI Confidence Interval CVaR Conditional VaR DF Direction Finder FL Forward Line GIS Geographic... .................................................................................................. 1 1.1. Background .................................................................................................. 1 1.2. Related objectives ......................................................................................... 3 1.3...

  18. Texas Fluid Dynamics Meeting, 2013 STABILITY OF ROTOR WAKES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinney, Charles E.

    to the presence of multiple helical fila- ments. Wakes of helicopter rotors, wind turbines and ma- rine propellers% confidence interval at wake ages, : 10 - 80. Dashed lines are separated by r /r = 3 in the wake of windTexas Fluid Dynamics Meeting, 2013 STABILITY OF ROTOR WAKES. Swathi M. Mula & Charles. E. Tinney

  19. Nine Elements of Watershed Based Plans for EPA Section 319

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watershed Protection Plan Feb 2008 #12;a.) Identify sources and causes for impairment (load duration curve of concern Uhland sub-area Confidence intervals from regression analysis of load duration curve Management knowledge of: the nature and source of the WQ problem, the pollutant load reductions needed to meet WQS

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    for lifetimes between 30-100 years, with a 90% confidence interval of 98-1200 MWth. Lumped parameter modeling the past 20 years. INTRODUCTION The OBGA comprises the regions of low temperature geothermal activityPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

  1. Javier Gonzalez-Garcia REYST report 07-2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsson, Brynjar

    30-100 years, with a 90% confidence interval of 98-1200 MWth. Lumped parameter modeling indicates-Temperature Geothermal Area, SW Iceland REYKJAVIK ENERGY GRADUATE SCHOOL OF SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS #12;#12;Reservoir Assessment of the lfus-Bakki Low-Temperature Geothermal Area, SW Iceland Javier Gonzalez-Garcia Faculty

  2. Using the Wild Bootstrap to Quantify Uncertainty in DTI Brandon Whitcher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcher, Brandon

    Using the Wild Bootstrap to Quantify Uncertainty in DTI Brandon Whitcher David S. Tuch Jonathan J; confidence interval; fiber orientation; fractional anisotropy Running head. The wild bootstrap in DTI 1 #12. In contrast to the regular bootstrap, the wild bootstrap method can be applied to such protocols in which

  3. June 2010 Visual Sample Plan Version 6.03.1 3.0 Sampling Plan Development Within VSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a confidence interval on a mean and places them on the map. Locate Hot Spots Use systematic grid sampling a predetermined threshold and places them on the map. This is called a one-sample problem. Compare Average mean or median and places them on the map. This is typically used when a reference area has been

  4. Robust Decision Making using a Risk-Averse Utility Set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 17, 2012 ... Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Sciences .... Monotonicity and boundedness are usually assumed to be basic properties of utility functions ..... approach is to treat personal choices as i.i.d. samples and a confidence interval is thus built to be ... In contrast, we present a linear program-.

  5. Converting 15-Minute Interval Electricity Load Data into Reduced Demand, Energy Reduction and Cash Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrin, D. G.

    , store managers are intimidated. 5 So what are the solutions? A data acquisition system. Pro-active with alarming and demand-response. Is there staff to maintain and ensure a response? Passive. Acquire the data and then evaluate and assess... is not required, this will prevent the requirement for additional costs of installing an OAT sensor at the building and potentially adding costs to the datalogger hardware or configuration. If possible, it is best to use and on-site OAT sensor. If a demand-response...

  6. Interval Methods for Sensitivity-Based Model-Predictive Control of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearfott, R. Baker

    cell systems (SOFC systems) [13, 3, 27, 10, 28, 29, 6, 18] are characterized by the fact that internal

  7. Intersplines: A New Approach to Globally Optimal Multivariate Splines Using Interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearfott, R. Baker

    - proximators are the multivariate simplex B-splines. Multivariate simplex B-splines consist of Bernstein basis polynomials that are defined on a ge- ometrical structure called a triangulation. Multivariate simplex B. Secondly, the simplex spline models are parametric models, which allows for effi- cient approximation

  8. Timing analysis of logic=level digital circuits using uncertainty intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Joshua Asher

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    satisfiability problem and is a known NP complex problem. Despite this several procedures have been developed and applied to the path sensitization problem. Many of these solutions come f'rom automatic test pattern generation (ATPG) research 17 which has...-algorithm, but a systematic enumeration of the search space required for false paths is still computationally expensive. The ATPG technique of FAN [17] has also been applied to the path sensitization problem. This technique is an improvement over both the D...

  9. Droplet Nucleation and Domain Wall Motion in a Bounded Interval Robert S. Maier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Robert S.

    magnetization. In the weak-noise limit, noise-activated magnetization reversals become exponentially rare, the reversal rate being given by the Kramers formula "!$#&% ')(1032547698 . Here 6 is the noise strength, 0 study a spatially extended model of noise-induced magne- tization reversal: a classical Ginzburg

  10. An analysis of beef cattle weights and gains measured at varying intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, James David

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be computed with the effect of fill removed. The type of ration being fed has a decided influence on fill as illustrated by Neyer et al. (1965). Their results indicated that reticulo-rumen fill was inversely correlated with energy intake. Their high energy...

  11. Calibration Monitoring for Sensor Calibration Interval Extension: Gaps in the Current Science Base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hashemian, Hash; Shumaker, Brent; Cummins, Dara

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently in the United States, periodic sensor recalibration is required for all safety-related sensors, typically occurring at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration in some plants. International application of calibration monitoring has shown that sensors may operate for longer periods within calibration tolerances. This issue is expected to also be important as the United States looks to the next generation of reactor designs (such as small modular reactors and advanced concepts), given the anticipated longer refueling cycles, proposed advanced sensors, and digital instrumentation and control systems. Online monitoring (OLM) can be employed to identify those sensors that require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors that need it. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the general concept of OLM for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no U.S. plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This paper summarizes a recent state-of-the-art assessment of online calibration monitoring in the nuclear power industry, including sensors, calibration practice, and OLM algorithms. This assessment identifies key research needs and gaps that prohibit integration of the NRC-approved online calibration monitoring system in the U.S. nuclear industry. Several technical needs were identified, including an understanding of the impacts of sensor degradation on measurements for both conventional and emerging sensors; the quantification of uncertainty in online calibration assessment; determination of calibration acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and assessment of the feasibility of using virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors in order to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity.

  12. Efficient Algorithms for the Prize Collecting Steiner Tree Problems with Interval Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermond, Jean-Claude

    occurs when a natural gas provider wants to build a most profitable transportation system to send natural 100190, China Abstract. Given a graph G = (V, E) with a cost on each edge in E and a prize at each vertex gas from a station to some customers on scattered locations, where each link (segment of pipleline

  13. Case Studies in Using Interval Data Energy Models for Savings Verification: Lessons from the Grocery Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effinger, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    responsible for driving energy use at the five stores. However, it?s recognized that poor regressions, defined by low R2 and high CV(RMSE), may still produce ?accurate? savings or at least savings that are good enough for some situations. Since many... to evaluate accuracy throughout this research. SAVINGS ANALYSIS This section outlines the process for determining the regression model specifications. Included is an analysis of possible driving variables and data resolution as well as an evaluation...

  14. Towards Combining Probabilistic, Interval, Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Constraints: An Example Using the Inverse Problem in Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    from the Earth, such as fossil fuels (oil, coal, natural gas), minerals, and water. Our need. For example, oil and gas tend to con- centrate near the top of natural underground domal struc- tures. So Computer Science and 2 Electrical & Computer Eng. Univ. of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX 79968, USA contact

  15. Towards Combining Probabilistic, Interval, Fuzzy Uncertainty, and Constraints: An Example Using the Inverse Problem in Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    from the Earth, such as fossil fuels (oil, coal, natural gas), minerals, and water. Our need. For example, oil and gas tend to con­ centrate near the top of natural underground domal struc­ tures. So Computer Science and 2 Electrical & Computer Eng. Univ. of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX 79968, USA contact

  16. Finite Element Method with the Interval Set Parameters and its Applications in Computational Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pownuk, Andrzej

    Science ANDRZEJ POWNUK The University of Texas at El Paso Department of Mathematical Sciences 500 West-ROUHANI The University of Texas at El Paso Department of Mathematical Sciences 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, Texas of Civil Engineering 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, Texas USA r.naveengoud@gmail.com Abstract

  17. Registering coherent change detection products associated with large image sets and long capture intervals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perkins, David Nikolaus; Gonzales, Antonio I

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of co-registered coherent change detection (CCD) products is produced from a set of temporally separated synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of a target scene. A plurality of transformations are determined, which transformations are respectively for transforming a plurality of the SAR images to a predetermined image coordinate system. The transformations are used to create, from a set of CCD products produced from the set of SAR images, a corresponding set of co-registered CCD products.

  18. Strong Negation: Its Relation to Intervals and Its Use in Expert Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Sciences, New Mexico State University Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA, email hunguyen@nmsu.edu Hoang Phuong­Liem National Center for Natural Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam email nhphuong@bdvn.vnmail.vnd.net Mirko Navara Center for Machine Perception, Faculty of Electrical Engineering Czech Technical University

  19. Somatotopic distortion of tactile temporal interval estimation Shinobu Kuroki1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachi, Susumu

    that sluggish neural signal, caused by transient luminance noise [2], impaired the accuracy of timing judgment events are crucial for human sensory and motor system, we focused whether this modification mechanism.1 Apparatus To avoid the negative effect of finger skin vibration, we used an

  20. Little Ice Age cold interval in West Antarctica: Evidence from borehole temperature at the West Antarctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    future climate changes. The LIA cooling was associated with a time of lower solar irradiance.1. The Last 1000 Years [2] The Northern Hemisphere experienced a widespread cooling from about 1400 to 1850 C of event is key to our knowledge of the variability in the climate system, and to our ability to forecast

  1. The Econometric Analysis of Interval-valued Data and Adaptive Regression Splines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Wei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to semiparametric GARCH-in-Mean models. University ofWe estimate the following GARCH(1,1) model y ct = c + ?Method CCRM CRM TS MTS GARCH-N (99%) GARCH-N (99.5%) GARCH-

  2. An analysis of the relationship of heart sound time intervals to respiratory sinus arrhythmia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schorsch, Eric Todd

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to be close to the clinically significant left ventricular ejection time (LVET). These results were obtained in a laboratory setting. Recording heart sounds at the trachea was not easy. The heart sound signal was not very stable. In order for a useful... VALVE R - LEFT VENTRICLE Figure 1. Crossectional view of the heart showing the four chambers and the four valves. l20 X IOO E E 80 oI 60 In 40 Aornc volve opens PROTODIASTOLE EJECTION~ COIJTRACTION~ I, r Aortic valve closes r ISOMETRIC...

  3. Indication of multiscaling in the volatility return intervals of stock markets Fengzhong Wang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    of financial markets has long been a focus of economics and econophysics research 19 . Study- ing recently, some related studies on financial markets, such as escape time 30 , exit time 31,32 , first and nonlinear features 36 . Recent studies 3739 of stock markets show that the distribution of activ- ity

  4. Multifactor analysis of multiscaling in volatility return intervals Fengzhong Wang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    markets 1721 show the following, for both daily and intraday data. i The distribution of the scaled and earthquakes 1315 . Also there are some related studies on financial markets, such as first passage time 25 Yamasaki,1,2 Shlomo Havlin,1,3 and H. Eugene Stanley1 1 Center for Polymer Studies and Department

  5. Multiple Interval Mapping for Gene Expression QTL and Zhao-Bang Zeng,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Zhao-Bang

    analysis on the 5182 eQTL we declared from the yeast data. The mapping results are available at http

  6. A Review of Sensor Calibration Monitoring for Calibration Interval Extension in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Hashemian, Hash; Shumaker, Brent; Cummins, Dara

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently in the United States, periodic sensor recalibration is required for all safety-related sensors, typically occurring at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration in some plants. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors that require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors that need it. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in United Kingdom, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. This issue is expected to also be important as the United States looks to the next generation of reactor designs (such as small modular reactors and advanced concepts), given the anticipated longer refueling cycles, proposed advanced sensors, and digital instrumentation and control systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no U.S. plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This report presents a state-of-the-art assessment of online calibration monitoring in the nuclear power industry, including sensors, calibration practice, and online monitoring algorithms. This assessment identifies key research needs and gaps that prohibit integration of the NRC-approved online calibration monitoring system in the U.S. nuclear industry. Several needs are identified, including the quantification of uncertainty in online calibration assessment; accurate determination of calibration acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and assessment of the feasibility of using virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors in order to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity. Understanding the degradation of sensors and the impact of this degradation on signals is key to developing technical basis to support acceptance criteria and set point decisions, particularly for advanced sensors which do not yet have a cumulative history of operating performance.

  7. Supplementary Material AMS Data Processing. AMS data were saved in 150-s intervals in alternating medium-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and 46 were adjusted to account for the variability of gas-phase contributions and for the interference measured gas-phase CO2 concentration. The signals of CO+ at m/z 28 and organic HxO+ at m/z 16, 17, and 18 that 50% of the emitted organic particles from combustion sources was hydrophobic, with an e

  8. Approximations for Aligned Coloring and Spillage Minimization in Interval and Chordal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyerson, Adam W.

    Douglas Carroll1 , Adam Meyerson2 , and Brian Tagiku2 1 Raytheon Company. E-mail: decarroll@raytheon.com 2

  9. THE SIZE OF EXPONENTIAL SUMS ON INTERVALS OF THE REAL LINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdlyi, Tams

    | Mj , |a0| = 1 , n N , where the exponents j R satisfy 0 = 0 , j j > 0 , j = 1, 2's conjecture, Konyagin's conjecture, Uhrig protocol, decoupling methods, quantum coherence, multi-pulse control

  10. Optimizing control flow in loops using interval anddependence analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghodrat, Mohammad Ali; Givargis, Tony; Nicolau, Alex

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    graphics mpgdec-initdec mpgenc-vh?lter mp3-psych mp3-align mpgenc-idct mpgdec-vh?lter Optimizing control ?graphics mpgdec-initdec mpgenc-vh?lter mp3-psych mp3-align mpgenc-idct mpgdec-vh?lter Optimizing control ?graphics mpgdec-initdec mpgenc-vh?lter mp3-psych mp3-align mpgenc-idct mpgdec-vh?lter Optimizing control ?

  11. The Econometric Analysis of Interval-valued Data and Adaptive Regression Splines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Wei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Miller, D. (2000). Econometric Foundations. CambridgeRegression Models, Econometric Reviews. Vol. 8, pp. 217-De- pendent Bootstrap, Econometric Reviews. Vol. 23, pp.

  12. Random Interval Generator v.3.x Russell T. Hurlburt, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    . If the device is left unattended, it enters a battery- saving "chirp" mode. Dimensions (inches): 4.15 X .85 X 2.40. Weight including batteries: 4.5 oz. The end and side views shown below are actual size. Controls outside Switch Bank Report Mode below.) 2. On/Off/Volume thumbwheel: Volume of both the onboard and earphone

  13. COLREGS-compliant autonomous collision avoidance using multi-objective optimization with interval programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woerner, Kyle

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High contact density environments are becoming ubiquitous in autonomous marine vehicle (AMV) operations. Safely managing these environments and their mission greatly taxes platforms. AMV collisions will likely increase as ...

  14. New Type-2 Rule Ranking Indices for Designing Parsimonious Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Logic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    rules can be effectively selected to construct parsimonious type-2 fuzzy models while the system processing [7][8], traffic forecasting [9], mobile robot control [10], pattern recognition [11] [12FLS mod- elling. As a matter of fact, even in type-I fuzzy logic system (FLS) modelling, developing

  15. New Type-2 Rule Ranking Indices for Designing Parsimonious Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Logic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granada, Universidad de

    rules can be effectively selected to construct parsimonious type-2 fuzzy models while the system processing [7][8], traffic forecasting [9], mobile robot control [10], pattern recognition [11FLS mod- elling. As a matter of fact, even in type-1 fuzzy logic system (FLS) modelling, developing

  16. No-Free-Lunch Result for Interval and Fuzzy Computing: When Bounds Are Unusually Good,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Mexicano de Petroleo, Ejec Central Lazaro Cardenas Norte 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan Mexico D, Their Computation is Unusually Slow Ildar Batyrshin1 , Martine Ceberio2 , and Vladik Kreinovich2 1 Instituto

  17. Robust stabilizer synthesis for interval plants using H-Infinity methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Saikat

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), It is also assumed that r(s) is a stable, proper, rational function. From the small gain theorem [12], it can be guaranteed that the system will be robustly stable iff 12 sup l(1+ Pp(j u)C(j ~) 'C(j ~)bP(jip)I & 1. A necessary and suf6cient condition.... Uncertainty band when r = ((6P~, ~(e, j u) ~(~ 32 This conservativeness can possibly be minimized by introducing poles and zeros in r(s) and shaping it such that ]r(ja)] approximates 6P, (ej w) at each w, as closely as possible. So, for each c, the maximum...

  18. Finding limiting flows of batch extractive distillation with interval Erika R. Fritsa,b*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csendes, Tibor

    ., Hungary, e-mail: ufo@mail.bme.hu b HAS ­ BUTE Research Group of Technical Chemistry, H-1521 Budapest, P

  19. Reliable Computing 1 (2) (1995), pp. 109-140 Parallel interval-basedreasoning in medical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearfott, R. Baker

    -based system Clinaid LADISLAVJ. KOHOUT, ISABEL STABILE,HASAN KALANTARt MARIA F. SAN-ANDRES, and JOHN ANDERSON Record Unit. 4. Co-ordination and Planning Unit. (~) U J. Kohout, I. Stabile, H Kalantar,M. F San

  20. A novel approach to determine post mortem interval using neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Cekanova, Maria [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Vass, Arpad Alexander [ORNL; Nichols, Trent L [ORNL; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe [ORNL; Donnell, Robert [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Finocchiaro, Vincenzo [University of Messina, Messina, Italy

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, neutron radiography (NR) is used non-destructively to measure changes in hydrogen (H) content in decaying tissues as a mean to estimate post-mortem invertal (PMI). After death, tissue undergoes sequential changes consisting of organic and inorganic phase variations, as well as a gradual reduction of tissue water content. H is the primary contributor to NR contrast in biological specimens because (1) it is the most abundant element in biological tissues and (2) its nucleus scatter thermal and cold neutrons more strongly than any other atomic nucleus. These contrast differences can be advantageous in a forensic context to determine small changes in hydrogen concentrations. Dog cadavers were used as a model for human cadavers. Canine tissues and cadavers were exposed to controlled (laboratory settings) and uncontrolled (University of Tennessee Anthropology Research Facility) environmental conditions during putefraction, respectively. Neutron radiographs were supplemented with photographs and histology data to assess the decomposition stage of cadavers. Results demonstrated that the increase in neutron transmission likely corresponded to a decrease in hydrogen content in the tissue, which was correlated with the time of decay of the tissue. Tissues depleted in hydrogen are brighter in the neutron transmission radiographs of skeletal muscles, lung, and bone, under controlled conditions. Over a period of 10 days, changes in neutron transmission through lung and muscle were found to be higher than bone by 8.3%, 7.0 %, and 2.0 %, respectively. Estimation of the PMI was calculated from a natural logarithmic fitting of the NR data. Under controlled conditions, estimation of the PMI was 70% and 63.9 % accurate for bone and lung tissues, while being 1.4% accurate for muscle tissue. All results underestimated the true PMI. In conclusion, neutron radiography can be used for detection of hydrogen changes in decaying tissues to estimate PMI.

  1. Physiological responses of reining horses to interval training versus conventional training procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haney, Elizabeth anne

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that reining horse maneuvers including galloping large, fast circles, spinning, and running to the sliding stop elicit anaerobiosis. Because the reining horse must produce energy anaerobically it is logical that the reining horse would benefit &om... in-depth maneuver workout which included spinning, galloping (500m/min) and stopping at intensities to elicit significant anaerobiosis (HR&200). Horses received stall rest with no forced exercise on d 6 and 7 of each week. This protocol is typical...

  2. File:Table for Tip Speed Intervals of Length.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEuropeStrat.pdf Jump to:student-HS.pdf JumpSkystream

  3. STATISTICA INFERENZIALE SHEDA N. 2 INTERVALLI DI CONFIDENZA PER IL VALORE ATTESO E LA FREQUENZA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogantin, Maria Piera

    determinare il prezzo medio l'ISTAT (Istituto Nazionale di Statistica) effettua un campionamento su vari negozi della regione, tenendo conto della dislocazione geografica, del tipo di distribuzione . Sappiamo, inoltre, che X ha ancora distribuzione normale: ( ,2.25).X N Vogliamo determinare tale che ( )P

  4. Decision Making under Interval and Fuzzy Uncertainty: Towards an Operational Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    State Oil Academy, Baku, Azerbaijan raliev@asoa.edu.az, oleg huseynov@yahoo.com 2 Azerbaijan Association assumption that for each two alterna- tives, a user can always meaningfully decide which of them. Traditional decision theory is based on a simplifying assumption that for each two alternatives, a user can

  5. Considerations for the use of radar-derived precipitation estimates in determining return intervals for extreme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Robert J.

    to those based on traditional rain gauge networks. For both the radar and gauge data, increasing, considerable differences between radar ARF and gauge ARF exist. Radar ARF decays at a faster rate (with increasing area) than gauge ARF. For a basin size of 20,000 km2 , the percent difference between radar ARF

  6. SEP Request for Approval Form 1 - Modeling of Data at Finer Intervals than

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDER 2913 | DepartmentFinancing ProgramsWeekly

  7. An Assessment of Interval Data and Their Potential Application to Residential Electricity End-Use Modeling

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S. Offshore U.S.:7)An Assessment

  8. Home Site Map Make Your Home Page Suggestions Enquiry JD(S) should have honoured agreement with BJP in Karanataka: JD(U) Yediyurappa confident of BJP returning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummaa, Virpi

    Envionmental Impact Assessment Environmental Policy & Audit www.bradley-enviro.co.uk Childsafe Protecting your Envionmental Impact Assessment Environmental Policy & Audit www.bradley-enviro.co.uk Mothercare Online Store the impact on mothers in developed nations, they claim that their findings may still be very relevant

  9. The Effect of Nursing Faculty Presence on Students' Level of Anxiety, Self-Confidence, and Clinical Performance During a Clinical Simulation Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horsley, Trisha Leann

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Nursing schools design their clinical simulation labs based upon faculty's perception of the optimal environment to meet the students' learning needs, other programs' success with integrating high-tech clinical simulation, ...

  10. The Failure of Confidence Mechanism: Reflections on the 1990s Social Change Movement in the Light of policy Measures Affecting Farming System in Nepal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandey, Tulsi Ram

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Manandhar 1982)- Dne believed to encDurage peDple for its management for fulfilling their needs of daily life such as timber, fuel wood, leaves and grasses. Under this programme, communities were to be entrusted with three ca:egories of 103 l o r e s t l a n...

  11. Countless resources exist to connect businesses and corporations with talent. When you partner with Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), you gain the confidence that comes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    of electricity. The Galvin Center is bringing together researchers, industry, government, and innovators to "plug and the environment. Robert W. Galvin Center for Electricity Innovation · The mission of the Galvin Center is to pursue groundbreaking work in the generation, transmission, distribution, management, and consumption

  12. Statement of position of the United States Department of Energy in the matter of proposed rulemaking on the storage and disposal of nuclear waste (waste confidence rulemaking)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose of this proceeding is to assess generically the degree of assurance that the radioactive waste can be safely disposed of, to determine when such disposal or off-site storage will be available, and to determine whether wastes can be safely stored on-site past license expiration until off-site disposal/storage is available. (DLC)

  13. Improved confidence in (U-Th)/He thermochronology using the laser microprobe: An example from a Pleistocene leucogranite, Nanga Parbat, Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyce, J. W.

    The newly developed laser microprobe (U-Th)/He thermochronometer permits, for the first time, the ability to generate precise (U-Th)/He cooling ages for even very young (<1 Ma) samples with a spatial resolution on the order ...

  14. The Johns Hopkins University Fun Facts " The public is sensitive to little things, and they wouldn't have full confidence in a college that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Heydt, Rüdiger

    at a now-demolished rink on North Avenue in Baltimore, Johns Hopkins played Yale in the first intercollegiate ice hockey game, which ended in a 2-2 tie. In 1916, the Faculty of Philosophy (now known

  15. Input-output multiplier distributions from probabilistic production paths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konecny, R.T.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the standard Leontief input-output model, a single dominant technology is assumed in the production of a particular commodity. However, in the real world, quite similar commodities are produced by firms with vastly different technologies. In addressing this limitation, the Probabilistic Production Path model (PPP) is used to investigate both the method of production and identity of the producer. An important feature of the PPP model is the consideration of the effects that heterogeneous technologies and dissimilar trade patterns have on the properties of the distribution of input-output multipliers. The derivation of the distribution of output multipliers is generalized for discrete probabilities based on market shares. Due to the complexity of the generalized solution, a simulation model is used to approximate the multiplier distribution. Results of the model show that the distributional properties of the multipliers are unpredictable, with the majority of the distributions being multimodal. Typically, the mean of the multipliers lies in a trough between two modes. Multimodal multiplier distributions were found to have a tighter symmetric interval than the corresponding standard normal confidence interval. Therefore, the use of the normal confidence interval appears to be sufficient, though overstated, for the construction of confidence intervals in the PPP model.

  16. Aspects of the life history of the southern Kingfish, Menticirrhus americanus, in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harding, Stephen Michael

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    used to predict initial and final sizes for growth increments are those in Figure 4 and Table 3. Equation and Interval of Collection Dates Predicted Initial and Pinal Total Len th Nean 99$ Confidence Interval on Observations Tl. me... one or two spawned groups normally predominated at any one time and no more than three cooccurred wi. th few possible exceptions. Observed mean sizes were 138 mm TL at 6 mo, and 192 and 272 mm at age I and II. Typical maximum size was 296-308 mn...

  17. How to confirm and exclude different models of material properties in the Casimir effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. M. Mostepanenko

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate a method allowing to confirm or exclude the alternative models of material properties at some definite confidence level in experiments on measuring the Casimir force. The method is based on the consideration of differences between the theoretical and mean measured quantities and the confidence intervals for these differences found at sufficiently high or low confidence probabilities. The developed method is applied to the data of four recent experiments on measuring the gradient of the Casimir force by means of a dynamic atomic force microscope. It is shown that in experiments with Au-Au and Ni-Ni test bodies, where the Drude model approach is excluded at a 95% confidence level, the plasma model approach agrees with the data at higher than 90% confidence. In experiments using an Au sphere interacting with either a Ni plate or a graphene-coated substrate the measurement data agree with the common prediction of the Drude and plasma model approaches and theory using the polarization tensor at 90% and 80% confidence levels, respectively.

  18. Bayesian method for testing TTBT compliance with unknown intercept and slope. Scientific report number 101

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, J.; Gray, H.L.; McCartor, G.D.; Woodward, W.A.

    1992-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report the authors examine the Bayesian method for testing for compliance to a given threshold studies by Nicholson, Mensing and Gray. It is noted that although this test and accompanying confidence intervals are valid for single event, it is incorrect to apply it or the confidence intervals to repeated events at the same site unless the number of calibration events is large. Since in any foreseeable future the number of calibration events is likely to be small, this report studies the applicability of the Bayesian test in this case. The results suggest that in many instances the Bayesian method examined here should be used on repeated events with caution if the number of calibration events is less than three.

  19. Solar Census - Perfecting the Art of Automated, Remote Solar Shading Assessments (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To validate the work completed by Solar Census as part of the Department of Energy SunShot Incubator 8 award, NREL validated the performanec of the Solar Census Surveyor tool against the industry standard Solmetric SunEye measurements for 4 residential sites in California who experienced light to heavy shading. Using the a two one-sided test (TOST) of statistical equivalence, NREL found that the mean differences between the Solar Census and SunEye mean solar access values for Annual, Summer, and Winter readings fall within the 95% confidence intervals and the confidence intervals themselves fall within the tolerances of +/- 5 SAVs, the Solar Census calculations are statistically equivalent to the SunEye measurements.

  20. Fatigue-crack growth correlations for design and analysis of stainless steel components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, L.A.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A relatively large collection of fatigue-crack growth results for annealed Types 304 and 316 stainless steels over a wide range of temperature was processed and analyzed in a consistent way. Only data that satisfied the criteria of ASTM E647-82 was retained and used in the statistical treatments that followed. Linear least-squares regression equations and 95% confidence intervals were fitted through the results for each material/temperature set. The regression results (and their associated limits of validity) provide useful equations for the analysis of structural components. Overlap (or the lack of overlap) of the confidence intervals was employed as a criterion as to whether the results for Types 304 and 316 should be separated into discrete sets, and on this basis it was concluded that the two alloys should be treated separately. 38 references, 16 figures, 1 table.

  1. A meta-analytic study of the Profile of Mood States in sport and exercise research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaughan, Kristen Lea

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    teammates or competitors, (2) elite athletes versus non-athletes, and (3) average athletes versus non-athletes. The results revealed mean effect sizes for each comparison category on the six mood scales which generally support the concept... States Sport and Exercise Research Meta-analysis METHOD Identification of Studies Comparison Groups Variables Coded Effect Size Calculation RESULTS 12 14 14 18 Stem-leaf Plots of Effect Sizes Mean Effect Size Confidence Intervals Comparison...

  2. A comparison of D statistic approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franklin, M. [Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper compares the traditional D statistic with a ratio estimator (R) of the true material discrepancy in the verification of nuclear material accounts. The purpose of the paper is to discuss whether there is any practical advantage in using R in place of D. The paper discusses D and R in terms of bias, standard deviation and its` estimation, reliability of confidence intervals and information requirements for implementation.

  3. Validation of the International Code Compliant Calculator (IC3) Using the RESNET Verification Procedures (No. 07-003)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhotra, Mini; Kim, Hyojin; Liu, Zi; Haberl, Jeff

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 2: Cooling Load and Cooling Load Differential Results Using IC3 in Las Vegas, NV ..................................... 6 Figure 3: Percent Heating/Cooling Energy Use Change Using IC3 for HVAC Test Cases ....................................... 10..., NV to evaluate cooling energy loads. Figures 1 and 2 show the 90% confidence intervals for the maximum and minimum ranges of allowable predictions for heating loads (Figures 1a and 1b) and heating load differential (Figures 1c and 1d) in Colorado...

  4. Validation of the International Code Compliant Calculator (IC3) v3.10 Using the RESNET Verification Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J. S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegas, NV ..................................... 6? Figure 3: Percent Heating/Cooling Energy Use Change Using IC3 for HVAC Test Cases ....................................... 10? Figure 4: Percent Heating/Cooling Energy Use Change Using IC3 for DSE Test... heating energy loads and in Las Vegas, NV to evaluate cooling energy loads. Figures 1 and 2 show the 90% confidence intervals for the maximum and minimum ranges of allowable predictions for heating loads (Figures 1a and 1b) and heating load...

  5. Understanding Data Better with Bayesian and Global Statistical Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William H. Press

    1996-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    To understand their data better, astronomers need to use statistical tools that are more advanced than traditional ``freshman lab'' statistics. As an illustration, the problem of combining apparently incompatible measurements of a quantity is presented from both the traditional, and a more sophisticated Bayesian, perspective. Explicit formulas are given for both treatments. Results are shown for the value of the Hubble Constant, and a 95% confidence interval of 66 < H0 < 82 (km/s/Mpc) is obtained.

  6. Sire selection: maximizing net present value of investments in dairy semen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcox, Marsha Lou

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heifer Due to Changes in Conception Rate. 63 Estimated Value of Type Under the Five PDS:PDT Weightings for All Sires, the Top Twenty, and the Top Ten Sires at the Variable Means. 66 LIST OF TABLES (Continued) Top Fifty Holstein Sires Under a 1...:0 Weighting at Variable Means Ranked by Net Present value With Upper and Lower 60% Confidence Intervals and Repeatablity. . 66 Negative Net Present Value Holstein Sires for the 1:0 Weighting at the Variable Neans...

  7. Global Change Biology (1996)2,169-182 Measurements of carbon sequestration by long-term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global Change Biology (1996)2,169-182 Measurements of carbon sequestration by long-term eddy. The integrated carbon sequestration in 1994 was 2.1 t C ha-l y-l with a 90% confidence interval due to sampling an overall uncertainty on the annual carbon sequestration in 1994 of --0.3to +0.8 t C ha-l y-l. Keywords

  8. Correction for serial correlation in volume ratio models. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reams, G.A.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Individual tree volume ratio models and associated taper functions are frequently used to estimate merchantable volume of trees to specific top diameters. However, little consideration has been given to the correlation between successive observations that exists in these models. An econometric procedure that corrects for this autocorrelation is presented. The corrected model is, in theory, closer to the 'true' model form and possesses confidence intervals that are more realistic than those given by uncorrected models.

  9. Perceptual and cognitive factors in legend legibility for large freeway guide signs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Abbott Bowman

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anaylsis 23 30 33 34 35 RESULTS Legibility Distance Recognition Distance . 41 46 Page CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS . 53 Conclusions Recommendations 53 55 REFERENCES . 57 APPENDICES 61 VITA 105 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE 1 Structural... (0. 4 sec) converted into distance by assuming a roadway speed of 70 mph (102. 6 ft/sec) = 41 ft It follows that 32 observations were needed to give a 95 percent confidence 24 interval about the means. Test subjects were recruited from...

  10. Evaluating and developing parameter optimization and uncertainty analysis methods for a computationally intensive distributed hydrological model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xuesong

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ? weights for river stage prediction (Chau, 2006). Other evolutionary algorithms, such as Differential Evaluation (DE) (Storn and Price, 1997) and Artificial Immune Systems (AIS) (de Castro and Von Zuben, 2002a; de Castro and Von Zuben, 2002b), although... is to structure the hydrologic model as a probability model, then the confidence interval of model output can be computed (Montanari et al., 1997). Representative methods of this category include Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) and a Generalized Likelihood...

  11. Improving the Simulation Environment for Computer Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naranjo Carmona, Alberto Javier

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 2.2.2 Confidence intervals for unknown mean and unknown standard deviation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 3. IMPLEMENTATION OF A THREE-LEVEL CACHE HIERARCHY IN GEM5... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 3.1 Original two-level cache hierarchy in gem5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 3.1.1 Micro-architectural model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 3.1.2 FSM in L1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 vi 3.1.3 FSM...

  12. Relative Risks Analysis in Nutritional Epidemiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yanqing

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 A.2 Proofs of Lemmas 1-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 A.3 More Details of Simulation Results in Chapter 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 A.4 Bootstrapping Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95... OF FIGURES FIGURE Page B.1 Relationship between the 95% confidence interval by using the inverse Fisher matrix and the number of points which involved in computing the derivative ?S?0.90,k`(?k`)/??Tk` and ?S?0.10,k`(?k`)/?? T k`. . . . . . . . 101 B.2...

  13. Quality characteristics of vacuum-packaged beef as affected by postmortem chill, storage temperature and storage interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beebe, Sammy Denzil

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    styrofoam tray and overwrapped with Goodyear "Choice Wrap" and displayed under retail conditions (1-3 C under 82 footcandles of incandescent light). The retail cuts were scored for four consecutive days for surface discoloration, peripheral discolora...

  14. Intra-Set Rest Intervals in Hypertrophic Training: Effects on Hypertrophy, Strength, Power, and Myosin Heavy Chain Composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Jonathan

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    +/- 245, 704 +/- 233, 723 +/- 227, 830 +/- 232W; ALT 632 +/- 171, 734 +/- 179, 783 +/- 188, 914 +/- 207W; pdesigned to elicit hypertrophy results in greater gains in strength and power...

  15. Calculation of probabilities of transfer, recurrence intervals, and positional indices for linear compartment models. Environmental Sciences Division Publication no. 1544

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carney, J.H.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Gardner, R.H.; Mankin, J.B.; Post, W.M.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Six indices are presented for linear compartment systems that quantify the probable pathways of matter or energy transfer, the likelihood of recurrence if the model contains feedback loops, and the number of steps (transfers) through the system. General examples are used to illustrate how these indices can simplify the comparison of complex systems or organisms in unrelated systems.

  16. Energy Consumption Estimation for Room Air-conditioners Using Room Temperature Simulation with One-Minute Intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, F.; Yoshida, H.; Matsumoto, K.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of simulated energy consumption can match the measured data. The simulation accuracy of room air temperature and energy consumption during the air-conditioner start-up period is not good and needs to be improved in future research. But in general...

  17. A comparison of the regular interval, varying start technique of work sampling with the completely random technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poage, Scott Tabor

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . D. HE Denholm whereby the "p oharts" of statistical ouality control are used to maintain sta- tistical control. 1. Brisleyp C. L. y "How You Can Put Work Sampling to Work, " FactorI Management and Maintenance, Vol. 110, No. 7, July N l~d, pp. H... 2 tt tttt2, 9 l. 76, N . 2, P trtprp, 1954, pp. ~331-33 1 the th h, 1954, te e r ~re t r ~Nehe e t ehd Maintenance, Mr. John M. Alderidgs presented and demon- strated. ths use of two nomographs for the calculations involved ln work sampling...

  18. [FG94] Fraigniaud, P., Gavoile, C.: Interval Routing Schemes. Research Rep. 9404, LIPSENS Lyon (1994). To appear in Algorithmica.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moran, Shlomo

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a significant price in time. Moreover, in Section 4 we revealed a connection between the total 2 diameter of an LIRS for it. We introduced the family of petal graphs (which includes all lithium graphs achieved by this result for lithium graphs is 1, which implies the impossibility result of [FG94]. Our work

  19. Shape and location effects on filled- and empty-intervals as indicators of an independent temporal code in working memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawyer, Alexia

    2011-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives Using the filled-duration illusion, this study investigated the existence of an independent temporal code operating in working memory. Extending research suggesting the principle distinction between filled- and ...

  20. 01988 Alan R. Liss. Inc. Cytometry 9:418425 (1988) Interval-Coded Texture Features for Artifact Rejection in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodenacker, Karsten

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .B.);Department of Electrical Engineering,SydneyUniversity, Sydney,Australia (P.N.);Department of Cytopathology,Charing Cross Hospital,London W68RF, England (K.W.) Received for publicationSeptember 23, 1987;acceptedApril 4), and statistical parameters (1).In quantitative cytology, the analysis of nuclear texture has been particularly

  1. Reliable Prediction of Phase Stability Using an Interval Newton Method James Z. Huaa, Joan F. Brenneckeb and Mark A. Stadtherra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadtherr, Mark A.

    mathematics, for the solution of the phase stability problem for the Margules equation and the NRTL equation

  2. Percentile Norms and Accompanying Interval Estimates from an Australian General Adult Population Sample for Self-Report Mood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, John R.

    , Adelaide, South Australia, 3 School of Psychology, University of NSW, and 4 University of Kurdistan Hawler

  3. A study of the sensitivity of topological dynamical systems and the Fourier spectrum of chaotic interval maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roque Sol, Marco A.

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study some topological properties of dynamical systems. In particular the rela- tionship between spatio-temporal chaotic and Li-Yorke sensitive dynamical systems establishing that for minimal dynamical systems those properties are equivalent...

  4. SUBMITTED FOR PUBLICATION TO: IEEE COMPUTER, 2002, JANUARY 28, 2002 1 Interval Set Clustering of Web Users with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Web Users with Rough K-means Pawan Lingras Chad West Abstract Data collection and analysis in web mining faces certain unique challenges. Due to a variety of reasons inherent in web browsing and web techniques in web mining need to accommodate such data. Fuzzy and rough sets provide the ability to deal

  5. Effect of Alfaprostol, Lasalocid and Once Daily Suckling on postpartum interval in Brahman and Brahman crossbred cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Vecchio, Ronald Paul

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 7 +3. 8 vs 87. 4+ 3. 9) and positively influenced the cumulative frequency of return to estrus (CFE; P& . 04) in cows and heifers. Alfaprostol did not affect PPI in cows or heifers but did increase (P& . 02) CFE by 90 days postpartum in heifers.... Lasalocid did not affect PPI or CFE in cows or heifers. First service conception and overall pregnancy rates did not differ between treatments. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author would like to extend his gratitude and utmost respect to Dr. R. D. Randel who...

  6. A Divide-and-Conquer Approach for Solving Interval Algebra Networks Jason Jingshi Li, Jinbo Huang, and Jochen Renz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jinbo

    information such as "the financial crisis begun dur- ing the 2008 presidential campaign" does not specify is NP-hard for many cal- culi including IA. If only atomic IA relations are permitted, however

  7. AnyExpress: Integrated toolkit for analysis of cross-platform gene expression data using a fast interval matching algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jihoon; Patel, Kiltesh; Jung, Hyunchul; Kuo, Winston P; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    external software tools such as Bowtie (indicated by pinkruns via software such as Bowtie or RMAP. The standard inputsoft- ware as inputs (e.g. , Bowtie for NGS), which consist

  8. Abstract--EEG inter-burst interval (IBI) and its evolution is a robust parameter for grading hypoxic encephalopathy and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [2, 3]. The degree of hypoxic brain injury and recovery is mainly determined by the severity and duration of insults [4]. However, secondary injury also develops over a time-period of several hours of the newborn. For this purpose, recovery of the IBI is again the most frequently used parameter. In [9

  9. APIC'95, El Paso, Extended Abstracts, A Supplement to the international journal of Reliable Computing 1 Functional Programming and Interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    increases. Nowadays, software already controls nuclear plants, weapons, etc. Human lives, and even to guarantee reliability is to test a pro­ gram for all possible cases. Usually, there are many possible inputs, so testing all of them is always dif­ ficult, and most of the time practically impossible. If we test

  10. Exercise overloading in the equine: cardiorespiratory and metabolic response to a combined long, slow, distance and interval training exercise regimen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drozd, Leann Francine

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) on an equine treadmill. The total conditioning portion of the study was divided into two, 42-d phases. The first 42 d of conditioning were designed to condition the horses through long, slow, distance (LSD) exercise. Horses were galloped 4. 8 km at 400 m... were not significantly different. After a 14-wk study of traditionally training the Thoroughbred, Foreman et al. (1983) reported no significant differences in HR at rest, during a SET gallop, nor at 20, 40 and 60 min post exercise. However...

  11. Changing Trends in the Refining Industry (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been some major changes in the U.S. refining industry recently, prompted in part by a significant decline in the quality of imported crude oil and by increasing restrictions on the quality of finished products. As a result, high-quality crudes, such as the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude that serves as a benchmark for oil futures on the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), have been trading at record premiums to the OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) Basket price.

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.& Exports" ,"ClickNYMEX Futures

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.& Exports" ,"ClickNYMEX

  14. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a(STEO)U.S. CoalInputs &Futures Prices (NYMEX)

  15. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a(STEO)U.S. CoalInputs &Futures Prices (NYMEX)Area

  16. A conceptual model and preliminary estimate of potential tritium migration from the Benham (U-20c) site, Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brikowski, T.; Mahin, G. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U-20c is the site of a large below-water-table nuclear test near the Nevada Test Site boundary. A conceptual model of potential groundwater migration of tritium from U-20c is constructed and quantitatively evaluated in this report. The lower portion of the collapse chimney at Benham is expected to intersect 200 m of permeable rhyolite lava, overlain by similar thicknesses of low-permeability zeolitized bedded tuff, then permeable welded tuff. Vertical groundwater flow through the chimney is predicted to be minimal, horizontal transport should be controlled by the regional groundwater flow. Analytic solutions treating only advective transport indicate 1 to 2 km of tritium movement (95% confidence interval 0.7--2.5 km) within 5 years after test-related pressure-temperature transients have dissipated. This point lies at the axis of a potentiometric surface trough along the west edge of Area 20, Nevada Test Site. Within 25 years, movement is predicted to extend to 3 km (95% confidence interval 2--5 km) approximately to the intersection of the trough and the Nevada Test Site boundary. Considering the effects of radioactive decay, but not dispersion, plume concentration would fall below Safe Drinking Water Act standards by 204 years, at a predicted distance of 11 km (95% confidence interval 7--31 km). This point is located in the eastern portion of the Timber Mountain Caldera moat within the Nellis Air Force Range (military bombing range).

  17. A valid and fast spatial bootstrap for correlation functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji Meng Loh

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we examine the validity of non-parametric spatial bootstrap as a procedure to quantify errors in estimates of N-point correlation functions. We do this by means of a small simulation study with simple point process models and estimating the two-point correlation functions and their errors. The coverage of confidence intervals obtained using bootstrap is compared with those obtained from assuming Poisson errors. The bootstrap procedure considered here is adapted for use with spatial (i.e. dependent) data. In particular, we describe a marked point bootstrap where, instead of resampling points or blocks of points, we resample marks assigned to the data points. These marks are numerical values that are based on the statistic of interest. We describe how the marks are defined for the two- and three-point correlation functions. By resampling marks, the bootstrap samples retain more of the dependence structure present in the data. Furthermore, this method of bootstrap can be performed much quicker than some other bootstrap methods for spatial data, making it a more practical method with large datasets. We find that with clustered point datasets, confidence intervals obtained using the marked point bootstrap has empirical coverage closer to the nominal level than the confidence intervals obtained using Poisson errors. The bootstrap errors were also found to be closer to the true errors for the clustered point datasets.

  18. The myth of science-based predictive modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemez, F. M. (Franois M.)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key aspect of science-based predictive modeling is the assessment of prediction credibility. This publication argues that the credibility of a family of models and their predictions must combine three components: (1) the fidelity of predictions to test data; (2) the robustness of predictions to variability, uncertainty, and lack-of-knowledge; and (3) the prediction accuracy of models in cases where measurements are not available. Unfortunately, these three objectives are antagonistic. A recently published Theorem that demonstrates the irrevocable trade-offs between fidelity-to-data, robustness-to-uncertainty, and confidence in prediction is summarized. High-fidelity models cannot be made increasingly robust to uncertainty and lack-of-knowledge. Similarly, robustness-to-uncertainty can only be improved at the cost of reducing the confidence in prediction. The concept of confidence in prediction relies on a metric for total uncertainty, capable of aggregating different representations of uncertainty (probabilistic or not). The discussion is illustrated with an engineering application where a family of models is developed to predict the acceleration levels obtained when impacts of varying levels propagate through layers of crushable hyper-foam material of varying thicknesses. Convex modeling is invoked to represent a severe lack-of-knowledge about the constitutive material behavior. The analysis produces intervals of performance metrics from which the total uncertainty and confidence levels are estimated. Finally, performance, robustness and confidence are extrapolated throughout the validation domain to assess the predictive power of the family of models away from tested configurations.

  19. Assessment of cartilage-dedicated sequences at ultra-high-field MRI: comparison of imaging performance and diagnostic confidence between 3.0 and 7.0T with respect to osteoarthritis-induced changes at the knee joint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OA)-induced changes at 7.0 and 3.0 T MRI. Materialsfor cartilage imaging at 3.0 T were tailored for 7.0 T: anM, Tanenbaum L, Crues JV 3rd. 3.0 Tesla imaging of the

  20. Meta-Analyses of the Associations of Respiratory Health Effectswith Dampness and Mold in Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Lei-Gomez, Quanhong; Mendell, Mark J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences recently completed a critical review of the scientific literature pertaining to the association of indoor dampness and mold contamination with adverse health effects. In this paper, we report the results of quantitative meta-analysis of the studies reviewed in the IOM report. We developed point estimates and confidence intervals (CIs) to summarize the association of several respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes with the presence of dampness and mold in homes. The odds ratios and confidence intervals from the original studies were transformed to the log scale and random effect models were applied to the log odds ratios and their variance. Models were constructed both accounting for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed and ignoring such potential correlation. Central estimates of ORs for the health outcomes ranged from 1.32 to 2.10, with most central estimates between 1.3 and 1.8. Confidence intervals (95%) excluded unity except in two of 28 instances, and in most cases the lower bound of the CI exceeded 1.2. In general, the two meta-analysis methods produced similar estimates for ORs and CIs. Based on the results of the meta-analyses, building dampness and mold are associated with approximately 30% to 80% increases in a variety of respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes. The results of these meta-analyses reinforce the IOM's recommendation that actions be taken to prevent and reduce building dampness problems.

  1. Comment on the Word 'Cooling' as it is Used in Beam Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2005-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences recently completed a critical review of the scientific literature pertaining to the association of indoor dampness and mold contamination with adverse health effects. In this paper, we report the results of quantitative meta-analysis of the studies reviewed in the IOM report. We developed point estimates and confidence intervals (CIs) to summarize the association of several respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes with the presence of dampness and mold in homes. The odds ratios and confidence intervals from the original studies were transformed to the log scale and random effect models were applied to the log odds ratios and their variance. Models were constructed both accounting for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed and ignoring such potential correlation. Central estimates of ORs for the health outcomes ranged from 1.32 to 2.10, with most central estimates between 1.3 and 1.8. Confidence intervals (95%) excluded unity except in two of 28 instances, and in most cases the lower bound of the CI exceeded 1.2. In general, the two meta-analysis methods produced similar estimates for ORs and CIs. Based on the results of the meta-analyses, building dampness and mold are associated with approximately 30% to 80% increases in a variety of respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes. The results of these meta-analyses reinforce the IOM's recommendation that actions be taken to prevent and reduce building dampness problems.

  2. Randomized Controlled Trial of Forward-Planned Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: Interim Results at 2 Years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, Gillian C. [Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge University Hospitals, National Health Service Foundation Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Jennifer S.; Moody, Anne M.; Wilson, Charles B.; Twyman, Nicola [Oncology Centre, Cambridge University Hospitals, National Health Services Foundation Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Wishart, Gordon C. [Cambridge Breast Unit, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Burnet, Neil G. [Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge University Hospitals, National Health Service Foundation Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Coles, Charlotte E., E-mail: charlotte.coles@addenbrookes.nhs.uk [Oncology Centre, Cambridge University Hospitals, National Health Services Foundation Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This single-center randomized trial was designed to investigate whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) reduces late toxicity in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The standard tangential plans of 1,145 nonselected patients were analyzed. The patients with inhomogeneous plans were randomized to a simple method of forward-planned IMRT or standard radiotherapy (RT). The primary endpoint was serial photographic assessment of breast shrinkage. Results: At 2 years, no significant difference was found in the development of any photographically assessed breast shrinkage between the patients randomized to the interventional or control group (odds ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.58; p = .41). The patients in the control group were more likely to develop telangiectasia than those in the IMRT group (odds ratio, 1.68; 95% confidence interval 1.13-2.40; p = .009). Poor baseline surgical cosmesis resulted in poor overall cosmesis at 2 years after RT. In patients who had good surgical cosmesis, those randomized to IMRT were less likely to deteriorate to a moderate or poor overall cosmesis than those in the control group (odds ratio, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-1.03, p = .061). Conclusions: IMRT can lead to a significant reduction in telangiectasia at comparatively early follow-up of only 2 years after RT completion. An important component of breast induration and shrinkage will actually result from the surgery and not from the RT. Surgical cosmesis is an important determinant of overall cosmesis and could partially mask the longer term benefits of IMRT at this early stage.

  3. Betting on the Future: The authors compare natural gas forecaststo futures buys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 12, 2005, the reference case projections from Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO 2006) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market. The goal is better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. Below is a discussion of our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past five years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past five years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this article we update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2006. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic. As was the case in the past five AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2005), we once again find that the AEO 2006 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEX-AEO 2006 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$2.3/MMBtu levelized over five years--that we have seen over the last six years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $2.3/MMBtu more than the AEO 2006 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years. Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years

  4. A soil moisture budget analysis of Texas using basic climatic data while assuming a possible warming trend across the state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjornson, Brian Matthew

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the slope (dashed lines) of the regression line of precipitation on mean temperature for the Lower Valley. 35. Isopleths of MTRANGE (in 'F) for Texas during August. 71 36. Percentage of monthly soil moisture (SM) for the High Plains for a O'F (control... are significant at the 95% confidence interval. 74 37. Percentage of monthly soil moisture (SM) for the High Plains for a O'F (control), I' F, 2'F, 3'F, and 4'F increase in the mean annual temperature of Texas. Mean monthly temperatures increase non...

  5. Cross-sectional study of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella in market-age swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrington, Leigh Anne

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the prevalence of apramycin-resistant Salmonella infection was greater among swine that received apramycin in the first 21 days post-birth than among those that did not, this difference was not significant (odds ratio (OR)=2, 3, 95'/o confidence interval (CI...): 0. 8 ? 7. 1). Streptomycin-resistant Salmonella infection also was more prevalent among pigs that received apramycin, but this difference was nonsignificant Wer adjusting for somatic serogroup (OR=1. 7, 955o CI: 0. 8 ? 3. 4) and serovar (OR=1. 3...

  6. The Two-Point Correlation Function of Gamma-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ming-Hua

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we examine the spacial distribution of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) using a sample of 373 objects. We subdivide the GRB data into two redshift intervals over the redshift range $0gamma}$ to the measured $\\xi(r)$ and obtain an amplitude and slope of $r_0= 1235.2 \\pm 342.6~h^{-1}$ Mpc and $\\gamma = 0.80\\pm 0.19 $ ($1\\sigma$ confidence level) over the scales $r=200$ to $10^4~h^{-1}$ Mpc. Our ...

  7. A comparison of two lung clearance models based on the dissolution rates of oxidized depleted uranium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crist, Kevin Craig

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTRODUCT1ON . RF VIEbl OF LITLRAiURE Page y1 V111 I4ETHODOI OBY Respi ral le Aeroso I 'enera Lion Dissolution Experiment Ana I y( es RESULTS DISCUSSION CONCLUSIONS RFCONINENDAi ION REFERI=NCES 17 18 21 24 47 APPEND'X A C'lassif. ication...!Ilpl e DU9 Test of Hypothesis ('Go=0) for 5'lopes Obtained from Linear Beg!. essicns (Figs. 8 and 9) 37 VII Determination oi Average Dissolution Rate and a 97. 5 Percent Confidence Interval on That Average for DL!5 and DU9 VIII Resuii. s from...

  8. Water and gas coning: two and three phase system correlations for the critical oil production rate and optimum location of the completion interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Francisco Manuel

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ; B. S. , The George Vashington University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Larry D. Piper This work presents an accurate and simple method of estimating the critical oi. l production rate for both two phase (oil-water or oil-gas) and three phase... The author would like to express his sincere appreciation to the following indivi. duels who, by their assistance and valuable suggestions, made this work possible. Professor Larry D. Piper for his guidance in outlining the goals of the project...

  9. Droplet Nucleation and Domain Wall Motion in a Bounded Interval Robert S. Maier 1;2 and D. L. Stein 2;1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Robert S.

    and negative magnetization. In the weak­noise limit, noise­activated magnetization reversals become exponentially rare, the reversal rate being given by the Kramers formula \\Gamma ¸ \\Gamma 0 exp], who worked out a `large deviation theory' of its magnetization reversals, but did not compute

  10. Effect of local cold-pack application on systemic anabolic and inflammatory response to sprint-interval training: a prospective comparative trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemet, Dan; Meckel, Yoav; Bar-Sela, Sheli; Zaldivar, Frank; Cooper, Dan M.; Eliakim, Alon

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    evaluated the eVect of cold ice-pack application following aon the eVec- tiveness of ice-pack application to improvecold- pack application could be made. In summary, local ice

  11. Effects of application intervals and levels of N, P, and K on cold hardiness relationships in Tifgreen bermudagrass (Cynodon sp.) and St. Augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, Sim Adair

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    direct relationship between N-K and N-P. As tissue N levels increased, the P and K levels increased also, Tifgreen bermudagrass grown under different nutrient levels, con- trolled conditions, and artificially frozen in a growth chamber showed...-inch round plastic containers, surrounded with sand, and moved to the greenhouse where the temperature was maintained at approximately 75-80 F. Immediately after transplanting, one plug from each block was artificially frozen in a Sherer growth...

  12. Digitally Available Interval-Specific Rock-Sample Data Compiled from Historical Records, Nevada Test Site and Vicinity, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Wood

    2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1951 and 1992, underground nuclear weapons testing was conducted at 828 sites on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Prior to and following these nuclear tests, holes were drilled and mined to collect rock samples. These samples are organized and stored by depth of borehole or drift at the U.S. Geological Survey Core Library and Data Center at Mercury, Nevada, on the Nevada Test Site. From these rock samples, rock properties were analyzed and interpreted and compiled into project files and in published reports that are maintained at the Core Library and at the U.S. Geological Survey office in Henderson, Nevada. These rock-sample data include lithologic descriptions, physical and mechanical properties, and fracture characteristics. Hydraulic properties also were compiled from holes completed in the water table. Rock samples are irreplaceable because pre-test, in-place conditions cannot be recreated and samples cannot be recollected from the many holes destroyed by testing. Documenting these data in a published report will ensure availability for future investigators.

  13. Understanding the Impact of Open-Framework Conglomerates on Water-Oil Displacements: Victor Interval of the Ivishak Reservoir, Prudhoe Bay Field, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gershenzon, Naum I; Ritzi, Robert W; Dominic, David F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Victor Unit of the Ivishak Formation in the Prudhoe Bay Oilfield is characterized by high net-to-gross fluvial sandstones and conglomerates. The highest permeability is found within sets of cross-strata of open-framework conglomerate (OFC). They are preserved within unit bar deposits and assemblages of unit bar deposits within compound (braid) bar deposits. They are thief zones limiting enhanced oil recovery. We incorporate recent research that has quantified important attributes of their sedimentary architecture within preserved deposits. We use high-resolution models to demonstrate the fundamental aspects of their control on oil production rate, water breakthrough time, and spatial and temporal distribution of residual oil saturation. We found that when the pressure gradient is oriented perpendicular to the paleoflow direction, the total oil production and the water breakthrough time are larger, and remaining oil saturation is smaller, than when it is oriented parallel to paleoflow. The pressure differe...

  14. 3-D structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation of the Guasare-Misoa Interval, VLE 196 Area, Block V, Lamar Field, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arzuman, Sadun

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    (La Luna Formation) main source rock in the basin (Bertagne et al., n.d.). During the Santonian to Maestrichtian time, the sedimentation took place in an open marine (oxic) condition represented by the thick shales of the Colon Formation which consists..., in the southwest of the basin, non-marine shale, sandstone, and coal of the Orocue Formation were deposited. Among its three members, the Catatumbo, Barco, and Los Cuervos Members, the lower Catatumbo and the upper Barco contain coal that is a secondary source rock...

  15. 3-D structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation of the Guasare-Misoa Interval, VLE 196 Area, Block V, Lamar Field, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arzuman, Sadun

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the structure, depositional system, and the seismic stratigraphy of the VLE 196 area, Block V in Lamar Field were interpreted using 3-D seismic data and well logs to characterize structural and depositional settings of the Guasare...

  16. An Application of Chaos Theory for Estimation of Simultaneous Variability of RR-intervals in Heart and Systolic Blood Pressure in Humans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elio Conte; Antonio Federici; Joseph P. Zbilut

    2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a new method to estimate BaroReflex Sensitivity (BRS) . The methodology, based on the CZF formulation, recently published (see Conte et al 2008), enables to evaluate simultaneous variability of RR and SBP and to estimate the coupling strength. The technique is applied to subjects (female and men with age ranging from 21 to 28 years old) and it is compared with the results that may be obtained by using the standard Fourier spectral analysis technique. The comparison is also performed by using the technique of Lomb-Scargle periodogram, based on Fourier analysis.

  17. Complex facies relationships and regional stratigraphy of the Mississippian Ste. Genevieve, Paoli, and Aux Vases Formations, Illinois basin: A major hydrocarbon-producing interval

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.D.; Nelson, W.J. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mississippian Ste. Genevieve and Paoli Limestones and sandstones of the Aux Vases Formation are lateral facies of one another. This interpretation is based on comprehensive investigations of outcrops, and selected cores, samples of well cuttings, and geophysical logs conducted over a period of four years. Both units exhibit similar sedimentological characteristics and represent open marine, shallow subtidal, and intertidal environments. The presence of low-angle cross-laminae, ripple- and plane-laminae, climbing ripples, and ooid shoals suggest most deposition occurred under low energy conditions. Lenticular, channel-like scour and fill structures that contain both fine-grained quartz sand and abraded, disarticulated fossil fragments indicate localized higher energy deposition. The authors studies indicate that siliciclastic vs. carbonate deposition was controlled strictly by available sediment, and not by regressive (siliciclastic) and transgressive (carbonate) events, as inferred by previous workers. This conclusion is based on lateral facies relationships, and the supplanting of carbonates by clastics occurring in the upper part of the Ste. Genevieve through the middle part of the Paoli. The Aux Vases is thickest, coarsest, and least mature in the northwestern part of the Illinois Basin, and pinches out to the southeast. This implies a northwesterly source for clastics, perhaps the Transcontinental Arch. After early Chesterian time, the Transcontinental Arch apparently supplied little or no sediment to any flanking basin. The Ste. Genevieve, Paoli, and Aux Vases are major oil-producing units in the Illinois Basin. New understanding of regional relationships should enhance exploratory success and improve recovery from established fields.

  18. APIC'95, El Paso, Extended Abstracts, A Supplement to the international journal of Interval Computations 1 Error Estimate of the Result of Measuring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    , when we need the signal to go only in one direction and do not want to waste energy on the broad beams of light of every ele­ ment of this matrix; ffl to compute the total energy I of the laser beam by adding­ ameter consists of placing a matrix of pho­ toelements on its way, measuring the energy (power) in each

  19. A Non-parametric Analysis of the CMB Power Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Miller; Robert C. Nichol; Christopher Genovese; Larry Wasserman

    2001-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature power spectra from the BOOMERANG, MAXIMA, and DASI experiments. We non-parametrically estimate the true power spectrum with no model assumptions. This is a significant departure from previous research which used either cosmological models or some other parameterized form (e.g. parabolic fits). Our non-parametric estimate is practically indistinguishable from the best fit cosmological model, thus lending independent support to the underlying physics that governs these models. We also generate a confidence set for the non-parametric fit and extract confidence intervals for the numbers, locations, and heights of peaks and the successive peak-to-peak height ratios. At the 95%, 68%, and 40% confidence levels, we find functions that fit the data with one, two, and three peaks respectively (0 8 sigma level. If we assume that there are three peaks in the data, we find their locations to be within l_1 = (118,300), l_2 = (377,650), and l_3 = (597,900). We find the ratio of the first peak-height to the second (Delta T_1)/(Delta T_2)^2= (1.06, 4.27) and the second to the third (Delta T_2)/(Delta T_3)^2= (0.41, 2.5). All measurements are for 95% confidence. If the standard errors on the temperature measurements were reduced to a third of what they are currently, as we expect to be achieved by the MAP and Planck CMB experiments, we could eliminate two-peak models at the 95% confidence limit. The non-parametric methodology discussed in this paper has many astrophysical applications.

  20. Benchmark West Texas Intermediate crude assayed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper gives an assay of West Texas Intermediate, one of the world's market crudes. The price of this crude, known as WTI, is followed by market analysts, investors, traders, and industry managers around the world. WTI price is used as a benchmark for pricing all other US crude oils. The 41[degree] API < 0.34 wt % sulfur crude is gathered in West Texas and moved to Cushing, Okla., for distribution. The WTI posted prices is the price paid for the crude at the wellhead in West Texas and is the true benchmark on which other US crudes are priced. The spot price is the negotiated price for short-term trades of the crude. And the New York Mercantile Exchange, or Nymex, price is a futures price for barrels delivered at Cushing.

  1. Cosmological parameter estimation and Bayesian model comparison using VSA data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anze Slosar; Pedro Carreira; Kieran Cleary; Rod D. Davies; Richard J. Davis; Clive Dickinson; Ricardo Genova-Santos; Keith Grainge; Carlos M. Gutierrez; Yaser A. Hafez; Michael P. Hobson; Michael E. Jones; Rudiger Kneissl; Katy Lancaster; Anthony Lasenby; J. P. Leahy; Klaus Maisinger; Phil J. Marshall; Guy G. Pooley; Rafael Rebolo; Jose Alberto Rubino-Martin; Ben Rusholme; Richard D. E. Saunders; Richard Savage; Paul F. Scott; Pedro J. Sosa Molina; Angela C. Taylor; David Titterington; Elizabeth Waldram; Robert A. Watson; Althea Wilkinson

    2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We constrain the basic comological parameters using the first observations by the Very Small Array (VSA) in its extended configuration, together with existing cosmic microwave background data and other cosmological observations. We estimate cosmological parameters for four different models of increasing complexity. In each case, careful consideration is given to implied priors and the Bayesian evidence is calculated in order to perform model selection. We find that the data are most convincingly explained by a simple flat Lambda-CDM cosmology without tensor modes. In this case, combining just the VSA and COBE data sets yields the 68 per cent confidence intervals Omega_b h^2=0.034 (+0.007, -0.007), Omega_dm h^2 = 0.18 (+0.06, -0.04), h=0.72 (+0.15,-0.13), n_s=1.07 (+0.06,-0.06) and sigma_8=1.17 (+0.25, -0.20). The most general model considered includes spatial curvature, tensor modes, massive neutrinos and a parameterised equation of state for the dark energy. In this case, by combining all recent cosmological data, we find, in particular, 95 percent limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio R < 0.63 and on the fraction of massive neutrinos f_nu < 0.11; we also obtain the 68 per cent confidence interval w=-1.06 (+0.20, -0.25) on the equation of state of dark energy.

  2. Measurements of neutrino oscillation in appearance and disappearance channels by the T2K experiment with 6.6E20 protons on target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abe, K; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bartet-Friburg, P; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bolognesi, S; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Rodrguez, J Caravaca; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Chikuma, N; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Dolan, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery-Schrenk, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Feusels, T; Finch, A J; Fiorentini, G A; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Garcia, A; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Goeldi, D; Golan, T; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haegel, L; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayashino, T; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Hosomi, F; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwai, E; Iwamoto, K; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Jiang, M; Johnson, S; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; King, S; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Koga, T; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Lamont, I; Larkin, E; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Lopez, J P; Ludovici, L; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Martins, P; Martynenko, S; Maruyama, T; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mefodiev, A; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Missert, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K G; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Nantais, C; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; Nowak, J; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Ovsyannikova, T; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Guerra, E S Pinzon; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J -M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Riccio, C; Rodrigues, P A; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Rychter, A; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Snchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shah, R; Shaker, F; Shaw, D; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Wakamatsu, K; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Warzycha, W; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yoshida, K; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; ?muda, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on measurements of neutrino oscillation using data from the T2K long-baseline neutrino experiment collected between 2010 and 2013. In an analysis of muon neutrino disappearance alone, we find the following estimates and 68% confidence intervals for the two possible mass hierarchies: Normal Hierarchy: $\\sin^2\\theta_{23}=0.514^{+0.055}_{-0.056}$ and $\\Delta m^2_{32}=(2.51\\pm0.10)\\times 10^{-3}$ eV$^2$/c$^4$ Inverted Hierarchy: $\\sin^2\\theta_{23}=0.511\\pm0.055$ and $\\Delta m^2_{13}=(2.48\\pm0.10)\\times 10^{-3}$ eV$^2$/c$^4$ The analysis accounts for multi-nucleon mechanisms in neutrino interactions which were found to introduce negligible bias. We describe our first analyses that combine measurements of muon neutrino disappearance and electron neutrino appearance to estimate four oscillation parameters and the mass hierarchy. Frequentist and Bayesian intervals are presented for combinations of these parameters, with and without including recent reactor measurements. At 90% confidence level and including...

  3. A Robust Determination of the Time Delay in 0957+561A,B and a Measurement of the Global Value of Hubble's Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomislav Kundic; Edwin L. Turner; Wesley N. Colley; J. Richard Gott, III; James E. Rhoads; Yun Wang; Louis E. Bergeron; Karen A. Gloria; Daniel C. Long; Sangeeta Malhotra; Joachim Wambsganss

    1997-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Photometric monitoring of the gravitational lens system 0957+561A,B in the g and r bands with the Apache Point Observatory (APO) 3.5 m telescope during 1996 shows a sharp g band event in the trailing (B) image light curve at the precise time predicted from the observation of an event during 1995 in the leading (A) image with a delay of 415 days. This success confirms the "short delay," and the lack of any feature at a delay near 540 days rejects the "long delay" for this system, resolving a long-standing controversy. A series of statistical analyses of our light curve data yield a best fit delay of 417 +/- 3 days (95% confidence interval). Recent improvements in the modeling of the lens system (consisting of a galaxy and cluster) allow us to derive a value of the global (at z = 0.36) value of Hubble's constant H_0 using Refsdal's method, a simple and direct distance determination based on securely understood physics and geometry. The result is H_0 = 63 +/- 12 km/s/Mpc (for Omega = 1) where this 95% confidence interval is dominated by remaining lens model uncertainties.

  4. Inorganic arsenic exposure and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coronado-Gonzalez, Jose Antonio [Clinical Epidemiologic Research Unit, General Regional Hospital 1 'Gabriel Mancera', Mexican Institute of the Social Security, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Razo, Luz Maria del [Toxicology Departament, Cinvestav, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo [School of Medicine, Durango State Juarez University, Gomez Palacio, Durango (Mexico); Biomedical Research Center, Coahuila, Autonomous University, Torreon, Coahuila (Mexico); Sanmiguel-Salazar, Francisca [Biomedical Research Center, Coahuila, Autonomous University, Torreon, Coahuila (Mexico); Escobedo-de la Pena, Jorge [Clinical Epidemiologic Research Unit, General Regional Hospital 1 'Gabriel Mancera', Mexican Institute of the Social Security, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: jorgeep@servidor.unam.mx

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Inorganic arsenic exposure in drinking water has been recently related to diabetes mellitus. To evaluate this relationship the authors conducted in 2003, a case-control study in an arseniasis-endemic region from Coahuila, a northern state of Mexico with a high incidence of diabetes. The present analysis includes 200 cases and 200 controls. Cases were obtained from a previous cross-sectional study conducted in that region. Diagnosis of diabetes was established following the American Diabetes Association criteria, with two fasting glucose values {>=}126 mg/100 ml ({>=}7.0 mmol/l) or a history of diabetes treated with insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents. The next subject studied, subsequent to the identification of a case in the cross-sectional study was taken as control. Inorganic arsenic exposure was measured through total arsenic concentrations in urine, measured by hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Subjects with intermediate total arsenic concentration in urine (63.5-104 {mu}g/g creatinine) had two-fold higher risk of having diabetes (odds ratio=2.16; 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 3.79), but the risk was almost three times greater in subjects with higher concentrations of total arsenic in urine (odds ratio=2.84; 95% confidence interval: 1.64, 4.92). This data provides additional evidence that inorganic arsenic exposure may be diabetogenic.

  5. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuromas: What Happens Long Term?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roos, Daniel E., E-mail: daniel.roos@health.sa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); University of Adelaide School of Medicine, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Potter, Andrew E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Brophy, Brian P. [Department of Neurosurgery, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); University of Adelaide School of Medicine, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the clinical outcomes for acoustic neuroma treated with low-dose linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) >10 years earlier at the Royal Adelaide Hospital using data collected prospectively at a dedicated SRS clinic. Methods and Materials: Between November 1993 and December 2000, 51 patients underwent SRS for acoustic neuroma. For the 44 patients with primary SRS for sporadic (unilateral) lesions, the median age was 63 years, the median of the maximal tumor diameter was 21 mm (range, 11-34), and the marginal dose was 14 Gy for the first 4 patients and 12 Gy for the other 40. Results: The crude tumor control rate was 97.7% (1 patient required salvage surgery for progression at 9.75 years). Only 8 (29%) of 28 patients ultimately retained useful hearing (interaural pure tone average {<=}50 dB). Also, although the Kaplan-Meier estimated rate of hearing preservation at 5 years was 57% (95% confidence interval, 38-74%), this decreased to 24% (95% confidence interval, 11-44%) at 10 years. New or worsened V and VII cranial neuropathy occurred in 11% and 2% of patients, respectively; all cases were transient. No case of radiation oncogenesis developed. Conclusions: The long-term follow-up data of low-dose (12-14 Gy) linear accelerator SRS for acoustic neuroma have confirmed excellent tumor control and acceptable cranial neuropathy rates but a continual decrease in hearing preservation out to {>=}10 years.

  6. Hearing Outcomes After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Unilateral Intracanalicular Vestibular Schwannomas: Implication of Transient Volume Expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Hoon [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Gyu, E-mail: gknife@plaza.snu.ac.kr [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jung Ho [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hyun-Tai; Kim, In Kyung; Song, Sang Woo [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Hoon [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Yong Hwy; Park, Chul-Kee [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chae-Yong [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paek, Sun Ha; Jung, Hee-Won [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We evaluated the prognostic factors for hearing outcomes after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for unilateral sporadic intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas (IC-VSs) as a clinical homogeneous group of VSs. Methods and Materials: Sixty consecutive patients with unilateral sporadic IC-VSs, defined as tumors in the internal acoustic canal, and serviceable hearing (Gardner-Roberson grade 1 or 2) were treated with SRS as an initial treatment. The mean tumor volume was 0.34 {+-} 0.03 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.03-1.00 cm{sup 3}), and the mean marginal dose was 12.2 {+-} 0.1 Gy (range, 11.5-13.0 Gy). The median follow-up duration was 62 months (range, 36-141 months). Results: The actuarial rates of serviceable hearing preservation were 70%, 63%, and 55% at 1, 2, and 5 years after SRS, respectively. In multivariate analysis, transient volume expansion of {>=}20% from initial tumor size was a statistically significant risk factor for loss of serviceable hearing and hearing deterioration (increase of pure tone average {>=}20 dB) (odds ratio = 7.638; 95% confidence interval, 2.317-25.181; P=.001 and odds ratio = 3.507; 95% confidence interval, 1.228-10.018; P=.019, respectively). The cochlear radiation dose did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions: Transient volume expansion after SRS for VSs seems to be correlated with hearing deterioration when defined properly in a clinically homogeneous group of patients.

  7. A Flexible Method of Estimating Luminosity Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandon C. Kelly; Xiaohui Fan; Marianne Vestergaard

    2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a Bayesian approach to estimating luminosity functions. We derive the likelihood function and posterior probability distribution for the luminosity function, given the observed data, and we compare the Bayesian approach with maximum-likelihood by simulating sources from a Schechter function. For our simulations confidence intervals derived from bootstrapping the maximum-likelihood estimate can be too narrow, while confidence intervals derived from the Bayesian approach are valid. We develop our statistical approach for a flexible model where the luminosity function is modeled as a mixture of Gaussian functions. Statistical inference is performed using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods, and we describe a Metropolis-Hastings algorithm to perform the MCMC. The MCMC simulates random draws from the probability distribution of the luminosity function parameters, given the data, and we use a simulated data set to show how these random draws may be used to estimate the probability distribution for the luminosity function. In addition, we show how the MCMC output may be used to estimate the probability distribution of any quantities derived from the luminosity function, such as the peak in the space density of quasars. The Bayesian method we develop has the advantage that it is able to place accurate constraints on the luminosity function even beyond the survey detection limits, and that it provides a natural way of estimating the probability distribution of any quantities derived from the luminosity function, including those that rely on information beyond the survey detection limits.

  8. Quality of Survival and Growth in Children and Young Adults in the PNET4 European Controlled Trial of Hyperfractionated Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy for Standard-Risk Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, Colin, E-mail: crk1@soton.ac.uk [University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Bull, Kim [University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Chevignard, Mathilde [Hpitaux de Saint Maurice, Saint Maurice (France); Neurophysiology, University of Pierre et Marie-Curie Paris 6, Paris (France); Culliford, David [University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Drr, Helmuth G. [Kinder- und Jugendklinik der Universitt Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Doz, Franois [Institut Curie and University Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cit (France); Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter [Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Lannering, Birgitta [Department of Pediatrics, The Sahlgren Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Massimino, Maura [Fondazione Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Navajas Gutirrez, Aurora [Hospital Universitario Cruces, Baracaldo-Vizcaya (Spain); Rutkowski, Stefan [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Spoudeas, Helen A. [Center for Pediatric Endocrinology, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Calaminus, Gabriele [Pediatric Oncology, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare quality of survival in standard-risk medulloblastoma after hyperfractionated radiation therapy of the central nervous system with that after standard radiation therapy, combined with a chemotherapy regimen common to both treatment arms, in the PNET4 randomised controlled trial. Methods and Materials: Participants in the PNET4 trial and their parents/caregivers in 7 participating anonymized countries completed standardized questionnaires in their own language on executive function, health status, behavior, health-related quality of life, and medical, educational, employment, and social information. Pre- and postoperative neurologic status and serial heights and weights were also recorded. Results: Data were provided by 151 of 244 eligible survivors (62%) at a median age at assessment of 15.2 years and median interval from diagnosis of 5.8 years. Compared with standard radiation therapy, hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with lower (ie, better) z-scores for executive function in all participants (mean intergroup difference 0.48 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.81, P=.004), but health status, behavioral difficulties, and health-related quality of life z-scores were similar in the 2 treatment arms. Data on hearing impairment were equivocal. Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was also associated with greater decrement in height z-scores (mean intergroup difference 0.43 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.10-0.76, P=.011). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with better executive function and worse growth but without accompanying change in health status, behavior, or quality of life.

  9. Salvage/Adjuvant Brachytherapy After Ophthalmic Artery Chemosurgery for Intraocular Retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, Jasmine H., E-mail: francij1@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Barker, Christopher A.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; McCormick, Beryl; Segal, Kira; Cohen, Gil [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Gobin, Y. Pierre; Marr, Brian P. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York (United States); Brodie, Scott E. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Dunkel, Ira J.; Abramson, David H. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of brachytherapy after ophthalmic artery chemosurgery (OAC) for retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: This was a single-arm, retrospective study of 15 eyes in 15 patients treated with OAC followed by brachytherapy at (blinded institution) between May 1, 2006, and December 31, 2012, with a median 19 months' follow-up from plaque insertion. Outcome measurements included patient and ocular survival, visual function, and retinal toxicity measured by electroretinogram (ERG). Results: Brachytherapy was used as adjuvant treatment in 2 eyes and as salvage therapy in 13 eyes of which 12 had localized vitreous seeding. No patients developed metastasis or died of retinoblastoma. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of ocular survival was 79.4% (95% confidence interval 48.7%-92.8%) at 18 months. Three eyes were enucleated, and an additional 6 eyes developed out-of-target volume recurrences, which were controlled with additional treatments. Patients with an ocular complication had a mean interval between last OAC and plaque of 2.5 months (SD 2.3 months), which was statistically less (P=.045) than patients without ocular complication who had a mean interval between last OAC and plaque of 6.5 months (SD 4.4 months). ERG responses from pre- versus postplaque were unchanged or improved in more than half the eyes. Conclusions: Brachytherapy following OAC is effective, even in the presence of vitreous seeding; the majority of eyes maintained stable or improved retinal function following treatment, as assessed by ERG.

  10. Radiotherapy for Stage II and Stage III Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Scodan, Romuald, E-mail: lescodan@crh1.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Selz, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Stevens, Denise [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Bollet, Marc A.; Lande, Brigitte de la; Daveau, Caroline [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Lerebours, Florence [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Labib, Alain [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Bruant, Sarah [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in Stage II-III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Patients and Materials: Of 1,054 breast cancer patients treated with NAC at our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 had pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The effect of PMRT on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis, including known prognostic factors. Results: Of the 134 eligible patients, 78 (58.2%) received PMRT and 56 (41.8%) did not. At a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and OS rate was 96.2% and 88.3% with PMRT and 92.5% and 94.3% without PMRT, respectively (p = NS). The corresponding values at 10 years were 96.2% and 77.2% with PMRT and 86.8% and 87.7% without PMRT (p = NS). On multivariate analysis, PMRT had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.61; p = .18) or OS (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6; p = .18). This remained true in the subgroups of patients with clinical Stage II or Stage III disease at diagnosis. A trend was seen toward poorer OS among patients who had not had a pathologic complete in-breast tumor response after NAC (hazard ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-54.12; p = .076). Conclusions: The results from the present retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence, or death when PMRT was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. Whether the omission of PMRT is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively.

  11. A global analysis of soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil microbes play a pivotal role in regulating land-atmosphere interactions; the soil microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C:N:P stoichiometry are important regulators for soil biogeochemical processes; however, the current knowledge on magnitude, stoichiometry, storage, and spatial distribution of global soil microbial biomass C, N, and P is limited. In this study, 3087 pairs of data points were retrieved from 281 published papers and further used to summarize the magnitudes and stoichiometries of C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass at global- and biome-levels. Finally, global stock and spatial distribution of microbial biomass C and N in 0-30 cm and 0-100 cm soil profiles were estimated. The results show that C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass vary substantially across biomes; the fractions of soil nutrient C, N, and P in soil microbial biomass are 1.6% in a 95% confidence interval of (1.5%-1.6%), 2.9% in a 95% confidence interval of (2.8%-3.0%), and 4.4% in a 95% confidence interval of (3.9%-5.0%), respectively. The best estimates of C:N:P stoichiometries for soil nutrients and soil microbial biomass are 153:11:1, and 47:6:1, respectively, at global scale, and they vary in a wide range among biomes. Vertical distribution of soil microbial biomass follows the distribution of roots up to 1 m depth. The global stock of soil microbial biomass C and N were estimated to be 15.2 Pg C and 2.3 Pg N in the 0-30 cm soil profiles, and 21.2 Pg C and 3.2 Pg N in the 0-100 cm soil profiles. We did not estimate P in soil microbial biomass due to data shortage and insignificant correlation with soil total P and climate variables. The spatial patterns of soil microbial biomass C and N were consistent with those of soil organic C and total N, i.e. high density in northern high latitude, and low density in low latitudes and southern hemisphere.

  12. Percentage of Positive Biopsy Cores: A Better Risk Stratification Model for Prostate Cancer?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Jiayi; Vicini, Frank A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Williams, Scott G. [Peter Maccallum Cancer Centre and University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Ye Hong; McGrath, Samuel; Ghilezan, Mihai; Krauss, Daniel; Martinez, Alvaro A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Kestin, Larry L., E-mail: lkestin@comcast.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the prognostic value of the percentage of positive biopsy cores (PPC) and perineural invasion in predicting the clinical outcomes after radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer and to explore the possibilities to improve on existing risk-stratification models. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2004, 1,056 patients with clinical Stage T1c-T3N0M0 prostate cancer, who had four or more biopsy cores sampled and complete biopsy core data available, were treated with external beam RT, with or without a high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost at William Beaumont Hospital. The median follow-up was 7.6 years. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed with PPC, Gleason score, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen, T stage, PNI, radiation dose, androgen deprivation, age, prostate-specific antigen frequency, and follow-up duration. A new risk stratification (PPC classification) was empirically devised to incorporate PPC and replace the T stage. Results: On multivariate Cox regression analysis, the PPC was an independent predictor of distant metastasis, cause-specific survival, and overall survival (all p < .05). A PPC >50% was associated with significantly greater distant metastasis (hazard ratio, 4.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.86-8.61), and its independent predictive value remained significant with or without androgen deprivation therapy (all p < .05). In contrast, PNI and T stage were only predictive for locoregional recurrence. Combining the PPC ({<=}50% vs. >50%) with National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk stratification demonstrated added prognostic value of distant metastasis for the intermediate-risk (hazard ratio, 5.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.78-16.6) and high-risk (hazard ratio, 4.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.70-11.3) groups, regardless of the use of androgen deprivation and high-dose RT (all p < .05). The proposed PPC classification appears to provide improved stratification of the clinical outcomes relative to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network classification. Conclusions: The PPC is an independent and powerful predictor of clinical outcomes of prostate cancer after RT. A risk model replacing T stage with the PPC to reduce subjectivity demonstrated potentially improved stratification.

  13. Cancer and birth defects surveillance system for communities around the Savannah River Site. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunbar, J.B.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical report presents the age-adjusted total, and race and sex specific geographic patterns of cancer mortality for South Carolina (SC) counties utilizing the 1953--1987 average annual age-adjusted mortality rates (AAMRs). The mortality information was obtained from the State Cancer Control Map and Data Program produced by the National Cancer Institute , Centers for Disease Control and the American Cancer Society. The AAMRs for selected primary sites are classified as significantly different or not significantly different from the corresponding United States and SC mortality rates. Categories for classification of the rates are determined using 95% confidence intervals. Geographic patterns of significantly high county AAMRs are identified and discussed. Individual county rates are not emphasized. The terminology, mortality rates used throughout this report pertains to the 1953--1987 AAMRS.

  14. Cancer and birth defects surveillance system for communities around the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunbar, J.B.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical report presents the age-adjusted total, and race and sex specific geographic patterns of cancer mortality for South Carolina (SC) counties utilizing the 1953--1987 average annual age-adjusted mortality rates (AAMRs). The mortality information was obtained from the State Cancer Control Map and Data Program produced by the National Cancer Institute , Centers for Disease Control and the American Cancer Society. The AAMRs for selected primary sites are classified as significantly different or not significantly different from the corresponding United States and SC mortality rates. Categories for classification of the rates are determined using 95% confidence intervals. Geographic patterns of significantly high county AAMRs are identified and discussed. Individual county rates are not emphasized. The terminology, mortality rates used throughout this report pertains to the 1953--1987 AAMRS.

  15. Degeneracy and Discreteness in Cosmological Model Fitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teng, Huan-Yu; Hu, Huan-Chen; Zhang, Tong-Jie

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the degeneracy and discreteness problems in the standard cosmological model ({\\Lambda}CDM). We use the Observational Hubble Data (OHD) and the type Ia supernova (SNe Ia) data to study this issue. In order to describe the discreteness in fitting of data, we define a factor G to test the influence from each single data point and analyze the goodness of G. Our results indicate that a higher absolute value of G shows a better capability of distinguishing models, which means the parameters are restricted into smaller confidence intervals with a larger figure of merit evaluation. Consequently, we claim that the factor G is an effective way in model differentiation when using different models to fit the observational data.

  16. Tank 241-AX-103, cores 212 and 214 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steen, F.H.

    1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-AX-103 push mode core segments collected between July 30, 1997 and August 11, 1997. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-AX-103 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Comer, 1997), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995) and the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO) (Turner, et al., 1995). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Total Alpha Activity (AT), plutonium 239 (Pu239), and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Conner, 1997). The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and not considered in this report.

  17. Statistical factors to qualify the superconducting magnets for the SSC based on warm/cold correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K.; Devred, A.; Coles, M.; Tompkins, J.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All of the SSC production magnets will be measured at room temperature (warm), but only a fraction of these will be measured at liquid helium temperature (cold). The fractional information will then be analyzed to determine warm acceptance criteria for the field quality of the SSC magnets. Regarding predictors of the field quality based on partial information, there are several observations and studies based on the warm/cold correlation. A different facet of the acceptance test is production control, which interprets the warm/cold correlation to adjust the process parameters. For these applications, we are evaluating statistical techniques relying on asymptotic estimators of the systematic errors and random errors, and their respective confidence intervals. The estimators are useful to qualify the population magnets based on a subset of sample magnets. We present the status of our work, including: (i) a recapitulation of analytic formulas, (ii) a justification based on HERA magnet experience, and (iii) a practical interpretation of these estimators.

  18. Broken Isotropy from a Linear Modulation of the Primordial Perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Gordon

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A linear modulation of the primordial perturbations is proposed as an explanation for the observed asymmetry between the northern and southern hemispheres of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data. A cut sky, reduced resolution third year "Internal Linear Combination" (ILC) map was used to estimate the modulation parameters. A foreground template and a modulated plus unmodulated monopole and dipole were projected out of the likelihood. The effective chi squared is reduced by nine for three extra parameters. The mean Galactic colatitude and longitude, of the modulation, with 68%, 95% and 99.7% confidence intervals were 56^{+17 +36 +65}_{-17 -35 -51} and 63^{+28 +59 +105}_{-26 -58 -213}. The mean percentage change of the variance, across the pole's of the modulation, was 62^{+18 +35 +57}_{-18 -35 -47}. Implications of these results and possible generating mechanisms are discussed.

  19. Robust estimation procedure in panel data model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shariff, Nurul Sima Mohamad [Faculty of Science of Technology, Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia (USIM), 71800, Nilai, Negeri Sembilan (Malaysia); Hamzah, Nor Aishah [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Malaya, 50630, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The panel data modeling has received a great attention in econometric research recently. This is due to the availability of data sources and the interest to study cross sections of individuals observed over time. However, the problems may arise in modeling the panel in the presence of cross sectional dependence and outliers. Even though there are few methods that take into consideration the presence of cross sectional dependence in the panel, the methods may provide inconsistent parameter estimates and inferences when outliers occur in the panel. As such, an alternative method that is robust to outliers and cross sectional dependence is introduced in this paper. The properties and construction of the confidence interval for the parameter estimates are also considered in this paper. The robustness of the procedure is investigated and comparisons are made to the existing method via simulation studies. Our results have shown that robust approach is able to produce an accurate and reliable parameter estimates under the condition considered.

  20. Physics-based, Bayesian sequential detection method and system for radioactive contraband

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Candy, James V; Axelrod, Michael C; Breitfeller, Eric F; Chambers, David H; Guidry, Brian L; Manatt, Douglas R; Meyer, Alan W; Sale, Kenneth E

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A distributed sequential method and system for detecting and identifying radioactive contraband from highly uncertain (noisy) low-count, radionuclide measurements, i.e. an event mode sequence (EMS), using a statistical approach based on Bayesian inference and physics-model-based signal processing based on the representation of a radionuclide as a monoenergetic decomposition of monoenergetic sources. For a given photon event of the EMS, the appropriate monoenergy processing channel is determined using a confidence interval condition-based discriminator for the energy amplitude and interarrival time and parameter estimates are used to update a measured probability density function estimate for a target radionuclide. A sequential likelihood ratio test is then used to determine one of two threshold conditions signifying that the EMS is either identified as the target radionuclide or not, and if not, then repeating the process for the next sequential photon event of the EMS until one of the two threshold conditions is satisfied.

  1. Direct measurement of the cosmic acceleration by 21cm absorption systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hao-Ran; Pen, Ue-Li

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    So far there is only indirect evidence that the universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion. The evidence for cosmic acceleration is based on the observation of different objects at different distances, and requires invoking the Copernican cosmological principle, and Einstein's equations of motion. We examine the direct observability using recession velocity drifts (Sandage-Loeb effect) of 21cm hydrogen absorption systems in upcoming radio surveys. This measures the change in velocity of the {\\it same} objects separate by a time interval and is a model-independent measure of acceleration. We forecast that for a CHIME-like survey with a decade time span, we can detect the acceleration of a $\\Lambda$CDM universe with $\\sim 6\\sigma$ confidence. This acceleration test requires modest data analysis and storage changes from the normal processing, and cannot be recovered retroactively.

  2. Search for the decay modes D??e?e?, D??????, and D??e??

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; et al

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present searches for the rare decay modes D??e?e?, D0?????, and D??e?? in continuum e?e??cc events recorded by the BABAR detector in a data sample that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb?. These decays are highly GlashowIliopoulosMaiani suppressed but may be enhanced in several extensions of the standard model. Our observed event yields are consistent with the expected backgrounds. An excess is seen in the D?????? channel, although the observed yield is consistent with an upward background fluctuation at the 5% level. Using the FeldmanCousins method, we set the following 90% confidence level intervals on the branching fractions:moreB(D??e?e?)??)less

  3. Search for first-generation leptoquarks in the jets and missing transverse energy topology in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsybychev, Dmitri

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors performed a search for the pair production of first-generation leptoquarks using 191 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data recorded by the CDF experiment during Run II of the Tevatron. The leptoquarks are sought via their decay into a neutrino and quark, which yields missing transverse energy and several high-E{sub T} jets. Several control regions were studied to check the background estimation from Standard Model sources, with good agreement observed in data. In the leptoquark signal region, 124 events were observed with 118.3 {+-} 14.5 expected from background. Therefore, no evidence for leptoquark production was observed, and limits were set on the cross section times the squared branching ratio. Using the next-to-leading order cross section for leptoquark production, they excluded the mass interval 78 to 117 GeV/c{sup 2} at the 95% confidence level for 100% branching ratio into neutrino plus quark.

  4. Building-associated risk of febrile acute respiratory diseases in Army trainees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brundage, J.F.; Scott, R.M.; Lednar, W.M.; Smith, D.W.; Miller, R.N.

    1988-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne transmission of infectious agents and associations of indoor air pollutants with respiratory illnesses are well documented. We hypothesized that energy conservation measures that tighten buildings also increase risks of respiratory infection among building occupants. At four Army training centers during a 47-month period, incidence rates of febrile acute respiratory disease were compared between basic trainees in modern (energy-efficient design and construction) and old barracks. Rates of febrile acute respiratory disease were significantly higher among trainees in modern barracks (adjusted relative risk estimate, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.46 to 1.56), and relative risks were consistent at the four centers. These results support the hypothesis that tight buildings with closed ventilation systems significantly increase risks of respiratory-transmitted infection among congregated, immunologically susceptible occupants.

  5. Fast computation of the performance evaluation of biometric systems: application to multibiometric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giot, Romain; Rosenberger, Christophe

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance evaluation of biometric systems is a crucial step when designing and evaluating such systems. The evaluation process uses the Equal Error Rate (EER) metric proposed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO/IEC). The EER metric is a powerful metric which allows easily comparing and evaluating biometric systems. However, the computation time of the EER is, most of the time, very intensive. In this paper, we propose a fast method which computes an approximated value of the EER. We illustrate the benefit of the proposed method on two applications: the computing of non parametric confidence intervals and the use of genetic algorithms to compute the parameters of fusion functions. Experimental results show the superiority of the proposed EER approximation method in term of computing time, and the interest of its use to reduce the learning of parameters with genetic algorithms. The proposed method opens new perspectives for the development of secure multibiometrics systems by speedi...

  6. Medium term municipal solid waste generation prediction by autoregressive integrated moving average

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younes, Mohammad K.; Nopiah, Z. M.; Basri, Noor Ezlin A.; Basri, Hassan [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Generally, solid waste handling and management are performed by municipality or local authority. In most of developing countries, local authorities suffer from serious solid waste management (SWM) problems and insufficient data and strategic planning. Thus it is important to develop robust solid waste generation forecasting model. It helps to proper manage the generated solid waste and to develop future plan based on relatively accurate figures. In Malaysia, solid waste generation rate increases rapidly due to the population growth and new consumption trends that characterize the modern life style. This paper aims to develop monthly solid waste forecasting model using Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA), such model is applicable even though there is lack of data and will help the municipality properly establish the annual service plan. The results show that ARIMA (6,1,0) model predicts monthly municipal solid waste generation with root mean square error equals to 0.0952 and the model forecast residuals are within accepted 95% confident interval.

  7. Tank 241-T-112, cores 185 and 186 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steen, F.H.

    1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-T-112 push mode core segments collected between February 26, 1997 and March 19, 1997. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-T-112 Push Mode Core Samplings and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO). The analytical results are included in the data summary table. None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Total Alpha Activity (AT) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding and are not considered in this report.

  8. Search for the decay modes D??e?e?, D??????, and D??e??

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Mullin, E.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bnger, C.; Grnberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schrder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Vavra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present searches for the rare decay modes D??e?e?, D0?????, and D??e?? in continuum e?e??cc events recorded by the BABAR detector in a data sample that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb?. These decays are highly GlashowIliopoulosMaiani suppressed but may be enhanced in several extensions of the standard model. Our observed event yields are consistent with the expected backgrounds. An excess is seen in the D?????? channel, although the observed yield is consistent with an upward background fluctuation at the 5% level. Using the FeldmanCousins method, we set the following 90% confidence level intervals on the branching fractions: B(D??e?e?)??)<3.310??.

  9. Pressure shift and broadening of the 254-nm intercombination line of mercury by N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, James P.; Warrington, R. Bruce [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Montana, Missoula, Montana 59812, USA (United States); Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA (United States)

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used laser absorption spectroscopy to study the collisional broadening and shift of the 254-nm 6 {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}6 {sup 3}P{sub 1} intercombination line of Hg in the presence of N{sub 2} for pressures below 400 Torr. This study comprises the first measurements of the proportionality constants for pressure broadening and shift of Hg due to N{sub 2} in this pressure range, and the first high-precision measurements of these pressure effects on Hg for any foreign gas. We obtain -2.54(2) MHz/Torr for the shift and 9.01(4) MHz/Torr for the broadening (full width at half maximum) at 21 degree sign C (95% confidence interval). These results are important for ongoing experiments using optical pumping of mercury in tests of fundamental symmetries, as well as for characterization of interatomic forces and tests of the theory of collisional line broadening.

  10. INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES UTILIZING SECONDARY/TERTIARY RECOVERY TECHNIQUES ON SMALL RESERVOIRS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from shallow-shelf carbonate buildups or mounds within the Desert Creek zone of the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. Five fields in southeastern Utah were evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. The Desert Creek zone includes three generalized facies belts: (1) open-marine, (2) shallow-shelf and shelf-margin, and (3) intra-shelf, salinity-restricted facies. These deposits have modern analogs near the coasts of the Bahamas, Florida, and Australia, respectively, and outcrop analogs along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. The analogs display reservoir heterogeneity, flow barriers and baffles, and lithofacies geometry observed in the fields; thus, these properties were incorporated in the reservoir simulation models. Productive carbonate buildups consist of three types: (1) phylloid algal, (2) coralline algal, and (3) bryozoan. Phylloid-algal buildups have a mound-core interval and a supra-mound interval. Hydrocarbons are stratigraphically trapped in porous and permeable lithotypes within the mound-core intervals of the lower part of the buildups and the more heterogeneous supramound intervals. To adequately represent the observed spatial heterogeneities in reservoir properties, the phylloid-algal bafflestones of the mound-core interval and the dolomites of the overlying supra-mound interval were subdivided into ten architecturally distinct lithotypes, each of which exhibits a characteristic set of reservoir properties obtained from outcrop analogs, cores, and geophysical logs. The Anasazi and Runway fields were selected for geostatistical modeling and reservoir compositional simulations. Models and simulations incorporated variations in carbonate lithotypes, porosity, and permeability to accurately predict reservoir responses. History matches tied previous production and reservoir pressure histories so that future reservoir performances could be confidently predicted. The simulation studies showed that despite most of the production being from the mound-core intervals, there were no corresponding decreases in the oil in place in these intervals. This behavior indicates gravity drainage of oil from the supra-mound intervals into the lower mound-core intervals from which the producing wells' major share of production arises. The key to increasing ultimate recovery from these fields (and similar fields in the basin) is to design either waterflood or CO{sub 2}-miscible flood projects capable of forcing oil from high-storage-capacity but low-recovery supra-mound units into the high-recovery mound-core units. Simulation of Anasazi field shows that a CO{sub 2} flood is technically superior to a waterflood and economically feasible. For Anasazi field, an optimized CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total 4.21 million barrels (0.67 million m3) of oil representing in excess of 89 percent of the original oil in place. For Runway field, the best CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total of 2.4 million barrels (0.38 million m3) of oil representing 71 percent of the original oil in place. If the CO{sub 2} flood performed as predicted, it is a financially robust process for increasing the reserves in the many small fields in the Paradox Basin. The results can be applied to other fields in the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent.

  11. Ovid: Yang: J Vasc Interv Radiol, Volume 9(6).November/December 1998.953-959 Copyright 1998 Society of Cardiovascular & Interventional Radiology Volume 9(6), November/December 1998, pp 953-959

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atalar, Ergin

    of view, RF = radiofrequency, SPGR = spoiled gradient echo, TE = echo time, TR = repetition time, 3D cancer, laser or radio-frequency (RF) ablation of head and neck tumors, monitoring of prostate cancer agent needed, and no risk of ionizing radiation, MR-guided cardiovascular interventions are still

  12. Making an Energy Histogram Using Pierre Auger Observatory Surface Detector Data A histogram is essentially a graphical representation of the frequency or distribution of a variable over specific intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Making an Energy Histogram Using Pierre Auger Observatory Surface Detector Data Histogram A histogram is essentially a graphical representation of the frequency or distribution of a variable over energies. Before you start you should know that: o This set of instructions only assumes a very minimal

  13. Low-Resolution STELab IPS 3D Reconstructions oftheWhole Heliosphere Interval and Comparison within-Ecliptic Solar Wind Measurements fromSTEREO and Wind Instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bisi, M. M.; Jackson, B. V.; Buffington, A.; Clover, J. M.; Hick, P. P.; Tokumaru, M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    structure of the fast solar wind. J. Geophys. Res. 112,observations of the solar wind. Proc. SPIE 6689, 668911-1.W.A. , Maagoe, S. : 1972, Solar wind velocity from ips

  14. Clinical Evaluation of Stereotactic Target Localization Using 3-Tesla MRI for Radiosurgery Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacFadden, Derek [University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); Zhang Beibei; Brock, Kristy K. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Hodaie, Mojgan [Division of Neurosurgery, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Laperriere, Normand [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Schwartz, Michael [Division of Neurosurgery, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Tsao, May [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Stainsby, Jeffrey [Applied Science Laboratories, GE Healthcare, Mississauga, ON (Canada); Lockwood, Gina [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Mikulis, David [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Menard, Cynthia, E-mail: cynthia.menard@rmp.uhn.on.c [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Increasing the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) field strength can improve image resolution and quality, but concerns remain regarding the influence on geometric fidelity. The objectives of the present study were to spatially investigate the effect of 3-Tesla (3T) MRI on clinical target localization for stereotactic radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: A total of 39 patients were enrolled in a research ethics board-approved prospective clinical trial. Imaging (1.5T and 3T MRI and computed tomography) was performed after stereotactic frame placement. Stereotactic target localization at 1.5T vs. 3T was retrospectively analyzed in a representative cohort of patients with tumor (n = 4) and functional (n = 5) radiosurgical targets. The spatial congruency of the tumor gross target volumes was determined by the mean discrepancy between the average gross target volume surfaces at 1.5T and 3T. Reproducibility was assessed by the displacement from an averaged surface and volume congruency. Spatial congruency and the reproducibility of functional radiosurgical targets was determined by comparing the mean and standard deviation of the isocenter coordinates. Results: Overall, the mean absolute discrepancy across all patients was 0.67 mm (95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.83), significantly <1 mm (p < .010). No differences were found in the overall interuser target volume congruence (mean, 84% for 1.5T vs. 84% for 3T, p > .4), and the gross target volume surface mean displacements were similar within and between users. The overall average isocenter coordinate discrepancy for the functional targets at 1.5T and 3T was 0.33 mm (95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.48), with no patient-specific differences between the mean values (p >.2) or standard deviations (p >.1). Conclusion: Our results have provided clinically relevant evidence supporting the spatial validity of 3T MRI for use in stereotactic radiosurgery under the imaging conditions used.

  15. Proton Radiotherapy for Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: Clinical Outcomes and Late Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Stephanie K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Kozak, Kevin R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wisconsin Cancer Center Johnson Creek, Madison, WI (United States); Friedmann, Alison M. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Adams, Judith; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yock, Torunn I., E-mail: tyock@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome and late side effect profile of proton radiotherapy in the treatment of children with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM-RMS). Methods and Materials: Seventeen consecutive children with PM-RMS were treated with proton radiotherapy at Massachusetts General Hospital between 1996 and 2005. We reviewed the medical records of all patients and asked referring physicians to report specific side effects of interest. Results: Median patient age at diagnosis was 3.4 years (range, 0.4-17.6). Embryonal (n = 11), alveolar (n = 4), and undifferentiated (n = 2) histologies were represented. Ten patients (59%) had intracranial extension. Median prescribed dose was 50.4 cobalt gray equivalents (GyRBE) (range, 50.4-56.0 GyRBE) delivered in 1.8-2.0-GyRBE daily fractions. Median follow-up was 5.0 years for survivors. The 5-year failure-free survival estimate was 59% (95% confidence interval, 33-79%), and overall survival estimate was 64% (95% confidence interval, 37-82%). Among the 7 patients who failed, sites of first recurrence were local only (n = 2), regional only (n = 2), distant only (n = 2), and local and distant (n = 1). Late effects related to proton radiotherapy in the 10 recurrence-free patients (median follow-up, 5 years) include failure to maintain height velocity (n = 3), endocrinopathies (n = 2), mild facial hypoplasia (n = 7), failure of permanent tooth eruption (n = 3), dental caries (n = 5), and chronic nasal/sinus congestion (n = 2). Conclusions: Proton radiotherapy for patients with PM-RMS yields tumor control and survival comparable to that in historical controls with similar poor prognostic factors. Furthermore, rates of late effects from proton radiotherapy compare favorably to published reports of photon-treated cohorts.

  16. Randomized Noninferiority Trial of Reduced High-Dose Volume Versus Standard Volume Radiation Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Results of the BC2001 Trial (CRUK/01/004)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huddart, Robert A., E-mail: robert.huddart@icr.ac.uk [Institute of Cancer Research, Royal Marsden NHSFT (National Health Service Foundation Trust) (United Kingdom); Hall, Emma [Institute of Cancer Research (United Kingdom); Hussain, Syed A. [University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Jenkins, Peter [Gloucestershire Hospitals NHSFT (United Kingdom); Rawlings, Christine [South Devon Healthcare NHSFT (United Kingdom); Tremlett, Jean [Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals (United Kingdom); Crundwell, Malcolm [Royal Devon and Exeter NHSFT (United Kingdom); Adab, Fawzi A. [University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Sheehan, Denise [Royal Devon and Exeter NHSFT (United Kingdom); Syndikus, Isabel [Clatterbridge Cancer Centre NHSFT (United Kingdom); Hendron, Carey [University of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Lewis, Rebecca; Waters, Rachel [Institute of Cancer Research (United Kingdom); James, Nicholas D. [University of Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To test whether reducing radiation dose to uninvolved bladder while maintaining dose to the tumor would reduce side effects without impairing local control in the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: In this phase III multicenter trial, 219 patients were randomized to standard whole-bladder radiation therapy (sRT) or reduced high-dose volume radiation therapy (RHDVRT) that aimed to deliver full radiation dose to the tumor and 80% of maximum dose to the uninvolved bladder. Participants were also randomly assigned to receive radiation therapy alone or radiation therapy plus chemotherapy in a partial 2 2 factorial design. The primary endpoints for the radiation therapy volume comparison were late toxicity and time to locoregional recurrence (with a noninferiority margin of 10% at 2 years). Results: Overall incidence of late toxicity was less than predicted, with a cumulative 2-year Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3/4 toxicity rate of 13% (95% confidence interval 8%, 20%) and no statistically significant differences between groups. The difference in 2-year locoregional recurrence free rate (RHDVRT ? sRT) was 6.4% (95% confidence interval ?7.3%, 16.8%) under an intention to treat analysis and 2.6% (?12.8%, 14.6%) in the per-protocol population. Conclusions: In this study RHDVRT did not result in a statistically significant reduction in late side effects compared with sRT, and noninferiority of locoregional control could not be concluded formally. However, overall low rates of clinically significant toxicity combined with low rates of invasive bladder cancer relapse confirm that (chemo)radiation therapy is a valid option for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

  17. Radiation Segmentectomy: A Novel Approach to Increase Safety and Efficacy of Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riaz, Ahsun; Gates, Vanessa L.; Atassi, Bassel; Lewandowski, Robert J. [Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Mulcahy, Mary F. [Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Ryu, Robert K.; Sato, Kent T. [Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Baker, Talia [Department of Transplant Surgery, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Kulik, Laura [Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Gupta, Ramona [Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Abecassis, Michael [Department of Transplant Surgery, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Benson, Al B. [Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Omary, Reed [Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Millender, Laura [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Kennedy, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Radiology Oncology, Cary, NC (United States); Salem, Riad, E-mail: r-salem@northwestern.ed [Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Department of Transplant Surgery, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To describe a technique of segmental radioembolization for the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Radiation segmentectomy was defined as radioembolization of two or fewer hepatic segments. We sought to (1) calculate dose when activity is delivered segmentally assuming uniform and nonuniform distribution and, (2) determine safety and efficacy of this novel technique. Methods and Materials: A total of 84 patients with HCC who were treated with {sup 90}Y radioembolization using a segmental approach were included in this analysis. The dose delivered to the segment was calculated assuming uniform and nonuniform microsphere distribution within the treatment volume. To calculate dose assuming nonuniform distribution, a tumor hypervascularity ratio was assigned. Posttreatment response (using size and necrosis guidelines), toxicity, time to progression, and survival were determined. Results: The median treatment volume was 110 cm{sup 3}. The median radiation-naive liver volume was 1403 cm{sup 3}. The median dose delivered to the segment(s) assuming uniform distribution was 521 Gy. Taking into account tumor hypervascularity (nonuniform distribution), the median dose delivered to the tumor and normal infused hepatic volume was 1214 Gy and 210 Gy, respectively. Response by size and necrosis guidelines was seen in 59% and 81% of patients. Grade 3/4 biochemical toxicities were observed in 8 patients (9%). Median time to progression was 13.6 months (95% confidence interval, 9.3-18.7 months); median survival was 26.9 months (95% confidence interval, 20.5-30.2 months). Conclusions: Radiation segmentectomy is a safe and efficacious method of selectively delivering high dose to the tumor with minimal exposure of normal parenchyma.

  18. Retrospective Evaluation Reveals That Long-term Androgen Deprivation Therapy Improves Cause-Specific and Overall Survival in the Setting of Dose-Escalated Radiation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Felix Y., E-mail: ffeng@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Blas, Kevin; Olson, Karin; Stenmark, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and duration for high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated RT (minimum 75 Gy) with or without ADT was performed. The relationship between ADT use and duration with biochemical failure (BF), metastatic failure (MF), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), non-prostate cancer death (NPCD), and overall survival (OS) was assessed as a function of pretreatment characteristics, comorbid medical illness, and treatment using Fine and Gray's cumulative incidence methodology. Results: The median follow-up time was 64 months. In men with National Comprehensive Cancer Network defined high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated RT, on univariate analysis, both metastasis (P<.0001; hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.18-0.67; cumulative incidence at 60 months 13% vs 35%) and PCSM (P=.015; hazard ratio 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.0; cumulative incidence at 60 months 6% vs 11%) were improved with the use of ADT. On multivariate analysis for all high-risk patients, Gleason score was the strongest negative prognostic factor, and long-term ADT (LTAD) improved MF (P=.002), PCSM (P=.034), and OS (P=.001). In men with prostate cancer and Gleason scores 8 to 10, on multivariate analysis after adjustment for other risk features, there was a duration-dependent improvement in BF, metastasis, PCSM, and OS, all favoring LTAD in comparison with STAD or RT alone. Conclusion: For men with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated EBRT, this retrospective study suggests that the combination of LTAD and RT provided a significant improvement in clinical outcome, which was especially true for those with Gleason scores of 8 to 10.

  19. Radiation Therapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Does Hospital Surgical Volume Matter? A Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chien, Chun-Ru [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University Hospital, and School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Pan, I-Wen [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tsai, Yi-Wen [Center of Health Policy Research and Development, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Institute of Health and Welfare Policy, National Yang-Ming University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Teressa [Center of Health Policy Research and Development, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Liang, Ji-An [Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University Hospital, and School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Shih, Ya-Chen Tina, E-mail: yashih@mdanderson.org [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To examine the association between hospital surgical volume and the use of radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in Taiwan. Methods and Materials: We used claims data from the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan (1997-2005) in this retrospective population-based study. We identified patients with breast cancer, receipt of BCS, use of radiation, and the factors that could potentially associated with the use of RT from enrollment records, and the ICD-9 and billing codes in claims. We conducted logistic regression to examine factors associated with RT use after BCS, and performed subgroup analyses to examine whether the association differs by medical center status or hospital volumes. Results: Among 5,094 patients with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer who underwent BCS, the rate of RT was significantly lower in low-volume hospitals (74% vs. 82%, p < 0.01). Patients treated in low-volume hospitals were less likely to receive RT after BCS (odds ratio = 0.72, 95% confidence interval = 0.62-0.83). In addition, patients treated after the implementation of the voluntary pay-for-performance policy in 2001 were more likely to receive RT (odds ratio = 1.23; 95% confidence interval = 1.05-1.45). Subgroup analyses indicated that the high-volume effect was limited to hospitals accredited as non-medical centers, and that the effect of the pay-for-performance policy was most pronounced among low-volume hospitals. Conclusions: Using population-based data from Taiwan, our study concluded that hospital surgical volume and pay-for-performance policy are positively associated with RT use after BCS.

  20. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 2 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on November 15, 2012. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and the results are compared using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER {<=} 3 indicates that, at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2012). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, all DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations.