Sample records for ny ct ri

  1. EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and Lower Hudson Valley Clean Communities, Inc. (NY, MA, PA); NYSERDA (ME, NH, VT, MA, RI, CT, NY, NJ, PA, DE, MD, DC)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  2. ?? / Kagaku / ?? /Ky?ri: Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsukahara, T?go

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    question when considering science and technology in Japanese?? /Kagaku / ?? /Ky?ri: Science Tsukahara T?go Translationto incorporate and develop science and technology from the

  3. Thng 9, 2011 Xu t b n b i O ce of International A airs M i thng tin trong t ri ny u c trn m ng. c thng tin chi ti t v c p nh t, xin vui lng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Tháng 9, 2011 Xu t b n b i O ce of International A airs M i thông tin trong t ri này u có trên m ng. có thông tin chi ti t và c p nh t, xin vui lòng tra c u t i website c a chúng tôi : httpThông tin nhanh NTU, tr ng i h c t ng h p l n nh t và lâu i nh t ài Loan, ã thông báo các chng trình ào

  4. QER Public Meeting in Providence, RI & Hartford, CT: New England...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    & Local Affairs - New England Dominion Resources, Inc. Remarks of Joe Rose, President, Propane Gas Association of New England Remarks of Michael Trunzo, President & CEO, New...

  5. Ya ri a bsod Collection 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sha bo don 'grub rdo rje; Skal dbang skyid

    This collection contains fourteen songs collected in the grasslands of Amdo (northeast Tibet) in the area where Sichuan, Gansu, and Qinghai provinces meet. The songs represent various genres, and were all composed by Ya ri a bsod, an itinerant bard...

  6. Ya ri a bsod Collection 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sha bo don 'grub rdo rje; Skal dbang skyid

    This collection contains fourteen songs collected in the grasslands of Amdo (northeast Tibet) in the area where Sichuan, Gansu, and Qinghai provinces meet. The songs represent various genres, and were all composed by Ya ri a bsod, an itinerant bard...

  7. Ya ri a bsod Collection 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sha bo don 'grub rdo rje; Skal dbang skyid

    This collection contains fourteen songs collected in the grasslands of Amdo (northeast Tibet) in the area where Sichuan, Gansu, and Qinghai provinces meet. The songs represent various genres, and were all composed by Ya ri a bsod, an itinerant bard...

  8. Ya ri a bsod Collection 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sha bo don 'grub rdo rje; Skal dbang skyid

    This collection contains fourteen songs collected in the grasslands of Amdo (northeast Tibet) in the area where Sichuan, Gansu, and Qinghai provinces meet. The songs represent various genres, and were all composed by Ya ri a bsod, an itinerant bard...

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Buffalo NY Site - NY 54

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertowni5WBuffalo NY Site - NY 54

  10. iU/riA ii riA Background and Technical Information for Collectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    m^ m im^Hii iU/riA ii riA Background and Technical Information for Collectors mmBiological Laboial Circular 111 #12;#12;DUCK STAMP DATA Background and Technical Information for Collectors By Edna N. Sater and conservationists, it aroused widespread interest among stamp collectors, many of whom had not previously collected

  11. Adam Meyers New York University: 719 Broadway, Room 702, NY, NY 10003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohri, Mehryar

    Adam Meyers New York University: 719 Broadway, Room 702, NY, NY 10003 Telephone: (212) 998-3482 Home: 123 W93 St. Apt 2G, NY, NY 10025 Telephone: (212) 222-2771 Email: meyers@cs.nyu.edu Homepage: http://nlp.cs.nyu.edu/people/meyers.html Fax: (212) 995-4123 Publications A. Meyers, R. Grishman, and C

  12. Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jumpsource History View New PagesRiverNorthborough,Northeast

  13. Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: Energy ResourcesGranby,Plains,Northampton, New York:Ohio:Northeast -

  14. WA_02_015_AIR_PRODUCTS_AND_CHEMICALS_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Ri...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    15AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSINCWaiverofPatentRi.pdf WA02015AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSINCWaiverofPatentRi.pdf WA02015AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSINCWaiverofPatent...

  15. SITN Regional Outreach Map

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Region States in Region Awardee(s) Location of Awardee(s) Contact(s) Northeast (Photovoltaics) CT * ME * MA * NH NY * RI * VT Hudson Valley Community College Troy, NY Richard...

  16. EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and Lower Hudson...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and Lower Hudson Valley Clean Communities, Inc. (NY, MA, PA); NYSERDA (ME, NH, VT, MA, RI, CT, NY, NJ, PA, DE, MD, DC) EV Community...

  17. NY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc. No.GS05: WomanAppendixKNY 17.8

  18. Category:Providence, RI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformationCashtonGo Back toFL"projectsOR Jump to:2RI

  19. QER- Comment of RI Office of Energy Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hi Matt, Please find additional materials from the RI Office of Energy Resources for the DOE QER. The documents attached include: 1) A powerpoint providing an overview of the RI State Energy Plan - the plan will be officially released in Fall, 2014; 2) Testimony to the RI Senate which outlines the need for coordinated work on the gas and electric infrastructure in New England; 3) A powerpoint version of the written testimony; 4) The 2013 Annual Report on the RI Energy Efficiency Program.

  20. aca ri tetranychidae: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Year The University of Rhode Island Transportation Center selected Steven Humphrey of Tiverton, RI as its Geosciences Websites Summary: as a spokesperson in URI's supply chain...

  1. NY-Sun Commerical/ Industrial Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) through NY-Sun Commercial/Industrial Incentive Program (PON 3082) provides incentives for installation of non-residential new grid...

  2. SwRI's HEDGE Technology for High Efficiency, Low Emissions Gasoline...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SwRI's HEDGE Technology for High Efficiency, Low Emissions Gasoline Engines SwRI's HEDGE Technology for High Efficiency, Low Emissions Gasoline Engines Presentation given at the...

  3. WA_00_018_PRAXAIR_Waive_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Invention_Ri...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    18PRAXAIRWaiveofDomesticandForeignInventionRi.pdf WA00018PRAXAIRWaiveofDomesticandForeignInventionRi.pdf WA00018PRAXAIRWaiveofDomesticandForeignInvention...

  4. Physics of MRI Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, NY 11201

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suel, Torsten

    than CT, more susceptible to patient motion CT MRI PET #12;EL582 MRI Physics Yao Wang, Polytechnic U structure (as with X-ray CT) · Provide high contrast between different soft tissues (X-ray CT cannot

  5. Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1993 January ... 94.3 95.7 94.9 85.2 94.0 87.1 91.7 93.4 91.2 105.2 February ... 94.6 95.9 96.2 85.4 94.4 86.9 91.8 93.3 90.8 106.8...

  6. Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1994 January ... 89.6 91.0 90.2 83.8 88.4 80.4 87.3 88.8 92.1 102.5 February ... 92.9 94.6 93.8 90.4 91.3 86.6 91.4 92.3 91.5 105.5...

  7. Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1995 January ... 86.9 87.6 86.7 77.8 84.8 78.4 87.3 85.7 88.4 102.4 February ... 87.4 88.2 87.8 77.4 84.9 78.5 87.3 85.9 88.5 103.4...

  8. Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1997 January ... 107.9 109.0 108.6 105.2 106.5 102.1 107.0 104.4 106.5 130.4 February ... 105.1 106.0 105.2 102.2 103.4 101.0 104.5...

  9. Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (MillionAdjustments174.37,681.01998$11.15 - 1993

  10. Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (MillionAdjustments174.37,681.01998$11.15 - 1993 1994

  11. Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (MillionAdjustments174.37,681.01998$11.15 - 1993 1994

  12. Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (MillionAdjustments174.37,681.01998$11.15 - 1993 1994

  13. Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (MillionAdjustments174.37,681.01998$11.15 - 1993 1994

  14. QER Public Meeting in Providence, RI & Hartford, CT: New England Regional

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 |ofDepartmentHederman,Department

  15. Ri* Report No. 139 Danish Atomic Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I 3 Ri* Report No. 139 Danish Atomic Energy Commission Research Establishment Riso Metallurgy Energy Commission Research Establishment Riso METALLURGY DEPARTMENT ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT for th* Period, the Central Welding Institution and the Metallurgy Department has begun an evaluation of what research

  16. ,"Waddington, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Waddington, NY...

  17. ,"Massena, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Massena, NY...

  18. ,"Champlain, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Champlain, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

  19. Atelier " i l ti ri e e l i e e ilie lli i el " e re er t ire e ri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passot, Thierry

    Atelier " i l ti ri e e l i e e ilie lli i el " e re er t ire e ri A r e i ti e A r e l i e ti l i e et le r l e e l er et re l i " le i ti e" i i t er e i i e r le l r e elle ti te relle t et r r el t li #12; Atelier " i l ti ri e e l i e e ilie lli i el " e re er t ire e ri

  20. Upstate NY Power Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLCEnergy) Redirect pageon permeability andUpstate NY

  1. Category:Syracuse, NY | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformationCashtonGo BackLocationSmart GridSyracuse, NY

  2. Quarry residuals RI/FS scoping document. [Weldon Spring quarry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to serve as a planning tool for the implementation of the Quarry Residual Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process and to provide direct input to revising and updating the 1988 Work Plan for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study-Environmental Impact Statement for the Weldon Spring Site (RI/FS-EIS) (Peterson et al. 1988) for this effort. The scoping process is intended to outline the tasks necessary to develop and implement activities in compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act-National Environmental Policy Act (CERCLA-NEPA) process from detailed planning through the appropriate decision document. In addition to scoping the entire process, this document will serve as the primary tool for planning and accomplishing all activities to be developed in the Quarry Residual RI/FS Work Plan. Subsequent tasks are difficult to plan at this time. 10 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  4. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  5. Utilizing a simple CT dosimetry phantom for the comprehension of the operational characteristics of CT AEC systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsalafoutas, Ioannis A. [Medical Physics Department, Anticancer-Oncology Hospital of Athens “Agios Savvas,” 171 Alexandras Avenue, 115 22 Athens (Greece)] [Medical Physics Department, Anticancer-Oncology Hospital of Athens “Agios Savvas,” 171 Alexandras Avenue, 115 22 Athens (Greece); Varsamidis, Athanasios; Thalassinou, Stella; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios P. [Second Department of Radiology, Medical School, University of Athens, University General Hospital, “Attikon,” Rimini 1, 124 62 Athens (Greece)] [Second Department of Radiology, Medical School, University of Athens, University General Hospital, “Attikon,” Rimini 1, 124 62 Athens (Greece)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the utility of the nested polymethylacrylate (PMMA) phantom (which is available in many CT facilities for CTDI measurements), as a tool for the presentation and comparison of the ways that two different CT automatic exposure control (AEC) systems respond to a phantom when various scan parameters and AEC protocols are modified.Methods: By offsetting the two phantom's components (the head phantom and the body ring) half-way along their longitudinal axis, a phantom with three sections of different x-ray attenuation was created. Scan projection radiographs (SPRs) and helical scans of the three-section phantom were performed on a Toshiba Aquilion 64 and a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanners, with different scan parameter selections [scan direction, pitch factor, slice thickness, and reconstruction interval (ST/RI), AEC protocol, and tube potential used for the SPRs]. The dose length product (DLP) values of each scan were recorded and the tube current (mA) values of the reconstructed CT images were plotted against the respective Z-axis positions on the phantom. Furthermore, measurements of the noise levels at the center of each phantom section were performed to assess the impact of mA modulation on image quality.Results: The mA modulation patterns of the two CT scanners were very dissimilar. The mA variations were more pronounced for Aquilion 64, where changes in any of the aforementioned scan parameters affected both the mA modulations curves and DLP values. However, the noise levels were affected only by changes in pitch, ST/RI, and AEC protocol selections. For Brilliance 64, changes in pitch affected the mA modulation curves but not the DLP values, whereas only AEC protocol and SPR tube potential selection variations affected both the mA modulation curves and DLP values. The noise levels increased for smaller ST/RI, larger weight category AEC protocol, and larger SPR tube potential selection.Conclusions: The nested PMMA dosimetry phantom can be effectively utilized for the comprehension of CT AEC systems performance and the way that different scan conditions affect the mA modulation patterns, DLP values, and image noise. However, in depth analysis of the reasons why these two systems exhibited such different behaviors in response to the same phantom requires further investigation which is beyond the scope of this study.

  6. ,"Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Exports to Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Niagara Falls, NY...

  7. RenewableNY - An Industrial Energy Conservation Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubarr, Tzipora

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The New York Industrial Retention Network (NYIRN) manages the RenewableNY program to assist industrial companies in New York City to implement energy efficiency projects. RenewableNY provides companies with project management assistance and grants to identify opportunities for energy savings and implement energy efficiency projects. The program helps companies identify energy efficient projects, complete an energy audit, and connect with energy contractors who install renewable energy and energy efficient equipment. It also provides grants to help cover the costs of installation for new systems and equipment. RenewableNY demonstrates that a small grant program that also provides project management assistance can incentivize companies to implement energy efficiency projects that might otherwise be avoided. Estimated savings through RenewableNY include 324,500 kWh saved through efficiency installations, 158 kW of solar energy systems installed, and 945 thm of gas avoided.

  8. Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process, elements and techniques guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual provides detailed guidance on Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FSs) conducted pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The purpose of the RI/FS, to assess the risk posed by a hazardous waste site and to determine the best way to reduce that risk, and its structure (site characterization, risk assessment, screening and detailed analysis of alternatives, etc.) is defined in the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) and further explained in the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies Under CERCLA (Interim Final) 540/G-89/004, OSWER Directive 9355.3-01, October 1988. Though issued in 1988, the EPA guidance remains an excellent source of information on the conduct and structure of an RI/FS. This document makes use of supplemental RI/FS-related guidance that EPA has developed since its initial document was issued in 1988, incorporates practical lessons learned in more than 12 years of experience in CERCLA hazardous site remediation, and drawing on those lessons, introduces the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER), developed by DOE as a way to proceed quickly and efficiently through the RI/FS process at DOE facilities. Thus as its title implies, this guidance is intended to describe in detail the process and component elements of an RI/FS, as well as techniques to manage the RI/FS effectively.

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Railway Express Office - NY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo - NY 63 Buffalo - NY

  10. Department of Economic Development EMERGENCY RULE MAKING START-UP NY Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Department of Economic Development EMERGENCY RULE MAKING START-UP NY Program I.D. No. EDV-31 into law the SUNY Tax-free Areas to Revitalize and Transform UPstate New York (START-UP NY) program, which affiliated with New York universities and colleges. The START-UP NY program will leverage these tax benefits

  11. Interoperability of Demand Response Resources Demonstration in NY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellington, Andre

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interoperability of Demand Response Resources Demonstration in NY (Interoperability Project) was awarded to Con Edison in 2009. The objective of the project was to develop and demonstrate methodologies to enhance the ability of customer sited Demand Response resources to integrate more effectively with electric delivery companies and regional transmission organizations.

  12. Medical Imaging Computed Tomography (CT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, Thomas N.

    Module 10 Medical Imaging · X-rays · Computed Tomography (CT) · Positron Emission Tomography (PET Sources PET-TOF #12;Four Sources PET #12;Four Sources PET-TOF #12;PET Scan MRI CT scan #12;Endocrine Gland,000 pixels! #12;Modern Example of CT Scan with the addition of Surface Shading Standard CT With Surface

  13. CT Solar Loan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered...

  14. VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2 1 Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy Storage Projects NH 32 Awards Support Projects in 24 States 6 11 MA...

  15. VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartment ofPrivilegesUnauthorized Access | Department2 1

  16. VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartment ofPrivilegesUnauthorized Access | Department2 1 2 1

  17. VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartment ofPrivilegesUnauthorized Access | Department2 1 2 1 7

  18. Dept. of Applied Physics and Applied Math, Columbia University. NY, NY 10027. 212-854-4496 Web-site: http://depts.washington.edu/ufa/home.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , recruit, and retain the best and the brightest students , scientists, and engineers..." is essential of physical sciences research budgets, are critical for maintaining America's long-term competitivenessDept. of Applied Physics and Applied Math, Columbia University. NY, NY 10027. 212-854-4496 Web

  19. RFI/RI work plan for the Road A Chemical Basin 904-111G

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kmetz, T.F.

    2000-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI)/Remedial Investigation (RI) Work Plan has been prepared for the Road A Chemical Basin Operable Unit (RdACB OU) (904-111G). This unit is subject to the requirements of both RCRA and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This Work Plan presents the initial evaluation of existing unit data, applicable background data, the regulatory framework for the unit investigation, and the evaluations and decisions made during the determination of the scope and objectives of the planned Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) activities.

  20. Property:EIA/861/IsoNy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,PillarPublicationType JumpDOEInvolve JumpallowedAltFuelVehicle JumpIsoNy Jump to:

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bethlehem Steel Corporation - NY 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo - NY 63Hill -Besley-Wells

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Guterl Specialty Steel - NY 12

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo -ElkGuterl Specialty Steel - NY 12

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hooker Chemical Co - NY 05

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo -ElkGuterlHooker Chemical Co - NY 05

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sylvania Corning Plant - NY 19

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K LeDowntown Site - MOSuttonPlant - NY 19

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Syracuse University - NY 29

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K LeDowntown Site - MOSuttonPlant - NY

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Colonie - NY 06

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertowni5WBuffalo NY

  7. From Bad to Worse: Senior economic inSecurity on the riSe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    From Bad to Worse: Senior economic inSecurity on the riSe Tatjana Meschede Laura Sullivan Thomas the Senior Financial Stability Index, economic insecurity among senior households increased by one demographic groups, economic security of seniors has deteriorated further. Contrary to the popular belief

  8. Honda Research Institute USA, Inc. http://www.honda-ri.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thrun, Sebastian

    Honda Research Institute USA, Inc. http://www.honda-ri.com Call For 2006 Summer Interns The computer science research section of Honda Research Institute USA (HRI-US), located in Mountain View internship will produce working concepts as well as publications, under close collaboration with Honda

  9. EUTROPHICATION A J Gold, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Art

    EUTROPHICATION A J Gold, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA J T Sims, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA Ã? 2005, Elsevier Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Introduction Eutrophication describes in nutrient inputs. Phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) are the nutrients that drive most eutrophication processes

  10. SwRI Patents Southwest Research Institute -Page 1 of 85

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Clark R.

    ,720,184 5/13/2014 Use of Braking Energy to Augment Exhaust Heat for Improved Operation of Exhaust Aftertreatment Devices Cynthia C. Webb, Karl J Kreder III SwRI 8,714,121 5/6/2014 Split-Cycle Air Hybrid V

  11. Steven Humphrey Named 2009 URITC Student of the Year The University of Rhode Island Transportation Center selected Steven Humphrey of Tiverton, RI as its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Transportation Center selected Steven Humphrey of Tiverton, RI as its 2009 Student of the Year in recognition

  12. CT NC0

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertowni5W 95.5x-L* d! CT NC0 - i , ,.

  13. CT reconstruction techniques for improved accuracy of lung CT airway measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Ranallo, F. N. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Judy, P. F. [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Gierada, D. S. [Department of Radiology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Fain, S. B., E-mail: sfain@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering,University of Wisconsin School of Engineering, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the impact of constrained reconstruction techniques on quantitative CT (qCT) of the lung parenchyma and airways for low x-ray radiation dose. Methods: Measurement of small airways with qCT remains a challenge, especially for low x-ray dose protocols. Images of the COPDGene quality assurance phantom (CTP698, The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) were obtained using a GE discovery CT750 HD scanner for helical scans at x-ray radiation dose-equivalents ranging from 1 to 4.12 mSv (12–100 mA s current–time product). Other parameters were 40 mm collimation, 0.984 pitch, 0.5 s rotation, and 0.625 mm thickness. The phantom was sandwiched between 7.5 cm thick water attenuating phantoms for a total length of 20 cm to better simulate the scatter conditions of patient scans. Image data sets were reconstructed using STANDARD (STD), DETAIL, BONE, and EDGE algorithms for filtered back projection (FBP), 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), and Veo reconstructions. Reduced (half) display field of view (DFOV) was used to increase sampling across airway phantom structures. Inner diameter (ID), wall area percent (WA%), and wall thickness (WT) measurements of eight airway mimicking tubes in the phantom, including a 2.5 mm ID (42.6 WA%, 0.4 mm WT), 3 mm ID (49.0 WA%, 0.6 mm WT), and 6 mm ID (49.0 WA%, 1.2 mm WT) were performed with Airway Inspector (Surgical Planning Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA) using the phase congruency edge detection method. The average of individual measures at five central slices of the phantom was taken to reduce measurement error. Results: WA% measures were greatly overestimated while IDs were underestimated for the smaller airways, especially for reconstructions at full DFOV (36 cm) using the STD kernel, due to poor sampling and spatial resolution (0.7 mm pixel size). Despite low radiation dose, the ID of the 6 mm ID airway was consistently measured accurately for all methods other than STD FBP. Veo reconstructions showed slight improvement over STD FBP reconstructions (4%–9% increase in accuracy). The most improved ID and WA% measures were for the smaller airways, especially for low dose scans reconstructed at half DFOV (18 cm) with the EDGE algorithm in combination with 100% ASIR to mitigate noise. Using the BONE + ASIR at half BONE technique, measures improved by a factor of 2 over STD FBP even at a quarter of the x-ray dose. Conclusions: The flexibility of ASIR in combination with higher frequency algorithms, such as BONE, provided the greatest accuracy for conventional and low x-ray dose relative to FBP. Veo provided more modest improvement in qCT measures, likely due to its compatibility only with the smoother STD kernel.

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Machine and Foundry Co - NY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo - NY 63 Buffalo - NY 6326 NY

  15. L. Jean Camp & Ka-Ping Yee Human implications of technology, Practical Handbook of Internet Computing ed. M. P. Singh, CRC Press (New York, NY) Winter 2003.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camp, L. Jean

    Press (New York, NY) Winter 2003. 3 designer that the single reliable principle of responsible design

  16. SHAHNOZA BOBOEVA Columbia University, The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science New York, NY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SHAHNOZA BOBOEVA EDUCATION Columbia University, The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied, Economic Theory PROJECT EXPERIENCE Columbia University Master's Thesis New York, NY Potential of Air Branch of Technological University of Tajikistan Khujand, Tajikistan Faculty "Agrotechnology" 2004

  17. Experimental Approach to Stellar Reactions with RI Beams - Overview of Experiments on Hydrogen Burning -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kubono

    2007-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    After a short review on resent developments achieved in astrophysics in the past years since last NN conference, experimental efforts in nuclear astrophysics primarily with RI beams were revisited, especially on the works relevant to neutron-deficient nuclei, the other half of the nuclear chart reviewed by Rehm in this conference. A new interesting recognition discussed in the past years is the important role of explosive hydrogen burning process in the very early stage of type II supernovae. A new broadening research field related to the first generation stars both from observations as well as from nuclear astrophysics was also discussed.

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- National Carbon Co - NY 48

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01 FUSRAPMonsantoMorseAcmeCarbon Co

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New York University - NY 50

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01Naturita36

  20. Bridging the Causeway: A Center for Healthcare Policy and Research Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmichael, Owen

    TN MS AL GA FL SC VA WV OH MI NY PA MD DE NJ CT RI MA ME VT NH AK HI FY06 CTSA Grantees (12) FY07 CTSA Grantees (12) #12;NIH and Institutions: Working together as a National Consortium Informatics

  1. Streamlining the OU3 RI/FS process to accommodate decontamination and dismantlement at Fernald

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hampshire, L.H.; Dalga, D.G.; Clark, T.R.; Throckmorton, J.D. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Janke, R.J. [USDOE Fernald Field Office, OH (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of a proper and complete assessment of data needs, relative to the characterization of a site, can never be understated. Not only will this assessment assure that the appropriate types, levels, and numbers of samples are taken, but as evidenced by the subject project, can lead to significant time and cost savings. The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), formerly known as the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC), covers an area measuring 4.25 square kilometers (1,050 acres) and is located in a rural agricultural area about 28 kilometers (17 miles) northwest of downtown Cincinnati, Ohio. The site is near the villages of Fernald, New Haven, Ross, and Shandon, Ohio. After providing some general background information on the site, and the subject RI/FS, the remainder of this presentation will focus on how the sampling approach was changed to reflect a reassessment of data needs, and the resultant benefits of that change. Specifically, discussion will be provided relative to the initial approach proposed for characterizing the contamination at the site, the revised, improved sampling approach contained in the approved RI/FS Work Plan Addendum, and the benefits derived from this change in the sampling approach.

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Seymour CT Site - CT 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K Le BlondSanta SusanaSeymour CT Site - CT

  3. Comparison of CT, PET, and PET/CT for Staging of Patients with Indolent Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fueger, Barbara J.; Yeom, Kristen; Czernin, Johannes; Sayre, James W.; Phelps, Michael E.; Allen-Auerbach, Martin S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differences between PET and CT were not significant forperformed significantly better than PET and CT in correctlyadditional information over PET and CT for the staging and

  4. Limited View Angle Iterative CT Reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Connelly, "CT Technologies," in Aspects of Explosives Detection, Elsevier 2009. Dual energy CT Z. Ying, R. Nam and C. R. Crawford, "Dual energy computed tomography for explosive detection," Journal of X

  5. Contribution of the Reaction Ny-]Nnk to Antikaon Production in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Che Ming.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy spectrum can also be understood qualitatively. ' There is another process NY ?+NNK which may also contribute to the production of antikaons in heavy-ion collisions. Since the threshold energies for this process are -455 MeV and -635 MeV for Y...=X and Y=A, respectively, and are larger than those for the process m Y?+KN, which are ?120 MeV and -215 MeV for Y=X and Y=A, respectively, one might intuitively think that the contribution from the reaction NY~NNK is negligible. To ensure...

  6. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. ISSN 0077-8923 ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. ISSN 0077-8923 ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Issue: Environmental endogenous RT doi: 10.1111/j.1749-6632.2012.06580.x Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 1259 (2012) 1­9 c 2012 New York

  7. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. ISSN 0077-8923 ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. ISSN 0077-8923 ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Issue: Ecological decision making and interactions provides an Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 1185 (2010) 39­53 c 2010 New York Academy

  8. Speech enhancement using STFT of real and imaginary parts of modulation This paper investigates an alternate modulation (RI-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speech enhancement using STFT of real and imaginary parts of modulation signals Abstract This paper investigates an alternate modulation (RI- modulation) AMS-based framework for speech enhancement, in which real subtraction. Experiments presented also show that while this framework is suited to speech enhancement

  9. On Maximum Available Feedback and PID Control -1 IEEE SMC UK&RI Applied Cybernetics Dr Richard Mitchell 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Richard

    On Maximum Available Feedback and PID Control - 1 IEEE SMC UK&RI Applied Cybernetics © Dr Richard Mitchell 2005 ON MAXIMUM AVAILABLE FEEDBACK AND PID CONTROL Dr Richard Mitchell, Cybernetics, University frequencies A recent IEEE SMC Paper describes a robust PID controller whose phase is flat at key frequencies

  10. Dating the Glass Lake Dugout by Dendrochronology (NY State Museum #CN-37516)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Sturt

    Dating the Glass Lake Dugout by Dendrochronology (NY State Museum #CN-37516) Carol Griggs, Dendrochronology Lab, Cornell University, cbg4@cornell.edu The Glass Lake Dugout was found at the bottom of Glass for the Glass Lake Dugout (Figure 2B). The series was compared with other site and regional white pine

  11. Scott M. Kaufman US Project Manager The Carbon Trust Brooklyn, NY January 2009 -present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy, The Earth Institute at Columbia University New York, NY Dec 2007 and direction for research. Crafted strategy for data collection and analysis from waste management partners waste managers to determine efficient collections routing and outreach strategies. Searched for new

  12. Abstract No. jone0499 FTIR Measurement of Organic Functional Groups in NY/NJ Harbor Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    % with a direct impact on shipping costs. Decontamination and beneficial use of the dredged material may help are enormous. In the NY/NJ Harbor case, dredging is required to maintain and improve navigation channels used for commercial purposes. Approximately 1,500,000 cubic meters of dredged material must be dredged and disposed

  13. Concrete as a Green Building Material Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    Concrete as a Green Building Material C. Meyer Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA to make it suitable as a "Green Building" material. Foremost and most successful in this regard is the use of the Green Building movement in North America is already changing the economic landscape and the factors

  14. 64 Home Power #30 August / September 1992 ny renewable energy system that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    by Underwriters Laboratories (UL)® for the manufacture and testing of residential, stand-alone PV inverters PV inverters might require that the ac output be isolated from the DC input and the chassis or case64 Home Power #30 · August / September 1992 ny renewable energy system that employs an inverter

  15. Ranjith K. Annepu 3149 Broadway, Apt 6, New York, NY, 10027

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Waste-to-Energy in New York City - Guided a senior-year project of seven undergraduates studying the feasibility and design of a waste-to-energy (WTE) plant in a client's plot in New York City. #12Ranjith K. Annepu 3149 Broadway, Apt 6, New York, NY, 10027 +1-347-260-3240, rka2109@columbia

  16. THERMAL PROPERTIES AND PROCESSES D Hillel, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - lengths, is proportional to the fourth power of the absolute temperature Tof the body's surface. This lawTHERMAL PROPERTIES AND PROCESSES D Hillel, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA Ã? 2005, Elsevier, and microbial activity. Soil temperature varies in response to changes in the radiant, thermal, and latent

  17. Parentage: MS702-80 x NY88 Developers: Michigan State University and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Boulder (MSF373-8) Parentage: MS702-80 x NY88 Developers: Michigan State University Douches at Michigan State University (517-355- 0271 x 194, douchesd@msu.edu). Morphological and the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station Plant Variety Protection: In application Strengths: Boulder

  18. "EMM Region","PC","IGCC","PC","Conv. CT","Adv. CT","Conv. CC...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "EMM Region","PC","IGCC","PC","Conv. CT","Adv. CT","Conv. CC","Adv. CC","Adv. CC wCCS","Fuel Cell","Nuclear","Biomass","MSW","On-shore Wind","Off-shore Wind","Solar...

  19. CT Offshore | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORT Americium/CuriumAguaBBBWind-BrizaHKC WindCT Offshore Place:

  20. Affirmatively furthering fair housing : overcoming barriers to implementation of the Westchester County, NY false claims case settlement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, Julie Iris

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Westchester County, NY was sued by the Anti-Discrimination Center of Metro New York, Inc. (ADC) under the False Claims Act for allegedly failing to meet its Affirmatively Further Fair Housing obligation for Community ...

  1. Brookhaven Forum 2011 "A First Glimpse of the Tera Scale" Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY --October 19-21, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    of the LUX Dark Matter Experiment" I. Lewis: "Majorana Neutrino and W' Chiral Couplings at Brookhaven Forum 2011 "A First Glimpse of the Tera Scale" Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY

  2. Built waterfront through edge, connection, and exchange : reclaiming a waterfront for Greenpoint, a project in Brooklyn, N.Y.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziesemann, Rodney P. (Rodney Paul), 1967-

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently the waterfront of Brooklyn N.Y. between the Gowanus Canal of Redhook and the Newton Creek of Greenpoint is predominantly lined with various types of industrial and manufacturing uses. Scattered throughout are ...

  3. DECONTAMINATION OF DREDGED MATERIAL FROM PORT OF NY/NJ DECONTAMINATION OF DREDGED MATERIAL FROM THE PORT OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    District, CENAN-PL-ES, 26 Federal Plaza, New York, NY 10278-0090 4 Department of Environmental and Energy THE PORT OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY 1 K. W. Jones, 2 E. A. Stern, 3 K. R. Donato, 4 N. L. Clesceri 1 - Region 2 - DEPP-PBPB, 290 Broadway, New York, NY 10007-1866 3 US Army Corps of Engineers - New York

  4. Siemens AG, CT, September 2001 CORPORATETECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    s © Siemens AG, CT, September 2001 CORPORATETECHNOLOGY Research and Technology at Siemens Transportation Power Information & Communications Health Automation & Control #12;2© Siemens AGResearch and Technology at Siemens CORPORATETECHNOLOGY CT / E 020 a - 02.01 Key Figures for 2000 Amounts in billions

  5. RI-mode investigations in the DIII-D tokamak with neon and argon induced radiating mantles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, G.L.; Staebler, G.M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Murakami, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The RI-mode regime, with high radiating power fractions from 0.5 to 0.9, energy confinement enhancements, H{sub 89P}, over ITER89-P L-mode scaling greater than 1.6, and operation at or above the Greenwald density limit (n{sub GW}) is an attractive operating scenario for future fusion burning plasma devices. The TEXTOR tokamak has demonstrated this scenario in a limiter device with steady state conditions, {Delta}t{sub RI-mode}/{tau}{sub E} > 100. Studies have been initiated on the DIII-D tokamak with the goals of: (a) extending these results to a larger non circular machine (providing size and shape scaling), (b) investigating the underlying physical mechanisms of RI-mode with a complementary diagnostic set to that on TEXTOR, and (c) using non-intrinsic impurities, e.g., neon and argon, to obtain high performance diverted discharges, ({beta}{sub N}H{sub 89P} > 6) in support of the DIII-D advanced tokamak (AT) program, where {beta}{sub N} = {beta}{sub T}/(I{sub p}/aB{sub T}) and {beta}{sub T}, I{sub p}, a, and B{sub T} are toroidal beta (in %), plasma current (MA), minor radius (m), and toroidal magnetic field (T) respectively. The authors define P{sub radLCFS} as the radiated power inside the LCFS and note that nearly all of this radiation occurs in the mantle region 0.6 < {rho} < 1.0, i.e., P{sub mantle} {approx} P{sub radLCFS}. Three types of DIII-D discharges where mantle radiation plays a significant role are discussed in this paper: (i) ELMing H-mode puff and pump, (ii) limiter L-mode, and (III) high performance.

  6. Low-energy RI beam technology and nuclear clusters in the explosive pp-chain breakout process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubono, S. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanchang Road 509, Lanzhou 73000 (China); RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0 (Japan); Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D. M.; Ohshiro, Y.; Watanabe, S.; Yamazaki, N. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-858 (Japan); Yanagisawa, Y.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kase, M. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hayakawa, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Kwon, Y. K. [Institute for Basic Science, 70, Yuseong-daero 1689-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-81 (Korea, Republic of); Hashimoto, T.; Fukuda, Y. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); He, J. J. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanchang Road 509, Lanzhou 73000 (China); Goto, A. [Faculty of Medcine, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-2331 (Japan); Muto, H. [Center of General Education, Tokyo University of Science at Suwa, Chino, Nagano 391-0292 (Japan)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture includes two parts: One is a discussion on the technology for developing RIB beam facility based on the in-flight method and relevant experimental technology. The second part is a discussion on experimental efforts for studying the breakout process from the pp-chain region based on recent works with low energy RI beams. The discussion of the second part specifically covers the problem of the vp-process in type II supernovae in terms of alpha cluster nature for the reactions.

  7. Optimizing Spectral Color Reproduction in Multiprimary Digital David Long, Mark D. Fairchild; Munsell Color Science Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology; Rochester, NY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairchild, Mark D.

    . Fairchild; Munsell Color Science Laboratory, Rochester Institute of Technology; Rochester, NY Abstract of constructing an abridged spectral reproduction display environment from P3 digital cinema-based displays

  8. MHK Projects/GCK Technology Shelter Island NY US | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformationCygnet < MHKSound, NY ProjectAdams <US <

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Allegheny-Ludlum Steel Corp - NY 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizona ArizonaWyomingAllegheny-Ludlum Steel Corp -NY

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Frederick Flader Inc - NY 0-13

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo -Elk RiverFrederick Flader Inc - NY

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Linde Air Products Division - NY 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffaloJohns HopkinsLaDivision - NY 08 FUSRAP

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Long Island College of Medicine - NY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffaloJohns HopkinsLaDivision - NY0-14

  13. CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gall, B.L.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a good'' surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

  14. CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gall, B.L.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a ``good`` surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

  15. FACT SHEET: Projects with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) CCICADA is involved in several projects in partnership with FEMA Region II (which covers NJ, NY, Puerto Rico, and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is involved in several projects in partnership with FEMA Region II (which covers NJ, NY, Puerto Rico

  16. Friction Reduction for Microhole CT Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Newman; Patrick Kelleher; Edward Smalley

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this 24 month project focused on improving microhole coiled tubing drilling bottom hole assembly (BHA) reliability and performance, while reducing the drilling cost and complexity associated with inclined/horizontal well sections. This was to be accomplished by eliminating the need for a downhole drilling tractor or other downhole coiled tubing (CT) friction mitigation techniques when drilling long (>2,000 ft.) of inclined/horizontal wellbore. The technical solution to be developed and evaluated in this project was based on vibrating the coiled tubing at surface to reduce the friction along the length of the downhole CT drillstring. The Phase 1 objective of this project centered on determining the optimum surface-applied vibration system design for downhole CT friction mitigation. Design of the system would be based on numerical modeling and laboratory testing of the CT friction mitigation achieved with various types of surface-applied vibration. A numerical model was developed to predict how far downhole the surface-applied vibration would travel. A vibration test fixture, simulating microhole CT drilling in a horizontal wellbore, was constructed and used to refine and validate the numerical model. Numerous tests, with varying surface-applied vibration parameters were evaluated in the vibration test fixture. The data indicated that as long as the axial force on the CT was less than the helical buckling load, axial vibration of the CT was effective at mitigating friction. However, surface-applied vibration only provided a small amount of friction mitigation as the helical buckling load on the CT was reached or exceeded. Since it would be impractical to assume that routine field operations be conducted at less than the helical buckling load of the CT, it was determined that this technical approach did not warrant the additional cost and maintenance issues that would be associated with the surface vibration equipment. As such, the project was concluded following completion of Phase 1, and Phase 2 (design, fabrication, and testing of a prototype surface vibration system) was not pursued.

  17. Respiratory correlated cone beam CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Zijp, Lambert; Remeijer, Peter; Herk, Marcel van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner integrated with a linear accelerator is a powerful tool for image guided radiotherapy. Respiratory motion, however, induces artifacts in CBCT, while the respiratory correlated procedures, developed to reduce motion artifacts in axial and helical CT are not suitable for such CBCT scanners. We have developed an alternative respiratory correlated procedure for CBCT and evaluated its performance. This respiratory correlated CBCT procedure consists of retrospective sorting in projection space, yielding subsets of projections that each corresponds to a certain breathing phase. Subsequently, these subsets are reconstructed into a four-dimensional (4D) CBCT dataset. The breathing signal, required for respiratory correlation, was directly extracted from the 2D projection data, removing the need for an additional respiratory monitor system. Due to the reduced number of projections per phase, the contrast-to-noise ratio in a 4D scan reduced by a factor 2.6-3.7 compared to a 3D scan based on all projections. Projection data of a spherical phantom moving with a 3 and 5 s period with and without simulated breathing irregularities were acquired and reconstructed into 3D and 4D CBCT datasets. The positional deviations of the phantoms center of gravity between 4D CBCT and fluoroscopy were small: 0.13{+-}0.09 mm for the regular motion and 0.39{+-}0.24 mm for the irregular motion. Motion artifacts, clearly present in the 3D CBCT datasets, were substantially reduced in the 4D datasets, even in the presence of breathing irregularities, such that the shape of the moving structures could be identified more accurately. Moreover, the 4D CBCT dataset provided information on the 3D trajectory of the moving structures, absent in the 3D data. Considerable breathing irregularities, however, substantially reduces the image quality. Data presented for three different lung cancer patients were in line with the results obtained from the phantom study. In conclusion, we have successfully implemented a respiratory correlated CBCT procedure yielding a 4D dataset. With respiratory correlated CBCT on a linear accelerator, the mean position, trajectory, and shape of a moving tumor can be verified just prior to treatment. Such verification reduces respiration induced geometrical uncertainties, enabling safe delivery of 4D radiotherapy such as gated radiotherapy with small margins.

  18. R.I. Borja (Ed.): Multiscal and Multiphysics Processes in Geomechanics, SSGG, pp 149-152. EARTHQUAKE SEQUENCE CALCULATIONS WITH DYNAMIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R.I. Borja (Ed.): Multiscal and Multiphysics Processes in Geomechanics, SSGG, pp 149 and Multiphysics Processes in Geomechanics (results of a workshop at Stanford University, 23-25 June, 2010), Springer Series in Geomechanics and Geoengineering, edited by Ronaldo I. Borja, ISBN 978

  19. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION | VOLUME 23 NUMBER 4 | 393-398 | apRiL 2010 393 original contributionsnature publishing group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION | VOLUME 23 NUMBER 4 | 393-398 | apRiL 2010 393 original to be an inde- pendent predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortalities,1 especially in hypertensive events3 and of fatal stroke4 in hypertensive patients, an independent risk factor for recurrent acute

  20. FREE ELECTRON LASERS AND HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING* Vladimir N. Litvinenko, BNL, Upton, Long Island, NY, USA#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    two orders-of-magnitude. Two techniques offering the potential to cool high- energy hadron beamsFREE ELECTRON LASERS AND HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING* Vladimir N. Litvinenko, BNL, Upton, Long Island, NY, USA# Yaroslav S. Derbenev, TJNAF, Newport News, VA, USA) Abstract Cooling intense high

  1. Job Opportunity at NEUROMATTERS, LLC 40 Wall Street, 28th Floor, New York, NY 10005 www.neuromatters.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Mark

    , Neuromatters is at the forefront of neurotechnologies, EEG signal processing and decoding. The successfulJob Opportunity at NEUROMATTERS, LLC 40 Wall Street, 28th Floor, New York, NY 10005 www.neuromatters.com Founded by recognized neuroengineering experts from Columbia University and the City College of New York

  2. Sediment Decontamination For Navigational And Environmental Restoration In NY/NJ Harbor Case Study: Passaic River, New Jersey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Sediment Decontamination For Navigational And Environmental Restoration In NY/NJ Harbor ­ Case compounds. Decontamination of these sediments is one tool that can be used to cope with the problems posed decontamination technologies in near- commercial scale projects during the 2004-2005time period. We stress

  3. Comparison of CT and MR-CT Fusion for Prostate Post-Implant Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maletz, Kristina L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Beth Israel Medical Center, Continuum Health Partners, New York, NY (Israel); Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY (United States); Ennis, Ronald D., E-mail: REnnis@chpnet.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Beth Israel Medical Center, Continuum Health Partners, New York, NY (Israel); Ostenson, Jason; Pevsner, Alexander [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Beth Israel Medical Center, Continuum Health Partners, New York, NY (Israel); Kagen, Alexander [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Medical Center, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital, Continuum Health Partners, New York, NY (Israel); Wernick, Iddo [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Beth Israel Medical Center, Continuum Health Partners, New York, NY (Israel)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The use of T2 MR for postimplant dosimetry (PID) after prostate brachytherapy allows more anatomically accurate and precise contouring but does not readily permit seed identification. We developed a reproducible technique for performing MR-CT fusion and compared the resulting dosimetry to standard CT-based PID. Methods and Materials: CT and T1-weighted MR images for 45 patients were fused and aligned based on seed distribution. The T2-weighted MR image was then fused to the aligned T1. Reproducibility of the fusion technique was tested by inter- and intraobserver variability for 13 patients. Dosimetry was computed for the prostate as a whole and for the prostate divided into anterior and posterior sectors of the base, mid-prostate, and apex. Results: Inter- and intraobserver variability for the fusion technique showed less than 1% variation in D90. MR-CT fusion D90 and CT D90 were nearly equivalent for the whole prostate, but differed depending on the identification of superior extent of the base (p = 0.007) and on MR/CT prostate volume ratio (p = 0.03). Sector analysis showed a decrease in MR-CT fusion D90 in the anterior base (ratio 0.93 {+-}0.25, p < 0.05) and an increase in MR-CT fusion D90 in the apex (p < 0.05). The volume of extraprostatic tissue encompassed by the V100 is greater on MR than CT. Factors associated with this difference are the MR/CT volume ratio (p < 0.001) and the difference in identification of the inferior extent of the apex (p = 0.03). Conclusions: We developed a reproducible MR-CT fusion technique that allows MR-based dosimetry. Comparing the resulting postimplant dosimetry with standard CT dosimetry shows several differences, including adequacy of coverage of the base and conformity of the dosimetry around the apex. Given the advantage of MR-based tissue definition, further study of MR-based dosimetry is warranted.

  4. abdominal multislice ct: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    planning. It includes an abdominal computer tomography (CT) image Leow, Wee Kheng 17 CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1 Physics...

  5. abdominal ct images: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods establish microCT imaging as a useful tool for comparative Metscher, Brian 31 CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1 Physics...

  6. abdominal ct findings: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    planning. It includes an abdominal computer tomography (CT) image Leow, Wee Kheng 11 CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1 Physics...

  7. Anatomic measurement accuracy: CT parameters and 3D rendering effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vorperian, Houri K.

    Anatomic measurement accuracy: CT parameters and 3D rendering effects Brian J Whyms a, E Michael of Neuroscience #12;INTRODUCTION · Measurements from 3D-CT rendering are used in research and clinical management-CT rendering techniques on measurements #12;METHODS Scanned: · 3 human mandibles · a phantom object Phantom

  8. Comparison of CT, PET, and PET/CT for Staging of Patients with Indolent Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fueger, Barbara J.; Yeom, Kristen; Czernin, Johannes; Sayre, James W.; Phelps, Michael E.; Allen-Auerbach, Martin S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. J. Fueger et al. : PET/CT for indolent lymphoma Table 2.Performance for detection of nodal disease Sensitivity PETCT PET/CT pG0.001 vs PET, CT Specificity pG0.001 vs PET

  9. 200 Seeley W. Mudd Building Mail Code 4701 500 West 120th Street New York, NY 10027 212-854-4458 Fax 212-854-8257

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    200 Seeley W. Mudd Building Mail Code 4701 500 West 120th Street New York, NY 10027 212 rooms are subject to state sales tax, city occupancy tax, and NYS hotel unit fee. Weekend rates may run

  10. INTERNATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER 213 Morey Hall, Box 270446, Rochester, NY 14627 Phone: (585) 275-2866 Fax: (585) 276-2943

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahon, Bradford Z.

    to your University funding, certification from your academic program is required, by signature below: $ Funding Sources University Funding (signature required): Non-University Funding Scholarship: $ PersonalINTERNATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER 213 Morey Hall, Box 270446, Rochester, NY

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Supply Depot AEC Warehouse - NY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01Naturita36 Supply Depot AEC

  12. Complications in CT-guided Procedures: Do We Really Need Postinterventional CT Control Scans?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nattenmüller, Johanna, E-mail: johanna.nattenmueller@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Filsinger, Matthias, E-mail: Matthias_filsinger@web.de; Bryant, Mark, E-mail: mark.bryant@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Stiller, Wolfram, E-mail: Wolfram.Stiller@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Radeleff, Boris, E-mail: boris.radeleff@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Grenacher, Lars, E-mail: lars.grenacher@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Kauczor, Hans-Ullrich, E-mail: hu.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Hosch, Waldemar, E-mail: waldemar.hosch@urz.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    PurposeThe aim of this study is twofold: to determine the complication rate in computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsies and drainages, and to evaluate the value of postinterventional CT control scans.MethodsRetrospective analysis of 1,067 CT-guided diagnostic biopsies (n = 476) and therapeutic drainages (n = 591) in thoracic (n = 37), abdominal (n = 866), and musculoskeletal (ms) (n = 164) locations. Severity of any complication was categorized as minor or major. To assess the need for postinterventional CT control scans, it was determined whether complications were detected clinically, on peri-procedural scans or on postinterventional scans only.ResultsThe complication rate was 2.5 % in all procedures (n = 27), 4.4 % in diagnostic punctures, and 1.0 % in drainages; 13.5 % in thoracic, 2.0 % in abdominal, and 3.0 % in musculoskeletal procedures. There was only 1 major complication (0.1 %). Pneumothorax (n = 14) was most frequent, followed by bleeding (n = 9), paresthesia (n = 2), material damage (n = 1), and bone fissure (n = 1). Postinterventional control acquisitions were performed in 65.7 % (701 of 1,067). Six complications were solely detectable in postinterventional control acquisitions (3 retroperitoneal bleeds, 3 pneumothoraces); all other complications were clinically detectable (n = 4) and/or visible in peri-interventional controls (n = 21).ConclusionComplications in CT-guided interventions are rare. Of these, thoracic interventions had the highest rate, while pneumothoraces and bleeding were most frequent. Most complications can be detected clinically or peri-interventionally. To reduce the radiation dose, postinterventional CT controls should not be performed routinely and should be restricted to complicated or retroperitoneal interventions only.

  13. Renal infarction: CT diagnosis and correlation between CT findings and etiologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, W.S.; Moss, A.A.; Federle, M.P.; Cochran, S.T.; London, S.S.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CT scans and the clinical records of 12 patients who had renal infarction were reviewed. The renal infarcts were classified as either focal or global. The CT findings were correlated with the etiologies of renal infarction. Embolism was the most common cause of renal infarcts that were multifocal with involvement of both kidneys. Trauma caused a unilateral global type of infract. A case of sickle cell anemia presented with multiple ''slit-like'' focal infarcts and enlarged kidneys. Forty-seven per cent of infarcts demonstrated the cortical rim sign, 11% were acapsular fluid collection, and 6% had an abnormally thickened renal fascia.

  14. aneurysm ct evaluation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    die Magnetresonanztomographie und die Positronen-Emissionstomographie ( CT, MRT, PET) sind heute, neben der Ultraschalltechnik, die wichtigsten nicht-invasiven bildgebenden...

  15. aided ct image: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging X-rays Computed Tomography (CT) Positron Emission Tomography (PET 12;LSO-APD Array Schematic 12;Time-of-Flight PET 12;Energy Spectrum with lutetium...

  16. Segmentation of artifacts and anatomy in CT metal artifact reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karimi, Seemeen; Cosman, Pamela; Wald, Christoph; Martz, Harry

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maximum- likelihood dual-energy tomographic imageartifact reduction by dual energy CT using monoenergetictive reconstruction of dual energy data 21 has the potential

  17. CT. L-2 United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertowni5W 95.5x-L* d! CT NC0 - i ,

  18. Sclerosing angiomatoid nodular transformation of the spleen: CT, MR, PET, and 99mTc-sulfur colloid SPECT CT findings with gross and histopathological correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thacker, Curtis; Korn, Ronald; Millstine, John; Harvin, Howard; Lier Ribbink, Jeffrey A.; Gotway, Michael B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    computed tomography-CT (FDG-PET CT) survey which revealed aof the spleen: CT, MR, PET, and 99m Tc-sulfur colloid SPECTT2, no enhancement US CT MR FDG-PET N/A › uptake N/A N/A N/A

  19. Automated movement correction for dynamic PET/CT images: Evaluation with phantom and patient data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    co- registration between PET and CT and for between frameco-registration between PET and CT, the PET images with ACregistration between PET and CT. Figure 3 shows that small

  20. Radioimmuntherapie3 Radioimmundiagnostik (Immuno-PET/CT)3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollisch, Tim

    Radioimmuntherapie3 Radioimmundiagnostik (Immuno-PET/CT)3 Entzündungsdiagnostik mit [18F]FDG3 of Inflammatory Diseases with [18F]FDG3 Characterisation of Multinodular Toxic Goiter3 Radioactive tracers onkologischer Therapiekonzepte Radioimmunotherapy3 Radioimmunodiagnostics (Immuno-PET/CT)3 Diagnosis

  1. Multi-energy CT Based on a Prior Rank, Intensity and Sparsity Model (PRISM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    -color, as a natural extension of dual energy CT [1], the future of CT will be multi-energy, generating much richer

  2. Risk-Informed Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (RI-MVA). An NRAP White Paper Documenting Methods and a Demonstration Model for Risk-Informed MVA System Design and Operations in Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Sadovsky, Artyom; Sullivan, E. C.; Anderson, Richard M.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper accompanies a demonstration model that implements methods for the risk-informed design of monitoring, verification and accounting (RI-MVA) systems in geologic carbon sequestration projects. The intent is that this model will ultimately be integrated with, or interfaced with, the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) integrated assessment model (IAM). The RI-MVA methods described here apply optimization techniques in the analytical environment of NRAP risk profiles to allow systematic identification and comparison of the risk and cost attributes of MVA design options.

  3. Low-Dose Dual-Energy CT for PET Attenuation Correction with Statistical Sinogram Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    1 Low-Dose Dual-Energy CT for PET Attenuation Correction with Statistical Sinogram Restoration. of Michigan & Univ. of Washington Outline Introduction - PET/CT background - CT-based attenuation correction for PET Conventional sinogram decomposition in DE-CT Statistically motivated sinogram restoration in DE

  4. The U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973 631 344-2345 www.bnl.gov Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Office of Nuclear Physics within the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, RHIC gives physicists of Nuclear Physics within the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science Total Upgrade Cost: $ 700 millionThe U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory · P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973

  5. Internship Philips Research North America, Briarcliff Manor, NY Philips Research North America (PRNA) is one of Philips' six worldwide research laboratories where

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Mark

    Internship ­ Philips Research North America, Briarcliff Manor, NY Philips Research North America an hour north of New York City. Length of Internship: 3 months Position Responsibilities: · Hands-on work to our area at the start and end of the internship. · If housing is necessary, PRNA supports home

  6. Internship Philips Research North America, Briarcliff Manor, NY Philips Research North America (PRNA) is one of Philips' six worldwide research laboratories where

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Mark

    Internship ­ Philips Research North America, Briarcliff Manor, NY Philips Research North America an hour north of New York City. Length of Internship: 3 months Position Responsibilities: · Gain knowledge expenses to our area at the start and end of the internship. · If housing is necessary, PRNA supports home

  7. Peter M. Groffman is a Senior Scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, NY, with research interests in ecosystem, soil, landscape and microbial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Peter M. Groffman is a Senior Scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, NY, with research interests in ecosystem, soil, landscape and microbial ecology, with a focus on carbon and nitrogen) and a Convening Lead Author for the 2013 U.S. National Climate Assessment Chapter on Ecosystems, Biodiversity

  8. Distributions and impact factors of antimony in topsoils and moss in Ny-lesund, Nan Jia, Liguang Sun*, Xin He, Kehua You, Xin Zhou, Nanye Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    been exten- sively studied. However, why the activity of coal mining can lead to an increase in Sb (Dicranum angustum) in disturbed and undisturbed areas, as well as coal and gangue, in Ny-Ålesund, Arctic was examined. Results show that the weathering of coal bed could not contribute to the increase of Sb

  9. ACEEE Summer Study on Energy in Industry, West Point, NY, July 19-22. 1 Benchmarking Approaches: An Alternate Method to Determine Best

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissock, Kelly

    : An Alternate Method to Determine Best Practice by Examining Plant-Wide Energy Signatures Yogesh Patil and JohnACEEE Summer Study on Energy in Industry, West Point, NY, July 19-22. 1 Benchmarking Approaches Seryak, Energy & Resource Solutions, Inc. Kelly Kissock, University of Dayton ABSTRACT Baselining

  10. Sanders, J. E.; and Merguerian, Charles, 1992a, Directional history of Pleistocene glaciers inferred from features eroded on bedrock, New York metropolitan area, SE NY.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Sanders, J. E.; and Merguerian, Charles, 1992a, Directional history of Pleistocene glaciers inferred from features eroded on bedrock, New York metropolitan area, SE NY. If a glacier erodes bedrock, the usual perception is that the youngest glacier will obliterate all direction-of-flow evidence that any

  11. Dynamic Bowtie for Fan-beam CT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Fenglin; Cong, Wenxiang; Hsieh, Scott; Pelc, Norbert

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bowtie is a filter used to shape an x-ray beam and equalize its flux reaching different detector channels. For development of spectral CT with energy-discriminative photon-counting (EDPC) detectors, here we propose and evaluate a dynamic bowtie for performance optimization based on a patient model or a scout scan. Our dynamic bowtie modifies an x-ray beam intensity profile by mechanical rotation and adaptive adjustment of the x-ray source flux. First, a mathematical model for dynamic bowtie filtering is established for an elliptical section in fan-beam geometry, and the contour of the optimal bowtie is derived. Then, numerical simulation is performed to compare the performance of the dynamic bowtie in the cases of an ideal phantom and a realistic cross-section relative to the counterparts without any bowtie and with a fixed bowtie respectively. Our dynamic bowtie can equalize the expected numbers of photons in the case of an ideal phantom. In practical cases, our dynamic bowtie can effectively reduce the dy...

  12. TLD assessment of mouse dosimetry during microCT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, Said Daibes; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Miller, William H.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J. [Harry S. Truman Memorial VA Hospital, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States) and Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Harry S. Truman Memorial VA Hospital, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States) and Departments of Internal Medicine, Chemistry, and the Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in laboratory animal imaging have provided new resources for noninvasive biomedical research. Among these technologies is microcomputed tomography (microCT) which is widely used to obtain high resolution anatomic images of small animals. Because microCT utilizes ionizing radiation for image formation, radiation exposure during imaging is a concern. The objective of this study was to quantify the radiation dose delivered during a standard microCT scan. Radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which were irradiated employing an 80 kVp x-ray source, with 0.5 mm Al filtration and a total of 54 mA s for a full 360 deg rotation of the unit. The TLD data were validated using a 3.2 cm{sup 3} CT ion chamber probe. TLD results showed a single microCT scan air kerma of 78.0{+-}5.0 mGy when using a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) anesthesia support module and an air kerma of 92.0{+-}6.0 mGy without the use of the anesthesia module. The validation CT ion chamber study provided a measured radiation air kerma of 81.0{+-}4.0 mGy and 97.0{+-}5.0 mGy with and without the PMMA anesthesia module, respectively. Internal TLD analysis demonstrated an average mouse organ radiation absorbed dose of 76.0{+-}5.0 mGy. The author's results have defined x-ray exposure for a routine microCT study which must be taken into consideration when performing serial molecular imaging studies involving the microCT imaging modality.

  13. Bryant University | 1150 Douglas Pike | Smithfield, RI 02917 | (877) 353-5667 | www.bryant.edu b r y a n t u n i v e r s i t y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blais, Brian

    Bryant University | 1150 Douglas Pike | Smithfield, RI 02917 | (877) 353-5667 | www.bryant.edu b r, if available. Please complete all that apply. I/we have provided for a bequest to Bryant University in the amount of $ ­ Or ­ My/Our current estate plan states that Bryant University will receive percent of my

  14. Mv. Space Res. Vol. 13, Mo. 9, ~. (9)331--(9)339, 1993 0273--1177/93$24.00 Punted in (Ireat Britain. All ri&its reserved. 1993COSPAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reames, Donald V.

    . All ri&its reserved. 1993COSPAR NON-THERMAL PARTICLES IN THE INTERPLANETARY MEDIUM Donald V. Reames ubiquitous presence of highly non- thermal particles in collisionless plasmas throughout the heliosphere and bow shocks, in traveling interplanetary shocks, in the interaction region between fast and slow solar

  15. Dose uncertainty due to computed tomography ,,CT... slice thickness in CT-based high dose rate brachytherapy of the prostate cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pouliot, Jean

    Dose uncertainty due to computed tomography ,,CT... slice thickness in CT-based high dose rate in Medicine. DOI: 10.1118/1.1785454 Key words: high dose rate brachytherapy, computed tomography, prostate at risk OARs by providing three-dimensional 3D anatomical information from computed tomography CT

  16. Realistic simulation of reduced-dose CT with noise modeling and sinogram synthesis using DICOM CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Won Kim, Chang [Interdisciplinary Program of Bioengineering Major Seoul National University College of Engineering, San 56-1, Silim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 152-742, South Korea and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28, Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Interdisciplinary Program of Bioengineering Major Seoul National University College of Engineering, San 56-1, Silim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 152-742, South Korea and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28, Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hyo, E-mail: kimjhyo@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28, Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do, 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do, 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Reducing the patient dose while maintaining the diagnostic image quality during CT exams is the subject of a growing number of studies, in which simulations of reduced-dose CT with patient data have been used as an effective technique when exploring the potential of various dose reduction techniques. Difficulties in accessing raw sinogram data, however, have restricted the use of this technique to a limited number of institutions. Here, we present a novel reduced-dose CT simulation technique which provides realistic low-dose images without the requirement of raw sinogram data. Methods: Two key characteristics of CT systems, the noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) and the algorithmic modulation transfer function (MTF), were measured for various combinations of object attenuation and tube currents by analyzing the noise power spectrum (NPS) of CT images obtained with a set of phantoms. Those measurements were used to develop a comprehensive CT noise model covering the reduced x-ray photon flux, object attenuation, system noise, and bow-tie filter, which was then employed to generate a simulated noise sinogram for the reduced-dose condition with the use of a synthetic sinogram generated from a reference CT image. The simulated noise sinogram was filtered with the algorithmic MTF and back-projected to create a noise CT image, which was then added to the reference CT image, finally providing a simulated reduced-dose CT image. The simulation performance was evaluated in terms of the degree of NPS similarity, the noise magnitude, the bow-tie filter effect, and the streak noise pattern at photon starvation sites with the set of phantom images. Results: The simulation results showed good agreement with actual low-dose CT images in terms of their visual appearance and in a quantitative evaluation test. The magnitude and shape of the NPS curves of the simulated low-dose images agreed well with those of real low-dose images, showing discrepancies of less than +/?3.2% in terms of the noise power at the peak height and +/?1.2% in terms of the spatial frequency at the peak height. The magnitudes of the noise measured for 12 different combinations the phantom size, tube current, and reconstruction kernel for the simulated and real low-dose images were very similar, with differences of 0.1 to 4.7%. Thep value for a statistical testing of the difference in the noise magnitude ranged from 0.99 to 0.11, showing that there was no difference statistically between the noise magnitudes of the real and simulated low-dose images using our method. The strength and pattern of the streak noise in an anthropomorphic phantom was also consistent with expectations. Conclusions: A novel reduced-dose CT simulation technique was developed which uses only CT images while not requiring raw sinogram data. Our method can provide realistic simulation results under reduced-dose conditions both in terms of the noise magnitude and the textual appearance. This technique has the potential to promote clinical research for patient dose reductions.

  17. Molecular imaging in oncology: the acceptance of PET/CT and the emergence of MR/PET imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiepers, Christiaan; Dahlbom, Magnus

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CT—Computed tomography . PET—Positron Emission Tomography .body imaging with MRI or PET/CT: the future for single-Sollitto RA et al (2009) 18F-FDG PET/CT of transitional cell

  18. Unusual association of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma with pancreatic metastasis: emerging role of PET-CT in tumor staging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Christie R, Daw NC et al ( 2005) PET/CT in the evaluation ofComparative study of FDG PET/CT and conventional imaging inet al (2009) Diagnostic value of PET/CT for the staging and

  19. Estimated cumulative radiation dose from PET/CT in children with malignancies: reply to Gelfand et al

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chawla, Soni C.; Boechat, M. Ines; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    radiation dose from PET/CT in children with malignancies.radiation dose from PET/CT in children with malig- nancies:radiation dose from PET/CT in children with malignancies:

  20. Molecular imaging in oncology: the acceptance of PET/CT and the emergence of MR/PET imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiepers, Christiaan; Dahlbom, Magnus

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    only [2] to combining PET and CT [3] and PET and MRI [4].varies widely between PET and CT, e.g. arms up or down,body imaging with MRI or PET/CT: the future for single-

  1. Estimated cumulative radiation dose from PET/CT in children with malignancies: a 5-year retrospective review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    N, Feig SA (2007) PET/CT in the evaluating pediatriccan be used for both PET and CT studies. The ALARA principleMB, Christie R, Daw NC (2005) PET/CT in the evaluation of

  2. Unusual association of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma with pancreatic metastasis: emerging role of PET-CT in tumor staging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The combination of PET and CT provided a mean effective doseChristie R, Daw NC et al ( 2005) PET/CT in the evaluation ofComparative study of FDG PET/CT and conventional imaging in

  3. Automatic CT simulation optimization for radiation therapy: A general strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hua, E-mail: huli@radonc.wustl.edu; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Tan, Jun; Gay, Hiram; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Yu, Lifeng [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Anastasio, Mark A. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In radiation therapy, x-ray computed tomography (CT) simulation protocol specifications should be driven by the treatment planning requirements in lieu of duplicating diagnostic CT screening protocols. The purpose of this study was to develop a general strategy that allows for automatically, prospectively, and objectively determining the optimal patient-specific CT simulation protocols based on radiation-therapy goals, namely, maintenance of contouring quality and integrity while minimizing patient CT simulation dose. Methods: The authors proposed a general prediction strategy that provides automatic optimal CT simulation protocol selection as a function of patient size and treatment planning task. The optimal protocol is the one that delivers the minimum dose required to provide a CT simulation scan that yields accurate contours. Accurate treatment plans depend on accurate contours in order to conform the dose to actual tumor and normal organ positions. An image quality index, defined to characterize how simulation scan quality affects contour delineation, was developed and used to benchmark the contouring accuracy and treatment plan quality within the predication strategy. A clinical workflow was developed to select the optimal CT simulation protocols incorporating patient size, target delineation, and radiation dose efficiency. An experimental study using an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom with added-bolus layers was used to demonstrate how the proposed prediction strategy could be implemented and how the optimal CT simulation protocols could be selected for prostate cancer patients based on patient size and treatment planning task. Clinical IMRT prostate treatment plans for seven CT scans with varied image quality indices were separately optimized and compared to verify the trace of target and organ dosimetry coverage. Results: Based on the phantom study, the optimal image quality index for accurate manual prostate contouring was 4.4. The optimal tube potentials for patient sizes of 38, 43, 48, 53, and 58 cm were 120, 140, 140, 140, and 140 kVp, respectively, and the corresponding minimum CTDIvol for achieving the optimal image quality index 4.4 were 9.8, 32.2, 100.9, 241.4, and 274.1 mGy, respectively. For patients with lateral sizes of 43–58 cm, 120-kVp scan protocols yielded up to 165% greater radiation dose relative to 140-kVp protocols, and 140-kVp protocols always yielded a greater image quality index compared to the same dose-level 120-kVp protocols. The trace of target and organ dosimetry coverage and the ? passing rates of seven IMRT dose distribution pairs indicated the feasibility of the proposed image quality index for the predication strategy. Conclusions: A general strategy to predict the optimal CT simulation protocols in a flexible and quantitative way was developed that takes into account patient size, treatment planning task, and radiation dose. The experimental study indicated that the optimal CT simulation protocol and the corresponding radiation dose varied significantly for different patient sizes, contouring accuracy, and radiation treatment planning tasks.

  4. Simultaneous Detection and Registration for Ileo-Cecal Valve Detection in 3D CT Colonography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbu, Adrian

    Simultaneous Detection and Registration for Ileo-Cecal Valve Detection in 3D CT Colonography Le Lu1-Cecal Valve (ICV) detection in both clean and tagged 3D CT colonography scans. Our final ICV detection system

  5. CT Poison Control Center 2014 Video Contest Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    CT Poison Control Center 2014 Video Contest Rules To Enter: 1) Record and upload a video to your an immediate family member who is an employee of the Connecticut Poison Control Center. Video Requirements: · DO NOT HANDLE, INGEST OR USE ANY ACTUAL POISONOUS OR HAZARDOUSSUBSTANCES. IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT

  6. Pulmonary fissure segmentation on CT Jingbin Wang a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betke, Margrit

    between the lobes in the lungs. Its segmentation is of clinical interest as it facilitates the assessment of lung disease on a lobar level. This paper describes a new approach for segmenting the major fissures in both lungs on thin-section computed tomography (CT). An image transformation called ``ridge map

  7. Status and Promise CT's and Magnetized Target Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Hill (LLNL) #12;CT's: Spheromaks & Field Reversed Configurations At LLNL, the SSPX experiment is investigating spheromak formation, sustainment, and confinement issues. (Hill, Mclean, Wood, Ryutov). At UC-Davis, formation and acceleration of spheromaks. (Hwang) At the U of Washington, field reversed configuration

  8. Collapsibility of Lung Volume by Paired Inspiratory and Expiratory CT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collapsibility of Lung Volume by Paired Inspiratory and Expiratory CT Scans: Correlations with Lung Function and Mean Lung Density Tsuneo Yamashiro, MD, Shin Matsuoka, MD, PhD, Brian J. Bartholmai, MD, Rau: To evaluate the relationship between measurements of lung volume (LV) on inspiratory/expiratory computed

  9. Thoracic CT-PET Registration Using a 3D Breathing Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Thoracic CT-PET Registration Using a 3D Breathing Model Antonio Moreno1 , Sylvie Chambon1 , Anand P Orlando, USA Abstract. In the context of thoracic CT-PET volume registration, we present a novel method applications. We consider Computed Tomography (CT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in thoracic regions

  10. Measurements from 3D-CT renderings are used in research and clinical management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vorperian, Houri K.

    Measurements from 3D-CT renderings are used in research and clinical management: · Characterization for the prism]) RENDERING TECHNIQUES USED in ANALYZE 10.0: - Volume Render - (2) Volumes of Interest 1) VOI-Auto & 2) VOI-Manual TOTAL 3D-CT MODELS: 3 mandibles X 18 CT series X 3 rendering techniques = 162 mandible

  11. Automated Tumour Delineation Using Joint PET/CT Information Vaclav Potesil 1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xiaolei

    Automated Tumour Delineation Using Joint PET/CT Information Vaclav Potesil 1,2 , Xiaolei Huang 1 for automated delineation of tumor boundaries in whole-body PET/CT by jointly using information from both PET. Keywords: Tumor delineation, PET-CT, segmentation, radiation therapy planning 1. INTRODUCTION

  12. Augmenting CT Cardiac Roadmaps with Segmented Streaming Qi Duan a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augmenting CT Cardiac Roadmaps with Segmented Streaming Ultrasound Qi Duan a,b , Guy Shechter Static X-ray computed tomography (CT) volumes are often used as anatomic roadmaps during catheter. Augmenting these static CT roadmaps with segmented myocardial borders extracted from live ultrasound (US

  13. Soft Classification with Gaussian Mixture Model for Clinical Dual-Energy CT Reconstructions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Soft Classification with Gaussian Mixture Model for Clinical Dual-Energy CT Reconstructions, and Ken D. Sauer, Member, IEEE Abstract--We study the distribution of the clinical dual-energy CT (DECT material separation. Index Terms--Computed tomography (CT), dual energy, sta- tistical method, Gaussian

  14. The New Oncology: Cost-effectiveness and Matchless Impactof PET-CT in Cancer Management CME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jadvar, Hossein

    The New Oncology: Cost-effectiveness and Matchless Impactof PET-CT in Cancer Management CME Author in integrating cost-effective FDG-PET and PET-CT fusion techniques into their clinical armamentarium to refine the clinical impact and cost-effectiveness of advanced imaging studies such as FDG-PET scanning and PET-CT

  15. Automatic Lung Nodule Detection from Chest CT Data Using Geometrical Features: Initial Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whelan, Paul F.

    Automatic Lung Nodule Detection from Chest CT Data Using Geometrical Features: Initial Results for automatic lung nodule detection from Chest CT data is proposed. The proposed system includes the methods of lung segmentation and nodule detection from CT data. The algorithm for lung segmentation consists

  16. Robust Segmentation of Challenging Lungs in CT using Multi-Stage Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robust Segmentation of Challenging Lungs in CT using Multi-Stage Learning and Level Set.Kevin Zhou1 Abstract Automatic segmentation of lung tissue in thoracic CT scans is useful for diagnosis and treatment planning of pulmonary diseases. Unlike healthy lung tissue that is easily identifiable in CT scans

  17. QROU Questions Fax: Fax transmits questions on the Quarry Residuals Operable Unit - Remedial Investigation Report (QROU - RI) for technical meeting set for August 14, 1997.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3u ;;;:: A' 3 ct : -. . . .~.Q

  18. Combining a Breathing Model and Tumor-Specific Rigidity Constraints for Registration of CT-PET Thoracic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambon, Sylvie

    Combining a Breathing Model and Tumor-Specific Rigidity Constraints for Registration of CT-PET modalities, namely Computerized Tomography (CT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). While recent technical advancements in combined CT/PET scanners provide 3D CT and PET data of the thoracic region

  19. In-patient to isocenter KERMA ratios in CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M.; Lavallee, Robert L.; Roskopf, Marsha L.; Scalzetti, Ernest M. [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), 96 Jonathan Lucas Street (MSC 323), Charleston, South Carolina 29425-3230 (United States); Department of Radiology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, 750 E Adams Street, Syracuse, New York 13210 (United States)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To estimate in-patient KERMA for specific organs in computed tomography (CT) scanning using ratios to isocenter free-in-air KERMA obtained using a Rando phantom.Method: A CT scan of an anthropomorphic phantom results in an air KERMA K at a selected phantom location and air kerma K{sub CT} at the CT scanner isocenter when the scan is repeated in the absence of the phantom. The authors define the KERMA ratio (R{sub K}) as K/ K{sub CT}, which were experimentally determined in a Male Rando Phantom using lithium fluoride chips (TLD-100). R{sub K} values were obtained for a total of 400 individual point locations, as well as for 25 individual organs of interest in CT dosimetry. CT examinations of Rando were performed on a GE LightSpeed Ultra scanner operated at 80 kV, 120 kV, and 140 kV, as well as a Siemens Sensation 16 operated at 120 kV. Results: At 120 kV, median R{sub K} values for the GE and Siemens scanners were 0.60 and 0.64, respectively. The 10th percentile R{sub K} values ranged from 0.34 at 80 kV to 0.54 at 140 kV, and the 90th percentile R{sub K} values ranged from 0.64 at 80 kV to 0.78 at 140 kV. The average R{sub K} for the 25 Rando organs at 120 kV was 0.61 {+-} 0.08. Average R{sub K} values in the head, chest, and abdomen showed little variation. Relative to R{sub K} values in the head, chest, and abdomen obtained at 120 kV, R{sub K} values were about 12% lower in the pelvis and about 58% higher in the cervical spine region. Average R{sub K} values were about 6% higher on the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner than the GE LightSpeed Ultra. Reducing the x-ray tube voltage from 120 kV to 80 kV resulted in an average reduction in R{sub K} value of 34%, whereas increasing the x-ray tube voltage to 140 kV increased the average R{sub K} value by 9%. Conclusions: In-patient to isocenter relative KERMA values in Rando phantom can be used to estimate organ doses in similar sized adults undergoing CT examinations from easily measured air KERMA values at the isocenter (free in air). Conversion from in-patient air KERMA values to tissue dose would require the use of energy-appropriate conversion factors.

  20. Upright cone beam CT imaging using the onboard imager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fave, Xenia, E-mail: xjfave@mdanderson.org; Martin, Rachael [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Yang, Jinzhong; Balter, Peter; Court, Laurence [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Carvalho, Luis [Varian Medical Systems, Zug 6303 (Switzerland)] [Varian Medical Systems, Zug 6303 (Switzerland); Pan, Tinsu [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Many patients could benefit from being treated in an upright position. The objectives of this study were to determine whether cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) could be used to acquire upright images for treatment planning and to demonstrate whether reconstruction of upright images maintained accurate geometry and Hounsfield units (HUs). Methods: A TrueBeam linac was programmed in developer mode to take upright CBCT images. The gantry head was positioned at 0°, and the couch was rotated to 270°. The x-ray source and detector arms were extended to their lateral positions. The x-ray source and gantry remained stationary as fluoroscopic projections were taken and the couch was rotated from 270° to 90°. The x-ray tube current was normalized to deposit the same dose (measured using a calibrated Farmer ion chamber) as that received during a clinical helical CT scan to the center of a cylindrical, polyethylene phantom. To extend the field of view, two couch rotation scans were taken with the detector offset 15 cm superiorly and then 15 cm inferiorly. The images from these two scans were stitched together before reconstruction. Upright reconstructions were compared to reconstructions from simulation CT scans of the same phantoms. Two methods were investigated for correcting the HUs, including direct calibration and mapping the values from a simulation CT. Results: Overall geometry, spatial linearity, and high contrast resolution were maintained in upright reconstructions. Some artifacts were created and HU accuracy was compromised; however, these limitations could be removed by mapping the HUs from a simulation CT to the upright reconstruction for treatment planning. Conclusions: The feasibility of using the TrueBeam linac to take upright CBCT images was demonstrated. This technique is straightforward to implement and could be of enormous benefit to patients with thoracic tumors or those who find a supine position difficult to endure.

  1. NY Green Bank

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Monday, October 6 th , 2014 Remarks by Nicholas Whitcombe, Managing Director, New York Green Bank Panel 1: Attracting and Maintaining Capital for Energy Transmission, Storage,...

  2. Training Session: Buffalo, NY

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 3.5-hour training provides builders with a comprehensive review of zero energy-ready home construction including the business case, detailed specifications, and opportunities to be recognized...

  3. NY-%-3 P

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 August 2008REGULATORY,.COMMISSION

  4. ACIM-~ NY.49

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertown Arsenal'.I Y.it ! ( , . /' /'

  5. NY Green Bank

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC)TABLEChallenges|Advanced AuthoringIt's time toIndustrialA C

  6. (12) United States Patent Grier et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    IN POTENTIAL ENERGY LANDSCAPES Inventors: David G. Grier, New York, NY (US); Marco Polin, New York, NY (US); Sang-Hyuk Lee, Rego Park, NY (US); Yael Roichman, NeW York, NY (US); Kosta Ladavac, Ridge?eld, CT (US) Assignee: New York University, NeW York, NY (Us) Notice: Subject to any disclaimer, the term ofthis patent

  7. Dedicated breast CT: Fibroglandular volume measurements in a diagnostic population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the mean and range of volumetric glandular fraction (VGF) of the breast in a diagnostic population using a high-resolution flat-panel cone-beam dedicated breast CT system. This information is important for Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients and for investigating the dependence of VGF on breast dimensions, race, and pathology. Methods: Image data from a clinical trial investigating the role of dedicated breast CT that enrolled 150 women were retrospectively analyzed to determine the VGF. The study was conducted in adherence to a protocol approved by the institutional human subjects review boards and written informed consent was obtained from all study participants. All participants in the study were assigned BI-RADS{sup Registered-Sign} 4 or 5 as per the American College of Radiology assessment categories after standard diagnostic work-up and underwent dedicated breast CT exam prior to biopsy. A Gaussian-kernel based fuzzy c-means algorithm was used to partition the breast CT images into adipose and fibroglandular tissue after segmenting the skin. Upon determination of the accuracy of the algorithm with a phantom, it was applied to 137 breast CT volumes from 136 women. VGF was determined for each breast and the mean and range were determined. Pathology results with classification as benign, malignant, and hyperplasia were available for 132 women, and were used to investigate if the distributions of VGF varied with pathology. Results: The algorithm was accurate to within {+-}1.9% in determining the volume of an irregular shaped phantom. The study mean ({+-} inter-breast SD) for the VGF was 0.172 {+-} 0.142 (range: 0.012-0.719). VGF was found to be negatively correlated with age, breast dimensions (chest-wall to nipple length, pectoralis to nipple length, and effective diameter at chest-wall), and total breast volume, and positively correlated with fibroglandular volume. Based on pathology, pairwise statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney test) indicated that at the 0.05 significance level, there was no significant difference in distributions of VGF without adjustment for age between malignant and nonmalignant breasts (p= 0.41). Pairwise comparisons of the distributions of VGF in increasing order of mammographic breast density indicated all comparisons were statistically significant (p < 0.002). Conclusions: This study used a different clinical prototype breast CT system than that in previous studies to image subjects from a different geographical region, and used a different algorithm for analysis of image data. The mean VGF estimated from this study is within the range reported in previous studies, indicating that the choice of 50% glandular weight fraction to represent an average breast for Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients in mammography needs revising. In the study, the distributions of VGF did not differ significantly with pathology.

  8. Embedded Library in WebCT: Pushing UCSD Library Resources to Faculty Courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, SuHui

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    keeper about pushing the library to department pages & webEmbedded Library in WebCT:Pushing UCSD Library Resources to Faculty Courses Presenter:

  9. A Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Margin- Support For A Significantly Elevated Palaeogeothermal Gradient During The Neogene? Jump to:...

  10. CT Scans of Cores Metadata, Barrow, Alaska 2015

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Katie McKnight; Tim Kneafsey; Craig Ulrich

    Individual ice cores were collected from Barrow Environmental Observatory in Barrow, Alaska, throughout 2013 and 2014. Cores were drilled along different transects to sample polygonal features (i.e. the trough, center and rim of high, transitional and low center polygons). Most cores were drilled around 1 meter in depth and a few deep cores were drilled around 3 meters in depth. Three-dimensional images of the frozen cores were constructed using a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. TIFF files can be uploaded to ImageJ (an open-source imaging software) to examine soil structure and densities within each core.

  11. Towards local progression estimation of pulmonary emphysema using CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staring, M., E-mail: m.staring@lumc.nl; Bakker, M. E.; Shamonin, D. P.; Reiber, J. H. C.; Stoel, B. C. [Department of Radiology, Division of Image Processing, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Division of Image Processing, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Stolk, J. [Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands)] [Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Whole lung densitometry on chest CT images is an accepted method for measuring tissue destruction in patients with pulmonary emphysema in clinical trials. Progression measurement is required for evaluation of change in health condition and the effect of drug treatment. Information about the location of emphysema progression within the lung may be important for the correct interpretation of drug efficacy, or for determining a treatment plan. The purpose of this study is therefore to develop and validate methods that enable the local measurement of lung density changes, which requires proper modeling of the effect of respiration on density. Methods: Four methods, all based on registration of baseline and follow-up chest CT scans, are compared. The first naïve method subtracts registered images. The second employs the so-called dry sponge model, where volume correction is performed using the determinant of the Jacobian of the transformation. The third and the fourth introduce a novel adaptation of the dry sponge model that circumvents its constant-mass assumption, which is shown to be invalid. The latter two methods require a third CT scan at a different inspiration level to estimate the patient-specific density-volume slope, where one method employs a global and the other a local slope. The methods were validated on CT scans of a phantom mimicking the lung, where mass and volume could be controlled. In addition, validation was performed on data of 21 patients with pulmonary emphysema. Results: The image registration method was optimized leaving a registration error below half the slice increment (median 1.0 mm). The phantom study showed that the locally adapted slope model most accurately measured local progression. The systematic error in estimating progression, as measured on the phantom data, was below 2 gr/l for a 70 ml (6%) volume difference, and 5 gr/l for a 210 ml (19%) difference, if volume correction was applied. On the patient data an underlying linearity assumption relating lung volume change with density change was shown to hold (fitR{sup 2} = 0.94), and globalized versions of the local models are consistent with global results (R{sup 2} of 0.865 and 0.882 for the two adapted slope models, respectively). Conclusions: In conclusion, image matching and subsequent analysis of differences according to the proposed lung models (i) has good local registration accuracy on patient data, (ii) effectively eliminates a dependency on inspiration level at acquisition time, (iii) accurately predicts progression in phantom data, and (iv) is reasonably consistent with global results in patient data. It is therefore a potential future tool for assessing local emphysema progression in drug evaluation trials and in clinical practice.

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Canaan Site - CT 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01Naturita36 SupplyCanaan Site -

  13. Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Lubbock, TX); Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for simultaneous transmission x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) comprises the steps of: injecting a subject with a tracer compound tagged with a .gamma.-ray emitting nuclide; directing an x-ray source toward the subject; rotating the x-ray source around the subject; emitting x-rays during the rotating step; rotating a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) two-sided detector on an opposite side of the subject from the source; simultaneously detecting the position and energy of each pulsed x-ray and each emitted .gamma.-ray captured by the CZT detector; recording data for each position and each energy of each the captured x-ray and .gamma.-ray; and, creating CT and SPECT images from the recorded data. The transmitted energy levels of the x-rays lower are biased lower than energy levels of the .gamma.-rays. The x-ray source is operated in a continuous mode. The method can be implemented at ambient temperatures.

  14. The U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973 631 344-2345 www.bnl.gov In Partnership with Stony Brook University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory · P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973 systems, including proteins and genomic information, to understand the structure and function of enzymes · U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory Funding $26 million from New York State

  15. Spatially-resolved EELS and EDS Analysis of HfOxNy Gate Dielectrics Deposited by MOCVD using [(C2H5)2N]4Hf with NO and O2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Wai Tung

    -resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS). HfOxNy gate dielectrics a replacement for SiO2 as the gate dielectric material. HfO2 is a promising candidate due to its high dielectric constant its stability on Si. However, crystallization temperatures of less than 500 °C and high impurity

  16. The U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973 631 344-2345 www.bnl.gov a passion for discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Hybridyne Imaging Technologies, Inc., ProxiScanTM won a 2009 R&D 100 AwardImaging Technologies,Inc. Patents · Inventorshold16patentson thetechnology · BrookhavenScience AssociatesThe U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory · P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973

  17. 2002 Marcel Dekker, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be used or reproduced in any form without the express written permission of Marcel Dekker, Inc. MARCEL DEKKER, INC. 270 MADISON AVENUE NEW YORK, NY 10016

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    ­3). These moments are usually derived from a probability balance equation for the distribution of the neutron number©2002 Marcel Dekker, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be used or reproduced in any AVENUE · NEW YORK, NY 10016 A CLASS OF SEMI-LINEAR EVOLUTION EQUATIONS ARISING IN NEUTRON FLUCTUATIONS Z

  18. Office of Technology Transfer and Innovation Partnerships, PO Box 6000, Binghamton, NY, 13902-6000. Ph: (607) 777-5870. FORM TT-2 Revised 03/19/09 FORM TT -2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Office of Technology Transfer and Innovation Partnerships, PO Box 6000, Binghamton, NY, 13902-6000. Ph: (607) 777-5870. FORM TT-2 Revised 03/19/09 FORM TT - 2 Technology Transfer NEW TECHNOLOGY DISCLOSURE PLEASE SUBMIT COMPLETED FORM TO OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND INNOVATIVE PARTNERSHIPS 1

  19. 2003 IEEE Workshop on Applications of Signal Processing to Audio and Acoustics October 19-22, 2003, New Paltz, NY FACTORS IN AUTOMATIC MUSICAL GENRE CLASSIFICATION OF AUDIO SIGNALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tzanetakis, George

    , New Paltz, NY FACTORS IN AUTOMATIC MUSICAL GENRE CLASSIFICATION OF AUDIO SIGNALS Tao Li Computer for or- ganizing the large collections of music that are becoming available to the average user user studies. This paper provides a detailed comparative analysis of various factors affecting

  20. Effects of the difference in tube voltage of the CT scanner on dose calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhee, Dong Joo; Moon, Young Min; Kim, Jung Ki; Jeong, Dong Hyeok

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed Tomography (CT) measures the attenuation coefficient of an object and converts the value assigned to each voxel into a CT number. In radiation therapy, CT number, which is directly proportional to the linear attenuation coefficient, is required to be converted to electron density for radiation dose calculation for cancer treatment. However, if various tube voltages were applied to take the patient CT image without applying the specific CT number to electron density conversion curve, the accuracy of dose calculation would be unassured. In this study, changes in CT numbers for different materials due to change in tube voltage were demonstrated and the dose calculation errors in percentage depth dose (PDD) and a clinical case were analyzed. The maximum dose difference in PDD from TPS dose calculation and Monte Carlo simulation were 1.3 % and 1.1 % respectively when applying the same CT number to electron density conversion curve to the 80 kVp and 140 kVp images. In the clinical case, the different CT nu...

  1. CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1 , A. Moreno1-based registration of CT (at two different instants of the breathing cycle, intermediate expirations) and PET images in order to simulate the instant in the breathing cycle most similar to the PET image and guarantee

  2. SPECIAL REPORTS AND REVIEWS Mass Screening With CT Colonography: Should the Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    SPECIAL REPORTS AND REVIEWS Mass Screening With CT Colonography: Should the Radiation Exposure is highly advantageous, it can be performed with lower radiation doses than almost any other CT examination market in the United States would soon be over 100 million people. Therefore, it is pertinent to consider

  3. Siemens AG, CT IC 4, H.-G. Zimmermann1 CORPORATETECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidhuber, Juergen

    © Siemens AG, CT IC 4, H.-G. Zimmermann1 CORPORATETECHNOLOGY System Identification & Forecasting with Advanced Neural Networks Principles, Techniques, Applications Hans Georg Zimmermann Siemens AG Email : Hans_Georg.Zimmermann@siemens.com © Siemens AG, CT IC 4, H.-G. Zimmermann2 CORPORATETECHNOLOGY . . . . ! " i ii wxw 0 w1 wn xn x1 Distinct

  4. Bone Surface Reconstruction From CT/MR Images Using Fast Marching and Level Set Methods1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chetverikov, Dmitry

    Bone Surface Reconstruction From CT/MR Images Using Fast Marching and Level Set Methods1) Istv surfaces reconstructed from MR volumes are shown. 1 Outline of the project One of our current projects steps of bone surface reconstruction from CT/MR slice images. 2 Main steps of reconstruction 2.1

  5. A Model-Based Iterative Algorithm for Dual-Energy X-Ray CT Reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Model-Based Iterative Algorithm for Dual-Energy X-Ray CT Reconstruction Ruoqiao Zhang, Jean, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--Recent developments in dual-energy X-ray CT have shown a number of benefits the opportunity to reduce noise and artifacts in dual energy reconstructions. However, previous approaches

  6. Multi-Material Decomposition Using Statistical Image Reconstruction in X-Ray CT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    and Jeffrey A. Fessler Abstract--Dual-energy (DE) CT scans provide two sets of measurements at two different-mean-square (RMS) errors. Index Terms--Computed tomography, dual energy, multi- material decomposition, statistical image reconstruction I. INTRODUCTION Dual-energy (DE) CT reconstruction methods typically re- construct

  7. Hemorrhage Slices Detection in Brain CT Images Ruizhe Liu, Chew Lim Tan, Tze Yun Leong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Chew Lim

    Hemorrhage Slices Detection in Brain CT Images Ruizhe Liu, Chew Lim Tan, Tze Yun Leong Department) scans are widely used in today's diagnosis of head traumas. It is effective to disclose the bleeding Tomography (CT) scans are widely used in today's diagnosis of head traumas. It is effective to disclose

  8. AUTOMATIC HEART ISOLATION FOR CT CORONARY VISUALIZATION USING G. Funka-Lea1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boykov, Yuri

    AUTOMATIC HEART ISOLATION FOR CT CORONARY VISUALIZATION USING GRAPH-CUTS G. Funka-Lea1 , Y. Boykov3 isolate the outer surface of the entire heart in Computer Tomogra- phy (CT) cardiac scans. Isolating the entire heart allows the coronary vessels on the surface of the heart to be easily visu- alized despite

  9. Non-Destructive Whole Lung Assessment via Multi-scale Micro CT Imaging Combined with Stereology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ge

    Non-Destructive Whole Lung Assessment via Multi-scale Micro CT Imaging Combined with Stereology Tech, Virginia, USA Running head Non-Destructive Whole Lung Assessment via µCT Contact Information Eric-hoffman@uiowa.edu Phone: 319-353-6213 Fax: 319-356-1503 #12;Abstract Estimating volume fractions of the lung parenchyma

  10. Location registration and recognition (LRR) for serial analysis of nodules in lung CT scans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Location registration and recognition (LRR) for serial analysis of nodules in lung CT scans Michal t In the clinical workflow for lung cancer management, the comparison of nodules between CT scans from subsequent in investigating the condition of the lung. The algorithm uses a combination of feature extraction, indexing

  11. ROBUST SEGMENTATION OF LUNG TISSUE IN CHEST CT SCANNING Amal Farag, James Graham and Aly Farag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louisville, University of

    ROBUST SEGMENTATION OF LUNG TISSUE IN CHEST CT SCANNING Amal Farag, James Graham and Aly Farag.edu ABSTRACT This paper deals with segmentation of the lung tissues from low dose CT (LDCT) scans of the chest. Goal is correct segmentation as well as maintaining the details of the lung region in the chest cavity

  12. Automated segmentation of lungs with severe interstitial lung disease in CT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automated segmentation of lungs with severe interstitial lung disease in CT Jiahui Wang Department: Accurate segmentation of lungs with severe interstitial lung disease ILD in thoracic computed tomography CT developed in this study a texture analysis-based method for accurate segmentation of lungs with severe ILD

  13. Gas and You: The Political Lay of the Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    Environment #12;Geologic formation that contains pockets of natural gas and runs through West Virginia, Maryland. Keith Ellison MN Rep. Eliot L. Engel NY Rep. Sam Farr CA Rep. Barney Frank MA Rep. Raul Grijalva AZ Rep. Langevin RI Rep. Zoe Lofgren CA Rep. Nita M. Lowey NY Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney NY Rep. Betty McCollum MN Rep

  14. CT-FIRE (V1.3 Beta2) User's Manual, LOCI @ UW-Madison CT-FIRE V1.3 Beta2 User's Manual (November 6 2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yavuz, Deniz

    CT-FIRE (V1.3 Beta2) User's Manual, LOCI @ UW-Madison 1 CT-FIRE V1.3 Beta2 User's Manual (November straightness. Using #12;CT-FIRE (V1.3 Beta2) User's Manual, LOCI @ UW-Madison 2 the advanced output control-processing. Major features of the versions Version 1.3 Beta2 (newest): The primary change in CT-FIRE V1.3 Beta2

  15. Pulmonary Vascular Tree Segmentation from Contrast-Enhanced CT Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmberger, M; Pienn, M; Balint, Z; Olschewski, A; Bischof, H

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a pulmonary vessel segmentation algorithm, which is fast, fully automatic and robust. It uses a coarse segmentation of the airway tree and a left and right lung labeled volume to restrict a vessel enhancement filter, based on an offset medialness function, to the lungs. We show the application of our algorithm on contrast-enhanced CT images, where we derive a clinical parameter to detect pulmonary hypertension (PH) in patients. Results on a dataset of 24 patients show that quantitative indices derived from the segmentation are applicable to distinguish patients with and without PH. Further work-in-progress results are shown on the VESSEL12 challenge dataset, which is composed of non-contrast-enhanced scans, where we range in the midfield of participating contestants.

  16. Monitoring internal organ motion with continuous wave radar in CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfanner, Florian [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen–Nürnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen–Nürnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Maier, Joscha [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Allmendinger, Thomas; Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany)] [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Kachelrieß, Marc [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen–Nürnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen–Nürnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To avoid motion artifacts in medical imaging or to minimize the exposure of healthy tissues in radiation therapy, medical devices are often synchronized with the patient's respiratory motion. Today's respiratory motion monitors require additional effort to prepare the patients, e.g., mounting a motion belt or placing an optical reflector on the patient's breast. Furthermore, they are not able to measure internal organ motion without implanting markers. An interesting alternative to assess the patient's organ motion is continuous wave radar. The aim of this work is to design, implement, and evaluate such a radar system focusing on application in CT.Methods: The authors designed a radar system operating in the 860 MHz band to monitor the patient motion. In the intended application of the radar system, the antennas are located close to the patient's body inside the table of a CT system. One receive and four transmitting antennas are used to avoid the requirement of exact patient positioning. The radar waves propagate into the patient's body and are reflected at tissue boundaries, for example at the borderline between muscle and adipose tissue, or at the boundaries of organs. At present, the authors focus on the detection of respiratory motion. The radar system consists of the hardware mentioned above as well as of dedicated signal processing software to extract the desired information from the radar signal. The system was evaluated using simulations and measurements. To simulate the radar system, a simulation model based on radar and wave field equations was designed and 4D respiratory-gated CT data sets were used as input. The simulated radar signals and the measured data were processed in the same way. The radar system hardware and the signal processing algorithms were tested with data from ten volunteers. As a reference, the respiratory motion signal was recorded using a breast belt simultaneously with the radar measurements.Results: Concerning the measurements of the test persons, there is a very good correlation (?= 0.917) between the respiratory motion phases received by the radar system and the external motion monitor. Our concept of using an array of transmitting antennas turned out to be widely insensitive to the positioning of the test persons. A time shift between the respiratory motion curves recorded with the radar system and the motion curves from the external respiratory monitor was observed which indicates a slight difference between internal organ motion and motion detected by the external respiratory monitor. The simulations were in good accordance with the measurements.Conclusions: A continuous wave radar operating in the near field of the antennas can be used to determine the respiratory motion of humans accurately. In contrast to trigger systems used today, the radar system is able to measure motion inside the body. If such a monitor was routinely available in clinical CT, it would be possible optimizing the scan start with respect to the respiratory state of the patient. Breathing commands would potentially widely be avoided, and as far as uncooperative patients or children are concerned, less sedation might be necessary. Further applications of the radar system could be in radiation therapy or interventional imaging for instance.

  17. Investigation of statistical iterative reconstruction for dedicated breast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makeev, Andrey; Glick, Stephen J. [UMass Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States)] [UMass Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Dedicated breast CT has great potential for improving the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. Statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) in dedicated breast CT is a promising alternative to traditional filtered backprojection (FBP). One of the difficulties in using SIR is the presence of free parameters in the algorithm that control the appearance of the resulting image. These parameters require tuning in order to achieve high quality reconstructions. In this study, the authors investigated the penalized maximum likelihood (PML) method with two commonly used types of roughness penalty functions: hyperbolic potential and anisotropic total variation (TV) norm. Reconstructed images were compared with images obtained using standard FBP. Optimal parameters for PML with the hyperbolic prior are reported for the task of detecting microcalcifications embedded in breast tissue.Methods: Computer simulations were used to acquire projections in a half-cone beam geometry. The modeled setup describes a realistic breast CT benchtop system, with an x-ray spectra produced by a point source and an a-Si, CsI:Tl flat-panel detector. A voxelized anthropomorphic breast phantom with 280 ?m microcalcification spheres embedded in it was used to model attenuation properties of the uncompressed woman's breast in a pendant position. The reconstruction of 3D images was performed using the separable paraboloidal surrogates algorithm with ordered subsets. Task performance was assessed with the ideal observer detectability index to determine optimal PML parameters.Results: The authors' findings suggest that there is a preferred range of values of the roughness penalty weight and the edge preservation threshold in the penalized objective function with the hyperbolic potential, which resulted in low noise images with high contrast microcalcifications preserved. In terms of numerical observer detectability index, the PML method with optimal parameters yielded substantially improved performance (by a factor of greater than 10) compared to FBP. The hyperbolic prior was also observed to be superior to the TV norm. A few of the best-performing parameter pairs for the PML method also demonstrated superior performance for various radiation doses. In fact, using PML with certain parameter values results in better images, acquired using 2 mGy dose, than FBP-reconstructed images acquired using 6 mGy dose.Conclusions: A range of optimal free parameters for the PML algorithm with hyperbolic and TV norm-based potentials is presented for the microcalcification detection task, in dedicated breast CT. The reported values can be used as starting values of the free parameters, when SIR techniques are used for image reconstruction. Significant improvement in image quality can be achieved by using PML with optimal combination of parameters, as compared to FBP. Importantly, these results suggest improved detection of microcalcifications can be obtained by using PML with lower radiation dose to the patient, than using FBP with higher dose.

  18. Computational analysis of whole body CT documents a bone structure alteration in adult advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piana, Michele

    progression. PET/CT images were analyzed using dedicated software, able to recognize an external 2-pixel bone ring whose Hounsfield coefficient served as cut off to recognize trabecular and compact bone. PET/CT of the disease. Keywords: Image Analysis, Bone Marrow, Skeletal Structure, ACLL, PET/CT #12;3 Introduction

  19. Measuring the whole bone marrow asset in humans by a computational approach to integrated PET/CT imaging.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piana, Michele

    ; 7 CNR-SPIN. Genova. Italy Running Head: PET/CT measurement of bone marrow volume AddressMeasuring the whole bone marrow asset in humans by a computational approach to integrated PET/CT to chemotherapy. Keywords: PET/CT; bone marrow imaging; image processing. #12;2 Introduction Bone marrow (BM

  20. Dual energy CT-based characterization of x-ray attenuation properties of breast equivalent material plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Dual energy CT-based characterization of x-ray attenuation properties of breast equivalent material of the same nominal breast density equivalence (+ 1.5 HU). In addition, dual energy CT provided mono equivalent material, breast density, attenuation properties, linear attenuation coefficients, dual energy CT

  1. Statistical analysis of Multi-Material Components using Dual Energy CT Christoph Heinzl, Johann Kastner, Torsten Moller, and Eduard Groller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statistical analysis of Multi-Material Components using Dual Energy CT Christoph Heinzl, Johann plastics-metal components. The presented work makes use of dual energy CT data acquisi- tion for artefact pipeline based on the dual ex- posure technique of dual energy CT. After prefilter- ing and multi

  2. Abstract-Proton Computed Tomography (CT) has important implications for both image-guided diagnosis and radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Abstract- Proton Computed Tomography (CT) has important implications for both image-guided diagnosis and radiation therapy. For diagnosis, the fact that the patient dose committed by proton CT and contrast, may be exploited in dose-critical clinical settings. Proton CT is also the most appropriate

  3. for Proton CT R. P. Johnson, Member, IEEE, V. Bashkirov, V. Giacometti, R. F. Hurley, P. Piersimoni,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    for Proton CT R. P. Johnson, Member, IEEE, V. Bashkirov, V. Giacometti, R. F. Hurley, P. Piersimoni beam test results with our pre-clinical (Phase-II) head scanner developed for proton computed tomography (pCT). After extensive preclinical testing, pCT will be employed in support of proton therapy

  4. T4DT: Processing 4D CT scans of the Lungs Robert Fowler Joe Warren Yin Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Joe

    T4DT: Processing 4D CT scans of the Lungs Robert Fowler Joe Warren Yin Zhang Rice University technology for processing time-varying CT scans (4D CT) of the lungs. In particular, we propose to develop these tools to quantitatively assess the effectiveness of current treatments for lung cancer. #12;T4DT

  5. SU-E-J-43: Deformed Planning CT as An Electron Density Substitute for Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, K [Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Godley, A [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To confirm that deforming the planning CT to the daily Cone-Beam CTs (CBCT) can provide suitable electron density for adaptive planning. We quantify the dosimetric difference between plans calculated on deformed planning CTs (DPCT) and daily CT-on-rails images (CTOR). CTOR is used as a test of the method as CTOR already contains accurate electron density to compare against. Methods: Five prostate only IMRT patients, each with five CTOR images, were selected and re-planned on Panther (Prowess Inc.) with a uniform 5 mm PTV expansion, prescribed 78 Gy. The planning CT was deformed to match each CTOR using ABAS (Elekta Inc.). Contours were drawn on the CTOR, and copied to the DPCT. The original treatment plan was copied to both the CTOR and DPCT, keeping the center of the prostate as the isocenter. The plans were then calculated using the collapsed cone heterogeneous dose engine of Prowess and typical DVH planning parameters used to compare them. Results: Each DPCT was visually compared to its CTOR with no differences observed. The agreement of the copied CTOR contours with the DPCT anatomy further demonstrated the deformation accuracy. The plans calculated using CTOR and DPCT were compared. Over the 25 plan pairs, the average difference between them for prostate D100, D98 and D95 were 0.5%, 0.2%, and 0.2%; PTV D98, D95 and mean dose: 0.3%, 0.2% and 0.3%; bladder V70, V60 and mean dose: 1.1%, 0.7%, and 0.2%; and rectum mean dose: 0.3%. (D100 is the dose covering 100% of the target; V70 is the volume of the organ receiving 70 Gy). Conclusion: We observe negligible difference between the dose calculated on the DPCT and the CTOR, implying that deformed planning CTs are a suitable substitute for electron density. The method can now be applied to CBCTs. Research version of Panther provided by Prowess Inc. Research version of ABAS provided by Elekta Inc.

  6. CtIP tetramer assembly is required for DNA-end resection and repair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Owen R.; Forment, Josep V.; Sun, Meidai; Belotserkovskaya, Rimma; Coates, Julia; Galanty, Yaron; Demir, Mukerrem; Morton, Christopher; Rzechorzek, Neil; Jackson, Stephen P.; Pellegrini, Luca

    2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    1     CtIP tetramer assembly is required for DNA-end resection and repair Owen R. Davies1,4*, Josep V. Forment1,2,3*, Meidai Sun1, Rimma Belotserkovskaya1,2, Julia Coates1,2, Yaron Galanty1,2, Mukerrem Demir1,2, Christopher Morton1... that a CtIP tetramer architecture is essential for effective DSB repair by homologous recombination. Keywords CtIP/RBBP8, double-strand DNA break repair, DNA-end resection, gene conversion, homologous recombination. 3...

  7. Iterative image-domain decomposition for dual-energy CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, Tianye; Dong, Xue; Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei, E-mail: leizhu@gatech.edu [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)] [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Dual energy CT (DECT) imaging plays an important role in advanced imaging applications due to its capability of material decomposition. Direct decomposition via matrix inversion suffers from significant degradation of image signal-to-noise ratios, which reduces clinical values of DECT. Existing denoising algorithms achieve suboptimal performance since they suppress image noise either before or after the decomposition and do not fully explore the noise statistical properties of the decomposition process. In this work, the authors propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for noise suppression in DECT, using the full variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated in the form of least-square estimation with smoothness regularization. Based on the design principles of a best linear unbiased estimator, the authors include the inverse of the estimated variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images as the penalty weight in the least-square term. The regularization term enforces the image smoothness by calculating the square sum of neighboring pixel value differences. To retain the boundary sharpness of the decomposed images, the authors detect the edges in the CT images before decomposition. These edge pixels have small weights in the calculation of the regularization term. Distinct from the existing denoising algorithms applied on the images before or after decomposition, the method has an iterative process for noise suppression, with decomposition performed in each iteration. The authors implement the proposed algorithm using a standard conjugate gradient algorithm. The method performance is evaluated using an evaluation phantom (Catphan©600) and an anthropomorphic head phantom. The results are compared with those generated using direct matrix inversion with no noise suppression, a denoising method applied on the decomposed images, and an existing algorithm with similar formulation as the proposed method but with an edge-preserving regularization term. Results: On the Catphan phantom, the method maintains the same spatial resolution on the decomposed images as that of the CT images before decomposition (8 pairs/cm) while significantly reducing their noise standard deviation. Compared to that obtained by the direct matrix inversion, the noise standard deviation in the images decomposed by the proposed algorithm is reduced by over 98%. Without considering the noise correlation properties in the formulation, the denoising scheme degrades the spatial resolution to 6 pairs/cm for the same level of noise suppression. Compared to the edge-preserving algorithm, the method achieves better low-contrast detectability. A quantitative study is performed on the contrast-rod slice of Catphan phantom. The proposed method achieves lower electron density measurement error as compared to that by the direct matrix inversion, and significantly reduces the error variation by over 97%. On the head phantom, the method reduces the noise standard deviation of decomposed images by over 97% without blurring the sinus structures. Conclusions: The authors propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for DECT. The method combines noise suppression and material decomposition into an iterative process and achieves both goals simultaneously. By exploring the full variance-covariance properties of the decomposed images and utilizing the edge predetection, the proposed algorithm shows superior performance on noise suppression with high image spatial resolution and low-contrast detectability.

  8. Temporal and spectral imaging with micro-CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, Samuel M.; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T. [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Micro-CT is widely used for small animal imaging in preclinical studies of cardiopulmonary disease, but further development is needed to improve spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and material contrast. We present a technique for visualizing the changing distribution of iodine in the cardiac cycle with dual source micro-CT. Methods: The approach entails a retrospectively gated dual energy scan with optimized filters and voltages, and a series of computational operations to reconstruct the data. Projection interpolation and five-dimensional bilateral filtration (three spatial dimensions + time + energy) are used to reduce noise and artifacts associated with retrospective gating. We reconstruct separate volumes corresponding to different cardiac phases and apply a linear transformation to decompose these volumes into components representing concentrations of water and iodine. Since the resulting material images are still compromised by noise, we improve their quality in an iterative process that minimizes the discrepancy between the original acquired projections and the projections predicted by the reconstructed volumes. The values in the voxels of each of the reconstructed volumes represent the coefficients of linear combinations of basis functions over time and energy. We have implemented the reconstruction algorithm on a graphics processing unit (GPU) with CUDA. We tested the utility of the technique in simulations and applied the technique in an in vivo scan of a C57BL/6 mouse injected with blood pool contrast agent at a dose of 0.01 ml/g body weight. Postreconstruction, at each cardiac phase in the iodine images, we segmented the left ventricle and computed its volume. Using the maximum and minimum volumes in the left ventricle, we calculated the stroke volume, the ejection fraction, and the cardiac output. Results: Our proposed method produces five-dimensional volumetric images that distinguish different materials at different points in time, and can be used to segment regions containing iodinated blood and compute measures of cardiac function. Conclusions: We believe this combined spectral and temporal imaging technique will be useful for future studies of cardiopulmonary disease in small animals.

  9. Impact of tumor size and tracer uptake heterogeneity in F-FDG PET and CT NonSmall Cell Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    heterogeneity on various PET uptake delineation approaches. Methods: 25 NSCLC cancer patients with 18F-FDG PET/CT increasingly used for staging Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) (1). In addition, the use of 18 F-FDG PET/CT F-FDG), associated with Computed Tomography (CT) since the development of PET/CT devices, has been

  10. RIS-M-2586 ELASTIC-PLASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSIS OF A CT-SPECIMEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISØ-M-2586 ELASTIC-PLASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSIS OF A CT-SPECIMEN - A TWO-DIMENSIONAL APPROACH Gunner C. Larsen Abstract. This report documents the results obtained from an elastic-plastic

  11. angiographic c-arm ct: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Christchurch Medical School) Summary The MARS-CT team has had great success over the past 6 months with support portfolio. This support underpins the research and development to...

  12. Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999).

  13. Lung nodule detection in low-dose and high-resolution CT scans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delogu, P; Gori, I; Preite Martínez, A; Retico, A; Tata, A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of small pulmonary nodules in screening CT scans. The main modules of our system, i.e. a dot-enhancement filter for nodule candidate selection and a neural classifier for false positive finding reduction, are described. The preliminary results obtained on the so-far collected database of lung CT are discussed.

  14. Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images for radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitton, I. [European Georges Pompidou Hospital, Department of Radiology, 20 rue Leblanc, 75015, Paris (France); Cornelissen, S. A. P. [Image Sciences Institute, UMC, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Duppen, J. C.; Rasch, C. R. N.; Herk, M. van [The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiotherapy, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Steenbakkers, R. J. H. M. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen (Netherlands); Peeters, S. T. H. [UZ Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgique (Belgium); Hoebers, F. J. P. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW School for Oncology and Development Biology Maastricht, 6229 ET Maastricht (Netherlands); Kaanders, J. H. A. M. [UMC St-Radboud, Department of Radiotherapy, Geert Grooteplein 32, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nowak, P. J. C. M. [ERASMUS University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology,Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a delineation tool that refines physician-drawn contours of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in nasopharynx cancer, using combined pixel value information from x-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during delineation. Methods: Operator-guided delineation assisted by a so-called ''snake'' algorithm was applied on weighted CT-MRI registered images. The physician delineates a rough tumor contour that is continuously adjusted by the snake algorithm using the underlying image characteristics. The algorithm was evaluated on five nasopharyngeal cancer patients. Different linear weightings CT and MRI were tested as input for the snake algorithm and compared according to contrast and tumor to noise ratio (TNR). The semi-automatic delineation was compared with manual contouring by seven experienced radiation oncologists. Results: A good compromise for TNR and contrast was obtained by weighing CT twice as strong as MRI. The new algorithm did not notably reduce interobserver variability, it did however, reduce the average delineation time by 6 min per case. Conclusions: The authors developed a user-driven tool for delineation and correction based a snake algorithm and registered weighted CT image and MRI. The algorithm adds morphological information from CT during the delineation on MRI and accelerates the delineation task.

  15. Lung Dose Calculation With SPECT/CT for {sup 90}Yittrium Radioembolization of Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Naichang, E-mail: yun@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Srinivas, Shaym M.; DiFilippo, Frank P.; Shrikanthan, Sankaran [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Levitin, Abraham; McLennan, Gordon; Spain, James [Department of Interventional Radiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Interventional Radiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Xia, Ping; Wilkinson, Allan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To propose a new method to estimate lung mean dose (LMD) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) single photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT for {sup 90}Yttrium radioembolization of liver tumors and to compare the LMD estimated using SPECT/CT with clinical estimates of LMD using planar gamma scintigraphy (PS). Methods and Materials: Images of 71 patients who had SPECT/CT and PS images of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA acquired before TheraSphere radioembolization of liver cancer were analyzed retrospectively. LMD was calculated from the PS-based lung shunt assuming a lung mass of 1 kg and 50 Gy per GBq of injected activity shunted to the lung. For the SPECT/CT-based estimate, the LMD was calculated with the activity concentration and lung volume derived from SPECT/CT. The effect of attenuation correction and the patient's breathing on the calculated LMD was studied with the SPECT/CT. With these effects correctly taken into account in a more rigorous fashion, we compared the LMD calculated with SPECT/CT with the LMD calculated with PS. Results: The mean dose to the central region of the lung leads to a more accurate estimate of LMD. Inclusion of the lung region around the diaphragm in the calculation leads to an overestimate of LMD due to the misregistration of the liver activity to the lung from the patient's breathing. LMD calculated based on PS is a poor predictor of the actual LMD. For the subpopulation with large lung shunt, the mean overestimation from the PS method for the lung shunt was 170%. Conclusions: A new method of calculating the LMD for TheraSphere and SIR-Spheres radioembolization of liver cancer based on {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT is presented. The new method provides a more accurate estimate of radiation risk to the lungs. For patients with a large lung shunt calculated from PS, a recalculation of LMD based on SPECT/CT is recommended.

  16. MRI-based treatment planning with pseudo CT generated through atlas registration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uh, Jinsoo, E-mail: jinsoo.uh@stjude.org; Merchant, Thomas E.; Hua, Chiaho [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)] [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States); Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based treatment planning using pseudo CTs generated through atlas registration. Methods: A pseudo CT, providing electron density information for dose calculation, was generated by deforming atlas CT images previously acquired on other patients. The authors tested 4 schemes of synthesizing a pseudo CT from single or multiple deformed atlas images: use of a single arbitrarily selected atlas, arithmetic mean process using 6 atlases, and pattern recognition with Gaussian process (PRGP) using 6 or 12 atlases. The required deformation for atlas CT images was derived from a nonlinear registration of conjugated atlas MR images to that of the patient of interest. The contrasts of atlas MR images were adjusted by histogram matching to reduce the effect of different sets of acquisition parameters. For comparison, the authors also tested a simple scheme assigning the Hounsfield unit of water to the entire patient volume. All pseudo CT generating schemes were applied to 14 patients with common pediatric brain tumors. The image similarity of real patient-specific CT and pseudo CTs constructed by different schemes was compared. Differences in computation times were also calculated. The real CT in the treatment planning system was replaced with the pseudo CT, and the dose distribution was recalculated to determine the difference. Results: The atlas approach generally performed better than assigning a bulk CT number to the entire patient volume. Comparing atlas-based schemes, those using multiple atlases outperformed the single atlas scheme. For multiple atlas schemes, the pseudo CTs were similar to the real CTs (correlation coefficient, 0.787–0.819). The calculated dose distribution was in close agreement with the original dose. Nearly the entire patient volume (98.3%–98.7%) satisfied the criteria of chi-evaluation (<2% maximum dose and 2 mm range). The dose to 95% of the volume and the percentage of volume receiving at least 95% of the prescription dose in the planning target volume differed from the original values by less than 2% of the prescription dose (root-mean-square, RMS < 1%). The PRGP scheme did not perform better than the arithmetic mean process with the same number of atlases. Increasing the number of atlases from 6 to 12 often resulted in improvements, but statistical significance was not always found. Conclusions: MRI-based treatment planning with pseudo CTs generated through atlas registration is feasible for pediatric brain tumor patients. The doses calculated from pseudo CTs agreed well with those from real CTs, showing dosimetric accuracy within 2% for the PTV when multiple atlases were used. The arithmetic mean process may be a reasonable choice over PRGP for the synthesis scheme considering performance and computational costs.

  17. Brachial Plexus Injury from CT-Guided RF Ablation Under General Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankar, Sridhar, E-mail: shankars@ummhc.org; Sonnenberg, Eric van; Silverman, Stuart G.; Tuncali, Kemal [Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States); Flanagan, Hugh L. [Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Anesthesia (United States); Whang, Edward E. [Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Surgery (United States)

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Brachial plexus injury in a patient under general anesthesia (GA) is not uncommon, despite careful positioning and, particularly, awareness of the possibility. The mechanism of injury is stretching and compression of the brachial plexus over a prolonged period. Positioning the patient within the computed tomography (CT) gantry for abdominal or chest procedures can simulate a surgical procedure, particularly when GA is used. The potential for brachial plexus injury is increased if the case is prolonged and the patient's arms are raised above the head to avoid CT image degradation from streak artifacts. We report a case of profound brachial plexus palsy following a CT-guided radiofrequency ablation procedure under GA. Fortunately, the patient recovered completely. We emphasize the mechanism of injury and detail measures to combat this problem, such that radiologists are aware of this potentially serious complication.

  18. Application of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique for mouse dosimetry in micro-CT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Courteau, Alan; Oudot, Alexandra; Collin, Bertrand [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex (France)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex (France); Ranouil, Julien [Landauer Europe, 33 avenue du Général Leclerc, Fontenay-aux-Roses 92266 Cedex (France)] [Landauer Europe, 33 avenue du Général Leclerc, Fontenay-aux-Roses 92266 Cedex (France); Morgand, Loïc; Raguin, Olivier [Oncodesign, 20 rue Jean Mazen, Dijon 21076 Cedex (France)] [Oncodesign, 20 rue Jean Mazen, Dijon 21076 Cedex (France); Walker, Paul [LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)] [LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France); Brunotte, François [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex, France and LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex, France and LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Micro-CT is considered to be a powerful tool to investigate various models of disease on anesthetized animals. In longitudinal studies, the radiation dose delivered by the micro-CT to the same animal is a major concern as it could potentially induce spurious effects in experimental results. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) are a relatively new kind of detector used in radiation dosimetry for medical applications. The aim of this work was to assess the dose delivered by the CT component of a micro-SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT camera during a typical whole-body mouse study, using commercially available OSLDs based on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C crystals.Methods: CTDI (computed tomography dose index) was measured in micro-CT with a properly calibrated pencil ionization chamber using a rat-like phantom (60 mm in diameter) and a mouse-like phantom (30 mm in diameter). OSLDs were checked for reproducibility and linearity in the range of doses delivered by the micro-CT. Dose measurements obtained with OSLDs were compared to those of the ionization chamber to correct for the radiation quality dependence of OSLDs in the low-kV range. Doses to tissue were then investigated in phantoms and cadavers. A 30 mm diameter phantom, specifically designed to insert OSLDs, was used to assess radiation dose over a typical whole-body mouse imaging study. Eighteen healthy female BALB/c mice weighing 27.1 ± 0.8 g (1 SD) were euthanized for small animal measurements. OLSDs were placed externally or implanted internally in nine different locations by an experienced animal technician. Five commonly used micro-CT protocols were investigated.Results: CTDI measurements were between 78.0 ± 2.1 and 110.7 ± 3.0 mGy for the rat-like phantom and between 169.3 ± 4.6 and 203.6 ± 5.5 mGy for the mouse-like phantom. On average, the displayed CTDI at the operator console was underestimated by 1.19 for the rat-like phantom and 2.36 for the mouse-like phantom. OSLDs exhibited a reproducibility of 2.4% and good linearity was found between 60 and 450 mGy. The energy scaling factor was calculated to be between 1.80 ± 0.16 and 1.86 ± 0.16, depending on protocol used. In phantoms, mean doses to tissue over a whole-body CT examination were ranging from 186.4 ± 7.6 to 234.9 ± 7.1 mGy. In mice, mean doses to tissue in the mouse trunk (thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and flanks) were between 213.0 ± 17.0 and 251.2 ± 13.4 mGy. Skin doses (3 OSLDs) were much higher with average doses between 350.6 ± 25.3 and 432.5 ± 34.1 mGy. The dose delivered during a topogram was found to be below 10 mGy. Use of the multimouse bed of the system gave a significantly 20%–40% lower dose per animal (p < 0.05).Conclusions: Absorbed doses in micro-CT were found to be relatively high. In micro-SPECT/CT imaging, the micro-CT unit is mainly used to produce a localization frame. As a result, users should pay attention to adjustable CT parameters so as to minimize the radiation dose and avoid any adverse radiation effects which may interfere with biological parameters studied.

  19. Comparison of MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetric analysis of prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Osamu [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan)]. E-mail: osa-mu@umin.ac.jp; Hayashi, Shinya [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Matsuo, Masayuki [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Sakurai, Kota [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Department of Urology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Nakano, Masahiro [Department of Urology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Maeda, Sunaho [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Kajita, Kimihiro R.T. [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Deguchi, Takashi [Department of Urology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Hoshi, Hiroaki [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan)

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based and computed tomography (CT)/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetry methods in permanent prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between October 2004 and March 2006, a total of 52 consecutive patients with prostate cancer were treated by brachytherapy, and postimplant dosimetry was performed using CT/MRI fusion. The accuracy and reproducibility were prospectively compared between MRI-based dosimetry and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) related parameters as recommended by the American Brachytherapy Society. Results: The prostate volume was 15.97 {+-} 6.17 cc (mean {+-} SD) in MRI-based dosimetry, and 15.97 {+-} 6.02 cc in CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry without statistical difference. The prostate V100 was 94.5% and 93.0% in MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.002). The prostate D90 was 119.4% and 114.4% in MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.004). Conclusion: Our current results suggested that, as with fusion images, MR images allowed accurate contouring of the organs, but they tended to overestimate the analysis of postimplant dosimetry in comparison to CT/MRI fusion images. Although this MRI-based dosimetric discrepancy was negligible, MRI-based dosimetry was acceptable and reproducible in comparison to CT-based dosimetry, because the difference between MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based results was smaller than that between CT-based and CT/MRI fusion-based results as previously reported.

  20. Dynamic cone beam CT angiography of carotid and cerebral arteries using canine model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai Weixing; Zhao Binghui; Conover, David; Liu Jiangkun; Ning Ruola [Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Radiology, Shanghai 6th People's Hospital, 600 Yishan Road, Xuhui, Shanghai (China); Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States) and Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This research is designed to develop and evaluate a flat-panel detector-based dynamic cone beam CT system for dynamic angiography imaging, which is able to provide both dynamic functional information and dynamic anatomic information from one multirevolution cone beam CT scan. Methods: A dynamic cone beam CT scan acquired projections over four revolutions within a time window of 40 s after contrast agent injection through a femoral vein to cover the entire wash-in and wash-out phases. A dynamic cone beam CT reconstruction algorithm was utilized and a novel recovery method was developed to correct the time-enhancement curve of contrast flow. From the same data set, both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction approaches were utilized and compared to remove the background tissues and visualize the 3D vascular structure to provide the dynamic anatomic information. Results: Through computer simulations, the new recovery algorithm for dynamic time-enhancement curves was optimized and showed excellent accuracy to recover the actual contrast flow. Canine model experiments also indicated that the recovered time-enhancement curves from dynamic cone beam CT imaging agreed well with that of an IV-digital subtraction angiography (DSA) study. The dynamic vascular structures reconstructed using both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction were almost identical as the differences between them were comparable to the background noise level. At the enhancement peak, all the major carotid and cerebral arteries and the Circle of Willis could be clearly observed. Conclusions: The proposed dynamic cone beam CT approach can accurately recover the actual contrast flow, and dynamic anatomic imaging can be obtained with high isotropic 3D resolution. This approach is promising for diagnosis and treatment planning of vascular diseases and strokes.

  1. Radiation dose reduction in medical CT through equally sloped tomography Benjamin P. Fahimian1,2,6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements10 , CT accounts for about 15% of the total radiological50Radiation dose reduction in medical CT through equally sloped tomography Benjamin P. Fahimian1 Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 3 Biomedical Physics

  2. A method for measuring joint kinematics designed for accurate registration of kinematic data to models constructed from CT data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Kenneth J.; Manson, T. T.; Pfaeffle, H. J.; Tomaino, M. M.; Woo, S. L-Y

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for position and 0.1 degrees for orientation for linkage digitization and better than +/- 0.2 mm and +/- 0.2 degrees for CT digitization. Surface models of the radius and ulna were constructed from CT data, as an example application. Kinematics of the bones...

  3. USPSTF Recommends Low-Dose CT Screening for Heavy Smoke Published on Cancer Network (http://www.cancernetwork.com)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serfling, Robert

    remains the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and is the third most common of all radiography, and found an overall reduction in death from any cause in the CT group of 6.7% (95% CI, 1, lie largely in the high rates of false positives. A total of 96.4% of the positive low-dose CT results

  4. 2002 IEEE NSS/MIC pCT: Hartmut F.-W. Sadrozinski , SCIPP Towards Proton Computed Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    2002 IEEE NSS/MIC pCT: Hartmut F.-W. Sadrozinski , SCIPP SCIPPSCIPP Towards Proton Computed Tomography L. R. Johnson, B. Keeney, G. Ross, H. F.-W. Sadrozinski, A. Seiden, D.C. Williams, L. Zhang Santa Radiography MC Study #12;2002 IEEE NSS/MIC pCT: Hartmut F.-W. Sadrozinski , SCIPP SCIPPSCIPP Computed

  5. Manifold Learning for 4D CT Reconstruction of the Lung Manfred Georg*, Richard Souvenir, Andrew Hope, Robert Pless*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pless, Robert

    Manifold Learning for 4D CT Reconstruction of the Lung Manfred Georg*, Richard Souvenir, Andrew, Canada Andrew.Hope@rmp.uhn.on.ca Abstract Computed Tomography is used to create models of lung dynamics because it provides high contrast images of lung tissue. Creating 4D CT models which capture dynamics

  6. Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and Bayside, NY - Addendum to July

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposed Action Title:SustainableDepartment ofSwitch Switch8,

  7. Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and Bayside, NY | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposed Action Title:SustainableDepartment ofSwitch

  8. Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and Bayside NY | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO OverviewRepositoryManagementFacilityExcellenceAboutSustaninableSylvania

  9. Does dual-energy CT of lower-extremity tendons incur penalties in patient radiation exposure or reduced multiplanar reconstruction image quality?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    diagnostic value of dual-energy CT and MRI in the detectionusing dual-source dual-energy MDCT: Results of JAFROCfor dose reduction in dual energy hepatic CT using non-

  10. Multimodal Vessel Visualization of Mouse Aorta PET/CT Scans Timo Ropinski, Member, IEEE, Sven Hermann, Rainer Reich, Michael Schafers, and Klaus Hinrichs, Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinrichs, Klaus

    Multimodal Vessel Visualization of Mouse Aorta PET/CT Scans Timo Ropinski, Member, IEEE, Sven present a visualization system for the visual analysis of PET/CT scans of aortic arches of mice

  11. Concurrent segmentation of the prostate on MRI and CT via linked statistical shape models for radiotherapy planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, Najeeb; Toth, Robert; Chappelow, Jonathan; Kim, Sung; Motwani, Sabin; Punekar, Salman; Lin Haibo; Both, Stefan; Vapiwala, Neha; Hahn, Stephen; Madabhushi, Anant

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Prostate gland segmentation is a critical step in prostate radiotherapy planning, where dose plans are typically formulated on CT. Pretreatment MRI is now beginning to be acquired at several medical centers. Delineation of the prostate on MRI is acknowledged as being significantly simpler to perform, compared to delineation on CT. In this work, the authors present a novel framework for building a linked statistical shape model (LSSM), a statistical shape model (SSM) that links the shape variation of a structure of interest (SOI) across multiple imaging modalities. This framework is particularly relevant in scenarios where accurate boundary delineations of the SOI on one of the modalities may not be readily available, or difficult to obtain, for training a SSM. In this work the authors apply the LSSM in the context of multimodal prostate segmentation for radiotherapy planning, where the prostate is concurrently segmented on MRI and CT. Methods: The framework comprises a number of logically connected steps. The first step utilizes multimodal registration of MRI and CT to map 2D boundary delineations of the prostate from MRI onto corresponding CT images, for a set of training studies. Hence, the scheme obviates the need for expert delineations of the gland on CT for explicitly constructing a SSM for prostate segmentation on CT. The delineations of the prostate gland on MRI and CT allows for 3D reconstruction of the prostate shape which facilitates the building of the LSSM. In order to perform concurrent prostate MRI and CT segmentation using the LSSM, the authors employ a region-based level set approach where the authors deform the evolving prostate boundary to simultaneously fit to MRI and CT images in which voxels are classified to be either part of the prostate or outside the prostate. The classification is facilitated by using a combination of MRI-CT probabilistic spatial atlases and a random forest classifier, driven by gradient and Haar features. Results: The authors acquire a total of 20 MRI-CT patient studies and use the leave-one-out strategy to train and evaluate four different LSSMs. First, a fusion-based LSSM (fLSSM) is built using expert ground truth delineations of the prostate on MRI alone, where the ground truth for the gland on CT is obtained via coregistration of the corresponding MRI and CT slices. The authors compare the fLSSM against another LSSM (xLSSM), where expert delineations of the gland on both MRI and CT are employed in the model building; xLSSM representing the idealized LSSM. The authors also compare the fLSSM against an exclusive CT-based SSM (ctSSM), built from expert delineations of the gland on CT alone. In addition, two LSSMs trained using trainee delineations (tLSSM) on CT are compared with the fLSSM. The results indicate that the xLSSM, tLSSMs, and the fLSSM perform equivalently, all of them out-performing the ctSSM. Conclusions: The fLSSM provides an accurate alternative to SSMs that require careful expert delineations of the SOI that may be difficult or laborious to obtain. Additionally, the fLSSM has the added benefit of providing concurrent segmentations of the SOI on multiple imaging modalities.

  12. QER- Comment of Elaine Mroz

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Elaine Mroz Quadrennial Energy Review: Comment on the Public Meetings ‘‘Infrastructure Restraints- New England” held April 21, 2014, in Providence, RI and Hartford, CT. Please see attached file.

  13. SU-E-J-86: Lobar Lung Function Quantification by PET Galligas and CT Ventilation Imaging in Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslick, E; Kipritidis, J; Keall, P [University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Bailey, D; Bailey, E [Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW (Australia)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the lobar lung function using the novel PET Galligas ([68Ga]-carbon nanoparticle) ventilation imaging and the investigational CT ventilation imaging in lung cancer patients pre-treatment. Methods: We present results on our first three lung cancer patients (2 male, mean age 78 years) as part of an ongoing ethics approved study. For each patient a PET Galligas ventilation (PET-V) image and a pair of breath hold CT images (end-exhale and end-inhale tidal volumes) were acquired using a Siemens Biograph PET CT. CT-ventilation (CT-V) images were created from the pair of CT images using deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms and the Hounsfield Unit (HU) ventilation metric. A comparison of ventilation quantification from each modality was done on the lobar level and the voxel level. A Bland-Altman plot was used to assess the difference in mean percentage contribution of each lobe to the total lung function between the two modalities. For each patient, a voxel-wise Spearmans correlation was calculated for the whole lungs between the two modalities. Results: The Bland-Altman plot demonstrated strong agreement between PET-V and CT-V for assessment of lobar function (r=0.99, p<0.001; range mean difference: ?5.5 to 3.0). The correlation between PET-V and CT-V at the voxel level was moderate(r=0.60, p<0.001). Conclusion: This preliminary study on the three patients data sets demonstrated strong agreement between PET and CT ventilation imaging for the assessment of pre-treatment lung function at the lobar level. Agreement was only moderate at the level of voxel correlations. These results indicate that CT ventilation imaging has potential for assessing pre-treatment lobar lung function in lung cancer patients.

  14. Soft Tissue Visualization Using a Highly Efficient Megavoltage Cone Beam CT Imaging System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pouliot, Jean

    Soft Tissue Visualization Using a Highly Efficient Megavoltage Cone Beam CT Imaging System Farhad A developed an imaging system that is optimized for MV and can acquire Megavoltage CBCT images containing soft through the detector. #12;The ability of an x-ray imaging system to differentiate soft tissues is affected

  15. Lobe-based Estimating Ventilation and Perfusion from 3D CT scans of the Lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Joe

    Lobe-based Estimating Ventilation and Perfusion from 3D CT scans of the Lungs Travis McPhail Joe are the ventilation (air flow) and perfusion (blood flow) in the patient's lungs. Given the flow of air and blood as possible. The current state of the art technology for assessing the ventilation in a patient's lungs

  16. CLASSIFICATION OF BIOMEDICAL HIGH-RESOLUTION MICRO-CT IMAGES FOR DIRECT VOLUME RENDERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López-Sánchez, Maite

    CLASSIFICATION OF BIOMEDICAL HIGH-RESOLUTION MICRO-CT IMAGES FOR DIRECT VOLUME RENDERING Maite L,cerquide,davidm,anna}@maia.ub.es ABSTRACT This paper introduces a machine learning approach into the process of direct volume rendering that generates the classification func- tion within the optical property function used for rendering. Briefly

  17. The feasibility of head motion tracking in helical CT: A step toward motion correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jung-Ha [Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW 2141 (Australia); Nuyts, Johan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven, Belgium and Medical Imaging Research Center, Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven (Belgium); Kuncic, Zdenka [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Fulton, Roger [Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW 2141 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Department of Medical Physics, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW 2145 (Australia)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To establish a practical and accurate motion tracking method for the development of rigid motion correction methods in helical x-ray computed tomography (CT). Methods: A commercially available optical motion tracking system provided 6 degrees of freedom pose measurements at 60 Hz. A 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 calibration matrix was determined to convert raw pose data acquired in tracker coordinates to a fixed CT coordinate system with origin at the isocenter of the scanner. Two calibration methods, absolute orientation (AO), and a new method based on image registration (IR), were compared by means of landmark analysis and correlation coefficient in phantom images coregistered using the derived motion transformations. Results: Transformations calculated using the IR-derived calibration matrix were found to be more accurate, with positional errors less than 0.5 mm (mean RMS), and highly correlated image voxel intensities. The AO-derived calibration matrix yielded larger mean RMS positional errors ( Asymptotically-Equal-To 1.0 mm), and poorer correlation coefficients. Conclusions: The authors have demonstrated the feasibility of accurate motion tracking for retrospective motion correction in helical CT. Their new IR-based calibration method based on image registration and function minimization was simpler to perform and delivered more accurate calibration matrices. This technique is a useful tool for future work on rigid motion correction in helical CT and potentially also other imaging modalities.

  18. Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittbuhl, Jean

    Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706 PARTICIPANT ORGANIZATION NAME: CNRS Synthetic 2nd year report Related with Work Package............ HYDRO-THERMAL FLOW in the influence of a realistic geometry of the fracture on its hydro-thermal response. Several studies have

  19. Interactive Separation of Segmented Bones in CT Volumes Using Graph Cut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ju, Tao

    mask customized to the shape of the bone, such as the femoral head. However, creat- ing masks for bones of different methodology have been reported for bone segmen- tation (see a recent survey in [1]). DueInteractive Separation of Segmented Bones in CT Volumes Using Graph Cut Lu Liu, David Raber, David

  20. DAWN: A JOURNEY TO THE BEGINNING OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM C.T. Russell(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuber, Maria

    -ray/neutron spectrometer, a magnetometer and a gravity investigation. Dawn uses solar arrays to power its xenon ion engine solar panels roughly 21 m tip-to-tip, a 5 m magnetometer boom and three ion thrusters, one of whichDAWN: A JOURNEY TO THE BEGINNING OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM C.T. Russell(1) , A. Coradini(2) , W

  1. Lee, C-T A Laser Ablation Data Reduction 2006 LASER ABLATION ICP-MS: DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    Lee, C-T A Laser Ablation Data Reduction 2006 1 LASER ABLATION ICP-MS: DATA REDUCTION Cin-Ty A. Lee 24 September 2006 Analysis and calculation of concentrations Laser ablation analyses are done in time by turning on the laser and ablating the sample, generating a time-dependent signal (Fig. 1). Measurements

  2. jCT: A Java Code Tomograph Markus Lumpe, Samiran Mahmud, and Olga Goloshchapova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lumpe, Markus

    jCT: A Java Code Tomograph Markus Lumpe, Samiran Mahmud, and Olga Goloshchapova Faculty,smahmud,ogoloshchapova}@swin.edu.au Abstract--We are concerned with analyzing software, in par- ticular, with its nature and how developer software engineering where measurement seeks to capture attributes affecting the product, process

  3. SCIPP 06/04 1 Prototype Tracking Studies for Proton CT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    SCIPP 06/04 1 Prototype Tracking Studies for Proton CT Nate Blumenkrantz, Jason Feldt, Jason the feasibility of proton computed tomography, the most likely path (MLP) of protons inside an absorber resolution. The locations of 200 MeV protons were measured at three different absorber depth of PMMA (3.75, 6

  4. Development of a proton Computed Tomography (pCT) scanner at NIU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uzunyan, S A; Boi, S; Coutrakon, G; Dyshkant, A; Erdelyi, B; Gearhart, A; Hedin, D; Johnson, E; Krider, J; Zutshi, V; Ford, R; Fitzpatrick, T; Sellberg, G; Rauch, J E; Roman, M; Rubinov, P; Wilson, P; Lalwani, K; Naimuddin, M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the development of a proton Computed Tomography (pCT) scanner at Northern Illinois University (NIU) in collaboration with Fermilab and Delhi University. This paper provides an overview of major components of the scanner and a detailed description of the data acquisition system (DAQ).

  5. Development of a proton Computed Tomography (pCT) scanner at NIU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Uzunyan; G. Blazey; S. Boi; G. Coutrakon; A. Dyshkant; B. Erdelyi; A. Gearhart; D. Hedin; E. Johnson; J. Krider; V. Zutshi; R. Ford; T. Fitzpatrick; G. Sellberg; J. E. Rauch; M. Roman; P. Rubinov; P. Wilson; K. Lalwani; M. Naimuddin

    2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the development of a proton Computed Tomography (pCT) scanner at Northern Illinois University (NIU) in collaboration with Fermilab and Delhi University. This paper provides an overview of major components of the scanner and a detailed description of the data acquisition system (DAQ).

  6. Surface Extraction from Multi-Material Components for Metrology using Dual Energy CT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    materials (e.g., carbon-fibre-reinforced plas- tics) induce manufacturers to design new functionSurface Extraction from Multi-Material Components for Metrology using Dual Energy CT Christoph surface models of multi-material components using dual energy com- puted tomography (DECT

  7. Toxoplasma encephalitis in Haitian adults with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a clinical-pathologic-CT correlation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, M.J.D.; Chan, J.C.; Hensley, G.T.; Hoffman, T.A.; Moskowitz, L.B.; Lippmann, S.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The clinical data, histologic findings, and computed tomographic (CT) abnormalities in eight adult Haitians with toxoplasma encephalitis were analyzed retrospectively. Diagnosis was established by identification of Toxoplasma gondii on autopsy in five and brain biopsy in three specimens and subsequently confirmed by the immunoperoxidase method. All these patiens, six of whom had been in the United States for 24 months or less, had severe idiopathic immunodeficiency syndrome. All were lymphopenic and six were on treatment for tuberculosis when the toxoplasma encephalitis developed. All patients were studied with CT when they developed an altered mental status and fever associated with seizures and/or focal neurologic deficits. Scans before treatment showed multiple intraparenchymal lesions in seven and a single lesion in the thalamus in one. Ring and/or nodular enhancement of the lesions was found in six and hypodense areas in two. Progressions of abnormalities occurred on serial studies. These CT findings that were best shown on axial and coronal thin-section double-dose contrast studies were useful but not diagnostically pathognomonic. In patients with similar clinical presentation CT is recommended to identify focal areas of involvement and to guide brain biopsy or excision so that prompt medical thereapy of this often lethal infection can be instituted.

  8. Multi-stage Learning for Robust Lung Segmentation in Challenging CT Volumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-stage Learning for Robust Lung Segmentation in Challenging CT Volumes Michal Sofka1 , Jens Imaging, Siemens Healthcare, Oxford, UK Abstract. Simple algorithms for segmenting healthy lung parenchyma an ini- tialization of a statistical shape model of the lungs. The initialization first detects

  9. Technical Reports Ultra-low Dose Lung CT Perfusion Regularized by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Technical Reports Ultra-low Dose Lung CT Perfusion Regularized by a Previous Scan1 Hengyong Yu, Ph­regularized reconstruction (PSRR) method was proposed to reduce radiation dose and applied to lung perfusion studies. Normal and ultra-low-dose lung computed tomographic perfusion studies were compared in terms of the estimation

  10. A Framework for Automatic Segmentation of Lung Nodules from Low Dose Chest CT Scans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farag, Aly A.

    A Framework for Automatic Segmentation of Lung Nodules from Low Dose Chest CT Scans Ayman El-Baz1 the high accuracy of the proposed approach. 1 Introduction Because lung cancer is the most common cause 1, an initial LDCT slice is segmented with our algorithms introduced in [3] to isolate lung tissues

  11. Volume Estimation and Surgery Planning from Lung CT Images ANA ELISA FERREIRA SCHMIDT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume Estimation and Surgery Planning from Lung CT Images ANA ELISA FERREIRA SCHMIDT 1 , PAULO to assist the planning of lung reduction surgeries, a technique that has been proposed for the treatment of certain illnesses. Doctors need to decide which portions of the lungs to remove to achieve a certain

  12. Automatic Lung Segmentation of Volumetric Low-Dose CT Scans Using Graph Cuts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farag, Aly A.

    Automatic Lung Segmentation of Volumetric Low-Dose CT Scans Using Graph Cuts Asem M. Ali and Aly A for unsupervised segmentation of the lung region from low dose computed tomography (LDCT) images. We follow distribution model. To better spec- ify region borders between lung and chest, each empirical distribution

  13. ny_50m_wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GRIDCODE DistributionInformation: ResourceDescription: Downloadable Data StandardOrderProcess: DigitalForm: DigitalTransferInformation: TransferSize: 14.600...

  14. NY.O-20- I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 August 2008REGULATORY,.COMMISSION; I.-'

  15. Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in clinical CT systems: Experimental assessment of noise performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ke; Tang, Jie [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Chen, Guang-Hong, E-mail: gchen7@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To reduce radiation dose in CT imaging, the statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) method has been introduced for clinical use. Based on the principle of MBIR and its nonlinear nature, the noise performance of MBIR is expected to be different from that of the well-understood filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction method. The purpose of this work is to experimentally assess the unique noise characteristics of MBIR using a state-of-the-art clinical CT system. Methods: Three physical phantoms, including a water cylinder and two pediatric head phantoms, were scanned in axial scanning mode using a 64-slice CT scanner (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) at seven different mAs levels (5, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200, 300). At each mAs level, each phantom was repeatedly scanned 50 times to generate an image ensemble for noise analysis. Both the FBP method with a standard kernel and the MBIR method (Veo{sup ®}, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) were used for CT image reconstruction. Three-dimensional (3D) noise power spectrum (NPS), two-dimensional (2D) NPS, and zero-dimensional NPS (noise variance) were assessed both globally and locally. Noise magnitude, noise spatial correlation, noise spatial uniformity and their dose dependence were examined for the two reconstruction methods. Results: (1) At each dose level and at each frequency, the magnitude of the NPS of MBIR was smaller than that of FBP. (2) While the shape of the NPS of FBP was dose-independent, the shape of the NPS of MBIR was strongly dose-dependent; lower dose lead to a “redder” NPS with a lower mean frequency value. (3) The noise standard deviation (?) of MBIR and dose were found to be related through a power law of ????(dose){sup ??} with the component ? ? 0.25, which violated the classical ????(dose){sup ?0.5} power law in FBP. (4) With MBIR, noise reduction was most prominent for thin image slices. (5) MBIR lead to better noise spatial uniformity when compared with FBP. (6) A composite image generated from two MBIR images acquired at two different dose levels (D1 and D2) demonstrated lower noise than that of an image acquired at a dose level of D1+D2. Conclusions: The noise characteristics of the MBIR method are significantly different from those of the FBP method. The well known tradeoff relationship between CT image noise and radiation dose has been modified by MBIR to establish a more gradual dependence of noise on dose. Additionally, some other CT noise properties that had been well understood based on the linear system theory have also been altered by MBIR. Clinical CT scan protocols that had been optimized based on the classical CT noise properties need to be carefully re-evaluated for systems equipped with MBIR in order to maximize the method's potential clinical benefits in dose reduction and/or in CT image quality improvement.

  16. Enlarged longitudinal dose profiles in cone-beam CT and the need for modified dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Nishizawa, Kanae; Tsunoo, Takanori; Aoyama, Takahiko; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Murase, Kenya [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); School of Health Sciences, Nagoya University, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); School of Allied Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to examine phantom length necessary to assess radiation dose delivered to patients in cone-beam CT with an enlarged beamwidth, we measured dose profiles in cylindrical phantoms of sufficient length using a prototype 256-slice CT-scanner developed at our institute. Dose profiles parallel to the rotation axis were measured at the central and peripheral positions in PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) phantoms of 160 or 320 mm diameter and 900 mm length. For practical application, we joined unit cylinders (150 mm long) together to provide phantoms of 900 mm length. Dose profiles were measured with a pin photodiode sensor having a sensitive region of approximately 2.8x2.8 mm{sup 2} and 2.7 mm thickness. Beamwidths of the scanner were varied from 20 to 138 mm. Dose profile integrals (DPI) were calculated using the measured dose profiles for various beamwidths and integration ranges. For the body phantom (320-mm-diam phantom), 76% of the DPI was represented for a 20 mm beamwidth and 60% was represented for a 138 mm beamwidth if dose profiles were integrated over a 100 mm range, while more than 90% of the DPI was represented for beamwidths between 20 and 138 mm if integration was carried out over a 300 mm range. The phantom length and integration range for dosimetry of cone-beam CT needed to be more than 300 mm to represent more than 90% of the DPI for the body phantom with the beamwidth of more than 20 mm. Although we reached this conclusion using the prototype 256-slice CT-scanner, it may be applied to other multislice CT-scanners as well.

  17. Comparison of Fusion Imaging Using a Combined SPECT/CT System and Intra-arterial CT: Assessment of Drug Distribution by an Implantable Port System in Patients Undergoing Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikeda, Osamu, E-mail: osamu-3643ik@do9.enjoy.ne.jp; Kusunoki, Shinichiroh; Nakaura, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Takamori, Hiroshi; Chikamoto, Akira; Kanemitsu, Keiichiro [Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Gastroenterological Surgery (Japan)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy is effective for treating primary and metastatic carcinoma of the liver. We compared the perfusion patterns of HAI chemotherapy on intra-arterial port-catheter computed tomography (iapc-CT) and fused images obtained with a combined single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) system. We studied 28 patients with primary or metastatic carcinoma of the liver who bore an implantable HAI port system. All underwent abdominal SPECT using Tc-99m-MAA (185 Mbq); the injection rate was 1 mL/min, identical to the chemotherapy infusion rate, and 0.5 mL/sec for iapc-CT. Delivery was through an implantable port. We compared the intrahepatic perfusion (IHP) and extrahepatic perfusion (EHP) patterns of HAI chemotherapy on iapc-CT images and fused images obtained with a combined SPECT/CT system. In 23 of 28 patients (82%), IHP patterns on iapc-CT images and fused images were identical. In 5 of the 28 patients (18%), IHP on fusion images was different from IHP on iapc-CT images. EHP was seen on fused images in 12 of the 28 patients (43%) and on iapc-CT images in 8 patients (29%). In 17 patients (61%), upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastroduodenal mucosal lesions. EHP was revealed on fused images in 10 of these patients; 9 of them manifested gastroduodenal toxicity at the time of subsequent HAI chemotherapy. Fusion imaging using the combined SPECT/CT system reflects the actual distribution of the infused anticancer agent. This information is valuable not only for monitoring adequate drug distribution but also for avoiding potential extrahepatic complications.

  18. Reconstruction of a time-averaged midposition CT scan for radiotherapy planning of lung cancer patients using deformable registration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolthaus, J. W. H.; Sonke, J.-J.; Herk, M. van; Damen, E. M. F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: lower lobe lung tumors move with amplitudes of up to 2 cm due to respiration. To reduce respiration imaging artifacts in planning CT scans, 4D imaging techniques are used. Currently, we use a single (midventilation) frame of the 4D data set for clinical delineation of structures and radiotherapy planning. A single frame, however, often contains artifacts due to breathing irregularities, and is noisier than a conventional CT scan since the exposure per frame is lower. Moreover, the tumor may be displaced from the mean tumor position due to hysteresis. The aim of this work is to develop a framework for the acquisition of a good quality scan representing all scanned anatomy in the mean position by averaging transformed (deformed) CT frames, i.e., canceling out motion. A nonrigid registration method is necessary since motion varies over the lung. Methods and Materials: 4D and inspiration breath-hold (BH) CT scans were acquired for 13 patients. An iterative multiscale motion estimation technique was applied to the 4D CT scan, similar to optical flow but using image phase (gray-value transitions from bright to dark and vice versa) instead. From the (4D) deformation vector field (DVF) derived, the local mean position in the respiratory cycle was computed and the 4D DVF was modified to deform all structures of the original 4D CT scan to this mean position. A 3D midposition (MidP) CT scan was then obtained by (arithmetic or median) averaging of the deformed 4D CT scan. Image registration accuracy, tumor shape deviation with respect to the BH CT scan, and noise were determined to evaluate the image fidelity of the MidP CT scan and the performance of the technique. Results: Accuracy of the used deformable image registration method was comparable to established automated locally rigid registration and to manual landmark registration (average difference to both methods <0.5 mm for all directions) for the tumor region. From visual assessment, the registration was good for the clearly visible features (e.g., tumor and diaphragm). The shape of the tumor, with respect to that of the BH CT scan, was better represented by the MidP reconstructions than any of the 4D CT frames (including MidV; reduction of 'shape differences' was 66%). The MidP scans contained about one-third the noise of individual 4D CT scan frames. Conclusions: We implemented an accurate method to estimate the motion of structures in a 4D CT scan. Subsequently, a novel method to create a midposition CT scan (time-weighted average of the anatomy) for treatment planning with reduced noise and artifacts was introduced. Tumor shape and position in the MidP CT scan represents that of the BH CT scan better than MidV CT scan and, therefore, was found to be appropriate for treatment planning.

  19. IMPROVING THE USER EXPERIENCE OF THE LAWRENCE TRANSIT SYSTEM: A FOCUS ON MAP USABILITY AND ROUTE PLANNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkman, Eric

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    No rth wo od Ln Co lor ad o S t W 3rd StB irc h L n Ca lifo rn ia St W 2nd Ter W 3rd St N Mi nn es ota St Flo rid a S t Quail Cr ee k D r Na ism ith D r Flo rid a S t Mi nn es ota St W 7th St Illi no is St Ala ba ma St Ma ine St Mi ss ou ri St... r d Ct Oxford Ct W 13th St Jana Ct Eisenhower Pl Yo rks hir e D rB o n d Pl Sundown Ct Riverview Rd Saddlehorn Dr Ca ny on Dr G r a n d v i e w T e r Cla yto n C t Ca lifo rni a S t W 3rd Ter Mt H op e C tW 2nd St Hu rric ane Ln (P ) W 22 nd...

  20. Estimation of the weighted CTDI{sub {infinity}} for multislice CT examinations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Xinhua; Zhang Da; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the variations of CT dose index (CTDI) efficiencies, {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100})=CTDI{sub 100}/CTDI{sub {infinity}}, with bowtie filters and CT scanner types. Methods: This was an extension of our previous study [Li, Zhang, and Liu, Phys. Med. Biol. 56, 5789-5803 (2011)]. A validated Monte Carlo program was used to calculate {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) on a Siemens Somatom Definition scanner. The {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) dependencies on tube voltages and beam widths were tested in previous studies. The influences of different bowtie filters and CT scanner types were examined in this work. The authors tested the variations of {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) with bowtie filters on the Siemens Definition scanner. The authors also analyzed the published CTDI measurements of four independent studies on five scanners of four models from three manufacturers. Results: On the Siemens Definition scanner, the difference in {epsilon}(CTDI{sub W}) between using the head and body bowtie filters was 2.5% (maximum) in the CT scans of the 32-cm phantom, and 1.7% (maximum) in the CT scans of the 16-cm phantom. Compared with CTDI{sub W}, the weighted CTDI{sub {infinity}} increased by 30.5% (on average) in the 32-cm phantom, and by 20.0% (on average) in the 16-cm phantom. These results were approximately the same for 80-140 kV and 1-40 mm beam widths (4.2% maximum deviation). The differences in {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) between the simulations and the direct measurements of four previous studies were 1.3%-5.0% at the center/periphery of the 16-cm/32-cm phantom (on average). Conclusions: Compared with CTDI{sub vol}, the equilibrium dose for large scan lengths is 30.5% higher in the 32-cm phantom, and is 20.0% higher in the 16-cm phantom. The relative increases are practically independent of tube voltages (80-140 kV), beam widths (up to 4 cm), and the CT scanners covered in this study.

  1. Correlation between human observer performance and model observer performance in differential phase contrast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ke; Garrett, John [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Chen, Guang-Hong [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: With the recently expanding interest and developments in x-ray differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT), the evaluation of its task-specific detection performance and comparison with the corresponding absorption CT under a given radiation dose constraint become increasingly important. Mathematical model observers are often used to quantify the performance of imaging systems, but their correlations with actual human observers need to be confirmed for each new imaging method. This work is an investigation of the effects of stochastic DPC-CT noise on the correlation of detection performance between model and human observers with signal-known-exactly (SKE) detection tasks.Methods: The detectabilities of different objects (five disks with different diameters and two breast lesion masses) embedded in an experimental DPC-CT noise background were assessed using both model and human observers. The detectability of the disk and lesion signals was then measured using five types of model observers including the prewhitening ideal observer, the nonprewhitening (NPW) observer, the nonprewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (NPWEi), the prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (PWEi), and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). The same objects were also evaluated by four human observers using the two-alternative forced choice method. The results from the model observer experiment were quantitatively compared to the human observer results to assess the correlation between the two techniques.Results: The contrast-to-detail (CD) curve generated by the human observers for the disk-detection experiments shows that the required contrast to detect a disk is inversely proportional to the square root of the disk size. Based on the CD curves, the ideal and NPW observers tend to systematically overestimate the performance of the human observers. The NPWEi and PWEi observers did not predict human performance well either, as the slopes of their CD curves tended to be steeper. The CHO generated the best quantitative agreement with human observers with its CD curve overlapping with that of human observer. Statistical equivalence between CHO and humans can be claimed within 11% of the human observer results, including both the disk and lesion detection experiments.Conclusions: The model observer method can be used to accurately represent human observer performance with the stochastic DPC-CT noise for SKE tasks with sizes ranging from 8 to 128 pixels. The incorporation of the anatomical noise remains to be studied.

  2. Akeida Capital Management | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Akeida Capital Management Jump to: navigation, search Name: Akeida Capital Management Place: New York, New York Zip: 10036 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Product: Financing...

  3. Cholecystokinin-Assisted Hydrodissection of the Gallbladder Fossa during FDG PET/CT-guided Liver Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, Sanjit O., E-mail: tewaris@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Petre, Elena N., E-mail: petree@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Interventional Radiology Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Osborne, Joseph, E-mail: osbornej@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Sofocleous, Constantinos T., E-mail: sofoclec@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Interventional Radiology Service, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 68-year-old female with colorectal cancer developed a metachronous isolated fluorodeoxyglucose-avid (FDG-avid) segment 5/6 gallbladder fossa hepatic lesion and was referred for percutaneous ablation. Pre-procedure computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated a distended gallbladder abutting the segment 5/6 hepatic metastasis. In order to perform ablation with clear margins and avoid direct puncture and aspiration of the gallbladder, cholecystokinin was administered intravenously to stimulate gallbladder contraction before hydrodissection. Subsequently, the lesion was ablated successfully with sufficient margins, of greater than 1.0 cm, using microwave with ultrasound and FDG PET/CT guidance. The patient tolerated the procedure very well and was discharged home the next day.

  4. Adaptive nonlocal means filtering based on local noise level for CT denoising

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhoubo; Trzasko, Joshua D.; Lake, David S.; Blezek, Daniel J.; Manduca, Armando, E-mail: manduca.armando@mayo.edu [Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Yu, Lifeng; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate an image-domain noise reduction method based on a modified nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm that is adaptive to local noise level of CT images and to implement this method in a time frame consistent with clinical workflow. Methods: A computationally efficient technique for local noise estimation directly from CT images was developed. A forward projection, based on a 2D fan-beam approximation, was used to generate the projection data, with a noise model incorporating the effects of the bowtie filter and automatic exposure control. The noise propagation from projection data to images was analytically derived. The analytical noise map was validated using repeated scans of a phantom. A 3D NLM denoising algorithm was modified to adapt its denoising strength locally based on this noise map. The performance of this adaptive NLM filter was evaluated in phantom studies in terms of in-plane and cross-plane high-contrast spatial resolution, noise power spectrum (NPS), subjective low-contrast spatial resolution using the American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom, and objective low-contrast spatial resolution using a channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO). Graphical processing units (GPU) implementation of this noise map calculation and the adaptive NLM filtering were developed to meet demands of clinical workflow. Adaptive NLM was piloted on lower dose scans in clinical practice. Results: The local noise level estimation matches the noise distribution determined from multiple repetitive scans of a phantom, demonstrated by small variations in the ratio map between the analytical noise map and the one calculated from repeated scans. The phantom studies demonstrated that the adaptive NLM filter can reduce noise substantially without degrading the high-contrast spatial resolution, as illustrated by modulation transfer function and slice sensitivity profile results. The NPS results show that adaptive NLM denoising preserves the shape and peak frequency of the noise power spectrum better than commercial smoothing kernels, and indicate that the spatial resolution at low contrast levels is not significantly degraded. Both the subjective evaluation using the ACR phantom and the objective evaluation on a low-contrast detection task using a CHO model observer demonstrate an improvement on low-contrast performance. The GPU implementation can process and transfer 300 slice images within 5 min. On patient data, the adaptive NLM algorithm provides more effective denoising of CT data throughout a volume than standard NLM, and may allow significant lowering of radiation dose. After a two week pilot study of lower dose CT urography and CT enterography exams, both GI and GU radiology groups elected to proceed with permanent implementation of adaptive NLM in their GI and GU CT practices. Conclusions: This work describes and validates a computationally efficient technique for noise map estimation directly from CT images, and an adaptive NLM filtering based on this noise map, on phantom and patient data. Both the noise map calculation and the adaptive NLM filtering can be performed in times that allow integration with clinical workflow. The adaptive NLM algorithm provides effective denoising of CT data throughout a volume, and may allow significant lowering of radiation dose.

  5. Evaluation of the potential utility of flat panel CT for quantifying relative contrast enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, A. Kyle; Mahvash, Armeen [Department of Imaging Physics, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Interventional Radiology, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Certain directed oncologic therapies seek to take advantage of the fact that tumors are typically more susceptible to directed therapeutic agents than normal tissue owing to their extensive networks of poorly formed, leaky vasculature. If differences between the vascularity of normal and tumor tissues could be quantified, patients could be selected for or excluded from directed treatments on the basis of this difference. However, angiographic imaging techniques such as digital subtraction angiography (DSA) yield two-dimensional data that may be inadequate for this task. As a first step, the authors evaluated the feasibility of using a commercial implementation of flat panel computed tomography (FPCT) to quantify differences in enhancement of a simulated tumor compared with normal tissue based on differences in CT number measured in precontrast and postcontrast scans. Methods: To evaluate the FPCT scanner studied, the authors scanned several phantoms containing simulated normal and tumor tissues. In the first experiment, the authors used an anthropomorphic phantom containing inclusions representing normal, tumor, and bone tissue to evaluate the constancy of CT numbers in scans repeated at clinically relevant intervals of 1 and 3 min. The authors then scanned gelatin phantoms containing dilutions of iodinated contrast to evaluate the accuracy of relative contrast enhancement measurements for a clinical FPCT system. Data were analyzed using widely available software. Results: CT numbers measured in identical locations were constant over both scan intervals evaluated. Measured relative contrast enhancement values were accurate compared with known relative contrast enhancement values. Care must be taken to avoid artifacts in reconstructed images when placing regions of interest. Conclusions: Despite its limitations, FPCT in the interventional laboratory can be used to quantify relative contrast enhancement in phantoms. This is accomplished by measuring CT number in simulated tumor and normal tissue on precontrast and postcontrast scans. This information opens the door for refinement of technique in an effort to use such a technique to plan directed therapies.

  6. Transhepatic CT-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Adrenal Metastases from Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuehl, Hilmar, E-mail: hilmar.kuehl@uni-due.de; Stattaus, Joerg; Forsting, Michael; Antoch, Gerald [University Hospital Essen, University at Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology (Germany)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The prognosis of patients with adrenal metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been poor, and aggressive treatment of these tumors is mandatory to improve patients' survival. Since adrenalectomy may be difficult to perform after previous surgery of the right liver lobe, other approaches are required to treat the adrenal mass. This report aims at demonstrating the feasibility of CT-guided transhepatic radiofrequency ablation of right adrenal HCC metastases pretreated with chemoembolization in patients unable to undergo surgical resection.

  7. SU-E-T-93: Creation of Standardized APBI SAVI Cavities Using CT Registration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahl, R [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Develop a consistent and rapid method of generating the initial cavity structure for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) using the SAVI applicator. Methods: Four SAVI (Cianna Medical) applicators (6-1 Mini, 6-1, 8-1, and 10-1) were scanned on a CT simulator. The applicators were scanned in air with the CT slices (0.625mm axial thickness) perpendicular to the long axis of the applicator. Following scanning the CT images were transferred to Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) and contours of the cavity were drawn. The cavity proximal and distal locations were defined according to MD specification. The scans and contours were then re-imported into the CT virtual simulation workstation.At the time of patient planning the appropriate applicator scan is anonymized and imported into Eclipse. In Brachytherapy Planning two Marker points are placed, one at the distal band location (cavity start) and the second at a defined distance along the applicator (cavity end). The actual patient scan is then registered to the applicator scan. A three point match is used to quickly get the two scans in approximate alignment. Manually matching is then used to fine tune the alignment of the cavity contour and Marker points. Results: The standard applicator scans have shown to agree well with the applicators in the patient scans. The time taken to register the scans has shown to be less than generating the cavities using the standard methods of contouring on the axial slices or using the dose shaper with sources in the central channel. Conclusion: The registration of a standard applicator scan and contour has improved the consistency in the generation of the initial cavity (SAVI) structure. Planning structures used for dose calculation are created with that structure as a starting point so accuracy and consistency are important for dose evaluation and plan comparison.

  8. SU-E-I-43: Pediatric CT Dose and Image Quality Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, G; Singh, R [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To design an approach to optimize radiation dose and image quality for pediatric CT imaging, and to evaluate expected performance. Methods: A methodology was designed to quantify relative image quality as a function of CT image acquisition parameters. Image contrast and image noise were used to indicate expected conspicuity of objects, and a wide-cone system was used to minimize scan time for motion avoidance. A decision framework was designed to select acquisition parameters as a weighted combination of image quality and dose. Phantom tests were used to acquire images at multiple techniques to demonstrate expected contrast, noise and dose. Anthropomorphic phantoms with contrast inserts were imaged on a 160mm CT system with tube voltage capabilities as low as 70kVp. Previously acquired clinical images were used in conjunction with simulation tools to emulate images at different tube voltages and currents to assess human observer preferences. Results: Examination of image contrast, noise, dose and tube/generator capabilities indicates a clinical task and object-size dependent optimization. Phantom experiments confirm that system modeling can be used to achieve the desired image quality and noise performance. Observer studies indicate that clinical utilization of this optimization requires a modified approach to achieve the desired performance. Conclusion: This work indicates the potential to optimize radiation dose and image quality for pediatric CT imaging. In addition, the methodology can be used in an automated parameter selection feature that can suggest techniques given a limited number of user inputs. G Stevens and R Singh are employees of GE Healthcare.

  9. TSUKUBA J. MATH. Vol. 17 No. 1 (1993). 193-200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Peña, José Antonio

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is finite, we get induced linear maps f 1 : CAo ~ Ct.o with f 1(V)(7r(i»= ~ v(g(i» SEO and f. : CiSo ~ Ct

  10. Retrocrural splanchnic nerve alchohol neurolysis with a CT-guided anterior transaortic approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, S. [Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel)] [Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Retrocrural splanchnic nerve alcohol neurolysis with a CT-guided anterior transonic approach, a new method for splanchnic block alleviation of chronic abdominal pain, is described. Ten patients with chronic abdominal pain requiring narcotic treatment, six with pancreatic carcinoma, one with gastric carcinoma, two with chronic pancreatitis, and one with pain of unknown etiology, were referred for splanchnic nerve neurolysis. With CT guidance, a 20 gauge needle was placed through the aorta into the retrocrural space at T11-T12, and 5-15 ml 96% alcohol was injected into the retrocrural space. Following the procedure, 6 of 10 patients were pain free, 2 patients had temporary pain relief, and 2 patients were without response. There were no significant complications. CT-guided anterior transaortic retrocrural splanchnic nerve alcohol neurolysis is technically feasible, easier to perform than the classic posterolateral approach, and may have less risk of complications. The success rate in this initial trial was reasonable and, therefore, this technique provides an additional method for the treatment of abdominal pain. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  11. CT-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation in Patients with Hepatic Metastases from Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakobs, Tobias F., E-mail: tobias.jakobs@med.uni-muenchen.de; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten; Schrader, Angelika [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Radiology (Germany); Stemmler, Hans Joachim [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Internal Medicine III (Germany); Trumm, Christoph [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Radiology (Germany); Lubienski, Andreas [University of Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Radiology (Germany); Murthy, Ravi [The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging (United States); Helmberger, Thomas K. [Klinikum Bogenhausen, Department of Radiology (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Radiology (Germany)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate technical success, technique effectiveness, and survival following radiofrequency ablation for breast cancer liver metastases and to determine prognostic factors. Forty-three patients with 111 breast cancer liver metastases underwent CT-guided percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Technical success and technique effectiveness was evaluated by performing serial CT scans. We assessed the prognostic value of hormone receptor status, overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and presence of extrahepatic tumor spread. Survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Technical success was achieved in 107 metastases (96%). Primary technique effectiveness was 96%. During follow-up local tumor progression was observed in 15 metastases, representing a secondary technique effectiveness of 86.5%. The overall time to progression to the liver was 10.5 months. The estimated overall median survival was 58.6 months. There was no significant difference in terms of survival probability with respect to hormone receptor status, HER2 overexpression, and presence of isolated bone metastases. Survival was significantly lower among patients with extrahepatic disease, with the exception of skeletal metastases. We conclude that CT-guided RF ablation of liver metastases from breast cancer can be performed with a high degree of technical success and technique effectiveness, providing promising survival rates in patients with no visceral extrahepatic disease. Solitary bone metastases did not negatively affect survival probability after RF ablation.

  12. Quality assurance for image-guided radiation therapy utilizing CT-based technologies: A report of the AAPM TG-179

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Balter, Peter A.; Dong Lei; Langen, Katja M.; Lovelock, D. Michael; Miften, Moyed; Moseley, Douglas J.; Pouliot, Jean; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Yoo, Sua [Task Group 179, Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, Florida 32806 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, UCSF Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1600 Divisadero St., Suite H 1031, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Commercial CT-based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) systems allow widespread management of geometric variations in patient setup and internal organ motion. This document provides consensus recommendations for quality assurance protocols that ensure patient safety and patient treatment fidelity for such systems. Methods: The AAPM TG-179 reviews clinical implementation and quality assurance aspects for commercially available CT-based IGRT, each with their unique capabilities and underlying physics. The systems described are kilovolt and megavolt cone-beam CT, fan-beam MVCT, and CT-on-rails. A summary of the literature describing current clinical usage is also provided. Results: This report proposes a generic quality assurance program for CT-based IGRT systems in an effort to provide a vendor-independent program for clinical users. Published data from long-term, repeated quality control tests form the basis of the proposed test frequencies and tolerances.Conclusion: A program for quality control of CT-based image-guidance systems has been produced, with focus on geometry, image quality, image dose, system operation, and safety. Agreement and clarification with respect to reports from the AAPM TG-101, TG-104, TG-142, and TG-148 has been addressed.

  13. Freehand Two-Step CT-Guided Brain Tumor Biopsy: A Fast and Effective Interventional Procedure in Selected Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thanos, Loukas, E-mail: loutharad@yahoo.com; Mylona, Sofia; Galani, Panagiota; Kalioras, Vasilios; Pomoni, Maria; Batakis, Nikolaos ['Korgialeneio-Benakeio', Hellenic Red-Cross Hospital of Athens, Radiology Department (Greece)

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided needle biopsy of brain lesions without a stereotactic device, and to determine the best possible indications for this technique. Methods. From February 2001 to February 2004, 20 patients (12 men, 8 women; age 61-82 years) underwent CT-guided brain lesion biopsy. The procedure started with a brain CT scan for lesion localization and for selection of the inlet for needle insertion. The patient was then transported to the operating room where cranioanatrisis was performed. Subsequently, the biopsy was performed under CT guidance using a 14G brain biopsy needle with a blind smooth end and lateral holes. At the end of the biopsy, the field was checked for possible complications with a CT scan. Results. Histopathologic results were: brain tumor in 16 patients (80%), inflammatory process in 3 (15%), and no conclusive diagnosis in 1 (5%). A repeat of the process was required in 2 patients. A minor complication of local hematoma was found in 1 patient (5%). There were no deaths or other serious complications.Conclusion. CT-guided biopsy is a reliable method for histopathologic diagnosis of brain lesions in selected cases. It is a simple, fast, effective, low-cost procedure with minimal complications, indicated especially for superficial and large tumors.

  14. The effects of gantry tilt on breast dose and image noise in cardiac CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, Michael E.; Gandhi, Diksha; Schmidt, Taly Gilat [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 (United States); Stevens, Grant M. [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States)] [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Foley, W. Dennis [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study investigated the effects of tilted-gantry acquisition on image noise and glandular breast dose in females during cardiac computed tomography (CT) scans. Reducing the dose to glandular breast tissue is important due to its high radiosensitivity and limited diagnostic significance in cardiac CT scans.Methods: Tilted-gantry acquisition was investigated through computer simulations and experimental measurements. Upon IRB approval, eight voxelized phantoms were constructed from previously acquired cardiac CT datasets. Monte Carlo simulations quantified the dose deposited in glandular breast tissue over a range of tilt angles. The effects of tilted-gantry acquisition on breast dose were measured on a clinical CT scanner (CT750HD, GE Healthcare) using an anthropomorphic phantom with MOSFET dosimeters in the breast regions. In both simulations and experiments, scans were performed at gantry tilt angles of 0°–30°, in 5° increments. The percent change in breast dose was calculated relative to the nontilted scan for all tilt angles. The percent change in noise standard deviation due to gantry tilt was calculated in all reconstructed simulated and experimental images.Results: Tilting the gantry reduced the breast dose in all simulated and experimental phantoms, with generally greater dose reduction at increased gantry tilts. For example, at 30° gantry tilt, the dosimeters located in the superior, middle, and inferior breast regions measured dose reductions of 74%, 61%, and 9%, respectively. The simulations estimated 0%–30% total breast dose reduction across the eight phantoms and range of tilt angles. However, tilted-gantry acquisition also increased the noise standard deviation in the simulated phantoms by 2%–50% due to increased pathlength through the iodine-filled heart. The experimental phantom, which did not contain iodine in the blood, demonstrated decreased breast dose and decreased noise at all gantry tilt angles.Conclusions: Tilting the gantry reduced the dose to the breast, while also increasing noise standard deviation. Overall, the noise increase outweighed the dose reduction for the eight voxelized phantoms, suggesting that tilted gantry acquisition may not be beneficial for reducing breast dose while maintaining image quality.

  15. Correlation between model observer and human observer performance in CT imaging when lesion location is uncertain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Zhang, Yi; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Carter, Rickey [Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Toledano, Alicia Y. [Biostatistics Consulting, LLC, 10606 Wheatley Street, Kensington, Maryland 20895 (United States)] [Biostatistics Consulting, LLC, 10606 Wheatley Street, Kensington, Maryland 20895 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between model observer and human observer performance in CT imaging for the task of lesion detection and localization when the lesion location is uncertain.Methods: Two cylindrical rods (3-mm and 5-mm diameters) were placed in a 35 × 26 cm torso-shaped water phantom to simulate lesions with ?15 HU contrast at 120 kV. The phantom was scanned 100 times on a 128-slice CT scanner at each of four dose levels (CTDIvol = 5.7, 11.4, 17.1, and 22.8 mGy). Regions of interest (ROIs) around each lesion were extracted to generate images with signal-present, with each ROI containing 128 × 128 pixels. Corresponding ROIs of signal-absent images were generated from images without lesion mimicking rods. The location of the lesion (rod) in each ROI was randomly distributed by moving the ROIs around each lesion. Human observer studies were performed by having three trained observers identify the presence or absence of lesions, indicating the lesion location in each image and scoring confidence for the detection task on a 6-point scale. The same image data were analyzed using a channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO) with Gabor channels. Internal noise was added to the decision variables for the model observer study. Area under the curve (AUC) of ROC and localization ROC (LROC) curves were calculated using a nonparametric approach. The Spearman's rank order correlation between the average performance of the human observers and the model observer performance was calculated for the AUC of both ROC and LROC curves for both the 3- and 5-mm diameter lesions.Results: In both ROC and LROC analyses, AUC values for the model observer agreed well with the average values across the three human observers. The Spearman's rank order correlation values for both ROC and LROC analyses for both the 3- and 5-mm diameter lesions were all 1.0, indicating perfect rank ordering agreement of the figures of merit (AUC) between the average performance of the human observers and the model observer performance.Conclusions: In CT imaging of different sizes of low-contrast lesions (?15 HU), the performance of CHO with Gabor channels was highly correlated with human observer performance for the detection and localization tasks with uncertain lesion location in CT imaging at four clinically relevant dose levels. This suggests the ability of Gabor CHO model observers to meaningfully assess CT image quality for the purpose of optimizing scan protocols and radiation dose levels in detection and localization tasks for low-contrast lesions.

  16. Correlation between internal fiducial tumor motion and external marker motion for liver tumors imaged with 4D-CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beddar, A. Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: abeddar@mdanderson.org; Kainz, Kristofer [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Briere, Tina Marie [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tsunashima, Yoshikazu [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Pan Tinsu [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Prado, Karl [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Krishnan, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We investigated the correlation between the motions of an external marker and internal fiducials implanted in the liver for 8 patients undergoing respiratory-based computed tomography (four-dimensional CT [4D-CT]) procedures. Methods and Materials: The internal fiducials were gold seeds, 3 mm in length and 1.2 mm in diameter. Four patients each had one implanted fiducial, and the other four had three implanted fiducials. The external marker was a plastic box, which is part of the Real-Time Position Management System (RPM) used to track the patient's respiration. Each patient received a standard helical CT scan followed by a time-correlated CT-image acquisition (4D-CT). The 4D-CT images were reconstructed in 10 separate phases covering the entire respiratory cycle. Results: The internal fiducial motion is predominant in the superior-inferior direction, with a range of 7.5-17.5 mm. The correlation between external respiration and internal fiducial motion is best during expiration. For 2 patients with their three fiducials separated by a maximum of 3.2 cm, the motions of the fiducials were well correlated, whereas for 2 patients with more widely spaced fiducials, there was less correlation. Conclusions: In general, there is a good correlation between internal fiducial motion imaged by 4D-CT and external marker motion. We have demonstrated that gating may be best performed at the end of the respiratory cycle. Special attention should be paid to gating for patients whose fiducials do not move in synchrony, because targeting on the correct respiratory amplitude alone would not guarantee that the entire tumor volume is within the treatment field.

  17. A modular VME or IBM PC based data acquisition system for multi-modality PET/CT scanners of different sizes and detector types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crosetto, D B

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A modular VME or IBM PC based data acquisition system for multi-modality PET/CT scanners of different sizes and detector types

  18. Real-time, programmable, digital signal-processing electronics for extracting the information from a detector module for multi-modality PET/SPECT/CT scanners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crosetto, D B

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Real-time, programmable, digital signal-processing electronics for extracting the information from a detector module for multi-modality PET/SPECT/CT scanners

  19. Stationary table CT dosimetry and anomalous scanner-reported values of CTDI{sub vol}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, Robert L., E-mail: rdixon@wfubmc.edu [Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157 (United States); Boone, John M. [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)] [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Anomalous, scanner-reported values of CTDI{sub vol} for stationary phantom/table protocols (having elevated values of CTDI{sub vol} over 300% higher than the actual dose to the phantom) have been observed; which are well-beyond the typical accuracy expected of CTDI{sub vol} as a phantom dose. Recognition of these outliers as “bad data” is important to users of CT dose index tracking systems (e.g., ACR DIR), and a method for recognition and correction is provided. Methods: Rigorous methods and equations are presented which describe the dose distributions for stationary-table CT. A comparison with formulae for scanner-reported values of CTDI{sub vol} clearly identifies the source of these anomalies. Results: For the stationary table, use of the CTDI{sub 100} formula (applicable to a moving phantom only) overestimates the dose due to extra scatter and also includes an overbeaming correction, both of which are nonexistent when the phantom (or patient) is held stationary. The reported DLP remains robust for the stationary phantom. Conclusions: The CTDI-paradigm does not apply in the case of a stationary phantom and simpler nonintegral equations suffice. A method of correction of the currently reported CTDI{sub vol} using the approach-to-equilibrium formula H(a) and an overbeaming correction factor serves to scale the reported CTDI{sub vol} values to more accurate levels for stationary-table CT, as well as serving as an indicator in the detection of “bad data.”.

  20. SU-E-I-18: CT Scanner QA Using Normalized CTDI Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randazzo, M; Tambasco, M; Russell, B [San Diego State University, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To create a ratio of weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) data normalized to in-air measurements (CTDIair) as a function of beam quality to create a look-up table for frequent, rapid quality assurance (QA) checks of CTDI. Methods: The CTDIw values were measured according to TG-63 protocol using a pencil ionization chamber (Unfors Xi CT detector) and head and body Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms (16 and 32 cm diameter, respectively). Single scan dose profiles were measured at each clinically available energy (80,100,120,140 kVp) on three different CT scanners (two Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash and one GE Optima), using a tube current of 400 mA, a one second rotation time, and the widest available beam width (32 × 0.6 mm and 16 × 1.25 mm, respectively). These values were normalized to CTDIair measurements using the same conditions as CTDIw. The ratios (expressed in cGy/R) were assessed for each scanner as a function of each energy's half value layer (HVL) paired with the phantom's appropriate bow tie filter measured in mmAl. Results: Normalized CTDI values vary linearly with HVL for both the head and body phantoms. The ratios for the two Siemens machines are very similar at each energy. Compared to the GE scanner, these values vary between 10–20% for each kVp setting. Differences in CTDIair contribute most to the deviation of the ratios across machines. Ratios are independent of both mAs and collimation. Conclusion: Look-up tables constructed of normalized CTDI values as a function of HVL can be used to derive CTDIw data from only three in-air measurements (one for CTDIair and two with added filtration for HVL) to allow for simple, frequent QA checks without CT phantom setup. Future investigations will involve comparing results with Monte Carlo simulations for validation.

  1. Specific recommendations for accurate and direct use of PET-CT in PET guided radiotherapy for head and neck sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C. M., E-mail: christopher.thomas@gstt.nhs.uk; Convery, D. J.; Greener, A. G. [Guy's and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Medical Physics Department, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)] [Guy's and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Medical Physics Department, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Pike, L. C.; Baker, S.; Woods, E. [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, King's Health Partners, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)] [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, King's Health Partners, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Hartill, C. E. [Guy's and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Radiotherapy, Clinical Outpatients Clinic, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)] [Guy's and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Radiotherapy, Clinical Outpatients Clinic, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To provide specific experience-based guidance and recommendations for centers wishing to develop, validate, and implement an accurate and efficient process for directly using positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) for the radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer patients. Methods: A PET-CT system was modified with hard-top couch, external lasers and radiotherapy immobilization and indexing devices and was subject to a commissioning and quality assurance program. PET-CT imaging protocols were developed specifically for radiotherapy planning and the image quality and pathway tested using phantoms and five patients recruited into an in-house study. Security and accuracy of data transfer was tested throughout the whole data pathway. The patient pathway was fully established and tested ready for implementation in a PET-guided dose-escalation trial for head and neck cancer patients. Results: Couch deflection was greater than for departmental CT simulator machines. An area of high attenuation in the couch generated image artifacts and adjustments were made accordingly. Using newly developed protocols CT image quality was suitable to maintain delineation and treatment accuracy. Upon transfer of data to the treatment planning system a half pixel offset between PET and CT was observed and corrected. By taking this into account, PET to CT alignment accuracy was maintained below 1 mm in all systems in the data pathway. Transfer of structures delineated in the PET fusion software to the radiotherapy treatment planning system was validated. Conclusions: A method to perform direct PET-guided radiotherapy planning was successfully validated and specific recommendations were developed to assist other centers. Of major concern is ensuring that the quality of PET and CT data is appropriate for radiotherapy treatment planning and on-treatment verification. Couch movements can be compromised, bore-size can be a limitation for certain immobilization techniques, laser positioning may affect setup accuracy and couch deflection may be greater than scanners dedicated to radiotherapy. The full set of departmental commissioning and routine quality assurance tests applied to radiotherapy CT simulators must be carried out on the PET-CT scanner. CT image quality must be optimized for radiotherapy planning whilst understanding that the appearance will differ between scanners and may affect delineation. PET-CT quality assurance schedules will need to be added to and modified to incorporate radiotherapy quality assurance. Methods of working for radiotherapy and PET staff will change to take into account considerations of both parties. PET to CT alignment must be subject to quality control on a loaded and unloaded couch preferably using a suitable emission phantom, and tested throughout the whole data pathway. Data integrity must be tested throughout the whole pathway and a system included to verify that delineated structures are transferred correctly. Excellent multidisciplinary team communication and working is vital, and key staff members on both sides should be specifically dedicated to the project. Patient pathway should be clearly devised to optimize patient care and the resources of all departments. Recruitment of a cohort of patients into a methodology study is valuable to test the quality assurance methods and pathway.

  2. Implementation and commissioning of an integrated micro-CT/RT system with computerized independent jaw collimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael D. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Jung, Jongho A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Holdsworth, David W. [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada) [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Surgery, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Drangova, Maria [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Chen, Jeff [Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada) [Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Wong, Eugene [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To design, construct, and commission a set of computer-controlled motorized jaws for a micro-CT/RT system to perform conformal image-guided small animal radiotherapy.Methods: The authors designed and evaluated a system of custom-built motorized orthogonal jaws, which allows the delivery of off-axis rectangular fields on a GE eXplore CT 120 preclinical imaging system. The jaws in the x direction are independently driven, while the y-direction jaws are symmetric. All motors have backup encoders, verifying jaw positions. Mechanical performance of the jaws was characterized. Square beam profiles ranging from 2 × 2 to 60 × 60 mm{sup 2} were measured using EBT2 film in the center of a 70 × 70 × 22 mm{sup 3} solid water block. Similarly, absolute depth dose was measured in a solid water and EBT2 film stack 50 × 50 × 50 mm{sup 3}. A calibrated Farmer ion chamber in a 70 × 70 × 20 mm{sup 3} solid water block was used to measure the output of three field sizes: 50 × 50, 40 × 40, and 30 × 30 mm{sup 2}. Elliptical target plans were delivered to films to assess overall system performance. Respiratory-gated treatment was implemented on the system and initially proved using a simple sinusoidal motion phantom. All films were scanned on a flatbed scanner (Epson 1000XL) and converted to dose using a fitted calibration curve. A Monte Carlo beam model of the micro-CT with the jaws has been created using BEAMnrc for comparison with the measurements. An example image-guided partial lung irradiation in a rat is demonstrated.Results: The averaged random error of positioning each jaw is less than 0.1 mm. Relative output factors measured with the ion chamber agree with Monte Carlo simulations within 2%. Beam profiles and absolute depth dose curves measured from the films agree with simulations within measurement uncertainty. Respiratory-gated treatments applied to a phantom moving with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 5 mm showed improved beam penumbra (80%–20%) from 3.9 to 0.8 mm.Conclusions: A set of computer-controlled motorized jaws for a micro-CT/RT system were constructed with position reliably better than a tenth of a millimeter. The hardware system is ready for image-guided conformal radiotherapy for small animals with capability of respiratory-gated delivery.

  3. Quantitative comparison of noise texture across CT scanners from different manufacturers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, Justin B.; Christianson, Olav; Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Departments of Radiology, Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare noise texture across computed tomography (CT) scanners from different manufacturers using the noise power spectrum (NPS). Methods: The American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom (Gammex 464, Gammex, Inc., Middleton, WI) was imaged on two scanners: Discovery CT 750HD (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and SOMATOM Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare, Germany), using a consistent acquisition protocol (120 kVp, 0.625/0.6 mm slice thickness, 250 mAs, and 22 cm field of view). Images were reconstructed using filtered backprojection and a wide selection of reconstruction kernels. For each image set, the 2D NPS were estimated from the uniform section of the phantom. The 2D spectra were normalized by their integral value, radially averaged, and filtered by the human visual response function. A systematic kernel-by-kernel comparison across manufacturers was performed by computing the root mean square difference (RMSD) and the peak frequency difference (PFD) between the NPS from different kernels. GE and Siemens kernels were compared and kernel pairs that minimized the RMSD and |PFD| were identified. Results: The RMSD (|PFD|) values between the NPS of GE and Siemens kernels varied from 0.01 mm{sup 2} (0.002 mm{sup -1}) to 0.29 mm{sup 2} (0.74 mm{sup -1}). The GE kernels 'Soft,''Standard,''Chest,' and 'Lung' closely matched the Siemens kernels 'B35f,''B43f,''B41f,' and 'B80f' (RMSD < 0.05 mm{sup 2}, |PFD| < 0.02 mm{sup -1}, respectively). The GE 'Bone,''Bone+,' and 'Edge' kernels all matched most closely with Siemens 'B75f' kernel but with sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values up to 0.18 mm{sup 2} and 0.41 mm{sup -1}, respectively. These sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values corresponded to visually perceivable differences in the noise texture of the images. Conclusions: It is possible to use the NPS to quantitatively compare noise texture across CT systems. The degree to which similar texture across scanners could be achieved varies and is limited by the kernels available on each scanner.

  4. Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard Karls University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum improvement of the NCC value by 100% and of the RMSD value by 81%. The corresponding maximum improvements for the registration-based approach were 20% and 40%. In phases with very rapid motion the registration-based algorithm obtained better image quality, while the image quality of the MAM algorithm was superior in phases with less motion. The image quality improvement of the MAM optimization was visually confirmed for the different clinical cases. Conclusions: The proposed method allows a software-based best-phase image quality improvement in coronary CT angiography. A short scan data interval at the target heart phase is sufficient, no additional scan data in other cardiac phases are required. The algorithm is therefore directly applicable to any standard cardiac CT acquisition protocol.

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Metals Selling Corp - CT 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site:

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New England Lime Co - CT 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01Naturita36 SupplyCanaan Site

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01Naturita36NewNortonOhmart

  8. A comparison of CT- and ultrasound-based imaging to localize the prostate for external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNair, Helen A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: Helen.McNair@rmh.nhs.uk; Mangar, Stephen A. [Department of Academic Urology Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Coffey, Jerome [Department of Academic Urology Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Shoulders, Beverley [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Hansen, Vibeke N. [Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Norman, Andrew [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Department of Academic Urology Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Staffurth, John [Department of Academic Urology Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Sohaib, S. Aslam [Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Warrington, Alan P. [Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Dearnaley, David P. [Department of Academic Urology Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study assesses the accuracy of NOMOS B-mode acquisition and targeting system (BAT) compared with computed tomography (CT) in localizing the prostate. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients were CT scanned, and the prostate was localized by 3 observers using the BAT system. The BAT couch shift measurements were compared with the CT localization. Six of the patients had gold markers present in the prostate, and the prostate movement determined by BAT was compared with the movement determined by the gold markers. Results: Using the BAT system, the 3 observers determined the prostate position to be a mean of 1-5 mm over all directions with respect to the CT. The proportion of readings with a difference >3 mm between the observers was in the range of 25% to 44%. The prostate movement based on gold markers was an average of 3-5 mm different from that measured by BAT. The literature assessing the accuracy and reproducibility on BAT is summarized and compared with our findings. Conclusions: We have found that there are systematic differences between the BAT-defined prostate position compared with that estimated on CT using gold grain marker seeds.

  9. SU-E-T-99: Design and Development of Isocenter Parameter System for CT Simulation Laser Based On DICOM RT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, G [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China (China)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In order to receive DICOM files from treatment planning system and generate patient isocenter positioning parameter file for CT laser system automatically, this paper presents a method for communication with treatment planning system and calculation of isocenter parameter for each radiation field. Methods: Coordinate transformation and laser positioning file formats were analyzed, isocenter parameter was calculated via data from DICOM CT Data and DICOM RTPLAN file. An in-house software-DicomGenie was developed based on the object-oriented program platform-Qt with DCMTK SDK (Germany OFFIS company DICOM SDK) . DicomGenie was tested for accuracy using Philips CT simulation plan system (Tumor LOC, Philips) and A2J CT positioning laser system (Thorigny Sur Marne, France). Results: DicomGenie successfully established DICOM communication between treatment planning system, DICOM files were received by DicomGenie and patient laser isocenter information was generated accurately. Patient laser parameter data files can be used for for CT laser system directly. Conclusion: In-house software DicomGenie received and extracted DICOM data, isocenter laser positioning data files were created by DicomGenie and can be use for A2J laser positioning system.

  10. Studies of the biological synthesis of amino acids by Lactobacillus arabinosus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hood, D. W.

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -2* Li.G aLNns RLiR oluRiACsG Ca aTsRLGaCWGt rMNA LCaRCtCsG dT RLG ieRCNs Nr LCaRCtiaGy .Ci rNMATloluRiACsG ist ilaNy Cs is ilRGMsiRC.G aGMCGa Nr eiRidNlCe MGieRCNsa RLMNuoL uMNeisCe ieCt ia is CsRGMAGtCiRGJ qU#IUFUDh qCaRCtCsG nia GiMlT YlieGt i...ANso RLG GaaGsRCil iACsN ieCtay ilRLNuoL RLGMG niay iR rCMaRy aNAG cuGaRCNs nLGRLGM CR ist iMoCsCsG eNult MsuRillT MGYlieG NsG isNRLGMJ ENaG ist BN: 5Hl* MGaNl.Gt RLCa cuGaRCNs dT aLNnCso RLiR MiRa nNult sNR oMNn Ns tCGRa liepCso LCaRCtCsG G.Gs Cr RLGT...

  11. Technical Note: Precision and accuracy of a commercially available CT optically stimulated luminescent dosimetry system for the measurement of CT dose index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrieze, Thomas J.; Sturchio, Glenn M.; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the precision and accuracy of CTDI{sub 100} measurements made using commercially available optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeters (Landaur, Inc.) as beam width, tube potential, and attenuating material were varied. Methods: One hundred forty OSL dosimeters were individually exposed to a single axial CT scan, either in air, a 16-cm (head), or 32-cm (body) CTDI phantom at both center and peripheral positions. Scans were performed using nominal total beam widths of 3.6, 6, 19.2, and 28.8 mm at 120 kV and 28.8 mm at 80 kV. Five measurements were made for each of 28 parameter combinations. Measurements were made under the same conditions using a 100-mm long CTDI ion chamber. Exposed OSL dosimeters were returned to the manufacturer, who reported dose to air (in mGy) as a function of distance along the probe, integrated dose, and CTDI{sub 100}. Results: The mean precision averaged over 28 datasets containing five measurements each was 1.4%{+-} 0.6%, range = 0.6%-2.7% for OSL and 0.08%{+-} 0.06%, range = 0.02%-0.3% for ion chamber. The root mean square (RMS) percent differences between OSL and ion chamber CTDI{sub 100} values were 13.8%, 6.4%, and 8.7% for in-air, head, and body measurements, respectively, with an overall RMS percent difference of 10.1%. OSL underestimated CTDI{sub 100} relative to the ion chamber 21/28 times (75%). After manual correction of the 80 kV measurements, the RMS percent differences between OSL and ion chamber measurements were 9.9% and 10.0% for 80 and 120 kV, respectively. Conclusions: Measurements of CTDI{sub 100} with commercially available CT OSL dosimeters had a percent standard deviation of 1.4%. After energy-dependent correction factors were applied, the RMS percent difference in the measured CTDI{sub 100} values was about 10%, with a tendency of OSL to underestimate CTDI relative to the ion chamber. Unlike ion chamber methods, however, OSL dosimeters allow measurement of the radiation dose profile.

  12. Percutaneous Extraction of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty Under CT and Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoretti, Nicolas, E-mail: amorettinicolas@yahoo.fr; Huwart, Laurent, E-mail: huwart.laurent@wanadoo.fr [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Radiology (France)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t'am (Thiebaud, France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.

  13. Sparse signal reconstruction from polychromatic X-ray CT measurements via mass attenuation discretization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Renliang; Dogandži?, Aleksandar [Iowa State University, Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, 1915 Scholl Road, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a method for reconstructing sparse images from polychromatic x-ray computed tomography (ct) measurements via mass attenuation coefficient discretization. The material of the inspected object and the incident spectrum are assumed to be unknown. We rewrite the Lambert-Beer’s law in terms of integral expressions of mass attenuation and discretize the resulting integrals. We then present a penalized constrained least-squares optimization approach for reconstructing the underlying object from log-domain measurements, where an active set approach is employed to estimate incident energy density parameters and the nonnegativity and sparsity of the image density map are imposed using negative-energy and smooth ?{sub 1}-norm penalty terms. We propose a two-step scheme for refining the mass attenuation discretization grid by using higher sampling rate over the range with higher photon energy, and eliminating the discretization points that have little effect on accuracy of the forward projection model. This refinement allows us to successfully handle the characteristic lines (Dirac impulses) in the incident energy density spectrum. We compare the proposed method with the standard filtered backprojection, which ignores the polychromatic nature of the measurements and sparsity of the image density map. Numerical simulations using both realistic simulated and real x-ray ct data are presented.

  14. Patients with Life-Threatening Arterial Renal Hemorrhage: CT Angiography and Catheter Angiography with Subsequent Superselective Embolization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, C. M., E-mail: christof.sommer@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Stampfl, U.; Bellemann, N.; Ramsauer, S. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Loenard, B. M. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology (Germany); Haferkamp, A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Anesthesiology (Germany); Hallscheidt, P.; Richter, G. M.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical and clinical success of superselective embolization in patients with life-threatening arterial renal hemorrhage undergoing preinterventional CT angiography. Forty-three patients with clinical signs of life-threatening arterial renal hemorrhage underwent CT angiography and catheter angiography. Superselective embolization was indicated in the case of a positive catheter angiography. Primary study goals were technical and clinical success of superselective embolization. Secondary study goals were CT angiographic and catheter angiographic image findings and clinical follow-up. The mean time interval between CT angiography and catheter angiography was 8.3 {+-} 10.3 h (range, 0.2-34.1 h). Arterial renal hemorrhage was identified with CT angiography in 42 of 43 patients (98%) and catheter angiography in 39 of 43 patients (91%) (overview angiography in 4 of 43 patients [9%], selective angiography in 16 of 43 patients [37%], and superselective angiography in 39 of 43 patients [91%]). Superselective embolization was performed in 39 of 43 patients (91%) and technically successful in 37 of 39 patients (95%). Therefore, coil embolization was performed in 13 of 37 patients (35%), liquid embolization in 9 of 37 patients (24%), particulate embolization in 1 of 37 patients (3%), and a combination in 14 of 37 patients (38%). Clinical failure occurred in 8 of 39 patients (21%) and procedure-related complications in 2 of 39 patients (5%). The 30-day mortality rate was 3%. Hemoglobin decreased significantly prior to intervention (P < 0.001) and increased significantly after intervention (P < 0.005). In conclusion, superselective embolization is effective, reliable, and safe in patients with life-threatening arterial renal hemorrhage. In contrast to overview and selective angiography, only superselective angiography allows reliable detection of arterial renal hemorrhage. Preinterventional CT angiography is excellent for detection and localization of arterial renal hemorrhage and appropriate for guidance of the embolization procedure.

  15. Radiofrequency Ablation Assisted by Real-Time Virtual Sonography and CT for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Undetectable by Conventional Sonography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakai, Motoki, E-mail: momonga@wakayama-med.ac.jp; Sato, Morio; Sahara, Shinya; Takasaka, Isao; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Tanihata, Hirohiko; Kimura, Masashi [Wakayama Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan); Takeuchi, Nozomu [Hidaka General Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Real-time virtual sonography (RVS) is a diagnostic imaging support system, which provides the same cross-sectional multiplanar reconstruction images as ultrasound images on the same monitor screen in real time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiofrequency ablation (RFA) assisted by RVS and CT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) undetectable with conventional sonography. Subjects were 20 patients with 20 HCC nodules not detected by conventional sonography but detectable by CT or MRI. All patients had hepatitis C-induced liver cirrhosis; there were 13 males and 7 females aged 55-81 years (mean, 69.3 years). RFA was performed in the CT room, and the tumor was punctured with the assistance of RVS. CT was performed immediately after puncture, and ablation was performed after confirming that the needle had been inserted into the tumor precisely. The mean number of punctures and success rates of the first puncture were evaluated. Treatment effects were evaluated with dynamic CT every 3 months after RFA. RFA was technically feasible and local tumor control was achieved in all patients. The mean number of punctures was 1.1, and the success rate of the first puncture was 90.0%. This method enabled safe ablation without complications. The mean follow-up period was 13.5 month (range, 9-18 months). No local recurrence was observed at the follow-up points. In conclusion, RFA assisted by RVS and CT is a safe and efficacious method of treatment for HCC undetectable by conventional sonography.

  16. SU-E-J-113: The Influence of Optimizing Pediatric CT Simulator Protocols On the Treatment Dose Calculation in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Hu, Q; Tie, J; Wu, H [Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Radiotherapy, Peking University Cancer Hospital ' Institute, Beijing (China); Deng, J [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the possibility of applying optimized scanning protocols for pediatric CT simulation by quantifying the dosimetric inaccuracy introduced by using a fixed HU to density conversion. Methods: The images of a CIRS electron density reference phantom (Model 062) were acquired by a Siemens CT simulator (Sensation Open) using the following settings of tube voltage and beam current: 120 kV/190mA (the reference protocol used to calibrate CT for our treatment planning system (TPS)); Fixed 190mA combined with all available kV: 80, 100, and 140; fixed 120 kV and various current from 37 to 444 mA (scanner extremes) with interval of 30 mA. To avoid the HU uncertainty of point sampling in the various inserts of known electron densities, the mean CT numbers of the central cylindrical volume were calculated using DICOMan software. The doses per 100 MU to the reference point (SAD=100cm, Depth=10cm, Field=10X10cm, 6MV photon beam) in a virtual cubic phantom (30X30X30cm) were calculated using Eclipse TPS (calculation model: AcurosXB-11031) by assigning the CT numbers to HU of typical materials acquired by various protocols. Results: For the inserts of densities less than muscle, CT number fluctuations of all protocols were within the tolerance of 10 HU as accepted by AAPM-TG66. For more condensed materials, fixed kV yielded stable HU with any mA combination where largest disparities were found in 1750mg/cc insert: HU{sub reference}=1801(106.6cGy), HU{sub minimum}=1799 (106.6cGy, error{sub dose}=0.00%), HU{sub maximum}=1815 (106.8cGy, error{sub dose}=0.19%). Yet greater disagreements were observed with increasing density when kV was modified: HU{sub minimum}=1646 (104.5cGy, error{sub dose}=- 1.97%), HU{sub maximum}=2487 (116.4cGy, error{sub dose}=9.19%) in 1750mg/cc insert. Conclusion: Without affecting treatment dose calculation, personalized mA optimization of CT simulator can be conducted by fixing kV for a better cost-effectiveness of imaging dose and quality especially for children. Unless recalibrated, kV should be constant for all anatomical sites if diagnostic CT scanner is used as a simulator. This work was partially supported by Capital Medical Development Scientific Research Fund of China.

  17. International Conference on Fully 3D Reconstruction in Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Linau, Germany, July 9-13, 2007 Abstract--Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Germany, July 9-13, 2007 Abstract--Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) plays an important role computed tomography (4D-CT) with respiratory gating provides dynamic volume imaging datasets of the moving

  18. Objective index of image fidelity for JPEG2000 compressed body CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Kil Joong; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kang, Heung-Sik; Kim, So Yeon; Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Bohyoung; Seo, Jinwook; Mantiuk, Rafal [Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, and Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggido, 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); School of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-Ro, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul, 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Computer Science, University of British Columbia, 201-2366 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Compression ratio (CR) has been the de facto standard index of compression level for medical images. The aim of the study is to evaluate the CR, peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), and a perceptual quality metric (high-dynamic range visual difference predictor HDR-VDP) as objective indices of image fidelity for Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) 2000 compressed body computed tomography (CT) images, from the viewpoint of visually lossless compression approach. A total of 250 body CT images obtained with five different scan protocols (5-mm-thick abdomen, 0.67-mm-thick abdomen, 5-mm-thick lung, 0.67-mm-thick lung, and 5-mm-thick low-dose lung) were compressed to one of five CRs (reversible, 6:1, 8:1, 10:1, and 15:1). The PSNR and HDR-VDP values were calculated for the 250 pairs of the original and compressed images. By alternately displaying an original and its compressed image on the same monitor, five radiologists independently determined if the pair was distinguishable or indistinguishable. The kappa statistic for the interobserver agreement among the five radiologists' responses was 0.70. According to the radiologists' responses, the number of distinguishable image pairs tended to significantly differ among the five scan protocols at 6:1-10:1 compressions (Fisher-Freeman-Halton exact tests). Spearman's correlation coefficients between each of the CR, PSNR, and HDR-VDP and the number of radiologists who responded as distinguishable were 0.72, -0.77, and 0.85, respectively. Using the radiologists' pooled responses as the reference standards, the areas under the receiver-operating-characteristic curves for the CR, PSNR, and HDR-VDP were 0.87, 0.93, and 0.97, respectively, showing significant differences between the CR and PSNR (p=0.04), or HDR-VDP (p<0.001), and between the PSNR and HDR-VDP (p<0.001). In conclusion, the CR is less suitable than the PSNR or HDR-VDP as an objective index of image fidelity for JPEG2000 compressed body CT images. The HDR-VDP is more promising than the PSNR as such an index.

  19. Regarding Autocontouring and Manual Contouring: Which Is the Better Method for Target Delineation Using 18F-FDG PET/CT in NonSmall Cell Lung Cancer? By K. Wu et al

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Using 18F-FDG PET/CT in Non­Small Cell Lung Cancer? By K. Wu et al M Hatt, D Visvikis, C Cheze Le Rest delineation in PET/CT for NSCLC. 17 NSCLC tumors were delineated with both automated and manual approaches, using either combined PET/CT or CT and PET independently. As expected, the manual contouring of the PET

  20. Evaluation of Radiation Dose Reduction during CT Scans Using Oxide Bismuth and Nano-Barium Sulfate Shields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seoung, Youl-Hun

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate radiation dose reduction and image quality during CT scanning by using a new dose reduction fiber sheet (DRFS) with commercially available bismuth shields. These DRFS were composed of nano-barium sulfate (BaSO4), filling the gaps left by the large oxide bismuth (Bi2O3) particle sizes. The radiation dose was measured five times at directionss of 12 o'clock from the center of the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) head phantom to calculate an average value using a CT ionization chamber. The image quality measured CT transverse images of the PMMA head phantom depending on X-ray tube voltages and the type of shielding. Two regions of interest in CT transverse images were chosen from the right and left areas under the surface of the PMMA head phantom and from ion chamber holes located at directions of 12 o'clock from the center of the PMMA head phantom. The results of this study showed that the new DRFS shields could reduce dosages to 15.61%, 23.05%, and 22.71% more in ...

  1. 200 MeV Proton Radiography Studies with a Hand Phantom Using a Prototype Proton CT Scanner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    200 MeV Proton Radiography Studies with a Hand Phantom Using a Prototype Proton CT Scanner Tia.F.W. Sadrozinski, K. Schubert, R. Schulte, B. Schultze, D. Steinberg, M. Witt, A. Zatserklyaniy Abstract--Proton alignment and verification procedures for proton beam radiation therapy. The quality of the image, both

  2. Osteocytes number and volume in osteoporotic and in healthy bone biopsies analysed using Synchrotron CT: a pilot study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prohaska, Steffen

    Synchrotron CT: a pilot study Ritter Z.1 , Staude A.2 , Prohaska S.3 , Brand R.4 Friedmann A.1,5 , Hege H.C.3 by synchrotron radiation to quantify the number and volume was set. The major objective was to determine in 70% ethanol in tailored containers adapted for the measurement requirement at BESSY aiming

  3. EVALUATION OF GEOMETRIC FEATURE DESCRIPTORS FOR DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION OF LUNG NODULES IN LOW DOSE CT SCANS OF THE CHEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farag, Aly A.

    EVALUATION OF GEOMETRIC FEATURE DESCRIPTORS FOR DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION OF LUNG NODULES IN LOW descriptors, common in computer vision, for false positive reduction and for classification of lung nodules in low dose CT (LDCT) scans. A data-driven lung nodule modeling approach creates templates for common

  4. TRACE/PARCS calculations of exercises 1 and 2 of the V1000CT-2 benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, B.; Ivanov, K. [Pennsylvania State Univ., 230 Reber Bldg, Univ. Park, PA 16801 (United States); Popov, E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exercises 1 and 2 of the VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark Phase 2 (V1000CT-2) are investigated using coupled three-dimensional (3-D) neutron kinetics/thermal-hydraulics code TRACE/PARCS. Two coarse mesh 3-D thermal-hydraulic models (with six angular sectors and with eighteen angular sectors) were developed for the system code TRACE for Exercise 1 and their applicability is evaluated using the test data provided in the benchmark specification. The six sector model is then coupled with the PARCS 3-D neutron kinetics model in order to analyze Exercise 2 of the benchmark. The results show that TRACE code is accurate enough to simulate the flow mixing occurring in the downcomer of the VVER-1000 reactor. (authors)

  5. CT Measurements of Two-Phase Flow in Fractured Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brigham, William E.; Castanier Louis M.; Hughes, Richard G.

    1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the design, construction, and preliminary results of an experiment that studies imbibition displacement in two fracture blocks. Multiphase (oil/water) displacements will be conducted at the same rate on three core configurations. The configurations are a compact core, a two-block system with a 1 mm spacer between the blocks, and a two-block system with no spacer. The blocks are sealed in epoxy so that saturation measurements can be made throughout the displacement experiments using a Computed Tomography (CT) scanner. Preliminary results are presented from a water/air experiment. These results suggest that it is incorrect to assume negligible capillary continuity between matrix blocks as is often done.

  6. CT of the liver and spleen with EOE-13: review of 225 examinations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.L.; Vermess, M.; Doppman, J.L.; Simon, R.M.; Sugarbaker, P.H.; O'Leary, T.J.; Grimes, G.; Chatterji, D.G.; Willis, M.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EOE-13 is an experimental liver-spleen-specific computed tomographic (CT) contrast agent developed at the National Institutes of Health. Experience with this agent in 225 clinical examinations is described. On average, use of EOE-13 increases the attenuation of normal liver by 32.5 H and that of normal spleen by 52.3 H. Tumors in these organs increase only 2.6 H, making them more easily detectable. Most of the iodine in EOE-13 appears to clear from the liver and spleen by 24 hr after injection. No deaths or permanent morbidity have been observed. The complication rate is 3.6%. EOE-13 is valuable for the detection of hepatic and splenic tumors.

  7. Mapping motion from 4D-MRI to 3D-CT for use in 4D dose calculations: A technical feasibility study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boye, Dirk [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Computer Vision Laboratory, ETH Zuerich, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Lomax, Tony [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); ETH Zuerich, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Knopf, Antje [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Target sites affected by organ motion require a time resolved (4D) dose calculation. Typical 4D dose calculations use 4D-CT as a basis. Unfortunately, 4D-CT images have the disadvantage of being a 'snap-shot' of the motion during acquisition and of assuming regularity of breathing. In addition, 4D-CT acquisitions involve a substantial additional dose burden to the patient making many, repeated 4D-CT acquisitions undesirable. Here the authors test the feasibility of an alternative approach to generate patient specific 4D-CT data sets. Methods: In this approach motion information is extracted from 4D-MRI. Simulated 4D-CT data sets [which the authors call 4D-CT(MRI)] are created by warping extracted deformation fields to a static 3D-CT data set. The employment of 4D-MRI sequences for this has the advantage that no assumptions on breathing regularity are made, irregularities in breathing can be studied and, if necessary, many repeat imaging studies (and consequently simulated 4D-CT data sets) can be performed on patients and/or volunteers. The accuracy of 4D-CT(MRI)s has been validated by 4D proton dose calculations. Our 4D dose algorithm takes into account displacements as well as deformations on the originating 4D-CT/4D-CT(MRI) by calculating the dose of each pencil beam based on an individual time stamp of when that pencil beam is applied. According to corresponding displacement and density-variation-maps the position and the water equivalent range of the dose grid points is adjusted at each time instance. Results: 4D dose distributions, using 4D-CT(MRI) data sets as input were compared to results based on a reference conventional 4D-CT data set capturing similar motion characteristics. Almost identical 4D dose distributions could be achieved, even though scanned proton beams are very sensitive to small differences in the patient geometry. In addition, 4D dose calculations have been performed on the same patient, but using 4D-CT(MRI) data sets based on variable breathing patterns to show the effect of possible irregular breathing on active scanned proton therapy. Using a 4D-CT(MRI), including motion irregularities, resulted in significantly different proton dose distributions. Conclusions: The authors have demonstrated that motion information from 4D-MRI can be used to generate realistic 4D-CT data sets on the basis of a single static 3D-CT data set. 4D-CT(MRI) presents a novel approach to test the robustness of treatment plans in the circumstance of patient motion.

  8. CT imaging during microwave ablation: Analysis of spatial and temporal tissue contraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Dong; Brace, Christopher L., E-mail: clbrace@wisc.edu [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To analyze the spatial distribution and temporal development of liver tissue contraction during high-temperature ablation by using intraprocedural computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: A total of 46 aluminum fiducial markers were positioned in a 60 × 45 mm grid, in a single plane, around a microwave ablation antenna in each of six ex vivo bovine liver samples. Ablations were performed for 10 min at 100 W. CT data of the liver sample were acquired every 30 s during ablation. Fiducial motion between acquisitions was tracked in postprocessing and used to calculate measures of tissue contraction and contraction rates. The spatial distribution and temporal evolution of contraction were analyzed. Results: Fiducial displacement indicated that the zone measured postablation was 8.2 ± 1.8 mm (?20%) smaller in the radial direction and 7.1 ± 1.0 mm (?10%) shorter in the longitudinal direction than the preablation tissue dimension. Therefore, the total ablation volume was reduced from its preablation value by approximately 45%. Very little longitudinal contraction was noted in the distal portion of the ablation zone. Central tissues contracted more than 60%, which was near an estimated limit of ?70% based on initial water content. More peripheral tissues contracted only 15% in any direction. Contraction rates peaked during the first 60 s of heating with a roughly exponential decay over time. Conclusions: Ablation zones measured posttreatment are significantly smaller than the pretreatment tissue dimensions. Tissue contraction is spatially dependent, with the greatest effect occurring in the central ablation zone. Contraction rate peaks early and decays over time.

  9. Statistical CT noise reduction with multiscale decomposition and penalized weighted least squares in the projection domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang Shaojie; Tang Xiangyang [Imaging and Medical Physics, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, 1701 Uppergate Dr., C-5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); School of Automation, Xi'an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710121 (China); Imaging and Medical Physics, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, 1701 Uppergate Dr., C-5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purposes: The suppression of noise in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging is of clinical relevance for diagnostic image quality and the potential for radiation dose saving. Toward this purpose, statistical noise reduction methods in either the image or projection domain have been proposed, which employ a multiscale decomposition to enhance the performance of noise suppression while maintaining image sharpness. Recognizing the advantages of noise suppression in the projection domain, the authors propose a projection domain multiscale penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) method, in which the angular sampling rate is explicitly taken into consideration to account for the possible variation of interview sampling rate in advanced clinical or preclinical applications. Methods: The projection domain multiscale PWLS method is derived by converting an isotropic diffusion partial differential equation in the image domain into the projection domain, wherein a multiscale decomposition is carried out. With adoption of the Markov random field or soft thresholding objective function, the projection domain multiscale PWLS method deals with noise at each scale. To compensate for the degradation in image sharpness caused by the projection domain multiscale PWLS method, an edge enhancement is carried out following the noise reduction. The performance of the proposed method is experimentally evaluated and verified using the projection data simulated by computer and acquired by a CT scanner. Results: The preliminary results show that the proposed projection domain multiscale PWLS method outperforms the projection domain single-scale PWLS method and the image domain multiscale anisotropic diffusion method in noise reduction. In addition, the proposed method can preserve image sharpness very well while the occurrence of 'salt-and-pepper' noise and mosaic artifacts can be avoided. Conclusions: Since the interview sampling rate is taken into account in the projection domain multiscale decomposition, the proposed method is anticipated to be useful in advanced clinical and preclinical applications where the interview sampling rate varies.

  10. Contouring Variability of the Penile Bulb on CT Images: Quantitative Assessment Using a Generalized Concordance Index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carillo, Viviana [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Cozzarini, Cesare [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Perna, Lucia; Calandra, Mauro [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Gianolini, Stefano [Medical Software Solutions GmbH, Hagendorn (Switzerland)] [Medical Software Solutions GmbH, Hagendorn (Switzerland); Rancati, Tiziana [Prostate Cancer Program, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy)] [Prostate Cancer Program, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy); Spinelli, Antonello Enrico [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Vavassori, Vittorio [Department of Radiotherapy, Cliniche Gavazzeni Humanitas, Bergamo (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Cliniche Gavazzeni Humanitas, Bergamo (Italy); Villa, Sergio [Department of Radiotherapy 1, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy 1, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy); Valdagni, Riccardo [Prostate Cancer Program, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy) [Prostate Cancer Program, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy 1, IRCCS National Institute of Cancer, Milano (Italy); Fiorino, Claudio, E-mail: fiorino.claudio@hsr.it [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Within a multicenter study (DUE-01) focused on the search of predictors of erectile dysfunction and urinary toxicity after radiotherapy for prostate cancer, a dummy run exercise on penile bulb (PB) contouring on computed tomography (CT) images was carried out. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess interobserver contouring variability by the application of the generalized DICE index. Methods and Materials: Fifteen physicians from different Institutes drew the PB on CT images of 10 patients. The spread of DICE values was used to objectively select those observers who significantly disagreed with the others. The analyses were performed with a dedicated module in the VODCA software package. Results: DICE values were found to significantly change among observers and patients. The mean DICE value was 0.67, ranging between 0.43 and 0.80. The statistics of DICE coefficients identified 4 of 15 observers who systematically showed a value below the average (p value range, 0.013 - 0.059): Mean DICE values were 0.62 for the 4 'bad' observers compared to 0.69 of the 11 'good' observers. For all bad observers, the main cause of the disagreement was identified. Average DICE values were significantly worse from the average in 2 of 10 patients (0.60 vs. 0.70, p < 0.05) because of the limited visibility of the PB. Excluding the bad observers and the 'bad' patients,' the mean DICE value increased from 0.67 to 0.70; interobserver variability, expressed in terms of standard deviation of DICE spread, was also reduced. Conclusions: The obtained values of DICE around 0.7 shows an acceptable agreement, considered the small dimension of the PB. Additional strategies to improve this agreement are under consideration and include an additional tutorial of the so-called bad observers with a recontouring procedure, or the recontouring by a single observer of the PB for all patients included in the DUE-01 study.

  11. Assessment of contrast enhanced respiration managed cone-beam CT for image guided radiotherapy of intrahepatic tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Nikolaj K. G., E-mail: nkyj@regionsjaelland.dk [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada)] [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Stewart, Errol [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada) [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Imaging Research Lab, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6C 2R5 (Canada); Lock, Michael; Fisher, Barbara [Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada) [Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Kozak, Roman [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada)] [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Chen, Jeff [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada) [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Lee, Ting-Yim [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada) [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Imaging Research Lab, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6C 2R5 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Wong, Eugene [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada) [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Contrast enhancement and respiration management are widely used during image acquisition for radiotherapy treatment planning of liver tumors along with respiration management at the treatment unit. However, neither respiration management nor intravenous contrast is commonly used during cone-beam CT (CBCT) image acquisition for alignment prior to radiotherapy. In this study, the authors investigate the potential gains of injecting an iodinated contrast agent in combination with respiration management during CBCT acquisition for liver tumor radiotherapy. Methods: Five rabbits with implanted liver tumors were subjected to CBCT with and without motion management and contrast injection. The acquired CBCT images were registered to the planning CT to determine alignment accuracy and dosimetric impact. The authors developed a simulation tool for simulating contrast-enhanced CBCT images from dynamic contrast enhanced CT imaging (DCE-CT) to determine optimal contrast injection protocols. The tool was validated against contrast-enhanced CBCT of the rabbit subjects and was used for five human patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma. Results: In the rabbit experiment, when neither motion management nor contrast was used, tumor centroid misalignment between planning image and CBCT was 9.2 mm. This was reduced to 2.8?mm when both techniques were employed. Tumors were not visualized in clinical CBCT images of human subjects. Simulated contrast-enhanced CBCT was found to improve tumor contrast in all subjects. Different patients were found to require different contrast injections to maximize tumor contrast. Conclusions: Based on the authors’ animal study, respiration managed contrast enhanced CBCT improves IGRT significantly. Contrast enhanced CBCT benefits from patient specific tracer kinetics determined from DCE-CT.

  12. Calculations of two new dose metrics proposed by AAPM Task Group 111 using the measurements with standard CT dosimetry phantoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)] [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: AAPM Task Group 111 proposed to measure the equilibrium dose-pitch product D-caret{sub eq} for scan modes involving table translation and the midpoint dose D{sub L}(0) for stationary-table modes on the central and peripheral axes of sufficiently long (e.g., at least 40 cm) phantoms. This paper presents an alternative approach to calculate both metrics using the measurements of scanning the standard computed tomographic (CT) dosimetry phantoms on CT scanners.Methods: D-caret{sub eq} was calculated from CTDI{sub 100} and ?(CTDI{sub 100}) (CTDI{sub 100} efficiency), and D{sub L}(0) was calculated from D-caret{sub eq} and the approach to equilibrium function H(L) =D{sub L}(0)/D{sub eq}, where D{sub eq} was the equilibrium dose. CTDI{sub 100} may be directly obtained from several sources (such as medical physicist's CT scanner performance evaluation or the IMPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator), or be derived from CTDI{sub Vol} using the central to peripheral CTDI{sub 100} ratio (R{sub 100}). The authors have provided the required ?(CTDI{sub 100}) and H(L) data in two previous papers [X. Li, D. Zhang, and B. Liu, Med. Phys. 39, 901–905 (2012); and ibid. 40, 031903 (10pp.) (2013)]. R{sub 100} was assessed for a series of GE, Siemens, Philips, and Toshiba CT scanners with multiple settings of scan field of view, tube voltage, and bowtie filter.Results: The calculated D{sub L}(0) and D{sub L}(0)/D{sub eq} in PMMA and water cylinders were consistent with the measurements on two GE CT scanners (LightSpeed 16 and VCT) by Dixon and Ballard [Med. Phys. 34, 3399–3413 (2007)], the measurements on a Siemens CT scanner (SOMATOM Spirit Power) by Descamps et al. [J. Appl. Clin. Med. Phys. 13, 293–302 (2012)], and the Monte Carlo simulations by Boone [Med. Phys. 36, 4547–4554 (2009)].Conclusions: D-caret{sub eq} and D{sub L}(0) can be calculated using the alternative approach. The authors have provided the required ?(CTDI{sub 100}) and H(L) data in two previous papers. R{sub 100} is presented for a majority of multidetector CT scanners currently on the market, and can be easily assessed for other CT scanners or operating conditions not covered in this study. The central to peripheral D{sub eq} ratio is about 1.50 and 1.12 times of R{sub 100} for the 32- and 16-cm diameter PMMA phantom, respectively.

  13. Effects of ray profile modeling on resolution recovery in clinical CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofmann, Christian [Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich–Alexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich–Alexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany); Knaup, Michael [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Kachelrieß, Marc, E-mail: marc.kachelriess@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich–Alexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich–Alexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Iterative image reconstruction gains more and more interest in clinical routine, as it promises to reduce image noise (and thereby patient dose), to reduce artifacts, or to improve spatial resolution. However, among vendors and researchers, there is no consensus of how to best achieve these goals. The authors are focusing on the aspect of geometric ray profile modeling, which is realized by some algorithms, while others model the ray as a straight line. The authors incorporate ray-modeling (RM) in nonregularized iterative reconstruction. That means, instead of using one simple single needle beam to represent the x-ray, the authors evaluate the double integral of attenuation path length over the finite source distribution and the finite detector element size in the numerical forward projection. Our investigations aim at analyzing the resolution recovery (RR) effects of RM. Resolution recovery means that frequencies can be recovered beyond the resolution limit of the imaging system. In order to evaluate, whether clinical CT images can benefit from modeling the geometrical properties of each x-ray, the authors performed a 2D simulation study of a clinical CT fan-beam geometry that includes the precise modeling of these geometrical properties. Methods: All simulations and reconstructions are performed in native fan-beam geometry. A water phantom with resolution bar patterns and a Forbild thorax phantom with circular resolution patterns representing calcifications in the heart region are simulated. An FBP reconstruction with a Ram–Lak kernel is used as a reference reconstruction. The FBP is compared to iterative reconstruction techniques with and without RM: An ordered subsets convex (OSC) algorithm without any RM (OSC), an OSC where the forward projection is modeled concerning the finite focal spot and detector size (OSC-RM) and an OSC with RM and with a matched forward and backprojection pair (OSC-T-RM, T for transpose). In all cases, noise was matched to be able to focus on comparing spatial resolution. The authors use two different simulation settings. Both are based on the geometry of a typical clinical CT system (0.7 mm detector element size at isocenter, 1024 projections per rotation). Setting one has an exaggerated source width of 5.0 mm. Setting two has a realistically small source width of 0.5 mm. The authors also investigate the transition from setting one to two. To quantify image quality, the authors analyze line profiles through the resolution patterns to define a contrast factor (CF) for contrast-resolution plots, and the authors compare the normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with respect to the ground truth of the circular resolution patterns. To independently analyze whether RM is of advantage, the authors implemented several iterative reconstruction algorithms: The statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm OSC, the ordered subsets simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (OSSART) and another statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm, denoted with ordered subsets maximum likelihood (OSML) algorithm. All algorithms were implemented both without RM (denoted as OSC, OSSART, and OSML) and with RM (denoted as OSC-RM, OSSART-RM, and OSML-RM). Results: For the unrealistic case of a 5.0 mm focal spot the CF can be improved by a factor of two due to RM: the 4.2 LP/cm bar pattern, which is the first bar pattern that cannot be resolved without RM, can be easily resolved with RM. For the realistic case of a 0.5 mm focus, all results show approximately the same CF. The NCC shows no significant dependency on RM when the source width is smaller than 2.0 mm (as in clinical CT). From 2.0 mm to 5.0 mm focal spot size increasing improvements can be observed with RM. Conclusions: Geometric RM in iterative reconstruction helps improving spatial resolution, if the ray cross-section is significantly larger than the ray sampling distance. In clinical CT, however, the ray is not much thicker than the distance between neighboring ray centers, as the focal spot size is small and detector crosstalk is negligi

  14. SU-E-I-78: Improving Prostatic Delineation Using Dual-Energy CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gersh, J; Fried, D [Gibbs Cancer Center ' Research Institute - Pelham, Greer, SC (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Visual prostatic definition is difficult using conventional CT. This is because the prostate is surrounded closely with tissue of similar electron density. Definition is further hindered when the region contains high-Z material (such as fiducial markers). Dual-energy CT (DECT) is a technique where images are rendered using two tube voltages during a single scan session. This study evaluates DECT as a means of improving prostatic volume delineation for radiation oncology. Methods: The patients were scanned using a Definition AS20 (Siemens Healthcare, Malvern, PA). This device uses a single-tube configuration, where two scans of differing energies are performed in serial. The scans are acquired with tube voltage of 80kVp and 140kVp. Following acquisition, these scan data were used to generate effective monoenergetic scans ranging from 40keV to 190keV. In the current study, the data were presented to observers using a novel program, which allows real-time adjustment of window, level, and effective keV; all while scrolling through volumetric slices. Three patients were scanned, each with a different high-contrast material in or around the prostate: I-125 seeds, gold fiducial markers, and prostatic calcifications. These images are compared to a weighted average of the 80kVp and 140kVP scans, which yield a scan similar to that of a 120 kVp scan, which is a common tube voltage in radiation oncology. Results: Prostatic definition improved in each case. Differentiation of soft tissue from surrounding adipose improved with lower keV, while higher keV provided a reduction of high-z artifacts. Furthermore, the dynamic adjustment of the keV allowed observers to better recognize regions of differing tissue composition within this relatively homogeneous area. Conclusion: By simultaneously providing the observer with the benefits of high-energy images and low-energy images, and allowing adjustment in real-time, improved imaging in highly homogeneous regions such as the male pelvis is achievable.

  15. Three-dimensional anisotropic adaptive filtering of projection data for noise reduction in cone beam CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maier, Andreas; Wigstroem, Lars; Hofmann, Hannes G.; Hornegger, Joachim; Zhu Lei; Strobel, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden); Pattern Recognition Laboratory, Department of Computer Science, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054, Erlangen (Germany); Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Siemens AG Healthcare, Forchheim 91301 (Germany); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The combination of quickly rotating C-arm gantry with digital flat panel has enabled the acquisition of three-dimensional data (3D) in the interventional suite. However, image quality is still somewhat limited since the hardware has not been optimized for CT imaging. Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the ability to improve image quality by reducing the noise level and therewith the radiation dose without introducing noticeable blurring. By applying the filtering prior to 3D reconstruction, noise-induced streak artifacts are reduced as compared to processing in the image domain. Methods: 3D anisotropic adaptive filtering was used to process an ensemble of 2D x-ray views acquired along a circular trajectory around an object. After arranging the input data into a 3D space (2D projections + angle), the orientation of structures was estimated using a set of differently oriented filters. The resulting tensor representation of local orientation was utilized to control the anisotropic filtering. Low-pass filtering is applied only along structures to maintain high spatial frequency components perpendicular to these. The evaluation of the proposed algorithm includes numerical simulations, phantom experiments, and in-vivo data which were acquired using an AXIOM Artis dTA C-arm system (Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany). Spatial resolution and noise levels were compared with and without adaptive filtering. A human observer study was carried out to evaluate low-contrast detectability. Results: The adaptive anisotropic filtering algorithm was found to significantly improve low-contrast detectability by reducing the noise level by half (reduction of the standard deviation in certain areas from 74 to 30 HU). Virtually no degradation of high contrast spatial resolution was observed in the modulation transfer function (MTF) analysis. Although the algorithm is computationally intensive, hardware acceleration using Nvidia's CUDA Interface provided an 8.9-fold speed-up of the processing (from 1336 to 150 s). Conclusions: Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the potential to substantially improve image quality and/or reduce the radiation dose required for obtaining 3D image data using cone beam CT.

  16. Volumetric quantification of lung nodules in CT with iterative reconstruction (ASiR and MBIR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Baiyu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Barnhart, Huiman [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Richard, Samuel [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Robins, Marthony [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Colsher, James [Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Volume quantifications of lung nodules with multidetector computed tomography (CT) images provide useful information for monitoring nodule developments. The accuracy and precision of the volume quantification, however, can be impacted by imaging and reconstruction parameters. This study aimed to investigate the impact of iterative reconstruction algorithms on the accuracy and precision of volume quantification with dose and slice thickness as additional variables.Methods: Repeated CT images were acquired from an anthropomorphic chest phantom with synthetic nodules (9.5 and 4.8 mm) at six dose levels, and reconstructed with three reconstruction algorithms [filtered backprojection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR), and model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR)] into three slice thicknesses. The nodule volumes were measured with two clinical software (A: Lung VCAR, B: iNtuition), and analyzed for accuracy and precision.Results: Precision was found to be generally comparable between FBP and iterative reconstruction with no statistically significant difference noted for different dose levels, slice thickness, and segmentation software. Accuracy was found to be more variable. For large nodules, the accuracy was significantly different between ASiR and FBP for all slice thicknesses with both software, and significantly different between MBIR and FBP for 0.625 mm slice thickness with Software A and for all slice thicknesses with Software B. For small nodules, the accuracy was more similar between FBP and iterative reconstruction, with the exception of ASIR vs FBP at 1.25 mm with Software A and MBIR vs FBP at 0.625 mm with Software A.Conclusions: The systematic difference between the accuracy of FBP and iterative reconstructions highlights the importance of extending current segmentation software to accommodate the image characteristics of iterative reconstructions. In addition, a calibration process may help reduce the dependency of accuracy on reconstruction algorithms, such that volumes quantified from scans of different reconstruction algorithms can be compared. The little difference found between the precision of FBP and iterative reconstructions could be a result of both iterative reconstruction's diminished noise reduction at the edge of the nodules as well as the loss of resolution at high noise levels with iterative reconstruction. The findings do not rule out potential advantage of IR that might be evident in a study that uses a larger number of nodules or repeated scans.

  17. Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rees, E.V.L.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Seol, Y.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To study physical properties of methane gas hydrate-bearing sediments, it is necessary to synthesize laboratory samples due to the limited availability of cores from natural deposits. X-ray computed tomography (CT) and other observations have shown gas hydrate to occur in a number of morphologies over a variety of sediment types. To aid in understanding formation and growth patterns of hydrate in sediments, methane hydrate was repeatedly formed in laboratory-packed sand samples and in a natural sediment core from the Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. CT scanning was performed during hydrate formation and decomposition steps, and periodically while the hydrate samples remained under stable conditions for up to 60 days. The investigation revealed the impact of water saturation on location and morphology of hydrate in both laboratory and natural sediments during repeated hydrate formations. Significant redistribution of hydrate and water in the samples was observed over both the short and long term.

  18. Cone-Beam CT with Flat-Panel-Detector Digital Angiography System: Early Experience in Abdominal Interventional Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirota, Shozo, E-mail: hirota-s@hyo-med.ac.jp; Nakao, Norio; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Maeda, Hiroaki; Ishikura, Reiichi; Miura, Koui; Sakamoto, Kiyoshi [Hyogo College of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Ueda, Ken [Hitachi Medical Corporation, Research and Development Center (Japan); Baba, Rika [Hitachi Limited, Central Research Laboratory (Japan)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system equipped with a large flat-panel detector. Data obtained by 200{sup o} rotation imaging are reconstructed by means of CBCT to generate three-dimensional images. We report the use of CBCT angiography using CBCT in 10 patients with 8 liver malignancies and 2 hypersplenisms during abdominal interventional procedures. CBCT was very useful for interventional radiologists to confirm a perfusion area of the artery catheter wedged on CT by injection of contrast media through the catheter tip, although the image quality was slightly degraded, scoring as 2.60 on average by streak artifacts. CBCT is space-saving because it does not require a CT system with a gantry, and it is also time-saving because it does not require the transfer of patients.

  19. SU-E-J-92: On-Line Cone Beam CT Based Planning for Emergency and Palliative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Held, M; Morin, O; Pouliot, J [UC San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate and develop the feasibility of on-line cone beam CT based planning for emergency and palliative radiotherapy treatments. Methods: Subsequent to phantom studies, a case library of 28 clinical megavoltage cone beam CT (MVCBCT) was built to assess dose-planning accuracies on MVCBCT for all anatomical sites. A simple emergency treatment plan was created on the MVCBCT and copied to its reference CT. The agreement between the dose distributions of each image pair was evaluated by the mean dose difference of the dose volume and the gamma index of the central 2D axial plane. An array of popular urgent and palliative cases was also evaluated for imaging component clearance and field-of-view. Results: The treatment cases were categorized into four groups (head and neck, thorax/spine, pelvis and extremities). Dose distributions for head and neck treatments were predicted accurately in all cases with a gamma index of >95% for 2% and 2 mm criteria. Thoracic spine treatments had a gamma index as low as 60% indicating a need for better uniformity correction and tissue density calibration. Small anatomy changes between CT and MVCBCT could contribute to local errors. Pelvis and sacral spine treatment cases had a gamma index between 90% and 98% for 3%/3 mm criteria. The limited FOV became an issue for large pelvis patients. Imaging clearance was difficult for cases where the tumor was positioned far off midline. Conclusion: The MVCBCT based dose planning and delivery approach is feasible in many treatment cases. Dose distributions for head and neck patients are unrestrictedly predictable. Some FOV restrictions apply to other treatment sites. Lung tissue is most challenging for accurate dose calculations given the current imaging filters and corrections. Additional clinical cases for extremities need to be included in the study to assess the full range of site-specific planning accuracies. This work is supported by Siemens.

  20. Automated segmentation of the pulmonary arteries in low-dose CT by vessel tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wala, Jeremiah; Lee, Jaesung; Jirapatnakul, Artit; Biancardi, Alberto; Reeves, Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fully automated method for top-down segmentation of the pulmonary arterial tree in low-dose thoracic CT images. The main basal pulmonary arteries are identified near the lung hilum by searching for candidate vessels adjacent to known airways, identified by our previously reported airway segmentation method. Model cylinders are iteratively fit to the vessels to track them into the lungs. Vessel bifurcations are detected by measuring the rate of change of vessel radii, and child vessels are segmented by initiating new trackers at bifurcation points. Validation is accomplished using our novel sparse surface (SS) evaluation metric. The SS metric was designed to quantify the magnitude of the segmentation error per vessel while significantly decreasing the manual marking burden for the human user. A total of 210 arteries and 205 veins were manually marked across seven test cases. 134/210 arteries were correctly segmented, with a specificity for arteries of 90%, and average segmentation error of 0.15 mm...

  1. CT-scan-monitored electrical-resistivity measurements show problems achieving homogeneous saturation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprunt, E.S.; Davis, R.M.; Muegge, E.L. (Mobil R and D Corp. (US)); Desai, K.P. (Saudi Aramco (SA))

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on x-ray computerized tomography (CT) scans obtained during measurement of the electrical resistivity of core samples which revealed some problems in obtaining uniform saturation along the lengths of the samples. The electrical resistivity of core samples is measured as a function of water saturation to determine the saturation exponent used in electric-log interpretation. An assumption in such tests is that the water saturation is uniformly distributed. Failure of this assumption can result in errors in the determination of the saturation exponent. Three problems were identified in obtaining homogeneous water saturation in two samples of a Middle Eastern carbonate grainstone: a stationary front formed in one sample at 1-psi oil/brine capillary pressure, a moving front formed at oil/brine capillary pressure {le}4 psi in samples tested in fresh mixed-wettability and cleaned water-wet states, and the heterogeneous fluid distribution caused by a rapidly moving front did not dissipate when the capillary pressure was eliminated in the samples.

  2. A Novel Time-Based Readout Scheme for a Combined PET-CT Detector Using APDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powolny, F; Hillemanns, H; Jarron, P; Lecoq, P; Meyer, T C; Moraes, D

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes CERN R&D work done in the framework of the European Commission's FP6 BioCare Project. The objective was to develop a novel "time-based" signal processing technique to read out LSO-APD photodetectors for medical imaging. An important aspect was to employ the technique in a combined scenario for both computer tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) with effectively no tradeoffs in efficiency and resolution compared to traditional single mode machines. This made the use of low noise and yet very high-speed monolithic front-end electronics essential so as to assure the required timing characteristics together with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Using APDs for photon detection, two chips, traditionally employed for particle physics, could be identified to meet the above criteria. Although both were not optimized for their intended new medical application, excellent performance in conjunction with LSO-APD sensors could be derived. Whereas a measured energy resolution of 16% (...

  3. Reduction of false positives on the rectal tube in computer-aided detection for CT colonography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iordanescu, Gheorghe; Summers, Ronald M. [Department of Radiology, National Institutes of Health Building 10, Room 1C660, 10 Center Drive MSC 1182, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1182 (United States)

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To eliminate false-positive (FP) polyp detections on the rectal tube (RT) in CT colonography (CTC) computer-aided detection (CAD). Methods: We use a three-stage approach to detect the RT: detect the RT shaft, track the tube to the tip and label all the voxels that belong to the RT. We applied our RT detection algorithm on a CTC dataset consisting of 80 datasets (40 patients scanned in both prone and supine positions). Two different types of RTs were present, characterized by differences in shaft/bulb diameters, wall intensities, and shape of tip. Results: The algorithm detected 90% of RT shafts and completely tracked 72% of them. We labeled all the voxels belonging to the completely tracked RTs (72%) and in 11 out of 80 (14%) cases the RT voxels were partially labeled. We obtained a 9.2% reduction of the FPs in the initial polyp candidates' population, and a 7.9% reduction of the FPs generated by our CAD system. None of the true-positive detections were mislabeled. Conclusions: The algorithm detects the RTs with good accuracy, is robust with respect to the two different types of RT used in our study, and is effective at reducing the number of RT FPs reported by our CAD system.

  4. Introduction of heat map to fidelity assessment of compressed CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hyunna; Kim, Bohyoung; Seo, Jinwook; Park, Seongjin; Shin, Yeong-Gil [School of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-ro, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Joong [Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine and Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study aimed to introduce heat map, a graphical data presentation method widely used in gene expression experiments, to the presentation and interpretation of image fidelity assessment data of compressed computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: The authors used actual assessment data that consisted of five radiologists' responses to 720 computed tomography images compressed using both Joint Photographic Experts Group 2000 (JPEG2000) 2D and JPEG2000 3D compressions. They additionally created data of two artificial radiologists, which were generated by partly modifying the data from two human radiologists. Results: For each compression, the entire data set, including the variations among radiologists and among images, could be compacted into a small color-coded grid matrix of the heat map. A difference heat map depicted the advantage of 3D compression over 2D compression. Dendrograms showing hierarchical agglomerative clustering results were added to the heat maps to illustrate the similarities in the data patterns among radiologists and among images. The dendrograms were used to identify two artificial radiologists as outliers, whose data were created by partly modifying the responses of two human radiologists. Conclusions: The heat map can illustrate a quick visual extract of the overall data as well as the entirety of large complex data in a compact space while visualizing the variations among observers and among images. The heat map with the dendrograms can be used to identify outliers or to classify observers and images based on the degree of similarity in the response patterns.

  5. SU-E-J-190: Characterization of Radiation Induced CT Number Changes in Tumor and Normal Lung During Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, C; Liu, F; Tai, A; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin Milwaukee WI (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To measure CT number (CTN) changes in tumor and normal lung as a function of radiation therapy (RT) dose during the course of RT delivery for lung cancer using daily IGRT CT images and single respiration phase CT images. Methods: 4D CT acquired during planning simulation and daily 3D CT acquired during daily IGRT for 10 lung cancer cases randomly selected in terms of age, caner type and stage, were analyzed using an in-house developed software tool. All patients were treated in 2 Gy fractions to primary tumors and involved nodal regions. Regions enclosed by a series of isodose surfaces in normal lung were delineated. The obtained contours along with target contours (GTVs) were populated to each singlephase planning CT and daily CT. CTN in term of Hounsfield Unit (HU) of each voxel in these delineated regions were collectively analyzed using histogram, mean, mode and linear correlation. Results: Respiration induced normal lung CTN change, as analyzed from single-phase planning CTs, ranged from 9 to 23 (±2) HU for the patients studied. Normal lung CTN change was as large as 50 (±12) HU over the entire treatment course, was dose and patient dependent and was measurable with dose changes as low as 1.5 Gy. For patients with obvious tumor volume regression, CTN within the GTV drops monotonically as much as 10 (±1) HU during the early fractions with a total dose of 20 Gy delivered. The GTV and CTN reductions are significantly correlated with correlation coefficient >0.95. Conclusion: Significant RT dose induced CTN changes in lung tissue and tumor region can be observed during even the early phase of RT delivery, and may potentially be used for early prediction of radiation response. Single respiration phase CT images have dramatically reduced statistical noise in ROIs, making daily dose response evaluation possible.

  6. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is required for full functionality and has a novel twist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madauss, Kevin P.; Burkhart, William A.; Consler, Thomas G.; Cowan, David J.; Gottschalk, William K.; Miller, Aaron B; Short, Steven A.; Tran, Thuy B.; Williams, Shawn P.; (GSKNC); (Duke); (UNC)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) may prevent lipid-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, making the enzyme an attractive pharmaceutical target. Although the enzyme is highly conserved amongst animals, only the yeast enzyme structure is available for rational drug design. The use of biophysical assays has permitted the identification of a specific C-terminal truncation of the 826-residue human ACC2 carboxyl transferase (CT) domain that is both functionally competent to bind inhibitors and crystallizes in their presence. This C-terminal truncation led to the determination of the human ACC2 CT domain-CP-640186 complex crystal structure, which revealed distinctions from the yeast-enzyme complex. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is comprised of three intertwined -helices that extend outwards from the enzyme on the opposite side to the ligand-binding site. Differences in the observed inhibitor conformation between the yeast and human structures are caused by differing residues in the binding pocket.

  7. Wavelet based characterization of ex vivo vertebral trabecular bone structure with 3T MRI compared to microCT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krug, R; Carballido-Gamio, J; Burghardt, A; Haase, S; Sedat, J W; Moss, W C; Majumdar, S

    2005-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Trabecular bone structure and bone density contribute to the strength of bone and are important in the study of osteoporosis. Wavelets are a powerful tool to characterize and quantify texture in an image. In this study the thickness of trabecular bone was analyzed in 8 cylindrical cores of the vertebral spine. Images were obtained from 3 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and micro-computed tomography ({micro}CT). Results from the wavelet based analysis of trabecular bone were compared with standard two-dimensional structural parameters (analogous to bone histomorphometry) obtained using mean intercept length (MR images) and direct 3D distance transformation methods ({micro}CT images). Additionally, the bone volume fraction was determined from MR images. We conclude that the wavelet based analyses delivers comparable results to the established MR histomorphometric measurements. The average deviation in trabecular thickness was less than one pixel size between the wavelet and the standard approach for both MR and {micro}CT analysis. Since the wavelet based method is less sensitive to image noise, we see an advantage of wavelet analysis of trabecular bone for MR imaging when going to higher resolution.

  8. Combined iterative reconstruction and image-domain decomposition for dual energy CT using total-variation regularization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xue; Niu, Tianye; Zhu, Lei, E-mail: leizhu@gatech.edu [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)] [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Dual-energy CT (DECT) is being increasingly used for its capability of material decomposition and energy-selective imaging. A generic problem of DECT, however, is that the decomposition process is unstable in the sense that the relative magnitude of decomposed signals is reduced due to signal cancellation while the image noise is accumulating from the two CT images of independent scans. Direct image decomposition, therefore, leads to severe degradation of signal-to-noise ratio on the resultant images. Existing noise suppression techniques are typically implemented in DECT with the procedures of reconstruction and decomposition performed independently, which do not explore the statistical properties of decomposed images during the reconstruction for noise reduction. In this work, the authors propose an iterative approach that combines the reconstruction and the signal decomposition procedures to minimize the DECT image noise without noticeable loss of resolution. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated as an optimization problem, which balances the data fidelity and total variation of decomposed images in one framework, and the decomposition step is carried out iteratively together with reconstruction. The noise in the CT images from the proposed algorithm becomes well correlated even though the noise of the raw projections is independent on the two CT scans. Due to this feature, the proposed algorithm avoids noise accumulation during the decomposition process. The authors evaluate the method performance on noise suppression and spatial resolution using phantom studies and compare the algorithm with conventional denoising approaches as well as combined iterative reconstruction methods with different forms of regularization. Results: On the Catphan©600 phantom, the proposed method outperforms the existing denoising methods on preserving spatial resolution at the same level of noise suppression, i.e., a reduction of noise standard deviation by one order of magnitude. This improvement is mainly attributed to the high noise correlation in the CT images reconstructed by the proposed algorithm. Iterative reconstruction using different regularization, including quadratic orq-generalized Gaussian Markov random field regularization, achieves similar noise suppression from high noise correlation. However, the proposed TV regularization obtains a better edge preserving performance. Studies of electron density measurement also show that our method reduces the average estimation error from 9.5% to 7.1%. On the anthropomorphic head phantom, the proposed method suppresses the noise standard deviation of the decomposed images by a factor of ?14 without blurring the fine structures in the sinus area. Conclusions: The authors propose a practical method for DECT imaging reconstruction, which combines the image reconstruction and material decomposition into one optimization framework. Compared to the existing approaches, our method achieves a superior performance on DECT imaging with respect to decomposition accuracy, noise reduction, and spatial resolution.

  9. The effect of spatial micro-CT image resolution and surface complexity on the morphological 3D analysis of open porous structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pyka, Grzegorz, E-mail: gregory.pyka@mtm.kuleuven.be [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Kerckhofs, Greet [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Biomechanics Research Unit, Université de Liege, Chemin des Chevreuils 1 - BAT 52/3, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Schrooten, Jan; Wevers, Martine [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In material science microfocus X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) is one of the most popular non-destructive techniques to visualise and quantify the internal structure of materials in 3D. Despite constant system improvements, state-of-the-art micro-CT images can still hold several artefacts typical for X-ray CT imaging that hinder further image-based processing, structural and quantitative analysis. For example spatial resolution is crucial for an appropriate characterisation as the voxel size essentially influences the partial volume effect. However, defining the adequate image resolution is not a trivial aspect and understanding the correlation between scan parameters like voxel size and the structural properties is crucial for comprehensive material characterisation using micro-CT. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the spatial image resolution on the micro-CT based morphological analysis of three-dimensional (3D) open porous structures with a high surface complexity. In particular the correlation between the local surface properties and the accuracy of the micro-CT-based macro-morphology of 3D open porous Ti6Al4V structures produced by selective laser melting (SLM) was targeted and revealed for rough surfaces a strong dependence of the resulting structure characteristics on the scan resolution. Reducing the surface complexity by chemical etching decreased the sensitivity of the overall morphological analysis to the spatial image resolution and increased the detection limit. This study showed that scan settings and image processing parameters need to be customized to the material properties, morphological parameters under investigation and the desired final characteristics (in relation to the intended functional use). Customization of the scan resolution can increase the reliability of the micro-CT based analysis and at the same time reduce its operating costs. - Highlights: • We examine influence of the image resolution on ?CT-based morphological analysis. • Surface properties influence accuracy of ?CT-based morphology of porous structures. • Total porosity was the least sensitive to surface complexity and scan voxel size. • The beam thickness analysis was overestimated by the surface roughness. • Voxel size customization can significantly reduce a cost of the ?CT-based analysis.

  10. Noise suppression in reconstruction of low-Z target megavoltage cone-beam CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Jing; Robar, James; Guan Huaiqun [Department of Radiation Oncology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75235 (United States); Departments of Radiation Oncology and Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H1V7 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Saint Vincent Hospital, Worcester, Massachusetts 01608 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To improve the image contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratio for low-Z target megavoltage cone-beam CT (MV CBCT) using a statistical projection noise suppression algorithm based on the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criterion. Methods: Projection images of a contrast phantom, a CatPhan{sup Registered-Sign} 600 phantom and a head phantom were acquired by a Varian 2100EX LINAC with a low-Z (Al) target and low energy x-ray beam (2.5 MeV) at a low-dose level and at a high-dose level. The projections were then processed by minimizing the PWLS objective function. The weighted least square (WLS) term models the noise of measured projection and the penalty term enforces the smoothing constraints of the projection image. The variance of projection data was chosen as the weight for the PWLS objective function and it determined the contribution of each measurement. An anisotropic quadratic form penalty that incorporates the gradient information of projection image was used to preserve edges during noise reduction. Low-Z target MV CBCT images were reconstructed by the FDK algorithm after each projection was processed by the PWLS smoothing. Results: Noise in low-Z target MV CBCT images were greatly suppressed after the PWLS projection smoothing, without noticeable sacrifice of the spatial resolution. Depending on the choice of smoothing parameter, the CNR of selected regions of interest in the PWLS processed low-dose low-Z target MV CBCT image can be higher than the corresponding high-dose image.Conclusion: The CNR of low-Z target MV CBCT images was substantially improved by using PWLS projection smoothing. The PWLS projection smoothing algorithm allows the reconstruction of high contrast low-Z target MV CBCT image with a total dose of as low as 2.3 cGy.

  11. CT measurements of two-phase flow in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, R.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The simulation of flow in naturally fractured reservoirs commonly divides the reservoir into two continua - the matrix system and the fracture system. Flow equations are written presuming that the primary flow between grid blocks occurs through the fracture system and that the primary fluid storage is in the matrix system. The dual porosity formulation of the equations assumes that there is no flow between matrix blocks while the dual permeability formulation allows fluid movement between matrix blocks. Since most of the fluid storage is contained in the matrix, recovery is dominated by the transfer of fluid from the matrix to the high conductivity fractures. The physical mechanisms influencing this transfer have been evaluated primarily through numerical studies. Relatively few experimental studies have investigated the transfer mechanisms. Early studies focused on the prediction of reservoir recoveries from the results of scaled experiments on single reservoir blocks. Recent experiments have investigated some of the mechanisms that are dominant in gravity drainage situations and in small block imbibition displacements. The mechanisms active in multiphase flow in fractured media need to be further illuminated, since some of the experimental results appear to be contradictory. This report describes the design, construction, and preliminary results of an experiment that studies imbibition displacement in two fracture blocks. Multiphase (oil/water) displacements will be conducted at the same rate on three core configurations. The configurations are a compact core, a two-block system with a 1 mm spacer between the blocks, and a two-block system with no spacer. The blocks are sealed in epoxy so that saturation measurements can be made throughout the displacement experiments using a Computed Tomography (CT) scanner.

  12. MicroCT-Based Skeletal Models for Use in Tomographic Voxel Phantoms for Radiological Protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesley Bolch

    2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT The University of Florida (UF) proposes to develop two high-resolution image-based skeletal dosimetry models for direct use by ICRP Committee 2’s Task Group on Dose Calculation in their forthcoming Reference Voxel Male (RVM) and Reference Voxel Female (RVF) whole-body dosimetry phantoms. These two phantoms are CT-based, and thus do not have the image resolution to delineate and perform radiation transport modeling of the individual marrow cavities and bone trabeculae throughout their skeletal structures. Furthermore, new and innovative 3D microimaging techniques will now be required for the skeletal tissues following Committee 2’s revision of the target tissues of relevance for radiogenic bone cancer induction. This target tissue had been defined in ICRP Publication 30 as a 10-?m cell layer on all bone surfaces of trabecular and cortical bone. The revised target tissue is now a 50-?m layer within the marrow cavities of trabecular bone only and is exclusive of the marrow adipocytes. Clearly, this new definition requires the use of 3D microimages of the trabecular architecture not available from past 2D optical studies of the adult skeleton. With our recent acquisition of two relatively young cadavers (males of age 18-years and 40-years), we will develop a series of reference skeletal models that can be directly applied to (1) the new ICRP reference voxel man and female phantoms developed for the ICRP, and (2) pediatric phantoms developed to target the ICRP reference children. Dosimetry data to be developed will include absorbed fractions for internal beta and alpha-particle sources, as well as photon and neutron fluence-to-dose response functions for direct use in external dosimetry studies of the ICRP reference workers and members of the general public

  13. PO Box 5786 Ithaca, NY 148525786

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    a case of "kennel cough", a single serum sample can determine whether the animal has been infected that cough are not infected with canine influenza virus. The standard respirato ry pathogens of dogs have

  14. US MidAtl NY Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Electricity consumption in New York homes is much lower than the U.S. average, because...

  15. Seneca Army Depot EPA ID#: NY0213820830

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and metals. Soils are contaminated with heavy metals, VOCs and SVOCs. Cleanup Approach The site is being. In response to EPA and NYSDEC comments on the Draft Feasibility Study (FS), the Army performed ground water drinking water from private wells within a 3-mile radius of the depot. The Army has stored and disposed

  16. Offshore Wind in NY State (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NYSERDA has expressed support for the development of offshore wind and committed funding to several publicly-available assessments that measure the potential energy benefits and environmental...

  17. Massena, NY Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0Feet)Year Jan Feb Marper2.7 2011

  18. Caldwell Hall Ithaca, NY 14853-2602

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    .P.S.(A.L.S.) only) farm management and production economics marketing and food distribution public policy analysis ART Creative Visual Arts [M.F.A.] painting photography printmaking sculpture studio art ASIAN Engineering [M.S., Ph.D., M.Eng., M.P.S.(A.L.S.)] bioenergy and integrated energy systems bioenvironmental

  19. Caldwell Hall Ithaca, NY 14853-2602

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazzaro, Brian

    .P.S.(A.L.S.) only) farm management and production economics marketing and food distribution public policy analysis ART Creative Visual Arts [M.F.A.] painting photography printmaking sculpture studio art ASIAN STUDIES and integrated energy systems bioenvironmental engineering biological engineering bioprocess engineering

  20. Projection Radiography Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, NY 11201

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suel, Torsten

    : · The produced x-ray power Px (in[W]) is given by: ­ Material constant k = 1.1×10-9 for Tungsten (Z=74). 2 tube tubeI V I 2 / : x-ray production efficiency x tube tube tube tube tube x tube tube P k Z V I kZ V P P P sizes) · Anode ­ Tungsten, Zw = 74, Tmelt = 2250 ºC ­ Embedded in copper for heat dissipation ­ Angled

  1. Microsoft Word - FUSRAP Colonie NY.rtf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F ENaturalWaterDurango,ExecutiveColonie

  2. Microsoft Word - NY.17-16.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:FEngineers® NewHydrologicPrinted with

  3. Western NY Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED JumpHills, NewWestbrook, Minnesota:Western Ethanol

  4. Waddington, NY Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810 0 0

  5. US MidAtl NY Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalThe Outlook269,023Year69,023US Virgin120 USMidAtl

  6. AER NY Kinetics LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 WindtheEnergySulfonate asAEE Solar Jump to: navigation,AEPAER

  7. NlZWYORK4,N.Y.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN .METALS~ C~RPO~~XON 41 BROAD

  8. Category:Rochester, NY | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformationCashtonGo BackLocation Media in category

  9. GE Global Research in Niskayuna, NY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey Campbell is

  10. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W., E-mail: jason.sohn@case.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and University Hospitals of Cleveland, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Sloan, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system—MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was “printed” using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm). A passing rate of 99% was measured in areas of above 40% of the prescription dose. The final inverse treatment plan was comprised of 43 beams ranging from 5 to 12.5 mm in diameter (2.5 mm size increments are available up to 15 mm in diameter collimation). Using the Xsight Spine Tracking module, the CyberKnife system could not reliably identify and track the tiny mouse spine; however, the CyberKnife system could identify and track the fiducial markers on the 3D mold.In vivo positional accuracy analysis using the 3D mold generated a mean error of 1.41 mm ± 0.73 mm when fiducial markers were used for position tracking. Analysis of the dissected brain confirmed the ability to target the correct brain volume. Conclusions: With the use of a stereotactic body mold with fiducial markers, microCT imaging, and resolution down-sampling, the CyberKnife system can successfully perform small-animal radiotherapy studies.

  11. Tumor Tracking Method Based on a Deformable 4D CT Breathing Motion Model Driven by an External Surface Surrogate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fassi, Aurora, E-mail: aurora.fassi@mail.polimi.it [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Schaerer, Joël; Fernandes, Mathieu [CREATIS, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, Université Lyon 1, INSA-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon (France); Riboldi, Marco [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Bioengineering Unit, CNAO Foundation, Pavia (Italy); Sarrut, David [CREATIS, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, Université Lyon 1, INSA-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon (France); Baroni, Guido [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Bioengineering Unit, CNAO Foundation, Pavia (Italy)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a tumor tracking method based on a surrogate-driven motion model, which provides noninvasive dynamic localization of extracranial targets for the compensation of respiration-induced intrafraction motion in high-precision radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The proposed approach is based on a patient-specific breathing motion model, derived a priori from 4-dimensional planning computed tomography (CT) images. Model parameters (respiratory baseline, amplitude, and phase) are retrieved and updated at each treatment fraction according to in-room radiography acquisition and optical surface imaging. The baseline parameter is adapted to the interfraction variations obtained from the daily cone beam (CB) CT scan. The respiratory amplitude and phase are extracted from an external breathing surrogate, estimated from the displacement of the patient thoracoabdominal surface, acquired with a noninvasive surface imaging device. The developed method was tested on a database of 7 lung cancer patients, including the synchronized information on internal and external respiratory motion during a CBCT scan. Results: About 30 seconds of simultaneous acquisition of CBCT and optical surface images were analyzed for each patient. The tumor trajectories identified in CBCT projections were used as reference and compared with the target trajectories estimated from surface displacement with the a priori motion model. The resulting absolute differences between the reference and estimated tumor motion along the 2 image dimensions ranged between 0.7 and 2.4 mm; the measured phase shifts did not exceed 7% of the breathing cycle length. Conclusions: We investigated a tumor tracking method that integrates breathing motion information provided by the 4-dimensional planning CT with surface imaging at the time of treatment, representing an alternative approach to point-based external–internal correlation models. Although an in-room radiograph-based assessment of the reliability of the motion model is envisaged, the developed technique does not involve the estimation and continuous update of correlation parameters, thus requiring a less intense use of invasive imaging.

  12. A Fully Automated Method for CT-on-Rails-Guided Online Adaptive Planning for Prostate Cancer Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiaoqiang; Quan, Enzhuo M.; Li, Yupeng [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Pan, Xiaoning [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, Tyler, Texas (United States); Zhou, Yin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xiaochun [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Du, Weiliang [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Johnson, Jennifer L. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuban, Deborah A.; Lee, Andrew K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study was designed to validate a fully automated adaptive planning (AAP) method which integrates automated recontouring and automated replanning to account for interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer patients receiving adaptive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on daily repeated computed tomography (CT)-on-rails images. Methods and Materials: Nine prostate cancer patients treated at our institution were randomly selected. For the AAP method, contours on each repeat CT image were automatically generated by mapping the contours from the simulation CT image using deformable image registration. An in-house automated planning tool incorporated into the Pinnacle treatment planning system was used to generate the original and the adapted IMRT plans. The cumulative dose–volume histograms (DVHs) of the target and critical structures were calculated based on the manual contours for all plans and compared with those of plans generated by the conventional method, that is, shifting the isocenters by aligning the images based on the center of the volume (COV) of prostate (prostate COV-aligned). Results: The target coverage from our AAP method for every patient was acceptable, while 1 of the 9 patients showed target underdosing from prostate COV-aligned plans. The normalized volume receiving at least 70 Gy (V{sub 70}), and the mean dose of the rectum and bladder were reduced by 8.9%, 6.4 Gy and 4.3%, 5.3 Gy, respectively, for the AAP method compared with the values obtained from prostate COV-aligned plans. Conclusions: The AAP method, which is fully automated, is effective for online replanning to compensate for target dose deficits and critical organ overdosing caused by interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer.

  13. Using Synchrotron X-Ray Nano-CT to Characterize SOFC Electrode Microstructures in Three-Dimensions at Operating Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shearing, P.R.; Bradley, R.S.; Gelb, J.; Lee, S.N.; Atkinson, A.; Withers, P.J.; Brandon, N.P. (Manchester); (Xradia); (ICL)

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, developments in tomography tools have provided unprecedented insight into the microstructure of electrodes for solid oxide fuel cells, enabling researchers to establish direct links between electrode microstructure and electrochemical performance. Here we present results of high resolution, synchrotron X-ray nano computed tomography experiments, which have enabled microstructural characterisation of a mixed ionic electronic conducting lanthanum strontium cobalt iron oxide (LSCF) cathode with sub-50nm resolution at operating temperature. Using the uniquely non-destructive nano-CT platform, it is possible to characterise microstructural evolution processes associated with heating and operation in-situ.

  14. Daily dose monitoring with atlas-based auto-segmentation on diagnostic quality CT for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wen; Vassil, Andrew; Xia, Ping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Zhong, Yahua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan 430071 (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of daily dose monitoring using a patient specific atlas-based autosegmentation method on diagnostic quality verification images.Methods: Seven patients, who were treated for prostate cancer with intensity modulated radiotherapy under daily imaging guidance of a CT-on-rails system, were selected for this study. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were manually contoured on the first six and last seven sets of daily verification images. For each patient, three patient specific atlases were constructed using manual contours from planning CT alone (1-image atlas), planning CT plus first three verification CTs (4-image atlas), and planning CT plus first six verification CTs (7-image atlas). These atlases were subsequently applied to the last seven verification image sets of the same patient to generate the auto-contours. Daily dose was calculated by applying the original treatment plans to the daily beam isocenters. The autocontours and manual contours were compared geometrically using the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), and dosimetrically using the dose to 99% of the prostate CTV (D99) and the D5 of rectum and bladder.Results: The DSC of the autocontours obtained with the 4-image atlases were 87.0%± 3.3%, 84.7%± 8.6%, and 93.6%± 4.3% for the prostate, rectum, and bladder, respectively. These indices were higher than those from the 1-image atlases (p < 0.01) and comparable to those from the 7-image atlases (p > 0.05). Daily prostate D99 of the autocontours was comparable to those of the manual contours (p= 0.55). For the bladder and rectum, the daily D5 were 95.5%± 5.9% and 99.1%± 2.6% of the planned D5 for the autocontours compared to 95.3%± 6.7% (p= 0.58) and 99.8%± 2.3% (p < 0.01) for the manual contours.Conclusions: With patient specific 4-image atlases, atlas-based autosegmentation can adequately facilitate daily dose monitoring for prostate cancer.

  15. Technical Note: Skin thickness measurements using high-resolution flat-panel cone-beam dedicated breast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi Linxi; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); O'Connell, Avice M. [Department of Radiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the mean and range of location-averaged breast skin thickness using high-resolution dedicated breast CT for use in Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients. Methods: This study retrospectively analyzed image data from a clinical study investigating dedicated breast CT. An algorithm similar to that described by Huang et al.['The effect of skin thickness determined using breast CT on mammographic dosimetry,' Med. Phys. 35(4), 1199-1206 (2008)] was used to determine the skin thickness in 137 dedicated breast CT volumes from 136 women. The location-averaged mean breast skin thickness for each breast was estimated and the study population mean and range were determined. Pathology results were available for 132 women, and were used to investigate if the distribution of location-averaged mean breast skin thickness varied with pathology. The effect of surface fitting to account for breast curvature was also studied. Results: The study mean ({+-} interbreast SD) for breast skin thickness was 1.44 {+-} 0.25 mm (range: 0.87-2.34 mm), which was in excellent agreement with Huang et al. Based on pathology, pair-wise statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney test) indicated that at the 0.05 significance level, there were no significant difference in the location-averaged mean breast skin thickness distributions between the groups: benign vs malignant (p= 0.223), benign vs hyperplasia (p= 0.651), hyperplasia vs malignant (p= 0.229), and malignant vs nonmalignant (p= 0.172). Conclusions: Considering this study used a different clinical prototype system, and the study participants were from a different geographical location, the observed agreement between the two studies suggests that the choice of 1.45 mm thick skin layer comprising the epidermis and the dermis for breast dosimetry is appropriate. While some benign and malignant conditions could cause skin thickening, in this study cohort the location-averaged mean breast skin thickness distributions did not differ significantly with pathology. The study also underscored the importance of considering breast curvature in estimating breast skin thickness.

  16. Final environment impact report supplement: Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a supplement to the final environmental impact report (FEIR) published in October 1994 on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electrification from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. The purpose of this supplement is to provide additional information relative to: the Roxbury Substation Alternative Analysis; an expanded discussion on mitigation of potential adverse impacts; draft Section 61 findings; the Memorandum of Understanding between Amtrak and the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) for Route 128 Station; Amtrak`s draft outreach program; and to address other Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act concerns.

  17. Spiral CT Quantification of Aorto-Renal Calcification and Its Use in the Detection of Atheromatous Renal Artery Stenosis: A Study in 42 Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gayard, Pierre; Garcier, Jean-Marc; Boire, Jean-Yves; Ravel, Anne; Perez, Nessim; Privat, Christian; Lucien, Pascal; Viallet, Jean-Francois; Boyer, Louis [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, BP 69, F-63003 Clermont Ferrand (France)

    2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate whether a correlation exists between aortic and renal arterial calcifications detected with spiral CT and significant angiographic renal artery stenosis (RAS).Methods: Forty-two patients (mean age 67 years, range 37-84 years), of whom 24 were hypertensive, prospectively underwent abdominal helical CT and aortic and renal arteriography. The 3-mm thickness CT scans (pitch = 1) were reconstructed each millimeter. A manual outline of the renal artery including its ostial portion was produced. Calcific hyperdensities were defined as areas of density more than 130 HU. CT data were compared with the presence or absence of RAS on angiography (24 cases); hypertension and age were taken into account (Mann-Whitney U-test).Results: CT detection and quantification appeared to be reliable and reproductible. We did not find any correlation between aortic and renal arterial calcifications and RAS, even for the patients above 65 years, with or without hypertension. There was no correlation either between calcifications and hypertension in patients without RAS. Conclusion: In this population, aortic and renal arterial calcifications have no predictive value for RAS.

  18. Comments on Draft Final Remedial Investigation (RI) for the Quarry Residuals Operable Unit, and Draft Final Baseline Risk Assessment (BRA) for the Quarry Residuals Operable Unit of the Weldon Spring Site, Both Dated April 1997. QY-500-501-1.03.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertowni5W 95.5x-L* d! CT.J>?j 1.29

  19. The Physiological Impact of Lighting

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - Arranged to Excert High Melanopic Stimulation * LED Spectrum with coolwhite and blue * 12000 K with Ra80 13 WojtysiakDoEPhysiological Impact.pptx | CT RI APP LQ | AW...

  20. Radiofrequency Ablation of Non-Small-Cell Carcinoma of the Lung Under Real-Time FDG PET CT Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoellnast, Helmut; Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Nehmeh, Sadek A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics (United States); Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Thornton, Raymond H.; Solomon, Stephen B., E-mail: solomons@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established method in treatment of patients with lung carcinomas who are not candidates for surgical resection. Usually computed tomographic (CT) guidance is used for the procedure, thus enabling needle placement and permitting evaluation of complications such as pneumothorax and bleeding. {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is generally used for tumor activity assessment and is therefore useful in follow-up after tumor treatment. A method that provides real-time image-based monitoring of RFA to ensure complete tumor ablation would be a valuable tool. In this report, we describe the behavior of preinjected FDG during PET CT-guided RFA of a non-small-cell lung carcinoma and discuss the value of FDG as a tool to provide intraprocedure monitor ablation. The size and the form of the activity changed during ablation. Ablation led to increase of the size and blurring and irregularity of the contour compared to pretreatment imaging. The maximal standardized uptake value decreased only slightly during the procedure. Therefore, before RFA, FDG PET can guide initial needle placement, but it does not serve as a monitoring tool to evaluate residual viable tissue during the procedure.

  1. SU-E-I-82: Improving CT Image Quality for Radiation Therapy Using Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms and Slightly Increasing Imaging Doses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noid, G; Chen, G; Tai, A; Li, X [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms are developed to improve CT image quality (IQ) by reducing noise without diminishing spatial resolution or contrast. For CT in radiation therapy (RT), slightly increasing imaging dose to improve IQ may be justified if it can substantially enhance structure delineation. The purpose of this study is to investigate and to quantify the IQ enhancement as a result of increasing imaging doses and using IR algorithms. Methods: CT images were acquired for phantoms, built to evaluate IQ metrics including spatial resolution, contrast and noise, with a variety of imaging protocols using a CT scanner (Definition AS Open, Siemens) installed inside a Linac room. Representative patients were scanned once the protocols were optimized. Both phantom and patient scans were reconstructed using the Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) and the Filtered Back Projection (FBP) methods. IQ metrics of the obtained CTs were compared. Results: IR techniques are demonstrated to preserve spatial resolution as measured by the point spread function and reduce noise in comparison to traditional FBP. Driven by the reduction in noise, the contrast to noise ratio is doubled by adopting the highest SAFIRE strength. As expected, increasing imaging dose reduces noise for both SAFIRE and FBP reconstructions. The contrast to noise increases from 3 to 5 by increasing the dose by a factor of 4. Similar IQ improvement was observed on the CTs for selected patients with pancreas and prostrate cancers. Conclusion: The IR techniques produce a measurable enhancement to CT IQ by reducing the noise. Increasing imaging dose further reduces noise independent of the IR techniques. The improved CT enables more accurate delineation of tumors and/or organs at risk during RT planning and delivery guidance.

  2. SU-E-J-219: Quantitative Evaluation of Motion Effects On Accuracy of Image-Guided Radiotherapy with Fiducial Markers Using CT Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, I; Oyewale, S; Ahmad, S; Algan, O [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Alsbou, N [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ada, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate quantitatively patient motion effects on the localization accuracy of image-guided radiation with fiducial markers using axial CT (ACT), helical CT (HCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) using modeling and experimental phantom studies. Methods: Markers with different lengths (2.5 mm, 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm) were inserted in a mobile thorax phantom which was imaged using ACT, HCT and CBCT. The phantom moved with sinusoidal motion with amplitudes ranging 0–20 mm and a frequency of 15 cycles-per-minute. Three parameters that include: apparent marker lengths, center position and distance between the centers of the markers were measured in the different CT images of the mobile phantom. A motion mathematical model was derived to predict the variations in the previous three parameters and their dependence on the motion in the different imaging modalities. Results: In CBCT, the measured marker lengths increased linearly with increase in motion amplitude. For example, the apparent length of the 10 mm marker was about 20 mm when phantom moved with amplitude of 5 mm. Although the markers have elongated, the center position and the distance between markers remained at the same position for different motion amplitudes in CBCT. These parameters were not affected by motion frequency and phase in CBCT. In HCT and ACT, the measured marker length, center and distance between markers varied irregularly with motion parameters. The apparent lengths of the markers varied with inverse of the phantom velocity which depends on motion frequency and phase. Similarly the center position and distance between markers varied inversely with phantom speed. Conclusion: Motion may lead to variations in maker length, center position and distance between markers using CT imaging. These effects should be considered in patient setup using image-guided radiation therapy based on fiducial markers matching using 2D-radiographs or volumetric CT imaging.

  3. HDRMC, an accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculator for high dose rate brachytherapy with CT-compatible applicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chibani, Omar, E-mail: omar.chibani@fccc.edu; C-M Ma, Charlie [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)] [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To present a new accelerated Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The new code (HDRMC) accounts for both tissue and nontissue heterogeneities (applicator and contrast medium). Methods: HDRMC uses a fast ray-tracing technique and detailed physics algorithms to transport photons through a 3D mesh of voxels representing the patient anatomy with applicator and contrast medium included. A precalculated phase space file for the{sup 192}Ir source is used as source term. HDRM is calibrated to calculated absolute dose for real plans. A postprocessing technique is used to include the exact density and composition of nontissue heterogeneities in the 3D phantom. Dwell positions and angular orientations of the source are reconstructed using data from the treatment planning system (TPS). Structure contours are also imported from the TPS to recalculate dose-volume histograms. Results: HDRMC was first benchmarked against the MCNP5 code for a single source in homogenous water and for a loaded gynecologic applicator in water. The accuracy of the voxel-based applicator model used in HDRMC was also verified by comparing 3D dose distributions and dose-volume parameters obtained using 1-mm{sup 3} versus 2-mm{sup 3} phantom resolutions. HDRMC can calculate the 3D dose distribution for a typical HDR cervix case with 2-mm resolution in 5 min on a single CPU. Examples of heterogeneity effects for two clinical cases (cervix and esophagus) were demonstrated using HDRMC. The neglect of tissue heterogeneity for the esophageal case leads to the overestimate of CTV D90, CTV D100, and spinal cord maximum dose by 3.2%, 3.9%, and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: A fast Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations which does not require a prebuilt applicator model is developed for those HDR brachytherapy treatments that use CT-compatible applicators. Tissue and nontissue heterogeneities should be taken into account in modern HDR brachytherapy planning.

  4. CT-guided Bipolar and Multipolar Radiofrequency Ablation (RF Ablation) of Renal Cell Carcinoma: Specific Technical Aspects and Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, C. M., E-mail: christof.sommer@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Lemm, G.; Hohenstein, E. [Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology (Germany); Bellemann, N.; Stampfl, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Goezen, A. S.; Rassweiler, J. [Clinic for Urology, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH (Germany); Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Pereira, P. L. [Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology (Germany)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of CT-guided bipolar and multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to analyze specific technical aspects between both technologies. Methods. We included 22 consecutive patients (3 women; age 74.2 {+-} 8.6 years) after 28 CT-guided bipolar or multipolar RF ablations of 28 RCCs (diameter 2.5 {+-} 0.8 cm). Procedures were performed with a commercially available RF system (Celon AG Olympus, Berlin, Germany). Technical aspects of RF ablation procedures (ablation mode [bipolar or multipolar], number of applicators and ablation cycles, overall ablation time and deployed energy, and technical success rate) were analyzed. Clinical results (local recurrence-free survival and local tumor control rate, renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR)]) and complication rates were evaluated. Results. Bipolar RF ablation was performed in 12 procedures and multipolar RF ablation in 16 procedures (2 applicators in 14 procedures and 3 applicators in 2 procedures). One ablation cycle was performed in 15 procedures and two ablation cycles in 13 procedures. Overall ablation time and deployed energy were 35.0 {+-} 13.6 min and 43.7 {+-} 17.9 kJ. Technical success rate was 100 %. Major and minor complication rates were 4 and 14 %. At an imaging follow-up of 15.2 {+-} 8.8 months, local recurrence-free survival was 14.4 {+-} 8.8 months and local tumor control rate was 93 %. GFR did not deteriorate after RF ablation (50.8 {+-} 16.6 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} before RF ablation vs. 47.2 {+-} 11.9 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} after RF ablation; not significant). Conclusions. CT-guided bipolar and multipolar RF ablation of RCC has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates. At short-term follow-up, clinical efficacy is high without deterioration of the renal function.

  5. SU-E-I-20: Dead Time Count Loss Compensation in SPECT/CT: Projection Versus Global Correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siman, W; Kappadath, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare projection-based versus global correction that compensate for deadtime count loss in SPECT/CT images. Methods: SPECT/CT images of an IEC phantom (2.3GBq 99mTc) with ?10% deadtime loss containing the 37mm (uptake 3), 28 and 22mm (uptake 6) spheres were acquired using a 2 detector SPECT/CT system with 64 projections/detector and 15 s/projection. The deadtime, Ti and the true count rate, Ni at each projection, i was calculated using the monitor-source method. Deadtime corrected SPECT were reconstructed twice: (1) with projections that were individually-corrected for deadtime-losses; and (2) with original projections with losses and then correcting the reconstructed SPECT images using a scaling factor equal to the inverse of the average fractional loss for 5 projections/detector. For both cases, the SPECT images were reconstructed using OSEM with attenuation and scatter corrections. The two SPECT datasets were assessed by comparing line profiles in xyplane and z-axis, evaluating the count recoveries, and comparing ROI statistics. Higher deadtime losses (up to 50%) were also simulated to the individually corrected projections by multiplying each projection i by exp(-a*Ni*Ti), where a is a scalar. Additionally, deadtime corrections in phantoms with different geometries and deadtime losses were also explored. The same two correction methods were carried for all these data sets. Results: Averaging the deadtime losses in 5 projections/detector suffices to recover >99% of the loss counts in most clinical cases. The line profiles (xyplane and z-axis) and the statistics in the ROIs drawn in the SPECT images corrected using both methods showed agreement within the statistical noise. The count-loss recoveries in the two methods also agree within >99%. Conclusion: The projection-based and the global correction yield visually indistinguishable SPECT images. The global correction based on sparse sampling of projections losses allows for accurate SPECT deadtime loss correction while keeping the study duration reasonable.

  6. Proceedings: Radiation Protection Technology Conference: Providence, RI, November 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Health physics (HP) professionals within the nuclear industry are continually upgrading their respective programs with new methods and technologies. The move to shorter outages combined with a diminishing group of contract HP technicians and demanding emergent work makes such changes even more important. The EPRI Radiation Protection Technology Conference focused on a number of key health physics issues and developments.

  7. R&I_3055_Receptionist_Sept14.doc RECEPTIONIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    & Innovation Responsibilities: · Answer telephone, screen and direct calls · Take and relay messages · Provide a competency test. E-mail: jayne.alexander@uct.ac.zaTelephone: 021 650 5440 Departmental website: http

  8. NO. RI'!V. NO. LEAM Thermal Design Report PAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    by minimizing the night heat leak and dissipating excess day energy gains with a radiator. It became immediately to solar energy to minimize noon heating; and should have as/EH 2::: 2. 5 to keep the film from melting for the dual sensors and analysis of the conceptual base lme design. The next step was nar- rowing down

  9. &RPSHWLWLYHQHVV (IIHFWV RI (QYLURQPHQWDO 7D[ 5HIRUPV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Sweden and UK); analyses world market conditions for a set of energy- intensive sectors, as a framework, sustainable development, competitiveness and trade policies (including improved means to assess economic://www.dmu.dk/COMETR AÃhtrÃu) Offshore windmills (DK), Samsø Energy Academy. Srvv)Ã1.0 3URMHFW &RQVRUWLXP &RQWUDFWRUV &RQWDFW

  10. Ri so-M-|fe>44 LIBRARY August 1973

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna, where they are processed by an electronic computer and merged to create OF * RADIOACTIVE WASTE DUMPS. EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES; F U E L REPROCESSING PLANTS; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; SITE SELECTION; WASTE STORAGE; BT: INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTE MANAGEMENT; E52. EURO

  11. 0HWKRGV IRU 3UREDELOLVWLF 'HVLJQ RI :LQG 7XUELQHV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turbines" ­ PRODETO ­ which was carried out during the years 1996-98 with partial funding from the European, which include probabilistic load and resistance modelling, calculation of failure prob- ability, and calibration of partial safety factors for use with a deterministic de- sign code format. The results

  12. Ri* Report No. 133 Danish Atomk Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commission Research Establishment Riso Chemistry Department Abstract As part of the work aimed at the exploitation of the uraniferous rock in southern Greenland a flotation process has been developed. The uranium as a possible source of uranium for Denmark's future energy supply. The uranium-bearing rock is a lujavrite

  13. RI&E Nano particles*) Carried out by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twente, Universiteit

    materials (non fibrous) Examples: metals (e.g. Ag, Au, Pb, La), metal oxides (e.g. TiO2, ZnO, CeO2, Co

  14. ModPET: A Novel Small-Animal PET System Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and PET/CT systems have become the gold standard for imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arizona, University of

    ModPET: A Novel Small-Animal PET System Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and PET/CT systems have these results to their human counterparts. Current small-animal PET scanners are very costly and complicated for Gamma-Ray Imaging, we are developing a novel small-animal PET scanner that utilizes common modular

  15. Three-dimensional multiphase segmentation of X-ray CT data of porous materials using a Bayesian Markov random field framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Ramaprasad; Tuller, Markus; Fink, Wolfgang; Wildschild, Dorthe (Oregon State U.); (Ariz)

    2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancements in noninvasive imaging methods such as X-ray computed tomography (CT) have led to a recent surge of applications in porous media research with objectives ranging from theoretical aspects of pore-scale fluid and interfacial dynamics to practical applications such as enhanced oil recovery and advanced contaminant remediation. While substantial efforts and resources have been devoted to advance CT technology, microscale analysis, and fluid dynamics simulations, the development of efficient and stable three-dimensional multiphase image segmentation methods applicable to large data sets is lacking. To eliminate the need for wet-dry or dual-energy scans, image alignment, and subtraction analysis, commonly applied in X-ray micro-CT, a segmentation method based on a Bayesian Markov random field (MRF) framework amenable to true three-dimensional multiphase processing was developed and evaluated. Furthermore, several heuristic and deterministic combinatorial optimization schemes required to solve the labeling problem of the MRF image model were implemented and tested for computational efficiency and their impact on segmentation results. Test results for three grayscale data sets consisting of dry glass beads, partially saturated glass beads, and partially saturated crushed tuff obtained with synchrotron X-ray micro-CT demonstrate great potential of the MRF image model for three-dimensional multiphase segmentation. While our results are promising and the developed algorithm is stable and computationally more efficient than other commonly applied porous media segmentation models, further potential improvements exist for fully automated operation.

  16. Published: March 25, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 1208 dx.doi.org/10.1021/ct100738h |J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2011, 7, 12081219

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponder, Jay

    Published: March 25, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 1208 dx.doi.org/10.1021/ct100738h |J, Jay W. Ponder,|| and Bernard R. Brooks*, Department of Chemistry, University of South Florida, 4202 E. This new facility is fully integrated with free energy perturbation methods, Hessian-based methods

  17. 1. Birru, D., C.-T. Chou, and A. Seyedi, "Coordination in Wireless Networks Having Devices with Different Physical Layer Transmission Schemes," US Patent 8233505, Jul. 31, 2012.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pattanaik, Sumanta N.

    Patents 1. Birru, D., C.-T. Chou, and A. Seyedi, "Coordination in Wireless Networks Having Devices with Different Physical Layer Transmission Schemes," US Patent 8233505, Jul. 31, 2012. 2. Birru, D. and A. Seyedi, "Cost-Effective Preamble Structure for High-Speed Communication of Packetized System," US Patent 8

  18. Proton Radiography Studies for Proton CT M. Petterson, N. Blumenkrantz, J. Feldt, J. Heimann, D. Lucia, A. Seiden, D. C. Williams, H. F.-W. Sadrozinski,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Proton Radiography Studies for Proton CT M. Petterson, N. Blumenkrantz, J. Feldt, J. Heimann, D. Randazzo, V. Sipala Abstract­We report the results of a beam experiment to develop proton Computed of a phantom to predict the path of the proton within the phantom and of a crystal calorimeter to measure

  19. A detailed pore characterization in 2D and 3D by means of optical and fluorescence microscopy combined with high-resolution X-ray CT.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    combined with high-resolution X-ray CT. Research Unit: Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology Topic about oil reservoirs, aquifers, building stone weathering). In the past, the pore network was mainly/or laboratory work: Precise sampling of the geological material. Petrographical research with optical

  20. Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 4. Comment letters and public hearing transcripts. Northeast corridor improvement project electrication: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume IV) reprints the comments received on the DEIS/R.

  1. VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT, STAFF SUPPORT NON EXEMPT POSITION THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    secretarial duties and office reception. Supply purchasing. REQUIRED TRAINING. KNOWLEDGE. EDUCATION Talent Search State Office Building, 1st Floor 44 Hawley Street BinQhamton. NY 13901-4452 IF PART.o. Box 6000 a~u;EL~:::r::::oJ~'e~c>:::;~D'-ir-e-ct-o-r/-D-e-s-ig-n-e-eBinghamton, NY 13902

  2. 9/14/2012 BOT 1 1:30 p.m. -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    , NY) 2014 - J. David Rogers, Chief Executive Officer, J.D. Capital Management (Greenwich, CT) Gary, NY) It is proposed to appoint Blake Gall and Edward R. Hintz, Jr. to membership with terms expiring, That Blake Gall and Edward R. Hintz, Jr., non-University employees, are appointed to the Penn State

  3. Summarizing the Evidence on the International Trade in Illegal Gail Emilia Rosen1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Kate

    Summarizing the Evidence on the International Trade in Illegal Wildlife Gail Emilia Rosen1, Providence, RI 02912 2 Wildlife Trust, New York, NY 10001 Abstract: The global trade in illegal wildlife species and disease spread. Despite the broad-sweeping implications of illegal wildlife sales, scientists

  4. Tracking the Sun: The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the U.S. from 1998-2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California Solar Initiative 10-100 kW >100 kW Tracking theSolar Partners Incentive Program Total % of Sample CA CT IL MA MD MN NJ NY OR PA WI Tracking

  5. Summer 2011 Internships-Employers and Salaries Carnegie Institute of Technology (CIT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Convergent Technologies Madison CT Department of the Navy Patuxent River MD ExxonMobil Houston TX Kazarians & Associates Glendale CA Suffolk County Water Authority Great River NY UPMC Pittsburgh PA Civil

  6. SU-E-I-90: Medical Physicists' Implication in Diagnostic CT in Switzerland: Results of After One Year of Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryckx, N.; Elandoy, C.; Bize, J.; Verdun, F.R. [Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, VD (Switzerland)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Since January 1st 2008, the Swiss ordinance on radiation protection requires the involvement of a medical physicist to support the optimization process of medical imaging techniques using ionizing radiation. After a long process of implementation, this requirement is satisfied all over the country since the beginning of 2013. The goal of this contribution is to summarize the main results obtained in this first year of experience in CT. Methods: We assessed the output and clinical use of 45 CT units using a three-pronged approach. First, we assessed the output of the device (CTDIvol, primary beam collimation and HU in water at different tube tensions). Secondly, we characterized the local chest and abdomen acquisition and reconstruction protocols using the Catphan 600 phantom. Lastly, we assessed the clinical use of the machine by analyzing an extract of a dozen clinical examinations per unit. Results: 9 out of 45 units had incorrect collimator settings, e.g. 4mm instead of 1mm. We witnessed also a large spread in reconstruction parameters, especially for reconstructed slice thickness, thus showing notable variations in low contrast detectability performances. Clinical practice is also clearly spread out. For example, estimated patient effective dose per abdomen examination lies at 18.7+/?12.7mSv (min: 2.0mSv — max: 112.0mSv). Chest and brain scans have a narrower dispersion, but patient effective dose is also spread by about a factor of 10 to 20. Conclusion: The spread in clinical practice being fairly large, it appears of crucial importance to collaborate more closely with radiologists and technologists to assess it. The lack of statistical precision will imply that we analyze clinical practice according to a specific medical demand rather than an anatomical region. Furthermore, low contrast sensitivity (LCD) being a crucial parameter, an objective method using a model observer will be used to assess LCD.

  7. SU-E-I-93: Improved Imaging Quality for Multislice Helical CT Via Sparsity Regularized Iterative Image Reconstruction Method Based On Tensor Framelet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, H [Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Guo, M [Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Lee, K [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Li, R [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Xing, L [Stanford UniversitySchool of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Gao, H [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Inspired by compressive sensing, sparsity regularized iterative reconstruction method has been extensively studied. However, its utility pertinent to multislice helical 4D CT for radiotherapy with respect to imaging quality, dose, and time has not been thoroughly addressed. As the beginning of such an investigation, this work carries out the initial comparison of reconstructed imaging quality between sparsity regularized iterative method and analytic method through static phantom studies using a state-of-art 128-channel multi-slice Siemens helical CT scanner. Methods: In our iterative method, tensor framelet (TF) is chosen as the regularization method for its superior performance from total variation regularization in terms of reduced piecewise-constant artifacts and improved imaging quality that has been demonstrated in our prior work. On the other hand, X-ray transforms and its adjoints are computed on-the-fly through GPU implementation using our previous developed fast parallel algorithms with O(1) complexity per computing thread. For comparison, both FDK (approximate analytic method) and Katsevich algorithm (exact analytic method) are used for multislice helical CT image reconstruction. Results: The phantom experimental data with different imaging doses were acquired using a state-of-art 128-channel multi-slice Siemens helical CT scanner. The reconstructed image quality was compared between TF-based iterative method, FDK and Katsevich algorithm with the quantitative analysis for characterizing signal-to-noise ratio, image contrast, and spatial resolution of high-contrast and low-contrast objects. Conclusion: The experimental results suggest that our tensor framelet regularized iterative reconstruction algorithm improves the helical CT imaging quality from FDK and Katsevich algorithm for static experimental phantom studies that have been performed.

  8. SU-E-J-151: Dosimetric Evaluation of DIR Mapped Contours for Image Guided Adaptive Radiotherapy with 4D Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balik, S [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Weiss, E; Williamson, J; Hugo, G [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Jan, N; Zhang, L [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Roman, N [San Antonio Precision Center Ctr, San Antonio, TX (United States); Christensen, G [University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To estimate dosimetric errors resulting from using contours deformably mapped from planning CT to 4D cone beam CT (CBCT) images for image-guided adaptive radiotherapy of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Ten locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients underwent one planning 4D fan-beam CT (4DFBCT) and weekly 4DCBCT scans. Multiple physicians delineated the gross tumor volume (GTV) and normal structures in planning CT images and only GTV in CBCT images. Manual contours were mapped from planning CT to CBCTs using small deformation, inverse consistent linear elastic (SICLE) algorithm for two scans in each patient. Two physicians reviewed and rated the DIR-mapped (auto) and manual GTV contours as clinically acceptable (CA), clinically acceptable after minor modification (CAMM) and unacceptable (CU). Mapped normal structures were visually inspected and corrected if necessary, and used to override tissue density for dose calculation. CTV (6mm expansion of GTV) and PTV (5mm expansion of CTV) were created. VMAT plans were generated using the DIR-mapped contours to deliver 66 Gy in 33 fractions with 95% and 100% coverage (V66) to PTV and CTV, respectively. Plan evaluation for V66 was based on manual PTV and CTV contours. Results: Mean PTV V66 was 84% (range 75% – 95%) and mean CTV V66 was 97% (range 93% – 100%) for CAMM scored plans (12 plans); and was 90% (range 80% – 95%) and 99% (range 95% – 100%) for CA scored plans (7 plans). The difference in V66 between CAMM and CA was significant for PTV (p = 0.03) and approached significance for CTV (p = 0.07). Conclusion: The quality of DIR-mapped contours directly impacted the plan quality for 4DCBCT-based adaptation. Larger safety margins may be needed when planning with auto contours for IGART with 4DCBCT images. Reseach was supported by NIH P01CA116602.

  9. SU-E-J-83: Ion Imaging to Better Estimate In-Vivo Relative Stopping Powers Using X-Ray CT Prior-Knowledge Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dias, M [Dipartamento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria - DEIB, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Collins-Fekete, C [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique et Centre de recherche sur le cancer, Universite Laval, Quebec (Canada); Riboldi, M; Baroni, G [Dipartamento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria - DEIB, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Doolan, P [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); University College London, London (United Kingdom); Hansen, D [Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Seco, J [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To reduce uncertainties in relative stopping power (RSP) estimates for ions (alpha and carbon) by using Ion radiographic-imaging and X-ray CT prior-knowledge. Methods: A 36×36 phantom matrix composed of 9 materials with different thicknesses and randomly placed is generated. Theoretical RSPs are calculated using stopping power (SP) data from three references (Janni, ICRU49 and Bischel). We introduced an artificial systematic error (1.5%, 2.5% or 3.5%) and a random error (<0.5%) to the SP to simulated patient ion-range errors present in clinic environment. Carbon/alpha final energy for each RSPs set (theoretical and from CT images) is obtained with a ray-tracing algorithm. A gradient descent (GD) method is used to minimize the difference in exit particle energy, between theory and X-ray CT RSP maps, by iteratively correcting the RSP map from X-ray CT. Once a new set of RSPs is obtained for a direction a new optimization is done over other direction using the RSPs from the previous optimization. Theoretical RSPs are compared with experimental RSPs obtained with Gammex Phantom. Results: Preliminary results show that optimized RSP values can be obtained with smaller uncertainties (<1%) than clinical RSPs (1.5% to 3.5%). Theoretical values from three different references show uncertainties, up to 3% from experimental values. Further investigation will consider prior-knowledge from RSP obtained with CT images and ion radiographies from Monte Carlo Simulations. Conclusion: GD and ray-tracing methods have been implemented to reduce RSP uncertainties from values obtained for clinical treatment. Experimental RSPs will be obtained using carbon/alpha beams to consider the existence of material dependent systematic errors. Based on the results, it is hoped to show that using ray-tracing optimization with ion radiography and prior knowledge on RPSs, treatment planning accuracy and cost-effectiveness can be improved.

  10. SU-C-12A-03: The Impact of Contrast Medium On Radiation Dose in CT: A Systematic Evaluation Across 58 Patient Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahbaee, P [NC State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Samei, E [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Segars, W [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the effect of contrast medium on radiation dose as a function of time via Monte Carlo simulation from the liver CT scan across a library of 5D XCAT models Methods: A validated Monte Carlo simulation package (PENELOPE) was employed to model a CT system (LightSpeed 64 VCT, GE Healthcare). The radiation dose was estimated from a common abdomen CT examination. The dose estimation was performed on a library of adult extended cardiac-torso (5D XCAT) phantoms (35 male, 23 female, mean age 51.5 years, mean weight 80.2 kg). The 5D XCAT models were created based on patient-specific iodine concentration-time results from our computational contrast medium propagation model for different intravenous injection protocols. To enable a dynamic estimation of radiation dose, each organ in the model was assigned to its own time-concentration curve via the PENELOPE package, material.exe. Using the Monte Carlo, for each scan time point after the injection, 80 million photons were initiated and tracked through the phantoms. Finally, the dose to the liver was tallied from the deposited energy. Results: Monte Carlo simulation results of radiation dose delivered to the liver from the XCAT models indicated up to 30% increase in dose for different time after the administration of contrast medium. Conclusion: The contrast enhancement is employed in over 60% of imaging modalities, which not only remarkably affects the CT image quality, but also increases the radiation dose by as much as 70%. The postinjection multiple acquisition in several enhanced CT protocols, makes the radiation dose increment through the use of contrast medium, an inevitable factor in optimization of these protocols. The relationship between radiation dose and injected contrast medium as a function of time studied in this work allows optimization of contrast administration for vulnerable individuals.

  11. $ 6WXG\\ RI 0DJQR[ :DVWH *ODVV 8QGHU &RQGLWLRQV RI +LJK 7HPSHUDWXUH 9HU\\ 'HHS *HRORJLFDO 'LVSRVDO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    of spent nuclear fuel and vitrified high level waste material [1, 2]. In order to assess the suitability repository concept for the disposal of High Level nuclear Waste (HLW) [1, 2]. This scheme uses large diameter are sealed by recrystallisation, annealing or hydration reactions, preventing the access of hydrous fluids

  12. 7KH 6SHFWUD | 3DJH 8QLYHUVLW\\ RI 9LUJLQLD 6FKRRO RI (QJLQHHULQJ DQG $SSOLHG 6FLHQFH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    and Environmental Engineering *UDGXDWH 6WXGHQW 5HYLHZHUV Philip Asare, Computer Engineering Lindsey Brinton\\UPJH[PVUZ 6MÄJL Timothy Allen Biomedical Engineering John Bean Electrical and Computer Engineering George L. Cahen Materials Science and Engineering Gavin Garner Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Lloyd Harriot

  13. 7KH8QLYHUVLW\\RI0LFKLJDQ7KH8QLYHUVLW\\RI0LFKLJDQ Where am I?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Johann

    SAND93-0827, Sandia National Laboratories, 1993. The authors wish to thank the Department of Energy Ridge National Lab (ORNL) D&D Program and the United States Department of Energy's Robotics Technology: material for next year's edition of the "Where am I" Report, click here for instruc- tions. #12

  14. Daytime location: 695 Park Avenue; East Building Room E1022; NY, NY 10065

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    Introduction to Translation (TSINTTRA) Tue. & Thu. 5:40-7:30pm; Starts 6/3 (10 sess.) Spanish Editing (TSSPAEDI) Mon. & Wed. 7:40-9:30pm; Starts 6/2 (10 sess.) Spanish Composition (TSSPACOM) Not available/3(10 sess.) Note Taking for Interpreters (TSNOTTAK) Mon. & Wed. 5:40-7:30pm; Starts 6/2 (10 sess.) Spanish

  15. Solar Market Analytics, Roadmapping, and Tracking NY (SMART NY) Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Case, Tria [City University of New York; Reilly, Laurie [City University of New York; Kling, Alison [Con Edison, formerly City University of New York

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report, including links to Working Group reports and an attached Working Group report for SunShot Initiative Rooftop Solar Challenge I, from Sustainable CUNY of the City University of New York, on behalf of New York City

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New York, NY, Site - NY 61

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNew MexicoUtah Mexican

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Niagara Falls Storage Site NY - NY 17

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNew MexicoUtah MexicanNiagara Falls Storage

  18. -CT CT)Computed Tomography(. ,. , -100 ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinsky, Ross

    ) QSR. / ( · -ISO 13485. ·. ·ISO 13485 / /-FDA-. ·.( ,) Manual Assembler : . /BB-. ·. Compliance ExpertProduction · -FDA . , ISO , . · , , , . : · 2-4 . · GMP

  19. Assessment and management of interfractional variations in daily diagnostic-quality-CT guided prostate-bed irradiation after prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Feng; Ahunbay, Ergun; Lawton, Colleen; Allen Li, X., E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To quantify interfractional anatomic variations and limitations of the current practice of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for prostate-bed patients and to study dosimetric benefits of an online adaptive replanning scheme that addresses the interfractional variations. Methods: Contours for the targets and organs at risk (OARs) from daily diagnostic-quality CTs acquired with in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) were generated by populating the planning contours using an autosegmentation tool based on deformable registration (ABAS, Elekta) with manual editing for ten prostate-bed patients treated with postoperative daily CT-guided IMRT. Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) obtained by maximizing the overlap of contours for a structure between the daily and plan contours was used to quantify the organ deformation between the plan and daily CTs. Three interfractional-variation-correction schemes, the current standard practice of IGRT repositioning, a previously developed online adaptive RT (ART), and the full reoptimization, were applied to these daily CTs and a number of dose-volume quantities for the targets and organs at risk were compared for their effectiveness to account for the interfractional variations. Results: Large interfractional organ deformations in prostate-bed irradiation were seen. The mean DSCs for CTV, rectum, and bladder were 86.6 ± 5.1% (range from 61% to 97%), 77.3% ± 7.4% (range from 55% to 90%), and 75.4% ± 11.2% (range from 46% to 96%), respectively. The fractional and cumulative dose-volume quantities for CTV and PTV: V100 (volume received at least 100% prescription dose), and rectum and bladder: V{sub 45Gy} and V{sub 60Gy} (volume received at least 45 or 60 Gy), were compared for the repositioning, adaptive, reoptimization, and original plans. The fractional and cumulative dosimetric results were nearly the same. The average cumulative CTV V100 were 88.0%, 98.4%, 99.2%, and 99.3% for the IGRT, ART, reoptimization, and original plans, respectively. The corresponding rectal V{sub 45Gy} (V{sub 60Gy}) were 58.7% (27.3%), 48.1% (20.7%), 43.8% (16.1%), and 44.9% (16.8%). The results for bladder were comparable among three schemes. Paired two-tailed Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were performed and it was found that ART and reoptimization provide better target coverage and better OAR sparing, especially rectum sparing. Conclusions: The interfractional organ motions and deformations during prostate-bed irradiation are significant. The online adaptive replanning scheme is capable of effectively addressing the large organ deformation, resulting in cumulative doses equivalent to those originally planned.

  20. Organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices in adult CT: Comparison of four types of reference phantoms across different examination protocols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Yakun; Li Xiang; Paul Segars, W.; Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Departments of Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radiation exposure from computed tomography (CT) to the public has increased the concern among radiation protection professionals. Being able to accurately assess the radiation dose patients receive during CT procedures is a crucial step in the management of CT dose. Currently, various computational anthropomorphic phantoms are used to assess radiation dose by different research groups. It is desirable to better understand how the dose results are affected by different choices of phantoms. In this study, the authors assessed the uncertainties in CT dose and risk estimation associated with different types of computational phantoms for a selected group of representative CT protocols. Methods: Routinely used CT examinations were categorized into ten body and three neurological examination categories. Organ doses, effective doses, risk indices, and conversion coefficients to effective dose and risk index (k and q factors, respectively) were estimated for these examinations for a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). Four methods were used, each employing a different type of reference phantoms. The first and second methods employed a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated in our laboratory. In the first method, the reference male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were used, which were initially created from the Visible Human data and later adjusted to match organ masses defined in ICRP publication 89. In the second method, the reference male and female phantoms described in ICRP publication 110 were used, which were initially developed from tomographic data of two patients and later modified to match ICRP 89 organ masses. The third method employed a commercial dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT group, London, England) with its own hermaphrodite stylized phantom. In the fourth method, another widely used dosimetry spreadsheet (CT-Expo, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, Germany) was employed together with its associated male and female stylized phantoms. Results: For fully irradiated organs, average coefficients of variation (COV) ranged from 0.07 to 0.22 across the four male phantoms and from 0.06 to 0.18 across the four female phantoms; for partially irradiated organs, average COV ranged from 0.13 to 0.30 across the four male phantoms and from 0.15 to 0.30 across the four female phantoms. Doses to the testes, breasts, and esophagus showed large variations between phantoms. COV for gender-averaged effective dose and k factor ranged from 0.03 to 0.23 and from 0.06 to 0.30, respectively. COV for male risk index and q factor ranged from 0.06 to 0.30 and from 0.05 to 0.36, respectively; COV for female risk index and q factor ranged from 0.06 to 0.49 and from 0.07 to 0.54, respectively. Conclusions: Despite closely matched organ mass, total body weight, and height, large differences in organ dose exist due to variation in organ location, spatial distribution, and dose approximation method. Dose differences for fully irradiated radiosensitive organs were much smaller than those for partially irradiated organs. Weighted dosimetry quantities including effective dose, male risk indices, k factors, and male q factors agreed well across phantoms. The female risk indices and q factors varied considerably across phantoms.

  1. Geology, hydrothermal petrology, stable isotope geochemistry, and fluid inclusion geothermometry of LASL geothermal test well C/T-1 (Mesa 31-1), East Mesa, Imperial Valley, California, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, K.R.; Elders, W.A.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole Mesa 31-1 (LASL C/T-1) is an 1899-m (6231-ft) deep well located in the northwestern part of the East Mesa Geothermal Field. Mesa 31-1 is the first Calibration/Test Well (C/T-1) in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), Geothermal Log Interpretation Program. The purpose of this study is to provide a compilation of drillhole data, drill cuttings, well lithology, and formation petrology that will serve to support the use of well LASL C/T-1 as a calibration/test well for geothermal logging. In addition, reviews of fluid chemistry, stable isotope studies, isotopic and fluid inclusion geothermometry, and the temperature log data are presented. This study provides the basic data on the geology and hydrothermal alteration of the rocks in LASL C/T-1 as background for the interpretation of wireline logs.

  2. Influence of radiation therapy on the lung-tissue in breast cancer patients: CT-assessed density changes and associated symptoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotstein, S.; Lax, I.; Svane, G. (Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative electron density of lung tissue was measured from computer tomography (CT) slices in 33 breast cancer patients treated by various techniques of adjuvant radiotherapy. The measurements were made before radiotherapy, 3 months and 9 months after completion of radiation therapy. The changes in lung densities at 3 months and 9 months were compared to radiation induced radiological (CT) findings. In addition, subjective symptoms such as cough and dyspnoea were assessed before and after radiotherapy. It was observed that the mean of the relative electron density of lung tissue varied from 0.25 when the whole lung was considered to 0.17 when only the anterior lateral quarter of the lung was taken into account. In patients with positive radiological (CT) findings the mean lung density of the anterior lateral quarter increased 2.1 times 3 months after radiotherapy and was still increased 1.6 times 6 months later. For those patients without findings, in the CT pictures the corresponding values were 1.2 and 1.1, respectively. The standard deviation of the pixel values within the anterior lateral quarter of the lung increased 3.8 times and 3.2 times at 3 months and 9 months, respectively, in the former group, as opposed to 1.2 and 1.1 in the latter group. Thirteen patients had an increase in either cough or dyspnoea as observed 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. In eleven patients these symptoms persisted 6 months later. No significant correlation was found between radiological findings and subjective symptoms. However, when three different treatment techniques were compared among 29 patients the highest rate of radiological findings was observed in patients in which the largest lung volumes received the target dose. A tendency towards an increased rate of subjective symptoms was also found in this group.

  3. SU-E-J-267: Weekly Volumetric and Dosimetric Changes in Adaptive Conformal Radiotherapy of Non-Small-Cell-Lung Cancer Using 4D CT and Gating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z [the 6th People's Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shang, Q [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Xiong, F; Zhang, X; Zhang, Q; Fu, S [the 6th People's Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study was to evaluate the significance of weekly imageguided patient setup and to assess the volumetric and dosimetric changes in no-small-cell-lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with adaptive conformal radiotherapy (CRT). Methods: 9 NSCLC patients treated with 3D CRT underwent 4D CT-on-rail every five fractions. ITV was generated from three phases of the 4DCT (the end of exhalation, 25% before and after the end of exhalation). The margin of ITV to PTV is 5mm. 6 weekly CTs were acquired for each patient. The weekly CTs were fused with the planning CT by vertebrae. The couch shift was recorded for each weekly CT to evaluate the setup error. The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on weekly CT images by a physician. Beams from the original plans were applied to weekly CTs to calculate the delivered doses. All patients underwent replanning after 20 fractions. Results: Among the total 54 CTs, the average setup error was 2.0± 1.7, 2.6± 2.1, 2.7± 2.2 mm in X, Y, and Z direction, respectively. The average volume of the primary GTV was reduced from 42.45 cc to 22.78 cc (47.04%) after 6 weeks. The maximal volume regression occurred between 15 and 20 fractions. Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) reduced the V20 and V5 of the lung by 33.5% and 16.89%, respectively. ART also reduced Dmean and D1/3 of the heart by 31.7% and 32.32%, respectively. Dmax of the spinal cord did not vary much during the treatment course. Conclusion: 5 mm margin is sufficient for 4D weekly CTguided radiotherapy in lung cancer. Tumor regression was observed in the majority of patients. ART significantly reduced the OARs dose. Our preliminary results indicated that an off-line ART approach is appropriate in clinical practice.

  4. SU-E-I-48: The Behavior of AEC in Scan Regions Outside the Localizer Radiograph FOV: An In Phantom Study of CT Systems From Four Vendors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Supanich, M [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Bevins, N [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This review of scanners from 4 major manufacturers examines the clinical impact of performing CT scans that extend into areas of the body that were not acquired in the CT localizer radiograph. Methods: Anthropomorphic chest and abdomen phantoms were positioned together on the tables of CT scanners from 4 different vendors. All of the scanners offered an Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) option with both lateral and axial tube current modulation. A localizer radiograph was taken covering the entire extent of both phantoms and then the scanner's Chest-Abdomen-Pelvis (CAP) study was performed with the clinical AEC settings employed and the scan and reconstruction range extending from the superior portion of the chest phantom through the inferior portion of the abdomen phantom. A new study was then initiated with a localizer radiograph extending the length of the chest phantom (not covering the abdomen phantom). The same CAP protocol and AEC settings were then used to scan and reconstruct the entire length of both phantoms. Scan parameters at specific locations in the abdomen phantom from both studies were investigated using the information contained in the DICOM metadata of the reconstructed images. Results: The AEC systems on all scanners utilized different tube current settings in the abdomen phantom for the scan completed without the full localizer radiograph. The AEC system behavior was also scanner dependent with the default manual tube current, the maximum tube current and the tube current at the last known position observed as outcomes. Conclusion: The behavior of the AEC systems of CT scanners in regions not covered by the localizer radiograph is vendor dependent. To ensure optimal image quality and radiation exposure it is important to include the entire planned scan region in the localizer radiograph.

  5. Final environmental impact statement/report and 4(f) statement. Volume 1. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume I) is the main body of the FEIS/R and includes a 4(f) Statement on the proposed location of an electrification facility in the Great Swamp Wildlife Management Area.

  6. Record of decision: Final environmental impact statement/report and 4(f) statement. Northeast Corridor Improvement Project electrification, New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This record of decision (ROD) completes the environmental review by the Federal Administration (FRA) of the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to extend electric train operation from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. In this ROD, FRA approves Amtrak`s proposal subject to the inclusion into the project of a number of measures to eliminate or minimize potential adverse environmental impacts.

  7. Appendix to the final environmental impact report supplement. Northeast Corridor Improvement Project electrification, New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is an appendix to the final Environmental Impact Report Supplement, published on February 15, 1995, addressing the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. The purpose of this document is to discuss the selection of the Boston area electrical substation site and the relocation of a paralleling station in East Foxboro.

  8. Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 2. Technical studies. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume II) presents additional technical studies to supplement Volume III of the DEIS/R issued in October 1993 (PB94-111838).

  9. Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source and dual-energy CT for visualization of acute ischemic stroke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hara, Hidetake; Matsuzawa, Hiroki; Inoue, Toshiyuki; Abe, Shinji; Satoh, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have recently developed a phantom that simulates acute ischemic stroke. We attempted to visualize acute-stage cerebral infarction by applying virtual monochromatic images to this phantom using dual-energy CT (DECT). Virtual monochromatic images were created using DECT from 40 to 100 keV at every 10 keV and from 60 to 80 keV at every 1 keV, under three energy conditions of tube voltages with thin (Sn) filters. Calculation of the CNR values allowed us to evaluate the visualization of acute-stage cerebral infarction. The CNR value of a virtual monochromatic image was the highest at 68 keV under 80 kV / Sn 140 kV, at 72 keV under 100 kV / Sn 140 kV, and at 67 keV under 140 kV / 80 kV. The CNR values of virtual monochromatic images between 65 and 75 keV were significantly higher than those obtained for all other created energy images. Therefore, optimal conditions for visualizing acute ischemic stroke were achievable.

  10. SU-E-J-256: Dual Energy Planar Image Based Localization in the Absence of On-Board CT Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadagopan, R; Yang, J; Li, H [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a tool enabling soft tissue based image guidance using dual energy radiographs for cases when on-board CT is not available. Method: Dual energy planar radiographs can be applied to image guidance for targeting lung lesions because the bone based alignment only may not be sufficient as the lesions move. We acquired images of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom at 120 and 60 KVp respectively. Using a weighted logarithmic subtraction of these dual energy images, a soft tissue enhanced and a bone enhanced image were generated and they could be used for the image guidance purpose. Similar processing was also applied to a dual energy image set acquired for a patient undergoing a proton therapy. Results: The soft tissue enhanced images suppressed bones (ribs and scapula) overlying on lung, thus enabling a better visualization of soft tissue and lesion, while the bone enhanced image suppressed the soft tissue. These enhanced effects were visually apparent without further processing for display enhancements, such as using histogram or edge enhancement technique. Conclusions: The phantom image processing was encouraging. The initial test on the patient image set showed that other post processing might still be able to add value in visualizing soft tissues in addition to the dual energy soft tissue enhancement. More evaluations are needed to determine the potential benefit of this technique in the clinic.

  11. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in radiation therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallas, Raya R; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy, so-called "end-to-end" tests are intended to cover all steps from therapy planning to follow-up to fulfill the high demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gains growing importance in the treatment process and established phantoms (such as the Alderson head) cannot be used for those tests, novel multimodality phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study for such a customizable multimodality head phantom. We used a set of patient CT images as the basis for the anthropomorphic head shape. The recipient - consisting of an epoxy resin - was produced using rapid prototyping (3D printing). The phantom recipient includes a nasal air cavity, two soft tissues volumes and cranial bone. Additionally a spherical tumor volume was positioned in the center. The volumes were filled with dipotassium phosphate-based cranial bone surrogate, agarose gel, and distilled water. The tumor volume was filled with normoxic dosimetr...

  12. Volume Changes of Experimental Carotid Sidewall Aneurysms Due to Embolization with Liquid Embolic Agents: A Multidetector CT Angiography Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudeck, O. [Charite, Campus Virchow Clinic, Department of Radiology (Germany)], E-mail: oliver.dudeck@charite.de; Okuducu, A. F. [Charite, Campus Virchow Clinic, Department of Neuropathology (Germany); Jordan, O. [University of Geneva, School of Pharmacy (Switzerland); Tesmer, K.; Pech, M. [Charite, Campus Virchow Clinic, Department of Radiology (Germany); Weigang, E. [Albert-Ludwigs-University of Freiburg, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Germany); Ruefenacht, D. A. [University Hospital of Geneva, Neuroradiology Section (Switzerland); Doelker, E. [University of Geneva, School of Pharmacy (Switzerland); Felix, R. [Charite, Campus Virchow Clinic, Department of Radiology (Germany)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Iodine-containing polyvinyl alcohol polymer (I-PVAL) is a novel precipitating liquid embolic that allows for artifact-free evaluation of CT angiography (CTA). As accurate aneurysm volumetry can be performed with multidetector CTA, we determined volumes of experimental aneurysms before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after embolization of 14 porcine experimental carotid sidewall aneurysms with this liquid embolic. An automated three-dimensional software measurement tool was used for volumetric analysis of volume-rendering CTA data. Furthermore, intra-aneurysmal pressure changes during liquid embolization were measured in four silicone aneurysms and potential polymer volume changes within 4 weeks were assessed in vitro. Liquid embolic injection was performed during temporary balloon occlusion of the aneurysm neck, resulting in a mean occlusion rate of 98.3%. Aneurysms enlarged significantly during embolization by 61.1 {+-} 28.9%, whereas a significant shrinkage of 5.6 {+-} 2.7% was observed within the follow-up period. Histologic analysis revealed an inflammatory foreign body reaction with partial polymer degradation. In silicone aneurysm models, intra-aneurysmal pressure remained unchanged during liquid embolic injection, whereas balloon inflation resulted in a mean pressure increase of 31.2 {+-} 0.7%. No polymer shrinkage was observed in vitro. The aneurysm enlargement noted was presumably due to pressure elevation after balloon inflation, which resulted in dilatation of the weak venous wall of the newly constructed aneurysm-another shortcoming of this experimental aneurysm model. The volume decrease after 4 weeks expressed partial polymer degradation.

  13. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for the Treatment of Liver Neoplasms in the Caudate Lobe Left of the Vena Cava: Electrode Placement Through the Left Lobe of the Liver Under CT-Fluoroscopic Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamakado, Koichiro, E-mail: yama@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Akeboshi, Masao; Takaki, Haruyuki; Takeda, Kan [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Five hepatocellular carcinomas and one liver metastasis located in the caudate lobe left of the inferior vena cava were successfully treated by radiofrequency (RF) ablation by placing the RF electrode into each tumor through the left lobe of the liver under the CT-fluoroscopic guidance. All tumors were free of enhancement on dynamic contrast-enhanced CT during the mean follow-up period of 6.3 months. There were no major complications related to the procedures.

  14. CT head-scan dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom and associated measurement of ACR accreditation-phantom imaging metrics under clinically representative scan conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunner, Claudia C.; Stern, Stanley H.; Chakrabarti, Kish [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)] [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); Minniti, Ronaldo [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Parry, Marie I. [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20889 (United States)] [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20889 (United States); Skopec, Marlene [National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)] [National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To measure radiation absorbed dose and its distribution in an anthropomorphic head phantom under clinically representative scan conditions in three widely used computed tomography (CT) scanners, and to relate those dose values to metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom.Methods: By inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in the head of an anthropomorphic phantom specially developed for CT dosimetry (University of Florida, Gainesville), we measured dose with three commonly used scanners (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Siemens Definition, Philips Brilliance 64) at two different clinical sites (Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, National Institutes of Health). The scanners were set to operate with the same data-acquisition and image-reconstruction protocols as used clinically for typical head scans, respective of the practices of each facility for each scanner. We also analyzed images of the ACR CT accreditation phantom with the corresponding protocols. While the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance protocols utilized only conventional, filtered back-projection (FBP) image-reconstruction methods, the GE Discovery also employed its particular version of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm that can be blended in desired proportions with the FBP algorithm. We did an objective image-metrics analysis evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and CNR for images reconstructed with FBP. For images reconstructed with ASIR, we only analyzed the CNR, since MTF and NPS results are expected to depend on the object for iterative reconstruction algorithms.Results: The OSLD measurements showed that the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance scanners (located at two different clinical facilities) yield average absorbed doses in tissue of 42.6 and 43.1 mGy, respectively. The GE Discovery delivers about the same amount of dose (43.7 mGy) when run under similar operating and image-reconstruction conditions, i.e., without tube current modulation and ASIR. The image-metrics analysis likewise showed that the MTF, NPS, and CNR associated with the reconstructed images are mutually comparable when the three scanners are run with similar settings, and differences can be attributed to different edge-enhancement properties of the applied reconstruction filters. Moreover, when the GE scanner was operated with the facility's scanner settings for routine head exams, which apply 50% ASIR and use only approximately half of the 100%-FBP dose, the CNR of the images showed no significant change. Even though the CNR alone is not sufficient to characterize the image quality and justify any dose reduction claims, it can be useful as a constancy test metric.Conclusions: This work presents a straightforward method to connect direct measurements of CT dose with objective image metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and CNR. It demonstrates that OSLD measurements in an anthropomorphic head phantom allow a realistic and locally precise estimation of magnitude and spatial distribution of dose in tissue delivered during a typical CT head scan. Additional objective analysis of the images of the ACR accreditation phantom can be used to relate the measured doses to high contrast resolution, noise, and CNR.

  15. Design and evaluation of a variable aperture collimator for conformal radiotherapy of small animals using a microCT scanner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, Edward E.; Zhou Hu; Chatterjee, Raja; Keall, Paul J.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Contag, Christopher H.; Boyer, Arthur L. [Department of Radiology Oncology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology Oncology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Scott and White Hospital, Temple, Texas 76508 (United States)

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Treatment of small animals with radiation has in general been limited to planar fields shaped with lead blocks, complicating spatial localization of dose and treatment of deep-seated targets. In order to advance laboratory radiotherapy toward what is accomplished in the clinic, we have constructed a variable aperture collimator for use in shaping the beam of microCT scanner. This unit can image small animal subjects at high resolution, and is capable of delivering therapeutic doses in reasonable exposure times. The proposed collimator consists of two stages, each containing six trapezoidal brass blocks that move along a frame in a manner similar to a camera iris producing a hexagonal aperture of variable size. The two stages are offset by 30 deg. and adjusted for the divergence of the x-ray beam so as to produce a dodecagonal profile at isocenter. Slotted rotating driving plates are used to apply force to pins in the collimator blocks and effect collimator motion. This device has been investigated through both simulation and measurement. The collimator aperture size varied from 0 to 8.5 cm as the driving plate angle increased from 0 to 41 deg. . The torque required to adjust the collimator varied from 0.5 to 5 N{center_dot}m, increasing with increasing driving plate angle. The transmission profiles produced by the scanner at isocenter exhibited a penumbra of approximately 10% of the collimator aperture width. Misalignment between the collimator assembly and the x-ray source could be identified on the transmission images and corrected by adjustment of the collimator location. This variable aperture collimator technology is therefore a feasible and flexible solution for adjustable shaping of radiation beams for use in small animal radiotherapy as well as other applications in which beam shaping is desired.

  16. A study of respiration-correlated cone-beam CT scans to correct target positioning errors in radiotherapy of thoracic cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santoro, J. P.; McNamara, J.; Yorke, E.; Pham, H.; Rimner, A.; Rosenzweig, K. E.; Mageras, G. S. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: There is increasingly widespread usage of cone-beam CT (CBCT) for guiding radiation treatment in advanced-stage lung tumors, but difficulties associated with daily CBCT in conventionally fractionated treatments include imaging dose to the patient, increased workload and longer treatment times. Respiration-correlated cone-beam CT (RC-CBCT) can improve localization accuracy in mobile lung tumors, but further increases the time and workload for conventionally fractionated treatments. This study investigates whether RC-CBCT-guided correction of systematic tumor deviations in standard fractionated lung tumor radiation treatments is more effective than 2D image-based correction of skeletal deviations alone. A second study goal compares respiration-correlated vs respiration-averaged images for determining tumor deviations. Methods: Eleven stage II-IV nonsmall cell lung cancer patients are enrolled in an IRB-approved prospective off-line protocol using RC-CBCT guidance to correct for systematic errors in GTV position. Patients receive a respiration-correlated planning CT (RCCT) at simulation, daily kilovoltage RC-CBCT scans during the first week of treatment and weekly scans thereafter. Four types of correction methods are compared: (1) systematic error in gross tumor volume (GTV) position, (2) systematic error in skeletal anatomy, (3) daily skeletal corrections, and (4) weekly skeletal corrections. The comparison is in terms of weighted average of the residual GTV deviations measured from the RC-CBCT scans and representing the estimated residual deviation over the treatment course. In the second study goal, GTV deviations computed from matching RCCT and RC-CBCT are compared to deviations computed from matching respiration-averaged images consisting of a CBCT reconstructed using all projections and an average-intensity-projection CT computed from the RCCT. Results: Of the eleven patients in the GTV-based systematic correction protocol, two required no correction, seven required a single correction, one required two corrections, and one required three corrections. Mean residual GTV deviation (3D distance) following GTV-based systematic correction (mean {+-} 1 standard deviation 4.8 {+-} 1.5 mm) is significantly lower than for systematic skeletal-based (6.5 {+-} 2.9 mm, p= 0.015), and weekly skeletal-based correction (7.2 {+-} 3.0 mm, p= 0.001), but is not significantly lower than daily skeletal-based correction (5.4 {+-} 2.6 mm, p= 0.34). In two cases, first-day CBCT images reveal tumor changes-one showing tumor growth, the other showing large tumor displacement-that are not readily observed in radiographs. Differences in computed GTV deviations between respiration-correlated and respiration-averaged images are 0.2 {+-} 1.8 mm in the superior-inferior direction and are of similar magnitude in the other directions. Conclusions: An off-line protocol to correct GTV-based systematic error in locally advanced lung tumor cases can be effective at reducing tumor deviations, although the findings need confirmation with larger patient statistics. In some cases, a single cone-beam CT can be useful for assessing tumor changes early in treatment, if more than a few days elapse between simulation and the start of treatment. Tumor deviations measured with respiration-averaged CT and CBCT images are consistent with those measured with respiration-correlated images; the respiration-averaged method is more easily implemented in the clinic.

  17. A database for estimating organ dose for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans for arbitrary spectra and angular tube current modulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rupcich, Franco; Badal, Andreu; Kyprianou, Iacovos; Schmidt, Taly Gilat [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 (United States); Division of Imaging and Applied Mathematics (OSEL/CDRH), US Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20905 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 (United States)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a database for estimating organ dose in a voxelized patient model for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT acquisitions with any spectra and angular tube current modulation setting. The database enables organ dose estimation for existing and novel acquisition techniques without requiring Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: The study simulated transport of monoenergetic photons between 5 and 150 keV for 1000 projections over 360 Degree-Sign through anthropomorphic voxelized female chest and head (0 Degree-Sign and 30 Degree-Sign tilt) phantoms and standard head and body CTDI dosimetry cylinders. The simulations resulted in tables of normalized dose deposition for several radiosensitive organs quantifying the organ dose per emitted photon for each incident photon energy and projection angle for coronary angiography and brain perfusion acquisitions. The values in a table can be multiplied by an incident spectrum and number of photons at each projection angle and then summed across all energies and angles to estimate total organ dose. Scanner-specific organ dose may be approximated by normalizing the database-estimated organ dose by the database-estimated CTDI{sub vol} and multiplying by a physical CTDI{sub vol} measurement. Two examples are provided demonstrating how to use the tables to estimate relative organ dose. In the first, the change in breast and lung dose during coronary angiography CT scans is calculated for reduced kVp, angular tube current modulation, and partial angle scanning protocols relative to a reference protocol. In the second example, the change in dose to the eye lens is calculated for a brain perfusion CT acquisition in which the gantry is tilted 30 Degree-Sign relative to a nontilted scan. Results: Our database provides tables of normalized dose deposition for several radiosensitive organs irradiated during coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans. Validation results indicate total organ doses calculated using our database are within 1% of those calculated using Monte Carlo simulations with the same geometry and scan parameters for all organs except red bone marrow (within 6%), and within 23% of published estimates for different voxelized phantoms. Results from the example of using the database to estimate organ dose for coronary angiography CT acquisitions show 2.1%, 1.1%, and -32% change in breast dose and 2.1%, -0.74%, and 4.7% change in lung dose for reduced kVp, tube current modulated, and partial angle protocols, respectively, relative to the reference protocol. Results show -19.2% difference in dose to eye lens for a tilted scan relative to a nontilted scan. The reported relative changes in organ doses are presented without quantification of image quality and are for the sole purpose of demonstrating the use of the proposed database. Conclusions: The proposed database and calculation method enable the estimation of organ dose for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans utilizing any spectral shape and angular tube current modulation scheme by taking advantage of the precalculated Monte Carlo simulation results. The database can be used in conjunction with image quality studies to develop optimized acquisition techniques and may be particularly beneficial for optimizing dual kVp acquisitions for which numerous kV, mA, and filtration combinations may be investigated.

  18. 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% Internet (2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyle, Robert

    Tarrytown NY General Electric Company Information Mgt Leadership Dvlpt Prog Fairfield CT General Electric Company Information Mgt Leadership Dvlpt Prog Norwalk CT General Electric Company Information Mgt of Information Studies Hyland Software Technical Support Analyst Westlake OH IBE, Amenture Consulting Co. Entry

  19. SU-E-T-86: Comparison of Two Commercially Available Programs for the Evaluation of Delivered Daily Dose Using Cone Beam CT (CBCT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuohy, R; Bosse, C; Mavroidis, P; Shi, Z; Crownover, R; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S [University of Texas Health Science Center, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In this study, two commercially available programs were compared for the evaluation of delivered daily dose using cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods: Thirty (n=30) patients previously treated in our clinic (10 prostate, 10 SBRT lung and 10 abdomen) were used in this study. The patients' plans were optimized and calculated using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. The daily CBCT scans were imported into Velocity and RayStation along with the corresponding planning CTs, structure sets and 3D dose distributions for each patient. The organs at risk (OAR) were contoured on each CBCT by the prescribing physician and were included in the evaluation of the daily delivered dose. Each CBCT was registered to the planning CT, once with rigid registration and then again, separately, with deformable registration. After registering each CBCT, the dose distribution from the planning CT was overlaid and the dose volume histograms (DVH) for the OAR and the planning target volumes (PTV) were calculated. Results: For prostate patients, we observed daily volume changes for the OARs. The DVH analysis for those patients showed variation in the sparing of the OARs while PTV coverage remained virtually unchanged using both Velocity and RayStation systems. Similar results were observed for abdominal patients. In contrast, for SBRT lung patients, the DVH for the OARs and target were comparable to those from the initial treatment plan. Differences in organ volume and organ doses were also observed when comparing the daily fractions using deformable and rigid registrations. Conclusion: By using daily CBCT dose reconstruction, we proved PTV coverage for prostate and abdominal targets is adequate. However, there is significant dosimetric change for the OARs. For lung SBRT patients, the delivered daily dose for both PTV and OAR is comparable to the planned dose with no significant differences.

  20. CT Imaging Findings and Their Relevance to the Clinical Outcomes After Stent Graft Repair of Penetrating Aortic Ulcers: Six-year, Single-center Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Ji Hoon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Angle, John F.; Park, Auh Whan; Anderson, Curtis; Sabri, Saher S.; Turba, Ulku C. [University of Virginia Health System, Division of Angiography, Interventional Radiology and Special Procedures, Department of Radiology (United States); Kern, John A.; Cherry, Kenneth J. [University of Virginia Health System, Department of Surgery (United States); Matsumoto, Alan H., E-mail: ahm4d@virginia.edu [University of Virginia Health System, Division of Angiography, Interventional Radiology and Special Procedures, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To present the computed tomographic (CT) imaging findings and their relevance to clinical outcomes related to stent graft placement in patients with penetrating aortic ulcers (PAUs). Methods: Medical and imaging records and imaging studies were reviewed for consecutive patients who underwent stent graft repair of a PAU. The distribution and characteristics of the PAU, technical success of stent graft repair, procedure-related complications, associated aortic wall abnormalities, and outcomes of the PAUs at follow-up CT scans were evaluated. Results: Fifteen patients underwent endovascular treatment for PAU. A total of 87% of the PAUs were in the proximal (n = 8) or distal (n = 5) descending thoracic aorta. There was a broad spectrum of PAU depth (mean, 7.9 {+-} 5.6 mm; range 1.5-25.0 mm) and diameter (mean, 13.5 {+-} 9.7 mm; range 2.2-41.0 mm). Atherosclerosis of the thoracic aorta and intramural hematoma were associated in 53 and 93% of the patients, respectively. Technical success was achieved in 100%. Two or more stent grafts were used in five patients. Endoleaks were observed in two patients within 2 weeks of the procedure, both of which resolved spontaneously. At follow-up CT scanning, regression and thrombosis of the PAUs were observed in all patients. The average patient survival was 61.8 months, with an overall mortality of 13% (2 of 15) at follow-up. Neither death was related to the endograft device or the PAU. Conclusion: Endovascular stent graft placement was safe and effective in causing regression and thrombosis of PAUs in this small series of patients. Two or more stent grafts were used in five patients (33%) with associated long-segmental atherosclerotic changes of the thoracic aorta or intramural hematoma.

  1. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of innovative applications of technology for cost reductions to the CT-121 FGD process. Quarterly report No. 6, July--September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The project`s objective is to demonstrate innovative applications of technology for cost reduction for the Chiyoda Thoroughbred-121 (CT-121) process. The CT-121 process is a wet FGD process that removes SO{sub 2}, can achieve simultaneous particulate control, and can produce a salable by-product gypsum thereby reducing or even eliminating solid waste disposal problems. Figure 1 shows a flow schematic of the process. CT-121 removes SO{sub 2} and particulate matter in a unique limestone-based scrubber called the Jet Bubbling Reactor (JBR). IN the JBR, flue gas bubbles beneath the slurry, SO{sub 2} is absorbed, and particulate matter is removed from the gas. The agitator circulates limestone slurry to ensure that fresh reactant is always available in the bubbling or froth zone sot that SO{sub 2} removal can proceed at a rapid rate. Air is introduced into the bottom of the JBR to oxidize the absorbed SO{sub 2} to sulfate, and limestone is added continuously to neutralize the acid slurry and form gypsum. The JBR is designed to allow ample time for complete oxidation of the SO{sub 2}, for complete reaction of the limestone, and for growth of large gypsum crystals. The gypsum slurry is continuously withdrawn from the JBR and is to be dewatered in a gypsum stack. The stacking technique involves filing a diked area with gypsum slurry, allowing the gypsum solids to settle, and removing clear liquid from the top of the stack for recycle back to the process.

  2. The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI): A Completed Reference Database of Lung Nodules on CT Scans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The development of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) methods for lung nodule detection, classification, and quantitative assessment can be facilitated through a well-characterized repository of computed tomography (CT) scans. The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI) completed such a database, establishing a publicly available reference for the medical imaging research community. Initiated by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), further advanced by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH), and accompanied by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) through active participation, this public-private partnership demonstrates the success of a consortium founded on a consensus-based process. Methods: Seven academic centers and eight medical imaging companies collaborated to identify, address, and resolve challenging organizational, technical, and clinical issues to provide a solid foundation for a robust database. The LIDC/IDRI Database contains 1018 cases, each of which includes images from a clinical thoracic CT scan and an associated XML file that records the results of a two-phase image annotation process performed by four experienced thoracic radiologists. In the initial blinded-read phase, each radiologist independently reviewed each CT scan and marked lesions belonging to one of three categories (''nodule{>=}3 mm,''''nodule<3 mm,'' and ''non-nodule{>=}3 mm''). In the subsequent unblinded-read phase, each radiologist independently reviewed their own marks along with the anonymized marks of the three other radiologists to render a final opinion. The goal of this process was to identify as completely as possible all lung nodules in each CT scan without requiring forced consensus. Results: The Database contains 7371 lesions marked ''nodule'' by at least one radiologist. 2669 of these lesions were marked ''nodule{>=}3 mm'' by at least one radiologist, of which 928 (34.7%) received such marks from all four radiologists. These 2669 lesions include nodule outlines and subjective nodule characteristic ratings. Conclusions: The LIDC/IDRI Database is expected to provide an essential medical imaging research resource to spur CAD development, validation, and dissemination in clinical practice.

  3. Liver segmentation in contrast enhanced CT data using graph cuts and interactive 3D segmentation refinement methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beichel, Reinhard; Bornik, Alexander; Bauer, Christian; Sorantin, Erich [Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Internal Medicine, Iowa Institute for Biomedical Imaging, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Institute for Computer Graphics and Vision, Graz University of Technology, Inffeldgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa Institute for Biomedical Imaging, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Department of Radiology, Medical University Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 34, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Liver segmentation is an important prerequisite for the assessment of liver cancer treatment options like tumor resection, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), radiofrequency ablation, etc. The purpose of this work was to evaluate a new approach for liver segmentation. Methods: A graph cuts segmentation method was combined with a three-dimensional virtual reality based segmentation refinement approach. The developed interactive segmentation system allowed the user to manipulate volume chunks and/or surfaces instead of 2D contours in cross-sectional images (i.e, slice-by-slice). The method was evaluated on twenty routinely acquired portal-phase contrast enhanced multislice computed tomography (CT) data sets. An independent reference was generated by utilizing a currently clinically utilized slice-by-slice segmentation method. After 1 h of introduction to the developed segmentation system, three experts were asked to segment all twenty data sets with the proposed method. Results: Compared to the independent standard, the relative volumetric segmentation overlap error averaged over all three experts and all twenty data sets was 3.74%. Liver segmentation required on average 16 min of user interaction per case. The calculated relative volumetric overlap errors were not found to be significantly different [analysis of variance (ANOVA) test, p = 0.82] between experts who utilized the proposed 3D system. In contrast, the time required by each expert for segmentation was found to be significantly different (ANOVA test, p = 0.0009). Major differences between generated segmentations and independent references were observed in areas were vessels enter or leave the liver and no accepted criteria for defining liver boundaries exist. In comparison, slice-by-slice based generation of the independent standard utilizing a live wire tool took 70.1 min on average. A standard 2D segmentation refinement approach applied to all twenty data sets required on average 38.2 min of user interaction and resulted in statistically not significantly different segmentation error indices (ANOVA test, significance level of 0.05). Conclusions: All three experts were able to produce liver segmentations with low error rates. User interaction time savings of up to 71% compared to a 2D refinement approach demonstrate the utility and potential of our approach. The system offers a range of different tools to manipulate segmentation results, and some users might benefit from a longer learning phase to develop efficient segmentation refinement strategies. The presented approach represents a generally applicable segmentation approach that can be applied to many medical image segmentation problems.

  4. CT Clean Energy Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clean Energy Communities program, offered by the Clean Energy Finance & Investment Authority and the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, offers incentives for communities that pledge their...

  5. CT Clean Energy Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clean Energy Communities program, offered by the Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority and the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, offers incentives for communities that pledge their...

  6. ContaCt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercializationValidation and UncertaintyPWR[NiFe]-hydrogenase

  7. An evaluation of the variability of tumor-shape definition derived by experienced observers from CT images of supraglottic carcinomas (ACRIN protocol 6658)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Jay S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States)]. E-mail: jcooper@maimonidesmed.org; Mukherji, Suresh K. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Otolaryngology Head Neck Surgery, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Toledano, Alicia Y. [Center for Statistical Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Beldon, Clifford [Department of Radiology, State University of New York, Albany Medical School, Albany, NY (United States); Schmalfuss, Ilona M. [Department of Radiology, University of Florida School of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Amdur, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida School of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sailer, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Loevner, Laurie A. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kousouboris, Phil [Department of Radiology, Bryn Mawr Hospital, Bryn Mawr, PA (United States); Ang, K. Kian [Department of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cormack, Jean [Center for Statistical Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Sicks, JoRean M.S. [Center for Statistical Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States)

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Accurate target definition is considered essential for sophisticated, image-guided radiation therapy; however, relatively little information has been reported that measures our ability to identify the precise shape of targets accurately. We decided to assess the manner in which eight 'experts' interpreted the size and shape of tumors based on 'real-life' contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scans. Methods and Materials: Four neuroradiologists and four radiation oncologists (the authors) with considerable experience and presumed expertise in treating head-and-neck tumors independently contoured, slice-by-slice, his/her interpretation of the precise gross tumor volume (GTV) on each of 20 sets of CT scans taken from 20 patients who previously were enrolled in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 91-11. Results: The average proportion of overlap (i.e., the degree of agreement) was 0.532 (95% confidence interval 0.457 to 0.606). There was a slight tendency for the proportion of overlap to increase with increasing average GTV. Conclusions: Our work suggests that estimation of tumor shape currently is imprecise, even for experienced physicians. In consequence, there appears to be a practical limit to the current trend of smaller fields and tighter margins.

  8. Evaluation of Extrahepatic Perfusion of Anticancer Drugs in the Right Gastric Arterial Region on Fused Images Using Combined CT/SPECT: Is Extrahepatic Perfusion Predictive of Gastric Toxicity?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikeda, Osamu, E-mail: osamu-3643ik@do9.enjoy.ne.jp; Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Morishita, Shouji [Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Takamori, Hiroshi; Chikamoto, Akira; Kanemitsu, Keiichirou [Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Japan); Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan)

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Background. Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy is effective for treating primary and metastatic carcinomas of the liver. Since hepatic arteries also supply the stomach and duodenum, HAI may result in unwanted infusion into the upper gastrointestinal tract and consequent gastric toxicity. Using fused images obtained with a combined SPECT/CT system, we assessed extrahepatic perfusion (EHP) and its correlation with gastrointestinal toxicity in patients receiving HAI. Methods. We studied 41 patients with primary or metastatic carcinoma of the liver who received HAI chemotherapy consisting of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin. All underwent abdominal SPECT using a {sup 99m}Tc-MAA (185 MBq) instrument and an injection rate of 0.1 ml/min, identical to the chemotherapy infusion rate. Delivery was through an implantable port. We analyzed the distribution of the anticancer agent on fused images and the relationship between EHP of the right gastric arterial region and gastric toxicity. All patients underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGDS). Results. Of the 41 patients, 11 (27%) manifested enhancement of the duodenal and gastric pyloric region on fused images. EGDS at the time of reservoir placement detected gastric ulcers in 10 of these patients. Conclusion. Fusion imaging with combined SPECT/CT reflects the actual distribution of the infused anticancer agents. The detection of EHP on fused images is predictive of the direct gastric toxicity from anticancer agents in patients undergoing HAI.

  9. Computerized method for evaluating diagnostic image quality of calcified plaque images in cardiac CT: Validation on a physical dynamic cardiac phantom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Martin; Rodgers, Zachary; Giger, Maryellen L.; Bardo, Dianna M. E.; Patel, Amit R. [Department of Radiology, Committee on Medical Physics, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 2026, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239 (United States); Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 5084, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In cardiac computed tomography (CT), important clinical indices, such as the coronary calcium score and the percentage of coronary artery stenosis, are often adversely affected by motion artifacts. As a result, the expert observer must decide whether or not to use these indices during image interpretation. Computerized methods potentially can be used to assist in these decisions. In a previous study, an artificial neural network (ANN) regression model provided assessability (image quality) indices of calcified plaque images from the software NCAT phantom that were highly agreeable with those provided by expert observers. The method predicted assessability indices based on computer-extracted features of the plaque. In the current study, the ANN-predicted assessability indices were used to identify calcified plaque images with diagnostic calcium scores (based on mass) from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom. The basic assumption was that better quality images were associated with more accurate calcium scores. Methods: A 64-channel CT scanner was used to obtain 500 calcified plaque images from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom at different heart rates, cardiac phases, and plaque locations. Two expert observers independently provided separate sets of assessability indices for each of these images. Separate sets of ANN-predicted assessability indices tailored to each observer were then generated within the framework of a bootstrap resampling scheme. For each resampling iteration, the absolute calcium score error between the calcium scores of the motion-contaminated plaque image and its corresponding stationary image served as the ground truth in terms of indicating images with diagnostic calcium scores. The performances of the ANN-predicted and observer-assigned indices in identifying images with diagnostic calcium scores were then evaluated using ROC analysis. Results: Assessability indices provided by the first observer and the corresponding ANN performed similarly (AUC{sub OBS1}=0.80 [0.73,0.86] vs AUC{sub ANN1}=0.88 [0.82,0.92]) as that of the second observer and the corresponding ANN (AUC{sub OBS2}=0.87 [0.83,0.91] vs AUC{sub ANN2}=0.90 [0.85,0.94]). Moreover, the ANN-predicted indices were generated in a fraction of the time required to obtain the observer-assigned indices. Conclusions: ANN-predicted assessability indices performed similar to observer-assigned assessability indices in identifying images with diagnostic calcium scores from the physical dynamic cardiac phantom. The results of this study demonstrate the potential of using computerized methods for identifying images with diagnostic clinical indices in cardiac CT images.

  10. A cascaded model of spectral distortions due to spectral response effects and pulse pileup effects in a photon-counting x-ray detector for CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cammin, Jochen, E-mail: jcammin1@jhmi.edu, E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu; Taguchi, Katsuyuki, E-mail: jcammin1@jhmi.edu, E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu [Division of Medical Imaging Physics, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)] [Division of Medical Imaging Physics, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Xu, Jennifer [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Hartsough, Neal E. [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States)] [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Energy discriminating, photon-counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology for computed tomography (CT) with various potential benefits for clinical CT. The photon energies measured by PCDs can be distorted due to the interactions of a photon with the detector and the interaction of multiple coincident photons. These effects result in distorted recorded x-ray spectra which may lead to artifacts in reconstructed CT images and inaccuracies in tissue identification. Model-based compensation techniques have the potential to account for the distortion effects. This approach requires only a small number of parameters and is applicable to a wide range of spectra and count rates, but it needs an accurate model of the spectral distortions occurring in PCDs. The purpose of this study was to develop a model of those spectral distortions and to evaluate the model using a PCD (model DXMCT-1; DxRay, Inc., Northridge, CA) and various x-ray spectra in a wide range of count rates. Methods: The authors hypothesize that the complex phenomena of spectral distortions can be modeled by: (1) separating them into count-rate independent factors that we call the spectral response effects (SRE), and count-rate dependent factors that we call the pulse pileup effects (PPE), (2) developing separate models for SRE and PPE, and (3) cascading the SRE and PPE models into a combined SRE+PPE model that describes PCD distortions at both low and high count rates. The SRE model describes the probability distribution of the recorded spectrum, with a photo peak and a continuum tail, given the incident photon energy. Model parameters were obtained from calibration measurements with three radioisotopes and then interpolated linearly for other energies. The PPE model used was developed in the authors’ previous work [K. Taguchi et al., “Modeling the performance of a photon counting x-ray detector for CT: Energy response and pulse pileup effects,” Med. Phys. 38(2), 1089–1102 (2011)]. The agreement between the x-ray spectra calculated by the cascaded SRE+PPE model and the measured spectra was evaluated for various levels of deadtime loss ratios (DLR) and incident spectral shapes, realized using different attenuators, in terms of the weighted coefficient of variation (COV{sub W}), i.e., the root mean square difference weighted by the statistical errors of the data and divided by the mean. Results: At low count rates, when DLR < 10%, the distorted spectra measured by the DXMCT-1 were in agreement with those calculated by SRE only, with COV{sub W}'s less than 4%. At higher count rates, the measured spectra were also in agreement with the ones calculated by the cascaded SRE+PPE model; with PMMA as attenuator, COV{sub W} was 5.6% at a DLR of 22% and as small as 6.7% for a DLR as high as 55%. Conclusions: The x-ray spectra calculated by the proposed model agreed with the measured spectra over a wide range of count rates and spectral shapes. The SRE model predicted the distorted, recorded spectra with low count rates over various types and thicknesses of attenuators. The study also validated the hypothesis that the complex spectral distortions in a PCD can be adequately modeled by cascading the count-rate independent SRE and the count-rate dependent PPE.

  11. SU-E-J-103: Setup Errors Analysis by Cone-Beam CT (CBCT)-Based Imaged-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, H; Wang, W; Hu, W; Chen, X; Wang, X; Yu, C [Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Taizhou, Zhejiang (China)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To quantify setup errors by pretreatment kilovolt cone-beam computed tomography(KV-CBCT) scans for middle or distal esophageal carcinoma patients. Methods: Fifty-two consecutive middle or distal esophageal carcinoma patients who underwent IMRT were included this study. A planning CT scan using a big-bore CT simulator was performed in the treatment position and was used as the reference scan for image registration with CBCT. CBCT scans(On-Board Imaging v1. 5 system, Varian Medical Systems) were acquired daily during the first treatment week. A total of 260 CBCT scans was assessed with a registration clip box defined around the PTV-thorax in the reference scan based on(nine CBCTs per patient) bony anatomy using Offline Review software v10.0(Varian Medical Systems). The anterior-posterior(AP), left-right(LR), superiorinferior( SI) corrections were recorded. The systematic and random errors were calculated. The CTV-to-PTV margins in each CBCT frequency was based on the Van Herk formula (2.5?+0.7?). Results: The SD of systematic error (?) was 2.0mm, 2.3mm, 3.8mm in the AP, LR and SI directions, respectively. The average random error (?) was 1.6mm, 2.4mm, 4.1mm in the AP, LR and SI directions, respectively. The CTV-to-PTV safety margin was 6.1mm, 7.5mm, 12.3mm in the AP, LR and SI directions based on van Herk formula. Conclusion: Our data recommend the use of 6 mm, 8mm, and 12 mm for esophageal carcinoma patient setup in AP, LR, SI directions, respectively.

  12. SU-E-J-19: Accuracy of Dual-Energy CT-Derived Relative Electron Density for Proton Therapy Dose Calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullins, J; Duan, X; Kruse, J; Herman, M [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Bues, M [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the suitability of dual-energy CT (DECT) to calculate relative electron density (RED) of tissues for accurate proton therapy dose calculation. Methods: DECT images of RED tissue surrogates were acquired at 80 and 140 kVp. Samples (RED=0.19?2.41) were imaged in a water-equivalent phantom in a variety of configurations. REDs were calculated using the DECT numbers and inputs of the high and low energy spectral weightings. DECT-derived RED was compared between geometric configurations and for variations in the spectral inputs to assess the sensitivity of RED accuracy versus expected values. Results: RED accuracy was dependent on accurate spectral input influenced by phantom thickness and radius from the phantom center. Material samples located at the center of the phantom generally showed the best agreement to reference RED values, but only when attenuation of the surrounding phantom thickness was accounted for in the calculation spectra. Calculated RED changed by up to 10% for some materials when the sample was located at an 11 cm radius from the phantom center. Calculated REDs under the best conditions still differed from reference values by up to 5% in bone and 14% in lung. Conclusion: DECT has previously been used to differentiate tissue types based on RED and Z for binary tissue-type segmentation. To improve upon the current standard of empirical conversion of CT number to RED for treatment planning dose calculation, DECT methods must be able to calculate RED to better than 3% accuracy throughout the image. The DECT method is sensitive to the accuracy of spectral inputs used for calculation, as well as to spatial position in the anatomy. Effort to address adjustments to the spectral calculation inputs based on position and phantom attenuation will be required before DECT-determined RED can achieve a consistent level of accuracy for application in dose calculation.

  13. Automatic segmentation of head and neck CT images for radiotherapy treatment planning using multiple atlases, statistical appearance models, and geodesic active contours

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritscher, Karl D., E-mail: Karl.Fritscher@umit.at; Sharp, Gregory [Department for Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)] [Department for Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Peroni, Marta [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland)] [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland); Zaffino, Paolo; Spadea, Maria Francesca [Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro 88100 (Italy)] [Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro 88100 (Italy); Schubert, Rainer [Institute for Biomedical Image Analysis, Private University of Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology, Hall in Tirol 6060 (Austria)] [Institute for Biomedical Image Analysis, Private University of Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology, Hall in Tirol 6060 (Austria)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Accurate delineation of organs at risk (OARs) is a precondition for intensity modulated radiation therapy. However, manual delineation of OARs is time consuming and prone to high interobserver variability. Because of image artifacts and low image contrast between different structures, however, the number of available approaches for autosegmentation of structures in the head-neck area is still rather low. In this project, a new approach for automated segmentation of head-neck CT images that combine the robustness of multiatlas-based segmentation with the flexibility of geodesic active contours and the prior knowledge provided by statistical appearance models is presented. Methods: The presented approach is using an atlas-based segmentation approach in combination with label fusion in order to initialize a segmentation pipeline that is based on using statistical appearance models and geodesic active contours. An anatomically correct approximation of the segmentation result provided by atlas-based segmentation acts as a starting point for an iterative refinement of this approximation. The final segmentation result is based on using model to image registration and geodesic active contours, which are mutually influencing each other. Results: 18 CT images in combination with manually segmented labels of parotid glands and brainstem were used in a leave-one-out cross validation scheme in order to evaluate the presented approach. For this purpose, 50 different statistical appearance models have been created and used for segmentation. Dice coefficient (DC), mean absolute distance and max. Hausdorff distance between the autosegmentation results and expert segmentations were calculated. An average Dice coefficient of DC = 0.81 (right parotid gland), DC = 0.84 (left parotid gland), and DC = 0.86 (brainstem) could be achieved. Conclusions: The presented framework provides accurate segmentation results for three important structures in the head neck area. Compared to a segmentation approach based on using multiple atlases in combination with label fusion, the proposed hybrid approach provided more accurate results within a clinically acceptable amount of time.

  14. SU-E-I-46: Sample-Size Dependence of Model Observers for Estimating Low-Contrast Detection Performance From CT Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiser, I; Lu, Z [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Recently, task-based assessment of diagnostic CT systems has attracted much attention. Detection task performance can be estimated using human observers, or mathematical observer models. While most models are well established, considerable bias can be introduced when performance is estimated from a limited number of image samples. Thus, the purpose of this work was to assess the effect of sample size on bias and uncertainty of two channelized Hotelling observers and a template-matching observer. Methods: The image data used for this study consisted of 100 signal-present and 100 signal-absent regions-of-interest, which were extracted from CT slices. The experimental conditions included two signal sizes and five different x-ray beam current settings (mAs). Human observer performance for these images was determined in 2-alternative forced choice experiments. These data were provided by the Mayo clinic in Rochester, MN. Detection performance was estimated from three observer models, including channelized Hotelling observers (CHO) with Gabor or Laguerre-Gauss (LG) channels, and a template-matching observer (TM). Different sample sizes were generated by randomly selecting a subset of image pairs, (N=20,40,60,80). Observer performance was quantified as proportion of correct responses (PC). Bias was quantified as the relative difference of PC for 20 and 80 image pairs. Results: For n=100, all observer models predicted human performance across mAs and signal sizes. Bias was 23% for CHO (Gabor), 7% for CHO (LG), and 3% for TM. The relative standard deviation, ?(PC)/PC at N=20 was highest for the TM observer (11%) and lowest for the CHO (Gabor) observer (5%). Conclusion: In order to make image quality assessment feasible in the clinical practice, a statistically efficient observer model, that can predict performance from few samples, is needed. Our results identified two observer models that may be suited for this task.

  15. ANNUAL FIRE SAFETY REPORT 2014 Ithaca, NY Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://sp.ehs.cornell.edu/firesafetyreport Environmental Health and Safety Building East Hill Office Building 201 Palm Road 395 Pine Tree Rd, Suite 210 with important information about fire safety on campus. You may obtain a copy of this report and the NYS Kerry

  16. ANNUAL FIRE SAFETY REPORT 2013 Ithaca, NY Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    ://sp.ehs.cornell.edu/firesafetyreport Environmental Health and Safety Building East Hill Office Building 201 Palm Road 395 Pine Tree Rd, Suite 210 with important information about fire safety on campus. You may obtain a copy of this report and the NYS Kerry

  17. New York, NY Vehicle Purchase & Infrastructure Development Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) administers the New York City Private Fleet Alternative Fuel/Electric Vehicle Program (Program) in cooperation with New York...

  18. aloe glycoprotein ny945: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    receptor A Abbreviations: Ad, adenovirus; BMDCs, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; CFDA-SE, 5 Nicchitta, Chris 68 Electron tomography analysis of envelope glycoprotein trimers...

  19. Radiological Scoping Survey of the Scotia Depot, Scotia, NY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, E. N.

    2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the radiological scoping survey were to collect adequate field data for use in evaluating the radiological condition of Scotia Depot land areas, warehouses, and support buildings.

  20. Mill Seat Landfill Bioreactor Renewable Green Power (NY)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton & Loguidice, P.C.

    2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The project was implemented at the Mill Seat landfill located in the Town of Bergen, Monroe County, New York. The landfill was previously equipped with a landfill gas collection system to collect methane gas produced by the bioreactor landfill and transport it to a central location for end use. A landfill gas to energy facility was also previously constructed at the site, which utilized generator engines, designed to be powered with landfill methane gas, to produce electricity, to be utilized on site and to be sold to the utility grid. The landfill gas generation rate at the site had exceeded the capacity of the existing generators, and the excess landfill gas was therefore being burned at a candlestick flare for destruction. The funded project consisted of the procurement and installation of two (2) additional 800 KW Caterpillar 3516 generator engines, generator sets, switchgear and ancillary equipment.

  1. 515 Loudon Road Loudonville, NY 12211-1462

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    it on hold and Facilities was unable to fix it. Due to the construction of the new residence hall, the area a meeting that went over the small details of what is going to be included in the new Residence Hall. Ie

  2. area ny hovedflyplass: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fax: (518) 437-8659 Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: statistics with a generic turbine power curve reflecting current megawatt-scale wind...

  3. ,"Grand Island, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Grand Island,...

  4. ,"Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Niagara Falls,...

  5. ,"Grand Island, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

  6. ,"Massena, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

  7. ,"Waddington, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

  8. Methane Gas Utilization Project from Landfill at Ellery (NY)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pantelis K. Panteli

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Landfill Gas to Electric Energy Generation and Transmission at Chautauqua County Landfill, Town of Ellery, New York. The goal of this project was to create a practical method with which the energy, of the landfill gas produced by the decomposing waste at the Chautauqua County Landfill, could be utilized. This goal was accomplished with the construction of a landfill gas to electric energy plant (originally 6.4MW and now 9.6MW) and the construction of an inter-connection power-line, from the power-plant to the nearest (5.5 miles) power-grid point.

  9. Hring om ny national solcellestrategi. Dato og tid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    beskrevne strategi i forbindelse med prioritering af PSO F&U midler på solcelleområdet. Udkastet til den indenfor solcelleområdet ­ eksempel på norsk succes. John Andersen, Vice President, Renewable Energy Corporation A/S, Oslo. 10.15: Præsentation af udkast til national strategi for solceller. Peter Ahm, PA Energy

  10. Weatherization Subgrantees Reach More N.Y. Homes | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    22, 2010 - 4:37pm Addthis Lindsay Gsell Thanks to funds from the Recovery Act, New York expanded its network of weatherization subgrantees. The state has added nine additional...

  11. Ny ageNda for humaNioras fremtid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mere ... af helge hollesen hho@adm.au.dk Omkring tre ud af fire ansatte har nu afgivet deres vurdering

  12. 143 Caldwell Hall Ithaca, NY 14853-2602

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    mail (original copy) To find contact information for Graduate School staff, visit: http://www.gradschool.cornell.edu/about-us/contacs

  13. Mo1u!ny Classes Today Oldest and Largest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with internal combustion engines w~s recog- nized after his retirement from teaching, was not surprised to learn

  14. DOE Awards Small Business Contract for West Valley NY Services

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CINCINNATI – The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a task order (contract) to Chenega Global Services, LLC of Anchorage, Alaska, for administrative and technical support services at the West Valley Demonstration Project, West Valley, New York. The contract has a one-year performance period with a value of $1.3 million, and contains two one-year extension options with a total value of $4.12 million. Chenega Global Services is a certified small and disadvantaged business under the Small Business Administration.

  15. 515 w 111th street New York, NY 10025

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. in Environmental Engineering, GPA: 90/100 Jun 2011 · Courses: Solid waste treatment and disposal EXPERINENCE Earth industry on solid Waste Management Nankai University Tianjin, China Research assistant Apr 2009- Aug 2009 digestion coupled with solid-phase extraction," Chromatograph 2010(5). SKILLS Microsoft Office, C++, Simapro

  16. NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN NY/NJ HARBOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VAN DER LELIE,D.JONES,K.W.REID-GREEN,J.D.STERN,E.A.

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the feasibility of using natural attenuation methods for ecosystem restoration in New York/New Jersey Harbor. Measurements were made of the most probable number of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in native sediments and in samples, which had been supplemented with an appropriate electron donor and electron acceptor. The results showed that the activity of the endogenous microbial population in the native sediment was high enough to make possible adequate chemical transformation rates. The bioavailability of the zinc in the sediments was measured using the BIOMET biosensor technique. The bioavailability of the zinc was effectively eliminated following the microbial activities. We concluded that natural attenuation could be used effectively in treating sediments from Newark Bay and surrounding waters and that the resultant materials could likely be used in environmental restoration projects of the type proposed for construction in South Kearny, NJ.

  17. Hadron Collider Physics XII 511 June 1997, Stony Brook, NY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    that cover different ranges of pseudorapidity, out to j = 4:2. D0 features a uniform design of depleted uranium and liquid argon calorimetry. The segmentation in j \\Gamma OE is 0:1 \\Theta 0:1, but the third

  18. Massena, NY Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0Feet)Year Jan Feb Marper2.7

  19. Microsoft Word - NY17-15 01-50.rtf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:FEngineers® NewHydrologicPrinted

  20. seca-core-tech-prw-ny | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development ofrluyendiNeed for713thProgram

  1. Buffalo, NY Liquefied Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14SalesSameCommercial(Million Cubic Feet)

  2. Champlain, NY Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million Cubic Feet)Iron andCarbon3,986

  3. Champlain, NY Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million Cubic Feet)Iron

  4. Champlain, NY Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million Cubic Feet)Iron(Million Cubic

  5. Champlain, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million Cubic Feet)Iron(Million

  6. Champlain, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million Cubic Feet)Iron(MillionThousand

  7. QER Public Meeting in New York, NY: Energy Infrastructure Finance |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005UNS Electric,RM ExitProperty Transfer or37 PM To: QERcommentsDepartment

  8. Waddington, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel Consumption0 0 0Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1

  9. Waddington, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel Consumption0 0 0Feet) Decade Year-0

  10. New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, Albany, NY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForumEngines |NewState Energy Research and Development

  11. New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, Albany, NY |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForumEngines |NewState Energy Research and

  12. Waddington, NY Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810 0 0349,980 267,227 231,831 241,506

  13. Waddington, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810 0 0349,980 267,227Thousand Cubic

  14. Waddington, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810 0 0349,980 267,227Thousand

  15. Waddington, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810 0 0349,980

  16. Business Council of Westchester County (NY) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LP Biomass Facility JumpBurleigh County,Busch Ranch Jump

  17. Grand Island, NY Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearper Thousand Cubic81,898 63,548 47,616

  18. Grand Island, NY Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearper Thousand Cubic81,898 63,548 47,6160

  19. QER Public Meeting in New York, NY: Energy Infrastructure Finance |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 |ofDepartmentHederman,Department ofDistribution

  20. Northern Westchester Energy Action Consortium (NY) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth America DrillingCaliforniaNorthern RioInformation