National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for nutrient dynamics trace

  1. Nutrient dynamics and nitrogen trace gas flux during ecosystem development in montane rain forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, R.H.; Vitousek, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    Patterns of nitrogen trace gas emissions, soil nitrogen flux, and nutrient availability were evaluated at five sites that form a chronosequence in Hawaiian montane rain forest. The estimated age of basaltic parent material from which soils developed at the Kilauea site was 200 yr, 6000 yr at the Puu Makaala site, 185000 yr at the Kohala site, 1.65 x 10{sup 6} yr at the Molokai site, and 4.5 x 10{sup 6} yr at the Kauai site. Peak net N mineralization and nitrification values were found in soils from the 185000-yr-old Kohala site. Nitrogen content of foliage and leaf litter was highest in the intermediate age sites (Puu Makaala and Kohala) and N and P retranslocation was lowest at the Puu Makaala site. Soil cores fertilized with nitrogen had significantly higher rates of root ingrowth than control cores at the two youngest sites (200 and 6000 yr old) but not in older sites (185000 and 4.5 x 10{sup 6}-yr-old sites) and total fine root growth into control cores was greatest at the Kohala site. The highest N{sub 2}O emissions were found at the 185000-yr-old Kohala site, while the highest combined flux of N{sub 2}O + NO was observed at the 4.5 x 10{sup 6}-yr-old Kauai site. While overall N{sub 2}O emission rates were correlated with rates of N transformations, soil water content appeared to influence the magnitude of emissions of N{sub 2}O and the ratios of emissions of NO vs. N{sub 2}O. N{sub 2}O emissions occurred when water-filled pore space (WFPS) values were >40%, with highest emissions in at least two sites observed at WFPS values of 75%. Among sites, high N{sub 2}O emissions were associated with high soil N transformation rates. Large NO fluxes were observed only at the Kauai site when WFPS values were <60%. 50 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Dynamic ray tracing and traveltime corrections for global seismic tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian Yue Hung, S.-H.; Nolet, Guust; Montelli, Raffaella; Dahlen, F.A.

    2007-09-10

    We present a dynamic ray tracing program for a spherically symmetric Earth that may be used to compute Frechet kernels for traveltime and amplitude anomalies at finite frequency. The program works for arbitrarily defined phases and background models. The numerical precisions of kinematic and dynamic ray tracing are optimized to produce traveltime errors under 0.1 s, which is well below the data uncertainty in global seismology. This tolerance level is obtained for an integration step size of about 20 km for the most common seismic phases. We also give software to compute ellipticity, crustal and topographic corrections and attenuation.

  3. TRACE3D. Interactive Beam-Dynamics Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, L.; Yao, C.Y.

    1993-12-01

    TRACE3D is an interactive program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined system. The transport system may consist of the following elements: drift, thin lens, quadrupole, permanent magnet quadrupole, solenoid, doublet, triplet, bending magnet, edge angle (for bend), RF gap, radio-frequency-quadrupole cell, RF cavity, coupled-cavity tank, user-desired element, coordinate rotation, and identical element. The beam is represented by a 6X6 matrix defining a hyper-ellipsoid in six-dimensional phase space. The projection of this hyperellipsoid on any two-dimensional plane is an ellipse that defines the boundary of the beam in that plane.

  4. Tracing ultrafast dynamics of strong fields at plasma-vacuum interfaces with longitudinal proton probing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abicht, F.; Braenzel, J.; Koschitzki, Ch.; Schnürer, M.; Priebe, G.; Andreev, A. A.; Nickles, P. V.; Sandner, W.

    2014-07-21

    If regions of localized strong fields at plasma-vacuum interfaces are probed longitudinally with laser accelerated proton beams their velocity distribution changes sensitively and very fast. Its measured variations provide indirectly a higher temporal resolution as deduced from deflection geometries which rely on the explicit temporal resolution of the proton beam at the position of the object to probe. With help of reasonable models and comparative measurements changes of proton velocity can trace the field dynamics even at femtosecond time scale. In longitudinal probing, the very low longitudinal emittance together with a broad band kinetic energy distribution of laser accelerated protons is the essential prerequisite of the method. With a combination of energy and one-dimensional spatial resolution, we resolve fast field changes down to 100 fs. The used pump probe setup extends previous schemes and allows discriminating simultaneously between electric and magnetic fields in their temporal evolution.

  5. Characterization of protein redox dynamics induced during light-to-dark transitions and nutrient limitation in cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ansong, Charles; Sadler, Natalie C.; Hill, Eric A.; Lewis, Michael P.; Zink, Erika M.; Smith, Richard D.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-07-03

    Protein redox chemistry constitutes a major void in knowledge pertaining to photoautotrophic system regulation and signaling processes. We have employed a chemical biology approach to analyze redox sensitive proteins in live Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 cells in both light and dark periods, and to understand how cellular redox balance is disrupted during nutrient perturbation. The present work identified several novel putative redox-sensitive proteins that are involved in the generation of reductant, macromolecule synthesis, and carbon flux through central metabolic pathways, and may be involved in cell signaling and response mechanisms. Furthermore, our research suggests that dynamic redox changes in response to specific nutrient limitations contribute to the regulatory changes driven by a shift from light to dark. Taken together, these results contribute to the high-level understanding of post-translational mechanisms regulating flux distributions and therefore present potential metabolic engineering targets for redirecting carbon towards biofuel precursors.

  6. EDDY RESOLVING NUTRIENT ECODYNAMICS IN THE GLOBAL PARALLEL OCEAN PROGRAM AND CONNECTIONS WITH TRACE GASES IN THE SULFUR, HALOGEN AND NMHC CYCLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. CHU; S. ELLIOTT

    2000-08-01

    Ecodynamics and the sea-air transfer of climate relevant trace gases are intimately coupled in the oceanic mixed layer. Ventilation of species such as dimethyl sulfide and methyl bromide constitutes a key linkage within the earth system. We are creating a research tool for the study of marine trace gas distributions by implementing coupled ecology-gas chemistry in the high resolution Parallel Ocean Program (POP). The fundamental circulation model is eddy resolving, with cell sizes averaging 0.15 degree (lat/long). Here we describe ecochemistry integration. Density dependent mortality and iron geochemistry have enhanced agreement with chlorophyll measurements. Indications are that dimethyl sulfide production rates must be adjusted for latitude dependence to match recent compilations. This may reflect the need for phytoplankton to conserve nitrogen by favoring sulfurous osmolytes. Global simulations are also available for carbonyl sulfide, the methyl halides and for nonmethane hydrocarbons. We discuss future applications including interaction with atmospheric chemistry models, high resolution biogeochemical snapshots and the study of open ocean fertilization.

  7. TRACING ELECTRON BEAMS IN THE SUN'S CORONA WITH RADIO DYNAMIC IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Bin; Bastian, T. S.; White, S. M.; Gary, D. E.; Perley, R.; Rupen, M.; Carlson, B.

    2013-01-20

    We report observations of type III radio bursts at decimeter wavelengths (type IIIdm bursts)-signatures of suprathermal electron beams propagating in the low corona-using the new technique of radio dynamic imaging spectroscopy provided by the recently upgraded Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. For the first time, type IIIdm bursts were imaged with high time and frequency resolution over a broad frequency band, allowing electron beam trajectories in the corona to be deduced. Together with simultaneous hard X-ray and extreme ultraviolet observations, we show that these beams emanate from an energy release site located in the low corona at a height below {approx}15 Mm, and propagate along a bundle of discrete magnetic loops upward into the corona. Our observations enable direct measurements of the plasma density along the magnetic loops, and allow us to constrain the diameter of these loops to be less than 100 km. These overdense and ultra-thin loops reveal the fundamentally fibrous structure of the Sun's corona. The impulsive nature of the electron beams, their accessibility to different magnetic field lines, and the detailed structure of the magnetic release site revealed by the radio observations indicate that the localized energy release is highly fragmentary in time and space, supporting a bursty reconnection model that involves secondary magnetic structures for magnetic energy release and particle acceleration.

  8. Nutrients in the Atlantic thermocline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawase, M.; Sarmiento, J.L.

    1985-09-20

    A set of maps are presented of nutrient distribution on isopycnal surfaces in the North and tropical Atlantic Ocean main thermocline. The data used in producing these maps are from the Transient Tracers in the Oceans (TTO) North Atlantic Study and Tropical Atlantic Study, an associated German study (Meteor 56/5), two cross-Atlantic sections from cruise 109 of the Atlantis II, and the GEOSECS program. The nutrient distributions reflect primarily the sources at the northern and southern outcrops of the isopycnal surfaces, the in situ regeneration due to decomposition of sinking organic materials, and the interior physical processes as inferred from thermocline models and the distribution of conservative properties such as salinity. However, silica also exhibits behavior that cannot be explained by in situ regeneration. A simple phenomenological model suggests that cross-isopycnal advection and mixing in the equatorial region may play an important role in the nutrient dynamics. These data should prove of great value in constraining models of physical as well as biogeochemical processes. 43 references, 12 figures, 1 table.

  9. Trace Holdings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Holdings Jump to: navigation, search Name: Trace Holdings Product: Trace Holdings is now fully integrated in Xantrex Technologies Inc following a 2000 merger. References: Trace...

  10. Carbon Bearing Trace Gases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon bearing trace gases Carbon Bearing Trace Gases A critical scientific and policy oriented question is what are the present day sources and sinks of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the natural environment and how will these sinks evolve under rising CO2 concentrations and expected climate change and ecosystem response. Sources and sinks of carbon dioxide impart their signature on the distribution, concentration, and isotopic composition of CO2. Spatial and temporal trends (variability) provide

  11. Analyzing PICL trace data with MEDEA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merlo, A.P.; Worley, P.H.

    1993-11-01

    Execution traces and performance statistics can be collected for parallel applications on a variety of multiprocessor platforms by using the Portable Instrumented Communication Library (PICL). The static and dynamic performance characteristics of performance data can be analyzed easily and effectively with the facilities provided within the MEasurements Description Evaluation and Analysis tool (MEDEA). This report describes the integration of the PICL trace file format into MEDEA. A case study is then outlined that uses PICL and MEDEA to characterize the performance of a parallel benchmark code executed on different hardware platforms and using different parallel algorithms and communication protocols.

  12. Dynamic

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Dynamic , and Static , Res.ponse of the Government Oil Shale Mine at ' , . , Rifle, ... AND STATIC RESPONSE 'OF THE GOVERNMENT OIL SHALE MINE A T RIFLE, COLORADO, T O THE, ...

  13. Further improvements on TRACE 3-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusthoi, D.P.; Lysenko, W.P.; Crandall, K.R.

    1997-08-01

    TRACE 3-D, an interactive beam-dynamics program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam (including linear space-charge forces) through a user-defined transport system, has undergone several upgrades in physics, coding, and capabilities. Recent modifications include centroid tracking (and misalignment capabilities) and an improved beam description that allows study of some nonlinear effects such as wakefields. The Fortran code has been made portable and runs on numerous platforms. It can be used with a variety of graphics packages. The additional beamline elements, new commands, expanded fitting capabilities, improved beam description, and coding modifications have extended TRACE 3-D`s usefulness and applicability to the accelerator community. These changes are documented in the third edition of TRACE 3-D Documentation.

  14. Stack Trace Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-02-19

    STAT is a light weight debugging tool that gathers and merges stack traces from all of the processes in a parallell application. STAT uses the MRNet tree based overlay network to broadcast commands from the tool front-end to the STAT daemons and for the front-end to gather the traces from the STAT daemons. As the traces propagate through the MRNet network tree, they are merged across all tasks to from a single call prefix tree.more » The call prefix tree can be examined to identify tasks with similar function call patterns and to delineate a small set of equivalence slasses. A representative task from each of these classes can then be fed into a full feature debugger like TotalView for root cause analysis.« less

  15. Stack Trace Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-01-16

    STAT is a light weight debugging tool that gathers and merges stack traces from all of the processes in a parallel application. STAT uses the MRNet free based overlay network to broadcast commands from the tool front-end to the STAT daemons and for the front-end to gather the traces from the STAT daemons. As the traces propagate through the MRNet network tree, they are merged across all tasks to form a single call prefix tree.more » The call prefix tree can be examined to identify tasks with similar function call patterns and to delineate a small set of equivalence classes. A representative task from each of these classes can then be fed into a full feature debugger like TotalView for root cause analysis.« less

  16. Without a Trace

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Without a Trace 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:July 2016 past issues All Issues » submit Without a Trace Some packages are so valuable that they require a way to unequivocally reveal if anyone has tried to get in. March 8, 2016 Rows of cans marked radioactive on a storage shelf The International Atomic Energy Agency uses tens of thousands of tamper-evident seals annually to help monitor nuclear material around the world. CREDIT: IAEA "The seal is designed to

  17. Plant Available Nutrients, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, Victoria; Liebig, Jenny; Curtis, Bryan; Hahn, Melanie; Iversen, Colleen; Siegrist, Julie

    2014-02-19

    This dataset consists of measurements of plant available nutrients made using Plant Root Simulator probes (Western Ag Innovations Inc.) during 2012 and 2013. In 2012, Ca, Mg, K, P, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, B, S, Pb, Al, Cd, NO3-N and NH4-N were measured during spring, summer and winter in the centers, edges and troughs of four polygons in each of four areas of contrasting moisture regime and polygon type. In 2013, probes were installed in centers, edges and troughs of four polygons in each of two areas (high-centered and low-centered polygons) at two-week intervals and at 3 soil depths to capture fine-scale season dynamics of NO3-N and NH4-N. PRS probes are ion exchange resin membranes held in plastic supports that are inserted into soil to measure ion supply in situ. The anion and cation exchange with the membrane is intended to mimic plant uptake and thus provide a relevant measure of soil nutrient bioavailability. Measurements are made per area of probe membrane and cannot be converted to concentrations or related to soil volume.

  18. Regulating nutrient allocation in plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Udvardi, Michael; Yang, Jiading; Worley, Eric

    2014-12-09

    The invention provides coding and promoter sequences for a VS-1 and AP-2 gene, which affects the developmental process of senescence in plants. Vectors, transgenic plants, seeds, and host cells comprising heterologous VS-1 and AP-2 genes are also provided. Additionally provided are methods of altering nutrient allocation and composition in a plant using the VS-1 and AP-2 genes.

  19. Multiple soil nutrient competition between plants, microbes,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Multiple soil nutrient competition between plants, microbes, and mineral surfaces: model development, parameterization, and example applications in several...

  20. ARM - Measurement - Trace gas concentration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govMeasurementsTrace gas concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Trace gas concentration The amount per unit volume of trace gases other than carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, ozone and water vapor, typically measured in conjunction with in situ aerosol measurements, e.g. carbon monoxide, and sulfur dioxide. Categories Atmospheric State, Atmospheric Carbon Instruments The above

  1. Automated nutrient analyses in seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitledge, T.E.; Malloy, S.C.; Patton, C.J.; Wirick, C.D.

    1981-02-01

    This manual was assembled for use as a guide for analyzing the nutrient content of seawater samples collected in the marine coastal zone of the Northeast United States and the Bering Sea. Some modifications (changes in dilution or sample pump tube sizes) may be necessary to achieve optimum measurements in very pronounced oligotrophic, eutrophic or brackish areas. Information is presented under the following section headings: theory and mechanics of automated analysis; continuous flow system description; operation of autoanalyzer system; cookbook of current nutrient methods; automated analyzer and data analysis software; computer interfacing and hardware modifications; and trouble shooting. The three appendixes are entitled: references and additional reading; manifold components and chemicals; and software listings. (JGB)

  2. Trace 700 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Trace 700 AgencyCompany Organization: Trane Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics: Technology characterizations...

  3. Concealed wire tracing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method that combines a signal generator and a passive signal receiver to detect and record the path of partially or completely concealed electrical wiring without disturbing the concealing surface. The signal generator applies a series of electrical pulses to the selected wiring of interest. The applied pulses create a magnetic field about the wiring that can be detected by a coil contained within the signal receiver. An audible output connected to the receiver and driven by the coil reflects the receivers position with respect to the wiring. The receivers audible signal is strongest when the receiver is directly above the wiring and the long axis of the receivers coil is parallel to the wiring. A marking means is mounted on the receiver to mark the location of the wiring as the receiver is directed over the wiring's concealing surface. Numerous marks made on various locations of the concealing surface will trace the path of the wiring of interest.

  4. Analyzing PICL trace data with MEDEA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merlo, A.P.; Worley, P.H.

    1994-04-01

    Execution traces and performance statistics can be collected for parallel applications on a variety of multiprocessor platforms by using the Portable Instrumented Communication Library (PICL). The static and dynamic performance characteristics of performance characteristics of performance data can be analyzed easily and effectively with the facilities provided within the MEasurements Description Evaluation and Analysis tool (MEDEA). A case study is then outlined that uses PICL and MEDEA to characterize the performance of a parallel benchmark code executed on different hardware platforms and using different parallel algorithms and communication protocols.

  5. Concealed wire tracing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    An apparatus and method that combines a signal generator and a passive signal receiver to detect and record the path of partially or completely concealed electrical wiring without disturbing the concealing surface is disclosed. The signal generator applies a series of electrical pulses to the selected wiring of interest. The applied pulses create a magnetic field about the wiring that can be detected by a coil contained within the signal receiver. An audible output connected to the receiver and driven by the coil reflects the receivers position with respect to the wiring. The receivers audible signal is strongest when the receiver is directly above the wiring and the long axis of the receivers coil is parallel to the wiring. A marking means is mounted on the receiver to mark the location of the wiring as the receiver is directed over the wiring's concealing surface. Numerous marks made on various locations of the concealing surface will trace the path of the wiring of interest. 4 figs.

  6. Recycling of Nutrients and Water in Algal Biofuels Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Peer Review Recycling of Nutrients and Water in Algal Biofuels Production Civil and ... and demonstrating efficient recycling of water, nutrients, & some carbon. * Without ...

  7. Infrared trace element detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.; Matthew, M.W.

    1988-11-15

    An infrared trace element detection system includes an optical cell into which the sample fluid to be examined is introduced and removed. Also introduced into the optical cell is a sample beam of infrared radiation in a first wavelength band which is significantly absorbed by the trace element and a second wavelength band which is not significantly absorbed by the trace element for passage through the optical cell through the sample fluid. The output intensities of the sample beam of radiation are selectively detected in the first and second wavelength bands. The intensities of a reference beam of the radiation are similarly detected in the first and second wavelength bands. The sensed output intensity of the sample beam in one of the first and second wavelength bands is normalized with respect to the other and similarly, the intensity of the reference beam of radiation in one of the first and second wavelength bands is normalized with respect to the other. The normalized sample beam intensity and normalized reference beam intensity are then compared to provide a signal from which the amount of trace element in the sample fluid can be determined. 11 figs.

  8. Energy flow, nutrient cycling, and ecosystem resilience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAngelis, D.L.

    1980-08-01

    The resilience, defined here as the speed with which a system returns to equilibrium state following a perturbation, is investigated for both food web energy models and nutrient cycling models. Previous simulation studies of food web energy models have shown that resilience increases as the flux of energy through the food web per unit amount of energy in the steady state web increases. Studies of nutrient cycling models have shown that resilience increases as the mean number of cycles that nutrient (or other mineral) atoms make before leaving the system decreases. In the present study these conclusions are verified analytically for general ecosystem models. The behavior of resilience in food web energy models and nutrient cycling models is a reflection of the time that a given unit, whether of energy or matter, spends in the steady state system. The shorter this residence time is, the more resilient the system is.

  9. Quasiparticle dynamics across the full Brillouin zone of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ traced with ultrafast time and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dakovski, Georgi L.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Riseborough, Peter S.; Gu, Genda; Gilbertson, Steve M.; Taylor, Antoinette; Rodriguez, George

    2015-10-12

    A hallmark in the cuprate family of high-temperature superconductors is the nodal-antinodal dichotomy. In this regard, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has proven especially powerful, providing band structure information directly in energy-momentum space. Time-resolved ARPES (trARPES) holds great promise of adding ultrafast temporal information, in an attempt to identify different interaction channels in the time domain. Previous studies of the cuprates using trARPES were handicapped by the low probing energy which significantly limits the accessible momentum space. Using 20.15eV, 12 fs pulses we show for the first time the evolution of quasiparticles in the antinodal region of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and demonstrate thatmore » nonmonotonic relaxation dynamics dominates above a certain fluence threshold. The dynamics is heavily influenced by transient modification of the electron-phonon interaction and phase space restrictions, in severe contrast to the monotonic relaxation in the nodal and off-nodal regions.« less

  10. Quasiparticle dynamics across the full Brillouin zone of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ traced with ultrafast time and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dakovski, Georgi L.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Riseborough, Peter S.; Gu, Genda; Gilbertson, Steve M.; Taylor, Antoinette; Rodriguez, George

    2015-10-12

    A hallmark in the cuprate family of high-temperature superconductors is the nodal-antinodal dichotomy. In this regard, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has proven especially powerful, providing band structure information directly in energy-momentum space. Time-resolved ARPES (trARPES) holds great promise of adding ultrafast temporal information, in an attempt to identify different interaction channels in the time domain. Previous studies of the cuprates using trARPES were handicapped by the low probing energy which significantly limits the accessible momentum space. Using 20.15eV, 12 fs pulses we show for the first time the evolution of quasiparticles in the antinodal region of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and demonstrate thatmore »nonmonotonic relaxation dynamics dominates above a certain fluence threshold. The dynamics is heavily influenced by transient modification of the electron-phonon interaction and phase space restrictions, in severe contrast to the monotonic relaxation in the nodal and off-nodal regions.« less

  11. Distributed trace using central performance counter memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satterfield, David L.; Sexton, James C.

    2013-01-22

    A plurality of processing cores, are central storage unit having at least memory connected in a daisy chain manner, forming a daisy chain ring layout on an integrated chip. At least one of the plurality of processing cores places trace data on the daisy chain connection for transmitting the trace data to the central storage unit, and the central storage unit detects the trace data and stores the trace data in the memory co-located in with the central storage unit.

  12. Distributed trace using central performance counter memory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satterfield, David L; Sexton, James C

    2013-10-22

    A plurality of processing cores, are central storage unit having at least memory connected in a daisy chain manner, forming a daisy chain ring layout on an integrated chip. At least one of the plurality of processing cores places trace data on the daisy chain connection for transmitting the trace data to the central storage unit, and the central storage unit detects the trace data and stores the trace data in the memory co-located in with the central storage unit.

  13. Trace Replay and Network Simulation Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-03-23

    TraceR is a trace reply tool built upon the ROSS-based CODES simulation framework. TraceR can be used for predicting network performances and understanding network behavior by simulating messaging in High Performance Computing applications on interconnection networks.

  14. Trace Element Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Trace Element Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region...

  15. Trace Water Catalyzes Lithium Peroxide Electrochemistry - Joint...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 19, 2014, Research Highlights Trace Water Catalyzes Lithium Peroxide Electrochemistry Reaction cycle for reduction of di-oxygen by lithium and water to lithium peroxide on ...

  16. SolTrace | Concentrating Solar Power | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SolTrace is a software tool developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to model concentrating solar power (CSP) systems and analyze their optical performance. ...

  17. Trace desulfurization. [DOE patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, H.L.; Stevens, C.G.

    A method for reducing a trace concentration of sulfur-containing compounds in a gas stream from about one part in 10/sup 4/ to about one part in 10/sup 7/. The method includes the steps of irradiating the gas stream with an energy source which has a central emission frequency chosen to substantially match a wavelength of energy absorption of the sulfur-containing compounds and of subsequently contacting the gas stream with a reactive surface which includes a reactant selected from elemental metals and metal oxides so that metallic sulfur-containing compounds are formed. The reduction in concentration allows the gas stream to be processed in certain reactions having catalysts which would otherwise be poisoned by the sulfur-containing compounds.

  18. Easy system call tracing for Plan 9.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minnich, Ronald G.

    2010-09-01

    Tracing system calls makes debugging easy and fast. On Plan 9, traditionally, system call tracing has been implemented with acid. New systems do not always implement all the capabilities needed for Acid, particularly the ability to rewrite the process code space to insert breakpoints. Architecture support libraries are not always available for Acid, or may not work even on a supported architecture. The requirement that Acid's libraries be available can be a problem on systems with a very small memory footprint, such as High Performance Computing systems where every Kbyte counts. Finally, Acid tracing is inconvenient in the presence of forks, which means tracing shell pipelines is particularly troublesome. The strace program available on most Unix systems is far more convenient to use and more capable than Acid for system call tracing. A similar system on Plan 9 can simplify troubleshooting. We have built a system calling tracing capability into the Plan 9 kernel. It has proven to be more convenient than strace in programming effort. One can write a shell script to implement tracing, and the C code to implement an strace equivalent is several orders of magnitude smaller.

  19. Method for remote detection of trace contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simonson, Robert J.; Hance, Bradley G.

    2003-09-09

    A method for remote detection of trace contaminants in a target area comprises applying sensor particles that preconcentrate the trace contaminant to the target area and detecting the contaminant-sensitive fluorescence from the sensor particles. The sensor particles can have contaminant-sensitive and contaminant-insensitive fluorescent compounds to enable the determination of the amount of trace contaminant present in the target are by relative comparison of the emission of the fluorescent compounds by a local or remote fluorescence detector. The method can be used to remotely detect buried minefields.

  20. SolTrace Optical Analysis Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-12-31

    SolTrace is a software package that models solar power optical systems and analyzes their performance. SolTrace can model parabolic trough collectors, point-focus concentrating systems, and power towers. It rapidly displays and saves data as scatter plots, flux maps, and performance graphs. SolTrace can model optical geometry as a series of stages, composed of optical elements that possess attributes such as shape, contour, and optical quality. It can also model any number of stages containing anymore » number of different elements, and it features an extensive variety of available shapes and contours.« less

  1. Multiple soil nutrient competition between plants, microbes, and mineral surfaces: model development, parameterization, and example applications in several tropical forests

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Q.; Riley, W. J.; Tang, J.; Koven, C. D.

    2016-01-18

    Soil is a complex system where biotic (e.g., plant roots, micro-organisms) and abiotic (e.g., mineral surfaces) consumers compete for resources necessary for life (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorus). This competition is ecologically significant, since it regulates the dynamics of soil nutrients and controls aboveground plant productivity. Here we develop, calibrate and test a nutrient competition model that accounts for multiple soil nutrients interacting with multiple biotic and abiotic consumers. As applied here for tropical forests, the Nutrient COMpetition model (N-COM) includes three primary soil nutrients (NH4+, NO3− and POx; representing the sum of PO43−, HPO42− and H2PO4−) and five potential competitors (plantmore » roots, decomposing microbes, nitrifiers, denitrifiers and mineral surfaces). The competition is formulated with a quasi-steady-state chemical equilibrium approximation to account for substrate (multiple substrates share one consumer) and consumer (multiple consumers compete for one substrate) effects. N-COM successfully reproduced observed soil heterotrophic respiration, N2O emissions, free phosphorus, sorbed phosphorus and NH4+ pools at a tropical forest site (Tapajos). The overall model uncertainty was moderately well constrained. Our sensitivity analysis revealed that soil nutrient competition was primarily regulated by consumer–substrate affinity rather than environmental factors such as soil temperature or soil moisture. Our results also imply that under strong nutrient limitation, relative competitiveness depends strongly on the competitor functional traits (affinity and nutrient carrier enzyme abundance). We then applied the N-COM model to analyze field nitrogen and phosphorus perturbation experiments in two tropical forest sites (in Hawaii and Puerto Rico) not used in model development or calibration. Under soil inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus elevated conditions, the model accurately replicated the experimentally observed

  2. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, Milton; Wai, Chien M.; Nagy, Zoltan

    1984-01-01

    A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  3. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

    1983-08-15

    A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  4. TRACE ELEMENT ANALYSES OF URANIUM MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beals, D; Charles Shick, C

    2008-06-09

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed an analytical method to measure many trace elements in a variety of uranium materials at the high part-per-billion (ppb) to low part-per-million (ppm) levels using matrix removal and analysis by quadrapole ICP-MS. Over 35 elements were measured in uranium oxides, acetate, ore and metal. Replicate analyses of samples did provide precise results however none of the materials was certified for trace element content thus no measure of the accuracy could be made. The DOE New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) does provide a Certified Reference Material (CRM) that has provisional values for a series of trace elements. The NBL CRM were purchased and analyzed to determine the accuracy of the method for the analysis of trace elements in uranium oxide. These results are presented and discussed in the following paper.

  5. Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling October 5, 2015 - 12:16pm Addthis Ryan Davis and Sandia National Laboratories colleagues have developed a method to recycle critical and costly algae cultivation nutrients phosphate and nitrogen. Photo by Dino Vournas. Ryan Davis and Sandia National Laboratories colleagues have developed a method to recycle critical and costly algae

  6. Algae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Algae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient Recycling, and Wastewater Breakout Session 2-C: Biogas and Beyond: Challenges and Opportunities for Advanced Biofuels ...

  7. Algae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... - Wastewater as source of N, P,... - Agricultural runoffs * Recycling of nutrients ... are being wasted. * Opportunity: some wet wastes have a significant heating value that can ...

  8. Integration of Nutrient and Water Recycling for Sustainable Algal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Nutrient and Water Recycling for Sustainable Algal Biorefineries 03252015 ALGAE ... residues. o Minimizes inputs of water and synthetic fertilizers. o High ...

  9. Trace anomaly on a quantum spacetime manifold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spallucci, Euro; Smailagic, Anais; Nicolini, Piero

    2006-04-15

    In this paper we investigate the trace anomaly in a space-time where single events are delocalized as a consequence of short distance quantum coordinate fluctuations. We obtain a modified form of heat kernel asymptotic expansion which does not suffer from short distance divergences. Calculation of the trace anomaly is performed using an IR regulator in order to circumvent the absence of UV infinities. The explicit form of the trace anomaly is presented and the corresponding 2D Polyakov effective action and energy-momentum tensor are obtained. The vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor in the Boulware, Hartle-Hawking and Unruh vacua is explicitly calculated in a rt section of a recently found, noncommutative inspired, Schwarzschild-like solution of the Einstein equations. The standard short distance divergences in the vacuum expectation values are regularized in agreement with the absence of UV infinities removed by quantum coordinate fluctuations.

  10. Paraxial ray-tracing approach for the simulation of ultrasonic inspection of welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardahaut, Audrey; Jezzine, Karim [CEA, LIST, Digiteo Labs, Bt 565, PC 120, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Cassereau, Didier [CNRS, UMR 7623, LIP, 15 rue de l'cole de mdecine, 75006 Paris, France and ESPCI ParisTech, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France)

    2014-02-18

    On-site inspection of bimetallic or austenitic welds can be very difficult to interpret owing to their internal structures. Skewing and splitting of the ultrasonic beam may occur due to the anisotropic and inhomogeneous properties of the welding material. In this paper, we present a ray-based method to simulate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such structures. The formalism is based on dynamic ray tracing system in Cartesian coordinates along a reference ray. Standard ray tracing consists in the solution of a system of linear ordinary differential equations of the first order and is used to determine the trajectory of the ray. Likewise, dynamic ray tracing (DRT) also called paraxial ray tracing consists in the solution of an additional system of linear ordinary differential equations along the ray allowing paraxial quantities to be computed. It is used to evaluate the geometrical spreading and amplitude along the ray and in its vicinity. DRT is applied on a smooth representation of the elastic properties of the weld obtained thanks to an image processing technique applied on a macrograph of the weld. Simulation results are presented and compared to finite elements and experimental results.

  11. Multiple soil nutrient competition between plants, microbes, and mineral surfaces: model development, parameterization, and example applications in several tropical forests

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Q.; Riley, W. J.; Tang, J.; Koven, C. D.

    2015-03-05

    Soil is a complex system where biotic (e.g., plant roots, micro-organisms) and abiotic (e.g., mineral surfaces) consumers compete for resources necessary for life (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorus). This competition is ecologically significant, since it regulates the dynamics of soil nutrients and controls aboveground plant productivity. Here we develop, calibrate, and test a nutrient competition model that accounts for multiple soil nutrients interacting with multiple biotic and abiotic consumers. As applied here for tropical forests, the Nutrient COMpetition model (N-COM) includes three primary soil nutrients (NH4+, NO3?, and POx (representing the sum of PO43?, HPO42?, and H2PO4?)) and five potential competitors (plantmoreroots, decomposing microbes, nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and mineral surfaces). The competition is formulated with a quasi-steady-state chemical equilibrium approximation to account for substrate (multiple substrates share one consumer) and consumer (multiple consumers compete for one substrate) effects. N-COM successfully reproduced observed soil heterotrophic respiration, N2O emissions, free phosphorus, sorbed phosphorus, and free NH4+ at a tropical forest site (Tapajos). The overall model posterior uncertainty was moderately well constrained. Our sensitivity analysis revealed that soil nutrient competition was primarily regulated by consumer-substrate affinity rather than environmental factors such as soil temperature or soil moisture. Our results imply that the competitiveness (from most to least competitive) followed this order: (1) for NH4+, nitrifiers ~ decomposing microbes > plant roots, (2) for NO3?, denitrifiers ~ decomposing microbes > plant roots, (3) for POx, mineral surfaces > decomposing microbes ~ plant roots. Although smaller, plant relative competitiveness is of the same order of magnitude as microbes. We then applied the N-COM model to analyze field nitrogen and phosphorus perturbation experiments in two tropical forest sites (in

  12. Spent fuel pool analysis using TRACE code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez-Saez, F.; Carlos, S.; Villanueva, J. F.; Martorell, S.

    2012-07-01

    The storage requirements of Spent Fuel Pools have been analyzed with the purpose to increase their rack capacities. In the past, the thermal limits have been mainly evaluated with conservative codes developed for this purpose, although some works can be found in which a best estimate code is used. The use of best estimate codes is interesting as they provide more realistic calculations and they have the capability of analyzing a wide range of transients that could affect the Spent Fuel Pool. Two of the most representative thermal-hydraulic codes are RELAP-5 and TRAC. Nowadays, TRACE code is being developed to make use of the more favorable characteristics of RELAP-5 and TRAC codes. Among the components coded in TRACE that can be used to construct the model, it is interesting to use the VESSEL component, which has the capacity of reproducing three dimensional phenomena. In this work, a thermal-hydraulic model of the Maine Yankee spent fuel pool using the TRACE code is developed. Such model has been used to perform a licensing calculation and the results obtained have been compared with experimental measurements made at the pool, showing a good agreement between the calculations predicted by TRACE and the experimental data. (authors)

  13. Ambient methods and apparatus for rapid laser trace constituent analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, Stuart C.; Partin, Judy K.; Grandy, Jon D.; Jeffery, Charles L.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for measuring trace amounts of constituents in samples by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence under ambient conditions. The laser induced fluorescence is performed at a selected wavelength corresponding to an absorption state of a selected trace constituent. The intensity value of the emission decay signal which is generated by the trace constituent is compared to calibrated emission intensity decay values to determine the amount of trace constituent present.

  14. Gaseous trace impurity analyzer and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jr., David (Bellport, NY); Schneider, William (Setauket, NY)

    1980-01-01

    Simple apparatus for analyzing trace impurities in a gas, such as helium or hydrogen, comprises means for drawing a measured volume of the gas as sample into a heated zone. A segregable portion of the zone is then chilled to condense trace impurities in the gas in the chilled portion. The gas sample is evacuated from the heated zone including the chilled portion. Finally, the chilled portion is warmed to vaporize the condensed impurities in the order of their boiling points. As the temperature of the chilled portion rises, pressure will develop in the evacuated, heated zone by the vaporization of an impurity. The temperature at which the pressure increase occurs identifies that impurity and the pressure increase attained until the vaporization of the next impurity causes a further pressure increase is a measure of the quantity of the preceding impurity.

  15. Method for detecting trace impurities in gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Freund, Samuel M.; Maier, II, William B.; Holland, Redus F.; Beattie, Willard H.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for considerably improving the sensitivity and specificity of infrared spectrometry as applied to quantitative determination of trace impurities in various carrier or solvent gases is presented. A gas to be examined for impurities is liquefied and infrared absorption spectra of the liquid are obtained. Spectral simplification and number densities of impurities in the optical path are substantially higher than are obtainable in similar gas-phase analyses. Carbon dioxide impurity (.about.2 ppm) present in commercial Xe and ppm levels of Freon 12 and vinyl chloride added to liquefied air are used to illustrate the method.

  16. Method for detecting trace impurities in gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Freund, S.M.; Maier, W.B. II; Holland, R.F.; Beattie, W.H.

    A technique for considerably improving the sensitivity and specificity of infrared spectrometry as applied to quantitative determination of trace impurities in various carrier or solvent gases is presented. A gas to be examined for impurities is liquefied and infrared absorption spectra of the liquid are obtained. Spectral simplification and number densities of impurities in the optical path are substantially higher than are obtainable in similar gas-phase analyses. Carbon dioxide impurity (approx. 2 ppM) present in commercial Xe and ppM levels of Freon 12 and vinyl chloride added to liquefied air are used to illustrate the method.

  17. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colwell, Frederick S.; Geesey, Gill G.; Gillis, Richard J.; Lehman, R. Michael

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure difference in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses.

  18. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colwell, Frederick S.; Geesey, Gill G.; Gillis, Richard J.; Lehman, R. Michael

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure differences in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses.

  19. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colwell, F.S.; Geesey, G.G.; Gillis, R.J.; Lehman, R.M.

    1997-11-11

    A method and apparatus is described for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure differences in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses. 5 figs.

  20. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colwell, F.S.; Geesey, G.G.; Gillis, R.J.; Lehman, R.M.

    1999-07-13

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for microorganisms in the sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure difference in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses. 5 figs.

  1. Observation of meshlike traces on nuclear emulsions during cold fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsumoto, Takaaki )

    1993-01-01

    Cold fusion products from the electrolysis of heavy water have been directly measured by using a thin palladium foil. Several anomalous traces have been clearly recorded on nuclear emulsions. Some traces have meshlike structures, which are classified into two types: (a) ones associated with ring traces that are caused by the gravity decay of quad-neutrons and (b) ones with no ring traces. The mechanisms that form these meshlike traces are discussed in terms of the Nattoh model. It is inferred that multiple-neutron nuclei such as quad-neutrons, covered by itonic mesh and iton beads, are born during cold fusion. Furthermore, other anomalous traces suggest the production of a new heavy particle during gravity decay. 14 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Trace Element Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Christensen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    release has occurred. References Odin D. Christensen, Regina A. Capuano, Joseph N. Moore (1983) Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot...

  3. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Geochemical Impacts of Carbon ...

  4. Magnetic Field Line Tracing Calculations for Conceptual PFC Design...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    enabling the investigation of high beta physics in a compact stellarator geometry. ... In this paper, we report on the magnetic field line tracing calculations used to evaluate ...

  5. Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters- Lessons Learned From Mammoth Mountain, USA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  6. Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Journal Article: Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters- Lessons Learned From Mammoth Mountain, Usa Abstract A major campaign to quantify the...

  7. SolTrace Background | Concentrating Solar Power | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Download Current Official Release SolTrace Version 2012.7.9 is now available. The plug-in for Trimble SketchUp requires SketchUp Version 8 to be loaded on your computer. The current version of the plug-in is SolTrace 0.6. SolTrace and the plug-in are available for both Windows (XP and Windows 7 32-bit) and Mac (OS X 10.6). All fields are required. First Name: Last Name: Email Address: Organization: Planned Use of SolarTrace: Platform: Windows (XP and Windows 7 32-bit) Mac (OS X 10.6) Do you want

  8. Spark discharge trace element detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler-Golden, Steven; Bernstein, Lawrence S.; Bien, Fritz

    1988-01-01

    A spark discharge trace element detection system is provided which includes a spark chamber including a pair of electrodes for receiving a sample of gas to be analyzed at no greater than atmospheric pressure. A voltage is provided across the electrodes for generating a spark in the sample. The intensity of the emitted radiation in at least one primary selected narrow band of the radiation is detected. Each primary band corresponds to an element to be detected in the gas. The intensity of the emission in each detected primary band is integrated during the afterglow time interval of the spark emission and a signal representative of the integrated intensity of the emission in each selected primary bond is utilized to determine the concentration of the corresponding element in the gas.

  9. Spark discharge trace element detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler-Golden, S.; Bernstein, L.S.; Bien, F.

    1988-08-23

    A spark discharge trace element detection system is provided which includes a spark chamber including a pair of electrodes for receiving a sample of gas to be analyzed at no greater than atmospheric pressure. A voltage is provided across the electrodes for generating a spark in the sample. The intensity of the emitted radiation in at least one primary selected narrow band of the radiation is detected. Each primary band corresponds to an element to be detected in the gas. The intensity of the emission in each detected primary band is integrated during the afterglow time interval of the spark emission and a signal representative of the integrated intensity of the emission in each selected primary bond is utilized to determine the concentration of the corresponding element in the gas. 12 figs.

  10. Method and apparatus for detecting and measuring trace impurities in flowing gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Gene W.; Dowdy, Edward J.

    1979-01-01

    Trace impurities in flowing gases may be detected and measured by a dynamic atomic molecular emission spectrograph utilizing as its energy source the energy transfer reactions of metastable species, atomic or molecular, with the impurities in the flowing gas. An electronically metastable species which maintains a stable afterglow is formed and mixed with the flowing gas in a region downstream from and separate from the region in which the metastable species is formed. Impurity levels are determined quantitatively by the measurement of line and/or band intensity as a function of concentration employing emission spectroscopic techniques.

  11. Method for removing trace pollutants from aqueous solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, G.L.

    A method of substantially removing a trace metallic contaminant from a liquid containing the same comprises: adding an oxidizing agent to a liquid containing a trace amount of a metallic contaminant of a concentration of up to about 0.1 ppM, and separating the homogeneously precipitated product from the liquid.

  12. Electric heat tracing designed to prevent icing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lonsdale, J.T.; Norrby, T.

    1985-11-01

    Mobile offshore rigs designed for warmer climates are not capable of operating year-round in the arctic or near-arctic regions. Icing is but one major operational problem in these waters. The danger of instability due to ice loading exists on an oil rig as well as on a ship. From a safety standpoint, ice must be prevented from forming on the helideck, escape passages, escape doors and hatches and handrails. Norsk Hydro A/S, as one of the major operators in the harsh environment outside northern Norway, recognized at an early stage the need for special considerations for the drilling rigs intended for year-round drilling in these regions. In 1982 Norsk Hydro awarded a contract for an engineering study leading to the design of a harsh environment semisubmersible drilling rig. The basic requirement was to develop a unit for safe and efficient year-round drilling operation in the waters of northern Norway. The study was completed in 1983 and resulted in a comprehensive report including a building specification. The electric heat tracing system designed to prevent icing on the unit is described.

  13. Trace Assessment for BWR ATWS Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, L.Y.; Diamond, D.; Arantxa Cuadra, Gilad Raitses, Arnold Aronson

    2010-04-22

    A TRACE/PARCS input model has been developed in order to be able to analyze anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) in a boiling water reactor. The model is based on one developed previously for the Browns Ferry reactor for doing loss-of-coolant accident analysis. This model was updated by adding the control systems needed for ATWS and a core model using PARCS. The control systems were based on models previously developed for the TRAC-B code. The PARCS model is based on information (e.g., exposure and moderator density (void) history distributions) obtained from General Electric Hitachi and cross sections for GE14 fuel obtained from an independent source. The model is able to calculate an ATWS, initiated by the closure of main steam isolation valves, with recirculation pump trip, water level control, injection of borated water from the standby liquid control system and actuation of the automatic depres-surization system. The model is not considered complete and recommendations are made on how it should be improved.

  14. Quasiparticle dynamics across the full Brillouin zone of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ traced with ultrafast time and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dakovski, Georgi L.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Riseborough, Peter S.; Gu, Genda; Gilbertson, Steve M.; Taylor, Antoinette; Rodriguez, George

    2015-10-12

    A hallmark in the cuprate family of high-temperature superconductors is the nodal-antinodal dichotomy. In this regard, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has proven especially powerful, providing band structure information directly in energy-momentum space. Time-resolved ARPES (trARPES) holds great promise of adding ultrafast temporal information, in an attempt to identify different interaction channels in the time domain. Previous studies of the cuprates using trARPES were handicapped by the low probing energy which significantly limits the accessible momentum space. Using 20.15eV, 12 fs pulses we show for the first time the evolution of quasiparticles in the antinodal region of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and demonstrate that nonmonotonic relaxation dynamics dominates above a certain fluence threshold. The dynamics is heavily influenced by transient modification of the electron-phonon interaction and phase space restrictions, in severe contrast to the monotonic relaxation in the nodal and off-nodal regions.

  15. Simulation of annual biogeochemical cycles of nutrient balance, phytoplankton bloom(s), and DO in Puget Sound using an unstructured grid model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Sackmann, Brandon S.; Long, Wen; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Roberts, Mindy

    2012-08-14

    Nutrient pollution from rivers, nonpoint source runoff, and nearly 100 wastewater discharges is a potential threat to the ecological health of Puget Sound with evidence of hypoxia in some basins. However, the relative contributions of loads entering Puget Sound from natural and anthropogenic sources, and the effects of exchange flow from the Pacific Ocean are not well understood. Development of a quantitative model of Puget Sound is thus presented to help improve our understanding of the annual biogeochemical cycles in this system using the unstructured grid Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) framework and the Integrated Compartment Model (CE QUAL-ICM) water quality kinetics. Results based on 2006 data show that phytoplankton growth and die-off, succession between two species of algae, nutrient dynamics, and dissolved oxygen in Puget Sound are strongly tied to seasonal variation of temperature, solar radiation, and the annual exchange and flushing induced by upwelled Pacific Ocean waters. Concentrations in the mixed outflow surface layer occupying approximately 5?20 m of the upper water column show strong effects of eutrophication from natural and anthropogenic sources, spring and summer algae blooms, accompanied by depleted nutrients but high dissolved oxygen levels. The bottom layer reflects dissolved oxygen and nutrient concentrations of upwelled Pacific Ocean water modulated by mixing with biologically active surface outflow in the Strait of Juan De Fuca prior to entering Puget Sound over the Admiralty Inlet. The effect of reflux mixing at the Admiralty Inlet sill resulting in lower nutrient and higher dissolved oxygen levels in bottom waters of Puget Sound than the incoming upwelled Pacific Ocean water is reproduced. By late winter, with the reduction in algal activity, water column constituents of interest, were renewed and the system appeared to reset with cooler temperature, higher nutrient, and higher dissolved oxygen waters from the Pacific Ocean.

  16. Recycling of Nutrients and Water in Algal Biofuels Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recycling of Nutrients and Water in Algal Biofuels Production Thursday, May 23, 2013 DOE Bioenergy Production Technologies Office Algae R&D Activities Peer Review PI: Tryg Lundquist Ph D P E (Engineering) PI: Tryg Lundquist, Ph.D., P.E. (Engineering) Co-PI: Corinne Lehr, Ph.D. (Chemistry) C f S California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Goal Statement * Improve the

  17. Sandia's Algae Nutrient Recycling Project Is a Triple Win

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Algae Nutrient Recycling Project Is a Triple Win - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste

  18. Simulation of radiation damping in rings, using stepwise ray-tracing methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meot, F.

    2015-06-26

    The ray-tracing code Zgoubi computes particle trajectories in arbitrary magnetic and/or electric field maps or analytical field models. It includes a built-in fitting procedure, spin tracking many Monte Carlo processes. The accuracy of the integration method makes it an efficient tool for multi-turn tracking in periodic machines. Energy loss by synchrotron radiation, based on Monte Carlo techniques, had been introduced in Zgoubi in the early 2000s for studies regarding the linear collider beam delivery system. However, only recently has this Monte Carlo tool been used for systematic beam dynamics and spin diffusion studies in rings, including eRHIC electron-ion collider project at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Some beam dynamics aspects of this recent use of Zgoubi capabilities, including considerations of accuracy as well as further benchmarking in the presence of synchrotron radiation in rings, are reported here.

  19. Simulation of radiation damping in rings, using stepwise ray-tracing methods

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meot, F.

    2015-06-26

    The ray-tracing code Zgoubi computes particle trajectories in arbitrary magnetic and/or electric field maps or analytical field models. It includes a built-in fitting procedure, spin tracking many Monte Carlo processes. The accuracy of the integration method makes it an efficient tool for multi-turn tracking in periodic machines. Energy loss by synchrotron radiation, based on Monte Carlo techniques, had been introduced in Zgoubi in the early 2000s for studies regarding the linear collider beam delivery system. However, only recently has this Monte Carlo tool been used for systematic beam dynamics and spin diffusion studies in rings, including eRHIC electron-ion collider projectmore » at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Some beam dynamics aspects of this recent use of Zgoubi capabilities, including considerations of accuracy as well as further benchmarking in the presence of synchrotron radiation in rings, are reported here.« less

  20. Trace elements in oil shale. Progress report, 1979-1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chappell, W R

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this research program is to understand the potential impact of an oil shale industry on environmental levels of trace contaminants in the region. The program involves a comprehensive study of the sources, release mechanisms, transport, fate, and effects of toxic trace chemicals, principally the trace elements, in an oil shale industry. The overall objective of the program is to evaluate the environmental and health consequences of the release of toxic trace elements by shale and oil production and use. The baseline geochemical survey shows that stable trace elements maps can be constructed for numerous elements and that the trends observed are related to geologic and climatic factors. Shale retorted by above-ground processes tends to be very homogeneous (both in space and in time) in trace element content. Leachate studies show that significant amounts of B, F, and Mo are released from retorted shales and while B and Mo are rapidly flushed out, F is not. On the other hand, As, Se, and most other trace elements are not present in significant quantities. Significant amounts of F and B are also found in leachates of raw shales. Very large concentrations of reduced sulfur species are found in leachates of processed shale. Very high levels of B and Mo are taken up in some plants growing on processed shale with and without soil cover. There is a tendency for some trace elements to associate with specific organic fractions, indicating that organic chelation or complexation may play an important role. Many of the so-called standard methods for analyzing trace elements in oil shale-related materials are inadequate. A sampling manual is being written for the environmental scientist and practicing engineer. A new combination of methods is developed for separating the minerals in oil shale into different density fractions. Microbial investigations have tentatively identified the existence of thiobacilli in oil shale materials such as leachates. (DC)

  1. Plutonium oxalate precipitation for trace elemental determination in plutonium materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Ning; Gallimore, David; Lujan, Elmer; Garduno, Katherine; Walker, Laurie; Taylor, Fiona; Thompson, Pam; Tandon, Lav

    2015-05-26

    In this study, an analytical chemistry method has been developed that removes the plutonium (Pu) matrix from the dissolved Pu metal or oxide solution prior to the determination of trace impurities that are present in the metal or oxide. In this study, a Pu oxalate approach was employed to separate Pu from trace impurities. After Pu(III) was precipitated with oxalic acid and separated by centrifugation, trace elemental constituents in the supernatant were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy with minimized spectral interferences from the sample matrix.

  2. SolTrace FAQs | Concentrating Solar Power | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FAQs This section will be expanded in the future. You may send questions and comments to the user support team at SolTrace Support. Q: What changes have been implemented in the current version of SolTrace? A: Here are the highlights of the modifications made since version 2012.3.28: We updated sample files, including example scripts to set up a system programmatically. We fixed situations in which SolTrace would hang on certain geometry files. We made scripting enhancements, including several

  3. SolTrace Support | Concentrating Solar Power | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Support The best place to find answers about using SolTrace are found in the software's Help system - just click Help Contents under the Help menu or select Help from the system tree in the main SolTrace screen. Currently, there are no user guides or other reference manuals. You may send questions and comments to the user support team at SolTrace Support. However, there is a very limited budget for support, so complex requests may be difficult to accommodate

  4. Sodium storage facility trace heat system design description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, D.D.

    1997-06-12

    This document describes the SSF PLC Ladder Logic, Cross references, and the software that was used to control the amount of power applied to the SSF Trace Heated components.

  5. Magnetic Field Line Tracing Calculations for Conceptual PFC Design...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Two methods for tracing the edge field line topology were used in this study. The first ... The details of the magnetic topology differ when computed with VMECMFBE as compared with ...

  6. Tax Deduction Qualified Software: TRACE Version 6.3.2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that the TRACE version 6.3.2 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D (c)(1) and (d) Regulations Notice 2006-52, Section 6 requirements as amplified by Notice 2008-40, Section 4 requirements.

  7. Technique for identifying, tracing, or tracking objects in image data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Robert J.; Rothganger, Fredrick

    2012-08-28

    A technique for computer vision uses a polygon contour to trace an object. The technique includes rendering a polygon contour superimposed over a first frame of image data. The polygon contour is iteratively refined to more accurately trace the object within the first frame after each iteration. The refinement includes computing image energies along lengths of contour lines of the polygon contour and adjusting positions of the contour lines based at least in part on the image energies.

  8. SolTrace Publications | Concentrating Solar Power | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications The following publications are related to SolTrace. Jorgensen, G. (1991). "Comparison of Predicted Optical Performance with Measured Results for Dish Concentrators." National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO. NREL/TP-257-4245. Wendelin, T. (2003). "SolTRACE: A New Optical Modeling Tool for Concentrating Solar Optics." Proceedings of the ISEC 2003: International Solar Energy Conference, 15-18 March 2003, Kohala Coast, Hawaii. New York: American Society of

  9. Steal Tree: Low-Overhead Tracing of Work Stealing Schedulers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lifflander, Jonathan; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Kale, Laxmikant

    2013-06-16

    Work stealing is a popular approach to scheduling task-parallel programs. The flexibility inherent in work stealing when dealing with load imbalance results in seemingly irregular computation structures, complicating the study of its runtime behavior. In this paper, we present an approach to efficiently trace async-finish parallel programs scheduled using work stealing. We identify key properties that allow us to trace the execution of tasks with low time and space overheads. We also study the usefulness of the proposed schemes in supporting algorithms for data-race detection and retentive steal- ing presented in the literature. We demonstrate that the perturbation due to tracing is within the variation in the execution time with 99% confidence and the traces are concise, amounting to a few tens of kilobytes per thread in most cases. We also demonstrate that the traces enable significant reductions in the cost of detecting data races and result in low, stable space overheads in supporting retentive stealing for async-finish programs.

  10. Algae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient Recycling, and Wastewater

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2-C: Biogas and Beyond: Challenges and Opportunities for Advanced Biofuels from Wet-Waste FeedstocksAlgae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient Recycling, and...

  11. AN OVERVIEW OF TOOL FOR RESPONSE ACTION COST ESTIMATING (TRACE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FERRIES SR; KLINK KL; OSTAPKOWICZ B

    2012-01-30

    Tools and techniques that provide improved performance and reduced costs are important to government programs, particularly in current times. An opportunity for improvement was identified for preparation of cost estimates used to support the evaluation of response action alternatives. As a result, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company has developed Tool for Response Action Cost Estimating (TRACE). TRACE is a multi-page Microsoft Excel{reg_sign} workbook developed to introduce efficiencies into the timely and consistent production of cost estimates for response action alternatives. This tool combines costs derived from extensive site-specific runs of commercially available remediation cost models with site-specific and estimator-researched and derived costs, providing the best estimating sources available. TRACE also provides for common quantity and key parameter links across multiple alternatives, maximizing ease of updating estimates and performing sensitivity analyses, and ensuring consistency.

  12. Trace metal levels and partitioning in Wisconsin rivers: Results of background trace metals study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, M.M.; Overdier, J.T.; Armstrong, D.E.; Hurley, J.P.; Webb, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    Levels of total and filtrable Ag, Al, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in 41 Wisconsin rivers draining watersheds of distinct homogeneous characteristics (land use/cover, soil type, surficial geology) were quantified. Levels, fluxes, and yields of trace metals are interpreted in terms of principal geochemical controls. The study samples were also used to evaluate the capability of modern ICP-MS techniques for ``background`` level quantification of metals. Order-of-magnitude variations in levels of a given metal between sites was measured. This large natural variance reflects influences of soil type, dissolved organic matter (DOC), ionic strength, and suspended particulate matter (SPM) on metal levels. Significant positive correlations between DOC levels and filtrable metal concentrations were observed, demonstrating the important role that DOC plays in metal speciation and behavior. Systematic, chemically consistent, differences in behavior between the metals is evident with partition coefficients (K,) and fraction in particulate forms ranking in the order: Al > Pb > Zn > Cr >Cd > Cu. Total metal yields correlate well with SPM yields, especially for highly partitioned elements, whereas filtrable metal yields reflect the interplay of partitioning and water yield. The State of Wisconsin will use these data in a re-evaluation of regulatory limits and in the development of water effects ratio criteria.

  13. ARM - Field Campaign - Carbonyl Sulfide for Tracing Carbon Fluxes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsCarbonyl Sulfide for Tracing Carbon Fluxes ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Carbonyl Sulfide for Tracing Carbon Fluxes 2012.03.26 - 2012.06.07 Lead Scientist : Elliott Campbell For data sets, see below. Abstract Regional flux partitioning represents a critical knowledge gap due to a lack of robust methods for regional-scale flux partitioning and large uncertainties in

  14. Method for removing trace pollutants from aqueous solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, Gary L.

    1986-01-01

    A method of substantially removing a trace metallic contaminant from a liquid containing the same comprises, adding an oxidizing agent to a liquid containing a trace amount of a metallic contaminant of a concentration of up to about 10.sup.-1 ppm, the oxidizing agent being one which oxidizes the contaminant to form an oxidized product which is insoluble in the liquid and precipitates therefrom, and the conditions of the addition being selected to ensure that the precipitation of the oxidized product is homogeneous, and separating the homogeneously precipitated product from the liquid.

  15. Automated Tracing of Horizontal Neuron Processes During Retinal Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerekes, Ryan A [ORNL; Martins, Rodrigo [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital; Dyer, Michael A [ORNL; Gleason, Shaun Scott [ORNL; Karakaya, Mahmut [ORNL; Davis, Denise [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

    2011-01-01

    In the developing mammalian retina, horizontal neurons undergo a dramatic reorganization oftheir processes shortly after they migrate to their appropriate laminar position. This is an importantprocess because it is now understood that the apical processes are important for establishing theregular mosaic of horizontal cells in the retina and proper reorganization during lamination isrequired for synaptogenesis with photoreceptors and bipolar neurons. However, this process isdifficult to study because the analysis of horizontal neuron anatomy is labor intensive and time-consuming. In this paper, we present a computational method for automatically tracing the three-dimensional (3-D) dendritic structure of horizontal retinal neurons in two-photon laser scanningmicroscope (TPLSM) imagery. Our method is based on 3-D skeletonization and is thus able topreserve the complex structure of the dendritic arbor of these cells. We demonstrate theeffectiveness of our approach by comparing our tracing results against two sets of semi-automatedtraces over a set of 10 horizontal neurons ranging in age from P1 to P5. We observe an averageagreement level of 81% between our automated trace and the manual traces. This automatedmethod will serve as an important starting point for further refinement and optimization.

  16. Trace Metal Source Terms in Carbon Sequestration Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karamalidis, Athanasios; Torres, Sharon G.; Hakala, Jacqueline A.; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Carroll, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising; however, possible CO2 or CO2-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define to provide a range of concentrations that can be used as the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations. Storage source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from cements and sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, and basalts from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin, Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands, and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution was tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g., pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments because of the presence of CO2. Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rocks exceed the MCLs byan order of magnitude, while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality.

  17. Trace metal levels in sediments of Pearl Harbor (Hawaii)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashwood, T.L.; Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L.; Tamura, T.

    1986-09-01

    This study was conducted to measure the distribution of lead and other trace metals in the sediments of Pearl Harbon (Hawaii) to determine whether paint chips from vessels of the US Navy's Inactive Fleet have affected the environmental quality of Middle Loch. Sediment cores (ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 m long) were collected from Middle Loch near the Naval Inactive Ships Maintenance Facility and in an area of West Loch that is relatively isolated and unaffected by naval operations. Concentrations of copper, lead, and zinc averaged 180 ..mu..g/g, 49 ..mu..g/g, and 272 ..mu..g/g, respectively, in recent Middle Loch sediments. These concentrations are significantly higher than those in either historical Middle Loch sediments or recent West Loch sediments. However, except for lead, the concentrations in recent Middle Loch sediments are similar to those of older Middle Loch sediments, which indicates that the increase in trace metal contamination began before the onset of Inactive Fleet operations (about 1946). Increased trace metal levels in recent Middle Loch sediments might be expected to result from two potential sources: (1) sewage discharges and (2) paint from inactive vessels. Since paint contains elevated levels of lead and zinc but little copper, the elevated copper levels in Middle Loch sediments tend to implicate sewage as the source of trace metal contamination. Moreover, the lead:zinc ratio of recent Middle Loch sediments (0.18:1) is a factor of 10 lower than that measured in paint (2.1:1), and the Middle Loch lead:zinc ratio is not significantly greater than that measured in recent West Loch sediments (0.21:1). Hence, we suggest that sewage rather than paint is the major source of trace metal contamination of Middle Loch. This is consistent with the findings of a previous study by US navy personnel.

  18. Active Layer Soil Carbon and Nutrient Mineralization, Barrow, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Stan D. Wullschleger; Holly M. Vander Stel; Colleen Iversen; Victoria L. Sloan; Richard J. Norby; Mallory P. Ladd; Jason K. Keller; Ariane Jong; Joanne Childs; Deanne J. Brice

    2015-10-29

    This data set consists of bulk soil characteristics as well as carbon and nutrient mineralization rates of active layer soils manually collected from the field in August, 2012, frozen, and then thawed and incubated across a range of temperatures in the laboratory for 28 day periods in 2013-2015. The soils were collected from four replicate polygons in each of the four Areas (A, B, C, and D) of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Soil samples were coincident with the established Vegetation Plots that are located in center, edge, and trough microtopography in each polygon. Data included are 1) bulk soil characteristics including carbon, nitrogen, gravimetric water content, bulk density, and pH in 5-cm depth increments and also by soil horizon, 2) carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus mineralization rates for soil horizons incubated aerobically (and in one case both aerobically and anaerobically) for 28 days at temperatures that included 2, 4, 8, and 12 degrees C. Additional soil and incubation data are forthcoming. They will be available when published as part of another paper that includes additional replicate analyses.

  19. Dendrite-free Li deposition using trace-amounts of water as an...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dendrite-free Li deposition using trace-amounts of water as an electrolyte additive ... Title: Dendrite-free Li deposition using trace-amounts of water as an electrolyte additive ...

  20. Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte Additive Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte ...

  1. GloudSim: Google trace based cloud simulator with virtual machines...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GloudSim: Google trace based cloud simulator with virtual machines: GloudSim: Google trace based cloud simulator with virtual machines Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  2. Image feature based GPS trace filtering for road network generation and road segmentation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yuan, Jiangye; Cheriyadat, Anil M.

    2015-10-19

    We propose a new method to infer road networks from GPS trace data and accurately segment road regions in high-resolution aerial images. Unlike previous efforts that rely on GPS traces alone, we exploit image features to infer road networks from noisy trace data. The inferred road network is used to guide road segmentation. We show that the number of image segments spanned by the traces and the trace orientation validated with image features are important attributes for identifying GPS traces on road regions. Based on filtered traces , we construct road networks and integrate them with image features to segmentmore » road regions. Lastly, our experiments show that the proposed method produces more accurate road networks than the leading method that uses GPS traces alone, and also achieves high accuracy in segmenting road regions even with very noisy GPS data.« less

  3. Matrix Optimization for the MALDI-TOF-MS Analysis of Trace Biodiesel Components (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAlpin, C. R.; Voorhees, K. J.; Alleman, T. L.; McCormick, R. L.

    2009-01-01

    Trace biodiesel components that could reduce the fuel's operability in cold weather are analyzed using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

  4. Fast stereoscopic images with ray-traced volume rendering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adelson, S.J.; Hansen, C.D.

    1994-05-01

    One of the drawbacks of standard volume rendering techniques is that is it often difficult to comprehend the three-dimensional structure of the volume from a single frame; this is especially true in cases where there is no solid surface. Generally, several frames must be generated and viewed sequentially, using motion parallax to relay depth. Another option is to generate a single spectroscopic pair, resulting in clear and unambiguous depth information in both static and moving images. Methods have been developed which take advantage of the coherence between the two halves of a stereo pair for polygon rendering and ray-tracing, generating the second half of the pair in significantly less time than that required to completely render a single image. This paper reports the results of implementing these techniques with parallel ray-traced volume rendering. In tests with different data types, the time savings is in the range of 70--80%.

  5. Ray tracing a three dimensional scene using a grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wald, Ingo; Ize, Santiago; Parker, Steven G; Knoll, Aaron

    2013-02-26

    Ray tracing a three-dimensional scene using a grid. One example embodiment is a method for ray tracing a three-dimensional scene using a grid. In this example method, the three-dimensional scene is made up of objects that are spatially partitioned into a plurality of cells that make up the grid. The method includes a first act of computing a bounding frustum of a packet of rays, and a second act of traversing the grid slice by slice along a major traversal axis. Each slice traversal includes a first act of determining one or more cells in the slice that are overlapped by the frustum and a second act of testing the rays in the packet for intersection with any objects at least partially bounded by the one or more cells overlapped by the frustum.

  6. Trace Metal Source Terms in Carbon Sequestration Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karamalidis, Athanasios K; Torres, Sharon G; Hakala, J Alexandra; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J; Carroll, Susan

    2012-02-05

    Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising, however, possible CO₂ or CO₂-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define trace metal source terms from the reaction of supercritical CO₂, storage reservoir brines, reservoir and cap rocks. Storage reservoir source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, basalts and cements from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin – Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution is tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g. pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments due to the presence of CO₂. Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rock exceed the MCLs by an order of magnitude while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the reservoir and caprock source term to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality.

  7. Monitoring Trace Radionuclides by ICP Mass Spectrometry with Femtosecond

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Ablation | The Ames Laboratory Monitoring Trace Radionuclides by ICP Mass Spectrometry with Femtosecond Laser Ablation FWP/Project Description: This project will develop analytical methodology for the use of femtosecond laser ablation sampling and analysis techniques for the rapid screening of samples derived from detection of clandestine nuclear operations, and nuclear non-proliferation and safeguards activities. A state-of-the-art femtosecond laser ablation system in conjunction with

  8. SolTrace Background | Concentrating Solar Power | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SolTrace Background Since the late 1980s, a number of different optical design codes have been developed at NREL for designing and modeling solar concentrating systems. Each of these codes was written to model a very specific optical geometry, and each one built upon the others in an evolutionary way. Examples of such codes include: OPTDSH, a code written to model circular aperture parabolic dish concentrators; ODMF, a code based on OPTDSH that modeled multifaceted parabolic dish concentrators;

  9. Trace elements in coal by glow discharge mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, M.L.; Wilson, C.R.; Pestovich, J. Jr.

    1995-08-01

    A need and a demand exist for determining trace elements in coal and coal related by-products, especially those elements which may potentially be a health hazard. The provisions of the 1990 clean air act require that the EPA evaluate the emissions of electric utilities for trace elements and other potentially hazardous organic compounds. The coal fired electric utility industry supplies roughly 60% of the total generating capacity of 2,882,525 million kilowatt hours (nearly 3 trillion kilowatt hours) generated in the U.S. This is accomplished by 414 power plants scattered across the country that burned 813,508,000 short tons of coal in 1993. The relative volatility of some inorganic constituents in coal makes them more prone to be emitted to the atmosphere following combustion. The production of analytical data for trace elements is known to be a difficult task in coal and by-products of coal combustion (fly ash, bottom ash, gas streams, etc.), in terms of both sample collection and analytical determinations. There are several common analytical methods available to the analyst to determine trace elements in coal and coal by-products. In general analytical germs, the material to be analyzed can be totally solubilized (or extracted), or the elements analytes can be determined in the material as a solid. A relatively new elemental technique, Glow Discharge Mass Spectrometry (GDMS) can be used with solids as well. This new analytical technique had never before been applied directly to coal. The radio frequency-glow discharge quadropole mass spectrometer was used to analyze coal directly for the first time ever by rf-GDMS. The rf-GDMS technique is described.

  10. Surface kinetic model for isotopic and trace element fractionation during precipitation of calcite from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePaolo, D.

    2010-10-15

    A surface reaction kinetic model is developed for predicting Ca isotope fractionation and metal/Ca ratios of calcite as a function of rate of precipitation from aqueous solution. The model is based on the requirements for dynamic equilibrium; i.e. proximity to equilibrium conditions is determined by the ratio of the net precipitation rate (R{sub p}) to the gross forward precipitation rate (R{sub f}), for conditions where ionic transport to the growing crystal surface is not rate-limiting. The value of R{sub p} has been experimentally measured under varying conditions, but the magnitude of R{sub f} is not generally known, and may depend on several factors. It is posited that, for systems with no trace constituents that alter the surface chemistry, R{sub f} can be estimated from the bulk far-from-equilibrium dissolution rate of calcite (R{sub b} or k{sub b}), since at equilibrium R{sub f} = R{sub b}, and R{sub p} = 0. Hence it can be inferred that R{sub f} {approx} R{sub p} + R{sub b}. The dissolution rate of pure calcite is measureable and is known to be a function of temperature and pH. At given temperature and pH, equilibrium precipitation is approached when R{sub p} (= R{sub f} - R{sub b}) << R{sub b}. For precipitation rates high enough that R{sub p} >> R{sub b}, both isotopic and trace element partitioning are controlled by the kinetics of ion attachment to the mineral surface, which tend to favor more rapid incorporation of the light isotopes of Ca and discriminate weakly between trace metals and Ca. With varying precipitation rate, a transition region between equilibrium and kinetic control occurs near R{sub p} {approx} R{sub b} for Ca isotopic fractionation. According to this model, Ca isotopic data can be used to estimate R{sub f} for calcite precipitation. Mechanistic models for calcite precipitation indicate that the molecular exchange rate is not constant at constant T and pH, but rather is dependent also on solution saturation state and hence R{sub p

  11. Photodissociation Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photodissociation Dynamics - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  12. Temporal variation in the importance of a dominant consumer to stream nutrient cycling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Griffiths, Natalie A.; Hill, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Animal excretion can be a significant nutrient flux within ecosystems, where it supports primary production and facilitates microbial decomposition of organic matter. The effects of excretory products on nutrient cycling have been documented for various species and ecosystems, but temporal variation in these processes is poorly understood. We examined variation in excretion rates of a dominant grazing snail, Elimia clavaeformis, and its contribution to nutrient cycling, over the course of 14 months in a well-studied, low-nutrient stream (Walker Branch, east Tennessee, USA). Biomass-specific excretion rates of ammonium varied over twofold during the study, coinciding with seasonal changes in food availabilitymore » (measured as gross primary production) and water temperature (multiple linear regression, R2 = 0.57, P = 0.053). The contribution of ammonium excretion to nutrient cycling varied with seasonal changes in both biological (that is, nutrient uptake rate) and physical (that is, stream flow) variables. On average, ammonium excretion accounted for 58% of stream water ammonium concentrations, 26% of whole-stream nitrogen demand, and 66% of autotrophic nitrogen uptake. Phosphorus excretion by Elimia was contrastingly low throughout the year, supplying only 1% of total dissolved phosphorus concentrations. The high average N:P ratio (89:1) of snail excretion likely exacerbated phosphorus limitation in Walker Branch. To fully characterize animal excretion rates and effects on ecosystem processes, multiple measurements through time are necessary, especially in ecosystems that experience strong seasonality.« less

  13. Temporal variation in the importance of a dominant consumer to stream nutrient cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffiths, Natalie A.; Hill, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Animal excretion can be a significant nutrient flux within ecosystems, where it supports primary production and facilitates microbial decomposition of organic matter. The effects of excretory products on nutrient cycling have been documented for various species and ecosystems, but temporal variation in these processes is poorly understood. We examined variation in excretion rates of a dominant grazing snail, Elimia clavaeformis, and its contribution to nutrient cycling, over the course of 14 months in a well-studied, low-nutrient stream (Walker Branch, east Tennessee, USA). Biomass-specific excretion rates of ammonium varied over twofold during the study, coinciding with seasonal changes in food availability (measured as gross primary production) and water temperature (multiple linear regression, R2 = 0.57, P = 0.053). The contribution of ammonium excretion to nutrient cycling varied with seasonal changes in both biological (that is, nutrient uptake rate) and physical (that is, stream flow) variables. On average, ammonium excretion accounted for 58% of stream water ammonium concentrations, 26% of whole-stream nitrogen demand, and 66% of autotrophic nitrogen uptake. Phosphorus excretion by Elimia was contrastingly low throughout the year, supplying only 1% of total dissolved phosphorus concentrations. The high average N:P ratio (89:1) of snail excretion likely exacerbated phosphorus limitation in Walker Branch. To fully characterize animal excretion rates and effects on ecosystem processes, multiple measurements through time are necessary, especially in ecosystems that experience strong seasonality.

  14. Dairy Analytics and Nutrient Analysis (DANA) Prototype System User Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sam Alessi; Dennis Keiser

    2012-10-01

    This document is a user manual for the Dairy Analytics and Nutrient Analysis (DANA) model. DANA provides an analysis of dairy anaerobic digestion technology and allows users to calculate biogas production, co-product valuation, capital costs, expenses, revenue and financial metrics, for user customizable scenarios, dairy and digester types. The model provides results for three anaerobic digester types; Covered Lagoons, Modified Plug Flow, and Complete Mix, and three main energy production technologies; electricity generation, renewable natural gas generation, and compressed natural gas generation. Additional options include different dairy types, bedding types, backend treatment type as well as numerous production, and economic parameters. DANA’s goal is to extend the National Market Value of Anaerobic Digester Products analysis (informa economics, 2012; Innovation Center, 2011) to include a greater and more flexible set of regional digester scenarios and to provide a modular framework for creation of a tool to support farmer and investor needs. Users can set up scenarios from combinations of existing parameters or add new parameters, run the model and view a variety of reports, charts and tables that are automatically produced and delivered over the web interface. DANA is based in the INL’s analysis architecture entitled Generalized Environment for Modeling Systems (GEMS) , which offers extensive collaboration, analysis, and integration opportunities and greatly speeds the ability construct highly scalable web delivered user-oriented decision tools. DANA’s approach uses server-based data processing and web-based user interfaces, rather a client-based spreadsheet approach. This offers a number of benefits over the client-based approach. Server processing and storage can scale up to handle a very large number of scenarios, so that analysis of county, even field level, across the whole U.S., can be performed. Server based databases allow dairy and digester

  15. Scattering Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scattering Dynamics - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  16. Design and application of a mobile ground-based observatory for continuous measurements of atmospheric trace-gas and criteria pollutant species

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bush, S. E.; Hopkins, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Lai, C.-T.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2015-01-06

    Ground-based measurements of atmospheric trace gas species and criteria pollutants are essential for understanding emissions dynamics across space and time. Gas composition in the surface 50 m has the greatest direct impacts on human health as well as ecosystem processes, hence data at this level is necessary for addressing carbon cycle and public health related questions. However, such surface data are generally associated with stationary measurement towers, where spatial representation is limited due to the high cost of establishing and maintaining an extensive network of measurement stations. We describe here a compact mobile laboratory equipped to provide high-precision, high-frequency, continuous,more » on-road synchronous measurements of CO2, CO, CH4, H2O, NOx, O3, aerosol, meteorological, and geospatial position data. The mobile laboratory has been deployed across the western USA. In addition to describing the vehicle and its capacity, we present data that illustrate the use of the laboratory as a powerful tool for investigating the spatial structure of urban trace gas emissions and criteria pollutants at spatial scales ranging from single streets to whole ecosystem and regional scales. We identify fugitive urban CH4 emissions and assess the magnitude of CH4 emissions from known point sources. We illustrate how such a mobile laboratory can be used to better understand emissions dynamics and quantify emissions ratios associated with trace gas emissions from wildfire incidents. Lastly, we discuss additional mobile laboratory applications in health and urban metabolism.« less

  17. Trace detection of analytes using portable raman systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, M. Kathleen; Hotchkiss, Peter J.; Martin, Laura E.; Jones, David Alexander

    2015-11-24

    Apparatuses and methods for in situ detection of a trace amount of an analyte are disclosed herein. In a general embodiment, the present disclosure provides a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) insert including a passageway therethrough, where the passageway has a SERS surface positioned therein. The SERS surface is configured to adsorb molecules of an analyte of interest. A concentrated sample is caused to flow over the SERS surface. The SERS insert is then provided to a portable Raman spectroscopy system, where it is analyzed for the analyte of interest.

  18. Developmental long trace profiler using optimally aligned mirror based pentaprism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, Samuel K; Morrison, Gregory Y; Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Gubarev, Mikhail V; Geckeler, Ralf D.; Buchheim, Jana; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas

    2010-12-20

    A low-budget surface slope measuring instrument, the Developmental Long Trace Profiler (DLTP), was recently brought into operation at the Advanced Light Source Optical Metrology Laboratory. The instrument is based on a precisely calibrated autocollimator and a movable pentaprism. The capability of the DLTP to achieve sub-microradian surface slope metrology has been verified via cross-comparison measurements with other high-performance slope measuring instruments when measuring the same high-quality test optics. In the present work, a further improvement of the DLTP is achieved by replacing the existing bulk pentaprism with a specially designed mirror based pentaprism. A mirror based pentaprism offers the possibility to eliminate systematic errors introduced by inhomogeneity of the optical material and fabrication imperfections of a bulk pentaprism. We provide the details of the mirror based pentaprism design and describe an original experimental procedure for precision mutual alignment of the mirrors. The algorithm of the alignment procedure and its efficiency are verified with rigorous ray tracing simulations. Results of measurements of a spherically curved test mirror and a flat test mirror using the original bulk pentaprism are compared with measurements using the new mirror based pentaprism, demonstrating the improved performance.

  19. Trace metals in urban streams and detention ponds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Licsko, Z.J.; Struger, J.

    1995-12-31

    Trace metal levels were monitored over a nine month period in two urban creeks in the Hamilton Harbour watershed and in two urban stormwater retention ponds in Guelph, Ontario. Samples were collected both during dry or non-event periods and immediately after wet weather events. Both water and surficial sediment samples were collected and tested for cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, and zinc. In almost all cases during wet weather conditions, Canadian Water Quality Guidelines for the protection of freshwater aquatic life were exceeded in water for lead (>7 mg/L), copper (>4 mg/L), and zinc (>30 mg/L) . Both stormwater ponds accumulated trace metals in sediment to levels above the lowest effect level guideline for the protection and management of aquatic sediment in Ontario, and, in the case of zinc (> 820 ug/g), above the severe effect level guideline. These levels of contamination raise serious concerns about the use of these and similar facilities as habitat for biota.

  20. Trace-element zoning in garnets from sheared mantle xenoliths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, W.L.; Cousens, D.R.; Ryan, C.G.; Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F. ); Smith, D. ); Boyd, F.R. )

    1989-02-01

    Proton-microprobe analyses of garnets from sheared high-temperature ultramafic xenoliths reveal marked zonation of trace elements, paralleling trends in major and minor elements. Garnet rims (600-1,000 {mu}m wide) are enriched in Fe, Ti, Zr, Y and Ga, and either enriched or depleted in Cr, relative to cores. Zoning profiles for Ti and Zr are S-shaped and extend further into the grains than the Cr and Ga gradients. The profiles are consistent with the formation of Ti, Zr, Y-enriched garnet overgrowths, followed by diffusive equilibration between rim and core over years to hundreds of years. This enrichment in Fe, Ca, Al and incompatible elements is ascribed to melt infiltration and consequent melt-crystal exchange and garnet growth, shortly before eruption. Zr/Y is 1 to 2 in garnet cores but 4 to 5 in rims, and so the infiltrating melt may have been relatively alkalic. Major and trace element concentrations in such high-temperature sheared xenoliths are not likely to resemble those of primitive mantle or of residual mantle depleted by melt extraction.

  1. Impacts of climate change on nutrient cycling in semi-arid and arid ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belnap, J.

    1995-09-01

    Effective precipitation is a major factor in determining nutrient pathways in different ecosystems. Soil flora and fauna play a critical role in nutrient cycles of all ecosystems. Temperature, timing, and amounts of precipitation affect population composition, activity levels, biomass, and recovery rates from disturbance. Changes in these variables can result in very different inputs and outputs for different nutrients. As a result, areas with less effective precipitation have very different nutrient cycles than more mesic zones. Climate change, therefore, can profoundly affect the nutrient cycles of ecosystems. Nitrogen cycles may be especially sensitive to changes in temperature and to timing and amounts of precipitation. Rainfall contains varying amounts of nitrogen compounds. Changes in amounts of rainfall will change amounts of nitrogen available to these systems. Because rainfall is limited in semi-arid and regions, these systems tend to be more dependent on microbial populations for nitrogen input. Consequently, understanding the effects of climate change on these organisms is critical in understanding the overall effect on ecosystems.

  2. Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Reaction and Transformation of Hg and Trace Metals in Combustion Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Helble; Clara Smith; David Miller

    2009-08-31

    The overall goal of this project was to produce a working dynamic model to predict the transformation and partitioning of trace metals resulting from combustion of a broad range of fuels. The information provided from this model will be instrumental in efforts to identify fuels and conditions that can be varied to reduce metal emissions. Through the course of this project, it was determined that mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As) would be the focus of the experimental investigation. Experiments were therefore conducted to examine homogeneous and heterogeneous mercury oxidation pathways, and to assess potential interactions between arsenic and calcium. As described in this report, results indicated that the role of SO{sub 2} on Hg oxidation was complex and depended upon overall gas phase chemistry, that iron oxide (hematite) particles contributed directly to heterogeneous Hg oxidation, and that As-Ca interactions occurred through both gas-solid and within-char reaction pathways. Modeling based on this study indicated that, depending upon coal type and fly ash particle size, vaporization-condensation, vaporization-surface reaction, and As-CaO in-char reaction all play a role in arsenic transformations under combustion conditions.

  3. CONTROL OF TRACE METAL EMISSIONS DURING COAL COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    THOMAS C. HO

    1998-02-18

    Emissions of toxic trace metals in the form of metal fumes or submicron particulates from a coal-fired combustion source have received greater environmental and regulatory concern over the past years. Current practice of controlling these emissions is to collect them at the cold-end of the process by air-pollution control devices (APCDs) such as electrostatic precipitators and baghouses. However, trace metal fumes may not always be effectively collected by these devices because the formed fumes are extremely small. The proposed research is to explore the opportunities for improved control of toxic trace metal emissions, alternatively, at the hot-end of the coal combustion process, i.e., in the combustion chamber. The technology proposed is to prevent the metal fumes from forming during the process, which would effectively eliminate the metal emission problems. Specifically, the technology is to employ suitable sorbents to (1) reduce the amount of metal volatilization during combustion and (2) capture volatilized metal vapors. The objectives of the project are to demonstrate the technology and to characterize the metal capture process during coal combustion in a fluidized bed combustor. This final technical report details the work performed, the conclusions obtained, and the accomplishments achieved over the project performance period from July 1, 1994 through December 31, 1997. Specifically, this report consists of the following five chapters: Chapter 1. Executive Summary; Chapter 2. Metal Capture by Various Sorbents; Chapter 3. Simultaneous Metal and Sulfur Capture; Chapter 4. Sorption and Desorption of Mercury on Sorbents; and Chapter 5. Project Conclusions. In summary, the metals involved in the project were arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury and selenium and the sorbents tested included bauxite, zeolite and calcined limestone. The three sorbents have been found to have various degree of metal capture capability on arsenic, cadmium, chromium and lead

  4. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1997-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species.

  5. Chemical structure and dynamics. Annual report 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1996-05-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program is a major component of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), providing a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for the characterization of waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detection and monitoring of trace atmospheric species.

  6. Cation Uptake and Allocation by Red Pine Seedlings under Cation-Nutrient Stress in a Column Growth Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Zhenqing; Balogh-Brunstad, Zsuzsanna; Grant, Michael R.; Harsh, James B.; Gill, Richard; Thomashow, Linda; Dohnalkova, Alice; Stacks, Daryl; Letourneau, Melissa; Keller, Chester K.

    2014-01-10

    Background and Aims Plant nutrient uptake is affected by environmental stress, but how plants respond to cation-nutrient stress is poorly understood. We assessed the impact of varying degrees of cation-nutrient limitation on cation uptake in an experimental plant-mineral system. Methods Column experiments, with red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) seedlings growing in sand/mineral mixtures, were conducted for up to nine months under a range of Ca- and K-limited conditions. The Ca and K were supplied from both minerals and nutrient solutions with varying Ca and K concentrations. Results Cation nutrient stress had little impact on carbon allocation after nine months of plant growth and K was the limiting nutrient for biomass production. The Ca/Sr and K/Rb ratio results allowed independent estimation of dissolution incongruency and discrimination against Sr and Rb during cation uptake processes. The fraction of K in biomass from biotite increased with decreasing K supply from nutrient solutions. The mineral anorthite was consistently the major source of Ca, regardless of nutrient treatment. Conclusions Red pine seedlings exploited more mineral K in response to more severe K deficiency. This did not occur for Ca. Plant discrimination factors must be carefully considered to accurately identify nutrient sources using cation tracers.

  7. Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility Citation Details In-Document Search ...

  8. Micro-PIXE Analysis of Trace Elements in Sulfides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickmott, D.D.; Wetteland, C.; Stimac, J.; Larocque, A.C.L.; Brearley, A.

    2003-08-26

    Micro-scale Proton-induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) of trace elements (TE) in sulfides provides insights into geologic processes including magmatic system evolution, ore forming events, and fluid-flow processes. The Los Alamos nuclear microprobe was used to determine TE concentrations and ratios in sulfides from diverse geologic environments including hydrothermal ore deposits, coal seams, and metamorphic rocks. Pyrrhotite (Po) from silicic volcanics contains high Cu and Ni; Po from the Clear Lake volcanic field has higher Mo than does Po from other volcanic fields. Coal pyrites contain high Cu, As, Se, Mo and Pb, and show high As/Se and Mo/Se in marine influenced sulfides from the Lower Kittanning coal, but not in other marine-influenced coals. Sulfides are amenable to micro-PIXE studies because of the difficulties in obtaining the homogeneous standards required for many other TE microanalytical techniques.

  9. Plasmonic trace sensing below the photon shot noise limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pooser, Raphael C.; Lawrie, Benjamin J.

    2015-12-09

    Plasmonic sensors are important detectors of biochemical trace compounds, but those that utilize optical readout are approaching their absolute limits of detection as defined by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle in both differential intensity and phase readout. However, the use of more general minimum uncertainty states in the form of squeezed light can push the noise floor in these sensors below the shot noise limit (SNL) in one analysis variable at the expense of another. Here, we demonstrate a quantum plasmonic sensor whose noise floor is reduced below the SNL in order to perform index of refraction measurements with sensitivities unobtainable with classical plasmonic sensors. The increased signal-to-noise ratio can result in faster detection of analyte concentrations that were previously lost in the noise. As a result, these benefits are the hallmarks of a sensor exploiting quantum readout fields in order to manipulate the limits of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle.

  10. Plasmonic trace sensing below the photon shot noise limit

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pooser, Raphael C.; Lawrie, Benjamin J.

    2015-12-09

    Plasmonic sensors are important detectors of biochemical trace compounds, but those that utilize optical readout are approaching their absolute limits of detection as defined by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle in both differential intensity and phase readout. However, the use of more general minimum uncertainty states in the form of squeezed light can push the noise floor in these sensors below the shot noise limit (SNL) in one analysis variable at the expense of another. Here, we demonstrate a quantum plasmonic sensor whose noise floor is reduced below the SNL in order to perform index of refraction measurements with sensitivities unobtainablemore » with classical plasmonic sensors. The increased signal-to-noise ratio can result in faster detection of analyte concentrations that were previously lost in the noise. As a result, these benefits are the hallmarks of a sensor exploiting quantum readout fields in order to manipulate the limits of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle.« less

  11. LineVISAR. A fringe-trace data analysis program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furnish, Michael D.

    2014-02-01

    The line-imaging ORVIS or VISAR provides velocity as a function of position and time for a line on an experimental setup via a streak camera record of interference fringes. This document describes a Matlab-based program which guides the user through the process of converting these fringe data to a velocity surface. The data reduction is of the "fringe trace" type, wherein the changes in velocity at a given position on the line are calculated based on fringe motion past that point. The analyst must establish the fringe behavior up front, aided by peak-finding routines in the program. However, the later work of using fringe jumps to compensate for phase problems in other analysis techniques is greatly reduced. This program is not a standard GUI construction, and is prescriptive. At various points it saves the progress, allowing later restarts from those points.

  12. Beam Dynamics Design and Simulation in Ion Linear Accelerators (

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-08-01

    Orginally, the ray tracing code TRACK has been developed to fulfill the many special requirements for the Rare Isotope Accelerator Facility known as RIA. Since no available beam-dynamics code met all the necessary requirements, modifications to the code TRACK were introduced to allow end-to-end (from the ion souce to the production target) simulations of the RIA machine, TRACK is a general beam-dynamics code and can be applied for the design, commissioning and operation of modernmore » ion linear accelerators and beam transport systems.« less

  13. Spatiotemporal focusing dynamics in plasmas at X-ray wavelength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, A., E-mail: a-physics2001@yahoo.com; Tibai, Z. [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs7624 (Hungary)] [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs7624 (Hungary); Hebling, J. [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs7624 (Hungary) [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs7624 (Hungary); Szentagothai Research Centre, University of Pecs, Pecs-7624 (Hungary); Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    2014-03-15

    Using a finite curvature beam, we investigate here the spatiotemporal focusing dynamics of a laser pulse in plasmas at X-ray wavelength. We trace the dependence of curvature parameter on the focusing of laser pulse and recognize that the self-focusing in plasma is more intense for the X-ray laser pulse with curved wavefront than with flat wavefront. The simulation results demonstrate that spatiotemporal focusing dynamics in plasmas can be controlled with the appropriate choice of beam-plasma parameters to explore the high intensity effects in X-ray regime.

  14. A Geographic Information System approach to modeling nutrient and sediment transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, D.A.; Hunsaker, C.T.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Timmins, S.P.

    1993-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a water quality model to quantify nonpoint-source (NPS) pollution that uses a geographic information system (GIS) to link statistical modeling of nutrient and sediment delivery with the spatial arrangement of the parameters that drive the model. The model predicts annual nutrient and sediment loading and was developed, calibrated, and tested on 12 watersheds within the Lake Ray Roberts drainage basin in north Texas. Three physiographic regions are represented by these watersheds, and model success, as measured by the accuracy of load estimates, was compared within and across these regions.

  15. Diagnosis & Correction of Soil Nutrient Limitations in Intensively managed southern pine forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    University of Florida

    2002-10-25

    Forest productivity is one manner to sequester carbon and it is a renewable energy source. Likewise, efficient use of fertilization can be a significant energy savings. To date, site-specific use of fertilization for the purpose of maximizing forest productivity has not been well developed. Site evaluation of nutrient deficiencies is primarily based on empirical approaches to soil testing and plot fertilizer tests with little consideration for soil water regimes and contributing site factors. This project uses mass flow diffusion theory in a modeling context, combined with process level knowledge of soil chemistry, to evaluate nutrient bioavailability to fast-growing juvenile forest stands growing on coastal plain Spodosols of the southeastern U.S. The model is not soil or site specific and should be useful for a wide range of soil management/nutrient management conditions. In order to use the model, field data of fast-growing southern pine needed to be measured and used in the validation of the model. The field aspect of the study was mainly to provide data that could be used to verify the model. However, we learned much about the growth and development of fast growing loblolly. Carbon allocation patterns, root shoot relationships and leaf area root relationships proved to be new, important information. The Project Objectives were to: (1) Develop a mechanistic nutrient management model based on the COMP8 uptake model. (2) Collect field data that could be used to verify and test the model. (3) Model testing.

  16. Constraints on the bioavailability of trace elements to terrestrial fauna at mining and smelting sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastorok, R.; Schoof, R.; LaTier, A.; Mellott, R.; Shields, W.; Ruby, M.

    1995-12-31

    At mining and smelting sites, the bioavailability of waste-related trace elements to terrestrial wildlife is limited by mineralogy of the waste material and the geochemistry of the waste-soil mixture. For example, encapsulation of trace elements in inert mineral matrices limits the assimilation of particle-associated trace elements that are ingested by wildlife. The bioavailability of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, silver, and zinc at mining and smelting sites in Oklahoma and Montana was evaluated based on analysis of waste material, soil chemistry, and concentrations of trace elements in whole-body samples of key food web species. Concentrations of trace elements were generally elevated relative to reference area values for selected species of vegetation, insects, spiders, and small mammals. Soil-to-tissue bioconcentration factors derived from field data at these sites were generally low (< 1), with the exception of cadmium in vegetation. For all of the trace elements evaluated, wildlife exposure models indicate that the potential for transfer of contaminants to wildlife species of public concern and high trophic-level predators is limited. Moreover, laboratory feeding experiments conducted with cadmium and lead indicate that the assimilation of waste-related trace elements by mammals is relatively low (24--47 percent for lead in blood and bone; 22--44 percent for cadmium in kidney). The relatively low bioavailability of trace elements at mining and smelting sites should be considered when estimating exposure of ecological receptors and when deriving soil cleanup criteria based on measured or modeled ecological risk.

  17. In-Depth and ion image analysis of minor and trace constituents in V{endash}Cr{endash}Ti alloy welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odom, R.W.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes application of dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to the study of the chemistry of welds in V{endash}Cr{endash}Ti alloys and presents preliminary data on the distribution of minor and trace elements (H, C, N, O, P, S, and Cl) in welds produced by gas tungsten arc (GTA) and electron beam techniques. The motivation for this research is to develop techniques that determine correlations between the concentration and distribution of trace elements in alloy metal welds and the physical properties of the weld. To this end, quantitative SIMS techniques were developed for N, O, and S analysis in vanadium alloy welds using an ion implantation/relative sensitivity factor methodology. The data presented in this paper demonstrates that trace compositions and distributions of selected welds correlate, at least qualitatively, with such properties as microhardness and tensile elongation. This data support continuing these investigations to develop microanalysis methods which quantitatively correlate weld composition with mechanical properties. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  18. Simulation of 1% hot leg SBLOCA with TRACE5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallardo, S.; Querol, A.; Veru, G.

    2012-07-01

    During a Small Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) transient, depressurization can be slow enough to delay the Accumulators (ACC) entry for a long time. Actuation of High Pressure Injection (HPI) system is then necessary in order to maintain the core temperature low enough to avoid core boil off, and consequently avoiding the core level to fall below fuel rods level, thus producing a temperature trip in the fuel cladding. In this frame, the OECD/NEA ROSA Project Test 1.2 (SB-HL-17 in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)) has been simulated using the thermal-hydraulic code TRACES. Test 1.2 was performed in the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) reproducing a 1% hot leg SBLOCA in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). A comparison between experimental and the main simulated variables was performed to study the effect of important parameters (liquid stratification, geometry and size) to model the break. Finally, in an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) failure scenario, loss of coolant is large enough to produce core boil-off and a Peak Cladding Temperature (PCT) excursion. With this purpose a sensitivity analysis varying the HPI mass flow rate has been performed covering the range between HPI actuation and failure. (authors)

  19. [Analysis of trace elements in limestone for archeological functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanc, A.; Holmes, L.; Harbottle, G.

    1998-12-31

    Numerous quarries in the Lutetian limestone formations of the Paris Basin provided stone for the building and the decoration of monuments from antiquity to the present. To determine the origin of stone used for masonry and sculptures in these monuments, a team of geologists and archaeologists has investigated 300 quarries and collected 2,300 samples. Petrographic and paleontologic examination of thin sections allows geologists to distinguish Lutetian limestones from Jurassic and Cretaceous limestones. Geologists also seek to formulate hypotheses regarding the origin of Lutetian limestones used for building and sculpture in the Paris region. In the search for the sources of building and sculptural stone, the analytical methods of geologists are limited because often several quarries produce the same lithofacies. A new tool is now available, however, to attack questions of provenance raised by art historians. Because limestones from different sources have distinctive patterns of trace-element concentrations, compositional analysis by neutron activation allows one to compare building or sculptural stone from one monument with stone from quarries or other monuments. This analytical method subjects a powdered limestone sample to standard neutron activation analysis procedures at Brookhaven National Laboratory. With the help of computer programs, the compositional fingerprints of Lutetian limestones can be determined and stored in a database. The limestone database contains data for approximately 2,100 samples from monuments, sculptures and quarries. It is particularly rich in samples from the Paris Basin.

  20. Imaging trace element distributions in single organelles and subcellular features

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kashiv, Yoav; Austin, Jotham R.; Lai, Barry; Rose, Volker; Vogt, Stefan; El-Muayed, Malek

    2016-02-25

    The distributions of chemical elements within cells are of prime importance in a wide range of basic and applied biochemical research. An example is the role of the subcellular Zn distribution in Zn homeostasis in insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined transmission electron microscopy with micro- and nano-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to image unequivocally for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the natural elemental distributions, including those of trace elements, in single organelles and other subcellular features. Detected elements include Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cdmore » (which some cells were supplemented with). Cell samples were prepared by a technique that minimally affects the natural elemental concentrations and distributions, and without using fluorescent indicators.We find it could likely be applied to all cell types and provide new biochemical insights at the single organelle level not available from organelle population level studies.« less

  1. The trace of the CNO cycle in the ring nebula NGC 6888

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mesa-Delgado, A.; Esteban, C.; García-Rojas, J.; Reyes-Pérez, J.; Morisset, C.; Bresolin, F.

    2014-04-20

    We present new results on the chemical composition of the Galactic ring nebula NGC 6888 surrounding the WN6(h) star WR136. The data are based on deep spectroscopical observations taken with the High Dispersion Spectrograph at the 8.2 m Subaru Telescope. The spectra cover the optical range from 3700 to 7400 Å. The effect of the CNO cycle is well-identified in the abundances of He, N, and O, while elements not involved in the synthesis such as Ar, S, and Fe present values consistent with the solar vicinity and the ambient gas. The major achievement of this work is the first detection of the faint C II λ4267 recombination line in a Wolf-Rayet nebula. This allows us to estimate the C abundance in NGC 6888 and therefore investigate for the first time the trace of the CNO cycle in a ring nebula around a Wolf-Rayet star. Although the detection of the C II line has a low signal-to-noise ratio, the C abundance seems to be higher than the predictions of recent stellar evolution models of massive stars. The Ne abundance also shows a puzzling pattern with an abundance of about 0.5 dex lower than the solar vicinity, which may be related to the action of the NeNa cycle. Attending to the constraints imposed by the dynamical timescale and the He/H and N/O ratios of the nebula, the comparison with stellar evolution models indicates that the initial mass of the stellar progenitor of NGC 6888 is between 25 M {sub ☉} and 40 M {sub ☉}.

  2. Identification of open quantum systems from observable time traces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Jun; Sarovar, Mohan

    2015-05-27

    Estimating the parameters that dictate the dynamics of a quantum system is an important task for quantum information processing and quantum metrology, as well as fundamental physics. In our paper we develop a method for parameter estimation for Markovian open quantum systems using a temporal record of measurements on the system. Furthermore, the method is based on system realization theory and is a generalization of our previous work on identification of Hamiltonian parameters.

  3. Comparative assessment of the trace-element composition of coals, crude oils, and oil shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.Y. Shpirt; S.A. Punanova

    2007-10-15

    A comparative analysis of the amounts of 42 trace elements in coals, crude oils, and oil and black shales was performed. The degree of concentration of trace elements by caustobioliths and their ashes relative to their abundance in argillaceous rocks and the Earth's crust was calculated. Typomorphic trace elements were distinguished, of which many turned out to be common for the different kinds of caustobioliths in question. The trace elements were classified according to their concentration factors in different caustobioliths. The ash of crude oils is enriched in trace elements (Cs, V, Mo, Cu, Ag, Au, Zn, Hg, Se, Cr, Co, Ni, U) to the greatest extent (concentration factor above 3.5) and that of oil shales is enriched to the least extent (Re, Cs, Hg, Se). The ratios between typomorphic trace elements in general strongly differ from those in the Earth's crust and argillaceous rocks and are not identical in different caustobioliths. Quantitative parameters that make it possible to calculate a change in these ratios on passing from one caustobiolith type to another were proposed and the relative trace-element affinity of different caustobioliths was estimated.

  4. Determination of Method Detection Limits for Trace 232-Thorium and 238-Uranium in Copper using Ion Exchange and ICPMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, Eric W.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Maiti, Tapas C.; Soin, Aleksandr

    2014-04-15

    Determination of Method Detection Limits for Trace 232-Thorium and 238-Uranium in Copper using Ion Exchange and ICPMS

  5. "Trace Analysis of Speciality and Electronic Gases," Chapter 4, "Emerging Infrared Laser Absorption Spectroscopic Techniques for Gas Analysis"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lascola, R.; McWhorter, S.; Tittel, F.; Lewicki, R.

    2013-07-01

    This chapter covers Laser Absorption Spectroscopic Techniques and Applications of Semiconductor LAS Based Trace Gas Sensor Systems.

  6. Design and application of a mobile ground-based observatory for continuous measurements of atmospheric trace gas and criteria pollutant species

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bush, S. E.; Hopkins, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Lai, C.-T.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2015-08-26

    Ground-based measurements of atmospheric trace gas species and criteria pollutants are essential for understanding emissions dynamics across space and time. Gas composition in the lower 50 m of the atmosphere has the greatest direct impacts on human health as well as ecosystem processes; hence data at this level are necessary for addressing carbon-cycle- and public-health-related questions. However, such surface data are generally associated with stationary measurement towers, where spatial representation is limited due to the high cost of establishing and maintaining an extensive network of measurement stations. We describe here a compact mobile laboratory equipped to provide high-precision, high-frequency, continuous,more » on-road synchronous measurements of CO2, CO, CH4, H2O, NOx, O3, aerosol, meteorological, and geospatial position data. The mobile laboratory has been deployed across the western USA. In addition to describing the vehicle and its capacity, we present data that illustrate the use of the laboratory as a powerful tool for investigating the spatial structure of urban trace gas emissions and criteria pollutants at spatial scales ranging from single streets to whole ecosystem and regional scales. We assess the magnitude of known point sources of CH4 and also identify fugitive urban CH4 emissions. We illustrate how such a mobile laboratory can be used to better understand emissions dynamics and quantify emissions ratios associated with trace gas emissions from wildfire incidents. Lastly, we discuss additional mobile laboratory applications in health and urban metabolism.« less

  7. A review of trace element emissions from the combustion of refuse-derived fuel with coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, G.A. )

    1992-05-01

    The effects of cocombusting refuse-derived fuel (RDF) with coal on stack emissions of trace elements in the ash stream were reviewed. The large number of variables and uncertainties involved precluded drawing definitive conclusions regarding many of the trace elements. However, it is evident that cocombustion resulted in increased emissions of Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn. Emissions of As and Ni tended to decrease when RDF was fired with coal. Modeling studies indicated that ambient levels of trace elements during cocombustion should be within acceptable limits. However, periodic monitoring of Cd, Hg, and Pb may be warranted in some instances.

  8. Report from the Field: Nutrient and Energy Recovery at DC Water

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BLUE PLAINS - WASHINGTON DC NUTRIENT & ENERGY RECOVERY FACILITY DCWater - Mark Ramirez mramirez@dcwater.com District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority George S. Hawkins, General Manager 2 We have been recognized as a profession that protects the environment and public health. We are now beginning to be recognized as resource stewards, needing to recover and utilize valuable and important resources as well. Introduction WATER RESOURCE RECOVERY FACILITY OUR VISION CLEAN WATER - PROCESSES

  9. Project 25 - Major Nutrient Recycling for Sustained Algal Production (9.1.1.3)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    25 - Major Nutrient Recycling for Sustained Algal Production (9.1.1.3) 5/24/2013 Algae Peer Review Todd W. Lane Ph.D. Sandia National Laboratories This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract

  10. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.1.1.0

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.1.1.0 meets Internal Revenue Code 179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  11. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.1.0.0

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.1.0.0 meets Internal Revenue Code 179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  12. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.1.2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.1.2 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  13. Analysis of Trace Gas Mixtures Using an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Kriesel, Jason M.

    2015-07-01

    We measure and analyze mixtures of trace gases at ppb-ppm levels using an external cavity quantum cascade laser sensor with a 1-second response time. Accurate spectral fits are obtained in the presence of overlapping spectra.

  14. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.4 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  15. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.5

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.5 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  16. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.9

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.9 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  17. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.7

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.7 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  18. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.6

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.6 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  19. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.8

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.8 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  20. Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research April 25, 2015, Research Highlights Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte Additive Dendrite growth leads to low CE and safety issues of Li anode. Trace amount of water enables dendrite-free Li deposition. Scientific Achievement Residual water (H2O) present in nonaqueous electrolytes has been widely regarded as a detrimental factor for lithium (Li) batteries. However, dendrite-free Li film can be obtained

  1. Patterns in the Cosmos Trace Evolution of the Universe | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) Patterns in the Cosmos Trace Evolution of the Universe High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees Community Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: Email Us More Information » 08.01.13 Patterns in the Cosmos Trace Evolution of the

  2. Dynamic Analysis of Nuclear Energy System Strategies

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-06-17

    DANESS is an integrated process model for nuclear energy systems allowing the simulation of multiple reactors and fuel cycles in a continuously changing nuclear reactor park configuration. The model is energy demand driven and simulates all nuclear fuel cycle facilites, up to 10 reactors and fuels. Reactor and fuel cycle facility history are traced and the cost of generating energy is calculated per reactor and for total nuclear energy system. The DANESS model aims atmore » performing dynamic systems analysis of nuclear energy development used for integrated analysis of development paths for nuclear energy, parameter scoping for new nuclear energy systems, economic analysis of nuclear energy, government role analysis, and education.« less

  3. Trace element emissions. Semi-annual report, October 1994--February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigeaud, A.; Maru, H.; Wilemski, G.; Helble, J.

    1995-02-01

    Many trace elements can exist in raw coal gas either in the form of metallic vapors or gaseous compounds which, besides their action on potentially ``very clean`` advanced power generating systems such as fuel cells and gas turbines, can also be detrimental to plant and animal life when released into the atmosphere. Therefore, volatile trace contaminants from coal which can also be toxic must be removed before they become detrimental to both power plant performance/endurance and the environment. Five trace elements were selected in this project based on: abundance in solid coal, volatility during gasification, effects on downstream systems and toxicity to plant and animal life. An understanding was sought in this investigation of the interactions of these five trace elements (and their high temperature species) with the different components in integrated cleanup and power generating systems, as well as the ultimate effects with respect to atmospheric emissions. Utilizing thermodynamic calculations and various experimental techniques, it was determined that a number of trace contaminants that exist in coal may be substantially removed by flyash, and after that by different sorbent systems. High temperature cleanup of contaminants by sorbents such as zinc titanate, primarily to remove sulfur, can also absorb some metallic contaminants such as cadmium and antimony. Further polishing will be required, however, to eliminate trace contaminant species incorporating the elements arsenic, selemium, lead, and mercury.

  4. Long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste stabilized by trace elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Lei; Jahng, Deokjin

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Korean food waste was found to contain low level of trace elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable anaerobic digestion of food waste was achieved by adding trace elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron played an important role in anaerobic digestion of food waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt addition further enhanced the process performance in the presence of iron. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine if long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste in a semi-continuous single-stage reactor could be stabilized by supplementing trace elements. Contrary to the failure of anaerobic digestion of food waste alone, stable anaerobic digestion of food waste was achieved for 368 days by supplementing trace elements. Under the conditions of OLR (organic loading rates) of 2.19-6.64 g VS (volatile solid)/L day and 20-30 days of HRT (hydraulic retention time), a high methane yield (352-450 mL CH{sub 4}/g VS{sub added}) was obtained, and no significant accumulation of volatile fatty acids was observed. The subsequent investigation on effects of individual trace elements (Co, Fe, Mo and Ni) showed that iron was essential for maintaining stable methane production. These results proved that the food waste used in this study was deficient in trace elements.

  5. ADVANCED GASIFICATION MERCURY/TRACE METAL CONTROL WITH MONOLITH TRAPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark A. Musich; Michael L. Swanson; Grant E. Dunham; Joshua J. Stanislowski

    2010-07-31

    Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-?g/m3 (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-?g/m3 (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most effective arsine and

  6. Shared and Dynamic Libraries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shared and Dynamic Libraries Shared and Dynamic Libraries The Edison system can support applications that use dynamic shared libraries (DSL) on the compute nodes. Some "out-of-the-box" applications require DSLs and some popular applications like Python use DSLs as well. Using System Shared and Dynamic Libraries "System" DSLs include those that support software packages found in "typical" Linux distributions, e.g. Python and Perl. To build an application that will

  7. Shared and Dynamic Libraries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shared and Dynamic Libraries Shared and Dynamic Libraries The Hopper system can support applications that use dynamic shared libraries (DSL) on the compute nodes. Some "out-of-the-box" applications require DSLs and some popular applications like Python use DSLs as well. Using System Shared and Dynamic Libraries "System" DSLs include those that support software packages found in "typical" Linux distributions, e.g. Python and Perl. To build an application that will

  8. Intramolecular and nonlinear dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.J.

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program focuses on three interconnected areas. The first involves the study of intramolecular dynamics, particularly of highly excited systems. The second area involves the use of nonlinear dynamics as a tool for the study of molecular dynamics and complex kinetics. The third area is the study of the classical/quantum correspondence for highly excited systems, particularly systems exhibiting classical chaos.

  9. Optimizing detector geometry for trace element mapping by X-ray fluorescence

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Yue; Gleber, Sophie -Charlotte; Jacobsen, Chris; Kirz, Janos; Vogt, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We report that trace metals play critical roles in a variety of systems, ranging from cells to photovoltaics. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) microscopy using X-ray excitation provides one of the highest sensitivities available for imaging the distribution of trace metals at sub-100 nm resolution. With the growing availability and increasing performance of synchrotron light source based instruments and X-ray nanofocusing optics, and with improvements in energy-dispersive XRF detectors, what are the factors that limit trace element detectability? To address this question, we describe an analytical model for the total signal incident on XRF detectors with various geometries, including the spectral responsemore » of energy dispersive detectors. This model agrees well with experimentally recorded X-ray fluorescence spectra, and involves much shorter calculation times than with Monte Carlo simulations. With such a model, one can estimate the signal when a trace element is illuminated with an X-ray beam, and when just the surrounding non-fluorescent material is illuminated. From this signal difference, a contrast parameter can be calculated and this can in turn be used to calculate the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for detecting a certain elemental concentration. We apply this model to the detection of trace amounts of zinc in biological materials, and to the detection of small quantities of arsenic in semiconductors. In conclusion, we conclude that increased detector collection solid angle is (nearly) always advantageous even when considering the scattered signal. However, given the choice between a smaller detector at 90° to the beam versus a larger detector at 180° (in a backscatter-like geometry), the 90° detector is better for trace element detection in thick samples, while the larger detector in 180° geometry is better suited to trace element detection in thin samples.« less

  10. Trace-element geochemistry of coal resource development related to environmental quality and health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This report assesses for decision makers and those involved in coal resource development the environmental and health impacts of trace-element effects arising from significant increases in the use of coal, unless unusual precautions are invoked. Increasing demands for energy and the pressing need for decreased dependence of the United States on imported oil require greater use of coal to meet the nation's energy needs during the next decade. If coal production and consumption are increased at a greatly accelerated rate, concern arises over the release, mobilization, transportation, distribution, and assimilation of certain trace elements, with possible adverse effects on the environment and human health. It is, therefore, important to understand their geochemical pathways from coal and rocks via air, water, and soil to plants, animals, and ultimately humans, and their relation to health and disease. To address this problem, the Panel on Trace Element Geochemistry of Coal Resource Development Related to Health (PECH) was established. Certain assumptions were made by the Panel to highlight the central issues of trace elements and health and to avoid unwarranted duplication of other studies. Based on the charge to the Panel and these assumptions, this report describes the amounts and distribution of trace elements related to the coal source; the various methods of coal extraction, preparation, transportation, and use; and the disposal or recycling of the remaining residues or wastes. The known or projected health effects are discussed at the end of each section.

  11. Trace element analysis of soil type collected from the Manjung and central Perak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azman, Muhammad Azfar Hamzah, Suhaimi; Rahman, Shamsiah Abdul; Elias, Md Suhaimi; Abdullah, Nazaratul Ashifa; Hashim, Azian; Shukor, Shakirah Abd; Kamaruddin, Ahmad Hasnulhadi Che

    2015-04-29

    Trace elements in soils primarily originated from their parent materials. Parents’ material is the underlying geological material that has been undergone different types of chemical weathering and leaching processes. Soil trace elements concentrations may be increases as a result of continuous input from various human activities, including power generation, agriculture, mining and manufacturing. This paper describes the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) method used for the determination of trace elements concentrations in part per million (ppm) present in the terrestrial environment soil in Perak. The data may indicate any contamination of trace elements contributed from human activities in the area. The enrichment factors were used to check if there any contamination due to the human activities (power plants, agricultural, mining, etc.) otherwise the values would serve as a baseline data for future study. The samples were collected from 27 locations of different soil series in the area at two different depths: the top soil (0-15cm) and the sub soil (15-30cm). The collected soil samples were air dried at 60°C and passed through 2 µm sieve. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) has been used for the determination of trace elements. Samples were activated in the Nuclear Malaysia TRIGA Mark II reactor followed by gamma spectrometric analysis. By activating the stable elements in the samples, the elements can be determined from the intensities of gamma energies emitted by the respected radionuclides.

  12. Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process: trace elements. Volume III. Pilot plant development work. Part 6. Fate of trace elements in the SRC process. [Ph. D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, C.S.

    1980-09-01

    A study of the forms of trace elements occurring in Solvent Refined Coal has been performed by chemical separation of the Solvent Refined Coal based on differences in the functionality and molecular weight of the organic matrix. Analysis of the fractions separated for various trace elements has revealed associations of certain elements with other elements as well as with certain fractions. The analysis of Solvent Refined Coal I by these methods provided data on the distribution of Ti, V, Ca, S, Al, Mn, As, Se, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, Sc, and Ga in the fractions generated. Because of the low trace element content of Solvent Refined Coal II only As, Se, and Cr could be detected in the silica fractions. Based on the distributions three different groups of elements have been based on the association of elements with each other and with certain fractions. The first group is composed of As, Se, and Cr associated with silica fractions of relatively low functionality; these elements have a high percent solubility in the starting Solvent Refined Coal II oil. The second group composed of Ti, V, and to a lesser extent a second form of Cr, is associated with fractions that have a high concentration of phenolic material and is probably present as phenoxide complexes. The third group composed of Fe, Ca, K, Al, and Mg is associated with the most functional fractions and is possibly present as humic acid type complexes or as submicron size particulates. The integration of chromatographic methods with trace element analysis of the fractions generated is capable of discerning the presence of different forms of the elements. The methods used are applicable to other important geologically occurring organic matter.

  13. RoboHound:developing sample collection and preconcentration hardware for a remote trace explosives detection system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, David J.; Denning, David J.; Hobart, Clinton G.; Lenz, Michael C.; Anderson, Robert J.; Carlson, Dennis L.; Hunter, John Anthony; Gladwell, T. Scott; Mitchell, Mary-Anne; Hannum, David W.; Baumann, Mark J.

    2005-09-01

    The RoboHound{trademark} Project was a three-year, multiphase project at Sandia National Laboratories to build and refine a working prototype trace explosive detection system as a tool for a commercial robot. The RoboHound system was envisioned to be a tool for emergency responders to test suspicious items (i.e., packages or vehicles) for explosives while maintaining a safe distance. The project investigated combining Sandia's expertise in trace explosives detection with a wheeled robotic platform that could be programmed to interrogate suspicious items remotely for the presence of explosives. All of the RoboHound field tests were successful, especially with regards to the ability to collect and detect trace samples of RDX. The project has gone from remote sampling with human intervention to a fully automatic system that requires no human intervention until the robot returns from a sortie. A proposal is being made for additional work leading towards commercialization.

  14. Recovery of essential nutrients from municipal solid waste – Impact of waste management infrastructure and governance aspects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zabaleta, Imanol; Rodic, Ljiljana

    2015-10-15

    Every year 120–140 million tonnes of bio-waste are generated in Europe, most of which is landfilled, incinerated or stabilized and used as covering material in landfill operation. None of these practices enables the recovery of essential nutrients such as phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N), which are in great demand for agricultural production. Recovery of these nutrients is a matter of international concern considering the non-renewable nature of P sources and the energy intensive production process required for the synthesis of N fertilizers. The objective of this research is to understand the relation between the municipal solid waste management (MSWM) system, both its the physical components and governance aspects, and the recovery of nutrients in Vitoria-Gasteiz (Basque Country) as a benchmark for European medium-size cities. The analysis shows that the existing physical infrastructure and facilities for bio-waste have high potential for nutrient recovery, 49% for N and 83% for P contained in bio-waste. However, governance aspects of the MSWM system such as legislation and user inclusivity play an important role and decrease the actual nutrient recovery to 3.4% and 7.4% for N and P respectively.

  15. [CII] dynamics in the S140 region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dedes, C.; Rllig, M.; Okada, Y.; Ossenkopf, V.; Mookerjea, B.; Collaboration: WADI Team

    2015-01-22

    We report the observation of [C II] emission in a cut through the S140 region together with single pointing observations of several molecular tracers, including hydrides, in key regions of the photon-dominated region (PDR) and molecular cloud [1]. At a distance of 910 pc, a BOV star ionizes the edge of the molecular cloud L1204, creating S140. In addition, the dense molecular cloud hosts a cluster of embedded massive young stellar objects only 75' from the H II region [e.g. 2, 3]. We used HIFI on Herschel to observe [CII] in a strip following the direction of the impinging radiation across the ionisation front and through the cluster of embedded YSOs. With [C II], we can trace the ionising radiation and, together with the molecular tracers such as CO isotopologues and HCO{sup +}, study the dynamical processes in the region. Combining HIFIs high spectral resolution data with ground based molecular data allows us to study the dynamics and excitation conditions both in the ionization front and the dense molecular star forming region and model their physical conditions [4].

  16. The Effects of Trace Contaminants on Catalytic Processing of Biomass-Derived Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Peterson, Keith L.; Muzatko, Danielle S.; Alderson, Eric V.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.

    2004-03-25

    Trace components in biomass feedstocks are potential catalyst poisons when catalytically processing these materials to value-added chemical products. Trace components include inorganic elements such as alkali metals and alkaline earths, phosphorus or sulfur, aluminum or silicon, chloride, or transition metals. Protein components in biomass feedstocks can lead to formation of peptide fractions (from hydrolysis) or ammonium ions (from more severe breakdown) both of which might interfere with catalysis. The effects of these components on catalytic hydrogenation processing has been studied in batch reactor processing tests

  17. Atmospheric Trace Gases from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication, Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. The collections under the CDIAC heading of Atmospheric Trace Gases include: Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide, Atmospheric Methane, Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide, Atmospheric Hydrogen, Isotopes in Greenhouse Gases, Radionuclides, Aerosols, and Other Trace Gases.

  18. Batch methods for enriching trace impurities in hydrogen gas for their further analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Lee, Sheldon H.D.; Kumar, Romesh; Papdias, Dionissios D.

    2014-07-15

    Provided herein are batch methods and devices for enriching trace quantities of impurities in gaseous mixtures, such as hydrogen fuel. The methods and devices rely on concentrating impurities using hydrogen transport membranes wherein the time period for concentrating the sample is calculated on the basis of optimized membrane characteristics, comprising its thickness and permeance, with optimization of temperature, and wherein the enrichment of trace impurities is proportional to the pressure ratio P.sub.hi/P.sub.lo and the volume ratio V.sub.1/V.sub.2, with following detection of the impurities using commonly-available detection methods.

  19. Ray tracing a three-dimensional scene using a hierarchical data structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wald, Ingo; Boulos, Solomon; Shirley, Peter

    2012-09-04

    Ray tracing a three-dimensional scene made up of geometric primitives that are spatially partitioned into a hierarchical data structure. One example embodiment is a method for ray tracing a three-dimensional scene made up of geometric primitives that are spatially partitioned into a hierarchical data structure. In this example embodiment, the hierarchical data structure includes at least a parent node and a corresponding plurality of child nodes. The method includes a first act of determining that a first active ray in the packet hits the parent node and a second act of descending to each of the plurality of child nodes.

  20. Trace fossils of Marnoso-Arenacea Formation (Miocene), northern Italy: preliminary data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBride, E.F.; Picard, M.D.

    1988-02-01

    Many horizons in the Marnoso-arenacea Formation contain rare to abundant trace fossils at numerous localities. Slope, fan, and basin-plain deposits have trace fossils dominated by the Nereites ichnofacies but include taxa from the Zoophycos ichnofacies plus Ohphiomorpha and Thalassinoides. Slope deposits contain Chondrites, Cosmorhaphe, Desmograpton, Helminthoida, Neonereites, Paleodictyon, Pelecypodichnus, Planolites, Punctorhaphe, and Scolicia; fan-channel deposits contain Chondrites and Planolites; fan-lobe deposits contain Chondrites, Ophiomorpha, Thalassinoides, Scolicia, and Zoophycos; and basin-plain deposits contain Chondrites, Helminthoida, Planolites, and Zoophycos. The distribution of hypichnial taxa may be in part the result of selective preservation (i.e., dependent on the depth of erosion by turbidity currents).

  1. Runtime Tracing of The Community Earth System Model: Feasibility and Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Dali [ORNL] [ORNL; Domke, Jens [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Community Earth System Models (CESM) is one of US's leading earth system modeling systems, which has over decades of development history and embraced by large, active user communities. In this paper, we first review the history of CESM software development and layout the general objectives of performance analysis. Then we present an offline global community land model simulation within the CESM framework to demonstrate the procedure of runtime tracing of CESM using the Vampir toolset. Finally, we explain the benefits of runtime tracing to the general earth system modeling community. We hope those considerations can also be beneficial to many other modeling research programs involving legacy high-performance computing applications.

  2. Oceanic Trace Gases Numeric Data Packages from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Most data sets or packages, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. CDIAC lists the following numeric data packages under the broad heading of Oceanic Trace Gases: Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16S_2005 ( 01/11/05 - 022405) Determination of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Parameters during the R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer Cruise in the Southern Indian Ocean (WOCE Section S04I, 050396 - 070496) Inorganic Carbon, Nutrient, and Oxygen Data from the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16N_2003a (060403 081103) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Maurice Ewing Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A17, 010494 - 032194) Global Ocean Data Analysis Project GLODAP: Results and Data Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruises in the North Atlantic Ocean on WOCE Sections AR24 (1102 120596) and A24, A20, and A22 (053097 090397) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic and Chemical Data Obtained During the Nine R/V Knorr Cruises Comprising the Indian Ocean CO2 Survey (WOCE Sections I8SI9S, I9N, I8NI5E, I3, I5WI4, I7N, I1, I10, and I2; 120 194 012296) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 28/1 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A8, 032994 - 051294) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruise 138-3, -4, and -5 in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P6E, P6C, and P6W, 050292 - 073092) Global Distribution of Total Inorganic Carbon and Total

  3. Dynamical principles in neuroscience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabinovich, Mikhail I.; Varona, Pablo; Selverston, Allen I.; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.

    2006-10-15

    Dynamical modeling of neural systems and brain functions has a history of success over the last half century. This includes, for example, the explanation and prediction of some features of neural rhythmic behaviors. Many interesting dynamical models of learning and memory based on physiological experiments have been suggested over the last two decades. Dynamical models even of consciousness now exist. Usually these models and results are based on traditional approaches and paradigms of nonlinear dynamics including dynamical chaos. Neural systems are, however, an unusual subject for nonlinear dynamics for several reasons: (i) Even the simplest neural network, with only a few neurons and synaptic connections, has an enormous number of variables and control parameters. These make neural systems adaptive and flexible, and are critical to their biological function. (ii) In contrast to traditional physical systems described by well-known basic principles, first principles governing the dynamics of neural systems are unknown. (iii) Many different neural systems exhibit similar dynamics despite having different architectures and different levels of complexity. (iv) The network architecture and connection strengths are usually not known in detail and therefore the dynamical analysis must, in some sense, be probabilistic. (v) Since nervous systems are able to organize behavior based on sensory inputs, the dynamical modeling of these systems has to explain the transformation of temporal information into combinatorial or combinatorial-temporal codes, and vice versa, for memory and recognition. In this review these problems are discussed in the context of addressing the stimulating questions: What can neuroscience learn from nonlinear dynamics, and what can nonlinear dynamics learn from neuroscience?.

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scour-tracc-cfd TRACC RESEARCH Computational Fluid Dynamics Computational Structural Mechanics Transportation Systems Modeling Computational Fluid Dynamics Overview of CFD: Video Clip with Audio Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research uses mathematical and computational models of flowing fluids to describe and predict fluid response in problems of interest, such as the flow of air around a moving vehicle or the flow of water and sediment in a river. Coupled with appropriate and prototypical

  5. Protein Dynamics and Biocatalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protein Dynamics and Biocatalysis Protein Dynamics and Biocatalysis 1998 Annual Report Grand Challenge Projects biocatalysis.gif A model of the Michaelis complex for the TEM-1/penicillin system from molecular dynamics simulations. Investigators: P. A. Bash, Northwestern University Medical School and M. Karplus, Harvard University Research Objectives A guiding principle of molecular biology is that the structure of a biomolecule defines its function. This principle is especially true in the case

  6. Shared and Dynamic Libraries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Some "out-of-the-box" applications require DSLs and some popular applications like Python use DSLs as well. Using System Shared and Dynamic Libraries "System" DSLs include...

  7. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Methods

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation on Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Methods was given at the DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials on May 18, 2006.

  8. Simultaneous investigation of ultrafast structural dynamics and transient electric field by sub-picosecond electron pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Run-Ze; Zhu, Pengfei; Chen, Long; Chen, Jie E-mail: jzhang1@sjtu.edu.cn; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie E-mail: jzhang1@sjtu.edu.cn; Cao, Jianming

    2014-05-14

    The ultrafast structure dynamics and surface transient electric field, which are concurrently induced by laser excited electrons of an aluminum nanofilm, have been investigated simultaneously by the same transmission electron diffraction patterns. These two processes are found to be significantly different and distinguishable by tracing the time dependent changes of electron diffraction and deflection angles, respectively. This study also provides a practical means to evaluate simultaneously the effect of transient electric field during the study of structural dynamics under low pump fluence by transmission ultrafast electron diffraction.

  9. High-frequency monitoring of water fluxes and nutrient loads to assess the effects of controlled drainage on water storage and nutrient transport

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rozemeijer, J. C.; Visser, A.; Borren, W.; Winegram, M.; van der Velde, Y.; Klein, J.; Broers, H. P.

    2016-01-19

    High nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fluxes from upstream agriculture threaten aquatic ecosystems in surface waters and estuaries, especially in areas characterized by high agricultural N and P inputs and densely drained catchments like the Netherlands. Controlled drainage has been recognized as an effective option to optimize soil moisture conditions for agriculture and to reduce unnecessary losses of fresh water and nutrients. This is achieved by introducing control structures with adjustable overflow levels into subsurface tube drain systems. A small-scale (1 ha) field experiment was designed to investigate the hydrological and chemical changes after introducing controlled drainage. Precipitation rates andmore » the response of water tables and drain fluxes were measured in the periods before the introduction of controlled drainage (2007–2008) and after (2009–2011). For the N and P concentration measurements, auto-analyzers for continuous records were combined with passive samplers for time-averaged concentrations at individual drain outlets. The experimental setup enabled the quantification of changes in the water and solute balance after introducing controlled drainage. The results showed that introducing controlled drainage reduced the drain discharge and increased the groundwater storage in the field. To achieve this, the overflow levels have to be elevated in early spring, before the drain discharge stops due to dryer conditions and falling groundwater levels. The groundwater storage in the field would have been larger if the water levels in the adjacent ditch were controlled as well by an adjustable weir. The N concentrations and loads increased, which was largely related to elevated concentrations in one of the three monitored tube drains. The P loads via the tube drains reduced due to the reduction in discharge after introducing controlled drainage. Furthermore, this may be counteracted by the higher groundwater levels and the larger contribution

  10. IJS procedure for RELAP5 to TRACE input model conversion using SNAP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prosek, A.; Berar, O. A.

    2012-07-01

    The TRAC/RELAP Advanced Computational Engine (TRACE) advanced, best-estimate reactor systems code developed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission comes with a graphical user interface called Symbolic Nuclear Analysis Package (SNAP). Much of efforts have been done in the past to develop the RELAP5 input decks. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the Institut 'Josef Stefan' (IJS) conversion procedure from RELAP5 to TRACE input model of BETHSY facility. The IJS conversion procedure consists of eleven steps and is based on the use of SNAP. For calculations of the selected BETHSY 6.2TC test the RELAP5/MOD3.3 Patch 4 and TRACE V5.0 Patch 1 were used. The selected BETHSY 6.2TC test was 15.24 cm equivalent diameter horizontal cold leg break in the reference pressurized water reactor without high pressure and low pressure safety injection. The application of the IJS procedure for conversion of BETHSY input model showed that it is important to perform the steps in proper sequence. The overall calculated results obtained with TRACE using the converted RELAP5 model were close to experimental data and comparable to RELAP5/MOD3.3 calculations. Therefore it can be concluded, that proposed IJS conversion procedure was successfully demonstrated on the BETHSY integral test facility input model. (authors)

  11. An Energy Conservative Ray-Tracing Method With a Time Interpolation of the Force Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, Jin

    2015-02-10

    A new algorithm that constructs a continuous force field interpolated in time is proposed for resolving existing difficulties in numerical methods for ray-tracing. This new method has improved accuracy, but with the same degree of algebraic complexity compared to Kaisers method.

  12. TRACE/PARCS Core Modeling of a BWR/5 for Accident Analysis of ATWS Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuadra A.; Baek J.; Cheng, L.; Aronson, A.; Diamond, D.; Yarsky, P.

    2013-11-10

    The TRACE/PARCS computational package [1, 2] isdesigned to be applicable to the analysis of light water reactor operational transients and accidents where the coupling between the neutron kinetics (PARCS) and the thermal-hydraulics and thermal-mechanics (TRACE) is important. TRACE/PARCS has been assessed for itsapplicability to anticipated transients without scram(ATWS) [3]. The challenge, addressed in this study, is to develop a sufficiently rigorous input model that would be acceptable for use in ATWS analysis. Two types of ATWS events were of interest, a turbine trip and a closure of main steam isolation valves (MSIVs). In the first type, initiated by turbine trip, the concern is that the core will become unstable and large power oscillations will occur. In the second type,initiated by MSIV closure,, the concern is the amount of energy being placed into containment and the resulting emergency depressurization. Two separate TRACE/PARCS models of a BWR/5 were developed to analyze these ATWS events at MELLLA+ (maximum extended load line limit plus)operating conditions. One model [4] was used for analysis of ATWS events leading to instability (ATWS-I);the other [5] for ATWS events leading to emergency depressurization (ATWS-ED). Both models included a large portion of the nuclear steam supply system and controls, and a detailed core model, presented henceforth.

  13. Tax Deduction Qualified Software: TRACE 700 version 6.3.3

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On this page you'll find information about the TRACE 700 version 6.3.3 Qualified Software for Calculating Commercial Building Tax Deductions | Department of Energy, which calculates energy and power cost savings that meet federal tax incentive requirements for commercial buildings.

  14. Kootenai River Nutrient Dosing System and N-P Consumption: Year 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holderman, Charles

    2009-02-19

    In early 2006 we designed and built low energy consumption, pump-operated system, for dosing of the liquid nutrient in the summer 2006 season. This operated successfully, and the system was used again during the 2007 and 2008 seasons for dosing. During the early winter period, 2008, laboratory tests were made of the liquid nutrient pump system, and it was noted that small amounts of air were being entrained on the suction side of the pump, during conditions when the inlet pressure was low. It was believed that this was the cause of diurnal fluctuations in the flow supplied, characteristic of the 2007 year flow data. Replacement of '0' rings on the inlet side of the pumps was the solution to this problem, and when tested in the field during the summer season, the flow supplied was found to be stable. A decision was made by the IKERT committee at the meeting of 20th to 21st May 2008 (held in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho) to use an injection flow rate of liquid fertilizer (polyammonium phosphate 10-34-0) to achieve a target phosphorus concentration of 3.0 {micro}g/L, after complete mixing in the river. This target concentration was the same as that used in 2006 and 2007. The proposed starting date was as early as possible in June 2008. Plans were made to measure the dosing flow in three ways. Two of the three methods of flow measurement (1 and 2 below) are inter-dependent. These were: (1) Direct measurement of flow rate by diverting dosing flow into a 1000 mL volume standard flask. The flow rate was computed by dividing the flask volume by the time required to fill the flask. This was done a few times only during the summer period. (2) Adjusting the flow rate reading of the Gamma dosing pump using the 'calibration' function to achieve agreement with the flow rate computed by method 1 above. (3) Direct measurement by electrical signal from conductive fluid passing through a magnetic field (Seametrics meter, as used in previous years). Values were recorded every 4 minutes by a

  15. Pyruvate modifies metabolic flux and nutrient sensing during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an immature swine model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ledee, Dolena R.; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Olson, Aaron; Isern, Nancy G.; Robillard Frayne, Isabelle; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2015-07-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides mechanical circulatory support for infants and children with postoperative cardiopulmonary failure. Nutritional support is mandatory during ECMO, although specific actions for substrates on the heart have not been delineated. Prior work shows that enhancing pyruvate oxidation promotes successful weaning from ECMO. Accordingly, we closely examined the role of prolonged systemic pyruvate supplementation in modifying metabolic parameters during the unique conditions of ventricular unloading provided by ECMO. Twelve male mixed breed Yorkshire piglets (age 30-49 days) received systemic infusion of either normal saline (Group C) or pyruvate (Group P) during ECMO for 8 hours. Over the final hour piglets received [2-13C] pyruvate, and [13C6]-L-leucine, as an indicator for oxidation and protein synthesis. A significant increase in lactate and pyruvate concentrations occurred, along with an increase in the absolute concentration of all measured CAC intermediates. Group P showed greater anaplerotic flux through pyruvate carboxylation although pyruvate oxidation relative to citrate synthase flux was similar to Group C. The groups demonstrated similar leucine fractional contributions to acetyl-CoA and fractional protein synthesis rates. Pyruvate also promoted an increase in the phosphorylation state of several nutrient sensitive enzymes, such as AMPK and ACC, and promoted O-GlcNAcylation through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP). In conclusion, prolonged pyruvate supplementation during ECMO modified anaplerotic pyruvate flux and elicited changes in important nutrient and energy sensitive pathways, while preserving protein synthesis. Therefore, the observed results support the further study of nutritional supplementation and its downstream effects on cardiac adaptation during ventricular unloading.

  16. Development of monitoring and control technology based on trace gas monitoring. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liebowitz, B.

    1997-07-01

    Trace gases are generated by many biological reactions. During anaerobic decomposition, trace levels of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO) gases are produced. It was shown previously that these trace gases are intrinsically related to the biochemical reactions occurring and, therefore, offer promise for on-line process monitoring and control. This work was designed to test how effectively hydrogen and CO could be to monitor high-rate anaerobic systems that has significant mass transfer and complex hydraulics. An experimental program was designed to examine the behavior of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor system under steady state and in response to organic loading perturbations. The responses of trace gases CO and H{sub 2} were tracked using an on-line, real-time gas-monitoring system linked to a computer-controlled data acquisition package. Data on conventional process parameters such as pH, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were concurrently collected. Monitoring of conventional process indicators (i.e., pH, VFA, gas production) and trace gas (H{sub 2} and CO) indicators was conducted using a matrix of nine different steady-state OLRs (4-23 kg COD/m{sup 3} -d) and system HRTs (0.5 to 2.5 days) was performed to determine any correlation among the indicators. Of OLR, HRT, and influent COD, only OLR had any significant influence on the process indicators examined. All parameters except methane increased with increases in OLR; methane decreased with increased OLR. The OLR and gas production rate (GP) were observed to be linearly correlated.

  17. Solar Dynamics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dynamics Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solar Dynamics Place: Ottumwa, Iowa Zip: IA 52501 Sector: Solar Product: Solar Dynamics is a US-based solar powered attic roof vents...

  18. System Dynamics Model | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics Model content top Chemical Supply Chain Analysis Posted by Admin on Mar 1, 2012 in | Comments 0 comments Chemical Supply Chain Analysis NISAC has developed a range of...

  19. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Methods

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Los Alamos Parallel Replica Dynamics Procedure Start clock and run thermostatted MD on ... Sum the trajectory times over all M processors. Advance simulation clock by this t sum Los ...

  20. Multipulsed dynamic moire interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A.

    1991-01-01

    An improved dynamic moire interferometer comprised of a lasing medium providing a plurality of beams of coherent light, a multiple q-switch producing multiple trains of 100,000 or more pulses per second, a combining means collimating multiple trains of pulses into substantially a single train and directing beams to specimen gratings affixed to a test material, and a controller, triggering and sequencing the emission of the pulses with the occurrence and recording of a dynamic loading event.

  1. Photochemical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, B.C.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

  2. Potential for Microbial Stimulation in Deep Vadose Zone Sediments by Gas-Phase Nutrients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, S.W.; Plymale, A. E.; Brockman, F.J.

    2006-04-05

    Viable microbial populations are low, typically 10{sup 4} cells per gram, in deep vadose zones in arid climates. There is evidence that microbial distribution in these environments is patchy. In addition, infiltration or injection of nutrient-laden water has the potential to spread and drive contaminants downward to the saturated zone. For these reasons, there are uncertainties regarding the feasibility of bioremediation of recalcitrant contaminants in deep vadose zones. The objectives of this study were to investigate the occurrence of denitrifying activity and gaseous carbon-utilizing activity in arid-climate deep vadose zone sediments contaminated with, and/or affected by past exposure to, carbon tetrachloride (CT). These metabolisms are known to degrade CT and/or its breakdown product chloroform under anoxic conditions. A second objective was to determine if CT would be degraded in these sediments under unsaturated, bulk-phase aerobic incubation conditions. Both denitrifier population (determined by MPN) and microbial heterotrophic activity (measured by mineralization of 14-C labeled glucose and acetate) were relatively low and the sediments with greater in situ moisture (10-21% versus 2-7%) tended to have higher activities. When sediments were amended with gaseous nutrients (nitrous oxide and triethyl/tributyl phosphate) and gaseous C sources (a mixture of methane, ethane, propylene, propane, and butane) and incubated for 6 months, approximately 50% of the samples showed removal of one or more gaseous C sources, with butane most commonly used (44% of samples), followed by propylene (42%), propane (31%), ethane (22%), and methane (4%). Gaseous N and gaseous P did not stimulate removal of gaseous C substrates compared to no addition of N and P. CT and gaseous C sources were spiked into the sediments that removed gaseous C sources to determine if hydrocarbon-degraders have the potential to degrade CT under unsaturated conditions. In summary, gaseous C sources

  3. Behavior of trace and companion elements of ULC-IF steel grades during RH-treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jungreithmeier, A.; Viertauer, A.; Presslinger, H.

    1996-12-31

    A large number of metallurgical reactions are caused by lowering the partial pressure during vacuum treatment. One of these reactions is the volatilization of elements with high vapor pressure. The concentration of trace and companion elements during RH-treatment mostly changes because of cooling scrap, deoxidation agents and ferro-alloy additions, slag/metal reactions, vaporization and also because of reactions with the RH-vessel lining. These changes in the concentration of trace and companion elements during RH-treatment are exemplified for ULC-IF (ultra low carbon--interstitial free) steel grades. The elements which are considered are chromium, nickel, molybdenum, copper, vanadium, tin, zinc, lead, phosphorus, sulfur and nitrogen. Calculations of the theoretical equilibrium solubility using thermodynamic data--in dependence of pressure and temperature--correspond well with the values obtained during steel production operations. 67 refs.

  4. Integration of stable isotope and trace contaminant concentration for enhanced forensic acetone discrimination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, James J.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Wahl, Jon H.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2013-07-18

    We analyzed 21 neat acetone samples from 15 different suppliers to demonstrate the utility of a coupled stable isotope and trace contaminant strategy for distinguishing forensically-relevant samples. By combining these two pieces of orthogonal data we could discriminate all of the acetones that were produced by the 15 different suppliers. Using stable isotope ratios alone, we were able to distinguish 9 acetone samples, while the remaining 12 fell into four clusters with highly similar signatures. Adding trace chemical contaminant information enhanced discrimination to 13 individual acetones with three residual clusters. The acetones within each cluster shared a common manufacturer and might, therefore, not be expected to be resolved. The data presented here demonstrates the power of combining orthogonal data sets to enhance sample fingerprinting and highlights the role disparate data could play in future forensic investigations.

  5. Atom Trap Trace Analysis at ANL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Atom Trap Trace Analysis at ANL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation Research / Small Business Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301)

  6. Trace collection for simulation driven co-design of exascale platforms and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    codes | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Trace collection for simulation driven co-design of exascale platforms and codes PI Name: David Evensky PI Email: evensky@sandia.gov Institution: Sandia National Laboratories Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 5 Million Year: 2011 Research Domain: Computer Science A key problem facing application developers is that the exascale machines which they are targeting will not be available for roughly another seven years. Developers

  7. Sensitive Multi-Species Emissions Monitoring: Infrared Laser-Based Detection of Trace-Level Contaminants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steill, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes our development of spectroscopic chemical analysis techniques and spectral modeling for trace-gas measurements of highly-regulated low-concentration species present in flue gas emissions from utility coal boilers such as HCl under conditions of high humidity. Detailed spectral modeling of the spectroscopy of HCl and other important combustion and atmospheric species such as H 2 O, CO 2 , N 2 O, NO 2 , SO 2 , and CH 4 demonstrates that IR-laser spectroscopy is a sensitive multi-component analysis strategy. Experimental measurements from techniques based on IR laser spectroscopy are presented that demonstrate sub-ppm sensitivity levels to these species. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy is used to detect and quantify HCl at ppm levels with extremely high signal-to-noise even under conditions of high relative humidity. Additionally, cavity ring-down IR spectroscopy is used to achieve an extremely high sensitivity to combustion trace gases in this spectral region; ppm level CH 4 is one demonstrated example. The importance of spectral resolution in the sensitivity of a trace-gas measurement is examined by spectral modeling in the mid- and near-IR, and efforts to improve measurement resolution through novel instrument development are described. While previous project reports focused on benefits and complexities of the dual-etalon cavity ring-down infrared spectrometer, here details on steps taken to implement this unique and potentially revolutionary instrument are described. This report also illustrates and critiques the general strategy of IR- laser photodetection of trace gases leading to the conclusion that mid-IR laser spectroscopy techniques provide a promising basis for further instrument development and implementation that will enable cost-effective sensitive detection of multiple key contaminant species simultaneously.

  8. Systematic Study of Trace Radioactive Impurities in Candidate Construction Materials for EXO-200

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, D.S.; Grinberg, P.; Weber, P.; Baussan, E.; Djurcic, Z.; Keefer, G.; Piepke, A.; Pocar, A.; Vuilleumier, J.-L.; Vuilleumier, J.-M.; Akimov, D.; Bellerive, A.; Bowcock, M.; Breidenbach, M.; Burenkov, A.; Conley, R.; Craddock, W.; Danilov, M.; DeVoe, R.; Dixit, M.; Dolgolenko, A.; /Alabama U. /NRC-INMS /Neuchatel U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Colorado State U. /Laurentian U. /Maryland U. /UC, Irvine

    2007-10-24

    The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) will search for double beta decays of 136Xe. We report the results of a systematic study of trace concentrations of radioactive impurities in a wide range of raw materials and finished parts considered for use in the construction of EXO-200, the first stage of the EXO experimental program. Analysis techniques employed, and described here, include direct gamma counting, alpha counting, neutron activation analysis, and high-sensitivity mass spectrometry.

  9. An Alternative Treatment of Trace Chemical Constituents in Calculated Chemical Source Terms for Hanford Tank Farms Safety Analsyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huckaby, James L.

    2006-09-26

    Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tank accident analyses require chemical waste toxicity source terms to assess potential accident consequences. Recent reviews of the current methodology used to generate source terms and the need to periodically update the sources terms has brought scrutiny to the manner in which trace waste constituents are included in the source terms. This report examines the importance of trace constituents to the chemical waste source terms, which are calculated as sums of fractions (SOFs), and recommends three changes to the manner in which trace constituents are included in the calculation SOFs.

  10. Simulation of a main steam line break with steam generator tube rupture using trace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallardo, S.; Querol, A.; Verdu, G.

    2012-07-01

    A simulation of the OECD/NEA ROSA-2 Project Test 5 was made with the thermal-hydraulic code TRACE5. Test 5 performed in the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) reproduced a Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) with a Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The result of these simultaneous breaks is a depressurization in the secondary and primary system in loop B because both systems are connected through the SGTR. Good approximation was obtained between TRACE5 results and experimental data. TRACE5 reproduces qualitatively the phenomena that occur in this transient: primary pressure falls after the break, stagnation of the pressure after the opening of the relief valve of the intact steam generator, the pressure falls after the two openings of the PORV and the recovery of the liquid level in the pressurizer after each closure of the PORV. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis has been performed to know the effect of varying the High Pressure Injection (HPI) flow rate in both loops on the system pressures evolution. (authors)

  11. TRACE Model for Simulation of Anticipated Transients Without Scram in a BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng L. Y.; Baek J.; Cuadra,A.; Aronson, A.; Diamond, D.; Yarsky, P.

    2013-11-10

    A TRACE model has been developed for using theTRACE/PARCS computational package [1, 2] to simulate anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) events in a boiling water reactor (BWR). The model represents a BWR/5 housed in a Mark II containment. The reactor and the balance of plant systems are modeled in sufficient detail to enable the evaluation of plant responses and theeffectiveness of automatic and operator actions tomitigate this beyond design basis accident.The TRACE model implements features thatfacilitate the simulation of ATWS events initiated by turbine trip and closure of the main steam isolation valves (MSIV). It also incorporates control logic to initiate actions to mitigate the ATWS events, such as water levelcontrol, emergency depressurization, and injection of boron via the standby liquid control system (SLCS). Two different approaches have been used to model boron mixing in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel: modulate coolant flow in the lower plenum by a flow valve, and use control logic to modular.

  12. Trace-gas sensing using the compliance voltage of an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.

    2013-06-04

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are increasingly being used to detect, identify, and measure levels of trace gases in the air. External cavity QCLs (ECQCLs) provide a broadly-tunable infrared source to measure absorption spectra of chemicals and provide high detection sensitivity and identification confidence. Applications include detecting chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals, monitoring building air quality, measuring greenhouse gases for atmospheric research, monitoring and controlling industrial processes, analyzing chemicals in exhaled breath for medical diagnostics, and many more. Compact, portable trace gas sensors enable in-field operation in a wide range of platforms, including handheld units for use by first responders, fixed installations for monitoring air quality, and lightweight sensors for deployment in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). We present experimental demonstration of a new chemical sensing technique based on intracavity absorption in an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL). This new technique eliminates the need for an infrared photodetector and gas cell by detecting the intracavity absorption spectrum in the compliance voltage of the laser device itself. To demonstrate and characterize the technique, we measure infrared absorption spectra of chemicals including water vapor and Freon-134a. Sub-ppm detection limits in one second are achieved, with the potential for increased sensitivity after further optimization. The technique enables development of handheld, high-sensitivity, and high-accuracy trace gas sensors for in-field use.

  13. Computational and experimental research on infrared trace by human being contact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong Zonglong; Yang Kuntao; Ding Wenxiu; Zhang Nanyangsheng; Zheng Wenheng

    2010-06-20

    The indoor detection of the human body's thermal trace plays an important role in the fields of infrared detecting, scouting, infrared camouflage, and infrared rescuing and tracking. Currently, quantitative description and analysis for this technology are lacking due to the absence of human infrared radiation analysis. To solve this problem, we study the heating and cooling process by observing body contact and removal on an object, respectively. Through finite-element simulation and carefully designed experiments, an analytical model of the infrared trace of body contact is developed based on infrared physics and heat transfer theory. Using this model, the impact of body temperature on material thermal parameters is investigated. The sensitivity of material thermal parameters, the thermal distribution, and the changes of the thermograph's contrast are then found and analyzed. Excellent matching results achieved between the simulation and the experiments demonstrate the strong impact of temperature on material thermal parameters. Conclusively, the new model, simulation, and experimental results are beneficial to the future development and implementation of infrared trace technology.

  14. Characterization of trace element emissions from a pilot-scale coal combustion unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hargis, R.A.; Pennline, H.W.

    1996-12-31

    The flue gas cleanup projects in the in-house research program at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center range from laboratory-scale work to testing with the combustion products of coal at a scale equivalent to about 0.75 MW of electric power generation. The largest unit is a 500-pound-per-hour coal combustor, complete with ductwork, spray dryer, baghouse, and ancillary equipment. Over the past year, tests to investigate the distribution and fate of trace elements have been conducted with this pilot unit. These investigations are an integral component of the Air Toxics and Fine Particulate Control subprogrammatic area of the AR and ET Power Systems Program. The overall effort of this area focuses on the improvement of existing technologies and the development of new technologies for the control of hazardous air pollutants and fine particulates associated with coal combustion. A major endeavor within the subprogram is the characterization of trace elements in flue gas from coal combustion, including a special emphasis on mercury speciation. The study described in this paper examined the results from an investigation on the pilot unit; the distribution of trace elements in the ash streams and flue gas stream, material recoveries for the system, baghouse removal efficiencies, and enrichment of ash particulate. Also, a preliminary comparison between the results from the pilot unit and a full-scale utility that burned coal from the same coal batch is provided.

  15. Effects of nutrient recycling and food-chain length on resilience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAngelis, D.L.; Bartell, S.M. ); Brenkert, A.L. )

    1989-11-01

    The attempt to explain the observed structure of ecological food webs has been one of the recent key issues of theoretical ecology. Unquestionably, many factors are involved in determining food-web structure. The dissipation of available energy from one trophic level to the next has been emphasized by Yodzis as the major factor limiting the length of food chains. However, Pimm and Lawton and Pimm have argued that a decrease in relative stability with increasing food-chain length may also be a factor. By relative stability (more commonly, resilience), we mean the rate at which a stable ecological system returns to a steady state following a perturbation. Resilience can be defined more precisely as the inverse of the return time T{sub R}, the time it takes a systems to return a specified fraction of the way toward a steady state following a perturbation. Besides its possible significance to food-web structure, ecosystem resilience is a factor of practical importance, since it is a measure of the rate at which the ecosystem can recover from disturbances. Our purpose is to investigate resilience in food-chain and food-web models as nutrient input and the trophic structure are varied and to offer explanations of the observed model behaviors. In this paper we present the basic results by first using a simple abstract food-chain model at steady state and then showing that these results hold for a more complex food-web simulation model without a constant steady state solution.

  16. JV Task 59-Demonstration of Accelerated In Situ Contaminant Degradation by Vacuum-Enhanced Nutrient Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaroslav Solc

    2007-03-15

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) conducted remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and groundwater at a former Mohler Oil site in Bismarck, North Dakota. The remedial strategy was based on the application of two innovative concepts: (1) design and deployment of the mobile extraction, treatment, and injection units to overcome site limitations associated with urban settings in high-traffic areas and (2) vacuum-controlled nutrient injection within and on the periphery of an induced hydraulic and pneumatic depression. Combined contaminant recovery since the beginning of the project in June 2003 totals over 13,600 lb ({approx}6,170 kg) of hydrocarbons, equivalent to 2176 gallons (8236 l) of product. In situ delivery of 1504 Ib (682 kg) of ionic nitrate and 540 Ib (245 kg) of dissolved oxygen translates into further reduction of about 489 Ib (222 kg) of benzene for the same period and provides for long-term stimulation of the natural attenuation process. In addition to contaminant recovered by extraction and reduced by in situ biodegradation, a total of 4136 Ib (1876 kg) of oxygen was delivered to the saturated zone, resulting in further in situ reduction of an estimated 1324 lb (600 kg) of dissolved-phase hydrocarbons. Based on the results of the EERC demonstration, the North Dakota Department of Health approved site abandonment and termination of the corrective action.

  17. Annual Report 1998: Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SD Colson; RS McDowell

    1999-05-10

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Labo- ratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of- the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interracial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in envi- ronmental chemistry and in nuclear waste proc- essing and storage; and (3) developing state-of- the-art analytical methods for characterizing com- plex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. Our program aims at achieving a quantitative understanding of chemical reactions at interfaces and, more generally, in condensed media, compa- rable to that currently available for gas-phase reactions. This understanding will form the basis for the development of a priori theories for pre- dicting macroscopic chemical behavior in con- densed and heterogeneous media, which will add significantly to the value of field-scale envi- ronmental models, predictions of short- and long- term nuclear waste storage stabilities, and other areas related to the primary missions of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  18. Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, James E.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-10-12

    Dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM) combines the benefits of high spatial resolution electron microscopy with the high temporal resolution of ultrafast lasers. The incorporation of these two components into a single instrument provides a perfect platform for in situ observations of material processes. However, previous DTEM applications have focused on observing structural changes occurring in samples exposed to high vacuum. Therefore, in order to expand the pump-probe experimental regime to more natural environmental conditions, in situ gas and liquid chambers must be coupled with Dynamic TEM. This chapter describes the current and future applications of in situ liquid DTEM to permit time-resolved atomic scale observations in an aqueous environment, Although this chapter focuses mostly on in situ liquid imaging, the same research potential exists for in situ gas experiments and the successful integration of these techniques promises new insights for understanding nanoparticle, catalyst and biological protein dynamics with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution.

  19. Nitrogen and Sulfur Requirements for Clostridium thermocellum and Caldicellulosiruptor bescii on Cellulosic Substrates in Minimal Nutrient Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kridelbaugh, Donna M; Nelson, Josh C; Engle, Nancy L; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Graham, David E

    2013-01-01

    Growth media for cellulolytic Clostridium thermocellum and Caldicellulosiruptor bescii bacteria usually contain excess nutrients that would increase costs for consolidated bioprocessing for biofuel production and create a waste stream with nitrogen, sulfur and phosphate. C. thermocellum was grown on crystalline cellulose with varying concentrations of nitrogen and sulfur compounds, and growth rate and alcohol production response curves were determined. Both bacteria assimilated sulfate in the presence of ascorbate reductant, increasing the ratio of oxidized to reduced fermentation products. From these results, a low ionic strength, defined minimal nutrient medium with decreased nitrogen, sulfur, phosphate and vitamin supplements was developed for the fermentation of cellobiose, cellulose and acid-pretreated Populus. Carbon and electron balance calculations indicate the unidentified residual fermentation products must include highly reduced molecules. Both bacterial populations were maintained in co-cultures with substrates containing xylan or hemicellulose in defined medium with sulfate and basal vitamin supplements.

  20. Dynamic cable analysis models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palo, P.A.; Meggitt, D.J.; Nordell, W.J.

    1983-05-01

    This paper presents a summary of the development and validation of undersea cable dynamics computer models by the Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory (NCEL) under the sponsorship of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command. These models allow for the analysis of both small displacement (strumming) and large displacement (static and dynamic) deformations of arbitrarily configured cable structures. All of the large displacement models described in this paper are available to the public. This paper does not emphasize the theoretical development of the models (this information is available in other references) but emphasizes the various features of the models, the comparisons between model output and experimental data, and applications for which the models have been used.

  1. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  2. Use of respirometry to determine the effect of nutrient enhancement on JP-8 biodegradability. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Totten, C.T.

    1995-11-27

    The purpose of this study was to use respirometry to measure the impact of nutrient combinations or treatments on JP - 8 biodegradation under simulated fuel spill soil conditions. The study was designed observe one soil type at a constant fuel exposure level of 1% and a constant moisture of 60% of field capacity. Three experiments conducted were of two and three factor designs with potassium nitrate and sodium phosphate addition levels serving as two factors and fuel serving as a third factor in Experiments 1 and 2. Cumulative oxygen values obtained by the respirometer were assumed to be a direct indicator of JP-8 biodegradation. Therefore, cumulative oxygen values were used as the response variable for statistical analysis to determine the impact of nutrient enhancement on biodegradation 0fJP - 8.O2 consumption and CO2 production rate data were collected to ensure respiration activity levels were declining or stable to allow for cumulative oxygen data interpretation. Nutrient enhancement was found not to have a positive impact on biodegradation under these conditions. Additionally, losses due to degradation of the JP - 8 were found to be less than losses from volatilization.

  3. An Efficient Format for Nearly Constant-Time Access to Arbitrary Time Intervals in Large Trace Files

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chan, Anthony; Gropp, William; Lusk, Ewing

    2008-01-01

    A powerful method to aid in understanding the performance of parallel applications uses log or trace files containing time-stamped events and states (pairs of events). These trace files can be very large, often hundreds or even thousands of megabytes. Because of the cost of accessing and displaying such files, other methods are often used that reduce the size of the tracefiles at the cost of sacrificing detail or other information. This paper describes a hierarchical trace file format that provides for display of an arbitrary time window in a time independent of the total size of the file andmore » roughly proportional to the number of events within the time window. This format eliminates the need to sacrifice data to achieve a smaller trace file size (since storage is inexpensive, it is necessary only to make efficient use of bandwidth to that storage). The format can be used to organize a trace file or to create a separate file of annotations that may be used with conventional trace files. We present an analysis of the time to access all of the events relevant to an interval of time and we describe experiments demonstrating the performance of this file format.« less

  4. Reclamation of acidic, denuded copper basin land: Revegetation performance of phosphate rock vs other nutrient sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soileau, J.M.; Sikora, F.J.; Maddox, J.J.; Kelsoe, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    Open pit smelting of Copper ore about 100 years ago resulted in approximately 9,300 ha of severely eroded, very acidic (pH 4.0 to 5.0) soils at Copper Basin, Tennessee. Along with other essential nutrients, phosphorus (P) amendments are critical for long-term productivity and sustainability of vegetation on this depleted soil. A field study was conducted (1992-1995) to compare revegetation from surface-applied North Carolina phosphate rock (PR) and triple superphosphate (TSP) at 20, 59, and 295 kg P ha{sup -1}, and to determine benefits of starter NPK tree tablets. The experimental design consisted of 7.3 x 9.1 m replicated plots, each planted to 20 loblolly pine seedlings and aerially seeded with a mixture of grasses and legumes. Tree survivability was high from all treatments. Through the third year, tree height and diameter increased with increasing P to 59 kg P ha without fertilizer tablets. There were no pine growth differences between PR and TSP. Weeping lovegrass has been the dominant cover crop through 1995, with increased stimulation to tree tablets and surface P. Tall fescue (KY 31), sericea lespedeza, and black locust responded more to PR than to TSP. Surface soil pH increased, and 0.01 M SrCl{sub 2} extractable Al decreased, with increasing rate of PR. For future loblolly pine plantings in the Copper Basin, this study suggests there is no benefit to applying both tree tablets and surface P at rates above 59 kg P ha{sup -1}. For reclaiming land with high acidity and low P fertility, PR has significant benefits. In reclaiming steep, gullied land, there is great potential for aerial application of PR and/or pelletized liming agents.

  5. Dynamics of helium films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, B.E.; Epstein, J.L.; Krotscheck, E.; Tymczak, C.J.; Saarela, M.

    1992-11-01

    The authors present quantitative calculations for the static structure and the dynamics of quantum liquid films on a translationally invariant substrate. The excitation spectrum is calculated by solving the equations of motion for time-dependent one- and two-body densities. They find significant corrections to the Feynman spectrum for the phonon-like collective excitations. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte Additive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Jiangfeng; Xu, Wu; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Engelhard, Mark H.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Zhang, Yaohui; Zhang, Jiguang

    2015-07-01

    Residual water presents in nonaqueous electrolytes has been widely regarded as a detrimental factor for lithium (Li) batteries. This is because water is highly reactive with the commonly used LiPF6 salt and leads to the formation of HF that corrodes battery materials. In this work, we demonstrate that a controlled trace-amount of water (25-100 ppm) can be an effective electrolyte additive for achieving dendrite-free Li metal deposition in LiPF6-based electrolytes and avoid its detrimental effect at the same time. Detailed analyses reveal that the trace amount of HF formed by the decomposition reaction of LiPF6 with water will be electrochemically reduced during initial Li deposition process to form a uniform and dense LiF-rich SEI layer on the surface of the substrate. This LiF-rich SEI layer leads to a uniform distribution of the electric field on the substrate surface and enables uniform and dendrite-free Li deposition. Meanwhile the detrimental effect of HF is diminished due to the consumption of HF in the LiF formation process. Microscopic analysis reveals that the as-deposited dendrite-free Li films exhibit a self-aligned and highly-compacted Li nanorods structure which is consistent with their charming blue color or known as structure color. These findings clearly demonstrate a novel approach to control the nucleation and grow process of Li metal films using well-controlled trace-amount of water. They also shine the light on the effect of water on other electrodeposition processes.

  7. Effects of a NBC (nuclear, biological, and chemical) nutrient solution on physiological and psychological status during sustained activity in the heat. Final report, February-March 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, M.S.; Francesconi, R.P.; Levine, L.; Shukitt, B.; Munro, I.

    1987-07-17

    Soldiers involved in nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) warfare may be encapsulated in MOPP4 ensemble for up to 24 hours. In that configuration the soldier is in a fasting state unless he can move to a decontaminated area to eat. The purpose of this study was to determine if a nutrient solution containing 2.34% carbohydrate and 24.1 mEq sodium per liter (NBC nutrient solution) would be more effective than a control solution of colored and flavored water in maintaining the physiological and psychological status of a person under thermal conditions that simulate MOPP4 encapsulation. Fluid intake was encouraged and the subjects maintained hydration fairly well. The results of this study indicated that water and the NBC Nutrient solution were equally effective in maintaining hydration and physiological status under hot dry conditions. The NBC Nutrient solution was more palatable, lowered symptom intensity, and improves mood; cognitive performance was not improved.

  8. Field-scale investigation of enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in the vadose zone combining soil venting as an oxygen source with moisture and nutrient addition. Appendices. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    This document contains appendices regarding a reprint on a field scale investigation of enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in the vadose zone combining soil venting as a oxygen source with moisture and nutrient addition.

  9. DOE's Ed Synakowski traces key discoveries in the quest for fusion energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab DOE's Ed Synakowski traces key discoveries in the quest for fusion energy By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe March 9, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The DOE's Associate Director of Science for Fusion Energy Sciences Ed Synakowski discusses the "aha" moments in the development of fusion energy at a March 5 Ronald E. Hatcher Science on Saturday lecture. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) The DOE's Associate Director of

  10. Characteristic emission enhancement in the atmosphere with Rn trace using metal assisted LIBS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashemi, M. M.; Parvin, P. Moosakhani, A.; Mortazavi, S. Z.; Reyhani, A.; Majdabadi, A.; Abachi, S.

    2014-06-15

    Several characteristic emission lines from the metal targets (Cu, Zn and Pb) were investigated in trace presence of radon gas in the atmospheric air, using Q-SW Nd:YAG laser induced plasma inside a control chamber. The emission lines of metal species are noticeably enhanced in (Rn+air), relative to those in the synthetic air alone. Similar spectra were also taken in various sub-atmospheric environments in order to determine the optimum pressure for enhancement. Solid-state nuclear track detectors were also employed to count the tracks due to alpha particles for the activity assessment.

  11. Appending High-Resolution Elevation Data to GPS Speed Traces for Vehicle Energy Modeling and Simulation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Appending High-Resolution Elevation Data to GPS Speed Traces for Vehicle Energy Modeling and Simulation E. Wood, E. Burton, A. Duran, and J. Gonder Technical Report NREL/TP-5400-61109 June 2014 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Contract No.

  12. Using a scalar parameter to trace dislocation evolution in atomistic modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jinbo; Zhang, Z F; Osetskiy, Yury N; Stoller, Roger E

    2015-01-01

    A scalar gamma-parameter is proposed from the Nye tensor. Its maximum value occurs along a dislocation line, either straight or curved, when the coordinate system is purposely chosen. This parameter can be easily obtained from the Nye tensor calculated at each atom in atomistic modeling. Using the gamma-parameter, a fully automated approach is developed to determine core atoms and the Burgers vectors of dislocations simultaneously. The approach is validated by revealing the smallest dislocation loop and by tracing the whole formation process of complicated dislocation networks on the fly.

  13. Sub-microradian Surface Slope Metrology with the ALS Developmental Long Trace Profiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Barber, Samuel; Domning, Edward E.; Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas; Geckeler, Ralf; Just, Andreas

    2009-09-11

    A new low budget slope measuring instrument, the Developmental Long Trace Profiler (DLTP), was recently brought to operation at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory. The design, instrumental control and data acquisition system, initial alignment and calibration procedures, as well as the developed experimental precautions and procedures are described in detail. The capability of the DLTP to achieve sub-microradian surface slope metrology is verified via cross-comparison measurements with other high performance slope measuring instruments when measuring the same high quality test optics. The directions of future work to develop a surface slope measuring profiler with nano-radian performance are also discussed.

  14. Trace Gas Emissions Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, and models and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Collections under the broad heading of Trace Gas Emissions are organized as Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions, Land-Use CO2 Emissions, Soil CO2 Emissions, and Methane.

  15. Fluid Dynamics and Solid Mechanics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Solid Mechanics Basic and applied research in theoretical continuum dynamics, modern hydrodynamic theory, materials modeling, global climate modeling, numerical...

  16. Entanglement dynamics in chaotic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghose, Shohini [Institute for Quantum Information Science, University of Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Sanders, Barry C. [Institute for Quantum Information Science, University of Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2004-12-01

    We study quantum chaos for systems with more than one degree of freedom, for which we present an analysis of the dynamics of entanglement. Our analysis explains the main features of entanglement dynamics and identifies entanglement-based signatures of quantum chaos. We discuss entanglement dynamics for a feasible experiment involving an atom in a magneto-optical trap and compare the results with entanglement dynamics for the well-studied quantum kicked top.

  17. Roaming Molecule Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roaming Molecule Dynamics - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  18. Beam Dynamics for ARIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr.

    2014-10-14

    Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

  19. Dynamic radioactive particle source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

    2012-06-26

    A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

  20. Bioturbating animals control the mobility of redox-sensitive trace elements in organic-rich mudstone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harazim, Dario; McIlroy, Duncan; Edwards, Nicholas P.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Manning, Phillip L.; Poduska, Kristin M.; Layne, Graham D.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Bergmann, Uwe

    2015-10-07

    Bioturbating animals modify the original mineralogy, porosity, organic content, and fabric of mud, thus affecting the burial diagenetic pathways of potential hydrocarbon source, seal, and reservoir rocks. High-sensitivity, synchrotron rapid scanning X-ray fluorescence elemental mapping reveals that producers of phycosiphoniform burrows systematically partition redox-sensitive trace elements (i.e., Fe, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, and As) in fine-grained siliciclastic rocks. Systematic differences in organic carbon content (total organic carbon >1.5 wt%) and quality (Δ13Corg~0.6‰) are measured between the burrow core and host sediment. The relative enrichment of redox-sensitive elements in the burrow core does not correlate with significant neo-formation of early diagenetic pyrite (via trace metal pyritization), but is best explained by physical concentration of clay- and silt-sized components. A measured loss (~–15%) of the large-ionic-radius elements Sr and Ba from both burrow halo and core is most likely associated with the release of Sr and Ba to pore waters during biological (in vivo) weathering of silt- to clay-sized lithic components and feldspar. In conclusion, this newly documented effect has significant potential to inform the interpretation of geochemical proxy and rock property data, particularly from shales, where elemental analyses are commonly employed to predict reservoir quality and support paleoenvironmental analysis.

  1. Coal quality trends and distribution of Title III trace elements in Eastern Kentucky coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eble, C.F.; Hower, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    The quality characteristics of eastern Kentucky coal beds vary both spatially and stratigraphically. Average total sulfur contents are lowest, and calorific values highest, in the Big Sandy and Upper Cumberland Reserve Districts. Average coal thickness is greatest in these two districts as well. Conversely, the thinnest coal with the highest total sulfur content, and lowest calorific value, on average, occurs in the Princess and Southwest Reserve Districts. Several Title III trace elements, notably arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, and nickel, mirror this distribution (lower average concentrations in the Big Sandy and Upper Cumberland Districts, higher average concentrations in the Princess and Southwest Districts), probably because these elements are primarily associated with sulfide minerals in coal. Ash yields and total sulfur contents are observed to increase in a stratigraphically older to younger direction. Several Title III elements, notably cadmium, chromium, lead, and selenium follow this trend, with average concentrations being higher in younger coals. Average chlorine concentration shows a reciprocal distribution, being more abundant in older coals. Some elements, such as arsenic, manganese, mercury, cobalt, and, to a lesser extent, phosphorus show concentration spikes in coal beds directly above, or below, major marine zones. With a few exceptions, average Title III trace element concentrations for eastern Kentucky coals are comparable with element distributions in other Appalachian coal-producing states.

  2. Flow injection sample pretreatment in the determination of trace elements in waters by atomic spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyson, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    Flow injection (FI) techniques are a way of automating sampling pretreatment procedures with direct coupling to the instrument. For a variety of reasons, flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) would be the method of choice for the determination of trace elements in water samples were it not for some of the inherent limitations of this technique. These limitations are concerned with the various interferences that arise from matrix components and with the atom number density in the source. This together with the various noise sources sets detection limits which are not low enough for many applications. Thus many FI procedures are devised with the aim of overcoming these limitations and thus solid phase extraction (SPE) as a means of preconcentration features largely in recently published work. Results will be presented for the determination of trace elements in water samples (both fresh and saline) in which SPE procedures were used to (a) remove the potentially interfering sea-water matrix for determinations using ICP-MS and (b) preconcentrate cadmium from surface waters prior to determination by FAAS. Hydride generation methods have been applied for the determination of selenium and arsenic. In highly saline media the elevated recoveries of Se have been investigated and for the determination of As, an evaluation of the claim that the use of surfactants improves the performance of a flow based hydride generation system has critically evaluated.

  3. Trace Elements in Hair from Tanzanian Children: Effect of Dietary Factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammed, Najat K.; Spyrou, Nicholas M.

    2009-04-19

    Trace elements in certain amounts are essential for childrens' health, because they are present in tissues participating in metabolic reactions of organisms. Deficiency of the essential elements may result in malnutrition, impaired body immunity, and poor resistance to disease. These conditions might be enhanced against a background of additional adverse environmental factors such as toxic elements. The analysis of elements in childrens' hair will give information on the deficiency of essential elements and excess of toxic elements in relation to their diet. In this study, 141 hair samples from children (girls and boys) living in two regions of Tanzanian mainland (Dar es Salaam and Moshi) and the island of Zanzibar have been analysed for trace elements in relation to food consumption habits. The analysis was carried out using long and short irradiation instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) of the Nuclear Physics Institute at Rez, Czech Republic. Arithmetic and geometric means with their respective standard deviations are presented for 19 elements. Subgroups were formed according to age, gender, and geographic regions from which the samples were collected. Differences in concentrations for the groups and with other childhood populations were explored and discussed.

  4. Bioturbating animals control the mobility of redox-sensitive trace elements in organic-rich mudstone

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Harazim, Dario; McIlroy, Duncan; Edwards, Nicholas P.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Manning, Phillip L.; Poduska, Kristin M.; Layne, Graham D.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Bergmann, Uwe

    2015-10-07

    Bioturbating animals modify the original mineralogy, porosity, organic content, and fabric of mud, thus affecting the burial diagenetic pathways of potential hydrocarbon source, seal, and reservoir rocks. High-sensitivity, synchrotron rapid scanning X-ray fluorescence elemental mapping reveals that producers of phycosiphoniform burrows systematically partition redox-sensitive trace elements (i.e., Fe, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, and As) in fine-grained siliciclastic rocks. Systematic differences in organic carbon content (total organic carbon >1.5 wt%) and quality (Δ13Corg~0.6‰) are measured between the burrow core and host sediment. The relative enrichment of redox-sensitive elements in the burrow core does not correlate with significant neo-formation ofmore » early diagenetic pyrite (via trace metal pyritization), but is best explained by physical concentration of clay- and silt-sized components. A measured loss (~–15%) of the large-ionic-radius elements Sr and Ba from both burrow halo and core is most likely associated with the release of Sr and Ba to pore waters during biological (in vivo) weathering of silt- to clay-sized lithic components and feldspar. In conclusion, this newly documented effect has significant potential to inform the interpretation of geochemical proxy and rock property data, particularly from shales, where elemental analyses are commonly employed to predict reservoir quality and support paleoenvironmental analysis.« less

  5. MCViNE- An object oriented Monte Carlo neutron ray tracing simulation package

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, J. Y. Y.; Smith, Hillary L.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Winn, Barry L.; Aczel, Adam A.; Aivazis, Michael; Fultz, Brent

    2015-11-28

    MCViNE (Monte-Carlo VIrtual Neutron Experiment) is an open-source Monte Carlo (MC) neutron ray-tracing software for performing computer modeling and simulations that mirror real neutron scattering experiments. We exploited the close similarity between how instrument components are designed and operated and how such components can be modeled in software. For example we used object oriented programming concepts for representing neutron scatterers and detector systems, and recursive algorithms for implementing multiple scattering. Combining these features together in MCViNE allows one to handle sophisticated neutron scattering problems in modern instruments, including, for example, neutron detection by complex detector systems, and single and multiplemore » scattering events in a variety of samples and sample environments. In addition, MCViNE can use simulation components from linear-chain-based MC ray tracing packages which facilitates porting instrument models from those codes. Furthermore it allows for components written solely in Python, which expedites prototyping of new components. These developments have enabled detailed simulations of neutron scattering experiments, with non-trivial samples, for time-of-flight inelastic instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source. Examples of such simulations for powder and single-crystal samples with various scattering kernels, including kernels for phonon and magnon scattering, are presented. As a result, with simulations that closely reproduce experimental results, scattering mechanisms can be turned on and off to determine how they contribute to the measured scattering intensities, improving our understanding of the underlying physics.« less

  6. MCViNE- An object oriented Monte Carlo neutron ray tracing simulation package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, J. Y. Y.; Smith, Hillary L.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Winn, Barry L.; Aczel, Adam A.; Aivazis, Michael; Fultz, Brent

    2015-11-28

    MCViNE (Monte-Carlo VIrtual Neutron Experiment) is an open-source Monte Carlo (MC) neutron ray-tracing software for performing computer modeling and simulations that mirror real neutron scattering experiments. We exploited the close similarity between how instrument components are designed and operated and how such components can be modeled in software. For example we used object oriented programming concepts for representing neutron scatterers and detector systems, and recursive algorithms for implementing multiple scattering. Combining these features together in MCViNE allows one to handle sophisticated neutron scattering problems in modern instruments, including, for example, neutron detection by complex detector systems, and single and multiple scattering events in a variety of samples and sample environments. In addition, MCViNE can use simulation components from linear-chain-based MC ray tracing packages which facilitates porting instrument models from those codes. Furthermore it allows for components written solely in Python, which expedites prototyping of new components. These developments have enabled detailed simulations of neutron scattering experiments, with non-trivial samples, for time-of-flight inelastic instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source. Examples of such simulations for powder and single-crystal samples with various scattering kernels, including kernels for phonon and magnon scattering, are presented. As a result, with simulations that closely reproduce experimental results, scattering mechanisms can be turned on and off to determine how they contribute to the measured scattering intensities, improving our understanding of the underlying physics.

  7. Dynamical impurity problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    In the past few years there has been a resurgence of interest in dynamical impurity problems, as a result of developments in the theory of correlated electron systems. The general dynamical impurity problem is a set of conduction electrons interacting with an impurity which has internal degrees of freedom. The simplest and earliest example, the Kondo problem, has attracted interest since the mid-sixties not only because of its physical importance but also as an example of a model displaying logarithmic divergences order by order in perturbation theory. It provided one of the earliest applications of the renormalization group method, which is designed to deal with just such a situation. As we shall see, the antiferromagnetic Kondo model is controlled by a strong-coupling fixed point, and the essence of the renormalization group solution is to carry out the global renormalization numerically starting from the original (weak-coupling) Hamiltonian. In these lectures, we shall describe an alternative route in which we identify an exactly solvable model which renormalizes to the same fixed point as the original dynamical impurity problem. This approach is akin to determining the critical behavior at a second order phase transition point by solving any model in a given universality class.

  8. Coastal-zone biogeochemical dynamics under global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackenzie, F.T.; Ver, L.M.; Lerman, A.

    2000-03-01

    The coastal zone, consisting of the continental shelves to a depth of 200 meters, including bays, lagoons, estuaries, and near-shore banks, is an environment that is strongly affected by its biogeochemical and physical interactions with reservoirs in the adjacent domains of land, atmosphere, open ocean, and marine sediments. Because the coastal zone is smaller in volume and area coverage relative to the open ocean, it traditionally has been studied as an integral part of the global oceans. In this paper, the authors show by numerical modeling that it is important to consider the coastal zone as an entity separate from the open ocean in any assessment of future Earth-system response under human perturbation. Model analyses for the early part of the 21st century suggest that the coastal zone plays a significant modifying role in the biogeochemical dynamics of the carbon cycle and the nutrient cycles coupled to it. This role is manifested in changes in primary production, storage, and/or export of organic matter, its remineralization, and calcium carbonate precipitation--all of which determine the state of the coastal zone with respect to exchange of CO{sub 2} with the atmosphere. Under a scenario of future reduced or complete cessation of the thermohaline circulation (THC) of the global oceans, coastal waters become an important sink for atmospheric CO{sub 2}, as opposed to the conditions in the past and present, when coastal waters are believed to be a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Profound changes in coastal-zone primary productivity underscore the important role of phosphorus as a limiting nutrient. In addition, calculations indicate that the saturation state of coastal waters with respect to carbonate minerals will decline by {approximately}15% by the year 2030. Any future slowdown in the THC of the oceans will increase slightly the rate of decline in saturation state.

  9. Novel Sorbent-Based Process for High Temperature Trace Metal Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gokhan Alptekin

    2008-09-30

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the efficacy of a novel sorbent can effectively remove trace metal contaminants (Hg, As, Se and Cd) from actual coal-derived synthesis gas streams at high temperature (above the dew point of the gas). The performance of TDA's sorbent has been evaluated in several field demonstrations using synthesis gas generated by laboratory and pilot-scale coal gasifiers in a state-of-the-art test skid that houses the absorbent and all auxiliary equipment for monitoring and data logging of critical operating parameters. The test skid was originally designed to treat 10,000 SCFH gas at 250 psig and 350 C, however, because of the limited gas handling capabilities of the test sites, the capacity was downsized to 500 SCFH gas flow. As part of the test program, we carried out four demonstrations at two different sites using the synthesis gas generated by the gasification of various lignites and a bituminous coal. Two of these tests were conducted at the Power Systems Demonstration Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Alabama; a Falkirk (North Dakota) lignite and a high sodium lignite (the PSDF operator Southern Company did not disclose the source of this lignite) were used as the feedstock. We also carried out two other demonstrations in collaboration with the University of North Dakota Energy Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC) using synthesis gas slipstreams generated by the gasification of Sufco (Utah) bituminous coal and Oak Hills (Texas) lignite. In the PSDF tests, we showed successful operation of the test system at the conditions of interest and showed the efficacy of sorbent in removing the mercury from synthesis gas. In Test Campaign No.1, TDA sorbent reduced Hg concentration of the synthesis gas to less than 5 {micro}g/m{sup 3} and achieved over 99% Hg removal efficiency for the entire test duration. Unfortunately, due to the relatively low concentration of the trace metals in the lignite feed and as a result of the

  10. Dynamic neutron scattering on incoherent systems using efficient resonance spin flip techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussler, Wolfgang [Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum, Technische Universitt Mnchen, D-85748 Garching, Germany and Physik-Department E21, Technische Universitt Mnchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kredler, Lukas [Physik-Department E21, Technische Universitt Mnchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    We have performed numerical ray-tracing Monte-Carlo-simulations of incoherent dynamic neutron scattering experiments. We intend to optimize the efficiency of incoherent measurements depending on the fraction of neutrons scattered without and with spin flip at the sample. In addition to conventional spin echo, we have numerically and experimentally studied oscillating intensity techniques. The results point out the advantages of these different spin echo variants and are an important prerequisite for neutron resonance spin echo instruments like RESEDA (FRM II, Munich), to choose the most efficient technique depending on the scattering vector range and the properties of the sample system under study.

  11. Degradation of polychlorinated biphenyl mixtures in soil using phanerochaete chrysosporium in nutrient rich, non-ligninolytic conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yadav, Jagjit S.; Reddy, Chilekampalli A.; Quensen, John F.; Tiedje, James M.

    2000-01-01

    Substantial degradation of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixtures is carried out using the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium, under nutrient, carbon and nitrogen source rich, non-ligninolytic conditions. The PCBs with various numbers of ortho, meta, and para chlorines were extensively degraded, indicating relative nonspecificity for the position of chlorine substitutions on the biphenyl ring. Maximal degradation of PCBs in a mixture was observed in malt extract medium (18.4% on a molar basis), in which most of the individual PCBs were degraded.

  12. Effects of flow rate and pretreatment on the extraction of trace metals from estuarine and coastal seawater by Chelex-100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulson, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    During the extraction of previously acidified estuarine samples, altered organic material still retains some capacity to inhibit the extraction of trace metals by Chelex-100. Previous studies have indicated that heating or UV oxidation of samples reduces the capacity of this organic matter to inhibit the extraction of trace metals by Chelex-100. The results of this study using recently collected samples indicate that decreasing the flow rate to 0.2 mL min/sup -1/ is also an effective means of increasing the retention of trace metals by Chelex-100. Additional benefits of the slow-flow column extraction method include improvements in precision and the elimination of pretreatment procedures that could cause contamination or reduce the extractability of Fe. Aged acidified samples require heating of the sample prior to extraction. Controlled contamination can be minimized for most metals by preextraction of the buffer solution. 21 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  13. Dynamic Underground Stripping Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aines, R.; Newmark, R.; McConachie, W.; Udell, K.; Rice, D.; Ramirez, A.; Siegel, W.; Buettner, M.; Daily, W.; Krauter, P.; Folsom, E.; Boegel, A.J.; Bishop, D.; Udell, K.

    1992-01-01

    LLNL is collaborating with the UC Berkeley College of Engineering to develop and demonstrate a system of thermal remediation and underground imaging techniques for use in rapid cleanup of localized underground spills. Called ``Dynamic Stripping`` to reflect the rapid and controllable nature of the process, it will combine steam injection, direct electrical heating, and tomographic geophysical imaging in a cleanup of the LLNL gasoline spill. In the first 8 months of the project, a Clean Site engineering test was conducted to prove the field application of the techniques before moving the contaminated site in FY 92.

  14. {sup 39}Ar Detection at the 10{sup -16} Isotopic Abundance Level with Atom Trap Trace Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, W.; Williams, W.; Bailey, K.; O'Connor, T. P.; Mueller, P.; Davis, A. M.; Hu, S.-M.; Sun, Y. R.; Lu, Z.-T.; Purtschert, R.; Sturchio, N. C.

    2011-03-11

    Atom trap trace analysis, a laser-based atom counting method, has been applied to analyze atmospheric {sup 39}Ar (half-life=269 yr), a cosmogenic isotope with an isotopic abundance of 8x10{sup -16}. In addition to the superior selectivity demonstrated in this work, the counting rate and efficiency of atom trap trace analysis have been improved by 2 orders of magnitude over prior results. The significant applications of this new analytical capability lie in radioisotope dating of ice and water samples and in the development of dark matter detectors.

  15. Determination of ultra-trace amounts of uranium by ICP-AES technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, A.G.; Godbole, S.V.; Nadraswala, K.H.; Kulkarni, M.J.; Mallapurkar, V.S.; Joshi, B.D.

    1983-09-01

    An atomic emission spectrometric method based on the use of Inductively coupled argon plasma source has been developed for the determination of ultra trace concentrations of uranium in aqueous solutions. Using the optimized experimental conditions for the ICP source, uranium can be determined at 0.05 ..mu..g/ml concentration in 0.3M HNO/sub 3/ solutions with either of the two analytical lines viz. 3859.6 A/sup 0/ or 4090.1 A/sup 0/. The precision of determinations at the lowest detection limit is better than 2% R.S.D. The uranium estimation has been corrected for the interference due to the presence of eighteen metallic elements using an inter-element correction procedure. A number of spiked samples and NBL reference samples with concomitant impurities have been analysed using the standardised procedure and good agreement has been observed with their certified values.

  16. Introducing GAMER: A fast and accurate method for ray-tracing galaxies using procedural noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groeneboom, N. E.; Dahle, H.

    2014-03-10

    We developed a novel approach for fast and accurate ray-tracing of galaxies using procedural noise fields. Our method allows for efficient and realistic rendering of synthetic galaxy morphologies, where individual components such as the bulge, disk, stars, and dust can be synthesized in different wavelengths. These components follow empirically motivated overall intensity profiles but contain an additional procedural noise component that gives rise to complex natural patterns that mimic interstellar dust and star-forming regions. These patterns produce more realistic-looking galaxy images than using analytical expressions alone. The method is fully parallelized and creates accurate high- and low- resolution images that can be used, for example, in codes simulating strong and weak gravitational lensing. In addition to having a user-friendly graphical user interface, the C++ software package GAMER is easy to implement into an existing code.

  17. Analyzing health risks due to trace substance emissions from utility fossil-fired plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    EPRI has undertaken a number of project addressing a range of issues on the potential health effects due to long-term inhalation exposure to trace substances emitted from utility stacks. This report describes particular studies conducted to assess the health risks due to emissions from groups of power plants operated by individual utility companies. Researchers conducted specialized risk assessments for each of the power plants involved by incorporating utility-specific data into a modeling framework developed as part of EPRI`s Comprehensive Risk Evaluation (CORE) project to tailor the analysis for the individual utility. The results indicated the value of using more up-to-date, precise data in conducting risk assessments, rather than default assumptions. The report also describes CRAFT, the Comprehensive Risk Assessment Framework for Toxics software package, developed to perform these utility-wide air toxics risk assessments.

  18. Tracing explosive in solvent using quantum cascade laser with pulsed electric discharge system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Seong-Wook; Tian, Chao; Martini, Rainer; Chen, Gang; Chen, I-chun Anderson

    2014-11-03

    We demonstrated highly sensitive detection of explosive dissolved in solvent with a portable spectroscopy system (Q-MACS) by tracing the explosive byproduct, N{sub 2}O, in combination with a pulsed electric discharge system for safe explosive decomposition. Using Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), the gas was monitored and analyzed by Q-MACS and the presence of the dissolved explosive clearly detected. While HMX presence could be identified directly in the air above the solutions even without plasma, much better results were achieved under the decomposition. The experiment results give an estimated detection limit of 10 ppb, which corresponds to a 15 pg of HMX.

  19. Identification of trace organic residues in river-groundwater percolation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Wang-Hsien; Wu, J.; Reinhard, M.

    1995-12-01

    A detail characterization of dissolved organic residues in river water and groundwater has been developed. The method involved concentration of samples by rotary evaporation, propylation using propanol/formic acid/acetyl chloride, and separation, detection and quantitation by capillary GC/EI and CI-MS analysis. The dicarboxylated compounds were identified by combating the mass spectra of methylated and propylated extracts of the same samples under the same analytical conditions. Trace organics such as EDTA, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), naphthalene decarboxylate (NDC) and alkylphenoxy ethoxy-carboxylates (APEC) have been identified and quantified at {mu}g/L level. The preliminary data suggest that percolation significantly remove DOC, whereas EDTA and NDC appear to be mobile and relatively refractory. Potentially, EDTA and NDC may serve as specific tracers of water from wastewater origin in the groundwater environment.

  20. Non-destructive determination of trace-element concentrations. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, G.E.; Zoller, W.H.; Walters, W.B.

    1980-08-01

    In this year's Report, the neutron-capture prompt ..gamma..-ray activation analysis (PGAA) for trace-element concentrations was used in several new types of samples such as: volcanic samples which included yellow deposits found near volcanoes, fresh ash samples, and suspended particles in plumes from Mt. St. Helens with aircraft; energy related samples which were coal, coal fly ash, oil shale, shale oil and oil; biological samples of freeze-dried blood and liver; neutron-capture cross-sections of borehole samples; and boron in semiconductor silicon. The report includes recommended ..gamma..-ray lines for quantitative determinations, systems improvements of the beam filter system, second sample position and data handling facilities.

  1. Determination of trace elements in soils with an axial sequential ICP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shkolnik, J.; Flajnik, C.

    1995-12-31

    Over the past few years the popularity of axial viewed ICP has increased greatly. The major claimed advantage of axial ICP is improvement in detection limits by an order of magnitude over radial viewed plasmas. It has also been noted however, that axial ICP suffers from greater chemical and ionization interferences than radial ICP, making it less desirable for samples with a {open_quotes}matrix{close_quotes}. In this paper we will describe the determination of a number of trace paper elements in soil samples by axial ICP. The chemical and ionization interferences will be examined and the accuracy and precision will be evaluated. Comparisons to the same determinations done on a radial ICP with ultrasonic nebulizer will also be discussed.

  2. (Relative mobilities and transport mechanisms of trace elements during contact metamorphism of carbonate rocks). Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the relative mobilities and transport mechanisms of major, minor, and trace elements during the contact metamorphism of carbonate rocks. The large contrasts in chemical potentials of SiO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and CaO across a granitic pluton-limestone contact may induce metasomatism. In addition, rare earth and transition metal elements may act as tracers, and their redistribution during metamorphism may record convective cooling processes. The results of this study may have an application toward the problem of radioactive waste disposal and the degree to which radioactive nuclides may be expected to migrate during geologically significant periods of time.

  3. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multi-component metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamic aspects of such a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulation with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (diffusion coefficient, relaxation times, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx ~1300K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs in the equilibrium liquid state well above the melting temperature of the system (Tm ~ 900K), and the crossover temperature ismore » roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a non-parametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter and the four-point correlation function.« less

  4. Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-09-01

    The Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator (CADS) package is a general library for aerosol modeling to address aerosol general dynamics, including formation from gas phase reactions, surface chemistry (growth and oxidation), bulk particle chemistry, transport by Brownian diffusion, thermophoresis, and diffusiophoresis with linkage to DSMC studies, and thermal radiative transport. The library is based upon Cantera, a C++ Cal Tech code that handles gas phase species transport, reaction, and thermodynamics. The method uses a discontinuous galerkinmore » formulation for the condensation and coagulation operator that conserves particles, elements, and enthalpy up to round-off error. Both O-D and 1-D time dependent applications have been developed with the library. Multiple species in the solid phase are handled as well. The O-D application, called Tdcads (Time Dependent CADS) is distributed with the library. Tdcads can address both constant volume and constant pressure adiabatic homogeneous problems. An extensive set of sample problems for Tdcads is also provided.« less

  5. Surface Cleaning Techniques: Ultra-Trace ICP-MS Sample Preparation and Assay of HDPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overman, Nicole R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2013-06-01

    The world’s most sensitive radiation detection and assay systems depend upon ultra-low background (ULB) materials to reduce unwanted radiological backgrounds. Herein, we evaluate methods to clean HDPE, a material of interest to ULB systems and the means to provide rapid assay of surface and bulk contamination. ULB level material and ultra-trace level detection of actinide elements is difficult to attain, due to the introduction of contamination from sample preparation equipment such as pipette tips, sample vials, forceps, etc. and airborne particulate. To date, literature available on the cleaning of such polymeric materials and equipment for ULB applications and ultra-trace analyses is limited. For these reasons, a study has been performed to identify an effective way to remove surface contamination from polymers in an effort to provide improved instrumental detection limits. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) was utilized to assess the effectiveness of a variety of leachate solutions for removal of inorganic uranium and thorium surface contamination from polymers, specifically high density polyethylene (HDPE). HDPE leaching procedures were tested to optimize contaminant removal of thorium and uranium. Calibration curves for thorium and uranium ranged from 15 ppq (fg/mL) to 1 ppt (pg/mL). Detection limits were calculated at 6 ppq for uranium and 7 ppq for thorium. Results showed the most effective leaching reagent to be clean 6 M nitric acid for 72 hour exposures. Contamination levels for uranium and thorium found in the leachate solutions were significant for ultralow level radiation detection applications.

  6. Incorporation of trace elements in Portland cement clinker: Thresholds limits for Cu, Ni, Sn or Zn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gineys, N.; Aouad, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Damidot, D.

    2011-11-15

    This paper aims at defining precisely, the threshold limits for several trace elements (Cu, Ni, Sn or Zn) which correspond to the maximum amount that could be incorporated into a standard clinker whilst reaching the limit of solid solution of its four major phases (C{sub 3}S, C{sub 2}S, C{sub 3}A and C{sub 4}AF). These threshold limits were investigated through laboratory synthesised clinkers that were mainly studied by X-ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The reference clinker was close to a typical Portland clinker (65% C{sub 3}S, 18% C{sub 2}S, 8% C{sub 3}A and 8% C{sub 4}AF). The threshold limits for Cu, Ni, Zn and Sn are quite high with respect to the current contents in clinker and were respectively equal to 0.35, 0.5, 0.7 and 1 wt.%. It appeared that beyond the defined threshold limits, trace elements had different behaviours. Ni was associated with Mg as a magnesium nickel oxide (MgNiO{sub 2}) and Sn reacted with lime to form a calcium stannate (Ca{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}). Cu changed the crystallisation process and affected therefore the formation of C{sub 3}S. Indeed a high content of Cu in clinker led to the decomposition of C{sub 3}S into C{sub 2}S and of free lime. Zn, in turn, affected the formation of C{sub 3}A. Ca{sub 6}Zn{sub 3}Al{sub 4}O{sub 15} was formed whilst a tremendous reduction of C{sub 3}A content was identified. The reactivity of cements made with the clinkers at the threshold limits was followed by calorimetry and compressive strength measurements on cement paste. The results revealed that the doped cements were at least as reactive as the reference cement.

  7. Accounting for partiality in serial crystallography using ray-tracing principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J. Schreurs, Antoine M. M.; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; Gros, Piet

    2015-08-25

    Serial crystallography generates partial reflections from still diffraction images. Partialities are estimated with EVAL ray-tracing simulations, thereby improving merged reflection data to a similar quality as conventional rotation data. Serial crystallography generates ‘still’ diffraction data sets that are composed of single diffraction images obtained from a large number of crystals arbitrarily oriented in the X-ray beam. Estimation of the reflection partialities, which accounts for the expected observed fractions of diffraction intensities, has so far been problematic. In this paper, a method is derived for modelling the partialities by making use of the ray-tracing diffraction-integration method EVAL. The method estimates partialities based on crystal mosaicity, beam divergence, wavelength dispersion, crystal size and the interference function, accounting for crystallite size. It is shown that modelling of each reflection by a distribution of interference-function weighted rays yields a ‘still’ Lorentz factor. Still data are compared with a conventional rotation data set collected from a single lysozyme crystal. Overall, the presented still integration method improves the data quality markedly. The R factor of the still data compared with the rotation data decreases from 26% using a Monte Carlo approach to 12% after applying the Lorentz correction, to 5.3% when estimating partialities by EVAL and finally to 4.7% after post-refinement. The merging R{sub int} factor of the still data improves from 105 to 56% but remains high. This suggests that the accuracy of the model parameters could be further improved. However, with a multiplicity of around 40 and an R{sub int} of ∼50% the merged still data approximate the quality of the rotation data. The presented integration method suitably accounts for the partiality of the observed intensities in still diffraction data, which is a critical step to improve data quality in serial crystallography.

  8. Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School » Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School The Seventeenth Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School Program Information and Application Process Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860 Email Executive Administrator Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2718 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505) 665-8899 Email How to Apply Students should email the following documents to LADSSApply@lanl.gov Application Form (pdf) A one-page cover letter describing your interest

  9. Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School The Seventeenth Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School School overview and focus. Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860 Email Executive Administrator Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505) 665-8899 Email The Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School is a very selective summer school in which top upper-level US-citizen undergraduate students from universities around the nation attend lectures and work in teams of three

  10. Dynamics, Spectral Geometry and Topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burghelea, Dan

    2011-02-10

    The paper is an informal report on joint work with Stefan Haller on Dynamics in relation with Topology and Spectral Geometry. By dynamics one means a smooth vector field on a closed smooth manifold; the elements of dynamics of concern are the rest points, instantons and closed trajectories. One discusses their counting in the case of a generic vector field which has some additional properties satisfied by a still very large class of vector fields.

  11. Look-ahead Dynamic Simulation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-10-20

    Look-ahead dynamic simulation software system incorporates the high performance parallel computing technologies, significantly reduces the solution time for each transient simulation case, and brings the dynamic simulation analysis into on-line applications to enable more transparency for better reliability and asset utilization. It takes the snapshot of the current power grid status, functions in parallel computing the system dynamic simulation, and outputs the transient response of the power system in real time.

  12. Following the dynamics of matter with femtosecond precision using the X-ray streaking method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, C.; Karvinen, P.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Vartiainen, I.; Milne, C. J.; Mozzanica, A.; Kayser, Y.; Diaz, A.; Mohacsi, I.; Carini, G. A.; Herrmann, S.; Färm, E.; Ritala, M.; Fritz, D. M.; Robert, A.

    2015-01-06

    X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs) can produce extremely intense and very short pulses, down to below 10 femtoseconds (fs). Among the key applications are ultrafast time-resolved studies of dynamics of matter by observing responses to fast excitation pulses in a pump-probe manner. Detectors with sufficient time resolution for observing these processes are not available. Therefore, such experiments typically measure a sample's full dynamics by repeating multiple pump-probe cycles at different delay times. This conventional method assumes that the sample returns to an identical or very similar state after each cycle. Here we describe a novel approach that can provide a time trace of responses following a single excitation pulse, jitter-free, with fs timing precision. We demonstrate, in an X-ray diffraction experiment, how it can be applied to the investigation of ultrafast irreversible processes.

  13. Following the dynamics of matter with femtosecond precision using the X-ray streaking method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    David, C.; Karvinen, P.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Vartiainen, I.; Milne, C. J.; Mozzanica, A.; Kayser, Y.; Diaz, A.; Mohacsi, I.; et al

    2015-01-06

    X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs) can produce extremely intense and very short pulses, down to below 10 femtoseconds (fs). Among the key applications are ultrafast time-resolved studies of dynamics of matter by observing responses to fast excitation pulses in a pump-probe manner. Detectors with sufficient time resolution for observing these processes are not available. Therefore, such experiments typically measure a sample's full dynamics by repeating multiple pump-probe cycles at different delay times. This conventional method assumes that the sample returns to an identical or very similar state after each cycle. Here we describe a novel approach that can provide amore » time trace of responses following a single excitation pulse, jitter-free, with fs timing precision. We demonstrate, in an X-ray diffraction experiment, how it can be applied to the investigation of ultrafast irreversible processes.« less

  14. Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Seventeenth Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School Program Information and Application Process Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email Executive...

  15. Dynamic bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stormo, Keith E. (Moscow, ID)

    1996-07-02

    A dynamic bed reactor is disclosed in which a compressible open cell foam matrix is periodically compressed and expanded to move a liquid or fluid through the matrix. In preferred embodiments, the matrix contains an active material such as an enzyme, biological cell, chelating agent, oligonucleotide, adsorbent or other material that acts upon the liquid or fluid passing through the matrix. The active material may be physically immobilized in the matrix, or attached by covalent or ionic bonds. Microbeads, substantially all of which have diameters less than 50 microns, can be used to immobilize the active material in the matrix and further improve reactor efficiency. A particularly preferred matrix is made of open cell polyurethane foam, which adsorbs pollutants such as polychlorophenol or o-nitrophenol. The reactors of the present invention allow unidirectional non-laminar flow through the matrix, and promote intimate exposure of liquid reactants to active agents such as microorganisms immobilized in the matrix.

  16. Dynamic Information Architecture System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-02-12

    The Dynamic Information System (DIAS) is a flexible object-based software framework for concurrent, multidiscplinary modeling of arbitrary (but related) processes. These processes are modeled as interrelated actions caused by and affecting the collection of diverse real-world objects represented in a simulation. The DIAS architecture allows independent process models to work together harmoniously in the same frame of reference and provides a wide range of data ingestion and output capabilities, including Geographic Information System (GIS) typemore » map-based displays and photorealistic visualization of simulations in progress. In the DIAS implementation of the object-based approach, software objects carry within them not only the data which describe their static characteristics, but also the methods, or functions, which describe their dynamic behaviors. There are two categories of objects: (1) Entity objects which have real-world counterparts and are the actors in a simulation, and (2) Software infrastructure objects which make it possible to carry out the simulations. The Entity objects contain lists of Aspect objects, each of which addresses a single aspect of the Entity''s behavior. For example, a DIAS Stream Entity representing a section of a river can have many aspects correspondimg to its behavior in terms of hydrology (as a drainage system component), navigation (as a link in a waterborne transportation system), meteorology (in terms of moisture, heat, and momentum exchange with the atmospheric boundary layer), and visualization (for photorealistic visualization or map type displays), etc. This makes it possible for each real-world object to exhibit any or all of its unique behaviors within the context of a single simulation.« less

  17. Carbon dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center: A for Atmospheric trace gases. Annual progress report, FY 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burtis, M.D.; Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.; Nelson, T.R.; Stoss, F.W.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments made by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases during the fiscal year 1994. Topics discussed in this report include; organization and staff, user services, systems, communications, Collaborative efforts with China, networking, ocean data and activities of the World Data Center-A.

  18. Drill core major, trace and rare earth element anlayses from wells RN-17B and RN-30, Reykjanes, Iceland

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-04-01

    Analytical results for X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurement of major, trace and rare earth elements in drill core from geothermal wells in Reykjanes, Iceland. Total Fe was analyzed as FeO, therefore is not included under the Fe2O3 column.

  19. Use of external cavity quantum cascade laser compliance voltage in real-time trace gas sensing of multiple chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Kriesel, Jason M.

    2015-02-08

    We describe a prototype trace gas sensor designed for real-time detection of multiple chemicals. The sensor uses an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) swept over its tuning range of 940-1075 cm-1 (9.30-10.7 µm) at a 10 Hz repetition rate.

  20. Dynamic granularity of imaging systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geissel, Matthias; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2015-11-04

    Imaging systems that include a specific source, imaging concept, geometry, and detector have unique properties such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, spatial resolution, distortions, and contrast. Some of these properties are inherently connected, particularly dynamic range and spatial resolution. It must be emphasized that spatial resolution is not a single number but must be seen in the context of dynamic range and consequently is better described by a function or distribution. We introduce the “dynamic granularity” Gdyn as a standardized, objective relation between a detector’s spatial resolution (granularity) and dynamic range for complex imaging systems in a given environment rather than the widely found characterization of detectors such as cameras or films by themselves. We found that this relation can partly be explained through consideration of the signal’s photon statistics, background noise, and detector sensitivity, but a comprehensive description including some unpredictable data such as dust, damages, or an unknown spectral distribution will ultimately have to be based on measurements. Measured dynamic granularities can be objectively used to assess the limits of an imaging system’s performance including all contributing noise sources and to qualify the influence of alternative components within an imaging system. Our article explains the construction criteria to formulate a dynamic granularity and compares measured dynamic granularities for different detectors used in the X-ray backlighting scheme employed at Sandia’s Z-Backlighter facility.

  1. Dynamic granularity of imaging systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Geissel, Matthias; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2015-11-04

    Imaging systems that include a specific source, imaging concept, geometry, and detector have unique properties such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, spatial resolution, distortions, and contrast. Some of these properties are inherently connected, particularly dynamic range and spatial resolution. It must be emphasized that spatial resolution is not a single number but must be seen in the context of dynamic range and consequently is better described by a function or distribution. We introduce the “dynamic granularity” Gdyn as a standardized, objective relation between a detector’s spatial resolution (granularity) and dynamic range for complex imaging systems in a given environment rathermore » than the widely found characterization of detectors such as cameras or films by themselves. We found that this relation can partly be explained through consideration of the signal’s photon statistics, background noise, and detector sensitivity, but a comprehensive description including some unpredictable data such as dust, damages, or an unknown spectral distribution will ultimately have to be based on measurements. Measured dynamic granularities can be objectively used to assess the limits of an imaging system’s performance including all contributing noise sources and to qualify the influence of alternative components within an imaging system. Our article explains the construction criteria to formulate a dynamic granularity and compares measured dynamic granularities for different detectors used in the X-ray backlighting scheme employed at Sandia’s Z-Backlighter facility.« less

  2. Grating light reflection spectroelectrochemistry for detection of trace amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KELLY,MICHAEL J.; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; KEMME,SHANALYN A.; KASUNIC,K.J.; BLAIR,DIANNA S.; ZAIDI,S.H.; MCNEIL,J.R.; BURGESS,L.W.; BRODSKY,A.M.; SMITH,S.A.

    2000-04-01

    Grating light reflection spectroscopy (GLRS) is an emerging technique for spectroscopic analysis and sensing. A transmission diffraction grating is placed in contact with the sample to be analyzed, and an incident light beam is directed onto the grating. At certain angles of incidence, some of the diffracted orders are transformed from traveling waves to evanescent waves. This occurs at a specific wavelength that is a function of the grating period and the complex index of refraction of the sample. The intensities of diffracted orders are also dependent on the sample's complex index of refraction. The authors describe the use of GLRS, in combination with electrochemical modulation of the grating, for the detection of trace amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons. The diffraction grating consisted of chromium lines on a fused silica substrate. The depth of the grating lines was 1 {micro}m, the grating period was 1 {micro}m, and the duty cycle was 50%. Since chromium was not suitable for electrochemical modulation of the analyte concentration, a 200 nm gold layer was deposited over the entire grating. This gold layer slightly degraded the transmission of the grating, but provided satisfactory optical transparency for the spectroelectrochemical experiments. The grating was configured as the working electrode in an electrochemical cell containing water plus trace amounts of the aromatic hydrocarbon analytes. The grating was then electrochemically modulated via cyclic voltammetry waveforms, and the normalized intensity of the zero order reflection was simultaneously measured. The authors discuss the lower limits of detection (LLD) for two analytes, 7-dimethylamino-1,2-benzophenoxazine (Meldola's Blue dye) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), probed with an incident HeNe laser beam ({lambda} = 543.5 nm) at an incident angle of 52.5{degree}. The LLD for 7-dimethylamino-1,2-benzophenoxazine is approximately 50 parts per billion (ppb), while the LLD for TNT is approximately 50 parts

  3. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multi-component metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamic aspects of such a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulation with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (diffusion coefficient, relaxation times, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx ~1300K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs in the equilibrium liquid state well above the melting temperature of the system (Tm ~ 900K), and the crossover temperature is roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a non-parametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter and the four-point correlation function.

  4. Dynamic Fault Detection Chassis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mize, Jeffery J

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The high frequency switching megawatt-class High Voltage Converter Modulator (HVCM) developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is now in operation. One of the major problems with the modulator systems is shoot-thru conditions that can occur in a IGBTs H-bridge topology resulting in large fault currents and device failure in a few microseconds. The Dynamic Fault Detection Chassis (DFDC) is a fault monitoring system; it monitors transformer flux saturation using a window comparator and dV/dt events on the cathode voltage caused by any abnormality such as capacitor breakdown, transformer primary turns shorts, or dielectric breakdown between the transformer primary and secondary. If faults are detected, the DFDC will inhibit the IGBT gate drives and shut the system down, significantly reducing the possibility of a shoot-thru condition or other equipment damaging events. In this paper, we will present system integration considerations, performance characteristics of the DFDC, and discuss its ability to significantly reduce costly down time for the entire facility.

  5. ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

    2012-07-01

    The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-04

    CFDLib05 is the Los Alamos Computational Fluid Dynamics LIBrary. This is a collection of hydrocodes using a common data structure and a common numerical method, for problems ranging from single-field, incompressible flow, to multi-species, multi-field, compressible flow. The data structure is multi-block, with a so-called structured grid in each block. The numerical method is a Finite-Volume scheme employing a state vector that is fully cell-centered. This means that the integral form of the conservation lawsmore » is solved on the physical domain that is represented by a mesh of control volumes. The typical control volume is an arbitrary quadrilateral in 2D and an arbitrary hexahedron in 3D. The Finite-Volume scheme is for time-unsteady flow and remains well coupled by means of time and space centered fluxes; if a steady state solution is required, the problem is integrated forward in time until the user is satisfied that the state is stationary.« less

  7. Modified Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld gravity with a trace term

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Che -Yu; Bouhmadi-Lopez, Mariam; Chen, Pisin

    2016-01-22

    In this study, a modified Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld (EiBI) theory with a pure trace term gμνR being added to the determinantal action is analysed from a cosmological point of view. It corresponds to the most general action constructed from a rank two tensor that contains up to first order terms in curvature. This term can equally be seen as a conformal factor multiplying the metric gμν . This very interesting type of amendment has not been considered within the Palatini formalism despite the large amount of works on the Born-Infeld-inspired theory of gravity. This model can provide smooth bouncing solutions which weremore » not allowed in the EiBI model for the same EiBI coupling. Most interestingly, for a radiation filled universe there are some regions of the parameter space that can naturally lead to a de Sitter inflationary stage without the need of any exotic matter field. Finally, in this model we discover a new type of cosmic “quasi-sudden” singularity, where the cosmic time derivative of the Hubble rate becomes very large but finite at a finite cosmic time.« less

  8. The role of trace impurities in classification of in-core reactor components. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luksic, A.T.; Pauley, K.A.; Reid, B.d.

    1993-08-01

    Low-level radioactive waste is classified into three distinct categories under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61 (10CFR61). These categories, Class A, B, and C, are determined by the concentrations of specified radionuclides, with Class C being the most restrictive. Waste which is determined to exceed the Class C limits is referred to as Greater Than Class C (GTCC) and is generally deemed to be unacceptable for disposal in a shallow land burial site. Under the Low-Level Waste Policy Act Amendments of 1985 (Public Law 99-240), the responsibility for disposal of waste classified as GTCC rests with the US government. To provide a better understanding of the elemental constituents that are present in nuclear fuel related materials, 41 samples of unirradiated materials used in the manufacture of fuel assembly hardware and nonfuel assembly components were obtained and analyzed. Particular emphasis was placed on evaluating the concentration of niobium in Zircaloy. The results of this work indicate that insignificant amounts of niobium are found in the current generation of Zircaloy. However, the reason for the inconsistency between the trace amounts of elemental niobium (<10 ppM) observed in the current analysis and the significant amounts (>100 ppM) that were observed in the previous analysis has not been identified.

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF BENZENE AS A TRACE REACTANT IN TITAN AEROSOL ANALOGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trainer, Melissa G.; Sebree, Joshua A.; Heidi Yoon, Y.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2013-03-20

    Benzene has been detected in Titan's atmosphere by Cassini instruments, with concentrations ranging from sub-ppb in the stratosphere to ppm in the ionosphere. Sustained levels of benzene in the haze formation region could signify that it is an important reactant in the formation of Titan's organic aerosol. To date, there have not been laboratory investigations to assess the influence of benzene on aerosol properties. We report a laboratory study on the chemical composition of organic aerosol formed from C{sub 6}H{sub 6}/CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} via far ultraviolet irradiation (120-200 nm). The compositional results are compared to those from aerosol generated by a more ''traditional Titan'' mixture of CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2}. Our results show that even a trace amount of C{sub 6}H{sub 6} (10 ppm) has significant impact on the chemical composition and production rates of organic aerosol. There are several pathways by which photolyzed benzene may react to form larger molecules, both with and without the presence of CH{sub 4}, but many of these reaction mechanisms are only beginning to be explored for the conditions at Titan. Continued work investigating the influence of benzene in aerosol growth will advance understanding of this previously unstudied reaction system.

  10. Mineral formation and redox-sensitive trace elements in a near-surface hydrothermal alteration system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehring, A.U.; Schosseler, P.M.; Weidler, P.G.

    1999-07-01

    A recent hydrothermal mudpool at the southwestern slope of the Rincon de la Vieja volcano in Northwest Costa Rica exhibits an argillic alteration system formed by intense interaction of sulfuric acidic fluids with wall rock materials. Detailed mineralogical analysis revealed an assemblage with kaolinite, alunite, and opal-C as the major mineral phases. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) showed 3 different redox-sensitive cations associated with the mineral phases, Cu{sup +} is structure-bound in opal-C, whereas VO{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} are located in the kaolinite structure. The location of the redox-sensitive cations in different minerals of the assemblage is indicative of different chemical conditions. The formation of the alteration products can be described schematically as a 2-step process. In a first step alunite and opal-C were precipitated in a fluid with slightly reducing conditions and a low chloride availability. The second step is characterized by a decrease in K{sup +} activity and subsequent formation of kaolinite under weakly oxidizing to oxidizing redox conditions as indicated by structure-bound VO{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}. The detection of paramagnetic trace elements structure-bound in mineral phases by EPR provide direct information about the prevailing redox conditions during alteration and can, therefore, be used as additional insight into the genesis of the hydrothermal, near-surface system.

  11. Effect of landfill leachate organic acids on trace metal adsorption by kaolinite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroth, B.; Garrison, Sposito

    1997-02-01

    Hexanoic (hex) and fulvic acid (FA), representing early and later stages of landfill leachate evolution, were examined for influence on trace metal adsorption by a poorly crystallized kaolinite (KGa-2). Our experiments represented a model approach to examine possible reaction mechanisms in an environmentally important ternary metal-ligand-mineral surface system. Batch experiments were conducted in 0.01 mol kg(-1) NaClO4 at pH 3-8. Concentrations of metals (Cu, Cd, and Pb) and ligands were representative of those found typically in groundwater immediately downgradient of a landfill. The presence of FA resulted in enhancement of metal adsorption below pH 5, whereas the presence of hex produced no significant net change in metal uptake. Measured surface charge properties of KGa-2 were combined with binary and ternary system data in constructing a quantitative model of the system. The simple combination of binary system results was not effective in predicting the observed ternary system behavior. In both ternary systems, the addition of ternary surface complexes (TSCs) to the models resulted in a satisfactory fit to the data. Our work suggests the strong possibility that TSC involvement in surface reactions of natural adsorbents may be a useful concept.

  12. DOSAGE DES ELEMENTS EN TRACE DES CALCAIRES AU SERVICE DE L'ARCHEOLOGIE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLANC,A.; HOLMES,L.; HARBOTTLE,G.

    1998-05-01

    Numerous quarries in the Lutetian limestone formations of the Paris Basin provided stone for the building and the decoration of monuments from antiquity to the present. To determine the origin of stone used for masonry and sculptures in these monuments, a team of geologists and archaeologists has investigated 300 quarries and collected 2,300 samples. Petrographic and paleontologic examination of thin sections allows geologists to distinguish Lutetian limestones from Jurassic and Cretaceous limestones. Geologists also seek to formulate hypotheses regarding the origin of Lutetian limestones used for building and sculpture in the Paris region. In the search for the sources of building and sculptural stone, the analytical methods of geologists are limited because often several quarries produce the same lithofacies. A new tool is now available, however, to attack questions of provenance raised by art historians. Because limestones from different sources have distinctive patterns of trace-element concentrations, compositional analysis by neutron activation allows them to compare building or sculptural stone from one monument with stone from quarries or other monuments. This analytical method subjects a powdered limestone sample to standard neutron activation analysis procedures at Brookhaven National Laboratory. With the help of computer programs, the compositional fingerprints of Lutetian limestones can be determined and stored in a database. The limestone database contains data for approximately 2,100 samples from monuments, sculptures and quarries. It is particularly rich in samples from the Paris Basin.

  13. Tracing the HIV-1 subtype B mobility in Europe: a phylogeographic approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, Thomas; Paraskevis, D; Pybus, O; Magiorkinis, G; Hatzakis, A

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence and the origin of HIV-1 subtype B, the most prevalent circulating clade among the long-term residents in Europe, have been studied extensively. However the spatial diffusion of the epidemic from the perspective of the virus has not previously been traced. In the current study we inferred the migration history of HIV-1 subtype B by way of a phylogeography of viral sequences sampled from 16 European countries and Israel. Migration events were inferred from viral phylogenies by character reconstruction using parsimony. With regard to the spatial dispersal of the HIV subtype B sequences across viral phylogenies, in most of the countries in Europe the epidemic was introduced by multiple sources and subsequently spread within local networks. Poland provides an exception where most of the infections were the result of a single point introduction. According to the significant migratory pathways, we show that there are considerable differences across Europe. Specifically, Greece, Portugal, Serbia and Spain, provide sources shedding HIV-1; Austria, Belgium and Luxembourg, on the other hand, are migratory targets, while for Denmark, Germany, Italy, Israel, Norway, the Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland and the UK we inferred significant bidirectional migration. For Poland no significant migratory pathways were inferred. Subtype B phylogeographies provide a new insight about the geographical distribution of viral lineages, as well as the significant pathways of virus dispersal across Europe, suggesting that intervention strategies should also address tourists, travellers and migrants.

  14. Appending High-Resolution Elevation Data to GPS Speed Traces for Vehicle Energy Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, E.; Burton, E.; Duran, A.; Gonder, J.

    2014-06-01

    Accurate and reliable global positioning system (GPS)-based vehicle use data are highly valuable for many transportation, analysis, and automotive considerations. Model-based design, real-world fuel economy analysis, and the growing field of autonomous and connected technologies (including predictive powertrain control and self-driving cars) all have a vested interest in high-fidelity estimation of powertrain loads and vehicle usage profiles. Unfortunately, road grade can be a difficult property to extract from GPS data with consistency. In this report, we present a methodology for appending high-resolution elevation data to GPS speed traces via a static digital elevation model. Anomalous data points in the digital elevation model are addressed during a filtration/smoothing routine, resulting in an elevation profile that can be used to calculate road grade. This process is evaluated against a large, commercially available height/slope dataset from the Navteq/Nokia/HERE Advanced Driver Assistance Systems product. Results will show good agreement with the Advanced Driver Assistance Systems data in the ability to estimate road grade between any two consecutive points in the contiguous United States.

  15. Trace species detection: Spectroscopy and molecular energy transfer at high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, J.A.

    1993-12-01

    Monitoring the concentration of trace species such as atomic and molecular free radicals is essential in forming predictive models of combustion processes. LIF-based techniques have the necessary sensitivity for concentration and temperature measurements but have limited accuracy due to collisional quenching in combustion applications. The goal of this program is to use spectroscopic and kinetic measurements to quantify nonradiative and collisional effects on LIF signals and to develop new background-free alternatives to LIF. The authors have measured the natural linewidth of several OH A-X (3,0) rotational transitions to determine predissociation lifetimes in the upper state, which were presumed to be short compared to quenching lifetimes, and as a result, quantitative predictions about the applicability of predissociation fluorescence methods at high pressures are made. The authors are investigating collisional energy transfer in the A-state of NO. Quenching rates which enable direct corrections to NO LIF quantum yields at high temperature were calculations. These quenching rates are now being used in studies of turbulence/chemistry interactions. The authors have measured the electric dipole moment {mu} of excited-state NO using Stark quantum-beat spectroscopy. {mu} is an essential input to a harpoon model which predicts quenching efficiencies for NO (A) by a variety of combustion-related species. The authors are developing new coherent multiphoton techniques for measurements of atomic hydrogen concentration in laboratory flames to avoid the quenching problems associated with previous multiphoton LIF schemes.

  16. Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlosser, Courtney Adam; Walter-Anthony, Katey; Zhuang, Qianlai; Melillo, Jerry

    2013-04-26

    Our overall goal was to quantify the potential for threshold changes in natural emission rates of trace gases, particularly methane and carbon dioxide, from pan-arctic terrestrial systems under the spectrum of anthropogenically forced climate warming, and the extent to which these emissions provide a strong feedback mechanism to global climate warming. This goal is motivated under the premise that polar amplification of global climate warming will induce widespread thaw and degradation of the permafrost, and would thus cause substantial changes in the extent of wetlands and lakes, especially thermokarst (thaw) lakes, over the Arctic. Through a coordinated effort of field measurements, model development, and numerical experimentation with an integrated assessment model framework, we have investigated the following hypothesis: There exists a climate-warming threshold beyond which permafrost degradation becomes widespread and thus instigates strong and/or sharp increases in methane emissions (via thermokarst lakes and wetland expansion). These would outweigh any increased uptake of carbon (e.g. from peatlands) and would result in a strong, positive feedback to global climate warming.

  17. How individual traces and interactive timelines could support outage execution - Toward an outage historian concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parfouru, S.; De-Beler, N.

    2012-07-01

    In the context of a project that is designing innovative ICT-based solutions for the organizational concept of outage management, we focus on the informational process of the OCR (Outage Control Room) underlying the execution of the outages. Informational process are based on structured and unstructured documents that have a key role in the collaborative processes and management of the outage. We especially track the structured and unstructured documents, electronically or not, from creation to sharing. Our analysis allows us to consider that the individual traces produced by an individual participant with a specific role could be multi-purpose and support sharing between participants without creating duplication of work. The ultimate goal is to be able to generate an outage historian, that is not just focused on highly structured information, which could be useful to improve the continuity of information between participants. We study the implementation of this approach through web technologies and social media tools to address this issue. We also investigate the issue of data access through interactive visualization timelines coupled with other modality's to assist users in the navigation and exploration of the proposed historian. (authors)

  18. Exploring Light's Interactions with Bubbles and Light Absorbers in Photoelectrochemical Devices using Ray Tracing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, John

    2013-12-31

    Ray tracing was used to perform optical optimization of arrays of photovoltaic microrods and explore the interaction between light and bubbles of oxygen gas on the surface of the microrods. The incident angle of light was varied over a wide range. The percent of incident light absorbed by the microrods and reflected by the bubbles was computed over this range. It was found that, for the 10 μm diameter, 100 μm tall SrTiO{sub 3} microrods simulated in the model, the optimal center-­‐to-­‐center spacing was 14 μm for a square grid. This geometry produced 75% average and 90% maximum absorbance. For a triangular grid using the same microrods, the optimal center-­‐to-­‐center spacing was 14 μm. This geometry produced 67% average and 85% maximum absorbance. For a randomly laid out grid of 5 μm diameter, 100 μm tall SrTiO! microrods with an average center-­‐to-­‐center spacing of 20 μm, the average absorption was 23% and the maximum absorption was 43%. For a 50% areal coverage fraction of bubbles on the absorber surface, between 2%-­‐20% of the incident light energy was reflected away from the rods by the bubbles, depending upon incident angle and bubble morphology.

  19. A National-Scale Comparison of Resource and Nutrient Demands for Algae-Based Biofuel Production by Lipid Extraction and Hydrothermal Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2014-03-01

    Algae’s high productivity provides potential resource advantages over other fuel crops. However, demand for land, water, and nutrients must be minimized to avoid impacts on food production. We apply our national-scale, open-pond, growth and resource models to assess several biomass to fuel technological pathways based on Chlorella. We compare resource demands between hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and lipid extraction (LE) to meet 1.89E+10 and 7.95E+10 L yr-1 biofuel targets. We estimate nutrient demands where post-fuel biomass is consumed as co-products and recycling by anaerobic digestion (AD) or catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG). Sites are selected through prioritization based on fuel value relative to a set of site-specific resource costs. The highest priority sites are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast, but potential sites exist nationwide. We find that HTL reduces land and freshwater consumption by up to 46% and saline groundwater by around 70%. Without recycling, nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) demand is reduced 33%, but is large relative to current U.S. agricultural consumption. The most nutrient-efficient pathways are LE+CHG for N and HTL+CHG for P (by 42%). Resource gains for HTL+CHG are offset by a 344% increase in N consumption relative to LE+CHG (with potential for further recycling). Nutrient recycling is essential to effective use of alternative nutrient sources. Modeling of utilization availability and costs remains, but we find that for HTL+CHG at the 7.95E+10 L yr-1 production target, municipal sources can offset 17% of N and 40% of P demand and animal manures can generally meet demands.

  20. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Dai, Zhenxue; Zheng, Liange

    2014-12-31

    An important risk at CO2 storage sites is the potential for groundwater quality impacts. As part of a system to assess the potential for these impacts a geochemical scaling function has been developed, based on a detailed reactive transport model of CO2 and brine leakage into an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer. Stochastic simulations varying a number of geochemical parameters were used to generate a response surface predicting the volume of aquifer that would be impacted with respect to regulated contaminants. The brine was assumed to contain several trace metals and organic contaminants. Aquifer pH and TDS were influenced by CO2more » leakage, while trace metal concentrations were most influenced by the brine concentrations rather than adsorption or desorption on calcite. Organic plume sizes were found to be strongly influenced by biodegradation.« less

  1. Global/Local Dynamic Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeffer, A; Das, S; Lawless, D; Ng, B

    2006-10-10

    Many dynamic systems involve a number of entities that are largely independent of each other but interact with each other via a subset of state variables. We present global/local dynamic models (GLDMs) to capture these kinds of systems. In a GLDM, the state of an entity is decomposed into a globally influenced state that depends on other entities, and a locally influenced state that depends only on the entity itself. We present an inference algorithm for GLDMs called global/local particle filtering, that introduces the principle of reasoning globally about global dynamics and locally about local dynamics. We have applied GLDMs to an asymmetric urban warfare environment, in which enemy units form teams to attack important targets, and the task is to detect such teams as they form. Experimental results for this application show that global/local particle filtering outperforms ordinary particle filtering and factored particle filtering.

  2. Gas-phase chemical dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weston, R.E. Jr.; Sears, T.J.; Preses, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program is directed towards the spectroscopy of small free radicals and reactive molecules and the state-to-state dynamics of gas phase collision, energy transfer, and photodissociation phenomena. Work on several systems is summarized here.

  3. Fluid Dynamics with Free Surfaces

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-01

    RIPPLE is a two-dimensional, transient, free surface incompressible fluid dynamics program. It allows multiple free surfaces with surface tension and wall adhesion forces and has a partial cell treatment which allows curved boundaries and interior obstacles.

  4. Dynamic Worldwide Solar Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Worldwide Solar Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dynamic Worldwide Solar Energy Sector: Solar Product: US-based solar developer and financer. References: Dynamic Worldwide...

  5. Soil Machine Dynamics Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Machine Dynamics Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Soil Machine Dynamics Ltd Region: United Kingdom Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is listed in the...

  6. Dynamic stall on wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, C.P.; Simms, D.; Scott, G. ); Hansen, A.C. )

    1991-12-01

    Dynamic loads must be predicted accurately in order to estimate the fatigue life of wind turbines operating in turbulent environments. Dynamic stall contributes to increased dynamic loads during normal operation of all types of horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWTs). This report illustrates how dynamic stall varies throughout the blade span of a 10 m HAWT during yawed and unyawed operating conditions. Lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients during dynamics stall are discussed. Resulting dynamic loads are presented, and the effects of dynamic stall on yaw loads are demonstrated using a yaw loads dynamic analysis (YAWDYN). 12 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Magnetofluid dynamics in curved spacetime (Journal Article) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Magnetofluid dynamics in curved spacetime Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetofluid dynamics in curved spacetime Authors: Bhattacharjee, Chinmoy ; Das, Rupam ; ...

  8. Integrated Study of MFRSR-derived Parameters of Atmospheric Aerosols and Trace Gases Over the ARM CART Site Extended Facili...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Integrated Study of MFRSR-Derived Parameters of Atmospheric Aerosols and Trace Gases Over the ARM CART Site Extended Facilities - Comparison with Satellite and Other Ground-Based Measurements M. D. Alexandrov and B. Cairns Columbia University National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York A. A. Lacis and B. E. Carlson National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York Comparison of SGP MFRSR

  9. Dynamical symmetries in nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casten, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years the concept of dynamical symmetries in nuclei has witnessed a renaissance of interest and activity. Much of this work has been developed in the context of the Interacting Boson Approximation (or IBA) model. The appearance and properties of dynamical symmetries in nuclei will be reviewed, with emphasis on their characteristic signatures and on the role of the proton-neutron interaction in their formation, systematics and evolution. 36 refs., 20 figs.

  10. RHESSI AND TRACE OBSERVATIONS OF MULTIPLE FLARE ACTIVITY IN AR 10656 AND ASSOCIATED FILAMENT ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, Bhuwan; Kushwaha, Upendra; Cho, K.-S.; Veronig, Astrid M.

    2013-07-01

    We present Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) observations of multiple flare activity that occurred in the NOAA active region 10656 over a period of 2 hr on 2004 August 18. Out of four successive flares, three were class C events, and the final event was a major X1.8 solar eruptive flare. The activities during the pre-eruption phase, i.e., before the X1.8 flare, are characterized by three localized episodes of energy release occurring in the vicinity of a filament that produces intense heating along with non-thermal emission. A few minutes before the eruption, the filament undergoes an activation phase during which it slowly rises with a speed of {approx}12 km s{sup -1}. The filament eruption is accompanied by an X1.8 flare, during which multiple hard X-ray (HXR) bursts are observed up to 100-300 keV energies. We observe a bright and elongated coronal structure simultaneously in E(UV) and 50-100 keV HXR images underneath the expanding filament during the period of HXR bursts, which provides strong evidence for ongoing magnetic reconnection. This phase is accompanied by very high plasma temperatures of {approx}31 MK, followed by the detachment of the prominence from the solar source region. From the location, timing, strength, and spectrum of HXR emission, we conclude that the prominence eruption is driven by the distinct events of magnetic reconnection occurring in the current sheet below the erupting prominence. These multi-wavelength observations also suggest that the localized magnetic reconnections associated with different evolutionary stages of the filament in the pre-eruption phase play an important role in destabilizing the active-region filament through the tether-cutting process, leading to large-scale eruption and X-class flare.

  11. Modeling the global emission, transport and deposition of trace elements associated with mineral dust

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Y.; Mahowald, N.; Scanza, R.; Journet, E.; Desboeufs, K.; Albani, S.; Kok, J.; Zhuang, G.; Chen, Y.; Cohen, D. D.; et al

    2014-12-17

    Trace element deposition from desert dust has important impacts on ocean primary productivity. In this study, emission inventories for 8 elements, which are primarily of soil origin, Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, K, Al, and Si were determined based on a global mineral dataset and a soils dataset. Datasets of elemental fractions were used to drive the desert dust model in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) in order to simulate the elemental concentrations of atmospheric dust. Spatial variability of mineral dust elemental fractions was evident on a global scale, particularly for Ca. Simulations of global variations in the Camore » / Al ratio, which typically ranged from around 0.1 to 5.0 in soil sources, were consistent with observations, suggesting this ratio to be a good signature for dust source regions. The simulated variable fractions of chemical elements are sufficiently different that estimates of deposition should include elemental variations, especially for Ca, Al and Fe. The model results have been evaluated with observational elemental aerosol concentration data from desert regions and dust events in non-dust regions, providing insights into uncertainties in the modeling approach. The ratios between modeled and observed elemental fractions ranged from 0.7 to 1.6 except for 3.4 and 3.5 for Mg and Mn, respectivly. Using the soil data base improved the correspondence of the spatial hetereogeneity in the modeling of several elements (Ca, Al and Fe) compared to observations. Total and soluble dust associated element fluxes into different ocean basins and ice sheets regions have been estimated, based on the model results. Annual inputs of soluble Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe and K associated with dust using mineral dataset were 0.28 Tg, 16.89 Gg, 1.32 Tg, 22.84 Gg, 0.068 Tg, and 0.15 Tg to global oceans and ice sheets.« less

  12. Recoil-Implantation Of Multiple Radioisotopes Towards Wear Rate Measurements And Particle Tracing In Prosthetic Joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, Jacob A.; Timmers, Heiko; Smith, Paul N.; Scarvell, Jennifer M.; Gladkis, Laura

    2011-06-01

    This study demonstrates a new method of radioisotope labeling of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene inserts in prosthetic joints for wear studies. The radioisotopes {sup 97}Ru, {sup 100}Pd, {sup 100}Rh, and {sup 101m}Rh are produced in fusion evaporation reactions induced by {sup 12}C ions in a {sup 92}Zr target foil. The fusion products recoil-implant into ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene plugs, machined to fit into the surface of the inserts. During laboratory simulations of the joint motion, a wear rate of the labeled polyethylene may be measured and the pathways of wear debris particles can be traced by detecting characteristic gamma-rays. The concentration profiles of the radioisotopes extend effectively uniformly from the polyethylene surface to a depth of about 4 {mu}m. The multiplicity of labeling and the use of several gamma-ray lines aids with avoiding systematic measurement uncertainties. Two polyethylene plugs were labeled and one was fitted into the surface of the tibial insert of a knee prosthesis, which had been worn in. Actuation over close to 100,000 cycles with a 900 N axial load and a 24 deg. flexion angle removed (14{+-}1)% of the gamma-ray activity from the plug. Most of this activity dispersed into the serum lubricant identifying this as the important debris pathway. Less than 1% activity was transferred to the femoral component of the prosthesis and the measured activity on the tibial tray was insignificant. Assuming uniform wear across the superior surface of the insert, a wear rate of (12{+-}3) mm{sup 3}/Megacycle was determined. This is consistent with wear rate measurements under similar conditions using other techniques.

  13. Trace element and isotope geochemistry of geothermal fluids, East Rift Zone, Kilauea, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, H.B.; Delanoy, G.A.; Thomas, D.M. . Hawaii Inst. of Geophysics); Gerlach, D.C. ); Chen, B.; Takahashi, P.; Thomas, D.M. Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA )

    1992-01-01

    A research program has been undertaken in an effort to better characterize the composition and the precipitation characteristic of the geothermal fluids produced by the HGP-A geothermal well located on the Kilauea East Rift Zone on the Island of Hawaii. The results of these studies have shown that the chemical composition of the fluids changed over the production life of the well and that the fluids produced were the result of mixing of at least two, and possibly three, source fluids. These source fluids were recognized as: a sea water composition modified by high temperature water-rock reactions; meteoric recharge; and a hydrothermal fluid that had been equilibrated with high temperature reservoir rocks and magmatic volatiles. Although the major alkali and halide elements show clearly increasing trends with time, only a few of the trace transition metals show a similar trend. The rare earth elements, were typically found at low concentrations and appeared to be highly variable with time. Studies of the precipitation characteristics of silica showed that amorphous silica deposition rates were highly sensitive to fluid pH and that increases in fluid pH above about 8.5 could flocculate more than 80% of the suspended colloidal silica in excess of its solubility. Addition of transition metal salts were also found to enhance the recovery fractions of silica from solution. The amorphous silica precipitate was also found to strongly scavenge the alkaline earth and transition metal ions naturally present in the brines; mild acid treatments were shown to be capable of removing substantial fractions of the scavenged metals from the silica flocs yielding a moderately pure gelatinous by-product. Further work on the silica precipitation process is recommended to improve our ability to control silica scaling from high temperature geothermal fluids or to recover a marketable silica by-product from these fluids prior to reinjection.

  14. HAWT performance with dynamic stall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbs, B.D.

    1986-02-01

    In this report we calculated the effects of flow nonuniformities (wing shear, tower wake, yaw, and large-scale turbulence) on the performance of a horizontal axis wind turbine, accounting for dynamic stall. We modified the PROP program to incorporate and compare these effects with the uniform flow case. The MIT model, which predicts dynamic lift coefficients substantially higher than the static maximum values and includes a crude model of the vortex roll-off phenomenon, represented dynamic stall. As associated model for drag was also used. The dynamic stall model was tested against experimental data for three typical reduced frequencies. Good instantaneous correlation was obtained. The effects of nonuniformities with and without the dynamic stall were calculated using the Westinghouse Mod O and Enertech 44/25 turbines. Modeling the dynamic stall has little effect on performance. Furthermore, the performance with nonuniform flow differed only slightly from the uniform flow case. Thus the now PROP model provides a powerful general capability to handle nonuniform flows.

  15. DYNAMICAL EVIDENCE FOR A MAGNETOCENTRIFUGAL WIND FROM A 20 M{sub Sun} BINARY YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenhill, L. J.; Goddi, C.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Chandler, C. J.; Matthews, L. D.

    2013-06-20

    In Orion BN/KL, proper motions of {lambda}7 mm vibrationally excited SiO masers trace the rotation of a nearly edge-on disk and a bipolar wide-angle outflow 10-100 AU from radio source I, a binary young stellar object of {approx}20 M{sub Sun }. Here we map ground-state {lambda}7 mm SiO emission with the Very Large Array and track proper motions over 9 yr. The innermost and strongest emission lies in two extended arcs bracketing Source I. The proper motions trace a northeast-southwest bipolar outflow 100-1000 AU from Source I with a median three-dimensional motion of {approx}18 km s{sup -1}. An overlying distribution of {lambda}1.3 cm H{sub 2}O masers betrays similar flow characteristics. Gas dynamics and emission morphology traced by the masers suggest the presence of a magnetocentrifugal disk wind. Reinforcing evidence lies in the colinearity of the flow, apparent rotation across the flow parallel to the disk rotation, and recollimation that narrows the flow opening angle {approx}120 AU downstream. The arcs of ground-state SiO emission may mark the transition point to a shocked super-Alfvenic outflow.

  16. Interactive Beam-Dynamics Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-01-08

    TRACE3D is an interactive program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined system. The transport system may consist of the following elements: drift, thin lens, quadrupole, permanent magnet quadrupole, solenoid, doublet, triplet, bending magnet, edge angle (for bend), RF gap, radio-frequency-quadrupole cell, RF cavity, coupled-cavity tank, user-desired element, coordinate rotation, and identical element. The beam is represented by a 6X6 matrix defining a hyper-ellipsoid in six-dimensional phasemore » space. The projection of this hyperellipsoid on any two-dimensional plane is an ellipse that defines the boundary of the beam in that plane.« less

  17. Dynamics near QCD critical point by dynamic renormalization group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minami, Yuki

    2011-05-01

    We work out the basic analysis on dynamics near the QCD critical point (CP) by the dynamic renormalization group (RG). In addition to the RG analysis by coarse-graining, we construct the nonlinear Langevin equation as a basic equation for the critical dynamics. Our construction is based on the generalized Langevin theory and the relativistic hydrodynamics. Applying the dynamic RG to the constructed equation, we derive the RG equation for the transport coefficients and analyze their critical behaviors. We find that the resulting RG equation turns out to be the same as that for the liquid-gas CP except for an insignificant constant. Therefore, the bulk viscosity and the thermal conductivity strongly diverge at the QCD CP. We also show that the thermal and viscous diffusion modes exhibit critical slowing down with the dynamic critical exponents z{sub thermal}{approx}3 and z{sub viscous}{approx}2, respectively. In contrast, the sound propagating mode shows critical speeding up with the negative exponent z{sub sound}{approx}-0.8.

  18. (Effects of nutrient recycling and food chain length on resilience): Foreign trip report, April 3--30, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAngelis, D.L.

    1988-05-11

    The traveler was a Guest Scholar in the Department of Biophysics at Kyoto University during the first three weeks of April 1988 at the invitation of Professor Ei Teramoto, Dean of the Faculty of Sciences. First, the traveler attended the Annual Meeting of the Japanese Ecological Society (JES) at Tohuku University, Sendai, where he presented a paper at a special symposium on theoretical ecology. Following the JES meeting, the traveler returned to Kyoto University to exchange ideas on some theoretical problems in ecology related to ongoing work at ORNL, as well as to plan the details of the Joint US-Japan Seminar in the Environmental Sciences held in Honolulu later in April. The traveler presented a seminar on stream nutrient cycling research being conducted at ORNL. The Joint US-Japan Seminar in the Environmental Sciences took place during the final week of April. The traveler was the US organizer of the meeting, and Professor Teramoto was the Japanese organizer. In attendance where 11 invited US and 15 invited Japanese ecologists and mathematical modelers, along with several observers from the University of Hawaii. The meeting was successful in promoting a strong interchange of ideas between US and Japanese scientists and promoting a synthesis of work in different areas of ecological theory.

  19. Fate of nutrient enrichment on continental shelves as indicated by the C/N content of bottom sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J.J.; Premuzic, E.T.; Whitledge, T.E.

    1980-01-01

    The trajectory and fate of particulate matter are poorly understood processes in a spatially heterogeneous coastal ocean. Parameterization of appropriate hydrodynamics for a quantitative description of these loss processes must thus await definition of the important biological time and space scales. Since the bottom sands tend to record the history of the water column, we have selected the C/N content of shelf sediments as a possible tracer of (1) sites of nutrient introduction to the shelf by various physical mechanisms, of (2) areas of subsequent downstream utilization by the phytoplankton, and of (3) where loss of particulate matter might occur from the water column. An analysis is made of the C/N patterns of bottom surface sediments in relation to the nitrogen sources from upwelling, river runoff, and tidal mixing on the Peruvian, west African, Amazonian, Gulf of Mexico, eastern US, Bering, and North Sea shelves in an initial attempt to proscribe the particle trajectories of organic matter on the continental shelf.

  20. Long-term Operation of an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser-based Trace-gas Sensor for Building Air Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Craig, Ian M.

    2013-11-03

    We analyze the long-term performance and stability of a trace-gas sensor based on an external cavity quantum cascade laser using data collected over a one-year period in a building air monitoring application.

  1. Simple Dynamic Gasifier Model That Runs in Aspen Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, P.J.; Luyben, W.L.

    2008-10-15

    Gasification (or partial oxidation) is a vital component of 'clean coal' technology. Sulfur and nitrogen emissions can be reduced, overall energy efficiency is increased, and carbon dioxide recovery and sequestration are facilitated. Gasification units in an electric power generation plant produce a fuel for driving combustion turbines. Gasification units in a chemical plant generate gas, which can be used to produce a wide spectrum of chemical products. Future plants are predicted to be hybrid power/chemical plants with gasification as the key unit operation. The widely used process simulator Aspen Plus provides a library of models that can be used to develop an overall gasifier model that handles solids. So steady-state design and optimization studies of processes with gasifiers can be undertaken. This paper presents a simple approximate method for achieving the objective of having a gasifier model that can be exported into Aspen Dynamics. The basic idea is to use a high molecular weight hydrocarbon that is present in the Aspen library as a pseudofuel. This component should have the same 1:1 hydrogen-to-carbon ratio that is found in coal and biomass. For many plantwide dynamic studies, a rigorous high-fidelity dynamic model of the gasifier is not needed because its dynamics are very fast and the gasifier gas volume is a relatively small fraction of the total volume of the entire plant. The proposed approximate model captures the essential macroscale thermal, flow, composition, and pressure dynamics. This paper does not attempt to optimize the design or control of gasifiers but merely presents an idea of how to dynamically simulate coal gasification in an approximate way.

  2. Modeling the global emission, transport and deposition of trace elements associated with mineral dust

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Y.; Mahowald, N.; Scanza, R. A.; Journet, E.; Desboeufs, K.; Albani, S.; Kok, J. F.; Zhuang, G.; Chen, Y.; Cohen, D. D.; et al

    2015-10-12

    Trace element deposition from desert dust has important impacts on ocean primary productivity, the quantification of which could be useful in determining the magnitude and sign of the biogeochemical feedback on radiative forcing. However, the impact of elemental deposition to remote ocean regions is not well understood and is not currently included in global climate models. In this study, emission inventories for eight elements primarily of soil origin, Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, K, Al, and Si are determined based on a global mineral data set and a soil data set. The resulting elemental fractions are used to drive themore » desert dust model in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) in order to simulate the elemental concentrations of atmospheric dust. Spatial variability of mineral dust elemental fractions is evident on a global scale, particularly for Ca. Simulations of global variations in the Ca / Al ratio, which typically range from around 0.1 to 5.0 in soils, are consistent with observations, suggesting that this ratio is a good signature for dust source regions. The simulated variable fractions of chemical elements are sufficiently different; estimates of deposition should include elemental variations, especially for Ca, Al and Fe. The model results have been evaluated with observations of elemental aerosol concentrations from desert regions and dust events in non-dust regions, providing insights into uncertainties in the modeling approach. The ratios between modeled and observed elemental fractions range from 0.7 to 1.6, except for Mg and Mn (3.4 and 3.5, respectively). Using the soil database improves the correspondence of the spatial heterogeneity in the modeling of several elements (Ca, Al and Fe) compared to observations. Total and soluble dust element fluxes to different ocean basins and ice sheet regions have been estimated, based on the model results. The annual inputs of soluble Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe and K associated with dust using the mineral data set are

  3. Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qianlai Zhuang

    2012-11-16

    During the three-year project period, Purdue University has specifically accomplished the following: revised the existing Methane Dynamics Model (MDM) to consider the effects of changes of atmospheric pressure; applied the methane dynamics model (MDM) to Siberian region to demonstrate that ebullition estimates could increase previous estimates of regional terrestrial CH{sub 4} emissions 3- to 7-fold in Siberia; Conducted an analysis of the carbon balance of the Arctic Basin from 1997 to 2006 to show that terrestrial areas of the Arctic were a net source of 41.5 Tg CH{sub 4} yr{sup ??1} that increased by 0.6 Tg CH{sub 4} yr{sup ??1} during the decade of analysis, a magnitude that is comparable with an atmospheric inversion of CH{sub 4}; improved the quantification of CH{sub 4} fluxes in the Arctic with inversion methods; evaluated AIRS CH4 retrieval data with a transport and inversion model and surface flux and aircraft data; to better quantify methane emissions from wetlands, we extended the MDM within a biogeochemistry model, the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM), to include a large-scale hydrology model, the variable infiltration capacity (VIC) model; more recently, we developed a single box atmospheric chemistry model involving atmospheric methane (CH{sub 4}), carbon monoxide (CO) and radical hydroxyl (OH) to analyze atmospheric CH{sub 4} concentrations from 1984 to 2008.

  4. The handbook of fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.W.

    1998-07-01

    This book provides professionals in the field of fluid dynamics with a comprehensive guide and resource. The book balances three traditional areas of fluid mechanics--theoretical, computational, and experimental--and expounds on basic science and engineering techniques. Each chapter introduces a topic, discusses the primary issues related to this subject, outlines approaches taken by experts, and supplies references for further information. Topics discussed include: (1) basic engineering fluid dynamics; (2) classical fluid dynamics; (3) turbulence modeling; (4) reacting flows; (5) multiphase flows; (6) flow and porous media; (7) high Reynolds number asymptotic theories; (8) finite difference method; (9) finite volume method; (10) finite element methods; (11) spectral element methods for incompressible flows; (12) experimental methods, such as hot-wire anemometry, laser-Doppler velocimetry, and flow visualization; and (13) applications, such as axial-flow compressor and fan aerodynamics, turbomachinery, airfoils and wings, atmospheric flows, and mesoscale oceanic flows.

  5. Fissile solution dynamics: Student research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hetrick, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    There are two research projects in criticality safety at the University of Arizona: one in dynamic simulation of hypothetical criticality accidents in fissile solutions, and one in criticality benchmarks using transport theory. We have used the data from nuclear excursions in KEWB, CRAC, and SILENE to help in building models for solution excursions. An equation of state for liquids containing gas bubbles has been developed and coupled to point-reactor dynamics in an attempt to predict fission rate, yield, pressure, and kinetic energy. It appears that radiolytic gas is unimportant until after the first peak, but that it does strongly affect the shape of the subsequent power decrease and also the dynamic pressure.

  6. Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process: trace elements. Research and development report No. 53, interim report No. 31, August 1976-July 1977. Volume III. Pilot plant development work. Part 6. [Fate of 36 trace elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-03-01

    Results are presented on a study of the distribution and fate of 34 trace elements in the Solvent Refined Coal Process at the pilot plant located at Fort Lewis, Washington, and operated by The Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co. under contract with the US Department of Energy. Neutron activation analysis was used to determine Ti, V, Ca, Mg, Al, Cl, Mn, As, Sb, Se, Hg, Br, Co, Ni, Cr, Fe, Na, Rb, Cs, K, Sc, Tb, Eu, Sm, Ce, La, Sr, Ba, Th, Hf, Ta, Ga, Zr, and Cu in feed coals, process solvent, Solvent Refined Coal (SRC), mineral residues, wet filter cake, by-product solvents, process and effluent waters and by-product sulfur. The sample points were chosen such that the major process streams were adequately described and that the major input and output materials were included. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to measure the toxic elements Pb, Cd, Be in plant-derived solvents, effluent water and Hamer Marsh water. Specific methods were developed for analysis of a wide range of material compositions. The neutron activation analysis procedures were divided into short and long irradiation procedures for elements with short half lives (less than 3 hours) and intermediate to long half lives ( 8 hours to 5.2 years). Data are presented for a third equilibrium set of samples from the SRC-I process and compared to two similar sets analyzed previously. A material balance (or budget) was calculated for each element from the concentration data and the yields of each process fraction. Data are also presented on a study of carbon monoxide addition to the hydrogen stream and its effect on trace elements, and trace element data on a study of thirty-six plant effluent water samples taken during an SRC-I production run.

  7. Dynamics of Block Copolymer Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mochrie, Simon G. J.

    2014-09-09

    A detailed study of the dynamics of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles suspended in polystyrene homopolymer matrices was carried out using X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy for temperatures between 120 and 180 C. For low molecular weight polystyrene homopolymers, the observed dynamics show a crossover from diffusive to hyper-diffusive behavior with decreasing temperatures. For higher molecular weight polystyrene, the nanoparticle dynamics appear hyper-diffusive at all temperatures studied. The relaxation time and characteristic velocity determined from the measured hyper-diffusive dynamics reveal that the activation energy and underlying forces determined are on the order of 2.14 10?19 J and 87 pN, respectively. We also carried out a detailed X-ray scattering study of the static and dynamic behavior of a styrene isoprene diblock copolymer melt with a styrene volume fraction of 0.3468. At 115 and 120 C, we observe splitting of the principal Bragg peak, which we attribute to phase coexistence of hexagonal cylindrical and cubic double- gyroid structure. In the disordered phase, above 130 C, we have characterized the dynamics of composition fluctuations via X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Near the peak of the static structure factor, these fluctuations show stretched-exponential relaxations, characterized by a stretching exponent of about 0.36 for a range of temperatures immediately above the MST. The corresponding characteristic relaxation times vary exponentially with temperature, changing by a factor of 2 for each 2 C change in temperature. At low wavevectors, the measured relaxations are diffusive with relaxation times that change by a factor of 2 for each 8 C change in temperature.

  8. Fairness and dynamic pricing: comments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, William W.

    2010-07-15

    In ''The Ethics of Dynamic Pricing,'' Ahmad Faruqui lays out a case for improved efficiency in using dynamic prices for retail electricity tariffs and addresses various issues about the distributional effects of alternative pricing mechanisms. The principal contrast is between flat or nearly constant energy prices and time-varying prices that reflect more closely the marginal costs of energy and capacity. The related issues of fairness criteria, contracts, risk allocation, cost allocation, means testing, real-time pricing, and ethical policies of electricity market design also must be considered. (author)

  9. Theoretical studies of combustion dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    The basic objectives of this research program are to develop and apply theoretical techniques to fundamental dynamical processes of importance in gas-phase combustion. There are two major areas currently supported by this grant. One is reactive scattering of diatom-diatom systems, and the other is the dynamics of complex formation and decay based on L{sup 2} methods. In all of these studies, the authors focus on systems that are of interest experimentally, and for which potential energy surfaces based, at least in part, on ab initio calculations are available.

  10. Modeling Temporal Behavior in Large Networks: A Dynamic Mixed-Membership Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossi, R; Gallagher, B; Neville, J; Henderson, K

    2011-11-11

    Given a large time-evolving network, how can we model and characterize the temporal behaviors of individual nodes (and network states)? How can we model the behavioral transition patterns of nodes? We propose a temporal behavior model that captures the 'roles' of nodes in the graph and how they evolve over time. The proposed dynamic behavioral mixed-membership model (DBMM) is scalable, fully automatic (no user-defined parameters), non-parametric/data-driven (no specific functional form or parameterization), interpretable (identifies explainable patterns), and flexible (applicable to dynamic and streaming networks). Moreover, the interpretable behavioral roles are generalizable, computationally efficient, and natively supports attributes. We applied our model for (a) identifying patterns and trends of nodes and network states based on the temporal behavior, (b) predicting future structural changes, and (c) detecting unusual temporal behavior transitions. We use eight large real-world datasets from different time-evolving settings (dynamic and streaming). In particular, we model the evolving mixed-memberships and the corresponding behavioral transitions of Twitter, Facebook, IP-Traces, Email (University), Internet AS, Enron, Reality, and IMDB. The experiments demonstrate the scalability, flexibility, and effectiveness of our model for identifying interesting patterns, detecting unusual structural transitions, and predicting the future structural changes of the network and individual nodes.

  11. Dynamical systems probabilistic risk assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denman, Matthew R.; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2014-03-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is the primary tool used to risk-inform nuclear power regulatory and licensing activities. Risk-informed regulations are intended to reduce inherent conservatism in regulatory metrics (e.g., allowable operating conditions and technical specifications) which are built into the regulatory framework by quantifying both the total risk profile as well as the change in the risk profile caused by an event or action (e.g., in-service inspection procedures or power uprates). Dynamical Systems (DS) analysis has been used to understand unintended time-dependent feedbacks in both industrial and organizational settings. In dynamical systems analysis, feedback loops can be characterized and studied as a function of time to describe the changes to the reliability of plant Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs). While DS has been used in many subject areas, some even within the PRA community, it has not been applied toward creating long-time horizon, dynamic PRAs (with time scales ranging between days and decades depending upon the analysis). Understanding slowly developing dynamic effects, such as wear-out, on SSC reliabilities may be instrumental in ensuring a safely and reliably operating nuclear fleet. Improving the estimation of a plant's continuously changing risk profile will allow for more meaningful risk insights, greater stakeholder confidence in risk insights, and increased operational flexibility.

  12. Stepwise renal lineage differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells tracing in vivo development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishikawa, Masaki; Yanagawa, Naomi; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Yuri, Shunsuke; Hauser, Peter V.; Jo, Oak D.; Yanagawa, Norimoto

    2012-01-13

    effective in inducing MM and UB markers, respectively. We also observed the emergence and gradual increase of cell populations expressing progenitor cell marker CD24 from Stage I to Stage III. These CD24{sup +} cells correlated with higher levels of expression of Brachyury at stage I, Pax2 and Lim1 at stage II and MM markers, such as WT1 and Cadherin 11, after exposure to UB-conditioned media at stage III. In conclusion, our results show that stepwise induction by tracing in vivo developmental stages was effective to generate renal lineage progenitor cells from mESC, and CD24 may serve as a useful surface marker for renal lineage cells at stage II and MM cells at stage III.

  13. JV Task-123 Determination of Trace Element Concentrations at an Eastern Bituminous Coal Plant Employing an SCR and Wet FGD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Laudal

    2008-05-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) and with funding from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), conducting tests to prove that a high level of mercury control (>90%) can be achieved at a power plant burning a high-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. With funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), DOE, and Center for Air Toxic Metals{reg_sign} (CATM{reg_sign}) Affiliates Program, the EERC completed an additional sampling project to provide data as to the behavior of a number of trace elements across the various pollution control devices, with a special emphasis on the wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. Results showed that the concentrations of almost all the elements of interest leaving the stack were very low, and a high percentage of the trace elements were captured in the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) (for most, >80%). Although, with a few exceptions, the overall mass balances were generally quite good, the mass balances across the wet FGD were more variable. This is most likely a result of some of the concentrations being very low and also the uncertainties in determining flows within a wet FGD.

  14. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for atmospheric trace gases: FY 1993 activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W. |

    1994-01-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC`s staff also provide technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC (including World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases) during the period October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of NDPS, CMPS, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints are provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also presented.

  15. Geochemical, metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into trace metal utilization by methane-oxidizing microbial consortia in sulphidic marine sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, DR. Jennifer; Yu, DR. Hang; Steele, Joshua; Dawson, Katherine; Sun, S; Chourey, Karuna; Pan, Chongle; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Orphan, V

    2013-01-01

    Microbes have obligate requirements for trace metals in metalloenzymes that catalyse important biogeochemical reactions. In anoxic methane- and sulphiderich environments, microbes may have unique adaptations for metal acquisition and utilization because of decreased bioavailability as a result of metal sulphide precipitation. However, micronutrient cycling is largely unexplored in cold ( 10 C) and sulphidic (> 1 mM H2S) deep-sea methane seep ecosystems. We investigated trace metal geochemistry and microbial metal utilization in methane seeps offshore Oregon and California, USA, and report dissolved concentrations of nickel (0.5 270 nM), cobalt (0.5 6 nM), molybdenum (10 5600 nM) and tungsten (0.3 8 nM) in Hydrate Ridge sediment porewaters. Despite low levels of cobalt and tungsten, metagenomic and metaproteomic data suggest that microbial consortia catalysing anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) utilize both scarce micronutrients in addition to nickel and molybdenum. Genetic machinery for cobalt-containing vitamin B12 biosynthesis was present in both anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulphate-reducing bacteria. Proteins affiliated with the tungsten-containing form of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase were expressed in ANME from two seep ecosystems, the first evidence for expression of a tungstoenzyme in psychrophilic microorganisms. Overall, our data suggest that AOM consortia use specialized biochemical strategies to overcome the challenges of metal availability in sulphidic environments.

  16. Geochemical, metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into trace metal utilization by methane-oxidizing microbial consortia in sulfidic marine sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, DR. Jennifer; Yu, DR. Hang; Steele, Joshua; Dawson, Katherine; Sun, S; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Orphan, V

    2014-01-01

    Microbes have obligate requirements for trace metals in metalloenzymes that catalyze important biogeochemical reactions. In anoxic methane- and sulfide-rich environments, microbes may have unique adaptations for metal acquisition and utilization due to decreased bioavailability as a result of metal sulfide precipitation. However, micronutrient cycling is largely unexplored in cold ( 10 C) and sulfidic (>1 mM H2S) deep-sea methane seep ecosystems. We investigated trace metal geochemistry and microbial metal utilization in methane seeps offshore Oregon and California, USA, and report dissolved concentrations of nickel (0.5-270 nM), cobalt (0.5-6 nM), molybdenum (10-5,600 nM) and tungsten (0.3-8 nM) in Hydrate Ridge sediment porewaters. Despite low levels of cobalt and tungsten, metagenomic and metaproteomic data suggest that microbial consortia catalyzing anaerobic oxidation of methane utilize both scarce micronutrients in addition to nickel and molybdenum. Genetic machinery for cobalt-containing vitamin B12 biosynthesis was present in both anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Proteins affiliated with the tungsten-containing form of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase were expressed in ANME from two seep ecosystems, the first evidence for expression of a tungstoenzyme in psychrotolerant microorganisms. Finally, our data suggest that chemical speciation of metals in highly sulfidic porewaters may exert a stronger influence on microbial bioavailability than total concentration

  17. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2000 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2001-11-15

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels.

  18. HelioDynamics Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    HelioDynamics Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: HelioDynamics Ltd Place: Cambridge, United Kingdom Zip: CB23 2SH Sector: Solar Product: Manufactures the HD211 product - a solar...

  19. Concentrations of 23 trace elements in ground water and surface water at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1988--91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liszewski, M.J.; Mann, L.J.

    1993-12-31

    Analytical data for 23 trace elements are reported for ground- and surface-water samples collected at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory during 1988--91. Water samples were collected from 148 wells completed in the Snake River Plain aquifer, 18 wells completed in discontinuous deep perched-water zones, and 1 well completed in an alluvial aquifer. Surface-water samples also were collected from three streams, two springs, two ponds, and one lake. Data are categorized by concentrations of total recoverable of dissolved trace elements. Concentrations of total recoverable trace elements are reported for unfiltered water samples and include results for one or more of the following: aluminum, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, selenium, silver, and zinc. Concentrations of dissolved trace elements are reported for water samples filtered through a nominal 0.45-micron filter and may also include bromide, fluoride, lithium, molybdenum, strontium, thallium, and vanadium. Concentrations of dissolved hexavalent chromium also are reported for many samples. The water samples were analyzed at the US Geological Survey`s National Water Quality Laboratory in Arvada, Colorado. Methods used to collect the water samples and quality assurance instituted for the sampling program are described. Concentrations of chromium equaled or exceeded the maximum contaminant level at 12 ground-water quality monitoring wells. Other trace elements did not exceed their respective maximum contaminant levels.

  20. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-05-30

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  1. Predissociation dynamics of lithium iodide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, H.; Vangerow, J. von; Stienkemeier, F.; Mudrich, M.; Bogomolov, A. S.; Baklanov, A. V.; Reich, D. M.; Skomorowski, W.; Koch, C. P.

    2015-01-28

    The predissociation dynamics of lithium iodide (LiI) in the first excited A-state is investigated for molecules in the gas phase and embedded in helium nanodroplets, using femtosecond pump-probe photoionization spectroscopy. In the gas phase, the transient Li{sup +} and LiI{sup +} ion signals feature damped oscillations due to the excitation and decay of a vibrational wave packet. Based on high-level ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of LiI and simulations of the wave packet dynamics, the exponential signal decay is found to result from predissociation predominantly at the lowest avoided X-A potential curve crossing, for which we infer a coupling constant V{sub XA} = 650(20) cm{sup −1}. The lack of a pump-probe delay dependence for the case of LiI embedded in helium nanodroplets indicates fast droplet-induced relaxation of the vibrational excitation.

  2. Identifying and Mitigating Potential Nutrient and Sediment Hot Spots under a Future Scenario in the Missouri River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, May; Zhang, Zhonglong

    2015-09-01

    clearly attributable to the conversion of a large amount of land to switchgrass. The Middle Lower Missouri River and Lower Missouri River were identified as hot regions. Further analysis identified four subbasins (10240002, 10230007, 10290402, and 10300200) as being the most vulnerable in terms of sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus loadings. Overall, results suggest that increasing the amount of switchgrass acreage in the hot spots should be considered to mitigate the nutrient loads. The study provides an analytical method to support stakeholders in making informed decisions that balance biofuel production and water sustainability.

  3. Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School » Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School-Overview Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School Projects Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School Projects and Resources Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860 Email Executive Administrator Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505) 665-8899 Email Past Programs and Resources 2015 2014 STUDENT RESOURCES Precollege Undergrads Graduates Postdocs Housing Los Alamos National Laboratory Logo

  4. Development of a Dynamic DOE Calibration Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A dynamic heavy duty diesel engine model was developed. The model can be applied for calibration and control system optimization.

  5. Insight Gained from Simplified Dynamic Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Insight Gained from Simplified Dynamic Analysis ... or Everything Old is New Again October 21, 2014 Greg Mertz Consultant

  6. Dynamical coupled-channel analysis at EBAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.-S. H. Lee

    2007-08-01

    The status and progress of the dynamical coupled-channel analysis at the Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC) is reported.

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Dynamic Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamic Materials Compressing materials under extreme conditions Pushing forward the frontiers of high-energy-density science Sandia Physicist, Marcus Knudson Sandia scientists are investigating the behavior of a wide-range of materials under the extreme conditions of very high pressures and densities. They seek the answers to such questions as: When do insulators become a metal? How strong do materials become when they are compressed? How and when do materials change their phase at very high

  8. Sierra Structural Dynamics User's Notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reese, Garth M.

    2015-10-19

    Sierra/SD provides a massively parallel implementation of structural dynamics finite element analysis, required for high fidelity, validated models used in modal, vibration, static and shock analysis of weapons systems. This document provides a users guide to the input for Sierra/SD. Details of input specifications for the different solution types, output options, element types and parameters are included. The appendices contain detailed examples, and instructions for running the software on parallel platforms.

  9. Advanced WEC Dynamics and Controls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WEC Dynamics and Controls - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  10. Dynamic load balancing of applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheat, Stephen R.

    1997-01-01

    An application-level method for dynamically maintaining global load balance on a parallel computer, particularly on massively parallel MIMD computers. Global load balancing is achieved by overlapping neighborhoods of processors, where each neighborhood performs local load balancing. The method supports a large class of finite element and finite difference based applications and provides an automatic element management system to which applications are easily integrated.

  11. Cryptosystems based on chaotic dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNees, R.A.; Protopopescu, V.; Santoro, R.T.; Tolliver, J.S.

    1993-08-01

    An encryption scheme based on chaotic dynamics is presented. This scheme makes use of the efficient and reproducible generation of cryptographically secure pseudo random numbers from chaotic maps. The result is a system which encrypts quickly and possesses a large keyspace, even in small precision implementations. This system offers an excellent solution to several problems including the dissemination of key material, over the air rekeying, and other situations requiring the secure management of information.

  12. Dynamic load balancing of applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheat, S.R.

    1997-05-13

    An application-level method for dynamically maintaining global load balance on a parallel computer, particularly on massively parallel MIMD computers is disclosed. Global load balancing is achieved by overlapping neighborhoods of processors, where each neighborhood performs local load balancing. The method supports a large class of finite element and finite difference based applications and provides an automatic element management system to which applications are easily integrated. 13 figs.

  13. Earth materials and earth dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, K; Shankland, T.

    2000-11-01

    In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  14. Brownian dynamics without Green's functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delong, Steven; Donev, Aleksandar; Usabiaga, Florencio Balboa; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael; Griffith, Boyce E.; Leon H. Charney Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016

    2014-04-07

    We develop a Fluctuating Immersed Boundary (FIB) method for performing Brownian dynamics simulations of confined particle suspensions. Unlike traditional methods which employ analytical Green's functions for Stokes flow in the confined geometry, the FIB method uses a fluctuating finite-volume Stokes solver to generate the action of the response functions on the fly. Importantly, we demonstrate that both the deterministic terms necessary to capture the hydrodynamic interactions among the suspended particles, as well as the stochastic terms necessary to generate the hydrodynamically correlated Brownian motion, can be generated by solving the steady Stokes equations numerically only once per time step. This is accomplished by including a stochastic contribution to the stress tensor in the fluid equations consistent with fluctuating hydrodynamics. We develop novel temporal integrators that account for the multiplicative nature of the noise in the equations of Brownian dynamics and the strong dependence of the mobility on the configuration for confined systems. Notably, we propose a random finite difference approach to approximating the stochastic drift proportional to the divergence of the configuration-dependent mobility matrix. Through comparisons with analytical and existing computational results, we numerically demonstrate the ability of the FIB method to accurately capture both the static (equilibrium) and dynamic properties of interacting particles in flow.

  15. Simulation and sequential dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortveit, H.S.; Reidys, C.M.

    1999-06-01

    Computer simulations have a generic structure. Motivated by this the authors present a new class of discrete dynamical systems that captures this structure in a mathematically precise way. This class of systems consists of (1) a loopfree graph {Upsilon} with vertex set {l_brace}1,2,{hor_ellipsis},n{r_brace} where each vertex has a binary state, (2) a vertex labeled set of functions (F{sub i,{Upsilon}}:F{sub 2}{sup n} {yields} F{sub 2}{sup n}){sub i} and (3) a permutation {pi} {element_of} S{sub n}. The function F{sub i,{Upsilon}} updates the state of vertex i as a function of the states of vertex i and its {Upsilon}-neighbors and leaves the states of all other vertices fixed. The permutation {pi} represents the update ordering, i.e., the order in which the functions F{sub i,{Upsilon}} are applied. By composing the functions F{sub i,{Upsilon}} in the order given by {pi} one obtains the dynamical system (equation given in paper), which the authors refer to as a sequential dynamical system, or SDS for short. The authors will present bounds for the number of functionally different systems and for the number of nonisomorphic digraphs {Gamma}[F{sub {Upsilon}},{pi}] that can be obtained by varying the update order and applications of these to specific graphs and graph classes.

  16. Use of a dynamic simulation model to understand nitrogen cycling in the middle Rio Grande, NM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meixner, Tom; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Oelsner, Gretchen; Brooks, Paul; Roach, Jesse D.

    2008-08-01

    Water quality often limits the potential uses of scarce water resources in semiarid and arid regions. To best manage water quality one must understand the sources and sinks of both solutes and water to the river system. Nutrient concentration patterns can identify source and sink locations, but cannot always determine biotic processes that affect nutrient concentrations. Modeling tools can provide insight into these large-scale processes. To address questions about large-scale nitrogen removal in the Middle Rio Grande, NM, we created a system dynamics nitrate model using an existing integrated surface water--groundwater model of the region to evaluate our conceptual models of uptake and denitrification as potential nitrate removal mechanisms. We modeled denitrification in groundwater as a first-order process dependent only on concentration and used a 5% denitrification rate. Uptake was assumed to be proportional to transpiration and was modeled as a percentage of the evapotranspiration calculated within the model multiplied by the nitrate concentration in the water being transpired. We modeled riparian uptake as 90% and agricultural uptake as 50% of the respective evapotranspiration rates. Using these removal rates, our model results suggest that riparian uptake, agricultural uptake and denitrification in groundwater are all needed to produce the observed nitrate concentrations in the groundwater, conveyance channels, and river as well as the seasonal concentration patterns. The model results indicate that a total of 497 metric tons of nitrate-N are removed from the Middle Rio Grande annually. Where river nitrate concentrations are low and there are no large nitrate sources, nitrate behaves nearly conservatively and riparian and agricultural uptake are the most important removal mechanisms. Downstream of a large wastewater nitrate source, denitrification and agricultural uptake were responsible for approximately 90% of the nitrogen removal.

  17. Dynamics of micelle-nanoparticle systems undergoing shear: a...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dynamics of micelle-nanoparticle systems undergoing shear: a coarse-grained molecular dynamics approach Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dynamics of micelle-nanoparticle ...

  18. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases, Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2003-08-28

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including atmospheric concentrations and atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels.

  19. Brownian Dynamics Simulation of Protein Solutions: Structural and Dynamical Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mereghetti, Paolo; Gabdoulline, Razif; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2010-12-01

    The study of solutions of biomacromolecules provides an important basis for understanding the behavior of many fundamental cellular processes, such as protein folding, self-assembly, biochemical reactions, and signal transduction. Here, we describe a Brownian dynamics simulation procedure and its validation for the study of the dynamic and structural properties of protein solutions. In the model used, the proteins are treated as atomically detailed rigid bodies moving in a continuum solvent. The protein-protein interaction forces are described by the sum of electrostatic interaction, electrostatic desolvation, nonpolar desolvation, and soft-core repulsion terms. The linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation is solved to compute electrostatic terms. Simulations of homogeneous solutions of three different proteins with varying concentrations, pH, and ionic strength were performed. The results were compared to experimental data and theoretical values in terms of long-time self-diffusion coefficients, second virial coefficients, and structure factors. The results agree with the experimental trends and, in many cases, experimental values are reproduced quantitatively. There are no parameters specific to certain protein types in the interaction model, and hence the model should be applicable to the simulation of the behavior of mixtures of macromolecules in cell-like crowded environments.

  20. Dynamics of gauge field inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, Stephon; Jyoti, Dhrubo; Kosowsky, Arthur; Marcianò, Antonino

    2015-05-05

    We analyze the existence and stability of dynamical attractor solutions for cosmological inflation driven by the coupling between fermions and a gauge field. Assuming a spatially homogeneous and isotropic gauge field and fermion current, the interacting fermion equation of motion reduces to that of a free fermion up to a phase shift. Consistency of the model is ensured via the Stückelberg mechanism. We prove the existence of exactly one stable solution, and demonstrate the stability numerically. Inflation arises without fine tuning, and does not require postulating any effective potential or non-standard coupling.

  1. dynamic-origin-destination-matrix

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamic Origin-Destination Matrix Estimation in TRANSIMS Using Direction-Guided Parallel Heuristic Search Algorithms Adel W. Sadek, Ph.D. Associate Professor University at Buffalo, The State University of New York 233 Ketter Hall Buffalo, NY 14260 Phone: (716) 645-4367 FAX: (716) 645-3733 E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. List of Authors ================ Adel W. Sadek, Ph.D. Shan Huang Liya Guo University at Buffalo, The State

  2. Interference of probabilities in dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zak, Michail

    2014-08-15

    A new class of dynamical systems with a preset type of interference of probabilities is introduced. It is obtained from the extension of the Madelung equation by replacing the quantum potential with a specially selected feedback from the Liouville equation. It has been proved that these systems are different from both Newtonian and quantum systems, but they can be useful for modeling spontaneous collective novelty phenomena when emerging outputs are qualitatively different from the weighted sum of individual inputs. Formation of language and fast decision-making process as potential applications of the probability interference is discussed.

  3. Lagrangian continuum dynamics in ALEGRA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Michael K. W.; Love, Edward

    2007-12-01

    Alegra is an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) multi-material finite element code that emphasizes large deformations and strong shock physics. The Lagrangian continuum dynamics package in Alegra uses a Galerkin finite element spatial discretization and an explicit central-difference stepping method in time. The goal of this report is to describe in detail the characteristics of this algorithm, including the conservation and stability properties. The details provided should help both researchers and analysts understand the underlying theory and numerical implementation of the Alegra continuum hydrodynamics algorithm.

  4. Dynamic Underground Stripping Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aines, R.; Newmark, R.; McConachie, W.; Rice, D.; Ramirez, A.; Siegel, W.; Buettner, M.; Daily, W.; Krauter, P.; Folsom, E.; Boegel, A.J.; Bishop, D. ); udel, K. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-03-01

    LLNL is collaborating with the UC Berkeley College of Engineering to develop and demonstrate a system of thermal remediation and underground imaging techniques for use in rapid cleanup of localized underground spills. Called Dynamic Stripping'' to reflect the rapid and controllable nature of the process, it will combine steam injection, direct electrical heating, and tomographic geophysical imaging in a cleanup of the LLNL gasoline spill. In the first 8 months of the project, a Clean Site engineering test was conducted to prove the field application of the techniques before moving to the contaminated site in FY 92.

  5. PyMPI Dynamic Benchmark

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-02-16

    Pynamic is a benchmark designed to test a system's ability to handle the Dynamic Linking and Loading (DLL) requirements of Python-based scientific applications. This benchmark is developed to add a workload to our testing environment, a workload that represents a newly emerging class of DLL behaviors. Pynamic buildins on pyMPI, and MPI extension to Python C-extension dummy codes and a glue layer that facilitates linking and loading of the generated dynamic modules into the resultingmore » pyMPI. Pynamic is configurable, enabling modeling the static properties of a specific code as described in section 5. It does not, however, model any significant computationss of the target and hence, it is not subjected to the same level of control as the target code. In fact, HPC computer vendors and tool developers will be encouraged to add it to their tesitn suite once the code release is completed. an ability to produce and run this benchmark is an effective test for valifating the capability of a compiler and linker/loader as well as an OS kernel and other runtime system of HPC computer vendors. In addition, the benchmark is designed as a test case for stressing code development tools. Though Python has recently gained popularity in the HPC community, it heavy DLL operations have hindered certain HPC code development tools, notably parallel debuggers, from performing optimally.« less

  6. Dynamic Testing of Gasifier Refractory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael D. Mann; Devdutt Shukla; John P. Hurley

    2003-09-27

    The University of North Dakota (UND) Chemical Engineering Department in conjunction with the UND Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) have initiated a program to thoroughly examine the combined chemical (reaction and phase change) and physical (erosion) effects experienced by a variety of refractory materials during both normal operation and thermal cycling under slagging coal gasification conditions. The goal of this work is to devise a mechanism of refractory loss under these conditions. The controlled-atmospheric dynamic corrodent application furnace (CADCAF) is being utilized to simulate refractory/slag interactions under dynamic conditions that more realistically simulate the environment in a slagging coal gasifier than any of the static tests used previously by refractory manufacturers and researchers. Shakedown testing of the CADCAF is in progress. Samples of slag and refractory from the Tampa Electric Polk Power Station have been obtained for testing in the CADCAF. The slag has been dried and sieved to the size needed for our flowing slag corrosion tests. Testing is expected to begin in October.

  7. Dynamic Testing of Gasifier Refractory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael D. Mann; Devdutt Shukla; Xi Hong; John P. Hurley

    2004-09-27

    The University of North Dakota (UND) Chemical Engineering Department in conjunction with the UND Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) have initiated a program to thoroughly examine the combined chemical (reaction and phase change) and physical (erosion) effects experienced by a variety of refractory materials during both normal operation and thermal cycling under slagging coal gasification conditions. The goal of this work is to devise a mechanism of refractory loss under these conditions. The controlled-atmospheric dynamic corrodent application furnace (CADCAF) is being utilized to simulate refractory/slag interactions under dynamic conditions that more realistically simulate the environment in a slagging coal gasifier than any of the static tests used previously by refractory manufacturers and researchers. Shakedown testing of the CADCAF has been completed. Samples of slag and refractory from the Tampa Electric Polk Power Station have been obtained for testing in the CADCAF. The slag has been dried and sieved to the size needed for our flowing slag corrosion tests. Screening tests are in currently in progress. Detailed analysis of corrosion rates from the first tests is in progress.

  8. Molecular dynamics of membrane proteins.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woolf, Thomas B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Stevens, Mark Jackson

    2004-10-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the membrane protein rhodopsin will have broad implications for other membrane proteins and cellular signaling processes. Rhodopsin (Rho) is a light activated G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). When activated by ligands, GPCRs bind and activate G-proteins residing within the cell and begin a signaling cascade that results in the cell's response to external stimuli. More than 50% of all current drugs are targeted toward G-proteins. Rho is the prototypical member of the class A GPCR superfamily. Understanding the activation of Rho and its interaction with its Gprotein can therefore lead to a wider understanding of the mechanisms of GPCR activation and G-protein activation. Understanding the dark to light transition of Rho is fully analogous to the general ligand binding and activation problem for GPCRs. This transition is dependent on the lipid environment. The effect of lipids on membrane protein activity in general has had little attention, but evidence is beginning to show a significant role for lipids in membrane protein activity. Using the LAMMPS program and simulation methods benchmarked under the IBIG program, we perform a variety of allatom molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins.

  9. Photodissociation dynamics of hydroxybenzoic acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Yilin; Dyakov, Yuri; Lee, Y. T.; Ni, Chi-Kung; Sun Yilun; Hu Weiping

    2011-01-21

    Aromatic amino acids have large UV absorption cross-sections and low fluorescence quantum yields. Ultrafast internal conversion, which transforms electronic excitation energy to vibrational energy, was assumed to account for the photostability of amino acids. Recent theoretical and experimental investigations suggested that low fluorescence quantum yields of phenol (chromophore of tyrosine) are due to the dissociation from a repulsive excited state. Radicals generated from dissociation may undergo undesired reactions. It contradicts the observed photostability of amino acids. In this work, we explored the photodissociation dynamics of the tyrosine chromophores, 2-, 3- and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid in a molecular beam at 193 nm using multimass ion imaging techniques. We demonstrated that dissociation from the excited state is effectively quenched for the conformers of hydroxybenzoic acids with intramolecular hydrogen bonding. Ab initio calculations show that the excited state and the ground state potential energy surfaces change significantly for the conformers with intramolecular hydrogen bonding. It shows the importance of intramolecular hydrogen bond in the excited state dynamics and provides an alternative molecular mechanism for the photostability of aromatic amino acids upon irradiation of ultraviolet photons.

  10. Dynamical effects in electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Jianqiang Sky Reshetnyak, Igor; Giorgetti, Christine; Sottile, Francesco; Reining, Lucia; Kas, J. J.; Rehr, J. J.; Sponza, Lorenzo; Guzzo, Matteo; Gatti, Matteo

    2015-11-14

    One of the big challenges of theoretical condensed-matter physics is the description, understanding, and prediction of the effects of the Coulomb interaction on materials properties. In electronic spectra, the Coulomb interaction causes a renormalization of energies and change of spectral weight. Most importantly, it can lead to new structures, often called satellites. These can be linked to the coupling of excitations, also termed dynamical effects. State-of-the-art methods in the framework of many-body perturbation theory, in particular, the widely used GW approximation, often fail to describe satellite spectra. Instead, approaches based on a picture of electron-boson coupling such as the cumulant expansion are promising for the description of plasmon satellites. In this work, we give a unified derivation of the GW approximation and the cumulant expansion for the one-body Green’s function. Using the example of bulk sodium, we compare the resulting spectral functions both in the valence and in the core region, and we discuss the dispersion of quasi-particles and satellites. We show that self-consistency is crucial to obtain meaningful results, in particular, at large binding energies. Very good agreement with experiment is obtained when the intrinsic spectral function is corrected for extrinsic and interference effects. Finally, we sketch how one can approach the problem in the case of the two-body Green’s function, and we discuss the cancellation of various dynamical effects that occur in that case.

  11. Pynamic: the Python Dynamic Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, G L; Ahn, D H; de Supinksi, B R; Gyllenhaal, J C; Miller, P J

    2007-07-10

    Python is widely used in scientific computing to facilitate application development and to support features such as computational steering. Making full use of some of Python's popular features, which improve programmer productivity, leads to applications that access extremely high numbers of dynamically linked libraries (DLLs). As a result, some important Python-based applications severely stress a system's dynamic linking and loading capabilities and also cause significant difficulties for most development environment tools, such as debuggers. Furthermore, using the Python paradigm for large scale MPI-based applications can create significant file IO and further stress tools and operating systems. In this paper, we present Pynamic, the first benchmark program to support configurable emulation of a wide-range of the DLL usage of Python-based applications for large scale systems. Pynamic has already accurately reproduced system software and tool issues encountered by important large Python-based scientific applications on our supercomputers. Pynamic provided insight for our system software and tool vendors, and our application developers, into the impact of several design decisions. As we describe the Pynamic benchmark, we will highlight some of the issues discovered in our large scale system software and tools using Pynamic.

  12. Ultrafast studies of solution dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, W.H.; Dyer, R.B.; Callender, R.H.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Fast chemical dynamics generally must be initiated photochemically. This limits the applicability of modern laser methods for following the structural changes that occur during chemical and biological reactions to those systems that have an electronic chromophore that has a significant yield of photoproduct when excited. This project has developed a new and entirely general approach to ultrafast initiation of reactions in solution: laser-induced temperature jump (T-jump). The results open entire new fields of study of ultrafast molecular dynamics in solution. The authors have demonstrated the T-jump technique on time scales of 50 ps and longer, and have applied it to study of the fast events in protein folding. They find that a general lifetime of alpha-helix formation is ca 100 ns, and that tertiary folds (in apomyoglobin) form in ca 100 {mu}s.

  13. Shock dynamics of phase diagrams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, Antonio

    2014-04-15

    A thermodynamic phase transition denotes a drastic change of state of a physical system due to a continuous change of thermodynamic variables, as for instance pressure and temperature. The classical van der Waals equation of state is the simplest model that predicts the occurrence of a critical point associated with the gasliquid phase transition. Nevertheless, below the critical temperature theoretical predictions of the van der Waals theory significantly depart from the observed physical behaviour. We develop a novel approach to classical thermodynamics based on the solution of Maxwell relations for a generalised family of nonlocal entropy functions. This theory provides an exact mathematical description of discontinuities of the order parameter within the phase transition region, it explains the universal form of the equations of state and the occurrence of triple points in terms of the dynamics of nonlinear shock wave fronts. -- Highlights: A new generalisation of van der Waals equation of state. Description of phase transitions in terms of shock dynamics of state curves. Proof of the universality of equations of state for a general class of models. Interpretation of triple points as confluence of classical shock waves. Correspondence table between thermodynamics and nonlinear conservation laws.

  14. Optimization of biological recycling of plant nutrients in livestock waste by utilizing waste heat from cooling water. Final report May 75-Sep 81

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddox, J.J.; Behrends, L.L.; Burch, D.W.; Kingsley, J.B.; Waddell, E.L. Jr

    1982-05-01

    The report summarizes a 5-year study of the beneficial uses of waste heat from condenser cooling water from steam-electric generating plants. The major effort addressed the recovery of plant nutrients in swine manure by aquatic farming of selected fish and Chinese waterchestnuts. Another effort included biogas production from swine manure in an anaerobic digester and the use of the digester waste to fertilize the aquatic farming system. Optimum recovery of plant nutrients resulted from operation of an integrated fish and waterchestnut system. Flowing water systems were 30-50% more productive than static systems. Annual fish yields of 5000-7000 lb/acre are projected for a properly stocked system over a 150-180 day growing period. Similarly, waterchestnut yields of nearly 17.8 tons/acre and dry hay yields of 6.7 tons/acre from sand-bed filters would be expected when fed wastewater from the fish system. The quality of the water leaving the sand beds would meet tertiary wastewater treatment standards during the growing season. An estimated 2000-head swine facility with a $400,000 investment would annually produce a 20% rate of return, save 360,000 bbl of oil through waste heat utilization, and produce biogas equivalent to 3000 bbl of oil.

  15. Channelized fluid flow through shear zones during fluid-enhanced dynamic recrystallization, Northern Apennines, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, K.E.; Dworkin, S.I. )

    1990-08-01

    Geochemical and petrographic studies of the Triassic Portoro limestone of the Tuscan nappe in Liguria, Italy, indicate that fluid flow was channeled through interlayered bedding-parallel shear zones during Miocene shearing and low-grade metamorphism. Carbon, oxygen, and strontium isotopic compositions and trace element concentrations in the Portoro indicate that it was precipitated from normal marine waters. In sheared and unsheared layers these isotopic compositions are indistinguishable, yet sheared layers of microspar contain less than half the amount of strontium preserved in undeformed layers. Wavy grain boundaries and a dimensional preferred orientation of elongated grains indicate that calcite within sheared zones was dynamically recrystallized. On the basis of these observations we suggest that during burial, extraformational fluids were buffered into oxygen isotopic, but not strontium-concentration, equilibrium with the Portoro. These syndeformational fluids were channeled through discrete 1- to 15-cm-thick shear zones in which strontium was expelled from calcite and incorporated into grain-boundary fluids during dynamic recrystallization.

  16. Drill cutting and core major, trace and rare earth element anlayses from wells RN-17B and RN-30, Reykjanes, Iceland

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-05-01

    Analytical results for x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and Inductively Couple Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurement of major, trace and rare earth elements in drill cuttings from geothermal wells in Reykjanes, Iceland. Total Fe was analyzed as FeO, therefore is not included under the Fe2O3 column.

  17. Hydrologic characterization of the Fry Canyon, Utah site prior to field demonstration of reactive chemical barriers to control radionuclide and trace-element contamination in ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naftz, D.L.; Freethey, G.W.; Davis, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    The Fry Canyon Site in southeastern Utah has been selected as a long term demonstration site to assess the performance of selected reaction barrier technologies for the removal of uranium and other trace elements from ground water. Objectives include site characterization and evaluation of barrier technologies.

  18. Predictive Dynamic Security Assessment through Advanced Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Diao, Ruisheng; Jin, Shuangshuang; Chen, Yousu

    2014-11-30

    Abstract— Traditional dynamic security assessment is limited by several factors and thus falls short in providing real-time information to be predictive for power system operation. These factors include the steady-state assumption of current operating points, static transfer limits, and low computational speed. This addresses these factors and frames predictive dynamic security assessment. The primary objective of predictive dynamic security assessment is to enhance the functionality and computational process of dynamic security assessment through the use of high-speed phasor measurements and the application of advanced computing technologies for faster-than-real-time simulation. This paper presents algorithms, computing platforms, and simulation frameworks that constitute the predictive dynamic security assessment capability. Examples of phasor application and fast computation for dynamic security assessment are included to demonstrate the feasibility and speed enhancement for real-time applications.

  19. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kellman, M.E.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  20. Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter Laser Driven Dynamic Loading of Condensed Matter Advanced diagnostics of experiments covering many orders of magnitude in strain rate Contact Eric Loomis (505) 665-3196 Email Dynamic materials experiments over a wide range of strain rates are essential to studying constitutive relations (e.g., plasticity), damage (e.g., spall), equations of state, phase transitions and kinetics, and novel materials. The Trident laser facility supplies unique,

  1. Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings Addthis 1 of 5 An oxygen plasma etcher is ... Kyle Alvine checks on the progress of the plasma etch. Image: Pacific Northwest National ...

  2. Regional Dynamics Model (REDYN) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    use the REDYN model to estimate the effects of actions and policies on people and the economy. The REDYN model powers the unique Regional Dynamics Economic Service, an...

  3. Theoretical & Experimental Aspects of Controlled Quantum Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Experimental Aspects of Controlled Quantum Dynamics Professor Herschel Rabitz Princeton University Wednesday, March 25, 2015 - 4:15PM MBG AUDITORIUM Refreshments at 4:00PM The...

  4. Communication: Quantum molecular dynamics simulation of liquid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Communication: Quantum molecular dynamics simulation of liquid para-hydrogen by nuclear and electron wave packet approach Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Communication:...

  5. Achieving atomistic understanding of solvation dynamics from...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mechanics and Quantum Mechanical Molecular Mechanics calculations, we have been ... Achieving atomistic understanding of solvation dynamics from X-ray free-electron laser ...

  6. Lithium electrodeposition dynamics in aprotic electrolyte observed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lithium electrodeposition dynamics in aprotic ... the Li plating and stripping processes is needed to enable practical Li-metal batteries. ...

  7. Quantitative Modeling of High Temperature Magnetization Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shufeng

    2009-03-01

    Final Technical Report Project title: Quantitative Modeling of High Temperature Magnetization Dynamics DOE/Office of Science Program Manager Contact: Dr. James Davenport

  8. Combined statistical and dynamical assessment of simulatedvegetation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    feedback of vegetation cover on subsequent annual precipitation is simulated for the mid-Holocene over North Africa using a fully coupled general circulation model with dynamic ...

  9. Dynamics Simulation in a Wave Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    focus: Advanced Naval concepts Also have projects in: Offshore Platforms Wave Energy Converters Wind Power 3 Coupled Dynamics (AEGIR Co-simulation Capability) * Interprocess ...

  10. Metastable supersymmetry breaking vacua from conformal dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    is not R-symmetric, and has a supersymmetric minimum. However, conformal dynamics suppresses several operators along renormalization group flow toward the infrared fixed point. ...

  11. Extrapolating dynamic leidenfrost principles to metallic nanodroplets...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    here we have used classical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate whether Cu ... Publisher: Nature Publishing Group Research Org: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak ...

  12. Metastable supersymmetry breaking vacua from conformal dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    At a high energy scale, the superpotential is not R-symmetric and has a supersymmetric minimum. However, conformal dynamics suppresses several operators along renormalization group ...

  13. Dynamic Provisioning for Terascale Science Applications Using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CircuitPacket Technologies and 100G Transmission Systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dynamic Provisioning for Terascale Science Applications Using Hybrid Circuit...

  14. Dynamics of Molecular Clouds: Observations, Simulations, and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Simulations, and NIF Experiments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dynamics of Molecular Clouds: Observations, Simulations, and NIF Experiments You are ...

  15. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of confined fluids...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) ... in a single simulation upon compression, whereas fluid molecules in the bulk ... for weak fluid -- wall interactions. ...

  16. Mountain-induced Dynamics Influence Cloud Phase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-2011 via coordinated projects targeting clouds, precipitation, and dynamics in the Park Range of Colorado. The National Science Foundation sponsored aircraft measurements as...

  17. Chiral dynamics and peripheral transverse densities Granados...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    dynamics and peripheral transverse densities Granados, Carlos G. Uppsala University (Sweden); Weiss, Christian JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States) 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY...

  18. Sierra Structural Dynamics Theory Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reese, Garth M.

    2015-10-19

    Sierra/SD provides a massively parallel implementation of structural dynamics finite element analysis, required for high fidelity, validated models used in modal, vibration, static and shock analysis of structural systems. This manual describes the theory behind many of the constructs in Sierra/SD. For a more detailed description of how to use Sierra/SD , we refer the reader to Sierra/SD, User's Notes . Many of the constructs in Sierra/SD are pulled directly from published material. Where possible, these materials are referenced herein. However, certain functions in Sierra/SD are specific to our implementation. We try to be far more complete in those areas. The theory manual was developed from several sources including general notes, a programmer notes manual, the user's notes and of course the material in the open literature. This page intentionally left blank.

  19. Dynamic Simulation Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-03-03

    DSNP (Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power-Plants) is a system of programs and data files by which a nuclear power plant, or part thereof, can be simulated. The acronym DSNP is used interchangeably for the DSNP language, the DSNP libraries, the DSNP precompiler, and the DSNP document generator. The DSNP language is a special-purpose, block-oriented, digital-simulation language developed to facilitate the preparation of dynamic simulations of a large variety of nuclear power plants. It is amore » user-oriented language that permits the user to prepare simulation programs directly from power plant block diagrams and flow charts by recognizing the symbolic DSNP statements for the appropriate physical components and listing these statements in a logical sequence according to the flow of physical properties in the simulated power plant. Physical components of nuclear power plants are represented by functional blocks, or modules. Many of the more complex components are represented by several modules. The nuclear reactor, for example, has a kinetic module, a power distribution module, a feedback module, a thermodynamic module, a hydraulic module, and a radioactive heat decay module. These modules are stored in DSNP libraries in the form of a DSNP subroutine or function, a block of statements, a macro, or a combination of the above. Basic functional blocks such as integrators, pipes, function generators, connectors, and many auxiliary functions representing properties of materials used in nuclear power plants are also available. The DSNP precompiler analyzes the DSNP simulation program, performs the appropriate translations, inserts the requested modules from the library, links these modules together, searches necessary data files, and produces a simulation program in FORTRAN.« less

  20. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akagi, Sheryl; Yokelson, Robert J.; Burling, Ian R.; Meinardi, S.; Simpson, I.; Blake, D. R.; McMeeking, Gavin; Sullivan, Amy; Lee, Taehyoung; Kredenweis, Sonia; Urbanski, Shawn; Reardon, James; Griffith, David WT; Johnson, Timothy J.; Weise, David

    2013-02-01

    In October-November 2011 we measured the trace gas emission factors from 7 prescribed fires in South Carolina, U.S. using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) systems and whole air sampling (WAS) into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analyses. The fires were intended to emulate high-intensity burns as they were lit during the dry season and in most cases represented stands that had not been treated with prescribed burns in 10+ years, if at all. A total of 97 trace gas species are reported here from both airborne and ground-based platforms making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements included the first data for a suite of monoterpene compounds emitted via distillation of plant tissues during real fires. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of ~0.40% of CO (molar basis), ~3.9% of NMOC (molar basis), and ~21% of organic aerosol (mass basis), suggests that they impacted post-emission formation of ozone, aerosol, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes. The variability in the terpene emissions in South Carolina (SC) fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the emitted gas-phase non-methane organic compounds was surprisingly different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~20 months earlier. It is likely that the slightly different ecosystems, time of year and the precursor variability all contributed to the variability in plume chemistry observed in this study and in the literature. The ?HCN/?CO emission ratio, however, is fairly consistent at 0.9 0.06 % for airborne fire measurements in coniferous-dominated ecosystems further confirming the value of HCN as a good biomass burning indicator/tracer. The SC results also support an earlier finding that C3-C4 alkynes may be of use as biomass burning indicators on the time-scale of hours to a day. It was

  1. STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS OF THE 2012 NOVEMBER 13/14 ECLIPSE WHITE-LIGHT CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Rušin, V.; Saniga, M.; Babcock, B. A.; Lu, M.; Davis, A. B. E-mail: vrusin@ta3.sk; and others

    2015-02-20

    Continuing our series of observations of coronal motion and dynamics over the solar-activity cycle, we observed from sites in Queensland, Australia, during the 2012 November 13 (UT)/14 (local time) total solar eclipse. The corona took the low-ellipticity shape typical of solar maximum (flattening index ε = 0.01), a change from the composite coronal images we observed and analyzed in this journal and elsewhere for the 2006 and 2008-2010 eclipses. After crossing the northeast Australian coast, the path of totality was over the ocean, so further totality was seen only by shipborne observers. Our results include velocities of a coronal mass ejection (CME; during the 36 minutes of passage from the Queensland coast to a ship north of New Zealand, we measured 413 km s{sup –1}) and we analyze its dynamics. We discuss the shapes and positions of several types of coronal features seen on our higher-resolution composite Queensland coronal images, including many helmet streamers, very faint bright and dark loops at the bases of helmet streamers, voids, and radially oriented thin streamers. We compare our eclipse observations with models of the magnetic field, confirming the validity of the predictions, and relate the eclipse phenomenology seen with the near-simultaneous images from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/AIA), NASA's Extreme Ultraviolet Imager on Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, ESA/Royal Observatory of Belgium's Sun Watcher with Active Pixels and Image Processing (SWAP) on PROBA2, and Naval Research Laboratory's Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment on ESA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. For example, the southeastern CME is related to the solar flare whose origin we trace with a SWAP series of images.

  2. Dynamic defense workshop : from research to practice.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crosby, Sean Michael; Doak, Justin E.; Haas, Jason J.; Helinski, Ryan; Lamb, Christopher C.

    2013-02-01

    On September 5th and 6th, 2012, the Dynamic Defense Workshop: From Research to Practice brought together researchers from academia, industry, and Sandia with the goals of increasing collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and external organizations, de ning and un- derstanding dynamic, or moving target, defense concepts and directions, and gaining a greater understanding of the state of the art for dynamic defense. Through the workshop, we broadened and re ned our de nition and understanding, identi ed new approaches to inherent challenges, and de ned principles of dynamic defense. Half of the workshop was devoted to presentations of current state-of-the-art work. Presentation topics included areas such as the failure of current defenses, threats, techniques, goals of dynamic defense, theory, foundations of dynamic defense, future directions and open research questions related to dynamic defense. The remainder of the workshop was discussion, which was broken down into sessions on de ning challenges, applications to host or mobile environments, applications to enterprise network environments, exploring research and operational taxonomies, and determining how to apply scienti c rigor to and investigating the eld of dynamic defense.

  3. Dynamics of polydots: Soft luminescent polymeric nanoparticles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maskey, Sabina; Osti, Naresh C.; Grest, Gary S.; Perahia, Dvora

    2016-03-04

    The conformation and dynamics of luminescent polymers collapsed into nanoparticles or polydots were studied using fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, providing a first insight into their internal dynamics. Controlling the conformation and dynamics of confined polymers is essential for realization of the full potential of polydots in nanomedicine and biotechnology. Specifically, the shape and internal dynamics of polydots that consist of highly rigid dialkyl p-phenylene ethynylene (PPE) are probed as a function of temperature. At room temperature, the polydots are spherical without any correlations between the aromatic rings on the PPE backbone. With increasing temperature, they expand and becomemore » slightly aspherical; however, the polymers remain confined. The coherent dynamic structure factor reveals that the internal motion of the polymer backbone is arrested, and the side chains dominate the internal dynamics of the polydots. Lastly, these new soft nanoparticles retain their overall shape and dynamics over an extended temperature range, and their conformation is tunable via their degree of expansion.« less

  4. Oil and gas exploration system and method for detecting trace amounts of hydrocarbon gases in the atmosphere

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wamsley, Paula R.; Weimer, Carl S.; Nelson, Loren D.; O'Brien, Martin J.

    2003-01-01

    An oil and gas exploration system and method for land and airborne operations, the system and method used for locating subsurface hydrocarbon deposits based upon a remote detection of trace amounts of gases in the atmosphere. The detection of one or more target gases in the atmosphere is used to indicate a possible subsurface oil and gas deposit. By mapping a plurality of gas targets over a selected survey area, the survey area can be analyzed for measurable concentration anomalies. The anomalies are interpreted along with other exploration data to evaluate the value of an underground deposit. The system includes a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system with a spectroscopic grade laser light and a light detector. The laser light is continuously tunable in a mid-infrared range, 2 to 5 micrometers, for choosing appropriate wavelengths to measure different gases and avoid absorption bands of interference gases. The laser light has sufficient optical energy to measure atmospheric concentrations of a gas over a path as long as a mile and greater. The detection of the gas is based on optical absorption measurements at specific wavelengths in the open atmosphere. Light that is detected using the light detector contains an absorption signature acquired as the light travels through the atmosphere from the laser source and back to the light detector. The absorption signature of each gas is processed and then analyzed to determine if a potential anomaly exists.

  5. Trace element content and magnetic properties of commercial HOPG samples studied by ion beam microscopy and SQUID magnetometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spemann, D. Esquinazi, P. Setzer, A.; Bhlmann, W.

    2014-10-15

    In this study, the impurity concentration and magnetic response of nine highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples with different grades and from different providers were determined using ion beam microscopy and SQUID magnetometry. Apart from sideface contaminations in the as-received state, bulk contamination of the samples in most cases consists of disk-shaped micron-sized particles made of Ti and V with an additional Fe contamination around the grain perimeter. The saturation magnetization typically increases with Fe concentration, however, there is no simple correlation between Fe content and magnetic moment. The saturation magnetization of one, respectively six, out of nine samples clearly exceeds the maximum contribution from pure Fe or Fe{sub 3}C. For most samples the temperature dependence of the remanence decreases linearly with T a dependence found previously for defect-induced magnetism (DIM) in HOPG. We conclude that apart from magnetic impurities, additional contribution to the ferromagnetic magnetization exists in pristine HOPG in agreement with previous studies. A comparative study between the results of ion beam microscopy and the commonly used EDX analysis shows clearly that EDX is not a reliable method for quantitative trace elemental analysis in graphite, clarifying weaknesses and discrepancies in the element concentrations given in the recent literature.

  6. Using Monte Carlo ray tracing simulations to model the quantum harmonic oscillator modes observed in uranium nitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, J. Y. Y. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Aczel, Adam A [ORNL] [ORNL; Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL] [ORNL; Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL] [ORNL; Buyers, W. J. L. [National Research Council of Canada] [National Research Council of Canada; Granroth, Garrett E [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Recently an extended series of equally spaced vibrational modes was observed in uranium nitride (UN) by performing neutron spectroscopy measurements using the ARCS and SEQUOIA time-of- flight chopper spectrometers [A.A. Aczel et al, Nature Communications 3, 1124 (2012)]. These modes are well described by 3D isotropic quantum harmonic oscillator (QHO) behavior of the nitrogen atoms, but there are additional contributions to the scattering that complicate the measured response. In an effort to better characterize the observed neutron scattering spectrum of UN, we have performed Monte Carlo ray tracing simulations of the ARCS and SEQUOIA experiments with various sample kernels, accounting for the nitrogen QHO scattering, contributions that arise from the acoustic portion of the partial phonon density of states (PDOS), and multiple scattering. These simulations demonstrate that the U and N motions can be treated independently, and show that multiple scattering contributes an approximate Q-independent background to the spectrum at the oscillator mode positions. Temperature dependent studies of the lowest few oscillator modes have also been made with SEQUOIA, and our simulations indicate that the T-dependence of the scattering from these modes is strongly influenced by the uranium lattice.

  7. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process: trace elements research and development report no. 53, interim report no. 34. Volume III. Pilot plant development work part 6: the fate of trace elements in the SRC process for the period, August 1, 1977 - February 28, 1979. [36 elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filby, R.H.; Khalil, S.R.; Grimm, C.A.; Ekabaram, V.; Hunt, M.L.

    1980-12-01

    This work reports the results of neutron activation analysis determination of the fate of trace elements in the SRC II process. Six coals were studied for their behavior in material balance runs carried out at the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant. The distribution of trace elements among products and input streams was determined by thermal neutron activation analysis using thermal neutron flux of 8 x 10/sup 12/ neutrons cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ followed by Ge(Li) gamma ray spectroscopy. National Bureau of Standards Standard Reference Materials (SRM) were used to evaluate the analytical precision and accuracy of the methods used. For each material balance study the trace element input stream was taken as ground coal and the output streams were vacuum bottoms, SRC II product oil, and process water. In addition to these major components, oils, sludges and waters from liquid-liquid separators, effluent waters, biosludges, and by-product sulfur were also analyzed. Concerning the distribution of trace elements in the SRC II process, it was found that the vacuum bottoms was the major sink for all trace element studied, with the exception of Hg. Much lower trace element concentrations (except for Hg) were found in the SRC II product oil relative to the vacuum bottoms or the feed coal, irrespective of coal type. The results indicate excellent balances for the elements studied, except for Hg. Except for Hg, Se, and C1, the SRC II product and process waters contributed less than 1% of the elemental balances for light oil fractions and process waters indicates that Hg, and to a lesser degree As, Se, and Sb, exhibited volatile behavior in the SRC II process but that the degree of volatility is strongly dependent on conditions or coal type.

  8. Dynamic underground stripping demonstration project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R.L.

    1992-04-01

    LLNL is collaborating with the UC Berkeley College of Engineering to develop and demonstrate a system of thermal remediation techniques for rapid cleanup of localized underground spills. Called dynamic stripping to reflect the rapid and controllable nature of the process, it will combine steam injection, direct electrical heating, and tomographic geophysical imaging in a cleanup of the LLNL gasoline spill. In the first eight months of the project, a Clean Site engineering test was conducted to prove the field application of the techniques. Tests then began on the contaminated site in FY 1992. This report describes the work at the Clean Site, including design and performance criteria, test results, interpretations, and conclusions. We fielded 'a wide range of new designs and techniques, some successful and some not. In this document, we focus on results and performance, lessons learned, and design and operational changes recommended for work at the contaminated site. Each section focuses on a different aspect of the work and can be considered a self-contained contribution.

  9. Flow dynamics and potential for Biodegradation of Organic Contaminants in Fractured Rock Vadose Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geller, J.T.; Holman, H.-Y.; Su, T.-S.; Liou, M.S.; Conrad, M.S.; Pruess, K.; Hunter-Devera, J.C.

    1998-12-01

    We present an experimental approach for investigating the potential for bioremediation of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in fractured-rock vadose zones. This approach is based on the coupling of fluid flow dynamics and biotransformation processes. Fluid flow and distribution within fracture networks may be a significant factor in the ability of microorganisms to degrade VOCs, as they affect the availability of substrate, moisture and nutrients. Biological activity can change liquid surface tension and generate biofilms that may change the nettability of solid surfaces, locally alter fracture permeability and redirect infiltrating liquids. Our approach has four components: (1) establishing a conceptual model for fluid and contaminant distribution in the geologic matrix of interest; (2) physical and numerical experiments of liquid seepage in the fracture plane; (3) non-destructive monitoring of biotransformations on rock surfaces at the micron-scale; and, (4) integration of flow and biological activity in natural rock ''geocosms''. Geocosms are core-scale flow cells that incorporate some aspects of natural conditions, such as liquid seepage in the fracture plane and moisture content. The experimental work was performed with rock samples and indigenous microorganisms from the site of the US Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), located in a basalt flow basin where VOC contamination threatens the Snake River Aquifer. The insights gained from this approach should contribute to the design of techniques to monitor and stimulate naturally occurring biological activity and control the spread of organic contaminants.

  10. Capturing Dynamics in the Power Grid: Formulation of Dynamic State Estimation through Data Assimilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Ning; Huang, Zhenyu; Meng, Da; Elbert, Stephen T.; Wang, Shaobu; Diao, Ruisheng

    2014-03-31

    With the increasing complexity resulting from uncertainties and stochastic variations introduced by intermittent renewable energy sources, responsive loads, mobile consumption of plug-in vehicles, and new market designs, more and more dynamic behaviors are observed in everyday power system operation. To operate a power system efficiently and reliably, it is critical to adopt a dynamic paradigm so that effective control actions can be taken in time. The dynamic paradigm needs to include three fundamental components: dynamic state estimation; look-ahead dynamic simulation; and dynamic contingency analysis (Figure 1). These three components answer three basic questions: where the system is; where the system is going; and how secure the system is against accidents. The dynamic state estimation provides a solid cornerstone to support the other 2 components and is the focus of this study.

  11. Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process: trace elements. Research and development report No. 53, interim report No. 30. Volume III. Pilot plant development work. Part 6. The fate of trace elements in the SRC process. [111 references

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, S. R.

    1980-02-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to study the distribution and fate of up to 36 elements in the Solvent Refined Coal Process Pilot Plant located at Fort Lewis, Washington. The elements Ti, V, Mg, Ca, Al, Cl, Mn, As, Br, Na, K, Sm, La, Ga, Cu, Sb, Se, Hg, Ni, Co, Cr, Fe, Rb, Cs, Sc, Tb, Eu, Ce, Sr, Ba, Th, U, Hf, Ta, Zr and Zn were measured in feed coal, insoluble residues, process solvent, process and effluent waters, by-product sulfur, SRC-I solid product, liquid-liquid separator oils and SRC-II liquid products. The material balance was calculated for each element from the concentration data and yields of each process fraction for both the SRC-I and SRC-II processes. Except for Ti, Cl and Br in the SRC-I mode and Hg in the SRC-II mode, each element was substantially lower in the SRC products than in the original feed coal. Residues from the process contained more than 80% of the trace element content found in the coal, except for Hg. More than 98.5% of the total contents of K and Fe in coal were retained in the insoluble residues. Elements such as Hg, Se, As and Sb can form volatile compounds (such as Hg/sup 0/, H/sub 2/Se, AsH/sub 3/ and SbH/sub 3/) stable under the process conditions. The high enhancement factors of Se (957), As (202) and Sb (27.4) in the aqueous phase of the separator water compared to that of the oil are evidence for the formation of volatile species which are more soluble in water than in the oil phase.

  12. Spatial Heterogeneity of Trace Species Distributions in the Atmosphere and their effects on Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiative Forcing and Climate Change at GFDL: A Perspective V. Ramaswamy NOAA/ Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Princeton University Climate and Climate Change * Basic curiosity  understanding the climate system * With the advancement of knowledge, through theory and measurements, an increasing desire to know the properties of all the components of the system and the interactions between them * Understanding climate variations and change, including those caused by internal and external

  13. Permafrost carbon—climate feedback is sensitive to deep soil carbon decomposability but not deep soil nitrogen dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koven, Charles D.; Lawrence, David M.; Riley, William J.

    2015-03-09

    Permafrost soils contain enormous amounts of organic carbon whose stability is contingent on remaining frozen. With future warming, these soils may release carbon to the atmosphere and act as a positive feedback to climate change. Significant uncertainty remains on the postthaw carbon dynamics of permafrost-affected ecosystems, in particular since most of the carbon resides at depth where decomposition dynamics may differ from surface soils, and since nitrogen mineralized by decomposition may enhance plant growth. Here we show, using a carbon–nitrogen model that includes permafrost processes forced in an unmitigated warming scenario, that the future carbon balance of the permafrost region is highly sensitive to the decomposability of deeper carbon, with the net balance ranging from 21 Pg C to 164 Pg C losses by 2300. Increased soil nitrogen mineralization reduces nutrient limitations, but the impact of deep nitrogen on the carbon budget is small due to enhanced nitrogen availability from warming surface soils and seasonal asynchrony between deeper nitrogen availability and plant nitrogen demands. The future carbon balance of this region is projected to hinge more on the rate and extent of permafrost thaw and soil decomposition than on enhanced nitrogen availability for vegetation growth resulting from permafrost thaw.

  14. Permafrost carbon—climate feedback is sensitive to deep soil carbon decomposability but not deep soil nitrogen dynamics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Koven, Charles D.; Lawrence, David M.; Riley, William J.

    2015-03-09

    Permafrost soils contain enormous amounts of organic carbon whose stability is contingent on remaining frozen. With future warming, these soils may release carbon to the atmosphere and act as a positive feedback to climate change. Significant uncertainty remains on the postthaw carbon dynamics of permafrost-affected ecosystems, in particular since most of the carbon resides at depth where decomposition dynamics may differ from surface soils, and since nitrogen mineralized by decomposition may enhance plant growth. Here we show, using a carbon–nitrogen model that includes permafrost processes forced in an unmitigated warming scenario, that the future carbon balance of the permafrost regionmore » is highly sensitive to the decomposability of deeper carbon, with the net balance ranging from 21 Pg C to 164 Pg C losses by 2300. Increased soil nitrogen mineralization reduces nutrient limitations, but the impact of deep nitrogen on the carbon budget is small due to enhanced nitrogen availability from warming surface soils and seasonal asynchrony between deeper nitrogen availability and plant nitrogen demands. The future carbon balance of this region is projected to hinge more on the rate and extent of permafrost thaw and soil decomposition than on enhanced nitrogen availability for vegetation growth resulting from permafrost thaw.« less

  15. Final report for DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64404 - Field Investigations of Microbially Facilitated Calcite Precipitation for Immobilization of Strontium-90 and Other Trace Metals in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Robert W; Fujita, Yoshiko; Ginn, Timothy R; Hubbard, Susan S

    2012-10-12

    Subsurface radionuclide and metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE's greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide 90Sr, is co-precipitation in calcite. We have previously found that that nutrient addition can stimulate microbial ureolytic activity that this activity accelerates calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of Sr, and that higher calcite precipitation rates can result in increased Sr partitioning. We have conducted integrated field, laboratory, and computational research to evaluate the relationships between ureolysis and calcite precipitation rates and trace metal partitioning under environmentally relevant conditions, and investigated the coupling between flow/flux manipulations and precipitate distribution. A field experimental campaign conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site located at Rifle, CO was based on a continuous recirculation design; water extracted from a down-gradient well was amended with urea and molasses (a carbon and electron donor) and re-injected into an up-gradient well. The goal of the recirculation design and simultaneous injection of urea and molasses was to uniformly accelerate the hydrolysis of urea and calcite precipitation over the entire inter-wellbore zone. The urea-molasses recirculation phase lasted, with brief interruptions for geophysical surveys, for 12 days followed by long-term monitoring which continued for 13 months. Following the recirculation phase we found persistent increases in urease activity (as determined from 14C labeled laboratory urea hydrolysis rates) in the upper portion of the inter-wellbore zone. We also observed an initial increase (approximately 2 weeks) in urea concentration associated with injection activities followed by decreasing urea concentration and associated increases in ammonium and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC

  16. Validation of the U.S. NRC coupled code system TRITON/TRACE/PARCS with the special power excursion reactor test III (SPERT III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, R. C.; Xu, Y.; Downar, T.; Hudson, N.

    2012-07-01

    The Special Power Excursion Reactor Test III (SPERT III) was a series of reactivity insertion experiments conducted in the 1950's. This paper describes the validation of the U.S. NRC Coupled Code system TRITON/PARCS/TRACE to simulate reactivity insertion accidents (RIA) by using several of the SPERT III tests. The work here used the SPERT III E-core configuration tests in which the RIA was initiated by ejecting a control rod. The resulting super-prompt reactivity excursion and negative reactivity feedback produced the familiar bell shaped power increase and decrease. The energy deposition during such a power peak has important safety consequences and provides validation basis for core coupled multi-physics codes. The transients of five separate tests are used to benchmark the PARCS/TRACE coupled code. The models were thoroughly validated using the original experiment documentation. (authors)

  17. Dynamic Metabolism Studies of Live Bacterial Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majors, Paul D.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.

    2008-11-01

    Bacterial film (biofilm) microbes exist within spatial (nutrient, electron-acceptor, pH, etc.) gradients of their own making. Correspondingly, biofilm bacteria are physiologically and functionally distinct from free-floating bacteria and from their own species at differing biofilm depths. This article describes our efforts to develop noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technologies for biofilm-metabolism studies. This involves integrating NMR with controlled-cultivation methods to interrogate microbial physiology live and under known growth conditions. NMR is uniquely capable of providing depth-resolved metabolic and transport information in a non-invasive, non-sample-consuming fashion, providing information required for experimental reactive transport studies. We have studied mono-species biofilms relevant to environment remediation and human health. We describe these technologies, discuss their advantages and limitations, and give examples of their application.

  18. A smart sensor system for trace organic vapor detection using a temperature-controlled array of surface acoustic wave vapor sensors, automated preconcentrator tubes, and pattern recognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, J.W.; Rose-Pehrsson, S.L.; Klusty, M.; Wohltjen, H.

    1993-05-01

    A smart sensor system for the detection, of toxic organophosphorus and toxic organosulfur vapors at trace concentrations has been designed, fabricated, and tested against a wide variety of vapor challenges. The key features of the system are: An array of four surface acoustic wave (SAW) vapor sensors, temperature control of the vapor sensors, the use of pattern recognition to analyze the sensor data, and an automated sampling system including thermally-desorbed preconcentrator tubes (PCTs).

  19. MECHANICS OF CRACK BRIDGING UNDER DYNAMIC LOADS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. SRIDHAR; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    A bridging law for fiber reinforced composites under dynamic crack propagation conditions has been derived. Inertial effects in the mechanism of fiber pullout during dynamic propagation of a bridged crack are critically examined for the first time. By reposing simple shear lag models of pullout as problems of dynamic wave propagation, the effect of the frictional coupling between the fibers and the matrix is accounted for in a fairly straightforward way. The solutions yield the time-dependent relationship between the crack opening displacement and the bridging traction. Engineering criteria and the role of material and geometrical parameters for significant inertial effects are identified.

  20. Swarm Intelligence for Urban Dynamics Modelling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghnemat, Rawan; Bertelle, Cyrille; Duchamp, Gerard H. E.

    2009-04-16

    In this paper, we propose swarm intelligence algorithms to deal with dynamical and spatial organization emergence. The goal is to model and simulate the developement of spatial centers using multi-criteria. We combine a decentralized approach based on emergent clustering mixed with spatial constraints or attractions. We propose an extension of the ant nest building algorithm with multi-center and adaptive process. Typically, this model is suitable to analyse and simulate urban dynamics like gentrification or the dynamics of the cultural equipment in urban area.

  1. Dynamics Modelling of Biolistic Gene Guns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, M.; Tao, W.; Pianetta, P.A.

    2009-06-04

    The gene transfer process using biolistic gene guns is a highly dynamic process. To achieve good performance, the process needs to be well understood and controlled. Unfortunately, no dynamic model is available in the open literature for analysing and controlling the process. This paper proposes such a model. Relationships of the penetration depth with the helium pressure, the penetration depth with the acceleration distance, and the penetration depth with the micro-carrier radius are presented. Simulations have also been conducted. The results agree well with experimental results in the open literature. The contribution of this paper includes a dynamic model for improving and manipulating performance of the biolistic gene gun.

  2. SIAM conference on applications of dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    A conference (Oct.15--19, 1992, Snowbird, Utah; sponsored by SIAM (Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) Activity Group on Dynamical Systems) was held that highlighted recent developments in applied dynamical systems. The main lectures and minisymposia covered theory about chaotic motion, applications in high energy physics and heart fibrillations, turbulent motion, Henon map and attractor, integrable problems in classical physics, pattern formation in chemical reactions, etc. The conference fostered an exchange between mathematicians working on theoretical issues of modern dynamical systems and applied scientists. This two-part document contains abstracts, conference program, and an author index.

  3. Parallel Implementation of Power System Dynamic Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Shuangshuang; Huang, Zhenyu; Diao, Ruisheng; Wu, Di; Chen, Yousu

    2013-07-21

    Dynamic simulation of power system transient stability is important for planning, monitoring, operation, and control of electrical power systems. However, modeling the system dynamics and network involves the computationally intensive time-domain solution of numerous differential and algebraic equations (DAE). This results in a transient stability implementation that may not maintain the real-time constraints of an online security assessment. This paper presents a parallel implementation of the dynamic simulation on a high-performance computing (HPC) platform using parallel simulation algorithms and computation architectures. It enables the simulation to run even faster than real time, enabling the look-ahead capability of upcoming stability problems in the power grid.

  4. TRACKING CODE DEVELOPMENT FOR BEAM DYNAMICS OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, L.

    2011-03-28

    Dynamic aperture (DA) optimization with direct particle tracking is a straight forward approach when the computing power is permitted. It can have various realistic errors included and is more close than theoretical estimations. In this approach, a fast and parallel tracking code could be very helpful. In this presentation, we describe an implementation of storage ring particle tracking code TESLA for beam dynamics optimization. It supports MPI based parallel computing and is robust as DA calculation engine. This code has been used in the NSLS-II dynamics optimizations and obtained promising performance.

  5. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2001 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2002-10-15

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels. CDIAC is located within the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. CDIAC is co-located with ESD researchers investigating global-change topics, such as the global carbon cycle and the effects of carbon dioxide on climate and vegetation. CDIAC staff are also connected with current ORNL research on related topics, such as renewable energy and supercomputing technologies. CDIAC is supported by the Environmental Sciences Division (Jerry Elwood, Director) of DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. CDIAC represents DOE in the multi-agency Global Change Data and Information System (GCDIS). Wanda Ferrell is DOE's Program Manager with overall responsibility for CDIAC. Roger Dahlman is responsible for CDIAC's AmeriFlux tasks, and Anna Palmisano for CDIAC's Ocean Data tasks. CDIAC is made up of three groups: Data

  6. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 1999 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2000-03-31

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global-change data and information analysis center of the Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has--since its inception in 1982--enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea level. CDIAC is located within the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. CDIAC is co-located with ESD researchers investigating global-change topics, such as the global carbon cycle and the effects of carbon dioxide on vegetation. CDIAC staff are also connected with current ORNL research on related topics, such as renewable energy and supercomputing technologies. CDIAC is supported by the Environmental Sciences Division (Jerry Elwood, Acting Director) of DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. CDIAC's FY 1999 budget was 2.2M dollars. CDIAC represents the DOE in the multi-agency Global Change Data and Information System. Bobbi Parra, and Wanda Ferrell on an interim basis, is DOE's Program Manager with responsibility for CDIAC. CDIAC comprises three groups, Global Change Data, Computer Systems, and Information

  7. DISCOVERY OF A LARGE NUMBER OF CANDIDATE PROTOCLUSTERS TRACED BY ∼15 Mpc-SCALE GALAXY OVERDENSITIES IN COSMOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, Yi-Kuan; Gebhardt, Karl; Overzier, Roderik

    2014-02-10

    To demonstrate the feasibility of studying the epoch of massive galaxy cluster formation in a more systematic manner using current and future galaxy surveys, we report the discovery of a large sample of protocluster candidates in the 1.62 deg{sup 2} COSMOS/UltraVISTA field traced by optical/infrared selected galaxies using photometric redshifts. By comparing properly smoothed three-dimensional galaxy density maps of the observations and a set of matched simulations incorporating the dominant observational effects (galaxy selection and photometric redshift uncertainties), we first confirm that the observed ∼15 comoving Mpc-scale galaxy clustering is consistent with ΛCDM models. Using further the relation between high-z overdensity and the present day cluster mass calibrated in these matched simulations, we found 36 candidate structures at 1.6 < z < 3.1, showing overdensities consistent with the progenitors of M{sub z} {sub =} {sub 0} ∼ 10{sup 15} M {sub ☉} clusters. Taking into account the significant upward scattering of lower mass structures, the probabilities for the candidates to have at least M{sub z=} {sub 0} ∼ 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉} are ∼70%. For each structure, about 15%-40% of photometric galaxy candidates are expected to be true protocluster members that will merge into a cluster-scale halo by z = 0. With solely photometric redshifts, we successfully rediscover two spectroscopically confirmed structures in this field, suggesting that our algorithm is robust. This work generates a large sample of uniformly selected protocluster candidates, providing rich targets for spectroscopic follow-up and subsequent studies of cluster formation. Meanwhile, it demonstrates the potential for probing early cluster formation with upcoming redshift surveys such as the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment and the Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph survey.

  8. Comparison of Packed Beds and Qiagen Columns for Recovering Trace Amounts of B. anthracis DNA from Liquid Suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorensen, K; Arroyo, E; Erler, A; Christian, A T; Camp, D; Wheeler, E K

    2006-06-23

    The goal of this work was to optimize and evaluate LLNL's in-bed amplification technology to improve the level of detection for suspensions containing trace amounts of anthracis DNA. The binding/cleaning performance of the packed bed is compared to the conventional commercial approach; Qiagen column cleanup and elution, followed by detection through an ex-situ amplification process. Five liquid suspensions were spiked with B.anthracis DNA in concentration series. These suspensions were: (1) water, (2) water with EDTA, (3) dirty water from carpet extraction, (4) dirty carpet extraction with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) plus 0.1% Tween 20 plus 0.1% gelatin, and (5) a subway aerosol collected in water. Each suspension matrix was spiked with DNA and injected (in replicate) into either Qiagen Microcolumns (using the kit processing instructions) or LLNL's packed bed (using the LLNL in-bed purification and amplification protocol). The process output was assayed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR). Table ES-1 shows the level of DNA (pg per 100 uL of input suspension) that resulted in successful amplification for all reactions (X=Y), and the level for which at least one of the reactions was successful (X>0). For each suspension and DNA concentration, there were Y QPCR assays of which X showed successful amplification. LLNL's packed bed technology outperformed Qiagen Microcolumns for all five suspensions, typically by one order of magnitude in both the limit of assured detection (all reactions positive), and the lower limit of detection (some reactions positive).

  9. Trace-level beryllium analysis in the laboratory and in the field: State of the art, challenges, and opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRISSON, MICHAEL

    2006-03-30

    Control of workplace exposure to beryllium is a growing issue in the United States and other nations. As the health risks associated with low-level exposure to beryllium are better understood, the need increases for improved analytical techniques both in the laboratory and in the field. These techniques also require a greater degree of standardization to permit reliable comparison of data obtained from different locations and at different times. Analysis of low-level beryllium samples, in the form of air filters or surface wipes, is frequently required for workplace monitoring or to provide data to support decision-making on implementation of exposure controls. In the United States and the United Kingdom, the current permissible exposure level is 2 {micro}g/m{sup 3} (air), and the United States Department of Energy has implemented an action level of 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3} (air) and 0.2 {micro}g/100 cm{sup 2} (surface). These low-level samples present a number of analytical challenges, including (1) a lack of suitable standard reference materials, (2) unknown robustness of sample preparation techniques, (3) interferences during analysis, (4) sensitivity (sufficiently low detection limits), (5) specificity (beryllium speciation), and (6) data comparability among laboratories. Additionally, there is a need for portable, real-time (or near real-time) equipment for beryllium air monitoring and surface wipe analysis that is both laboratory-validated and field-validated in a manner that would be accepted by national and/or international standards organizations. This paper provides a review of the current analytical requirements for trace-level beryllium analysis for worker protection, and also addresses issues that may change those requirements. The current analytical state of the art and relevant challenges facing the analytical community will be presented, followed by suggested criteria for real-time monitoring equipment. Recognizing and addressing these challenges will

  10. Airborne and ground-based measurements of the trace gases and particles emitted from prescribed fires in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burling, Ian; Yokelson, Robert J.; Akagi, Sheryl; Urbanski, Shawn; Wold, Cyle E.; Griffith, David WT; Johnson, Timothy J.; Reardon, James; Weise, David

    2011-12-07

    We measured the emission factors for 19 trace gas species and particulate matter (PM2.5) from 14 prescribed fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as pine forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. These are likely the most extensive emission factor field measurements for temperate biomass burning to date and the only published emission factors for temperate oak savanna fuels. This study helps close the gap in emissions data available for temperate zone fires relative to tropical biomass burning. We present the first field measurements of the biomass burning emissions of glycolaldehyde, a possible precursor for aqueous phase secondary organic aerosol formation. We also measured the emissions of phenol, another aqueous phase secondary organic aerosol precursor. Our data confirm previous suggestions that urban deposition can impact the NOx emission factors and thus subsequent plume chemistry. For two fires, we measured the emissions in the convective smoke plume from our airborne platform at the same time the unlofted residual smoldering combustion emissions were measured with our ground-based platform after the flame front passed through. The smoke from residual smoldering combustion was characterized by emission factors for hydrocarbon and oxygenated organic species that were up to ten times higher than in the lofted plume, including significant 1,3-butadiene and isoprene concentrations which were not observed in the lofted plume. This should be considered in modeling the air quality impacts of smoke that disperses at ground level, and we show that the normally-ignored unlofted emissions can also significantly impact estimates of total emissions. Preliminary evidence of large emissions of monoterpenes was seen in the residual smoldering spectra, but we have not yet quantified these emissions. These data should lead to an improved capacity to model the impacts of biomass burning in similar

  11. Analysis of selected trace metals in leachate from reference fly ash. Phase II. Supplemental leaching program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webster, W.C.; Jackson, K.F.; Paule, R.C.

    1981-03-01

    An inter-laboratory testing program was conducted to isolate and measure the primary components of variability in the American Society for Testing and Materials' (ASTM) and Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) extraction procedures for testing the leaching potential of solid wastes. The program is a continuation of the Collaborative Test Programs undertaken jointly by ASTM Subcommittee D19.12 and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The National Bureau of Standards was retained by DOE to design the program and analyze the results. Engineering-Science provided initial program coordination, and Webster and Associates coodinated the data analysis and preparation of the report, both under contract to DOE. Thirteen laboratories participated in the program, all on a voluntary basis. In carrying out the program, specially prepared samples of a Reference Fly Ash were utilized in order to minimize sample heterogeneity. Each laboratory preformed both the ASTM and EPA extraction procedures on the Reference Fly Ash in duplicate, split the extract into two equal portions, completed duplicate analytical determinations on one portion, and shipped the other portion to a central laboratory. The central laboratory performed duplicate analytical determinations on all extracts. The main observations and conclusions from the test program are: (1) sampling may be a large variable in field situations; however, with the use of the Reference Fly Ash, sample heterogeneity was controlled, allowing analysis of effects other than sampling variability; (2) the cooperating laboratories demonstrated acceptable analytical reproducibility based on analytical quality control data; (3) poor reproducibility of the trace metal results on the extracts from the Reference Fly Ash was shown to be primarily due to variability in the leaching process rather than analytical technique.

  12. Thermodynamic analysis of interactions between Ni-based solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) anodes and trace species in a survey of coal syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Martinez; Kirk Gerdes; Randall Gemmen; James Postona

    2010-03-20

    A thermodynamic analysis was conducted to characterize the effects of trace contaminants in syngas derived from coal gasification on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material. The effluents from 15 different gasification facilities were considered to assess the impact of fuel composition on anode susceptibility to contamination. For each syngas case, the study considers the magnitude of contaminant exposure resulting from operation of a warm gas cleanup unit at two different temperatures and operation of a nickel-based SOFC at three different temperatures. Contaminant elements arsenic (As), phosphorous (P), and antimony (Sb) are predicted to be present in warm gas cleanup effluent and will interact with the nickel (Ni) components of a SOFC anode. Phosphorous is the trace element found in the largest concentration of the three contaminants and is potentially the most detrimental. Poisoning was found to depend on the composition of the syngas as well as system operating conditions. Results for all trace elements tended to show invariance with cleanup operating temperature, but results were sensitive to syngas bulk composition. Synthesis gas with high steam content tended to resist poisoning.

  13. Coupling field and laboratory measurements to estimate the emission factors of identified and unidentified trace gases for prescribed fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokelson, Robert J.; Burling, Ian R.; Gilman, Jessica; Warneke, Carsten; Stockwell, Chelsea E.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Akagi, Sheryl; Urbanski, Shawn; Veres, Patrick; Roberts, James M.; Kuster, W. C.; Reardon, James; Griffith, David WT; Johnson, Timothy J.; Hosseini, SeyedEhsan; Miller, J. Wayne; Cocker, David R.; Jung, H.; Weise, David

    2013-01-07

    Vegetative fuels commonly consumed in prescribed fires were collected from five locations in the southeastern and southwestern U.S. and burned in a series of 77 fires at the U.S. Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions were measured by gravimetric filter sampling with subsequent analysis for elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and 38 elements. The trace gas emissions were measured with a large suite of state-of-the-art instrumentation including an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP FTIR) spectrometer, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS), negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS), and gas chromatography with MS detection (GC-MS). 204 trace gas species (mostly non-methane organic compounds (NMOC)) were identified and quantified with the above instruments. An additional 152 significant peaks in the unit mass resolution mass spectra were quantified, but either could not be identified or most of the signal at that molecular mass was unaccounted for by identifiable species. As phase II of this study, we conducted airborne and ground-based sampling of the emissions from real prescribed fires mostly in the same land management units where the fuels for the lab fires were collected. A broad variety, but smaller number of species (21 trace gas species and PM2.5) was measured on 14 fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as pine forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. These extensive field measurements of emission factors (EF) for temperate biomass burning are useful both for modeling and to examine the representativeness of our lab fire EF. The lab/field EF ratio for the pine understory fuels was not statistically different from one, on average. However, our lab EF for smoldering compounds emitted by burning the semi

  14. HFE-TRACE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003281IBMPC00 An Integrated Tool for Functional Requirements Analysis, Function Allocation and Task Analysis

  15. Dynamical dipole mode in fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierroutsakou, D.; Boiano, A.; Romoli, M.; Martin, B.; Inglima, G.; La Commara, M.; Sandoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Coniglione, R.; Zoppo, A. Del; Maiolino, C.; Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Baran, V.; Glodariu, T.; Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.

    2009-05-04

    We investigated the dynamical dipole mode, related with entrance channel charge asymmetry effects, in the {sup 40}Ar+{sup 92}Zr and {sup 36}Ar+{sup 96}Zr fusion reactions at E{sub lab} = 15.1 A and 16 A MeV, respectively. These reactions populate, through entrance channels having different charge asymmetries, a compound nucleus in the A = 126 mass energy region, identical spin distribution at an average excitation energy of about 280 MeV. The compound nucleus average excitation energy and average mass were deduced by the analysis of the light charged particle energy spectra. By studying the {gamma}-ray energy spectra and the {gamma}-ray angular distributions of the considered reactions, the dynamical nature of the prompt radiation related to the dynamical dipole mode was evidenced. The data are compared with calculations based on a collective bremsstrahlung analysis of the reaction dynamics.

  16. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the...

  17. Chiral dynamics and peripheral transverse densities (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Chiral dynamics and peripheral transverse densities Citation Details ... Report Number(s): JLAB-THY--13-1763; DOEOR--23177-2641 Journal ID: ISSN 1029-8479; TRN: ...

  18. Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings 1 of 5 An oxygen plasma etcher is used to ... Kyle Alvine checks on the progress of the plasma etch. Image: Pacific Northwest National ...

  19. Dynamic temperature measurements with embedded optical sensors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Seagle, Christopher T; Ao, Tommy

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes LDRD project number 151365, %5CDynamic Temperature Measurements with Embedded Optical Sensors%22. The purpose of this project was to develop an optical sensor capable of detecting modest temperature states (<1000 K) with nanosecond time resolution, a recurring diagnostic need in dynamic compression experiments at the Sandia Z machine. Gold sensors were selected because the visible re ectance spectrum of gold varies strongly with temperature. A variety of static and dynamic measurements were performed to assess re ectance changes at di erent temperatures and pressures. Using a minimal optical model for gold, a plausible connection between static calibrations and dynamic measurements was found. With re nements to the model and diagnostic upgrades, embedded gold sensors seem capable of detecting minor (<50 K) temperature changes under dynamic compression.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of electrolytes andelectrolyte...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. es40smith.pdf (4 MB) More Documents & Publications Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies of ...

  1. Single ion dynamics in molten sodium bromide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alcaraz, O.; Trullas, J.; Demmel, F.

    2014-12-28

    We present a study on the single ion dynamics in the molten alkali halide NaBr. Quasielastic neutron scattering was employed to extract the self-diffusion coefficient of the sodium ions at three temperatures. Molecular dynamics simulations using rigid and polarizable ion models have been performed in parallel to extract the sodium and bromide single dynamics and ionic conductivities. Two methods have been employed to derive the ion diffusion, calculating the mean squared displacements and the velocity autocorrelation functions, as well as analysing the increase of the line widths of the self-dynamic structure factors. The sodium diffusion coefficients show a remarkable good agreement between experiment and simulation utilising the polarisable potential.

  2. Interfacial effects revealed by ultrafast relaxation dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Interfacial effects revealed by ultrafast relaxation dynamics in BiFeO 3 YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 bilayers Authors: Springer, D. ; Nair, Saritha K. ; He, Mi ; Lu, C. L. ; Cheong, S. ...

  3. A Fast Dynamic Language for Technical Computing Stefan Karpinski...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fast Dynamic Language for Technical Computing Stefan Karpinski, Jeff Bezanson, Viral B. Shah & Alan Edelman u a l j i Two Language Problem People love dynamic environments for...

  4. Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics Authors: Huang,...

  5. Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Online optimization of storage ring nonlinear beam dynamics You are...

  6. Monte-Carlo particle dynamics in a variable specific impulse...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Monte-Carlo particle dynamics in a variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Monte-Carlo particle dynamics in a variable specific ...

  7. Ganglion dynamics of Supercritical CO2 in heterogeneous media...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ganglion dynamics of Supercritical CO2 in heterogeneous media. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ganglion dynamics of Supercritical CO2 in heterogeneous media. Abstract ...

  8. Modifications to WRFs dynamical core to improve the treatment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Modifications to WRFs dynamical core to improve the treatment of moisture for large-eddy simulations Title: Modifications to WRFs dynamical core to improve the treatment of ...

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Diesel Engine Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Diesel Engine Combustion and Emissions Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Diesel Engine Combustion and Emissions 2005 Diesel Engine ...

  10. Sandia Energy - Molecular Dynamics Simulations Predict Fate of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Dynamics Simulations Predict Fate of Uranium in Sediments Home Highlights - Energy Research Molecular Dynamics Simulations Predict Fate of Uranium in Sediments Previous...

  11. General Dynamics and Nissan Case Studies Highlight Benefits of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The General Dynamics Ordnance and Tactical Systems case study discusses the company's ... Achieved energy savings under a dynamic energy team drawn from every level of management. ...

  12. Temperature Dependence of Dynamic Deformation in FCC Metals,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Temperature Dependence of Dynamic Deformation in FCC Metals, Aluminum and Invar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Temperature Dependence of Dynamic Deformation in FCC ...

  13. Quantum effects in the dynamics of deeply supercooled water ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quantum effects in the dynamics of deeply supercooled water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantum effects in the dynamics of deeply supercooled water Authors: Agapov, ...

  14. Jiawei Solarchina Dynamic Green Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jiawei Solarchina Dynamic Green Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Jiawei Solarchina Dynamic Green Energy Ltd Place: Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China Zip: 518001...

  15. Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent Behavior in Complex ... Title: Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent Behavior in ...

  16. Multichannel Kondo Impurity Dynamics in a Majorana Device (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Multichannel Kondo Impurity Dynamics in a Majorana Device Title: Multichannel Kondo Impurity Dynamics in a Majorana Device Authors: Altland, A. ; Bri, B. ; Egger, R. ; Tsvelik, ...

  17. Driven Skyrmions and Dynamical Transitions in Chiral Magnets...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Driven Skyrmions and Dynamical Transitions in Chiral Magnets Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Driven Skyrmions and Dynamical Transitions in Chiral Magnets Authors: Lin, ...

  18. Voltage Quench Dynamics of a Kondo System (Journal Article) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Voltage Quench Dynamics of a Kondo System This content will become publicly available on January 18, 2017 Prev Next Title: Voltage Quench Dynamics of a Kondo System Authors: ...

  19. DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    applications DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications Large scale Python and other dynamic applications may spend huge time at startup. The DLFM library,...

  20. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dataset: Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic...

  1. Equilibration dynamics and conductivity of warm dense hydrogen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Equilibration dynamics and conductivity of warm dense hydrogen Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Equilibration dynamics and conductivity of warm dense hydrogen Authors: ...

  2. simulate the dynamic distribution of lithium in the electrode

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulate the dynamic distribution of lithium in the electrode - Sandia Energy Energy ... simulate the dynamic distribution of lithium in the electrode HomeTag:simulate the ...

  3. Extreme dynamic compression with a low energy laser pulse (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Extreme dynamic compression with a low energy laser pulse Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Extreme dynamic compression with a low energy laser pulse You ...

  4. RAVEN and Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment: Software overview...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    RAVEN and Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment: Software overview Citation Details In-Document Search Title: RAVEN and Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment: Software overview ...

  5. O2Diesel Corporation formerly Dynamic Ventures | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    O2Diesel Corporation formerly Dynamic Ventures Jump to: navigation, search Name: O2Diesel Corporation (formerly Dynamic Ventures) Place: Newark, Delaware Zip: 19713 Product:...

  6. All-electrical manipulation of magnetization dynamics in a ferromagnet...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    All-electrical manipulation of magnetization dynamics in a ferromagnet by antiferromagnets ... manipulation of magnetization dynamics in a ferromagnet by antiferromagnets ...

  7. Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The Experimental Evidence Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Household Response To Dynamic...

  8. ITP Chemicals: Technology Roadmap for Computational Fluid Dynamics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fluid Dynamics, January 1999 ITP Chemicals: Technology Roadmap for Computational Fluid Dynamics, January 1999 cfdroadmap.pdf (323.09 KB) More Documents & Publications 3-D ...

  9. Interaction and Coalescence of Nanovoids and Dynamic Fracture...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Nanovoids and Dynamic Fracture in Silica Glass: Multimiilion-to-Billion Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interaction and...

  10. Dynamics of electrical double layer formation in room-temperature...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Dynamics of ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dynamics of ... We report detailed simulation results on the formation ...

  11. Anomaly Detection in Dynamic Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turcotte, Melissa

    2014-10-14

    Anomaly detection in dynamic communication networks has many important security applications. These networks can be extremely large and so detecting any changes in their structure can be computationally challenging; hence, computationally fast, parallelisable methods for monitoring the network are paramount. For this reason the methods presented here use independent node and edge based models to detect locally anomalous substructures within communication networks. As a first stage, the aim is to detect changes in the data streams arising from node or edge communications. Throughout the thesis simple, conjugate Bayesian models for counting processes are used to model these data streams. A second stage of analysis can then be performed on a much reduced subset of the network comprising nodes and edges which have been identified as potentially anomalous in the first stage. The first method assumes communications in a network arise from an inhomogeneous Poisson process with piecewise constant intensity. Anomaly detection is then treated as a changepoint problem on the intensities. The changepoint model is extended to incorporate seasonal behavior inherent in communication networks. This seasonal behavior is also viewed as a changepoint problem acting on a piecewise constant Poisson process. In a static time frame, inference is made on this extended model via a Gibbs sampling strategy. In a sequential time frame, where the data arrive as a stream, a novel, fast Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) algorithm is introduced to sample from the sequence of posterior distributions of the change points over time. A second method is considered for monitoring communications in a large scale computer network. The usage patterns in these types of networks are very bursty in nature and don’t fit a Poisson process model. For tractable inference, discrete time models are considered, where the data are aggregated into discrete time periods and probability models are fitted to the

  12. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics | Argonne Leadership Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility reactive molecular dynamics Authors: Chris KnighT, Gerrick E. Lindberg, Gregory A. Voth Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data

  13. computational-fluid-dynamics-student-thesis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fluid Dynamics Student Thesis Abstract DEVELOPMENT OF A THREE-DIMENSIONAL SCOURING METHODOLOGY AND ITS IMPLEMENTATION IN A COMMERCIAL CFD CODE FOR OPEN CHANNEL FLOW OVER A FLOODED BRIDGE DECK The Computational Fluid Dynamics staff at TRACC is supporting three students from Northern Illinois University who are working for a Masters degree. The CFD staff is directing the thesis research and working with them on three projects: (1) a three-dimensional scour computation methodology for pressure flow

  14. Dynamic Fracture Simulations of Explosively Loaded Cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur, Carly W.; Goto, D. M.

    2015-11-30

    This report documents the modeling results of high explosive experiments investigating dynamic fracture of steel (AerMet® 100 alloy) cylinders. The experiments were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during 2007 to 2008 [10]. A principal objective of this study was to gain an understanding of dynamic material failure through the analysis of hydrodynamic computer code simulations. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional computational cylinder models were analyzed using the ALE3D multi-physics computer code.

  15. Protein Dynamics Hit the Big Screen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protein Dynamics Hit the Big Screen Protein Dynamics Hit the Big Screen Now playing at a supercomputer near you: proteins in action June 29, 2005 Contact: Dan Krotz, dakrotz@lbl.gov 06tyrosinekinasechanging.jpg This simulation of a tyrosine kinase reveals how the protein changes shape. Scientists from Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley are using one the world's most powerful computers to simulate how protein molecules move, rotate, and fold as they carry out life's most fundamental tasks.Although they

  16. Reliable Viscosity Calculation from Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulations: A Time Decomposition Method - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research July 7, 2015, Research Highlights Reliable Viscosity Calculation from Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulations: A Time Decomposition Method Schematic demonstration of the time decomposition method Scientific Achievement An equilibrium molecular dynamics-based computational method is developed and tested for the reliable calculation of viscosity. Significance and Impact Viscosity is one of the key properties

  17. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print Wednesday, 25 June 2008 00:00 At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the correlated motion of groups of self-assembled, outer-lying electrons in the extremely complex electronic system found in manganites. The manganite family of materials has puzzled physicists for years by defying standard models for the motion of

  18. Trace element partitioning in ashes from boilers firing pure wood or mixtures of solid waste with respect to fuel composition, chlorine content and temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saqib, Naeem Bäckström, Mattias

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Different solids waste incineration is discussed in grate fired and fluidized bed boilers. • We explained waste composition, temperature and chlorine effects on metal partitioning. • Excessive chlorine content can change oxide to chloride equilibrium partitioning the trace elements in fly ash. • Volatility increases with temperature due to increase in vapor pressure of metals and compounds. • In Fluidized bed boiler, most metals find themselves in fly ash, especially for wood incineration. - Abstract: Trace element partitioning in solid waste (household waste, industrial waste, waste wood chips and waste mixtures) incineration residues was investigated. Samples of fly ash and bottom ash were collected from six incineration facilities across Sweden including two grate fired and four fluidized bed incinerators, to have a variation in the input fuel composition (from pure biofuel to mixture of waste) and different temperature boiler conditions. As trace element concentrations in the input waste at the same facilities have already been analyzed, the present study focuses on the concentration of trace elements in the waste fuel, their distribution in the incineration residues with respect to chlorine content of waste and combustion temperature. Results indicate that Zn, Cu and Pb are dominating trace elements in the waste fuel. Highly volatile elements mercury and cadmium are mainly found in fly ash in all cases; 2/3 of lead also end up in fly ash while Zn, As and Sb show a large variation in distribution with most of them residing in the fly ash. Lithophilic elements such as copper and chromium are mainly found in bottom ash from grate fired facilities while partition mostly into fly ash from fluidized bed incinerators, especially for plants fuelled by waste wood or ordinary wood chips. There is no specific correlation between input concentration of an element in the waste fuel and fraction partitioned to fly ash. Temperature and chlorine

  19. Final Report: Computational Fluid Dynamics and Combustion Dynamics, February 15, 1995 - February 14, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colella, Phillip

    1998-09-22

    The HPCC Grand Challenge Project on Computational Fluid Dynamics and Combustion Dynamics focuses on the development of advanced numerical methodologies for modeling realistic engineering problems in combustion and other areas of fluid dynamics. The project was a collaboration between two DOE Laboratories (LBNL and LANL) and two universities (University of California, Berkeley, and New York University). In this document, we report on the work done under the UC Berkeley portion of the grant.

  20. Dynamic force matching: A method for constructing dynamical coarse-grained models with realistic time dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davtyan, Aram; Dama, James F.; Voth, Gregory A.; Andersen, Hans C.

    2015-04-21

    Coarse-grained (CG) models of molecular systems, with fewer mechanical degrees of freedom than an all-atom model, are used extensively in chemical physics. It is generally accepted that a coarse-grained model that accurately describes equilibrium structural properties (as a result of having a well constructed CG potential energy function) does not necessarily exhibit appropriate dynamical behavior when simulated using conservative Hamiltonian dynamics for the CG degrees of freedom on the CG potential energy surface. Attempts to develop accurate CG dynamic models usually focus on replacing Hamiltonian motion by stochastic but Markovian dynamics on that surface, such as Langevin or Brownian dynamics. However, depending on the nature of the system and the extent of the coarse-graining, a Markovian dynamics for the CG degrees of freedom may not be appropriate. In this paper, we consider the problem of constructing dynamic CG models within the context of the Multi-Scale Coarse-graining (MS-CG) method of Voth and coworkers. We propose a method of converting a MS-CG model into a dynamic CG model by adding degrees of freedom to it in the form of a small number of fictitious particles that interact with the CG degrees of freedom in simple ways and that are subject to Langevin forces. The dynamic models are members of a class of nonlinear systems interacting with special heat baths that were studied by Zwanzig [J. Stat. Phys. 9, 215 (1973)]. The properties of the fictitious particles can be inferred from analysis of the dynamics of all-atom simulations of the system of interest. This is analogous to the fact that the MS-CG method generates the CG potential from analysis of equilibrium structures observed in all-atom simulation data. The dynamic models generate a non-Markovian dynamics for the CG degrees of freedom, but they can be easily simulated using standard molecular dynamics programs. We present tests of this method on a series of simple examples that demonstrate that

  1. The Dynamic Analyzer for MPI: the first dynamic analyzer of MPI

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-10-31

    DAMPI is a dynamic testing/verification tool that scalably covers non-deterministic interactions of MPI (e.g., sildcard-receives).

  2. Dynamic Event Tree Analysis Through RAVEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Alfonsi; C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. A. Kinoshita; A. Naviglio

    2013-09-01

    Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics is not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (D-PRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed in a high modular and pluggable way in order to enable easy integration of different programming languages (i.e., C++, Python) and coupling with other application including the ones based on the MOOSE framework, developed by INL as well. RAVEN performs two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, RAVEN also models stochastic events, such as components failures, and performs uncertainty quantification. Such stochastic modeling is employed by using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This paper focuses on the first task and shows how it is possible to perform the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, the Dynamic PRA analysis, using Dynamic Event Tree, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out scenario is presented.

  3. A novel approach to neutron scattering instrumentation for probing multiscale dynamics in soft and biological matter

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mamontov, Eugene

    2016-06-29

    We present a concept and ray-tracing simulation results of a mechanical device that will enable inelastic neutron scattering measurements where the data at energy transfers from a few eV to several hundred meV can be collected in a single, gapless spectrum. Besides covering 5 orders of magnitude on the energy (time) scale, the device provides data over 2 orders of magnitude on the scattering momentum (length) scale in a single measurement. Such capabilities are geared primarily toward soft and biological matter, where the broad dynamical features of relaxation origin largely overlap with vibration features, thus necessitating gapless spectral coverage overmore » several orders of magnitude in time and space. Furthermore, neutron scattering experiments with such a device are performed with a fixed neutron final energy, which enables measurements, with neutron energy loss in the sample, at arbitrarily low temperatures over the same broad spectral range. Lastly, this capability is also invaluable in biological and soft matter research, as the variable temperature dependence of different relaxation components allows their separation in the scattering spectra as a function of temperature.« less

  4. Drama in Dynamics: Boom, Splash, and Speed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heather Marie Netzloff

    2004-12-19

    The full nature of chemistry and physics cannot be captured by static calculations alone. Dynamics calculations allow the simulation of time-dependent phenomena. This facilitates both comparisons with experimental data and the prediction and interpretation of details not easily obtainable from experiments. Simulations thus provide a direct link between theory and experiment, between microscopic details of a system and macroscopic observed properties. Many types of dynamics calculations exist. The most important distinction between the methods and the decision of which method to use can be described in terms of the size and type of molecule/reaction under consideration and the type and level of accuracy required in the final properties of interest. These considerations must be balanced with available computational codes and resources as simulations to mimic ''real-life'' may require many time steps. As indicated in the title, the theme of this thesis is dynamics. The goal is to utilize the best type of dynamics for the system under study while trying to perform dynamics in the most accurate way possible. As a quantum chemist, this involves some level of first principles calculations by default. Very accurate calculations of small molecules and molecular systems are now possible with relatively high-level ab initio quantum chemistry. For example, a quantum chemical potential energy surface (PES) can be developed ''on-the-fly'' with dynamic reaction path (DRP) methods. In this way a classical trajectory is developed without prior knowledge of the PES. In order to treat solvation processes and the condensed phase, large numbers of molecules are required, especially in predicting bulk behavior. The Effective Fragment Potential (EFP) method for solvation decreases the cost of a fully quantum mechanical calculation by dividing a chemical system into an ab initio region that contains the solute and an ''effective fragment'' region that contains the remaining solvent

  5. Computational simulation of dynamic impact problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muenz, T.W.; Rix, K.S.; Willam, K.J.

    1996-12-31

    Recent advances of computing methods make it possible to examine dynamic failure and complicated contact-impact load scenarios in time and space. The response simulation for these extreme load conditions needs to capture dynamic contact between the impactor and the deformable target and progressive failure in the target. Independently from the impact scenario, two basic approaches may be used to describe the failure process in an appropriate manner, namely the Discrete Failure Approach and the Smeared Failure Approach. In the contribution the dynamic impact of a pendulum test and the failure scenario in notched cylindrical specimens (Charpy-type IZOD test) are examined using the explicit dynamic finite element code DYNA3D. The study focuses on the question, whether the smeared crack approach is able to capture the dynamic failure process using von Mises plasticity with a plastic strain-based failure limiter. The computational results indicate that upon consistent mesh refinement the overall energy dissipation approaches the value observed in laboratory experiments.

  6. Hydrogen bond dynamics in bulk alcohols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinokita, Keisuke; Cunha, Ana V.; Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.

    2015-06-07

    Hydrogen-bonded liquids play a significant role in numerous chemical and biological phenomena. In the past decade, impressive developments in multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy and combined molecular dynamicsquantum mechanical simulation have established many intriguing features of hydrogen bond dynamics in one of the fundamental solvents in nature, water. The next class of a hydrogen-bonded liquidalcoholshas attracted much less attention. This is surprising given such important differences between water and alcohols as the imbalance between the number of hydrogen bonds, each molecule can accept (two) and donate (one) and the very presence of the hydrophobic group in alcohols. Here, we use polarization-resolved pump-probe and 2D infrared spectroscopy supported by extensive theoretical modeling to investigate hydrogen bond dynamics in methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol employing the OH stretching mode as a reporter. The sub-ps dynamics in alcohols are similar to those in water as they are determined by similar librational and hydrogen-bond stretch motions. However, lower density of hydrogen bond acceptors and donors in alcohols leads to the appearance of slow diffusion-controlled hydrogen bond exchange dynamics, which are essentially absent in water. We anticipate that the findings herein would have a potential impact on fundamental chemistry and biology as many processes in nature involve the interplay of hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups.

  7. "The gate-keepers in a changing world: integrating microbial diversity and dynamics with global change biology."

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessica L.M. Gutknecht and Kathryn M. Docherty

    2011-11-01

    Microorganisms (Bacteria, Archaea and Fungi) are the gate-keepers of many ecosystem-scale biogeochemical cycles. Although there have been measurable changes in ecosystem function due to human activities such as greenhouse gas production, nutrient loading, land-use change, and water consumption, few studies have connected microbial community dynamics with these changes in ecosystem function. Specifically, very little is known about how global changes will induce important functional changes in microbial biodiversity. Even less is known about how microbial functional changes could alter rates of nutrient cycling or whether microbial communities have enough functional redundancy that changes will have little impact on overall process rates. The proposed symposium will provide an overview of this emerging research area, with emphasis on linking the microorganisms directly to important ecological functions under the influence of global change dynamics. The session will include both broad overviews as well as specific case-studies by researchers who examine microbial communities from a variety of taxonomic levels and from various environments. The session will begin broadly, with speakers discussing how microbial communities may inform ecosystem-scale global change studies, and help to make microbial ecological knowledge more tangible for a broad range of ecologists. The session will continue with case studies of microbial community information informing process in global change experiments. Finally, the session will close with speakers discussing how microbial community information might fit into global change models, and what types of information are useful for future studies. We have requested that speakers particularly incorporate their views on what types of microbial data is useful and informative in the context of larger ecosystem processes. We foresee that this session could serve as a focal point for global change microbial ecologists to meet and discuss their

  8. CAB-DWTM for 5 μm trace-width deposition of solar cell metallization top-contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Justin Hoey; Drew Thompson; Matt Robinson; Zakaria Mahmud; Orven F. Swenson; Iskander S. Akhatov; Douglas L. Schulz

    2009-06-08

    This paper reviews methods for creating solar cell grid contacts and explores how cell efficiency can be increased using CAB-DW{trademark}. Specifically, the efficiency of p-i-n structure solar cells built in-house with 90 {micro}m sputtered lines and 5 {micro}m CAB-DW lines were compared. Preliminary results of the comparison show a marked improvement in solar cell efficiency using CAB-DW. In addition to this, a theoretical and experimental analysis of the dynamics of particle impaction on a substrate (i.e. whether particle stick or bounce) will be discussed including how this analysis may lead to further improvement of CAB-DW.

  9. Current scaling of axially radiated power in dynamic hohlraums and dynamic hohlraum load design for ZR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mock, Raymond Cecil; Nash, Thomas J.; Sanford, Thomas W. L.

    2007-03-01

    We present designs for dynamic hohlraum z-pinch loads on the 28 MA, 140 ns driver ZR. The scaling of axially radiated power with current in dynamic hohlraums is reviewed. With adequate stability on ZR this scaling indicates that 30 TW of axially radiated power should be possible. The performance of the dynamic hohlraum load on the 20 MA, 100 ns driver Z is extensively reviewed. The baseline z-pinch load on Z is a nested tungsten wire array imploding onto on-axis foam. Data from a variety of x-ray diagnostics fielded on Z are presented. These diagnostics include x-ray diodes, bolometers, fast x-ray imaging cameras, and crystal spectrometers. Analysis of these data indicates that the peak dynamic radiation temperature on Z is between 250 and 300 eV from a diameter less than 1 mm. Radiation from the dynamic hohlraum itself or from a radiatively driven pellet within the dynamic hohlraum has been used to probe a variety of matter associated with the dynamic hohlraum: the tungsten z-pinch itself, tungsten sliding across the end-on apertures, a titanium foil over the end aperture, and a silicon aerogel end cap. Data showing the existence of asymmetry in radiation emanating from the two ends of the dynamic hohlraum is presented, along with data showing load configurations that mitigate this asymmetry. 1D simulations of the dynamic hohlraum implosion are presented and compared to experimental data. The simulations provide insight into the dynamic hohlraum behavior but are not necessarily a reliable design tool because of the inherently 3D behavior of the imploding nested tungsten wire arrays.

  10. DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications DLFM library tools for large scale dynamic applications Large scale Python and other dynamic applications may spend huge time at startup. The DLFM library, developed by Mike Davis at Cray, Inc., is a set of functions that can be incorporated into a dynamically-linked application to provide improved performance during the loading of dynamic libraries when running the application at large scale on Edison. To access this library, do module

  11. API Requirements for Dynamic Graph Prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallagher, B; Eliassi-Rad, T

    2006-10-13

    Given a large-scale time-evolving multi-modal and multi-relational complex network (a.k.a., a large-scale dynamic semantic graph), we want to implement algorithms that discover patterns of activities on the graph and learn predictive models of those discovered patterns. This document outlines the application programming interface (API) requirements for fast prototyping of feature extraction, learning, and prediction algorithms on large dynamic semantic graphs. Since our algorithms must operate on large-scale dynamic semantic graphs, we have chosen to use the graph API developed in the CASC Complex Networks Project. This API is supported on the back end by a semantic graph database (developed by Scott Kohn and his team). The advantages of using this API are (i) we have full-control of its development and (ii) the current API meets almost all of the requirements outlined in this document.

  12. A study of the HEB longitudinal dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, D.J.

    1993-12-01

    A study of the High Energy Booster (HEB) longitudinal dynamics is presented. Full derivations of ramp dependent longitudinal variables are given. The formulas assume that the input magnetic field and beam longitudinal emittance are known as a function of time, and that either the rf voltage or the rf bucket area are known as a function of time. Once these three inputs are specified, the formulas can be used to calculate values for all other longitudinal dynamics variables. The formulas have been incorporated into a single computer code named ELVIRA: Evaluation of Longitudinal Variables in Relativistic Accelerators. The ELVIRA code is documented here in detail. The ELVIRA code is used under two initial longitudinal emittance assumptions to plot ramp functions for the longitudinal dynamics design of the HEB as of May 5, 1992.

  13. Dynamic procedure for filtered gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morel, P.; Banon Navarro, A.; Albrecht-Marc, M.; Carati, D.; Merz, F.; Goerler, T.; Jenko, F.

    2012-01-15

    Large eddy simulations (LES) of gyrokinetic plasma turbulence are investigated as interesting candidates to decrease the computational cost. A dynamic procedure is implemented in the gene code, allowing for dynamic optimization of the free parameters of the LES models (setting the amplitudes of dissipative terms). Employing such LES methods, one recovers the free energy and heat flux spectra obtained from highly resolved direct numerical simulations. Systematic comparisons are performed for different values of the temperature gradient and magnetic shear, parameters which are of prime importance in ion temperature gradient driven turbulence. Moreover, the degree of anisotropy of the problem, which can vary with parameters, can be adapted dynamically by the method that shows gyrokinetic large eddy simulation to be a serious candidate to reduce numerical cost of gyrokinetic solvers.

  14. The Challenges to Coupling Dynamic Geospatial Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, N

    2006-06-23

    Many applications of modeling spatial dynamic systems focus on a single system and a single process, ignoring the geographic and systemic context of the processes being modeled. A solution to this problem is the coupled modeling of spatial dynamic systems. Coupled modeling is challenging for both technical reasons, as well as conceptual reasons. This paper explores the benefits and challenges to coupling or linking spatial dynamic models, from loose coupling, where information transfer between models is done by hand, to tight coupling, where two (or more) models are merged as one. To illustrate the challenges, a coupled model of Urbanization and Wildfire Risk is presented. This model, called Vesta, was applied to the Santa Barbara, California region (using real geospatial data), where Urbanization and Wildfires occur and recur, respectively. The preliminary results of the model coupling illustrate that coupled modeling can lead to insight into the consequences of processes acting on their own.

  15. Pion optical potential with Δ dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karaoglu, B.; Moniz, Ernest J.

    1986-03-01

    A pion optical potential is constructed which incorporates the Δ dynamics found to be important in Δ-hole analyses of pion scattering from light nuclei. These dynamics include Δ propagation, binding and Pauli blocking, and a Δ spreading potential. We employ a local density approximation for the medium-modified Δ propagator, resulting in a computationally flexible tool for the analysis of pion-nucleus data. We reproduce the Δ-hole results for π-16O scattering satisfactorily. Elastic π±-208Pb scattering is described very well with the same strongly damping spreading potential found for light nuclei. The pion wave functions in the medium are substantially modified by the Δ dynamics.

  16. Application of optimal prediction to molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber IV, John Letherman

    2004-12-01

    Optimal prediction is a general system reduction technique for large sets of differential equations. In this method, which was devised by Chorin, Hald, Kast, Kupferman, and Levy, a projection operator formalism is used to construct a smaller system of equations governing the dynamics of a subset of the original degrees of freedom. This reduced system consists of an effective Hamiltonian dynamics, augmented by an integral memory term and a random noise term. Molecular dynamics is a method for simulating large systems of interacting fluid particles. In this thesis, I construct a formalism for applying optimal prediction to molecular dynamics, producing reduced systems from which the properties of the original system can be recovered. These reduced systems require significantly less computational time than the original system. I initially consider first-order optimal prediction, in which the memory and noise terms are neglected. I construct a pair approximation to the renormalized potential, and ignore three-particle and higher interactions. This produces a reduced system that correctly reproduces static properties of the original system, such as energy and pressure, at low-to-moderate densities. However, it fails to capture dynamical quantities, such as autocorrelation functions. I next derive a short-memory approximation, in which the memory term is represented as a linear frictional force with configuration-dependent coefficients. This allows the use of a Fokker-Planck equation to show that, in this regime, the noise is {delta}-correlated in time. This linear friction model reproduces not only the static properties of the original system, but also the autocorrelation functions of dynamical variables.

  17. Adaptive Dynamic Event Tree in RAVEN code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Mandelli, Diego; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph; Kinoshita, Robert Arthur

    2014-11-01

    RAVEN is a software tool that is focused on performing statistical analysis of stochastic dynamic systems. RAVEN has been designed in a high modular and pluggable way in order to enable easy integration of different programming languages (i.e., C++, Python) and coupling with other applications (system codes). Among the several capabilities currently present in RAVEN, there are five different sampling strategies: Monte Carlo, Latin Hyper Cube, Grid, Adaptive and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) sampling methodologies. The scope of this paper is to present a new sampling approach, currently under definition and implementation: an evolution of the DET me

  18. Relaxation dynamics in correlated quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andergassen, S.; Schuricht, D.; Pletyukhov, M.; Schoeller, H.

    2014-12-04

    We study quantum many-body effects on the real-time evolution of the current through quantum dots. By using a non-equilibrium renormalization group approach, we provide analytic results for the relaxation dynamics into the stationary state and identify the microscopic cutoff scales that determine the transport rates. We find rich non-equilibrium physics induced by the interplay of the different energy scales. While the short-time limit is governed by universal dynamics, the long-time behavior features characteristic oscillations as well as an interplay of exponential and power-law decay.

  19. Dynamic analysis of tension-leg platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    The dynamic response of tension-leg platforms subjected to wave loading was investigated using a deterministic dynamic analysis. The model employed in this study is based on coupled nonlinear stiffness coefficients and closed form inertia and drag forcing functions derived using Morison's equation. The forcing functions include relative motion behavior between the fluid particles and the structure. These forcing functions are integrated manually thereby avoiding the need for expensive numerical integration. A set of coupled nonlinear differential equations was integrated sequentially in the time domain using the Newmark beta-method. A computer program was developed to simulate the time history response of the platform motion.

  20. VUV studies of molecular photofragmentation dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, M.G.

    1993-12-01

    State-resolved, photoion and photoelectron methods are used to study the neutral fragmentation and ionization dynamics of small molecules relevant to atmospheric and combustion chemistry. Photodissociation and ionization are initiated by coherent VUV radiation and the fragmentation dynamics are extracted from measurements of product rovibronic state distributions, kinetic energies and angular distributions. The general aim of these studies is to investigate the multichannel interactions between the electronic and nuclear motions which determine the evolution of the photoexcited {open_quotes}complex{close_quotes} into the observed asymptotic channels.