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Sample records for numerous basaltic lava

  1. Petrography, age, and paleomagnetism of basalt lava flows in coreholes Well 80, NRF 89-04, NRF 89-05, and ICPP 123, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanphere, M.A.; Champion, D.E.; Kuntz, M.A.

    1993-12-31

    The petrography, age, and paleomagnetism were determined on basalt from 23 lava flows comprising about 1200 feet of core from four coreholes in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (ML). The four coreholes are located in the southwestern part of the INEL. Paleomagnetic measurements were made on 192 samples of basalt, and K-Ar ages were measured on 19 basalt samples. All of the samples have normal magnetic polarity and were erupted during the Brunhes Normal Polarity Epoch. Basalt lava flows in ICPP 123 can be satisfactorily correlated with lava flows in the previously studied corehole at Site E, but correlations cannot be made with confidence between ICPP 123 and the other three coreholes studied in this investigation.

  2. Analytical-Numerical Modeling Of Komatiite Lava Emplacement And...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    submarine tuff. Flow distances must have been long (tens to hundreds of kilometers) and flow volumes must have been very high (hundreds to thousands of km3). Lava...

  3. Petrography, age, and paleomagnetism of basaltic lava flows in coreholes at Test Area North (TAN), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanphere, M.A.; Champion, D.E.; Kuntz, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    The petrography, age, and paleomagnetism were determined on basalt from 21 lava flows comprising about 1,700 feet of core from two coreholes (TAN CH No. 1 and TAN CH No. 2) in the Test Area North (TAN) area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Paleomagnetic studies were made on two additional cores from shallow coreholes in the TAN area. K-Ar ages and paleomagnetism also were determined on nearby surface outcrops of Circular Butte. Paleomagnetic measurements were made on 416 samples from four coreholes and on a single site in surface lava flows of Circular Butte. K-Ar ages were measured on 9 basalt samples from TAN CH No. 1 and TAN CH No. 2 and one sample from Circular Butte. K-Ar ages ranged from 1.044 Ma to 2.56 Ma. All of the samples have reversed magnetic polarity and were erupted during the Matuyama Reversed Polarity Epoch. The purpose of investigations was to develop a three-dimensional stratigraphic framework for geologic and hydrologic studies including potential volcanic hazards to facilities at the INEL and movement of radionuclides in the Snake River Plain aquifer.

  4. Basaltic island sand provenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsaglia, K.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The Hawaiian Islands are an ideal location to study basaltic sand provenance in that they are a series of progressively older basaltic shield volcanoes with arid to humid microclimates. Sixty-two sand samples were collected from beaches on the islands of Hawaii, Maui, Oahu and Kauai and petrographically analyzed. The major sand components are calcareous bioclasts, volcanic lithic fragments, and monomineralic grains of dense minerals and plagioclase. Proportions of these components vary from island to island, with bioclastic end members being more prevalent on older islands exhibiting well-developed fringing reef systems and volcanic end members more prevalent on younger, volcanically active islands. Climatic variations across the island of Hawaii are reflected in the percentage of weathered detritus, which is greater on the wetter, northern side of the island. The groundmass of glassy, basaltic lithics is predominantly black tachylite, with lesser brown sideromelane; microlitic and lathwork textures are more common than holohyaline vitric textures. Other common basaltic volcanic lithic fragments are holocrystalline aggregates of silt-sized pyroxene or olivine, opaque minerals and plagioclase. Sands derived from alkalic lavas are texturally and compositionally indistinguishable from sands derived from tholeiitic lavas. Although Hawaiian basaltic sands overlap in composition with magmatic arc-derived sands in terms of their relative QFL, QmPK and LmLvLs percentages, they are dissimilar in that they lack felsic components and are more enriched in lathwork volcanic lithic fragments, holocrystalline volcanic lithic fragments, and dense minerals.

  5. Lava Dome | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Horst and Graben Shield Volcano Flat Lava Dome Stratovolcano Cinder Cone Caldera Depression Resurgent Dome Complex "Volcanic or lava domes are formed by relatively small,...

  6. Composition and isotopic constraints on the petrogenesis of alkaline arc lavas: Lihir Island, Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, A.K.; Hart, S.R.; Frey, F.A. )

    1990-05-10

    The SiO{sub 2}-undersaturated lavas from Lihir island, Papua New Guinea, like most arc lavas are highly enriched in Sr, Ba, K, Rb, and Cc and depleted in Hf, Ta, Nb, and Ti relative to ocean floor basalts and oceanic island basalts. These alkali-rich lavas have arc trace element signatures and Nd, Sr, and Pb isotopic systematics. However, they are not a product of present-day subduction, as this volcanism has tapped mantle which was enriched by prior subduction episodes. The narrow range of Pb isotopic compositions suggest a cogenetic origin for these lavas. During the fractionation of the primitive Lihir lavas, elements normally considered incompatible (i.e., the light rare earth elements (LREE), Rb, Th, and P) have high bulk solid/melt partition coefficients (0.15-1.5). Relatively higher partition coefficients during formation of the evolved lavas produced crossing rare earth element (REE) patterns, and primitive lavas have higher incompatible elements abundances than evolved lavas. The Lihir lavas have lower alkali, Sr, Ba, K, Rb, Cs, and LREE abundances than other Tabar-Feni lavas. They are derived from a less enriched mantle source rather than by a higher degree of melting of a source similar to that of the other islands. The similarity of Sm/Nd ratios of these undersaturated arc lavas to those of tholeiitic and calc-alkaline arc lavas and the moderate chondrite-normalized La/Yb (la/Yb{sub cn} = 3-7) indicates that there has been limited enrichment of the LREE relative to the heavy REE during generation of the arc-modified source mantle. The alkaline nature of these lavas reflects their generation, in a tensional tectonic environment, from a fossil arc mantle region that has undergone extreme arc enrichment of alkali and alkaline earth elements during two earlier subduction episodes.

  7. Lava Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lava Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lava Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Lava Hot...

  8. Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    How can a prehistoric volcanic eruption help us reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere today? The answer is found in the basalt formations created by the lava – formations that can be used as sites for injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from industrial sources in a process called carbon capture and storage. The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership recently injected 1,000 metric tons of CO2 into the Grande Ronde Basalt Formation in eastern Washington. This first-of-its kind injection is part of research meant to determine if basalt formations could provide a long-term solution for storing CO2, a potent greenhouse gas.

  9. Lava Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lava Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Lava Hot Springs...

  10. Injection and Monitoring at the Wallula Basalt Pilot Project

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McGrail, B. Peter; Spane, Frank A.; Amonette, James E.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-01-01

    Continental flood basalts represent one of the largest geologic structures on earth but have received comparatively little attention for geologic storage of CO2. Flood basalt lava flows have flow tops that are porous, permeable, and have large potential capacity for storage of CO2. In appropriate geologic settings, interbedded sediment layers and dense low-permeability basalt rock flow interior sections may act as effective seals allowing time for mineralization reactions to occur. Previous laboratory experiments showed the relatively rapid chemical reaction of CO2-saturated pore water with basalts to form stable carbonate minerals. However, recent laboratory tests with water-saturated supercritical CO2 show thatmore » mineralization reactions occur in this phase as well, providing a second and potentially more important mineralization pathway than was previously understood. Field testing of these concepts is proceeding with drilling of the world’s first supercritical CO2 injection well in flood basalt being completed in May 2009 near the township of Wallula in Washington State and corresponding CO2 injection permit granted by the State of Washington in March 2011. Injection of a nominal 1000 MT of CO2 was completed in August 2013 and site monitoring is in progress. Well logging conducted immediately after injection termination confirmed the presence of CO2 predominantly within the upper flow top region, and showed no evidence of vertical CO2 migration outside the well casing. Shallow soil gas samples collected around the injection well show no evidence of leakage and fluid and gas samples collected from the injection zone show strongly elevated concentrations of Ca, Mg, Mn, and Fe and 13C/18O isotopic shifts that are consistent with basalt-water chemical reactions. If proven viable by this field test and others that are in progress or being planned, major flood basalts in the U.S., India, and perhaps Australia would provide significant additional CO2 storage

  11. Injection and Monitoring at the Wallula Basalt Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrail, B. Peter; Spane, Frank A.; Amonette, James E.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-01-01

    Continental flood basalts represent one of the largest geologic structures on earth but have received comparatively little attention for geologic storage of CO2. Flood basalt lava flows have flow tops that are porous, permeable, and have large potential capacity for storage of CO2. In appropriate geologic settings, interbedded sediment layers and dense low-permeability basalt rock flow interior sections may act as effective seals allowing time for mineralization reactions to occur. Previous laboratory experiments showed the relatively rapid chemical reaction of CO2-saturated pore water with basalts to form stable carbonate minerals. However, recent laboratory tests with water-saturated supercritical CO2 show that mineralization reactions occur in this phase as well, providing a second and potentially more important mineralization pathway than was previously understood. Field testing of these concepts is proceeding with drilling of the world’s first supercritical CO2 injection well in flood basalt being completed in May 2009 near the township of Wallula in Washington State and corresponding CO2 injection permit granted by the State of Washington in March 2011. Injection of a nominal 1000 MT of CO2 was completed in August 2013 and site monitoring is in progress. Well logging conducted immediately after injection termination confirmed the presence of CO2 predominantly within the upper flow top region, and showed no evidence of vertical CO2 migration outside the well casing. Shallow soil gas samples collected around the injection well show no evidence of leakage and fluid and gas samples collected from the injection zone show strongly elevated concentrations of Ca, Mg, Mn, and Fe and 13C/18O isotopic shifts that are consistent with basalt-water chemical reactions. If proven viable by this field test and others that are in progress or being planned, major flood basalts in the U.S., India, and perhaps Australia would provide significant additional CO2 storage capacity

  12. Seismic Structure And Seismicity Of The Cooling Lava Lake Of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of The Cooling Lava Lake Of Kilauea Iki, Hawaii Abstract The use of multiple methods is indispensable for the determination of the seismic properties of a complex body...

  13. Laboratory Shock Experiments on Basalt - Iron Sulfate Mixes at...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Laboratory Shock Experiments on Basalt - Iron Sulfate Mixes at 40 - 50 GPa and their ... Title: Laboratory Shock Experiments on Basalt - Iron Sulfate Mixes at 40 - 50 GPa and ...

  14. Equilibration of Leachants with Basalt Rock for Repository Simulation Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2001-07-02

    In a nuclear waste repository in basalt, the groundwater will have a low redox potential (Eh) which may affect the leach rate of SRP waste glass. Accurate laboratory simulations of conditions in a basalt reposition must maintain low Eh values throughout the course of the experiment. In this report, important parameters affecting the ability of basalt to maintain appropriate Eh-pH conditions are examined, in particular basalt type and groundwater simulation.

  15. A Pliocene Shoaling Basaltic Seamount- Ba Volcanic Group At Rakiraki...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    or temporary storage in shoreline or shallow water environments prior to redeposition. Red, oxidised lava and scoria clasts in bedded breccia and conglomerate also imply that the...

  16. Combined U-Th/He and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of post-shield lavas from the Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aciego, S.M.; Jourdan, F.; DePaolo, D.J.; Kennedy, B.M.; Renne, P.R.; Sims, K.W.W.

    2009-10-01

    Late Quaternary, post-shield lavas from the Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes on the Big Island of Hawaii have been dated using the {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar and U-Th/He methods. The objective of the study is to compare the recently demonstrated U-Th/He age method, which uses basaltic olivine phenocrysts, with {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages measured on groundmass from the same samples. As a corollary, the age data also increase the precision of the chronology of volcanism on the Big Island. For the U-Th/He ages, U, Th and He concentrations and isotopes were measured to account for U-series disequilibrium and initial He. Single analyses U-Th/He ages for Hamakua lavas from Mauna Kea are 87 {+-} 40 ka to 119 {+-} 23 ka (2{sigma} uncertainties), which are in general equal to or younger than {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages. Basalt from the Polulu sequence on Kohala gives a U-Th/He age of 354 {+-} 54 ka and a {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age of 450 {+-} 40 ka. All of the U-Th/He ages, and all but one spurious {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages conform to the previously proposed stratigraphy and published {sup 14}C and K-Ar ages. The ages also compare favorably to U-Th whole rock-olivine ages calculated from {sup 238}U - {sup 230}Th disequilibria. The U-Th/He and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar results agree best where there is a relatively large amount of radiogenic {sup 40}Ar (>10%), and where the {sup 40}Ar/{sup 36}Ar intercept calculated from the Ar isochron diagram is close to the atmospheric value. In two cases, it is not clear why U-Th/He and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages do not agree within uncertainty. U-Th/He and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar results diverge the most on a low-K transitional tholeiitic basalt with abundant olivine. For the most alkalic basalts with negligible olivine phenocrysts, U-Th/He ages were unattainable while {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar results provide good precision even on ages as low as 19 {+-} 4 ka. Hence, the strengths and weaknesses of the U-Th/He and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar methods are

  17. Physical Constraints on Geologic CO2 Sequestration in Low-Volume Basalt Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan M. Pollyea; Jerry P. Fairley; Robert K. Podgorney; Travis L. McLing

    2014-03-01

    Deep basalt formations within large igneous provinces have been proposed as target reservoirs for carbon capture and sequestration on the basis of favorable CO2-water-rock reaction kinetics that suggest carbonate mineralization rates on the order of 102103 d. Although these results are encouraging, there exists much uncertainty surrounding the influence of fracture-controlled reservoir heterogeneity on commercial-scale CO2 injections in basalt formations. This work investigates the physical response of a low-volume basalt reservoir to commercial-scale CO2 injections using a Monte Carlo numerical modeling experiment such that model variability is solely a function of spatially distributed reservoir heterogeneity. Fifty equally probable reservoirs are simulated using properties inferred from the deep eastern Snake River Plain aquifer in southeast Idaho, and CO2 injections are modeled within each reservoir for 20 yr at a constant mass rate of 21.6 kg s1. Results from this work suggest that (1) formation injectivity is generally favorable, although injection pressures in excess of the fracture gradient were observed in 4% of the simulations; (2) for an extensional stress regime (as exists within the eastern Snake River Plain), shear failure is theoretically possible for optimally oriented fractures if Sh is less than or equal to 0.70SV; and (3) low-volume basalt reservoirs exhibit sufficient CO2 confinement potential over a 20 yr injection program to accommodate mineral trapping rates suggested in the literature.

  18. Repository site definition in basalt: Pasco Basin, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzowski, R.V.; Nimick, F.B.; Muller, A.B.

    1982-03-01

    Discussion of the regional setting, geology, hydrology, and geochemistry of the Pasco Basin are included in this report. Pasco basin is a structural and topographic basin of approximately 2000 mi/sup 2/ (5180 km/sup 2/) located within the Yakima Fold Belt Subprovince of the Columbia Plateau. The stratigraphic sequence within the basin consists of an undetermined thickness of lower Miocene and younger flood basalts with interbedded and overlying sedimentary units. This sequence rests upon a basement of probably diverse rock types that may range in age from precambrian through early Tertiary. Although a large amount of information is available on the hydrology of the unconfined aquifer system, ground-water flow within the basin is, in general, poorly understood. Recharge areas for the Mabton interbed and the Saddle Mountains Formation are the highlands surrounding the basin with the flow for these units toward Gable Butte - Gable Mountain and Lake Wallula. Gable Butte - Gable Mountain probably is a ground-water sink, although the vertical flow direction in this zone is uncertain. The amount of upward vertical leakage from the Saddle Mountains Formation into the overlying sediments or to the Columbia River is unknown. Units underlying the Mabton interbed may have a flow scheme similar to those higher units or a flow scheme dominated by interbasin flow. Upward vertical leakage either throughout the basin, dominantly to the Columbia River, or dominantly to Lake Wallula has been proposed for the discharge of the lower units. None of these proposals is verified. The lateral and vertical distribution of major and minor ions in solution, Eh and pH, and ion exchange between basalt and ground-water are not well defined for the basin. Changes in the redox potential from the level of the subsurface facility to the higher stratigraphic levels along with the numerous other factors influencing K/sub d/, result in a poor understanding of the retardation process.

  19. The Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain: Hotspot volcanism with mid-ocean ridge basalt affinity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desonie, D.L.; Duncan, R.A. )

    1990-08-10

    Cobb hotspot, currently located beneath Axial seamount on the Juan de Fuca ridge, has the temporal but not the isotopic characteristics usually attributed to a mantle plume. The earlier volcanic products of the hotspot, form eight volcanoes in the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount (CES) chain, show a westward age progression away from the hotspot and a westward increase in the age difference between the seamounts and the crust on which they formed. These results are consistent with movement of the Pacific plate over a fixed Cobb hotspot and eventual encroachment by the westwardly migrating Juan de Fuca ridge. CES lavas are slightly enriched in alkalies and incompatible elements relative to those of the Juan de Fuca ridge but they have Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions virtually identical to those found along the ridge. Therefore, Cobb hotspot is a stationary, upper mantle melting anomaly whose volcanic products show strong mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) affinity. These observations can be explained by low degrees of partial melting of entrained heterogeneous upper mantle MORB source material within a thermally driven lower mantle diapir or by an intrinsic MORB-like composition of the deeper mantle source region from which northeast Pacific plumes rise.

  20. Shock Experiments on Basalt - Ferric Sulfate Mixes at 21 GPa...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Shock Experiments on Basalt - Ferric Sulfate Mixes at 21 GPa ; 49 GPa and their Relevance to Martian Meteorite Impact Glasses Authors: Rao, M.N. ; Ross, D.K. ; See, T.H. ; ...

  1. Insulation from basaltic stamp sand. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, F. D.

    1981-04-01

    A Midwest Appropriate Technology Grant was awarded to determine the technical and economic feasibility of producing mineral-fiber insulation directly from extensive deposits of basaltic sand produced during former mining and milling operations in the Keweenaw Peninsula region of Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The amounts of local basaltic sands available and representative chemical compositions were determined. The variation of viscosity with temperature and chemical composition was estimated. Samples were melted and either pulled or blown into fiber. In all cases fiber could be made with a reasonable tensile strength to ensure usefulness. It was concluded that it was technically feasible to produce fibers from basaltic stamp sands of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. A technical feasibility study using published data, a cost and design analysis of a basalt fiber production plant, a market survey of fiber needs, and an economic analysis for investing in a basalt fiber venture was undertaken. These studies concluded that the local production of basaltic insulation was both feasible and economically reasonable. It was suggested that the plant be located in a region of greater population density with lower utility costs. A representative one-third of these studies is included as appendices A, B, C, and D.

  2. Breakthroughs in Seismic and Borehole Characterization of Basalt Sequestration Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, E. C.; Hardage, Bob A.; McGrail, B. Peter; Davis, Klarissa N.

    2011-04-01

    Mafic continental flood basalts form a globally important, but under-characterized CO2 sequestration target. The Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) in the northwestern U.S. is up to 5 km thick and covers over 168,000 km2. In India, flood basalts are 3 km thick and cover greater than 500,000 km2. Laboratory experiments demonstrate that the CRBG and other basalts react with formation water and super critical (sc) CO2 to precipitate carbonates, thus adding a potential mineral trapping mechanism to the standard trapping mechanisms of most other types of CO2 sequestration reservoirs. Brecciated tops of individual basalt flows in the CRBG form regional aquifers that locally have greater than 30% porosity and three Darcies of permeability. Porous flow tops are potential sites for sequestration of gigatons of scCO2 in areas where the basalts contain unpotable water and are at depths greater than 800 m. In this paper we report on the U.S. DOE Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership surface seismic and borehole geophysical characterization that supports a field test of capacity, integrity, and geochemical reactivity of CRBG reservoirs in eastern Washington, U.S.A. Traditional surface seismic methods have had little success in imaging basalt features in on-shore areas where the basalt is thinly covered by sediment. Processing of the experimental 6.5 km, 5 line 3C seismic swath included constructing an elastic wavefield model, identifying and separating seismic wave modes, and processing the swath as a single 2D line. Important findings include: (1) a wide variety of shear wave energy modes swamp the P-wave seismic records; (2) except at very short geophone offsets, ground roll overprints P-wave signal; and (3) because of extreme velocity contrasts, P-wave events are refracted at incidence angles greater than 7-15 degrees. Subsequent removal of S-wave and other noise during processing resulted in tremendous improvement in image quality. The application of wireline

  3. Preliminary Hydrogeologic Characterization Results from the Wallula Basalt Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.P. McGrail; E. C. Sullivan; F. A. Spane; D. H. Bacon; G. Hund; P. D. Thorne; C. J. Thompson; S. P. Reidel; F. S. Colwell

    2009-12-01

    The DOE's Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership has completed drilling the first continental flood basalt sequestration pilot borehole to a total depth (TD) of 4,110 feet on the Boise White Paper Mill property at Wallula, Washington. Site suitability was assessed prior to drilling by the 2007-2008 acquisition, processing and analysis of a four-mile, five-line three component seismic swath, which was processed as a single data-dense line. Analysis of the seismic survey data indicated a composite basalt formation thickness of {approx}8,000 feet and absence of major geologic structures (i.e., faults) along the line imaged by the seismic swath. Drilling of Wallula pilot borehole was initiated on January 13, 2009 and reached TD on April 6, 2009. Based on characterization results obtained during drilling, three basalt breccia zones were identified between the depth interval of 2,716 and 2,910 feet, as being suitable injection reservoir for a subsequent CO2 injection pilot study. The targeted injection reservoir lies stratigraphically below the massive Umtanum Member of the Grande Ronde Basalt, whose flow-interior section possesses regionally recognized low-permeability characteristics. The identified composite injection zone reservoir provides a unique and attractive opportunity to scientifically study the reservoir behavior of three inter-connected reservoir intervals below primary and secondary caprock confining zones. Drill cuttings, wireline geophysical logs, and 31one-inch diameter rotary sidewall cores provided geologic data for characterization of rock properties. XRF analyses of selected rock samples provided geochemical characterizations of the rocks and stratigraphic control for the basalt flows encountered by the Wallula pilot borehole. Based on the geochemical results, the pilot borehole was terminated in the Wapshilla Ridge 1 flow of the Grande Ronde Basalt Formation. Detailed hydrologic test characterizations of 12 basalt interflow reservoir

  4. Nuclear waste package materials testing report: basaltic and tuffaceous environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, D.J.; Coles, D.G.; Hodges, F.N.; McVay, G.L.; Westerman, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The disposal of high-level nuclear wastes in underground repositories in the continental United States requires the development of a waste package that will contain radionuclides for a time period commensurate with performance criteria, which may be up to 1000 years. This report addresses materials testing in support of a waste package for a basalt (Hanford, Washington) or a tuff (Nevada Test Site) repository. The materials investigated in this testing effort were: sodium and calcium bentonites and mixtures with sand or basalt as a backfill; iron and titanium-based alloys as structural barriers; and borosilicate waste glass PNL 76-68 as a waste form. The testing also incorporated site-specific rock media and ground waters: Reference Umtanum Entablature-1 basalt and reference basalt ground water, Bullfrog tuff and NTS J-13 well water. The results of the testing are discussed in four major categories: Backfill Materials: emphasizing water migration, radionuclide migration, physical property and long-term stability studies. Structural Barriers: emphasizing uniform corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical testing. Waste Form Release Characteristics: emphasizing ground water, sample surface area/solution volume ratio, and gamma radiolysis effects. Component Compatibility: emphasizing solution/rock, glass/rock, glass/structural barrier, and glass/backfill interaction tests. This area also includes sensitivity testing to determine primary parameters to be studied, and the results of systems tests where more than two waste package components were combined during a single test.

  5. Basalt Waste Isolation Project. Annual report, fiscal year 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    During this fiscal year the information available in the fields of geology and hydrology of the Columbia Plateau was consolidated and two reports were issued summarizing this information. In addition, the information on engineered barriers was consolidated and a report summarizing the research to date on waste package development and design of borehole seals was prepared. The waste package studies, when combined with the hydrologic integration, revealed that even under extreme disruptive conditions, a repository in basalt with appropriately designed waste packages can serve as an excellent barrier for containment of radionuclides for the long periods of time required for waste isolation. On July 1, 1980, the first two heater tests at the Near-Surface Test Facility were started and have been successfully operated to this date. The papers on the Near-Surface Test Facility section of this report present the results of the equipment installed and the preliminary results of the testing. In October 1979, the US Department of Energy selected the joint venture of Kaiser Engineers/Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade and Douglas, Inc., to be the architect-engineer to produce a conceptual design of a repository in basalt. During the year, this design has progressed and concept selection has now been completed. This annual report presents a summary of the highlights of the work completed during fiscal year 1980. It is intended to supplement and summarize the nearly 200 papers and reports that have been distributed to date as a part of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project studies.

  6. Engineered barrier development for a nuclear waste repository in basalt: an integration of current knowledge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.J.

    1980-05-01

    This document represents a compilation of data and interpretive studies conducted as part of the engineered barriers program of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. The overall objective of these studies is to provide information on barrier system designs, emplacement and isolation techniques, and chemical reactions expected in a nuclear waste repository located in the basalts underlying the Hanford Site within the state of Washington. Backfills, waste-basalt interactions, sorption, borehole plugging, etc., are among the topics discussed.

  7. Preliminary potentiometric map and flow dynamic characteristics for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Raymond, R.G.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide potentiometric map for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system (i.e., the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt). In constructing the potentiometric map, over forty on-site and off-site monitoring wells and boreholes were used. The potentiometric map developed for the upper-basalt confined aquifer is consistent with the areal head pattern indicated for the Mabton interbed, which is a deeper and more areally extensive confined aquifer underlying the Hanford Site. Salient features for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system potentiometric map are described.

  8. Final Reclamation Report: Basalt Waste Isolation Project exploratory shaft site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.

    1990-06-01

    The restoration of areas disturbed by activities of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) constitutes a unique operation at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site, both from the standpoint of restoration objectives and the time frame for accomplishing these objectives. The BWIP reclamation program comprises three separate projects: borehole reclamation, Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF) reclamation, and Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) reclamation. The main focus of this report is on determining the success of the revegetation effort 1 year after work was completed. This report also provides a brief overview of the ESF reclamation program. 21 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  9. Basalt Waste Isolation Project. Quarterly report, July 1, 1980-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deju, R.A.

    1980-11-01

    This report presents the technical progress for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 1980. The overall Basalt Waste Isolation Project is divided into the following principal work areas: systems integration; geosciences; hydrology; engineered barriers; near-surface test facility; engineering testing; and repository studies. Summaries of major accomplishments for each of these areas are reported.

  10. Prokaryotic diversity, distribution, and insights into their role in biogeochemical cycling in marine basalts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Olivia U.; Di Meo-Savoie, Carol A.; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong; Fisk, Martin R.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2008-09-30

    We used molecular techniques to analyze basalts of varying ages that were collected from the East Pacific Rise, 9 oN, from the rift axis of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, and from neighboring seamounts. Cluster analysis of 16S rDNA Terminal Restriction Fragment Polymorphism data revealed that basalt endoliths are distinct from seawater and that communities clustered, to some degree, based on the age of the host rock. This age-based clustering suggests that alteration processes may affect community structure. Cloning and sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes revealed twelve different phyla and sub-phyla associated with basalts. These include the Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae, the candidate phylum SBR1093 in the c, andin the Archaea Marine Benthic Group B, none of which have been previously reported in basalts. We delineated novel ocean crust clades in the gamma-Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Actinobacteria that are composed entirely of basalt associated microflora, and may represent basalt ecotypes. Finally, microarray analysis of functional genes in basalt revealed that genes coding for previously unreported processes such as carbon fixation, methane-oxidation, methanogenesis, and nitrogen fixation are present, suggesting that basalts harbor previously unrecognized metabolic diversity. These novel processes could exert a profound influence on ocean chemistry.

  11. Interim reclamation report: Basalt Waste Isolation Project exploration shaft site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.

    1990-02-01

    In 1968, a program was started to assess the feasibility of storing Hanford Site defense waste in deep caverns constructed in basalt. This program was expanded in 1976 to include investigations of the Hanford Site as a potential location for a mined commercial nuclear waste repository. Extensive studies of the geotechnical aspects of the site were undertaken, including preparations for drilling a large diameter Exploratory Shaft. This report describes the development of the reclamation program for the Exploratory Shaft Facility, its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation program is to return sites disturbed by the repository program as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native plant species. 43 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Understanding heat and groundwater flow through continental flood basalt provinces: insights gained from alternative models of permeability/depth relationships for the Columbia Plateau, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, Erick R.; Williams, Colin F.; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Voss, Clifford I.; Spane, Frank A.; DeAngelo, Jacob

    2015-02-01

    Heat-flow mapping of the western USA has identified an apparent low-heat-flow anomaly coincident with the Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System, a thick sequence of basalt aquifers within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). A heat and mass transport model (SUTRA) was used to evaluate the potential impact of groundwater flow on heat flow along two different regional groundwater flow paths. Limited in situ permeability (k) data from the CRBG are compatible with a steep permeability decrease (approximately 3.5 orders of magnitude) at 600–900 m depth and approximately 40°C. Numerical simulations incorporating this permeability decrease demonstrate that regional groundwater flow can explain lower-than-expected heat flow in these highly anisotropic (kx/kz ~ 104) continental flood basalts. Simulation results indicate that the abrupt reduction in permeability at approximately 600 m depth results in an equivalently abrupt transition from a shallow region where heat flow is affected by groundwater flow to a deeper region of conduction-dominated heat flow. Most existing heat-flow measurements within the CRBG are from shallower than 600 m depth or near regional groundwater discharge zones, so that heat-flow maps generated using these data are likely influenced by groundwater flow. Substantial k decreases at similar temperatures have also been observed in the volcanic rocks of the adjacent Cascade Range volcanic arc and at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, where they result from low-temperature hydrothermal alteration.

  13. Probability encoding of hydrologic parameters for basalt. Elicitation of expert opinions from a panel of three basalt waste isolation project staff hydrologists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Runchal, A.K.; Merkhofer, M.W.; Olmsted, E.; Davis, J.D.

    1984-11-01

    The present study implemented a probability encoding method to estimate the probability distributions of selected hydrologic variables for the Cohassett basalt flow top and flow interior, and the anisotropy ratio of the interior of the Cohassett basalt flow beneath the Hanford Site. Site-speciic data for these hydrologic parameters are currently inadequate for the purpose of preliminary assessment of candidate repository performance. However, this information is required to complete preliminary performance assessment studies. Rockwell chose a probability encoding method developed by SRI International to generate credible and auditable estimates of the probability distributions of effective porosity and hydraulic conductivity anisotropy. The results indicate significant differences of opinion among the experts. This was especially true of the values of the effective porosity of the Cohassett basalt flow interior for which estimates differ by more than five orders of magnitude. The experts are in greater agreement about the values of effective porosity of the Cohassett basalt flow top; their estimates for this variable are generally within one to two orders of magnitiude of each other. For anisotropy ratio, the expert estimates are generally within two or three orders of magnitude of each other. Based on this study, the Rockwell hydrologists estimate the effective porosity of the Cohassett basalt flow top to be generally higher than do the independent experts. For the effective porosity of the Cohassett basalt flow top, the estimates of the Rockwell hydrologists indicate a smaller uncertainty than do the estimates of the independent experts. On the other hand, for the effective porosity and anisotropy ratio of the Cohassett basalt flow interior, the estimates of the Rockwell hydrologists indicate a larger uncertainty than do the estimates of the independent experts.

  14. Natural Gas Storage in Basalt Aquifers of the Columbia Basin, Pacific Northwest USA: A Guide to Site Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, Steve P.; Spane, Frank A.; Johnson, Vernon G.

    2002-08-08

    This report provides the technical background and a guide to characterizing a site for storing natural gas in the Columbia River Basalt

  15. Preconceptual systems and equipment for plugging of man-made accesses to a repository in basalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, C.L.; O'Rourke, J.E.; Allirot, D.; O'Connor, K.

    1980-09-01

    This report presents results of a study leading to preconceptual designs for plugging boreholes, shafts, and tunnels to a nuclear waste repository in basalt. Beginning design criteria include a list of preferred plug materials and plugging machines that were selected to suit the environmental conditions, and depths, diameters, and orientations of the accesses to a nuclear waste repository in the Columbia River basalts located in eastern Washington State. The environmental conditions are described. The fiscal year 1979-1980 Task II work is presented in two parts: preliminary testing of materials for plugging of man-made accesses to a repository in basalt (described in a separate report); and preconceptual systems and equipment for plugging of man-made accesses to a repository in basalt (described in this report). To fulfill the scope of the Task II work, Woodward-Clyde Consultants (WCC) was requested to: provide preconceptual systems for plugging boreholes, tunnels, and shafts in basalt; describe preconceptual borehole plugging equipment for placing the selected materials in man-made accesses; utilize the quality assurance program, program plan and schedule, and work plans previously developed for Task II; and prepare a preliminary report.

  16. Modeling of the Sedimentary Interbedded Basalt Stratigraphy for the Idaho National Laboratory Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzette Payne

    2006-04-01

    This report summarizes how the effects of the sedimentary interbedded basalt stratigraphy were modeled in the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Drill holes indicate the bedrock beneath INL facilities is composed of about 1.1 km of alternating layers of basalt rock and loosely consolidated sediments. Alternating layers of hard rock and “soft” loose sediments tend to attenuate seismic energy greater than uniform rock due to scattering and damping. The INL PSHA incorporated the effects of the sedimentary interbedded basalt stratigraphy by developing site-specific shear (S) wave velocity profiles. The profiles were used in the PSHA to model the near-surface site response by developing site-specific stochastic attenuation relationships.

  17. Modeling of the Sedimentary Interbedded Basalt Stratigraphy for the Idaho National Laboratory Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzette Payne

    2007-08-01

    This report summarizes how the effects of the sedimentary interbedded basalt stratigraphy were modeled in the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Drill holes indicate the bedrock beneath INL facilities is composed of about 1.1 km of alternating layers of basalt rock and loosely consolidated sediments. Alternating layers of hard rock and “soft” loose sediments tend to attenuate seismic energy greater than uniform rock due to scattering and damping. The INL PSHA incorporated the effects of the sedimentary interbedded basalt stratigraphy by developing site-specific shear (S) wave velocity profiles. The profiles were used in the PSHA to model the near-surface site response by developing site-specific stochastic attenuation relationships.

  18. Basalt waste isolation project. Quarterly report, October 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deju, R.A.

    1981-02-01

    In September 1977, the National Waste Terminal Storage Program was restructured to support investigations of two US DOE sites - Hanford and Nevada. The Basalt Waste Isolation Project within Rockwell Hanford Operations has been chartered with the responsibility of conducting these investigations. The overall Basalt Waste Isolation Project is divided into the following principal work areas: systems integration, geosciences, hydrology, engineered barriers, near-surface test facility, engineering testing, and repository studies. Summaries of major accomplishments for each of these areas are reported in this document.

  19. Basalt waste isolation project. Quarterly report, April 1, 1981-June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deju, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    This document reports progress made in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project during the third quarter of fiscal year 1981. Efforts are described for the following programs of the project work breakdown structure: systems; waste package; site; repository; regulatory and institutional; test facilities; in situ test facilities.

  20. Wellbore cement fracture evolution at the cement–basalt caprock interface during geologic carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Hun Bok; Kabilan, Senthil; Carson, James P.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Um, Wooyong; Martin, Paul F.; Dahl, Michael E.; Kafentzis, Tyler A.; Varga, Tamas; Stephens, Sean A.; Arey, Bruce W.; Carroll, KC; Bonneville, Alain; Fernandez, Carlos A.

    2014-08-01

    Composite Portland cement-basalt caprock cores with fractures, as well as neat Portland cement columns, were prepared to understand the geochemical and geomechanical effects on the integrity of wellbores with defects during geologic carbon sequestration. The samples were reacted with CO2-saturated groundwater at 50 ºC and 10 MPa for 3 months under static conditions, while one cement-basalt core was subjected to mechanical stress at 2.7 MPa before the CO2 reaction. Micro-XRD and SEM-EDS data collected along the cement-basalt interface after 3-month reaction with CO2-saturated groundwater indicate that carbonation of cement matrix was extensive with the precipitation of calcite, aragonite, and vaterite, whereas the alteration of basalt caprock was minor. X-ray microtomography (XMT) provided three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the opening and interconnection of cement fractures due to mechanical stress. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling further revealed that this stress led to the increase in fluid flow and hence permeability. After the CO2-reaction, XMT images displayed that calcium carbonate precipitation occurred extensively within the fractures in the cement matrix, but only partially along the fracture located at the cement-basalt interface. The 3-D visualization and CFD modeling also showed that the precipitation of calcium carbonate within the cement fractures after the CO2-reaction resulted in the disconnection of cement fractures and permeability decrease. The permeability calculated based on CFD modeling was in agreement with the experimentally determined permeability. This study demonstrates that XMT imaging coupled with CFD modeling represent a powerful tool to visualize and quantify fracture evolution and permeability change in geologic materials and to predict their behavior during geologic carbon sequestration or hydraulic fracturing for shale gas production and enhanced geothermal systems.

  1. Scenarios constructed for basaltic igneous activity at Yucca Mountain and vicinity; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, G.E.; Dunn, E.; Dockery, H.; Barnard, R.; Valentine, G.; Crowe, B.

    1993-08-01

    Basaltic volcanism has been identified as a possible future event initiating a release of radionuclides from a potential repository at the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level waste repository site. The performance assessment method set forth in the Site Characterization Plan (DOE, 1988) requires that a set of scenarios encompassing all significant radionuclide release paths to the accessible environment be described. This report attempts to catalogue the details of the interactions between the features and processes produced by basaltic volcanism in the presence of the presumed groundwater flow system and a repository structure, the engineered barrier system (EBS), and waste. This catalogue is developed in the form of scenarios. We define a scenario as a well-posed problem, starting from an initiating event or process and proceeding through a logically connected and physically possible combination or sequence of features, events, and processes (FEPs) to the release of contaminants.

  2. Intermediate-scale sodium-concrete reaction tests with basalt and limestone concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassberger, J.A.; Muhlestein, L.D.

    1981-01-01

    Ten tests were performed to investigate the chemical reactions and rate and extent of attack between sodium and basalt and limestone concretes. Test temperatures ranged from 510 to 870/sup 0/C (950 to 1600/sup 0/F) and test times from 2 to 24 hours. Sodium hydroxide was added to some of the tests to assess the impact of a sodium hydroxide-aided reaction on the overall penetration characteristics. Data suggest that the sodium penetration of concrete surfaces is limited. Penetration of basalt concrete in the presence of sodium hydroxide is shown to be less severe than attack by the metallic sodium alone. Presence of sodium hydroxide changes the characteristics of sodium penetration of limestone concrete, but no major differences in bulk penetration were observed as compared to penetration by metallic sodium.

  3. Rate of deformation in the Pasco Basin during the Miocene as determined by distribution of Columbia River basalt flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, S.P.; Ledgerwood, R.K.; Myers, C.W.; Jones, M.G.; Landon, R.D.

    1980-03-01

    Detailed mapping of over 8000 square kilometers and logs from 20 core holes were used to determine the distribution and thickness of basalt flows and interbeds in the Pasco Basin. The data indicate the high-MgO Grande Ronde Basalt and Wanapum Basalt thicken from the northeast to the southwest. Deformation began in late Frenchman Springs time in the Saddle Mountains along a northwest-southeast trend and in Roza time along an east-west trend. By late Wanapum time, basalt flows were more restricted on the east side. Saddle Mountains Basalt flows spread out in the basin from narrow channels to the east. The Umatilla Member entered from the southeast and is confined to the south-central basin, while the Wilbur Creek, Asotin, Esquatzel, Pomona, and Elephant Mountain Members entered from the east and northeast. The distribution of these members is controlled by flow volume, boundaries of other flows, and developing ridges. The Wilbur Creek, Asotin, and Esquatzel flows exited from the basin in a channel along the northern margin of the Umatilla flow, while the Pomona and Elephant Mountain flows exited between Umtanum Ridge and Wallula Gap. The thickness of sedimentary interbeds and basalt flows indicated subsidence and/or uplift began in post-Grande Ronde time (14.5 million years before present) and continued through Saddle Mountains time (10.5 million years before present). Maximum subsidence occurred 40 kilometers (24 miles) north of Richland, Washington with an approximate rate of 25 meters (81 feet) per million years during the eruption of the basalt. Maximum uplift along the developing ridges was 70 meters (230 feet) per million years.

  4. Tabulation and evaluation of ion exchange data on smectites, certain zeolites and basalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, L.V.

    1980-05-01

    An extensive search of the literature has been made for ion exchange data on smectites, certain zeolites and basalt. The data are in the form of thermodynamic equilibrium constants, corrected selectivity coefficients, and distribution coefficients. Room temperature alkali and alkaline earth metal cation ion exchange data for smectites are extensive. Correlation between the exchange free energies of alkali metal cations on Camp Berteau montmorillonite values with their Debeye-Hueckel parameter was found. Significant differences in values of exchange constants for the same reaction on different smectites were noted. While this in part may be attributable to differences in experimental procedures, much of the variance is probably due to differences in charge densities and the effective field strengths of the smectites. Differences in field strength are related to the type and amount of substitution on intercrystalline octahedral and tetrahedral sites. Data on smectites suggest that cation exchange selectivities are very strong functions of temperature. Experiments on the exchange properties of clinoptilolite and mordenite have been generally confined to alkali and alkaline earth cations although data for certain transition metal ions are also available for synthetic mordenite. The temperature dependences of zeolite exchange selectivities remain largely unknown. Distribution coefficients for groundwater-basalt systems have been measured for a variety of elements at temperatures up to 150/sup 0/C. Steady state concentrations are often never achieved either from the sorption or the desorption side. Classical models of ion exchange have been applied successfully to zeolite and smectite exchange reactions. The sorption behavior of a basalt is better treated with models of the interface which take surface ionization and complexation into account.

  5. Preliminary Analysis of Grande Ronde Basalt Formation Flow Top Transmissivity as it Relates to Assessment and Site Selection Applications for Fluid/Energy Storage and Sequestration Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.

    2013-04-29

    Preliminary Analysis of Grande Ronde Basalt Formation Flow Top Transmissivity as it Relates to Assessment and Site Selection Applications for Fluid/Energy Storage and Sequestration Projects

  6. Imaging beneath an opaque basaltic layer using densely sampled wide-angle OBS data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samson, C.; Barton, P.J.; Karwatowski, J.

    1995-05-01

    A combined reflection/refraction (wide-angle) seismic survey was conducted on the continental shelf north-west of Britain, using a conventional streamer with an air gun source, and static ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) to record wide-angle energy. The shallow structure down to a basaltic layer was reasonably well imaged on the stacked reflection section. The basalts, however, proved to be opaque to the conventional reflection method and prevented the imaging of deeper horizons, where an important velocity inversion was anticipated. This paper reports on the processing, modeling and interpretation of the densely sampled wide-angle OBS data that were coincident with the reflection profile. Eleven OBS instruments were deployed along a 75 km line and recorded signal from a powerful 149 liter (9100 in.{sup 3}) air gun array fired every 50 m. Data processing was performed using a standard industrial reflection seismic software package prior to first-arrival picking. Processing steps included geometry definition, trace summation and display of the data using various scaling algorithms. An initial model was constructed from 1D velocity-time profiles digitized every 4 km along the stacked section. First arrival travel time modeling rapidly converged to a detailed model of the structure of the top 5 km of the crust. Modeling revealed the existence of a buried low-velocity Mesozoic sedimentary basin, of a prominent basement horst and of a normal fault penetrating to the basement.

  7. The Effects of Heterogeneity in Magma Water Concentration on the Development of Flow Banding and Spherulites in Rhyolitic Lava

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seaman, S.; Dyar, D; Marinkovic, N

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the origin of flow-banded rhyolites that consist of compositionally similar darker and lighter flow bands of contrasting texture and color. Infrared radiation was used to obtain Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra from which water concentrations were calculated, and to map variations in water concentrations across zones of spherulites and glass from the 23 million year old Sycamore Canyon lava flow of southern Arizona. Lighter-colored, thicker flow bands consist of gray glass, fine-grained quartz, and large (1.0 to 1.5 mm) spherulites. Darker-colored, thinner flow bands consist of orange glass and smaller (0.1 to 0.2 mm) spherulites. The centers of both large and small spherulites are occupied by either (1) a quartz or sanidine crystal, (2) a granophyric intergrowth, or (3) a vesicle. Mapping of water concentration (dominantly OH- in glass and OH- and H2O in sanidine crystals) illustrates fluctuating water availability during quenching of the host melt. Textures of large spherulites in the lighter (gray) bands in some cases indicate complex quenching histories that suggest that local water concentration controlled the generation of glass versus crystals. Small spherulites in darker (orange) bands have only one generation of radiating crystal growth. Both the glass surrounding spherulites, and the crystals in the spherulites contain more water in the gray flow bands than in the orange flow bands. Flow banding in the Sycamore Canyon lava flow may have originated by the stretching of a magma that contained pre-existing zones (vesicles or proto-vesicles) of contrasting water concentration, as the magma flowed in the conduit and on the surface. Variation in the original water concentration in the alternating layers is interpreted to have resulted in differences in undercooling textures in spherulites in the lighter compared to the darker flow bands.

  8. Direct Numerical Simulation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Numerical Simulation - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  9. Probability encoding of hydrologic parameters for basalt. Elicitation of expert opinions from a panel of five consulting hydrologists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Runchal, A.K.; Merkhofer, M.W.; Olmsted, E.; Davis, J.D.

    1984-11-01

    The Columbia River basalts underlying the Hanford Site in Washington State are being considered as a possible location for a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. To investigate the feasibility of a repository at this site, the hydrologic parameters of the site must be evaluated. Among hydrologic parameters of particular interest are the effective porosity of the Cohassett basalt flow top and flow interior and the vertical-to-horizontal hydraulic conductivity, or anisotropy ratio, of the Cohassett basalt flow interior. The Cohassett basalt flow is the prime candidate horizon for repository studies. Site-specific data for these hydrologic parameters are currently inadequate for the purpose of preliminary assessment of candidate repository performance. To obtain credible, auditable, and independently derived estimates of the specified hydrologic parameters, a panel of five nationally recognized hydrologists was assembled. Their expert judgments were quantified during two rounds of Delphi process by means of a probability encoding method developed to estimate the probability distributions of the selected hydrologic variables. The results indicate significant differences of expert opinion for cumulative probabilities of less than 10% and greater than 90%, but relatively close agreement in the middle ranges of values. The principal causes of the diversity of opinion are believed to be the lack of site-specific data and the absence of a single, widely accepted, conceptual or theoretical basis for analyzing these variables.

  10. Simulating Geologic Co-sequestration of Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Sulfide in a Basalt Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Ramanathan, Ramya; Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2014-01-15

    Co-sequestered CO2 with H2S impurities could affect geologic storage, causing changes in pH and oxidation state that affect mineral dissolution and precipitation reactions and the mobility of metals present in the reservoir rocks. We have developed a variable component, non-isothermal simulator, STOMP-COMP (Water, Multiple Components, Salt and Energy), which simulates multiphase flow gas mixtures in deep saline reservoirs, and the resulting reactions with reservoir minerals. We use this simulator to model the co-injection of CO2 and H2S into brecciated basalt flow top. A 1000 metric ton injection of these supercritical fluids, with 99% CO2 and 1% H2S, is sequestered rapidly by solubility and mineral trapping. CO2 is trapped mainly as calcite within a few decades and H2S is trapped as pyrite within several years.

  11. Confidence in Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemez, Francois M.

    2015-02-23

    This PowerPoint presentation offers a high-level discussion of uncertainty, confidence and credibility in scientific Modeling and Simulation (M&S). It begins by briefly evoking M&S trends in computational physics and engineering. The first thrust of the discussion is to emphasize that the role of M&S in decision-making is either to support reasoning by similarity or to “forecast,” that is, make predictions about the future or extrapolate to settings or environments that cannot be tested experimentally. The second thrust is to explain that M&S-aided decision-making is an exercise in uncertainty management. The three broad classes of uncertainty in computational physics and engineering are variability and randomness, numerical uncertainty and model-form uncertainty. The last part of the discussion addresses how scientists “think.” This thought process parallels the scientific method where by a hypothesis is formulated, often accompanied by simplifying assumptions, then, physical experiments and numerical simulations are performed to confirm or reject the hypothesis. “Confidence” derives, not just from the levels of training and experience of analysts, but also from the rigor with which these assessments are performed, documented and peer-reviewed.

  12. Rythmos Numerical Integration Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-09-01

    Rythmos numerically integrates transient differential equations. The differential equations can be explicit or implicit ordinary differential equations ofr formulated as fully implicit differential-algebraic equations. Methods include backward Euler, forward Euler, explicit Runge-Kutta, and implicit BDF at this time. Native support for operator split methods and strict modularity are strong design goals. Forward sensitivity computations will be included in the first release with adjoint sensitivities coming in the near future. Rythmos heavily relies on Thyra formore » linear algebra and nonlinear solver interfaces to AztecOO, Amesos, IFPack, and NOX in Tilinos. Rythmos is specially suited for stiff differential equations and thos applictions where operator split methods have a big advantage, e.g. Computational fluid dynamics, convection-diffusion equations, etc.« less

  13. Upper concentration limits for {sup 239}Pu traces in some {open_quotes}KTB{close_quotes}-samples and in one Hawaiian lava

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barth, H.; Ganz, M.; Brandt, R.

    1994-11-01

    Trace quantities of plutonium are observed in the environment all over the world, and include both man-made {sup 238-242}Pu and natural {sup 239}Pu in uranium ores. Typical concentrations range from 10{sup {minus}14} g Pu/g sample up to 10{sup {minus}12} g Pu/g in pitchblende. We have determined some upper concentration limits for the plutonium in samples from KTB (Kontinentales Tiefbohrprogramm, Germany) which are in the range of 10{sup {minus}15} down to 3{center_dot}10{sup {minus}17} g Pu/g sample. In addition, we have investigated one sample of Hawaiian lava, with a limit of 5{center_dot}10{sup {minus}15}. We could not confirm previous reports on the observation of plutonium in some Pacific Lavas, nor do our results show any evidence for cold fusion neutrons producing plutonium in fluids of great depth in the crust.

  14. Radiocarbon as a Reactive Tracer for Tracking Permanent CO2 Storage in Basaltic Rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matter, Juerg; Stute, Martin; Schlosser, Peter; Broecker, Wallace

    2015-09-30

    In view of concerns about the long-term integrity and containment of CO2 storage in geologic reservoirs, many efforts have been made to improve the monitoring, verification and accounting methods for geologically stored CO2. Our project aimed to demonstrate that carbon-14 (14C) could be used as a reactive tracer to monitor geochemical reactions and evaluate the extent of mineral trapping of CO2 in basaltic rocks. The capacity of a storage reservoir for mineral trapping of CO2 is largely a function of host rock composition. Mineral carbonation involves combining CO2 with divalent cations including Ca2+, Mg2+ and Fe2+. The most abundant geological sources for these cations are basaltic rocks. Based on initial storage capacity estimates, we know that basalts have the necessary capacity to store million to billion tons of CO2 via in situ mineral carbonation. However, little is known about CO2-fluid-rock reactions occurring in a basaltic storage reservoir during and post-CO2 injection. None of the common monitoring and verification techniques have been able to provide a surveying tool for mineral trapping. The most direct method for quantitative monitoring and accounting involves the tagging of the injected CO2 with 14C because 14C is not present in deep geologic reservoirs prior to injection. Accordingly, we conducted two CO2 injection tests at the CarbFix pilot injection site in Iceland to study the feasibility of 14C as a reactive tracer for monitoring CO2-fluid-rock reactions and CO2 mineralization. Our newly developed monitoring techniques, using 14C as a reactive tracer, have been successfully demonstrated. For the first time, permanent and safe disposal of CO2 as environmentally benign carbonate minerals in basaltic rocks could be shown. Over 95% of the injected CO2 at the Carb

  15. Permeameter studies of water flow through cement and clay borehole seals in granite, basalt and tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.L.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1986-10-01

    Boreholes near a repository must be sealed to prevent rapid migration of radionuclide-contaminated water to the accessible environment. The objective of this research is to assess the performance of borehole seals under laboratory conditions, particularly with regard to varying stress fields. Flow through a sealed borehole is compared with flow through intact rock. Cement or bentonite seals have been tested in granite, basalt, and welded tuff. The main conclusion is that under laboratory conditions, existing commercial materials can form high quality seals. Triaxial stress changes about a borehole do not significantly affect seal performance if the rock is stiffer than the seal. Temperature but especially moisture variations (drying) significantly degrade the quality of cement seals. Performance partially recovers upon resaturation. A skillfully sealed borehole may be as impermeable as the host rock. Analysis of the influence of relative seal-rock permeabilities shows that a plug with permeability one order of magnitude greater than that of the rock results in a flow increase through the hole and surrounding rock of only 1-1/2 times compared to the undisturbed rock. Since a borehole is only a small part of the total rock mass, the total effect is even less pronounced. The simplest and most effective way to decrease flow through a rock-seal system is to increase the seal length, assuming it can be guaranteed that no dominant by-pass flowpath through the rock exists.

  16. Site characterization report for the basalt waste isolation project. Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-11-01

    The reference location for a repository in basalt for the terminal storage of nuclear wastes on the Hanford Site and the candidate horizons within this reference repository location have been identified and the preliminary characterization work in support of the site screening process has been completed. Fifteen technical questions regarding the qualification of the site were identified to be addressed during the detailed site characterization phase of the US Department of Energy-National Waste Terminal Storage Program site selection process. Resolution of these questions will be provided in the final site characterization progress report, currently planned to be issued in 1987, and in the safety analysis report to be submitted with the License Application. The additional information needed to resolve these questions and the plans for obtaining the information have been identified. This Site Characterization Report documents the results of the site screening process, the preliminary site characterization data, the technical issues that need to be addressed, and the plans for resolving these issues. Volume 2 contains chapters 6 through 12: geochemistry; surface hydrology; climatology, meteorology, and air quality; environmental, land-use, and socioeconomic characteristics; repository design; waste package; and performance assessment.

  17. Summary of INEL research on the iron-enriched basalt waste form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimann, G.A.; Grandy, J.D.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the knowledge base on the iron-enriched basalt (IEB) waste form developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during 1979--1982. The results presented discuss the applicability of IEB in converting retrieved transuranic (TRU) waste from INEL`s Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) into a vitreous/ceramic (glassy/rock) stable waste form suitable for permanent disposal in an appropriate repository, such as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Borosilicate glass (BSG), the approved high-level waste form, appears unsuited for this application. Melting the average waste-soil mix from the RWMC produces the IEB composition and attempting to convert IEB to the BSG composition would require additions of substantial B{sub 2}0{sub 3}, Na, and SiO{sub 2} (glass frit). IEB requires processing temperatures of 1400 to 1600{degrees}C, depending upon the waste composition. Production of the IEB waste form, using Joule heated melters, has proved difficult in the past because of electrode and refractory corrosion problems associated with the high temperature melts. Higher temperature electric melters (arc and plasma) are available to produce this final waste form. Past research focused on extensive slag property measurements, waste form leachability tests, mechanical, composition, and microstructure evaluations, as well as a host of experiments to improve production of the waste form. Past INEL studies indicated that the IEB glass-ceramic is a material that will accommodate and stabilize a wide range of heterogeneous waste materials, including long lived radionuclides and scrap metals, while maintaining a superior level of chemical and physical performance characteristics. Controlled cooling of the molten IEB and subsequent heat treatment will produce a glass-ceramic waste form with superior leach resistance.

  18. Summary of INEL research on the iron-enriched basalt waste form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimann, G.A.; Grandy, J.D.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the knowledge base on the iron-enriched basalt (IEB) waste form developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during 1979--1982. The results presented discuss the applicability of IEB in converting retrieved transuranic (TRU) waste from INEL's Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) into a vitreous/ceramic (glassy/rock) stable waste form suitable for permanent disposal in an appropriate repository, such as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Borosilicate glass (BSG), the approved high-level waste form, appears unsuited for this application. Melting the average waste-soil mix from the RWMC produces the IEB composition and attempting to convert IEB to the BSG composition would require additions of substantial B{sub 2}0{sub 3}, Na, and SiO{sub 2} (glass frit). IEB requires processing temperatures of 1400 to 1600{degrees}C, depending upon the waste composition. Production of the IEB waste form, using Joule heated melters, has proved difficult in the past because of electrode and refractory corrosion problems associated with the high temperature melts. Higher temperature electric melters (arc and plasma) are available to produce this final waste form. Past research focused on extensive slag property measurements, waste form leachability tests, mechanical, composition, and microstructure evaluations, as well as a host of experiments to improve production of the waste form. Past INEL studies indicated that the IEB glass-ceramic is a material that will accommodate and stabilize a wide range of heterogeneous waste materials, including long lived radionuclides and scrap metals, while maintaining a superior level of chemical and physical performance characteristics. Controlled cooling of the molten IEB and subsequent heat treatment will produce a glass-ceramic waste form with superior leach resistance.

  19. Numerical study of nucleation and growth of bubbles in viscous magmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toramaru, A.

    1995-02-01

    The nucleation and growth processes of bubbles in viscous magmas with a constant decompression rate have been numerically investigated based on a formation which accounts for effects of viscosity, as well as diffusivity, interfacial tension, and decompression rate. The numerical solutions show two regimes in the nucleation and growth process, a diffusion-controlled regime and a viscosity-controlled regime, mainly depending on the decompression rate, initial saturation pressure and viscosity. The basic mechanism common to both regimes is that growth governs nucleation through depletion of degassing components. In basaltic eruptions the vesiculation is essentially controlled by diffusion, and the viscosity-controlled regime is limited to very high decompression rate and very small water content. When andesitic magma saturated by water at 10 MPa is decompressed through the propagation of rarefraction wave induced by a landslide, as took place in the Mount St. Helens 1980 eruption, the vesiculation is controlled by the viscosity up to 100 m depth. On the other hand, in a rhyolitic magma for the same situation, vesiculation is controlled by the viscosity over the whole depth of the magma column. In the viscosity-controlled regime, the vesicularity may be 90% or less as seen in silicic pumice, whereas in the diffusion-controlled regime the vesicularity equals or exceeds 98% such as in reticulite in Hawaiian basalt. An observed variation of the number density of bubbles by several orders of magnitude in plinian eruptions and the correlation with the SiO2 content can be attributed approximately to the dependence of diffusivity of viscosity on SiO2 content and temperature, assuming the apparent correlation between SiO2 content and temperature of magma.

  20. Numerical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... saturation mechanism depends sensitively on the viscosity parameterized by Pm. ... A more thorough treatment of the dynamic variation of dominant eigenmodes can be found for ...

  1. Computed solid phases limiting the concentration of dissolved constituents in basalt aquifers of the Columbia Plateau in eastern Washington. Geochemical modeling and nuclide/rock/groundwater interaction studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deutsch, W.J.; Jenne, E.A.; Krupka, K.M.

    1982-08-01

    A speciation-solubility geochemical model, WATEQ2, was used to analyze geographically-diverse, ground-water samples from the aquifers of the Columbia Plateau basalts in eastern Washington. The ground-water samples compute to be at equilibrium with calcite, which provides both a solubility control for dissolved calcium and a pH buffer. Amorphic ferric hydroxide, Fe(OH)/sub 3/(A), is at saturation or modestly oversaturated in the few water samples with measured redox potentials. Most of the ground-water samples compute to be at equilibrium with amorphic silica (glass) and wairakite, a zeolite, and are saturated to oversaturated with respect to allophane, an amorphic aluminosilicate. The water samples are saturated to undersaturated with halloysite, a clay, and are variably oversaturated with regard to other secondary clay minerals. Equilibrium between the ground water and amorphic silica presumably results from the dissolution of the glassy matrix of the basalt. The oversaturation of the clay minerals other than halloysite indicates that their rate of formation lags the dissolution rate of the basaltic glass. The modeling results indicate that metastable amorphic solids limit the concentration of dissolved silicon and suggest the same possibility for aluminum and iron, and that the processes of dissolution of basaltic glass and formation of metastable secondary minerals are continuing even though the basalts are of Miocene age. The computed solubility relations are found to agree with the known assemblages of alteration minerals in the basalt fractures and vesicles. Because the chemical reactivity of the bedrock will influence the transport of solutes in ground water, the observed solubility equilibria are important factors with regard to chemical-retention processes associated with the possible migration of nuclear waste stored in the earth's crust.

  2. Stephanie von Numers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Stephanie von Numers - Communications and Web Coordinator, Education & Workforce Development Stephanie von Numers joined the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency ...

  3. Probability encoding of hydrologic parameters for basalt: Elicitation of expert opinions from a panel of five consulting hydrologists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.D.

    1984-12-10

    The Columbia River Basalts Underlying the Hanford Site in Washington State are being considered as a possible location for a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. To investigate the feasibility of a repository at this site, the hydrologic parameters of the site must be evaluated. Among hydrologic parameters of particular interest are the effective porosity of the Cohassett flow top and flow interior and the vertical-to-horizontal hydraulic conductivity, or anisotropy ratio, of the Cohassett flow interior. Site-specific data for these hydrologic parameters are currently inadequate. To obtain credible, auditable, and independently derived estimates of the specified hydrologic parameters for the purpose of preliminary assessment of candidate repository performance, a panel of five nationally recognized hydrologists was assembled. Their expert judgments were quantified during two rounds of Delphi process by means of a probability encoding method developed to estimate the probability distributions of the selected hydrologic variables. 210 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Disruptive Innovation in Numerical Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waltz, Jacob I.

    2012-09-06

    We propose the research and development of a high-fidelity hydrodynamic algorithm for tetrahedral meshes that will lead to a disruptive innovation in the numerical modeling of Laboratory problems. Our proposed innovation has the potential to reduce turnaround time by orders of magnitude relative to Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) codes; reduce simulation setup costs by millions of dollars per year; and effectively leverage Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and future Exascale computing hardware. If successful, this work will lead to a dramatic leap forward in the Laboratory's quest for a predictive simulation capability.

  5. Fate of Magnesium Chloride Brine Applied to Suppress Dust from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Within the deep vadose zone, which consists of interlayered basalt lava flows and sedimentary interbeds, brine has moved up to 110 m laterally. This lateral migration suggests ...

  6. Numerical computation of Pop plot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-03-23

    The Pop plot — distance-of-run to detonation versus initial shock pressure — is a key characterization of shock initiation in a heterogeneous explosive. Reactive burn models for high explosives (HE) must reproduce the experimental Pop plot to have any chance of accurately predicting shock initiation phenomena. This report describes a methodology for automating the computation of a Pop plot for a specific explosive with a given HE model. Illustrative examples of the computation are shown for PBX 9502 with three burn models (SURF, WSD and Forest Fire) utilizing the xRage code, which is the Eulerian ASC hydrocode at LANL. Comparison of the numerical and experimental Pop plot can be the basis for a validation test or as an aid in calibrating the burn rate of an HE model. Issues with calibration are discussed.

  7. Interagency mechanical operations group numerical systems group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    This report consists of the minutes of the May 20-21, 1971 meeting of the Interagency Mechanical Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. This group looks at issues related to numerical control in the machining industry. Items discussed related to the use of CAD and CAM, EIA standards, data links, and numerical control.

  8. Evidence for biological activity in mineralization of secondary sulphate deposits in a basaltic environment: implications for the search for life in the Martian subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Doc Richardson; Nancy W. Hinman; Jill R. Scott

    2013-10-01

    Evidence of microbial activity associated with mineralization of secondary Na-sulphate minerals (thenardite, mirabilite) in the basaltic subsurface of Craters of the Moon National Monument (COM), Idaho were examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, laser desorption Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LD-FTICR-MS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Peaks suggestive of bio/organic compounds were observed in the secondary Na-sulphate deposits by LD-FTICR-MS. FTIR provided additional evidence for the presence of bio/organic compounds. Sulphur fractionation was explored to assist in determining if microbes may play a role in oxidizing sulphur. The presence of bio/organic compounds associated with Na-sulphate deposits, along with the necessity of oxidizing reduced sulphur to sulphate, suggests that biological activity may be involved in the formation of these secondary minerals. The secondary Na-sulphate minerals probably form from the overlying basalt through leached sodium ions and sulphate ions produced by bio-oxidation of Fe-sulphide minerals. Since the COM basalts are one of the most comparable terrestrial analogues for their Martian counterparts, the occurrence of biological activity in the formation of sulphate minerals at COM has direct implications for the search for life on Mars. In addition, the presence of caves on Mars suggests the importance of these environments as possible locations for growth and preservation of microbial activity. Therefore, understanding the physiochemical pathways of abiotic and biotic mineralization in the COM subsurface and similar basaltic settings has direct implications for the search for extinct or extant life on Mars.

  9. Transient Inverse Calibration of Site-Wide Groundwater Model to Hanford Operational Impacts from 1943 to 1996--Alternative Conceptual Model Considering Interaction with Uppermost Basalt Confined Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Cole, Charles R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Thorne, Paul D.; Wurstner, Signe K.

    2001-08-29

    The baseline three-dimensional transient inverse model for the estimation of site-wide scale flow parameters, including their uncertainties, using data on the transient behavior of the unconfined aquifer system over the entire historical period of Hanford operations, has been modified to account for the effects of basalt intercommunication between the Hanford unconfined aquifer and the underlying upper basalt confined aquifer. Both the baseline and alternative conceptual models (ACM-1) considered only the groundwater flow component and corresponding observational data in the 3-Dl transient inverse calibration efforts. Subsequent efforts will examine both groundwater flow and transport. Comparisons of goodness of fit measures and parameter estimation results for the ACM-1 transient inverse calibrated model with those from previous site-wide groundwater modeling efforts illustrate that the new 3-D transient inverse model approach will strengthen the technical defensibility of the final model(s) and provide the ability to incorporate uncertainty in predictions related to both conceptual model and parameter uncertainty. These results, however, indicate that additional improvements are required to the conceptual model framework. An investigation was initiated at the end of this basalt inverse modeling effort to determine whether facies-based zonation would improve specific yield parameter estimation results (ACM-2). A description of the justification and methodology to develop this zonation is discussed.

  10. Seismic Characterization of Basalt Topography at Two Candidate Sites for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Sondrup; Gail Heath; Trent Armstrong; Annette Shafer; Jesse Bennett; Clark Scott

    2011-04-01

    This report presents the seismic refraction results from the depth to bed rock surveys for two areas being considered for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (RH-LLW) disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. The first area (Site 5) surveyed is located southwest of the Advanced Test Reactor Complex and the second (Site 34) is located west of Lincoln Boulevard near the southwest corner of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). At Site 5, large area and smaller-scale detailed surveys were performed. At Site 34, a large area survey was performed. The purpose of the surveys was to define the topography of the interface between the surficial alluvium and underlying basalt. Seismic data were first collected and processed using seismic refraction tomographic inversion. Three-dimensional images for both sites were rendered from the data to image the depth and velocities of the subsurface layers. Based on the interpreted top of basalt data at Site 5, a more detailed survey was conducted to refine depth to basalt. This report briefly covers relevant issues in the collection, processing and inversion of the seismic refraction data and in the imaging process. Included are the parameters for inversion and result rendering and visualization such as the inclusion of physical features. Results from the processing effort presented in this report include fence diagrams of the earth model, for the large area surveys and iso-velocity surfaces and cross sections from the detailed survey.

  11. numerical modeling | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Submitted by Ocop(5) Member 15 July, 2014 - 07:07 MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Cost Current DOE LCOE numerical modeling Performance Tidal Wave To normalize competing...

  12. Numerical evaluation of effective unsaturated hydraulic properties...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    unsaturated hydraulic properties for fractured rocks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical evaluation of effective unsaturated hydraulic properties for ...

  13. Uranium potential of southwestern New Mexico (southern Hidalgo County), including observations on crystallization history of lavas and ash tuffs and the release of uranium from them. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, A.W.; Salter, T.L.; Zetterlund, D.

    1980-08-01

    Geological environments present in southwestern New Mexico include thick sequences of sedimentary rock including limestone, conglomerates, sandstone, and shale: igneous intrusions with associated metal deposits; caldera centers, margins, and outflow facies; and basins with marginal faults and thick late Cenozoic sedimentary fillings. Predominant rock types are Paleozoic carbonates, Mesozoic terrigeneous rocks and carbonates, and Cenozoic volcanic rocks and basin-filling terrigeneous rocks. Consideration of information available in Preliminary Reconnaissance Reports and in Hydrogeochemical and Stream Reconnaissance Reports together with 347 new whole rock chemical analyses points to three areas of anomalous uranium abundance in Hidalgo County, New Mexico. The area has experienced three major periods of igneous activity in Phanerozoic time: one associated with the Laramide cycle of the Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary, mid-Tertiary cycle of silicic volcanism with abundant calderas, and a late Tertiary cycle of mafic volcanism. Silicic volcanic rocks are the most common exposed rock type in the area, and the most enriched in uranium (range, 0.4 to 19 ppM). The most likely source for any uranium ore-forming solutions lies with this cycle of volcanism. Solutions might have been introduced during volcanism or formed later by groundwater leaching of cooled volcanic rocks. Results indicate that groundwater leaching of cooled volcanic rocks was not an effective means of mobilizing uranium in the area. Study of several rhyolite lava flows indicates that they were emplaced in supercooled condition and may have crystallized completely at temperatures well below their liquids, or they may have warmed as crystallization released latent heat. Statistical comparison of the uranium concentration revealed no differences between vitrophyres and associated felsites.

  14. Geologic ages and accumulation rates of basalt-flow groups and sedimentary interbeds in selected wells at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.R.; Liszewski, M.J.; Cecil, L.D.

    1997-01-01

    Geologic ages and accumulation rates, estimated from regressions, were used to evaluate measured ages and interpreted stratigraphic and structural relations of basalt and sediment in the unsaturated zone and the Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in eastern Idaho. Geologic ages and accumulation rates were estimated from standard linear regressions of 21 mean potassium-argon (K-Ar) ages, selected mean paleomagnetic ages, and cumulative depths of a composite stratigraphic section composed of complete intervals of basalt and sediment that were deposited in areas of past maximum subsidence. Accumulation rates also were estimated from regressions of stratigraphic intervals in three wells in and adjacent to an area of interpreted uplift at and near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) and the Test Reactor Area (TRA) to allow a comparison of rates in areas of past uplift and subsidence. Estimated geologic ages range from about 200 thousand to 1.8 million years before present and are reasonable approximations for the interval of basalt and sediment above the effective base of the aquifer, based on reported uncertainties of corresponding measured ages. Estimated ages between 200 and 800 thousand years are within the range of reported uncertainties for all 15 K-Ar ages used in regressions and two out of three -argon ({sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar) ages of duplicate argon samples. Two sets of estimated ages between 800 thousand and 1.8 million years are within the range of reported uncertainties for all seven K-Ar ages used in regressions, which include one shared age of about 800 thousand years. Two sets of ages were estimated for this interval because K-Ar ages make up two populations that agree with previous and revised ages of three paleomagnetic subchrons. The youngest set of ages is consistent with a K-Ar age from the effective base of the aquifer that agrees with previous ages of the Olduvai Normal-Polarity Subchron.

  15. Direct Numerical Simulation of Compressible, Turbulent Flow ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The computational mesh for this direct numerical simulation was over 33 billion cells, and was run on up to 102,400 cores under a DoD HPCMP Frontier Project. Nicholas Bisek and ...

  16. Numerical simulations of strong incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, J.; Cattaneo, F.; Perez, J. C.; Boldyrev, S.

    2012-05-15

    Magnetised plasma turbulence pervades the universe and is likely to play an important role in a variety of astrophysical settings. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) provides the simplest theoretical framework in which phenomenological models for the turbulent dynamics can be built. Numerical simulations of MHD turbulence are widely used to guide and test the theoretical predictions; however, simulating MHD turbulence and accurately measuring its scaling properties is far from straightforward. Computational power limits the calculations to moderate Reynolds numbers and often simplifying assumptions are made in order that a wider range of scales can be accessed. After describing the theoretical predictions and the numerical approaches that are often employed in studying strong incompressible MHD turbulence, we present the findings of a series of high-resolution direct numerical simulations. We discuss the effects that insufficiencies in the computational approach can have on the solution and its physical interpretation.

  17. Mechanical diode: Comparing numerical and experimental characterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagartz, M.J.; Segalman, D.; Simmermacher, T.

    1998-02-01

    In this introductory work, joint compliance is studied in both a numerical and experimental setting. A simple bolted interface is used as the test article and compliance is measured for the joint in both compression and in tension. This simple interface is shown to exhibit a strong non-linearity near the transition from compression to tension (or vice-versa). Modeling issues pertaining to numerically solving for the compliance are addressed. It is shown that the model predictions, in spite of convergence being very sensitive to numerical artifacts of the interface model, are in good agreement with experimentally measured strains and joint compliances. The joint behavior is a mechanical analogy to a diode, i.e., in compression, the joint is very stiff, acting almost as a rigid link, while in tension the joint is relatively soft, acting as a spring.

  18. Numerical prediction of window condensation potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowan, A.G.

    1995-08-01

    Although a substantial amount of effort has been expended to develop numerical methods for determining windows U-factors (EE 1983; Goss and Curcija 1994; Standaert 1985; CSA 1993a; NFRC 1991), there has been little work to data on using numerical methods to predict condensation potential. It is perhaps of direct interest to most ASHRAE members to determine heat loss and solar gains through windows as a precursor to sizing heating and cooling equipment, but condensation has long been recognized as an extremely important issue for consumers (and, consequently, for window manufacturers). Moreover, building scientists recognize the link between condensation and increased energy consumption (due to latent loads), reduced occupant comfort and indoor air quality (from the presence of bacteria and mold), and structural damage (where accumulated condensation is absorbed by the building material, thus reducing their structural stability). The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) is developing a rating method for condensation potential in fenestration products as part of its mandate from the US Department of Energy (DOE). A rating method would benefit from the use of simulation as a supplement to physical condensation resistance testing to reduce the cost and time required for implementation and increase the flexibility of the rating method. This paper outlines one of the necessary components in the application of numerical methods for evaluating condensation in fenestration products. The theoretical approach and its practical application are discussed, as well as some comparisons between numerical prediction and physical test results for a sample of products.

  19. Numerical likelihood analysis of cosmic ray anisotropies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Hojvat et al.

    2003-07-02

    A numerical likelihood approach to the determination of cosmic ray anisotropies is presented which offers many advantages over other approaches. It allows a wide range of statistically meaningful hypotheses to be compared even when full sky coverage is unavailable, can be readily extended in order to include measurement errors, and makes maximum unbiased use of all available information.

  20. Error Estimation for Fault Tolerance in Numerical Integration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Error Estimation for Fault Tolerance in Numerical Integration Solvers Event Sponsor: ... In numerical integration solvers, approximation error can be estimated at a low cost. We ...

  1. Numerical Verification of Bounce Harmonic Resonances in Neoclassical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for Tokamaks Kimin Kim, Jong-Kyu Park and Allen H. Boozer 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY Tokamaks, Numerical Verification Tokamaks, Numerical Verification This...

  2. Development of Numerical Simulation Capabilities for In Situ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Development of Numerical Simulation Capabilities for In Situ Heating of Oil Shale Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of Numerical Simulation Capabilities for In ...

  3. Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominatedgeothermal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominatedgeothermal reservoirs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical modeling of water injection ...

  4. Stress-dependent permeability of fractured rock masses: A numerical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    permeability of fractured rock masses: A numerical study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stress-dependent permeability of fractured rock masses: A numerical study We ...

  5. Toward portable programming of numerical linear algebra on manycore...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Toward portable programming of numerical linear algebra on manycore nodes. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Toward portable programming of numerical linear algebra on ...

  6. Numerical simulations for low energy nuclear reactions including...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Numerical simulations for low energy nuclear reactions including direct channels to validate statistical models Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical simulations for ...

  7. Numerical Modeling Studies of The Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Numerical Modeling Studies of The Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection ProcessDuring CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical Modeling ...

  8. Numerical Modeling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (McKenna ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Numerical Modeling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (McKenna & Blackwell, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Numerical Modeling...

  9. Sandia Energy - Numerical Simulations of Hydrokinetics in the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Numerical Simulations of Hydrokinetics in the Roza Canal, Yakima Washington Home Renewable Energy Energy Water Power Computational Modeling & Simulation Numerical Simulations of...

  10. Numerical recipes for mold filling simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kothe, D.; Juric, D.; Lam, K.; Lally, B.

    1998-07-01

    Has the ability to simulate the filling of a mold progressed to a point where an appropriate numerical recipe achieves the desired results? If results are defined to be topological robustness, computational efficiency, quantitative accuracy, and predictability, all within a computational domain that faithfully represents complex three-dimensional foundry molds, then the answer unfortunately remains no. Significant interfacial flow algorithm developments have occurred over the last decade, however, that could bring this answer closer to maybe. These developments have been both evolutionary and revolutionary, will continue to transpire for the near future. Might they become useful numerical recipes for mold filling simulations? Quite possibly. Recent progress in algorithms for interface kinematics and dynamics, linear solution methods, computer science issues such as parallelization and object-oriented programming, high resolution Navier-Stokes (NS) solution methods, and unstructured mesh techniques, must all be pursued as possible paths toward higher fidelity mold filling simulations. A detailed exposition of these algorithmic developments is beyond the scope of this paper, hence the authors choose to focus here exclusively on algorithms for interface kinematics. These interface tracking algorithms are designed to model the movement of interfaces relative to a reference frame such as a fixed mesh. Current interface tracking algorithm choices are numerous, so is any one best suited for mold filling simulation? Although a clear winner is not (yet) apparent, pros and cons are given in the following brief, critical review. Highlighted are those outstanding interface tracking algorithm issues the authors feel can hamper the reliable modeling of today`s foundry mold filling processes.

  11. Advanced Numerical Model for Irradiated Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giorla, Alain B.

    2015-03-01

    In this report, we establish a numerical model for concrete exposed to irradiation to address these three critical points. The model accounts for creep in the cement paste and its coupling with damage, temperature and relative humidity. The shift in failure mode with the loading rate is also properly represented. The numerical model for creep has been validated and calibrated against different experiments in the literature [Wittmann, 1970, Le Roy, 1995]. Results from a simplified model are shown to showcase the ability of numerical homogenization to simulate irradiation effects in concrete. In future works, the complete model will be applied to the analysis of the irradiation experiments of Elleuch et al. [1972] and Kelly et al. [1969]. This requires a careful examination of the experimental environmental conditions as in both cases certain critical information are missing, including the relative humidity history. A sensitivity analysis will be conducted to provide lower and upper bounds of the concrete expansion under irradiation, and check if the scatter in the simulated results matches the one found in experiments. The numerical and experimental results will be compared in terms of expansion and loss of mechanical stiffness and strength. Both effects should be captured accordingly by the model to validate it. Once the model has been validated on these two experiments, it can be applied to simulate concrete from nuclear power plants. To do so, the materials used in these concrete must be as well characterized as possible. The main parameters required are the mechanical properties of each constituent in the concrete (aggregates, cement paste), namely the elastic modulus, the creep properties, the tensile and compressive strength, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the drying shrinkage. These can be either measured experimentally, estimated from the initial composition in the case of cement paste, or back-calculated from mechanical tests on concrete. If some

  12. Numerical uncertainty in computational engineering and physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemez, Francois M

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining a solution that approximates ordinary or partial differential equations on a computational mesh or grid does not necessarily mean that the solution is accurate or even 'correct'. Unfortunately assessing the quality of discrete solutions by questioning the role played by spatial and temporal discretizations generally comes as a distant third to test-analysis comparison and model calibration. This publication is contributed to raise awareness of the fact that discrete solutions introduce numerical uncertainty. This uncertainty may, in some cases, overwhelm in complexity and magnitude other sources of uncertainty that include experimental variability, parametric uncertainty and modeling assumptions. The concepts of consistency, convergence and truncation error are overviewed to explain the articulation between the exact solution of continuous equations, the solution of modified equations and discrete solutions computed by a code. The current state-of-the-practice of code and solution verification activities is discussed. An example in the discipline of hydro-dynamics illustrates the significant effect that meshing can have on the quality of code predictions. A simple method is proposed to derive bounds of solution uncertainty in cases where the exact solution of the continuous equations, or its modified equations, is unknown. It is argued that numerical uncertainty originating from mesh discretization should always be quantified and accounted for in the overall uncertainty 'budget' that supports decision-making for applications in computational physics and engineering.

  13. RELAP-7 Numerical Stabilization: Entropy Viscosity Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Berry; M. O. Delchini; J. Ragusa

    2014-06-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL's modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5's capability and extends the analysis capability for all reactor system simulation scenarios. RELAP-7 utilizes a single phase and a novel seven-equation two-phase flow models as described in the RELAP-7 Theory Manual (INL/EXT-14-31366). The basic equation systems are hyperbolic, which generally require some type of stabilization (or artificial viscosity) to capture nonlinear discontinuities and to suppress advection-caused oscillations. This report documents one of the available options for this stabilization in RELAP-7 -- a new and novel approach known as the entropy viscosity method. Because the code is an ongoing development effort in which the physical sub models, numerics, and coding are evolving, so too must the specific details of the entropy viscosity stabilization method. Here the fundamentals of the method in their current state are presented.

  14. Very high numerical aperture light transmitting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, Stephen W.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Sales, Brian C.

    1998-01-01

    A new light-transmitting device using a SCIN glass core and a novel calcium sodium cladding has been developed. The very high index of refraction, radiation hardness, similar solubility for rare earths and similar melt and viscosity characteristics of core and cladding materials makes them attractive for several applications such as high-numerical-aperture optical fibers and specialty lenses. Optical fibers up to 60 m in length have been drawn, and several simple lenses have been designed, ground, and polished. Preliminary results on the ability to directly cast optical components of lead-indium phosphate glass are also discussed as well as the suitability of these glasses as a host medium for rare-earth ion lasers and amplifiers.

  15. NUMERICAL MODELING OF CATHODE CONTACT MATERIAL DENSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeppel, Brian J.; Liu, Wenning N.; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-11-01

    Numerical modeling was used to simulate the constrained sintering process of the cathode contact layer during assembly of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). A finite element model based on the continuum theory for sintering of porous bodies was developed and used to investigate candidate low-temperature cathode contact materials. Constitutive parameters for various contact materials under investigation were estimated from dilatometry screening tests, and the influence of processing time, processing temperature, initial grain size, and applied compressive stress on the free sintering response was predicted for selected candidate materials. The densification behavior and generated stresses within a 5-cell planar SOFC stack during sintering, high temperature operation, and room temperature shutdown were predicted. Insufficient constrained densification was observed in the stack at the proposed heat treatment, but beneficial effects of reduced grain size, compressive stack preload, and reduced thermal expansion coefficient on the contact layer densification and stresses were observed.

  16. A survey of numerical cubature over triangles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyness, J.N.; Cools, R.

    1993-12-31

    This survey collects together theoretical results in the area of numerical cubature over triangles and is a vehicle for a current bibliography. We treat first the theory relating to regular integrands and then the corresponding theory for singular integrands with emphasis on the ``full comer singularity.`` Within these two sections we treat successively approaches based on transforming the triangle into a square, formulas based on polynomial moment fitting, and extrapolation techniques. Within each category we quote key theoretical results without proof, and relate other results and references to these. Nearly all the references we have found may be readily placed in one of these categories. This survey is theoretical in character and does not include recent work in adaptive and automatic integration.

  17. Numerical Studies of Impurities in Fusion Plasmas

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Hulse, R. A.

    1982-09-01

    The coupled partial differential equations used to describe the behavior of impurity ions in magnetically confined controlled fusion plasmas require numerical solution for cases of practical interest. Computer codes developed for impurity modeling at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory are used as examples of the types of codes employed for this purpose. These codes solve for the impurity ionization state densities and associated radiation rates using atomic physics appropriate for these low-density, high-temperature plasmas. The simpler codes solve local equations in zero spatial dimensions while more complex cases require codes which explicitly include transport of the impurity ions simultaneously with the atomic processes of ionization and recombination. Typical applications are discussed and computational results are presented for selected cases of interest.

  18. High numerical aperture multilayer Laue lenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, Andrew J.; Prasciolu, Mauro; Andrejczuk, Andrzej; Krzywinski, Jacek; Meents, Alke; Pennicard, David; Graafsma, Heinz; Barty, Anton; Bean, Richard J.; Barthelmess, Miriam; Oberthuer, Dominik; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Aquila, Andrew; Chapman, Henry N.; Bajt, Saša

    2015-06-01

    The ever-increasing brightness of synchrotron radiation sources demands improved X-ray optics to utilise their capability for imaging and probing biological cells, nanodevices, and functional matter on the nanometer scale with chemical sensitivity. Here we demonstrate focusing a hard X-ray beam to an 8 nm focus using a volume zone plate (also referred to as a wedged multilayer Laue lens). This lens was constructed using a new deposition technique that enabled the independent control of the angle and thickness of diffracting layers to microradian and nanometer precision, respectively. This ensured that the Bragg condition is satisfied at each point along the lens, leading to a high numerical aperture that is limited only by its extent. We developed a phase-shifting interferometric method based on ptychography to characterise the lens focus. The precision of the fabrication and characterisation demonstrated here provides the path to efficient X-ray optics for imaging at 1 nm resolution.

  19. New numeric data packages from CDIAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, C.J.; Warren, S.G.; London, J.

    1995-12-31

    This article describes 6 numerical data packages related to climate and greenhouse gas concentrations: Edited synoptic cloud reports from ships and land stations (1982-1991); Carbon dioxide concentrations in surface water and the atmosphere (1986-1989); Carbon-13 isotopic abundance and concentration of atmospheric methane for background air (1978-1989); Six and Three hourly meteorological observations from 223 USSR stations; Global, regional and national annual CO2 emission estimates from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic-cement production, and gas flaring (1950-1992); continental-scale estimates of biotic carbon flux from land-cover change (1850-1980); Carbon dioxide, hydrographic and chemical data in the south Atlantic Ocean (February-March 1991).

  20. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J.H.

    1993-12-01

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  1. An Updated Numerical Model Of The Larderello-Travale Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Numerical Model Of The Larderello-Travale Geothermal System, Italy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An Updated Numerical Model Of...

  2. Numerical simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities involving solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Chong H.

    2015-11-20

    This report is a description of research performed by LANL regarding numeric simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  3. Numerical Modeling Of Basin And Range Geothermal Systems | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for extensional geothermal systems that include structure, heat input, and permeability distribution have been established using numerical models. Extensional geothermal...

  4. High numerical aperture multilayer Laue lenses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Morgan, Andrew J.; Prasciolu, Mauro; Andrejczuk, Andrzej; Krzywinski, Jacek; Meents, Alke; Pennicard, David; Graafsma, Heinz; Barty, Anton; Bean, Richard J.; Barthelmess, Miriam; et al

    2015-06-01

    The ever-increasing brightness of synchrotron radiation sources demands improved X-ray optics to utilise their capability for imaging and probing biological cells, nanodevices, and functional matter on the nanometer scale with chemical sensitivity. Here we demonstrate focusing a hard X-ray beam to an 8 nm focus using a volume zone plate (also referred to as a wedged multilayer Laue lens). This lens was constructed using a new deposition technique that enabled the independent control of the angle and thickness of diffracting layers to microradian and nanometer precision, respectively. This ensured that the Bragg condition is satisfied at each point along themore » lens, leading to a high numerical aperture that is limited only by its extent. We developed a phase-shifting interferometric method based on ptychography to characterise the lens focus. The precision of the fabrication and characterisation demonstrated here provides the path to efficient X-ray optics for imaging at 1 nm resolution.« less

  5. Numerical simulations of capillary barrier field tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, C.E.; Stormont, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    Numerical simulations of two capillary barrier systems tested in the field were conducted to determine if an unsaturated flow model could accurately represent the observed results. The field data was collected from two 7-m long, 1.2-m thick capillary barriers built on a 10% grade that were being tested to investigate their ability to laterally divert water downslope. One system had a homogeneous fine layer, while the fine soil of the second barrier was layered to increase its ability to laterally divert infiltrating moisture. The barriers were subjected first to constant infiltration while minimizing evaporative losses and then were exposed to ambient conditions. The continuous infiltration period of the field tests for the two barrier systems was modelled to determine the ability of an existing code to accurately represent capillary barrier behavior embodied in these two designs. Differences between the field test and the model data were found, but in general the simulations appeared to adequately reproduce the response of the test systems. Accounting for moisture retention hysteresis in the layered system will potentially lead to more accurate modelling results and is likely to be important when developing reasonable predictions of capillary barrier behavior.

  6. Self-similar radiation from numerical Rosenau-Hyman compactons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rus, Francisco Villatoro, Francisco R.

    2007-11-10

    The numerical simulation of compactons, solitary waves with compact support, is characterized by the presence of spurious phenomena, as numerically induced radiation, which is illustrated here using four numerical methods applied to the Rosenau-Hyman K(p, p) equation. Both forward and backward radiations are emitted from the compacton presenting a self-similar shape which has been illustrated graphically by the proper scaling. A grid refinement study shows that the amplitude of the radiations decreases as the grid size does, confirming its numerical origin. The front velocity and the amplitude of both radiations have been studied as a function of both the compacton and the numerical parameters. The amplitude of the radiations decreases exponentially in time, being characterized by a nearly constant scaling exponent. An ansatz for both the backward and forward radiations corresponding to a self-similar function characterized by the scaling exponent is suggested by the present numerical results.

  7. Numerical analysis and measurement in corner-fired furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhengjun, S.; Rongsheng, G.

    1999-07-01

    For several years, numerical analysis has been successfully used by Dongfang Boiler (Group) Co., Ltd. at a 200MW boiler, a 300MW boiler and so on, which were designed and made by DBC. The distribution of results is agreement each other between numerical analysis and measurement. In conclusion, it is considered that numerical analysis can be used as an important reference method in pulverized coal boiler design and test.

  8. Numerical Verification of Bounce Harmonic Resonances in Neoclassical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Toroidal Viscosity for Tokamaks (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Numerical Verification of Bounce Harmonic Resonances in Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity for Tokamaks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical Verification of Bounce Harmonic Resonances in Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity for Tokamaks This Letter presents the rst numerical veri cation for the bounce-harmonic (BH) resonance phenomena of the neoclassical transport in a tokamak perturbed by non-axisymmetric magnetic

  9. Numerical Modeling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Numerical Modeling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983)...

  10. Development of Numerical Simulation Capabilities for In Situ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Numerical Simulation Capabilities for In Situ Heating of Oil Shale Hoda, Nazish ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, Houston, TX, USA; Fang, Chen ExxonMobil Upstream Research...

  11. Using fully coupled hydro-geomechanical numerical test bed to...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    test bed to study reservoir stimulation with low hydraulic pressure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Using fully coupled hydro-geomechanical numerical test bed to ...

  12. Final Report on Experimental and Numerical Modeling Activities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Final Report on Experimental and Numerical Modeling Activities for the Newark Basin Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Final Report on Experimental and ...

  13. Numerical Analysis of Fixed Point Algorithms in the Presence...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the Presence of Hardware Faults Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical Analysis of Fixed Point Algorithms in the Presence of Hardware Faults You are ...

  14. Development of Numerical Simulation Capabilities for In Situ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for In Situ Heating of Oil Shale Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of Numerical Simulation Capabilities for In Situ Heating of Oil Shale Authors: Hoda, ...

  15. Numerical Modelling of Geothermal Systems a Short Introduction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modelling of Geothermal Systems a Short Introduction Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: Numerical Modelling of Geothermal Systems a Short...

  16. Accurate and fast numerical solution of Poisson s equation for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Accurate and fast numerical solution of Poisson ... Our method avoids all ill-convergent sums, is simple, accurate, efficient, and works ...

  17. Info-Gap Analysis of Truncation Errors in Numerical Simulations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Info-Gap Analysis of Truncation Errors in Numerical Simulations. Authors: Kamm, James R. ; Witkowski, Walter R. ; Rider, William J. ; Trucano, Timothy Guy ; Ben-Haim, Yakov. ...

  18. Info-Gap Analysis of Numerical Truncation Errors. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Info-Gap Analysis of Numerical Truncation Errors. Authors: Kamm, James R. ; Witkowski, Walter R. ; Rider, William J. ; Trucano, Timothy Guy ; Ben-Haim, Yakov. Publication ...

  19. A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal Exploration - Discussion...

  20. Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    transform is employed to characterize guided-wave's velocity-frequency dispersion, and numerical methods are used to simulate the guided-wave propagation. The modeling...

  1. Numerical Simulation of Ni Grain Growth in a Thermal Gradient

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    665C Numerical Simulation of Ni Grain Growth in a Thermal Gradient Sandia National Laboratories John A. Mitchell and Veena Tikare Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque New ...

  2. Direct Numerical Simulations and Robust Predictions of Cloud...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cloud. Credit: Computational Science and Engineering Laboratory, ETH Zurich, Switzerland Direct Numerical Simulations and Robust Predictions of Cloud Cavitation Collapse PI Name:...

  3. Numerical simulations for low energy nuclear reactions including...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Numerical simulations for low energy nuclear reactions including direct channels to ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  4. An Integrated Experimental and Numerical Study: Developing a...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in a numerical simulator (modified version of TOUGH2) that can adjust porosity and permeability fields according to experimentally observed chemical fluid-rock interactions...

  5. A review of recent advances of numerical simulations of microscale...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Due to the reformer's small size, numerical simulations are critical to understand heat and mass transfer phenomena occurring in the systems. This paper reviews the development of ...

  6. History, Applications, Numerical Values and Problems with the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Numerical Values and Problems with the Calculation of EROI (Energy Return on Energy Investment) Professor Charles Hall State University of NY College of Environmental Science and...

  7. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tightshale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs,...

  8. Numerical Modeling At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (O'Brien...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleNumericalModelingAtLightningDockGeothermalArea(O%27Brien,EtAl.,1984)&oldid762871...

  9. Numerical Modeling of PCCI Combustion | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PCCI Combustion Numerical Modeling of PCCI Combustion 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/University of Michigan 2004_deer_flowers.pdf (252.97 KB) More Documents & Publications Modeling of HCCI and PCCI Combustion Processes Bridging the Gap between Fundamental Physics and Chemistry and Applied Models for HCCI Engines Numerical Modeling of HCCI Combustion

  10. Mineralogical textural and compositional data on the alteration of basaltic glass from Kilauea, Hawaii to 300 degrees C: Insights to the corrosion of a borosilicate glass waste-form. [Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    Mineralogical, textural and compositional data accompanying greenschist facies metamorphism (to 300{degrees}C) of basalts of the East Rift Zone (ERZ), Kilauea, Hawaii may be evaluated relative to published and experimental results for the surface corrosion of borosilicate glass. The ERZ alteration sequence is dominated by intermittent palagonite, interlayered smectite-chlorite, chlorite, and actinolite-epidote-anhydrite. Alteration is best developed in fractures and vesicles where surface reaction layers root on the glass matrix forming rinds in excess of 100 microns thick. Fractures control fluid circulation and the alteration sequence. Proximal to the glass surface, palagonite, Fe-Ti oxides and clays replace fresh glass as the surface reaction layer migrates inwards; away from the surface, amphibole, anhydrite, quartz and calcite crystallize from hydrothermal fluids in contact with the glass. The texture and composition of basaltic glass surfaces are similar to those of a SRL-165 glass leached statically for sixty days at 150 {degrees}C. While the ERZ reservoir is a complex open system, conservative comparisons between the alteration of ERZ and synthetic borosilicate glass are warranted. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Simple intrinsic defects in GaAs : numerical supplement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2012-04-01

    This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in gallium arsenide, GaAs, as computed by density functional theory. This Report serves as a numerical supplement to the results published in: P.A. Schultz and O.A. von Lilienfeld, 'Simple intrinsic defects in GaAs', Modelling Simul. Mater. Sci Eng., Vol. 17, 084007 (2009), and intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models. The numerical results for density functional theory calculations of properties of simple intrinsic defects in gallium arsenide are presented.

  12. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We investigated whether the West African anvil clouds connected with squall line MCSs passing over the Niamey ARM site could be simulated in a numerical model by comparing the ...

  13. Numerical simulation experiments on the long-term evolution of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the long-term evolution of a CO2 plume under a sloping caprock Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical simulation experiments on the long-term evolution of a CO2 plume ...

  14. A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    L Pellerin, J M Johnston & G W Hohmann, Geophysics, 61(1), 1996, Pp 121-130 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Numerical...

  15. Numerical study of heterogeneous mean temperature and shock wave...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We numerically study the gas oscillation with shock wave in a resonator of square cross section by solving the initial and boundary value problem of the system of three-dimensional ...

  16. Lava Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    100C373.15 K 212 F 671.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 5 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  17. Recent advances in two-phase flow numerics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahaffy, J.H.; Macian, R.

    1997-07-01

    The authors review three topics in the broad field of numerical methods that may be of interest to individuals modeling two-phase flow in nuclear power plants. The first topic is iterative solution of linear equations created during the solution of finite volume equations. The second is numerical tracking of macroscopic liquid interfaces. The final area surveyed is the use of higher spatial difference techniques.

  18. Numerical simulations shed new light on early universe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Numerical simulations shed new light on early universe Numerical simulations shed new light on early universe The code simulates conditions during the first few minutes of cosmological evolution to model the role of neutrinos, nuclei and other particles in shaping the early universe. April 21, 2016 Los Alamos scientists developed the BURST computer code to predict-to unprecedented precision-the amounts of light nuclei synthesized in the Big Bang. Los Alamos scientists developed the BURST

  19. An integrated experimental and numerical study: Developing a reaction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    transport model that couples chemical reactions of mineral dissolution/precipitation with spatial and temporal flow variations in CO2/brine/rock systems | Department of Energy An integrated experimental and numerical study: Developing a reaction transport model that couples chemical reactions of mineral dissolution/precipitation with spatial and temporal flow variations in CO2/brine/rock systems An integrated experimental and numerical study: Developing a reaction transport model that

  20. MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING Between The Numerical Algorithms Group Ltd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Between The Numerical Algorithms Group Ltd and The University of California, as Management and Operating Contractor for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on a Visitor Exchange Program This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is by and between the Numerical Algorithms Group Ltd (NAG) with a registered address at: Wilkinson House, Jordan hill Road, Oxford, UK and the University of California, as Management and Operating Contractor for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, including its

  1. Numerical Investigation of Advanced Compressor Technologies | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Investigation of Advanced Compressor Technologies Numerical Investigation of Advanced Compressor Technologies The purpose of the work was to explore advanced boost technologies to support clean diesel combustion, such as HCCI/LTC applications. deer08_sun.pdf (189.93 KB) More Documents & Publications Numerical Investigation of Advanced Compressor Technologies Advanced boost system development for diesel HCCI/LTC applications Advanced Boost System Development for Diesel HCCI/LTC

  2. Simple intrinsic defects in InAs : numerical predictions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2013-03-01

    This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in indium arsenide, InAs, as computed by density functional theory using semi-local density functionals, intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models.

  3. Mathematical and Numerical Analyses of Peridynamics for Multiscale Materials Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunzburger, Max

    2015-02-17

    We have treated the modeling, analysis, numerical analysis, and algorithmic development for nonlocal models of diffusion and mechanics. Variational formulations were developed and finite element methods were developed based on those formulations for both steady state and time dependent problems. Obstacle problems and optimization problems for the nonlocal models were also treated and connections made with fractional derivative models.

  4. Translation and integration of numerical atomic orbitals in linear molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinäsmäki, Sami

    2014-02-14

    We present algorithms for translation and integration of atomic orbitals for LCAO calculations in linear molecules. The method applies to arbitrary radial functions given on a numerical mesh. The algorithms are based on pseudospectral differentiation matrices in two dimensions and the corresponding two-dimensional Gaussian quadratures. As a result, multicenter overlap and Coulomb integrals can be evaluated effectively.

  5. Numerical Modeling At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (U.S....

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Exploration Technique Numerical Modeling Activity Date 2011 - 2011 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis A numerical reservoir model was created to...

  6. Numerical study of thermoacoustic convection in a cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fusegi, Toru; Farouk, B.; Oran, E.S.

    1995-12-31

    Thermoacoustic convection in a two-dimensional cavity is numerically studied. Part of a compressible fluid (Helium) near the center line of the cavity is suddenly energized to generate pressure waves. Numerical solutions are secured by employing a highly accurate explicit method termed LCPFCT algorithm for the convection terms of the full Navier-Stokes equations. Thermoacoustic waves, which decay in large time due to the viscosity of fluid, are of the oscillatory nature. Much higher heat transfer rate can be achieved in an initial stage of transient processes, compared to that due to conduction. When a partial length of the cavity center line is heated, resulting thermoacoustic waves exhibit remarkable two-dimensional patterns.

  7. On Numerical Considerations for Modeling Reactive Astrophysical Shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papatheodore, Thomas L; Messer, Bronson

    2014-01-01

    Simulating detonations in astrophysical environments is often complicated by numerical approximations to shock structure. A common prescription to ensure correct detonation speeds (and associated quantities) is to prohibit burning inside the numerically broadened shock (Fryxell et al. 1989). We have performed a series of simulations to verify the efficacy of this approximation and to understand how resolution and dimensionality might affect its use. Our results show that, in one dimension, prohibiting burning in the shock is important wherever the carbon burning length is not resolved, in keeping with the results of Fryxell et al. (1989). In two dimensions, we find that the prohibition of shock burning effectively inhibits the development of cellular structure for all but the most highly-resolved cases. We discuss the possible impacts this outcome may have on sub-grid models and detonation propagation in Type Ia supernovae.

  8. AEETES---A solar reflux receiver thermal performance numerical model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, R.E. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Reflux solar receivers for dish-Stirling electric power generation systems are currently being investigated by several companies and laboratories. In support of these efforts, the AEETES thermal performance numerical model has been developed to predict thermal performance of pool-boiler and heat-pipe reflux receivers. The formulation of the AEETES numerical model, which is applicable to axisymmetric geometries with asymmetric incident fluxes, is presented in detail. Thermal efficiency predictions agree to within 4.1% with test data from on-sun tests of a pool-boiler reflux receiver. Predicted absorber and sidewall temperatures agree with thermocouple data to within 3.3.% and 7.3%, respectively. The importance of accounting for the asymmetric incident fluxes is demonstrated in comparisons with predictions using azimuthally averaged variables. The predicted receiver heat losses are characterized in terms of convective, solar and infrared radiative, and conductive heat transfer mechanisms. 27 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Numerical modeling of solar magnetostatic structures bounded by current sheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pizzo, V.J. )

    1990-12-01

    A numerical method for efficiently determining the magnetostatic equilibrium configuration of erupted solar flux concentrations, such as sunspots and flux tubes, is presented. The magnetic structures are taken to be approximately vertically oriented and axisymmetric in the surface layers and are assumed to be isolated from the surrounding photosphere by a vanishingly thin current sheet. Since the location of the current sheet is initially unknown, the final structure is generated iteratively as a free-surface problem, with the magnetic configuration for each iterate being obtained from the horizontal force balance equation, subject to the appropriate boundary conditions. Multigrid methods are used at each stage to solve the equilibrium equation, which is mapped algebraically into a body-fitted coordinate system via transfinite interpolation techniques. Several model flux tubes and sunspots are computed to illustrate the procedure, and the accuracy of the numerical method is assessed against exact analytic solutions. 32 refs.

  10. Numerical method for shear bands in ductile metal with inclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plohr, Jee Yeon N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Plohr, Bradley J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    A numerical method for mesoscale simulation of high strain-rate loading of ductile metal containing inclusions is described. Because of small-scale inhomogeneities, such a composite material is prone to localized shear deformation (adiabatic shear bands). The modeling framework is the Generalized Method of Cells of Paley and Aboudi [Mech. Materials, vol. 14, pp. /27-139, 1992], which ensures that the micromechanical response of the material is reflected in the behavior of the composite at the mesoscale. To calculate the effective plastic strain rate when shear bands are present, the analytic and numerical analysis of shear bands by Glimm, Plohr, and Sharp [Mech. Materials, vol. 24, pp. 31-41, 1996] is adapted and extended.

  11. Numerical solution of sand transport in hydraulic fracturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daneshy, A.A.; Crichlow, H.B.

    1980-02-07

    A numerical solution is developed for the deposition of a propping agent inside a hydraulic fracture. Such parameters as fluid leak-off into the formation, increase in sand concentration caused by leak-off, non-Newtonian fracturing fluids, hindered settling velocity, and an up-to-date geometry are taken into consideration. Three examples investigate the proppant deposition for low-, medium-, and high-viscosity fracturing fluids.

  12. Direct Numerical Simulations and Robust Predictions of Cloud Cavitation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collapse | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility cavitating vapor bubbles above a solid wall This image shows cavitating vapor bubbles above a solid wall. The yellow is a visualization of the pressure peak in the center of the bubble cloud. Credit: Computational Science and Engineering Laboratory, ETH Zurich, Switzerland Direct Numerical Simulations and Robust Predictions of Cloud Cavitation Collapse PI Name: Petros Koumoutsakos PI Email: petros@ethz.ch Institution: ETH Zürich Allocation

  13. Direct Numerical Simulations and Robust Predictions of Cloud Cavitation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collapse | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Initiation of cloud cavitation collapse for 50,000 bubbles Initiation of cloud cavitation collapse for 50,000 bubbles. Jonas Sukys, ETH Zurich Direct Numerical Simulations and Robust Predictions of Cloud Cavitation Collapse PI Name: Petros Koumoutsakos PI Email: petros@ethz.ch Institution: ETH Zurich Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 72 Million Year: 2016 Research Domain: Engineering Cloud cavitation collapse-the evolution

  14. Direct Numerical Simulations of High Reynolds Number Turbulent Channel Flow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Visualization of the spanwise vorticity in a turbulent channel. S. Hoyas and O. Flores while they were at Universidad Politecnica de Madrid Direct Numerical Simulations of High Reynolds Number Turbulent Channel Flow PI Name: Robert Moser PI Email: rmoser@ices.utexas.edu Institution: University of Texas Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 175 Million Year: 2013 Research Domain: Engineering Approximately 28% of U.S. energy resources are

  15. Numerical simulations of the decay of primordial magnetic turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahniashvili, Tina [McWilliams Center for Cosmology and Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, ON P3E 2C (Canada); Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Brandenburg, Axel [Nordita, AlbaNova University Center, Roslagstullsbacken 23, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, SE 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Tevzadze, Alexander G. [Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Tbilisi State University, 1 Chavchavadze Avenue Tbilisi, GE-0128 (Georgia); Ratra, Bharat [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    We perform direct numerical simulations of forced and freely decaying 3D magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in order to model magnetic field evolution during cosmological phase transitions in the early Universe. Our approach assumes the existence of a magnetic field generated either by a process during inflation or shortly thereafter, or by bubble collisions during a phase transition. We show that the final configuration of the magnetic field depends on the initial conditions, while the velocity field is nearly independent of initial conditions.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Groundwater Withdrawal at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Rosemary; Giroux, Brian; Pohll, Greg; Hershey, Ronald; Russell, Charles; Howcroft, William

    2004-01-28

    Alternative uses of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) may require large amounts of water to construct and/or operate. The only abundant source of water at the NTS is groundwater. This report describes preliminary modeling to quantify the amount of groundwater available for development from three hydrographic areas at the NTS. Modeling was conducted with a three-dimensional transient numerical groundwater flow model.

  17. NREL Receives Numerous Accolades from Industry and DOE - News Releases |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Receives Numerous Accolades from Industry and DOE Lab honored with awards for sustainability; employees recognized for hydrogen, battery R&D November 8, 2012 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)'s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and its employees have garnered awards and recognition from industry groups for advancing energy research as well as furthering the lab's sustainable operating practices. Bryan Pivovar Named Charles W. Tobias Young Investigator by the

  18. Numerical Simulations of Small Non-spherical Particles in Turbulence |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Numerical Simulations of Small Non-spherical Particles in Turbulence Event Sponsor: Mathematics and Computer Science Division LANS Seminar Start Date: Aug 31 2016 - 3:00pm Building/Room: Building 240/Room 1404-1405 Location: Argonne National Laboratory Speaker(s): Nimish Pujara Speaker(s) Title: UC Berkeley Motivated by the ubiquity of natural particles in turbulent flows in the natural environment as well as in many industrial processes, we investigate

  19. COLLOQUIUM: History, Applications, Numerical Values and Problems with the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calculation of EROI - Energy Return on (Energy) Investment | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab March 2, 2016, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: History, Applications, Numerical Values and Problems with the Calculation of EROI - Energy Return on (Energy) Investment Professor Charles Hall State University of NY College of Environmental Science and Forestry Plants and animals are subjected to fierce selective pressure to do the "right thing" energetically, that is to

  20. Los Alamos National Laboratory communicators capture numerous awards from

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Society for Technical Communication Society for Technical Communication Awards Los Alamos National Laboratory communicators capture numerous awards from Society for Technical Communication Three Los Alamos entries garnered Distinguished Technical Communication awards, the competition's highest award category. April 15, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering

  1. Numerical Modeling of HCCI Combustion | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HCCI Combustion Numerical Modeling of HCCI Combustion Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006_deer_aceves.pdf (840 KB) More Documents & Publications High Fidelity Modeling of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Engines New Methodologies for Analysis of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Engines Modeling of HCCI and PCCI Combustion Processes

  2. Dispersion of helically corrugated waveguides: Analytical, numerical, and experimental study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, G.; Ronald, K.; Young, A.R.; Phelps, A.D.R.; Cross, A.W.; Konoplev, I.V.; He, W.; Thomson, J.; Whyte, C.G.; Samsonov, S.V.; Denisov, G.G.; Bratman, V.L.

    2004-10-01

    Helically corrugated waveguides have recently been studied for use in various applications such as interaction regions in gyrotron traveling-wave tubes and gyrotron backward-wave oscillators and as a dispersive medium for passive microwave pulse compression. The paper presents a summary of various methods that can be used for analysis of the wave dispersion of such waveguides. The results obtained from an analytical approach, simulations with the three-dimensional numerical code MAGIC, and cold microwave measurements are analyzed and compared.

  3. Transient productivity index for numerical well test simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanc, G.; Ding, D.Y.; Ene, A.

    1997-08-01

    The most difficult aspect of numerical simulation of well tests is the treatment of the Bottom Hole Flowing (BHF) Pressure. In full field simulations, this pressure is derived from the Well-block Pressure (WBP) using a numerical productivity index which accounts for the grid size and permeability, and for the well completion. This productivity index is calculated assuming a pseudo-steady state flow regime in the vicinity of the well and is therefore constant during the well production period. Such a pseudo-steady state assumption is no longer valid for the early time of a well test simulation as long as the pressure perturbation has not reached several grid-blocks around the well. This paper offers two different solutions to this problem: (1) The first one is based on the derivation of a Numerical Transient Productivity Index (NTPI) to be applied to Cartesian grids; (2) The second one is based on the use of a Corrected Transmissibility and Accumulation Term (CTAT) in the flow equation. The representation of the pressure behavior given by both solutions is far more accurate than the conventional one as shown by several validation examples which are presented in the following pages.

  4. Numerical simulation of the hydrodynamical combustion to strange quark matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niebergal, Brian; Ouyed, Rachid; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2010-12-15

    We present results from a numerical solution to the burning of neutron matter inside a cold neutron star into stable u,d,s quark matter. Our method solves hydrodynamical flow equations in one dimension with neutrino emission from weak equilibrating reactions, and strange quark diffusion across the burning front. We also include entropy change from heat released in forming the stable quark phase. Our numerical results suggest burning front laminar speeds of 0.002-0.04 times the speed of light, much faster than previous estimates derived using only a reactive-diffusive description. Analytic solutions to hydrodynamical jump conditions with a temperature-dependent equation of state agree very well with our numerical findings for fluid velocities. The most important effect of neutrino cooling is that the conversion front stalls at lower density (below {approx_equal}2 times saturation density). In a two-dimensional setting, such rapid speeds and neutrino cooling may allow for a flame wrinkle instability to develop, possibly leading to detonation.

  5. Numerical Investigation of Laser Propulsion for Transport in Water Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han Bing; Li Beibei; Zhang Hongchao; Chen Jun; Shen Zhonghua; Lu Jian; Ni Xiaowu

    2010-10-08

    Problems that cumber the development of the laser propulsion in atmosphere and vacuum are discussed. Based on the theory of interaction between high-intensity laser and materials, as air and water, it is proved that transport in water environment can be impulsed by laser. The process of laser propulsion in water is investigated theoretically and numerically. It shows that not only the laser induced plasma shock wave, but also the laser induced bubble oscillation shock waves and the pressure induced by the collapsing bubble can be used. Many experimental results show that the theory and the numerical results are valid. The numerical result of the contribution of every propulsion source is given in percentage. And the maximum momentum coupling coefficient Cm is given. Laser propulsion in water environment can be applied in many fields. For example, it can provide highly controllable forces of the order of micro-Newton ({mu}N) in microsystems, such as the MEMS (Micro-electromechanical Systems). It can be used as minimally invasive surgery tools of high temporal and spatial resolution. It can be used as the propulsion source in marine survey and exploitation.

  6. Numerical simulation of steam injection processes with solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zerpa, L.; Mendez, Z.

    1995-12-31

    In Venezuela during recent years, gas oil has been evaluated as an additive to increase steam injection process efficiency. The results of laboratory and field tests have shown a significant improvement in the production behavior. Despite these experiences, it is necessary to complement the information with results obtained from numerical simulation studies in order to know injection parameter effects, such as gas oil concentration, schemes and rates of injection, temperatures, etc., and also some mechanisms involved in the process. In this work, the results achieved in the numerical simulation of displacement tests with steam and gas oil are presented. A fully implicit 2-D thermal, three-phase compositional simulator was used to obtain all the data presented in this paper The numerical simulation results show a similar oil production performance to those obtained in the displacement tests with injection of gas oil and steam simultaneously. These results indicate rising of the production rate when the solvent concentration increases. They also reveal that the solvent co-injection scheme improves the productivity in relation to the gas oil pre-injection at low temperature. However, when gas oil is pre-injected at higher temperature, the oil production performance is similar to the co-injection scheme performance. This can attribute to the favorable temperature effect on the diffusion mechanisms. On the other hand, an increase of the gas oil injection rate causes a productivity reduction. In addition, the gas oil capacity to remove more viscous fractions than the original crude was verified. It was determined that the gas oil light fraction volatilization contributes to the process improvement. In general, these results confirm the benefit of using solvent and contribute to the understanding of process mechanisms.

  7. Diffusive mesh relaxation in ALE finite element numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dube, E.I.

    1996-06-01

    The theory for a diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is developed for use in three-dimensional Arbitary Lagrange/Eulerian (ALE) finite element simulation techniques. This mesh relaxer is derived by a variational principle for an unstructured 3D grid using finite elements, and incorporates hourglass controls in the numerical implementation. The diffusive coefficients are based on the geometric properties of the existing mesh, and are chosen so as to allow for a smooth grid that retains the general shape of the original mesh. The diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is then applied to an ALE code system, and results from several test cases are discussed.

  8. Numerical calculation of the ion polarization in MEIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derbenev, Yaroslav; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong; Kondratenko, Anatoliy; Kondratenko, M A; Filatov, Yury

    2015-09-01

    Ion polarization in the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) is controlled by means of universal 3D spin rotators designed on the basis of "weak" solenoids. We use numerical calculations to demonstrate that the 3D rotators have negligible effect on the orbital properties of the ring. We present calculations of the polarization dynamics along the collider's orbit for both longitudinal and transverse polarization directions at a beam interaction point. We calculate the degree of depolarization due to the longitudinal and transverse beam emittances in case when the zero-integer spin resonance is compensated.

  9. Advanced numerical methods in mesh generation and mesh adaptation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipnikov, Konstantine; Danilov, A; Vassilevski, Y; Agonzal, A

    2010-01-01

    Numerical solution of partial differential equations requires appropriate meshes, efficient solvers and robust and reliable error estimates. Generation of high-quality meshes for complex engineering models is a non-trivial task. This task is made more difficult when the mesh has to be adapted to a problem solution. This article is focused on a synergistic approach to the mesh generation and mesh adaptation, where best properties of various mesh generation methods are combined to build efficiently simplicial meshes. First, the advancing front technique (AFT) is combined with the incremental Delaunay triangulation (DT) to build an initial mesh. Second, the metric-based mesh adaptation (MBA) method is employed to improve quality of the generated mesh and/or to adapt it to a problem solution. We demonstrate with numerical experiments that combination of all three methods is required for robust meshing of complex engineering models. The key to successful mesh generation is the high-quality of the triangles in the initial front. We use a black-box technique to improve surface meshes exported from an unattainable CAD system. The initial surface mesh is refined into a shape-regular triangulation which approximates the boundary with the same accuracy as the CAD mesh. The DT method adds robustness to the AFT. The resulting mesh is topologically correct but may contain a few slivers. The MBA uses seven local operations to modify the mesh topology. It improves significantly the mesh quality. The MBA method is also used to adapt the mesh to a problem solution to minimize computational resources required for solving the problem. The MBA has a solid theoretical background. In the first two experiments, we consider the convection-diffusion and elasticity problems. We demonstrate the optimal reduction rate of the discretization error on a sequence of adaptive strongly anisotropic meshes. The key element of the MBA method is construction of a tensor metric from hierarchical edge

  10. Numerical routines for predicting ignition in pyrotechnic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, K.G.

    1986-06-01

    Two numerical models of the thermal processes leading to ignition in a pyrotechnic device have been developed. These models are based on finite difference approximations to the heat diffusion equation, with temperature-dependent thermal properties, in a single spatial coordinate. The derivation of the finite difference equations is discussed and the methods employed at boundaries and interfaces are given. The sources of the thermal-properties data are identified and how these data are used is explained. The program structure is explained and example runs of the programs are given.

  11. ASSIMILATION OF DOPPLER RADAR DATA INTO NUMERICAL WEATHER MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiswell, S.; Buckley, R.

    2009-01-15

    During the year 2008, the United States National Weather Service (NWS) completed an eight fold increase in sampling capability for weather radars to 250 m resolution. This increase is expected to improve warning lead times by detecting small scale features sooner with increased reliability; however, current NWS operational model domains utilize grid spacing an order of magnitude larger than the radar data resolution, and therefore the added resolution of radar data is not fully exploited. The assimilation of radar reflectivity and velocity data into high resolution numerical weather model forecasts where grid spacing is comparable to the radar data resolution was investigated under a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) 'quick hit' grant to determine the impact of improved data resolution on model predictions with specific initial proof of concept application to daily Savannah River Site operations and emergency response. Development of software to process NWS radar reflectivity and radial velocity data was undertaken for assimilation of observations into numerical models. Data values within the radar data volume undergo automated quality control (QC) analysis routines developed in support of this project to eliminate empty/missing data points, decrease anomalous propagation values, and determine error thresholds by utilizing the calculated variances among data values. The Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) three dimensional variational data assimilation package (WRF-3DVAR) was used to incorporate the QC'ed radar data into input and boundary conditions. The lack of observational data in the vicinity of SRS available to NWS operational models signifies an important data void where radar observations can provide significant input. These observations greatly enhance the knowledge of storm structures and the environmental conditions which influence their development. As the increase in computational power and availability has made higher

  12. Numerical simulation of carbon arc discharge for nanoparticle synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kundrapu, M.; Keidar, M.

    2012-07-15

    Arc discharge with catalyst-filled carbon anode in helium background was used for the synthesis of carbon nanoparticles. In this paper, we present the results of numerical simulation of carbon arc discharges with arc current varying from 10 A to 100 A in a background gas pressure of 68 kPa. Anode sublimation rate and current voltage characteristics are compared with experiments. Distribution of temperature and species density, which is important for the estimation of the growth of nanoparticles, is obtained. The probable location of nanoparticle growth region is identified based on the temperature range for the formation of catalyst clusters.

  13. Numerical studies of the radiant flash pyrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kothari, V.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    When biomass particles are heated very rapidly (temperatures greater than 1000 degrees/s) in an oxygen free environment, they undergo pyrolysis with the formation of little or no char. If concentrated solar energy is used to rapidly heat the particles their temperature may exceed that of the surrounding gaseous environment by several hundred degrees Celsius when pyrolysis occurs. This two temperature effect gives rise to the formation of high yields of syrups from the pyrolyzing biomass. Numerical exploration of the combined effects of heat and mass transfer on the radiative flash pyrolysis phenonmena are described in this paper. 12 references.

  14. High numerical aperture projection system for extreme ultraviolet projection lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudyma, Russell M.

    2000-01-01

    An optical system is described that is compatible with extreme ultraviolet radiation and comprises five reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The five optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as concave, convex, concave, convex, and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for ring field, step and scan lithography methods. The invention uses aspheric mirrors to minimize static distortion and balance the static distortion across the ring field width which effectively minimizes dynamic distortion. The present invention allows for higher device density because the optical system has improved resolution that results from the high numerical aperture, which is at least 0.14.

  15. Numerical analysis of decoy state quantum key distribution protocols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrington, Jim W; Rice, Patrick R

    2008-01-01

    Decoy state protocols are a useful tool for many quantum key distribution systems implemented with weak coherent pulses, allowing significantly better secret bit rates and longer maximum distances. In this paper we present a method to numerically find optimal three-level protocols, and we examine how the secret bit rate and the optimized parameters are dependent on various system properties, such as session length, transmission loss, and visibility. Additionally, we show how to modify the decoy state analysis to handle partially distinguishable decoy states as well as uncertainty in the prepared intensities.

  16. Numerical simulation model for vertical flow in geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tachimori, M.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical simulation model for vertical flow in geothermal wells is presented. The model consists of equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, for thermodynamic state of water, for friction losses, for slip velocity relations, and of the criteria for various flow regimes. A new set of correlations and criteria is presented for two-phase flow to improve the accuracy of predictions; bubbly flow - Griffith and Wallis correlation, slug flow - Nicklin et al. one, annular-mist flow - Inoue and Aoki and modified by the author. The simulation method was verified by data from actual wells.

  17. Numerical Model for Conduction-Cooled Current Lead Heat Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, M.J.; Wang, X.L.; Brueck, H.D.; /DESY

    2011-06-10

    Current leads are utilized to deliver electrical power from a room temperature junction mounted on the vacuum vessel to a superconducting magnet located within the vacuum space of a cryostat. There are many types of current leads used at laboratories throughout the world; however, conduction-cooled current leads are often chosen for their simplicity and reliability. Conduction-cooled leads have the advantage of using common materials, have no superconducting/normal state transition, and have no boil-off vapor to collect. This paper presents a numerical model for conduction-cooled current lead heat loads. This model takes into account varying material and fluid thermal properties, varying thicknesses along the length of the lead, heat transfer in the circumferential and longitudinal directions, electrical power dissipation, and the effect of thermal intercepts. The model is validated by comparing the numerical model results to ideal cases where analytical equations are valid. In addition, the XFEL (X-Ray Free Electron Laser) prototype current leads are modeled and compared to the experimental results from testing at DESY's XFEL Magnet Test Stand (XMTS) and Cryomodule Test Bench (CMTB).

  18. Numerical and experimental analysis of a retrievable offshore loading facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterndorff, M.J.; O`Brien, P.

    1995-12-31

    ROLF (Retrievable Offshore Loading Facility) has been proposed as an alternative offshore oil export tanker loading system for the North Sea. The system consists of a flexible riser ascending from the seabed in a lazy wave configuration to the bow of a dynamically positioned tanker. In order to supplant and support the numerical analyses performed to design the system, an extensive model test program was carried out in a 3D offshore basin at scale 1:50. A model riser with properties equivalent to the properties of the oil filled prototype riser installed in seawater was tested in several combinations of waves and current. During the tests the forces at the bow of the tanker and at the pipeline end manifold were measured together with the motions of the tanker and the riser. The riser motions were measured by means of a video based 3D motion monitoring system. Of special importance was accurate determination of the minimum bending radius for the riser. This was derived based on the measured riser motions. The results of the model tests were compared to numerical analyses by an MCS proprietary riser analysis program.

  19. Numerical analysis of the spatial range of the Kondo effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busser, C. A.; Martins, G. B.; Ribeiro, L. Costa; Vernek, E.; Anda, E. V.; Dagotto, Elbio R

    2010-01-01

    The spatial length of the Kondo screening is still a controversial issue related to Kondo physics. While renormalization-group and Bethe-Ansatz solutions have provided detailed information about the thermodynamics of magnetic impurities, they are insufficient to study the effect on the surrounding electrons, i.e., the spatial range of the correlations created by the Kondo effect between the localized magnetic moment and the conduction electrons. The objective of this work is to present a quantitative way of measuring the extension of these correlations by studying their effect directly on the local density of states (LDOS) at arbitrary distances from the impurity. The numerical techniques used, the embedded cluster approximation, the finite-U slave bosons, and numerical renormalization group, calculate the Green s functions in real space. With this information, one can calculate how the local density of states away from the impurity is modified by its presence, below and above the Kondo temperature, and then estimate the range of the disturbances in the noninteracting Fermi sea due to the Kondo effect, and how it changes with the Kondo temperature TK. The results obtained agree with results obtained through spin-spin correlations, showing that the LDOS captures the phenomenology of the Kondo cloud as well.

  20. A hybrid numerical fluid dynamics code for resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-04-01

    Spasmos is a computational fluid dynamics code that uses two numerical methods to solve the equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows in compressible, inviscid, conducting media[1]. The code is implemented as a set of libraries for the Python programming language[2]. It represents conducting and non-conducting gases and materials with uncomplicated (analytic) equations of state. It supports calculations in 1D, 2D, and 3D geometry, though only the 1D configuation has received significant testing to date. Because it uses the Python interpreter as a front end, users can easily write test programs to model systems with a variety of different numerical and physical parameters. Currently, the code includes 1D test programs for hydrodynamics (linear acoustic waves, the Sod weak shock[3], the Noh strong shock[4], the Sedov explosion[5], magnetic diffusion (decay of a magnetic pulse[6], a driven oscillatory "wine-cellar" problem[7], magnetic equilibrium), and magnetohydrodynamics (an advected magnetic pulse[8], linear MHD waves, a magnetized shock tube[9]). Spasmos current runs only in a serial configuration. In the future, it will use MPI for parallel computation.

  1. Numerical simulation of multi-layered textile composite reinforcement forming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, P.; Hamila, N.; Boisse, P.

    2011-05-04

    One important perspective in aeronautics is to produce large, thick or/and complex structural composite parts. The forming stage presents an important role during the whole manufacturing process, especially for LCM processes (Liquid Composites Moulding) or CFRTP (Continuous Fibre Reinforcements and Thermoplastic resin). Numerical simulations corresponding to multi-layered composite forming allow the prediction for a successful process to produce the thick parts, and importantly, the positions of the fibres after forming to be known. This paper details a set of simulation examples carried out by using a semi-discrete shell finite element made up of unit woven cells. The internal virtual work is applied on all woven cells of the element taking into account tensions, in-plane shear and bending effects. As one key problem, the contact behaviours of tool/ply and ply/ply are described in the numerical model. The simulation results not only improve our understanding of the multi-layered composite forming process but also point out the importance of the fibre orientation and inter-ply friction during formability.

  2. A hybrid numerical fluid dynamics code for resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-04-01

    Spasmos is a computational fluid dynamics code that uses two numerical methods to solve the equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows in compressible, inviscid, conducting media[1]. The code is implemented as a set of libraries for the Python programming language[2]. It represents conducting and non-conducting gases and materials with uncomplicated (analytic) equations of state. It supports calculations in 1D, 2D, and 3D geometry, though only the 1D configuation has received significant testing to date. Becausemore » it uses the Python interpreter as a front end, users can easily write test programs to model systems with a variety of different numerical and physical parameters. Currently, the code includes 1D test programs for hydrodynamics (linear acoustic waves, the Sod weak shock[3], the Noh strong shock[4], the Sedov explosion[5], magnetic diffusion (decay of a magnetic pulse[6], a driven oscillatory "wine-cellar" problem[7], magnetic equilibrium), and magnetohydrodynamics (an advected magnetic pulse[8], linear MHD waves, a magnetized shock tube[9]). Spasmos current runs only in a serial configuration. In the future, it will use MPI for parallel computation.« less

  3. Mathematical and Numerical Analyses of Peridynamics for Multiscale Materials Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Qiang

    2014-11-12

    The rational design of materials, the development of accurate and efficient material simulation algorithms, and the determination of the response of materials to environments and loads occurring in practice all require an understanding of mechanics at disparate spatial and temporal scales. The project addresses mathematical and numerical analyses for material problems for which relevant scales range from those usually treated by molecular dynamics all the way up to those most often treated by classical elasticity. The prevalent approach towards developing a multiscale material model couples two or more well known models, e.g., molecular dynamics and classical elasticity, each of which is useful at a different scale, creating a multiscale multi-model. However, the challenges behind such a coupling are formidable and largely arise because the atomistic and continuum models employ nonlocal and local models of force, respectively. The project focuses on a multiscale analysis of the peridynamics materials model. Peridynamics can be used as a transition between molecular dynamics and classical elasticity so that the difficulties encountered when directly coupling those two models are mitigated. In addition, in some situations, peridynamics can be used all by itself as a material model that accurately and efficiently captures the behavior of materials over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Peridynamics is well suited to these purposes because it employs a nonlocal model of force, analogous to that of molecular dynamics; furthermore, at sufficiently large length scales and assuming smooth deformation, peridynamics can be approximated by classical elasticity. The project will extend the emerging mathematical and numerical analysis of peridynamics. One goal is to develop a peridynamics-enabled multiscale multi-model that potentially provides a new and more extensive mathematical basis for coupling classical elasticity and molecular dynamics, thus enabling next

  4. Rapid installation of numerical models in multiple parent codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brannon, R.M.; Wong, M.K.

    1996-10-01

    A set of``model interface guidelines``, called MIG, is offered as a means to more rapidly install numerical models (such as stress-strain laws) into any parent code (hydrocode, finite element code, etc.) without having to modify the model subroutines. The model developer (who creates the model package in compliance with the guidelines) specifies the model`s input and storage requirements in a standardized way. For portability, database management (such as saving user inputs and field variables) is handled by the parent code. To date, NUG has proved viable in beta installations of several diverse models in vectorized and parallel codes written in different computer languages. A NUG-compliant model can be installed in different codes without modifying the model`s subroutines. By maintaining one model for many codes, MIG facilitates code-to-code comparisons and reduces duplication of effort potentially reducing the cost of installing and sharing models.

  5. Numerical Modeling of Impact Initiation of High Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C J; Piggott, T; Yoh, J; Reaugh, J

    2006-05-31

    We performed continuum mechanics simulations to examine the behavior of energetic materials in Ballistic Chamber Impact (BIC) experiments, using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian code (ALE3D). Our simulations revealed that interface friction plays an important role in inducing the formation of shear bands, which result in 'hot spots' for ignition. The temperature localization during BIC impact was found to be significant in materials with high yield strength. In those materials, there are multiple locations inside shear bands can achieve temperatures exceeding the threshold temperature for reaction. In addition, we investigated the relevant parameters influencing the pressure profile of a BIC test by numerical analysis from a simple phenomenological model. To our surprise, we found that the peaks of BIC pressure profiles not only can be a result of multi-center chemical reactions, but can also arise from factors associated apparatus configuration.

  6. Numerical studies of the radiant flash pyrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kothari, V.; Antal, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    When biomass particles are heated very rapidly (>1000/sup 0/C/s) in an oxygen free environment, they undergo pyrolysis with the formation of little or no char. If concentrated solar energy is used to rapidly heat the particles, their temperature may exceed that of the surrounding gaseous environment by several hundred degrees Celsius when pyrolysis occurs. This ''two temperature'' effect gives rise to the formation of high yields of sirups from the pyrolyzing biomass. Interest in the selective formation of sirups during the radiative flash pyrolysis of biomass caused the authors to initiate numerical explorations of the combined effects of heat and mass transfer on the radiative flash pyrolysis phenomena. These explorations are described in this paper.

  7. Three dimensional numerical simulations of the UPS-292-SC engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Rourke, P.J.; Amsden, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    We present and analyze three-dimensional calculations of the spray, mixing and combustion in the UPS-292 stratified charge engine for three different operating conditions, corresponding to overall air-fuel ratios between 22.4 and 61.0. The numerical calculations are performed with KIVA, a multidimensional arbitrary-mesh, finite-difference hydrodynamics program for internal combustion engine applications. The calculations use a mesh of 10,000 computational cells, which conform to the shape of the piston bowl and cylinder and move to follow piston motion. Each operating condition is calculated from intake valve closure at 118/sup 0/ BTDC to 90/sup 0/ ATDC and requires approximately three hours of CRAY-XMP computer time.

  8. The implementation of substation automation coordinated with numerical protection relaying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welie, G. van; Carolin, T.

    1994-12-31

    During 1987 Eskom embarked on a process of defining user requirements in the area of substation control. This ultimately resulted in a project being established for the procurement and development of a new generation of substation control equipment. At the same time it was decided to establish a new generation of protection schemes for transmission substations, based on numerical protection relays. From the outset, a high degree of coordination was planned between the substation control and protection equipment. Development contracts were placed with suppliers during late 1990 for the protection schemes and during early 1991 for the substation control equipment. These contracts are nearing completion and the first large installations will commence during 1994. The Transmission Group has committed to employing this new technology in all new substations and all substations to be refurbished. This paper discusses the concept of coordinated substation control and protection and gives insight into implementation issues and functional compromises which had to be made to meet project deadlines.

  9. Progress report on LBL's numerical modeling studies on Cerro Prieto

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halfman-Dooley, S.E.; Lippman, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1989-04-01

    An exploitation model of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system is needed to assess the energy capacity of the field, estimate its productive lifetime and develop an optimal reservoir management plan. The model must consider the natural state (i.e., pre-exploitation) conditions of the system and be able to predict changes in the reservoir thermodynamic conditions (and fluid chemistry) in response to fluid production (and injection). This paper discusses the results of a three-dimensional numerical simulation of the natural state conditions of the Cerro Prieto field and compares computed and observed pressure and temperature/enthalpy changes for the 1973--1987 production period. 16 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Numerical analysis of modified Central Solenoid insert design

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khodak, Andrei; Martovetsky, Nicolai; Smirnov, Aleksandre; Titus, Peter

    2015-06-21

    The United States ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for fabrication of the Central Solenoid (CS) for ITER project. The ITER machine is currently under construction by seven parties in Cadarache, France. The CS Insert (CSI) project should provide a verification of the conductor performance in relevant conditions of temperature, field, currents and mechanical strain. The US IPO designed the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at JAEA, Naka. To validate the modified design we performed three-dimensional numerical simulations using coupled solver for simultaneous structural, thermal and electromagnetic analysis. Thermal and electromagneticmore » simulations supported structural calculations providing necessary loads and strains. According to current analysis design of the modified coil satisfies ITER magnet structural design criteria for the following conditions: (1) room temperature, no current, (2) temperature 4K, no current, (3) temperature 4K, current 60 kA direct charge, and (4) temperature 4K, current 60 kA reverse charge. Fatigue life assessment analysis is performed for the alternating conditions of: temperature 4K, no current, and temperature 4K, current 45 kA direct charge. Results of fatigue analysis show that parts of the coil assembly can be qualified for up to 1 million cycles. Distributions of the Current Sharing Temperature (TCS) in the superconductor were obtained from numerical results using parameterization of the critical surface in the form similar to that proposed for ITER. Lastly, special ADPL scripts were developed for ANSYS allowing one-dimensional representation of TCS along the cable, as well as three-dimensional fields of TCS in superconductor material. Published by Elsevier B.V.« less

  11. Numerical analysis of modified Central Solenoid insert design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khodak, Andrei; Martovetsky, Nicolai; Smirnov, Aleksandre; Titus, Peter

    2015-06-21

    The United States ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for fabrication of the Central Solenoid (CS) for ITER project. The ITER machine is currently under construction by seven parties in Cadarache, France. The CS Insert (CSI) project should provide a verification of the conductor performance in relevant conditions of temperature, field, currents and mechanical strain. The US IPO designed the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at JAEA, Naka. To validate the modified design we performed three-dimensional numerical simulations using coupled solver for simultaneous structural, thermal and electromagnetic analysis. Thermal and electromagnetic simulations supported structural calculations providing necessary loads and strains. According to current analysis design of the modified coil satisfies ITER magnet structural design criteria for the following conditions: (1) room temperature, no current, (2) temperature 4K, no current, (3) temperature 4K, current 60 kA direct charge, and (4) temperature 4K, current 60 kA reverse charge. Fatigue life assessment analysis is performed for the alternating conditions of: temperature 4K, no current, and temperature 4K, current 45 kA direct charge. Results of fatigue analysis show that parts of the coil assembly can be qualified for up to 1 million cycles. Distributions of the Current Sharing Temperature (TCS) in the superconductor were obtained from numerical results using parameterization of the critical surface in the form similar to that proposed for ITER. Lastly, special ADPL scripts were developed for ANSYS allowing one-dimensional representation of TCS along the cable, as well as three-dimensional fields of TCS in superconductor material. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Oceanic Trace Gases Numeric Data Packages from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Most data sets or packages, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. The collection provides access to the Oceanographic Numeric Data Packages (NDPs).

  13. Partitioning of Eu between augite and a highly spiked martian basalt composition as a function of oxygen fugacity (IW-1 to QFM): Determination of Eu[superscript 2+]/Eu[superscript 3+] ratios by XANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, J.M.; Papike, J.J.; Sutton, S.R.; Burger, P.V.; Shearer, C.K.; Le, L.; Newville, M.; Choi, Y.

    2010-03-16

    We have determined D{sub Eu} between augite and melt in samples that crystallized from a highly spiked martian basalt composition at four f{sub O{sub 2}} conditions. D{sub Eu} augite/melt shows a steady increase with f{sub O{sub 2}} from 0.086 at IW-1 to 0.274 at IW+3.5. This increase is because Eu{sup 3+} is more compatible than Eu{sup 2+} in the pyroxene structure; thus increasing f{sub O{sub 2}} leads to greater Eu{sup 3+}/Eu{sup 2+} in the melt and more Eu (total) can partition into the crystallizing pyroxene. This interpretation is supported by direct determinations of Eu valence state by XANES, which show a steady increase of Eu{sup 3+}/Eu{sup 2+} with increasing f{sub O{sub 2}} in both pyroxene (0.38 to 14.6) and glass (0.20 to 12.6) in the samples. Also, pyroxene Eu{sup 3+}/Eu{sup 2+} is higher than that of adjacent glass in all the samples, which verifies that Eu{sup 3+} is more compatible than Eu{sup 2+} in the pyroxene structure. Combining partitioning data with XANES data allows for the calculation of specific valence state D-values for augite/melt where D{sub Eu{sup 3+}} = 0.28 and D{sub Eu{sup 2+}} = 0.07.

  14. NUMERICAL STUDY OF THE VISHNIAC INSTABILITY IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michaut, C.; Cavet, C.; Bouquet, S. E.; Roy, F.; Nguyen, H. C.

    2012-11-10

    The Vishniac instability is thought to explain the complex structure of radiative supernova remnants in their Pressure-Driven Thin Shell (PDTS) phase after a blast wave (BW) has propagated from a central explosion. In this paper, the propagation of the BW and the evolution of the PDTS stage are studied numerically with the two-dimensional (2D) code HYDRO-MUSCL for a finite-thickness shell expanding in the interstellar medium (ISM). Special attention is paid to the adiabatic index, {gamma}, and three distinct values are taken for the cavity ({gamma}{sub 1}), the shell ({gamma}{sub 2}), and the ISM ({gamma}{sub 3}) with the condition {gamma}{sub 2} < {gamma}{sub 1}, {gamma}{sub 3}. This low value of {gamma}{sub 2} accounts for the high density in the shell achieved by a strong radiative cooling. Once the spherical background flow is obtained, the evolution of a 2D-axisymmetric perturbation is computed from the linear to the nonlinear regime. The overstable mechanism, previously demonstrated theoretically by E. T. Vishniac in 1983, is recovered numerically in the linear stage and is expected to produce and enhance anisotropies and clumps on the shock front, leading to the disruption of the shell in the nonlinear phase. The period of the increasing oscillations and the growth rate of the instability are derived from several points of view (the position of the perturbed shock front, mass fluxes along the shell, and density maps), and the most unstable mode differing from the value given by Vishniac is computed. In addition, the influence of several parameters (the Mach number, amplitude and wavelength of the perturbation, and adiabatic index) is examined and for wavelengths that are large enough compared to the shell thickness, the same conclusion arises: in the late stage of the evolution of the radiative supernova remnant, the instability is dampened and the angular initial deformation of the shock front is smoothed while the mass density becomes uniform with the

  15. Numerical integration for ab initio many-electron self energy calculations within the GW approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Fang; Lin, Lin; Vigil-Fowler, Derek; Lischner, Johannes; Kemper, Alexander F.; Sharifzadeh, Sahar; Jornada, Felipe H. da; Deslippe, Jack; Yang, Chao; and others

    2015-04-01

    We present a numerical integration scheme for evaluating the convolution of a Green's function with a screened Coulomb potential on the real axis in the GW approximation of the self energy. Our scheme takes the zero broadening limit in Green's function first, replaces the numerator of the integrand with a piecewise polynomial approximation, and performs principal value integration on subintervals analytically. We give the error bound of our numerical integration scheme and show by numerical examples that it is more reliable and accurate than the standard quadrature rules such as the composite trapezoidal rule. We also discuss the benefit of using different self energy expressions to perform the numerical convolution at different frequencies.

  16. Advanced Numerical Methods and Software Approaches for Semiconductor Device Simulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carey, Graham F.; Pardhanani, A. L.; Bova, S. W.

    2000-01-01

    In this article we concisely present several modern strategies that are applicable to driftdominated carrier transport in higher-order deterministic models such as the driftdiffusion, hydrodynamic, and quantum hydrodynamic systems. The approaches include extensions of “upwind” and artificial dissipation schemes, generalization of the traditional Scharfetter – Gummel approach, Petrov – Galerkin and streamline-upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG), “entropy” variables, transformations, least-squares mixed methods and other stabilized Galerkin schemes such as Galerkin least squares and discontinuous Galerkin schemes. The treatment is representative rather than an exhaustive review and several schemes are mentioned only briefly with appropriate reference to the literature. Some of themore » methods have been applied to the semiconductor device problem while others are still in the early stages of development for this class of applications. We have included numerical examples from our recent research tests with some of the methods. A second aspect of the work deals with algorithms that employ unstructured grids in conjunction with adaptive refinement strategies. The full benefits of such approaches have not yet been developed in this application area and we emphasize the need for further work on analysis, data structures and software to support adaptivity. Finally, we briefly consider some aspects of software frameworks. These include dial-an-operator approaches such as that used in the industrial simulator PROPHET, and object-oriented software support such as those in the SANDIA National Laboratory framework SIERRA.« less

  17. Numerical simulation of plasma heating of a composite powder particle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demetriou, M.D.; Lavine, A.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.

    1999-07-01

    The use of fine composite powder particles (composed of a ceramic core and a metallic coating) in plasma spraying processes is desirable in developing thin film coatings that possess high abrasion as well as high fracture resistance. Quantitative knowledge of the thermal behavior of a composite particle in a plasma beam is essential in optimizing the process variables to achieve uniform melting of the coating material. In this work, a numerical model is developed to analyze the in-flight thermal behavior of a spherically symmetric WC-Co composite particle travelling in an argon arc-jet DC plasma under strongly unsteady plasma conditions. The model gives quantitative as well as qualitative information about the thermal response of the heated particle. The important features that are addressed are the temperature response of the particle; the history of the location of the melting and vaporization fronts; and the physical state of the particle at the end of its flight. For the conditions investigated, it was determined that the internal conduction resistance is negligible as compared to the net external resistance. However, the presence of the ceramic base was found to affect the transient heating process since its content in the particle composition determines the time constant of the process. Another interesting observation is that proper selection of the particle injection speed and injection location can be effective means for optimizing the heating process and achieving uniform melting of the coating material.

  18. Advances in the numerical modeling of field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belova, Elena V.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Ji, Hantao; Yamada, Masaaki

    2006-05-15

    The field-reversed configuration (FRC) is a compact torus with little or no toroidal magnetic field. A theoretical understanding of the observed FRC equilibrium and stability properties presents significant challenges due to the high plasma beta, plasma flows, large ion gyroradius, and the stochasticity of the particle orbits. Advanced numerical simulations are generally required to describe and understand the detailed behavior of FRC plasmas. Results of such simulations are presented in this paper. It is shown that 3D nonlinear hybrid simulations using the HYM code [E. V. Belova et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4996 (2000)] reproduce all major experimentally observed stability properties of elongated (theta-pinch-formed) FRCs. Namely, the scaling of the growth rate of the n=1 tilt mode with the S*/E parameter (S* is the FRC kinetic parameter, E is elongation, and n is toroidal mode number), the nonlinear saturation of the tilt mode, ion toroidal spin-up, and the growth of the n=2 rotational mode have been demonstrated and studied in detail. The HYM code has also been used to study stability properties of FRCs formed by the counterhelicity spheromak merging method. A new stability regime has been found for FRCs with elongation E{approx}1, which requires a close-fitting conducting shell and energetic beam ion stabilization.

  19. Comparison of numerical models of a pyrotechnic device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, K.G.

    1986-01-01

    The predictions of two numerical models of a hot-wire initiated pyrotechnic device are compared to each other and to experimental results. Both models employ finite difference approximations to the heat diffusion equation in cylindrical coordinates. The temperature dependence of the thermal properties of the pyrotechnic materials and of the bridgewire are modeled. An Arrhenius' model is used to describe the exothermic reaction in the powder. One model employs a single radial coordinate and predicts the radial temperature distribution in the bridgewire and surrounding powder mass. In addition to the radial coordinate, the other model also employs a longitudinal coordinate to predict the temperature distribution parallel to the axis of the bridgewire. The predictions of the two-dimensional model concerning the energy requirements for ignition and the energy losses from the ends of the bridgewire are presented. A comparison of the predictions of the two models and the development of thermal gradients are employed to define the regime where the assumption, in the one-dimensional model, of negligible heat transfer axial to the bridgewire does not lead to significant error. The general problems associated with predicting ignition from a diffusion model are also discussed.

  20. Numeric spectral radiation hydrodynamic calculations of supernova shock breakouts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sapir, Nir; Halbertal, Dorri

    2014-12-01

    We present here an efficient numerical scheme for solving the non-relativistic one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics equations including inelastic Compton scattering, which is not included in most codes and is crucial for solving problems such as shock breakout. The devised code is applied to the problems of a steady-state planar radiation mediated shock (RMS) and RMS breakout from a stellar envelope. The results are in agreement with those of a previous work on shock breakout, in which Compton equilibrium between matter and radiation was assumed and the 'effective photon' approximation was used to describe the radiation spectrum. In particular, we show that the luminosity and its temporal dependence, the peak temperature at breakout, and the universal shape of the spectral fluence derived in this earlier work are all accurate. Although there is a discrepancy between the spectral calculations and the effective photon approximation due to the inaccuracy of the effective photon approximation estimate of the effective photon production rate, which grows with lower densities and higher velocities, the difference in peak temperature reaches only 30% for the most discrepant cases of fast shocks in blue supergiants. The presented model is exemplified by calculations for supernova 1987A, showing the detailed evolution of the burst spectrum. The incompatibility of the stellar envelope shock breakout model results with observed properties of X-ray flashes (XRFs) and the discrepancy between the predicted and observed rates of XRFs remain unexplained.

  1. Numerical simulation of linear fiction welding (LFW) processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fratini, L.; La Spisa, D. [University of Palermo-Dept. of Industrial engineering (Italy)

    2011-05-04

    Solid state welding processes are becoming increasingly important due to a large number of advantages related to joining ''unweldable'' materials and in particular light weight alloys. Linear friction welding (LFW) has been used successfully to bond non-axisymmetric components of a range of materials including titanium alloys, steels, aluminum alloys, nickel, copper, and also dissimilar material combinations. The technique is useful in the research of quality of the joints and in reducing costs of components and parts of the aeronautic and automotive industries.LFW involves parts to be welded through the relative reciprocating motion of two components under an axial force. In such process the heat source is given by the frictional forces work decaying into heat determining a local softening of the material and proper bonding conditions due to both the temperature increase and the local pressure of the two edges to be welded. This paper is a comparative test between the numerical model in two dimensions, i.e. in plane strain conditions, and in three dimensions of a LFW process of AISI1045 steel specimens. It must be observed that the 3D model assures a faithful simulation of the actual threedimensional material flow, even if the two-dimensional simulation computational times are very short, a few hours instead of several ones as the 3D model. The obtained results were compared with experimental values found out in the scientific literature.

  2. DRIVER TO SUPPORT USE OF NUMERICAL SIMULATION TOOLS

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-02-13

    UNIPACK is a computer interface that simplifies and enhances the use of numerical simulation tools to design a primary geometry and/or a forming die for a powder compact and/or to design the pressing process used to shape a powder by compaction. More particularly, it is an interface that utilizes predefined generic geometric configurations to simplify the use of finite element method modeling software to simply and more efficiently design: (1) the shape and size amore » powder compact; (2) a forming die to shape a powder compact; and/or (3) the pressing process used to form a powder compact. UNIPACK is a user interface for a predictive model for powder compaction that incorporates unprecedented flexibility to design powder press tooling and powder pressing processes. UNIPACK works with the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Engineering Analysis Cide Access System (SEACAS) to generate a finite element (FE) mesh and automatically perform a FE analysis of powder compaction. UNIPACK was developed to allow a non-expert with minimal training to quickly and easily design/construct a variable dimension component or die in real time on a desktop or laptop personal computer.« less

  3. Numerical calculation of two-phase turbulent jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saif, A.A.

    1995-05-01

    Two-phase turbulent round jets were numerically simulated using a multidimensional two-phase CFD code based on the two-fluid model. The turbulence phenomena were treated with the standard k-{epsilon} model. It was modified to take into account the additional dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy by the dispersed phase. Within the context of the two-fluid model it is more appropriate and physically justified to treat the diffusion by an interfacial force in the momentum equation. In this work, the diffusion force and the additional dissipation effect by the dispersed phase were modeled starting from the classical turbulent energy spectrum analysis. A cut-off frequency was proposed to decrease the dissipation effect by the dispersed phase when large size particles are introduced in the flow. The cut-off frequency combined with the bubble-induced turbulence effect allows for an increase in turbulence for large particles. Additional care was taken in choosing the right kind of experimental data from the literature so that a good separate effect test was possible for their models. The models predicted the experimental data very closely and they were general enough to predict extreme limit cases: water-bubble and air-droplet jets.

  4. Numerical investigation of spontaneous flame propagation under RCCI conditions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bhagatwala, Ankit V; Sankaran, Ramanan; Kokjohn, Sage; Chen, Jacqueline H

    2015-06-30

    This paper presents results from one and two-dimensional direct numerical simulations under Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) conditions of a primary reference fuel (PRF) mixture consisting of n-heptane and iso-octane. RCCI uses in-cylinder blending of two fuels with different autoignition characteristics to control combustion phasing and the rate of heat release. These simulations employ an improved model of compression heating through mass source/sink terms developed in a previous work by Bhagatwala et al. (2014), which incorporates feedback from the flow to follow a predetermined experimental pressure trace. Two-dimensional simulations explored parametric variations with respect to temperature stratification, pressure profiles andmore » n-heptane concentration. Furthermore, statistics derived from analysis of diffusion/reaction balances locally normal to the flame surface were used to elucidate combustion characteristics for the different cases. Both deflagration and spontaneous ignition fronts were observed to co-exist, however it was found that higher n-heptane concentration provided a greater degree of flame propagation, whereas lower n-heptane concentration (higher fraction of iso-octane) resulted in more spontaneous ignition fronts. A significant finding was that simulations initialized with a uniform initial temperature and a stratified n-heptane concentration field, resulted in a large fraction of combustion occurring through flame propagation. The proportion of spontaneous ignition fronts increased at higher pressures due to shorter ignition delay when other factors were held constant. For the same pressure and fuel concentration, the contribution of flame propagation to the overall combustion was found to depend on the level of thermal stratification, with higher initial temperature gradients resulting in more deflagration and lower gradients generating more ignition fronts. Statistics of ignition delay are computed to assess the Zel

  5. Numerical investigation of spontaneous flame propagation under RCCI conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhagatwala, Ankit V; Sankaran, Ramanan; Kokjohn, Sage; Chen, Jacqueline H

    2015-06-30

    This paper presents results from one and two-dimensional direct numerical simulations under Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) conditions of a primary reference fuel (PRF) mixture consisting of n-heptane and iso-octane. RCCI uses in-cylinder blending of two fuels with different autoignition characteristics to control combustion phasing and the rate of heat release. These simulations employ an improved model of compression heating through mass source/sink terms developed in a previous work by Bhagatwala et al. (2014), which incorporates feedback from the flow to follow a predetermined experimental pressure trace. Two-dimensional simulations explored parametric variations with respect to temperature stratification, pressure profiles and n-heptane concentration. Furthermore, statistics derived from analysis of diffusion/reaction balances locally normal to the flame surface were used to elucidate combustion characteristics for the different cases. Both deflagration and spontaneous ignition fronts were observed to co-exist, however it was found that higher n-heptane concentration provided a greater degree of flame propagation, whereas lower n-heptane concentration (higher fraction of iso-octane) resulted in more spontaneous ignition fronts. A significant finding was that simulations initialized with a uniform initial temperature and a stratified n-heptane concentration field, resulted in a large fraction of combustion occurring through flame propagation. The proportion of spontaneous ignition fronts increased at higher pressures due to shorter ignition delay when other factors were held constant. For the same pressure and fuel concentration, the contribution of flame propagation to the overall combustion was found to depend on the level of thermal stratification, with higher initial temperature gradients resulting in more deflagration and lower gradients generating more ignition fronts. Statistics of ignition delay are computed to assess the Zel

  6. Numerical modeling of the SNS H{sup ?} ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veitzer, Seth A.; Beckwith, Kristian R. C.; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Stoltz, Peter H.

    2015-04-08

    Ion source rf antennas that produce H- ions can fail when plasma heating causes ablation of the insulating coating due to small structural defects such as cracks. Reducing antenna failures that reduce the operating capabilities of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator is one of the top priorities of the SNS H- Source Program at ORNL. Numerical modeling of ion sources can provide techniques for optimizing design in order to reduce antenna failures. There are a number of difficulties in developing accurate models of rf inductive plasmas. First, a large range of spatial and temporal scales must be resolved in order to accurately capture the physics of plasma motion, including the Debye length, rf frequencies on the order of tens of MHz, simulation time scales of many hundreds of rf periods, large device sizes on tens of cm, and ion motions that are thousands of times slower than electrons. This results in large simulation domains with many computational cells for solving plasma and electromagnetic equations, short time steps, and long-duration simulations. In order to reduce the computational requirements, one can develop implicit models for both fields and particle motions (e.g. divergence-preserving ADI methods), various electrostatic models, or magnetohydrodynamic models. We have performed simulations using all three of these methods and have found that fluid models have the greatest potential for giving accurate solutions while still being fast enough to perform long timescale simulations in a reasonable amount of time. We have implemented a number of fluid models with electromagnetics using the simulation tool USim and applied them to modeling the SNS H- ion source. We found that a reduced, single-fluid MHD model with an imposed magnetic field due to the rf antenna current and the confining multi-cusp field generated increased bulk plasma velocities of > 200 m/s in the region of the antenna where ablation is often observed in the SNS source. We report

  7. Numerical Study of Velocity Shear Stabilization of 3D and Theoretical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We studied the feasibility of resonantly driving GAMs in tokamaks. A numerical simulation ... Theoretical support was provided for the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment, funded in a ...

  8. Improvements to the RELAP5-3D Nearly-Implicit Numerical Scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard A. Riemke; Walter L. Weaver; RIchard R. Schultz

    2005-05-01

    The RELAP5-3D computer program has been improved with regard to its nearly-implicit numerical scheme for twophase flow and single-phase flow. Changes were made to the nearly-implicit numerical scheme finite difference momentum equations as follows: (1) added the velocity flip-flop mass/energy error mitigation logic, (2) added the modified Henry-Fauske choking model, (3) used the new time void fraction in the horizontal stratification force terms and gravity head, and (4) used an implicit form of the artificial viscosity. The code modifications allow the nearly-implicit numerical scheme to be more implicit and lead to enhanced numerical stability.

  9. Numerical method to test a theoretical model of the quantum interferen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A numerical method is provided to fit the experimental conductivity to the complicated conductivity expression for the quantum interference effect of Anderson localization. This ...

  10. A High-Wavenumber Viscosity for High-Resolution Numerical Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, A; Cabot, W H

    2003-02-19

    Numerical simulations of compressible flows are commonly based on the Euler equations when effects of viscosity are thought to be negligible. These equations admit singular solutions, even in cases where the initial and boundary conditions are smooth. So-called ''Euler solvers'' rely on numerical dissipation, explicitly or implicitly present in the scheme, to regularize the problem, such that physical solutions are selected.

  11. Numerical and experimental study of the weld joints formation in welding foam materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bezginov, Roman O. E-mail: rakrekt@mail.ru; Krektuleva, Raisa A. E-mail: rakrekt@mail.ru; Mishin, Mikhail A. E-mail: rakrekt@mail.ru; Cherepanov, Oleg I. Cherepanov, Roman O.

    2014-11-14

    A numerical analysis of fusion welding of steel- and aluminum-based foam materials is carried out. The schemes of the structured and stochastic pore distribution are considered. The research results were used to conduct the experiments which confirmed the reliability of the numerical calculations.

  12. On the Numerical Dispersion of Electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell Code : Finite Grid Instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, Michael David; Huang, Chengkun; Zeng, Yong; Yi, Sunghwan; Albright, Brian James

    2014-07-15

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is widely used in relativistic particle beam and laser plasma modeling. However, the PIC method exhibits numerical instabilities that can render unphysical simulation results or even destroy the simulation. For electromagnetic relativistic beam and plasma modeling, the most relevant numerical instabilities are the finite grid instability and the numerical Cherenkov instability. We review the numerical dispersion relation of the electromagnetic PIC algorithm to analyze the origin of these instabilities. We rigorously derive the faithful 3D numerical dispersion of the PIC algorithm, and then specialize to the Yee FDTD scheme. In particular, we account for the manner in which the PIC algorithm updates and samples the fields and distribution function. Temporal and spatial phase factors from solving Maxwell's equations on the Yee grid with the leapfrog scheme are also explicitly accounted for. Numerical solutions to the electrostatic-like modes in the 1D dispersion relation for a cold drifting plasma are obtained for parameters of interest. In the succeeding analysis, we investigate how the finite grid instability arises from the interaction of the numerical 1D modes admitted in the system and their aliases. The most significant interaction is due critically to the correct representation of the operators in the dispersion relation. We obtain a simple analytic expression for the peak growth rate due to this interaction.

  13. Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D. BRENT; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fecht, Karl R.; Lanigan, David C.; Reidel, Steve; Rust, Colleen F.

    2007-02-28

    In 2006, DOE-ORP initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct Vs measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) confirmation of the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the corehole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt was also penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of movement and less than 15 feet of repeated section. Most of the

  14. Numerical simulation of scattering of acoustic waves by inelastic bodies using hypersingular boundary integral equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daeva, S.G.; Setukha, A.V.

    2015-03-10

    A numerical method for solving a problem of diffraction of acoustic waves by system of solid and thin objects based on the reduction the problem to a boundary integral equation in which the integral is understood in the sense of finite Hadamard value is proposed. To solve this equation we applied piecewise constant approximations and collocation methods numerical scheme. The difference between the constructed scheme and earlier known is in obtaining approximate analytical expressions to appearing system of linear equations coefficients by separating the main part of the kernel integral operator. The proposed numerical scheme is tested on the solution of the model problem of diffraction of an acoustic wave by inelastic sphere.

  15. Numerical research of the optimal control problem in the semi-Markov inventory model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorshenin, Andrey K.

    2015-03-10

    This paper is devoted to the numerical simulation of stochastic system for inventory management products using controlled semi-Markov process. The results of a special software for the systems research and finding the optimal control are presented.

  16. Numerical simulation of tectonic plates motion and seismic process in Central Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peryshkin, A. Yu.; Makarov, P. V. Eremin, M. O.

    2014-11-14

    An evolutionary approach proposed in [1, 2] combining the achievements of traditional macroscopic theory of solid mechanics and basic ideas of nonlinear dynamics is applied in a numerical simulation of present-day tectonic plates motion and seismic process in Central Asia. Relative values of strength parameters of rigid blocks with respect to the soft zones were characterized by the ? parameter that was varied in the numerical experiments within ? = 1.11.8 for different groups of the zonal-block divisibility. In general, the numerical simulations of tectonic block motion and accompanying seismic process in the model geomedium indicate that the numerical solutions of the solid mechanics equations characterize its deformation as a typical behavior of a nonlinear dynamic system under conditions of self-organized criticality.

  17. Numerical thermalization in particle-in-cell simulations with Monte-Carlo collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, P. Y.; Lin, T. Y.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Chen, S. H.

    2014-12-15

    Numerical thermalization in collisional one-dimensional (1D) electrostatic (ES) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations was investigated. Two collision models, the pitch-angle scattering of electrons by the stationary ion background and large-angle collisions between the electrons and the neutral background, were included in the PIC simulation using Monte-Carlo methods. The numerical results show that the thermalization times in both models were considerably reduced by the additional Monte-Carlo collisions as demonstrated by comparisons with Turner's previous simulation results based on a head-on collision model [M. M. Turner, Phys. Plasmas 13, 033506 (2006)]. However, the breakdown of Dawson's scaling law in the collisional 1D ES PIC simulation is more complicated than that was observed by Turner, and the revised scaling law of the numerical thermalization time with numerical parameters are derived on the basis of the simulation results obtained in this study.

  18. Numerical modeling of self-limiting and self-enhancing caprock...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    modeling of self-limiting and self-enhancing caprock alteration induced by CO2 storage in a depleted gas reservoir Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical modeling of ...

  19. A numerical study of crack initiation in a bcc iron system based...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    direct numerical results to the dynamic bifurcation theory R. Haberman, SIAM J. Appl. Math. 37, 69-106 (1979). Authors: Li, Xiantao, E-mail: xli@math.psu.edu 1 + Show Author...

  20. Numerical simulation of the flow in wire-wrapped pin bundles: Effect of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pin-wire contact modeling | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility simulation of the flow in wire-wrapped pin bundles: Effect of pin-wire contact modeling Authors: Merzari, E., Smith, J.G., Tentner, A., Pointer, W.D., Fischer, P. The rapid advancement of numerical techniques and the availability of increasingly powerful supercomputers recently enabled scientists to use large eddy simulation (LES) to simulate numerically the flow in a full subassembly composed of wire-wrapped pins. Because of

  1. Force-controlled absorption in a fully-nonlinear numerical wave tank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spinneken, Johannes Christou, Marios; Swan, Chris

    2014-09-01

    An active control methodology for the absorption of water waves in a numerical wave tank is introduced. This methodology is based upon a force-feedback technique which has previously been shown to be very effective in physical wave tanks. Unlike other methods, an a-priori knowledge of the wave conditions in the tank is not required; the absorption controller being designed to automatically respond to a wide range of wave conditions. In comparison to numerical sponge layers, effective wave absorption is achieved on the boundary, thereby minimising the spatial extent of the numerical wave tank. In contrast to the imposition of radiation conditions, the scheme is inherently capable of absorbing irregular waves. Most importantly, simultaneous generation and absorption can be achieved. This is an important advance when considering inclusion of reflective bodies within the numerical wave tank. In designing the absorption controller, an infinite impulse response filter is adopted, thereby eliminating the problem of non-causality in the controller optimisation. Two alternative controllers are considered, both implemented in a fully-nonlinear wave tank based on a multiple-flux boundary element scheme. To simplify the problem under consideration, the present analysis is limited to water waves propagating in a two-dimensional domain. The paper presents an extensive numerical validation which demonstrates the success of the method for a wide range of wave conditions including regular, focused and random waves. The numerical investigation also highlights some of the limitations of the method, particularly in simultaneously generating and absorbing large amplitude or highly-nonlinear waves. The findings of the present numerical study are directly applicable to related fields where optimum absorption is sought; these include physical wavemaking, wave power absorption and a wide range of numerical wave tank schemes.

  2. Direct Numerical Simulation of Autoiginition of a Hydrogen Jet in a

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preheated Cross Flow | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Numerical Simulation of Autoiginition of a Hydrogen Jet in a Preheated Cross Flow Authors: Abdilghanie, A., Frouzakis, C.E., Fischer, P Autoignition of a nitrogen-diluted hydrogen mixture issuing from a round nozzle into a cross-flowing turbulent stream of preheated air flowing in a channel at a friction Reynolds number Re = 180 is inves- tigated via 3-D direct numerical simulations (DNS) at two crossflow stream temperatures (930

  3. Advanced numerical methods for three dimensional two-phase flow calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toumi, I.; Caruge, D.

    1997-07-01

    This paper is devoted to new numerical methods developed for both one and three dimensional two-phase flow calculations. These methods are finite volume numerical methods and are based on the use of Approximate Riemann Solvers concepts to define convective fluxes versus mean cell quantities. The first part of the paper presents the numerical method for a one dimensional hyperbolic two-fluid model including differential terms as added mass and interface pressure. This numerical solution scheme makes use of the Riemann problem solution to define backward and forward differencing to approximate spatial derivatives. The construction of this approximate Riemann solver uses an extension of Roe`s method that has been successfully used to solve gas dynamic equations. As far as the two-fluid model is hyperbolic, this numerical method seems very efficient for the numerical solution of two-phase flow problems. The scheme was applied both to shock tube problems and to standard tests for two-fluid computer codes. The second part describes the numerical method in the three dimensional case. The authors discuss also some improvements performed to obtain a fully implicit solution method that provides fast running steady state calculations. Such a scheme is not implemented in a thermal-hydraulic computer code devoted to 3-D steady-state and transient computations. Some results obtained for Pressurised Water Reactors concerning upper plenum calculations and a steady state flow in the core with rod bow effect evaluation are presented. In practice these new numerical methods have proved to be stable on non staggered grids and capable of generating accurate non oscillating solutions for two-phase flow calculations.

  4. Elimination of numerical diffusion in 1 - phase and 2 - phase flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajamaeki, M.

    1997-07-01

    The new hydraulics solution method PLIM (Piecewise Linear Interpolation Method) is capable of avoiding the excessive errors, numerical diffusion and also numerical dispersion. The hydraulics solver CFDPLIM uses PLIM and solves the time-dependent one-dimensional flow equations in network geometry. An example is given for 1-phase flow in the case when thermal-hydraulics and reactor kinetics are strongly coupled. Another example concerns oscillations in 2-phase flow. Both the example computations are not possible with conventional methods.

  5. Experimental and numerical investigation of one-dimensional waterflood in porous reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadia, N.; Chaudhari, L.; Mitra, Sushanta K.; Aggarwal, A.; Vinjamur, M.; Singh, R.

    2007-11-15

    Experimental and numerical investigation of relative permeability and oil recovery from the porous reservoir are described for short and long core samples. The relative permeability ratios, which are function of water saturation, obtained from laboratory core flooding experiments have been used for prediction of oil recovery through numerical simulation of non-dimensional Buckley-Leverett equation. The simulation results for oil recovery compared well with recovery results obtained from core flooding experiments. (author)

  6. Harnessing Sun, Wind and Lava for Islands' Energy Needs | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cue in the Energy Development in Island Nations (EDIN) project - this international ... and is currently conducting a wind forecast to assess the potential of local trade ...

  7. Subtask 2.2 - Creating A Numerical Technique for Microseismic Data Inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anastasia Dobroskok; Yevhen Holubnyak; James Sorensen

    2009-05-01

    Geomechanical and geophysical monitoring are the techniques which can complement each other and provide enhancement in the solutions of many problems of geotechnical engineering. One of the most promising geophysical techniques is passive seismic monitoring. The essence of the technique is recording the acoustic signals produced in the subsurface, either naturally or in response to human activity. The acoustic signals are produced by mechanical displacements on the contacts of structural elements (e.g., faults, boundaries of rock blocks, natural and induced fractures). The process can be modeled by modern numerical techniques developed in geomechanics. The report discusses a study that was aimed at the unification of the passive seismic monitoring and numerical modeling for the monitoring of the hydraulic fracture propagation. The approach adopted in the study consisted of numerical modeling of the seismicity accompanying hydraulic fracture propagation and defining seismic attributes and patterns characterizing the process and fracture parameters. Numerical experiments indicated that the spatial distribution of seismic events is correlated to geometrical parameters of hydrofracture. Namely, the highest density of the events is observed along fracture contour, and projection of the events to the fracture plane makes this effect most pronounced. The numerical experiments also showed that dividing the totality of the events into groups corresponding to the steps of fracture propagation allows for reconstructing the geometry of the resulting fracture more accurately than has been done in the majority of commercial applications.

  8. NUMERICAL VERIFICATION OF THE RELAP-7 CORE CHANNEL SINGLE-PHASE MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; Richard Martineau

    2014-06-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation of nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). All the physics in RELAP-7 are fully coupled and the errors resulted from the traditional operator-splitting approach are eliminated. By using 2nd order methods in both time and space and eliminating operator-splitting errors, the numerical error of RELAP-7 can be minimized. Numerical verification is the process to verify the orders of numerical methods. It is an important part of modern verification and validation process. The core channel component in RELAP-7 is designed to simulate coolant flow as well as the conjugated heat transfer between coolant flow and the fuel rod. A special treatment at fuel centerline to avoid numerical singularity for the cylindrical heat conduction in the continuous finite element mesh is discussed. One steady state test case and one fast power up transient test case are utilized for the verification of the core channel model with single-phase flow. Analytical solution for the fuel pin temperature and figures of merit such as peak clad temperature and peak fuel temperature are used to define numerical errors. These cases prove that the mass and energy are well conserved and 2nd order convergence rates for both time and space are achieved in the core channel model.

  9. Numerical and experimental investigation of melting with internal heat generation within cylindrical enclosures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amber Shrivastava; Brian Williams; Ali S. Siahpush; Bruce Savage; John Crepeau

    2014-06-01

    There have been significant efforts by the heat transfer community to investigate the melting phenomenon of materials. These efforts have included the analytical development of equations to represent melting, numerical development of computer codes to assist in modeling the phenomena, and collection of experimental data. The understanding of the melting phenomenon has application in several areas of interest, for example, the melting of a Phase Change Material (PCM) used as a thermal storage medium as well as the melting of the fuel bundle in a nuclear power plant during an accident scenario. The objective of this research is two-fold. First a numerical investigation, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), of melting with internal heat generation for a vertical cylindrical geometry is presented. Second, to the best of authors knowledge, there are very limited number of engineering experimental results available for the case of melting with Internal Heat Generation (IHG). An experiment was performed to produce such data using resistive, or Joule, heating as the IHG mechanism. The numerical results are compared against the experimental results and showed favorable correlation. Uncertainties in the numerical and experimental analysis are discussed. Based on the numerical and experimental analysis, recommendations are made for future work.

  10. Numerical approaches to combustion modeling. Progress in Astronautics and Aeronautics. Vol. 135

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oran, E.S.; Boris, J.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Various papers on numerical approaches to combustion modeling are presented. The topics addressed include; ab initio quantum chemistry for combustion; rate coefficient calculations for combustion modeling; numerical modeling of combustion of complex hydrocarbons; combustion kinetics and sensitivity analysis computations; reduction of chemical reaction models; length scales in laminar and turbulent flames; numerical modeling of laminar diffusion flames; laminar flames in premixed gases; spectral simulations of turbulent reacting flows; vortex simulation of reacting shear flow; combustion modeling using PDF methods. Also considered are: supersonic reacting internal flow fields; studies of detonation initiation, propagation, and quenching; numerical modeling of heterogeneous detonations, deflagration-to-detonation transition to reactive granular materials; toward a microscopic theory of detonations in energetic crystals; overview of spray modeling; liquid drop behavior in dense and dilute clusters; spray combustion in idealized configurations: parallel drop streams; comparisons of deterministic and stochastic computations of drop collisions in dense sprays; ignition and flame spread across solid fuels; numerical study of pulse combustor dynamics; mathematical modeling of enclosure fires; nuclear systems.

  11. Discrete kinetic eigenmode spectra of electron plasma oscillations in weakly collisional plasma: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Carrie; Ng, C. S.

    2013-01-15

    It has been demonstrated that in the presence of weak collisions, described by the Lenard-Bernstein (LB) collision operator, the Landau-damped solutions become true eigenmodes of the system and constitute a complete set [C.-S. Ng et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1974 (1999) and C. S. Ng et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 065002 (2004)]. We present numerical results from an Eulerian Vlasov code that incorporates the Lenard-Bernstein collision operator [A. Lenard and I. B. Bernstein, Phys. Rev. 112, 1456 (1958)]. The effect of collisions on the numerical recursion phenomenon seen in Vlasov codes is discussed. The code is benchmarked against exact linear eigenmode solutions in the presence of weak collisions, and a spectrum of Landau-damped solutions is determined within the limits of numerical resolution. Tests of the orthogonality and the completeness relation are presented.

  12. Technical progress report for application of numerical simulation methodology to automotive combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-12-01

    The second quarterly technical progress report is presented for a program entitled, Application of Numerical Simulation Methodology to Automotive Combustion. The goal of the program is to develop, validate, demonstrate and apply a numerical simulation methodology for in-cylinder reactive flows in internal combustion engines. Previous work on this contract involved the initial development and validation of a finite difference based simulation model for time dependent axisymmetric flows which includes: a generalized coordinate system for arbitrary mesh design and treatment of complex and time dependent boundaries; multiple and interacting chemical species; coupled swirl flow velocity component; and two-equation turbulence closure. In its various stages of development, the model has been used to simulate numerous engine-related problems for validation and demonstration purposes. The technical effort during the current reporting period has concentrated on: reactive flow model development, test and data comparison studies; swirl flow simulations; and in-cylinder compression cycle flow simulations. Results of these studies are discussed.

  13. Foundation heat exchangers for residential ground source heat pump systems Numerical modeling and experimental validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing, Lu; Cullin, James; Spitler, Jeffery; Im, Piljae; Fisher, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    A new type of ground heat exchanger that utilizes the excavation often made for basements or foundations has been proposed as an alternative to conventional ground heat exchangers. This article describes a numerical model that can be used to size these foundation heat exchanger (FHX) systems. The numerical model is a two-dimensional finite-volume model that considers a wide variety of factors, such as soil freezing and evapotranspiration. The FHX numerical model is validated with one year of experimental data collected at an experimental house located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The model shows good agreement with the experimental data-heat pump entering fluid temperatures typically within 1 C (1.8 F) - with minor discrepancies due to approximations, such as constant moisture content throughout the year, uniform evapotranspiration over the seasons, and lack of ground shading in the model.

  14. A NUMERICAL STUDY OF DIFFUSIVE COSMIC-RAY TRANSPORT WITH ADIABATIC FOCUSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Noble, P. L.

    2013-03-01

    Focused particle transport in a nonuniform large-scale magnetic field is investigated numerically in the case of isotropic pitch-angle scattering. Evolving particle density profiles and distribution moments are computed from solutions of a system of stochastic differential equations, equivalent to the original Fokker-Planck equation for the particle distribution. Conflicting analytical predictions for the transport coefficients in the diffusion limit, independently calculated by Beeck and Wibberenz and Shalchi, are compared with the numerical results. The reasons for the discrepancies among the analytical and numerical treatments, as well as the general limitations of the diffusion model, are discussed. The telegraph equation, derived in a higher-order expansion of the particle distribution function, is shown to describe the particle transport much more accurately than the diffusion model, especially ahead of a moving density pulse.

  15. Formulation and numerical analysis of nonisothermal multiphase flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, M.J.

    1995-06-01

    A mathematical formulation is presented for describing the transport of air, water and energy through porous media. The development follows a continuum mechanics approach. The theory assumes the existence of various average macroscopic variables which describe the state of the system. Balance equations for mass and energy are formulated in terms of these macroscopic variables. The system is supplemented with constitutive equations relating fluxes to the state variables, and with transport property specifications. Specification of various mixing rules and thermodynamic relations completes the system of equations. A numerical simulation scheme, employing the method of lines, is described for one-dimensional flow. The numerical method is demonstrated on sample problems involving nonisothermal flow of air and water. The implementation is verified by comparison with existing numerical solutions.

  16. Numerical design of SiC bulk crystal growth for electronic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wejrzanowski, T.; Grybczuk, M.; Kurzydlowski, K. J.; Tymicki, E.

    2014-10-06

    Presented study concerns numerical simulation of Physical Vapor Transport (PVT) growth of bulk Silicon Carbide (SiC) crystals. Silicon Carbide is a wide band gap semiconductor, with numerous applications due to its unique properties. Wider application of SiC is limited by high price and insufficient quality of the product. Those problems can be overcame by optimizing SiC production methods. Experimental optimization of SiC production is expensive because it is time consuming and requires large amounts of energy. Numerical modeling allows to learn more about conditions inside the reactor and helps to optimize the process at much lower cost. In this study several simulations of processes with different reactor geometries were presented along with discussion of reactor geometry influence on obtained monocrystal shape and size.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Horizontal Continuous Casting Process of C194 Copper Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Guojie; Xie Shuisheng; Cheng Lei; Cheng Zhenkang [State Key Laboratory for Fabrication and Processing of Nonferrous Metals, Beijing General Research Institute for Non-ferrous Metals, China, 100088 (China)

    2007-05-17

    Horizontal Continuous Casting (H.C.C) is an important method to cast C194 copper ingot. In this paper, numerical simulation is adopted to investigate the casting process in order to optimize the H.C.C technical parameters, such as the casting temperature, casting speed and cooling intensity. According to the numerical results, the reasonable parameters are that the casting temperature is between 1383K{approx}1463K, the casting speed is between 7.2m/h{approx}10.8m/h and the speed of cooling water is between 3.6m/s{approx}4.6m/s. The results of numerical simulation provide the significant reference to the subsequent experiments.

  18. Numerical solution of the time dependent neutron transport equation by the method of the characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talamo, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    This study presents three numerical algorithms to solve the time dependent neutron transport equation by the method of the characteristics. The algorithms have been developed taking into account delayed neutrons and they have been implemented into the novel MCART code, which solves the neutron transport equation for two-dimensional geometry and an arbitrary number of energy groups. The MCART code uses regular mesh for the representation of the spatial domain, it models up-scattering, and takes advantage of OPENMP and OPENGL algorithms for parallel computing and plotting, respectively. The code has been benchmarked with the multiplication factor results of a Boiling Water Reactor, with the analytical results for a prompt jump transient in an infinite medium, and with PARTISN and TDTORT results for cross section and source transients. The numerical simulations have shown that only two numerical algorithms are stable for small time steps.

  19. Effect of virtual mass on the characteristics and the numerical stability in two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    No, H.C.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1981-04-01

    It is known that the typical six equation two-fluid model of the two-phase flow possesses complex characteristics, exhibits unbounded instabilities in the short-wavelength limit and constitutes an ill-posed initial value problem. Among the suggestions to overcome these difficulties, one model for the virtual mass force terms were studied here, because the virtual mass represents real physical effects to accomplish the dissipation for numerical stability. It was found that the virtual mass has a profound effect upon the mathematical characteristic and numerical stability. Here a quantitative bound on the coefficient of the virtual mass terms was suggested for mathematical hyperbolicity and numerical stability. It was concluded that the finite difference scheme with the virtual mass model is restricted only by the convective stability conditions with the above suggested value.

  20. Proceedings of the IMOG (Interagency Manufacturing Operations Group) Numerical Systems Group. 62nd Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maes, G.J.

    1993-10-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the 62nd Interagency Manufacturing Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. Included are the minutes of the 61st meeting and the agenda for the 62nd meeting. Presentations at the meeting are provided in the appendices to this document. Presentations were: 1992 NSG Annual Report to IMOG Steering Committee; Charter for the IMOG Numerical Systems Group; Y-12 Coordinate Measuring Machine Training Project; IBH NC Controller; Automatically Programmed Metrology Update; Certification of Anvil-5000 for Production Use at the Y-12 Plant; Accord Project; Sandia National Laboratories {open_quotes}Accord{close_quotes}; Demo/Anvil Tool Path Generation 5-Axis; Demo/Video Machine/Robot Animation Dynamics; Demo/Certification of Anvil Tool Path Generation; Tour of the M-60 Inspection Machine; Distributed Numerical Control Certification; Spline Usage Method; Y-12 NC Engineering Status; and Y-12 Manufacturing CAD Systems.

  1. Electromagnetic scattering problems -Numerical issues and new experimental approaches of validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geise, Robert; Neubauer, Bjoern; Zimmer, Georg

    2015-03-10

    Electromagnetic scattering problems, thus the question how radiated energy spreads when impinging on an object, are an essential part of wave propagation. Though the Maxwells differential equations as starting point, are actually quite simple,the integral formulation of an objects boundary conditions, respectively the solution for unknown induced currents can only be solved numerically in most cases.As a timely topic of practical importance the scattering of rotating wind turbines is discussed, the numerical description of which is still based on rigorous approximations with yet unspecified accuracy. In this context the issue of validating numerical solutions is addressed, both with reference simulations but in particular with the experimental approach of scaled measurements. For the latter the idea of an incremental validation is proposed allowing a step by step validation of required new mathematical models in scattering theory.

  2. Dynamical properties of fractal networks: Scaling, numerical simulations, and physical realizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakayama, T.; Yakubo, K. ); Orbach, R.L. )

    1994-04-01

    This article describes the advances that have been made over the past ten years on the problem of fracton excitations in fractal structures. The relevant systems to this subject are so numerous that focus is limited to a specific structure, the percolating network. Recent progress has followed three directions: scaling, numerical simulations, and experiment. In a happy coincidence, large-scale computations, especially those involving array processors, have become possible in recent years. Experimental techniques such as light- and neutron-scattering experiments have also been developed. Together, they form the basis for a review article useful as a guide to understanding these developments and for charting future research directions. In addition, new numerical simulation results for the dynamical properties of diluted antiferromagnets are presented and interpreted in terms of scaling arguments. The authors hope this article will bring the major advances and future issues facing this field into clearer focus, and will stimulate further research on the dynamical properties of random systems.

  3. ARRAY OPTIMIZATION FOR TIDAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN A TIDAL CHANNEL A NUMERICAL MODELING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea

    2014-04-18

    This paper presents an application of a hydrodynamic model to simulate tidal energy extraction in a tidal dominated estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast. A series of numerical experiments were carried out to simulate tidal energy extraction with different turbine array configurations, including location, spacing and array size. Preliminary model results suggest that array optimization for tidal energy extraction in a real-world site is a very complex process that requires consideration of multiple factors. Numerical models can be used effectively to assist turbine siting and array arrangement in a tidal turbine farm for tidal energy extraction.

  4. Numerical investigation of low-viscosity drop breakup in a contracting flow

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Numerical investigation of low-viscosity drop breakup in a contracting flow Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical investigation of low-viscosity drop breakup in a contracting flow Authors: Zhu, Guangdong ; Mammoli, Andrea Publication Date: 2011-03-01 OSTI Identifier: 1256411 Report Number(s): NREL/JA-550-51916 Journal ID: ISSN 1531-3492 DOE Contract Number: AC36-08GO28308 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name:

  5. Numerical study of self modulation instability of 1 nC electron bunch at ATF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang Yun; Mori, Warren; Muggli, Patric

    2012-12-21

    The development of self-modulation instability (SMI) is investigated numerically for the 1 nC electron bunch available at Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Possible experiment based on the simulation results is proposed. All the simulations are performed with the 2D-cylindrically symmetric particle-in-cell code.

  6. Numerical simulation of transient, incongruent vaporization induced by high power laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, C.H.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model and numerical calculations were developed to solve the heat and mass transfer problems specifically for uranum oxide subject to laser irradiation. It can easily be modified for other heat sources or/and other materials. In the uranium-oxygen system, oxygen is the preferentially vaporizing component, and as a result of the finite mobility of oxygen in the solid, an oxygen deficiency is set up near the surface. Because of the bivariant behavior of uranium oxide, the heat transfer problem and the oxygen diffusion problem are coupled and a numerical method of simultaneously solving the two boundary value problems is studied. The temperature dependence of the thermal properties and oxygen diffusivity, as well as the highly ablative effect on the surface, leads to considerable non-linearities in both the governing differential equations and the boundary conditions. Based on the earlier work done in this laboratory by Olstad and Olander on Iron and on Zirconium hydride, the generality of the problem is expanded and the efficiency of the numerical scheme is improved. The finite difference method, along with some advanced numerical techniques, is found to be an efficient way to solve this problem.

  7. Numerical Studies of Collective Phenomena in Two-Dimensional Electron and Cold Atom Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rezayi, Edward

    2013-07-25

    Numerical calculations were carried out to investigate a number of outstanding questions in both two-dimensional electron and cold atom systems. These projects aimed to increase our understanding of the properties of and prospects for non-Abelian states in quantum Hall matter.

  8. On Improving Analytical Models of Cosmic Reionization for Matching Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaurov, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    The methods for studying the epoch of cosmic reionization vary from full radiative transfer simulations to purely analytical models. While numerical approaches are computationally expensive and are not suitable for generating many mock catalogs, analytical methods are based on assumptions and approximations. We explore the interconnection between both methods. First, we ask how the analytical framework of excursion set formalism can be used for statistical analysis of numerical simulations and visual representation of the morphology of ionization fronts. Second, we explore the methods of training the analytical model on a given numerical simulation. We present a new code which emerged from this study. Its main application is to match the analytical model with a numerical simulation. Then, it allows one to generate mock reionization catalogs with volumes exceeding the original simulation quickly and computationally inexpensively, meanwhile reproducing large scale statistical properties. These mock catalogs are particularly useful for CMB polarization and 21cm experiments, where large volumes are required to simulate the observed signal.

  9. A novel method of including Landau level mixing in numerical studies of the quantum Hall effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wooten, Rachel; Quinn, John; Macek, Joseph

    2013-12-04

    Landau level mixing should influence the quantum Hall effect for all except the strongest applied magnetic fields. We propose a simple method for examining the effects of Landau level mixing by incorporating multiple Landau levels into the Haldane pseudopotentials through exact numerical diagonalization. Some of the resulting pseudopotentials for the lowest and first excited Landau levels will be presented.

  10. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 12, Numerically indexed bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-10-01

    This appendix contains the numerically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal solid waste management alternatives. The list references information on the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting and anaerobic digestion of MSW.