National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for numerical modeling performance

  1. AEETES---A solar reflux receiver thermal performance numerical model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, R.E. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Reflux solar receivers for dish-Stirling electric power generation systems are currently being investigated by several companies and laboratories. In support of these efforts, the AEETES thermal performance numerical model has been developed to predict thermal performance of pool-boiler and heat-pipe reflux receivers. The formulation of the AEETES numerical model, which is applicable to axisymmetric geometries with asymmetric incident fluxes, is presented in detail. Thermal efficiency predictions agree to within 4.1% with test data from on-sun tests of a pool-boiler reflux receiver. Predicted absorber and sidewall temperatures agree with thermocouple data to within 3.3.% and 7.3%, respectively. The importance of accounting for the asymmetric incident fluxes is demonstrated in comparisons with predictions using azimuthally averaged variables. The predicted receiver heat losses are characterized in terms of convective, solar and infrared radiative, and conductive heat transfer mechanisms. 27 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Numeric-modeling sensitivity analysis of the performance of wind turbine arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lissaman, P.B.S.; Gyatt, G.W.; Zalay, A.D.

    1982-06-01

    An evaluation of the numerical model created by Lissaman for predicting the performance of wind turbine arrays has been made. Model predictions of the wake parameters have been compared with both full-scale and wind tunnel measurements. Only limited, full-scale data were available, while wind tunnel studies showed difficulties in representing real meteorological conditions. Nevertheless, several modifications and additions have been made to the model using both theoretical and empirical techniques and the new model shows good correlation with experiment. The larger wake growth rate and shorter near wake length predicted by the new model lead to reduced interference effects on downstream turbines and hence greater array efficiencies. The array model has also been re-examined and now incorporates the ability to show the effects of real meteorological conditions such as variations in wind speed and unsteady winds. The resulting computer code has been run to show the sensitivity of array performance to meteorological, machine, and array parameters. Ambient turbulence and windwise spacing are shown to dominate, while hub height ratio is seen to be relatively unimportant. Finally, a detailed analysis of the Goodnoe Hills wind farm in Washington has been made to show how power output can be expected to vary with ambient turbulence, wind speed, and wind direction.

  3. numerical modeling | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Submitted by Ocop(5) Member 15 July, 2014 - 07:07 MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Cost Current DOE LCOE numerical modeling Performance Tidal Wave To normalize competing...

  4. DRSPALL: Impact of the Modification of the Numerical Spallings Model on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Performance Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kicker, Dwayne Curtis; Herrick, Courtney G.; Zeitler, Todd; Malama, Bwalya; Rudeen, David Keith; Gilkey, Amy P.

    2016-01-01

    The numerical code DRSPALL (from direct release spallings) is written to calculate the volume of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) solid waste subject to material failure and transport to the surface as a result of a hypothetical future inadvertent drilling intrusion. An error in the implementation of the DRSPALL finite difference equations was discovered as documented in Software Problem Report (SPR) 13-001. The modifications to DRSPALL to correct the finite difference equations are detailed, and verification and validation testing has been completed for the modified DRSPALL code. The complementary cumulative distribution function (CCDF) of spallings releases obtained using the modified DRSPALL is higher compared to that found in previous WIPP performance assessment (PA) calculations. Compared to previous PAs, there was an increase in the number of vectors that result in a nonzero spallings volume, which generally translates to an increase in spallings releases. The overall mean CCDFs for total releases using the modified DRSPALL are virtually unchanged, thus the modification to DRSPALL did not impact WIPP PA calculation results.

  5. Modifications improve waterflood performance model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Banbi, A.H.; Abdel Wally, A.; Abd-el Fattah, K.A.; Sayyouh, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    Modifications to the Craig-Geffen-Morse (CGM) waterflooding model improve reservoir performance predictions and allow for the inclusion of pressure drop variations with time. The modified model was validated against numerical simulation results. The paper describes the CGM model, the hypothetical data set, the simulation technique, comparisons between the CGM model and the simulation, and modifications to the CGM model relating to pressure drop variation and water production.

  6. PV Reliability & Performance Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reliability & Performance Model - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations ... Twitter Google + Vimeo GovDelivery SlideShare PV Reliability & Performance Model Home...

  7. Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominatedgeothermal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominatedgeothermal reservoirs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical modeling of water injection ...

  8. Numerical Modeling Studies of The Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Numerical Modeling Studies of The Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection ProcessDuring CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical Modeling ...

  9. Numerical Modeling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (McKenna ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Numerical Modeling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (McKenna & Blackwell, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Numerical Modeling...

  10. Advanced Numerical Model for Irradiated Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giorla, Alain B.

    2015-03-01

    In this report, we establish a numerical model for concrete exposed to irradiation to address these three critical points. The model accounts for creep in the cement paste and its coupling with damage, temperature and relative humidity. The shift in failure mode with the loading rate is also properly represented. The numerical model for creep has been validated and calibrated against different experiments in the literature [Wittmann, 1970, Le Roy, 1995]. Results from a simplified model are shown to showcase the ability of numerical homogenization to simulate irradiation effects in concrete. In future works, the complete model will be applied to the analysis of the irradiation experiments of Elleuch et al. [1972] and Kelly et al. [1969]. This requires a careful examination of the experimental environmental conditions as in both cases certain critical information are missing, including the relative humidity history. A sensitivity analysis will be conducted to provide lower and upper bounds of the concrete expansion under irradiation, and check if the scatter in the simulated results matches the one found in experiments. The numerical and experimental results will be compared in terms of expansion and loss of mechanical stiffness and strength. Both effects should be captured accordingly by the model to validate it. Once the model has been validated on these two experiments, it can be applied to simulate concrete from nuclear power plants. To do so, the materials used in these concrete must be as well characterized as possible. The main parameters required are the mechanical properties of each constituent in the concrete (aggregates, cement paste), namely the elastic modulus, the creep properties, the tensile and compressive strength, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the drying shrinkage. These can be either measured experimentally, estimated from the initial composition in the case of cement paste, or back-calculated from mechanical tests on concrete. If some

  11. IR DIAL performance modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharlemann, E.T.

    1994-07-01

    We are developing a DIAL performance model for CALIOPE at LLNL. The intent of the model is to provide quick and interactive parameter sensitivity calculations with immediate graphical output. A brief overview of the features of the performance model is given, along with an example of performance calculations for a non-CALIOPE application.

  12. NUMERICAL MODELING OF CATHODE CONTACT MATERIAL DENSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeppel, Brian J.; Liu, Wenning N.; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-11-01

    Numerical modeling was used to simulate the constrained sintering process of the cathode contact layer during assembly of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). A finite element model based on the continuum theory for sintering of porous bodies was developed and used to investigate candidate low-temperature cathode contact materials. Constitutive parameters for various contact materials under investigation were estimated from dilatometry screening tests, and the influence of processing time, processing temperature, initial grain size, and applied compressive stress on the free sintering response was predicted for selected candidate materials. The densification behavior and generated stresses within a 5-cell planar SOFC stack during sintering, high temperature operation, and room temperature shutdown were predicted. Insufficient constrained densification was observed in the stack at the proposed heat treatment, but beneficial effects of reduced grain size, compressive stack preload, and reduced thermal expansion coefficient on the contact layer densification and stresses were observed.

  13. An Updated Numerical Model Of The Larderello-Travale Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Numerical Model Of The Larderello-Travale Geothermal System, Italy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An Updated Numerical Model Of...

  14. Numerical Modeling Of Basin And Range Geothermal Systems | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for extensional geothermal systems that include structure, heat input, and permeability distribution have been established using numerical models. Extensional geothermal...

  15. Numerical Modelling of Geothermal Systems a Short Introduction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modelling of Geothermal Systems a Short Introduction Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: Numerical Modelling of Geothermal Systems a Short...

  16. Numerical Modeling of PCCI Combustion | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PCCI Combustion Numerical Modeling of PCCI Combustion 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/University of Michigan 2004_deer_flowers.pdf (252.97 KB) More Documents & Publications Modeling of HCCI and PCCI Combustion Processes Bridging the Gap between Fundamental Physics and Chemistry and Applied Models for HCCI Engines Numerical Modeling of HCCI Combustion

  17. On Numerical Considerations for Modeling Reactive Astrophysical Shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papatheodore, Thomas L; Messer, Bronson

    2014-01-01

    Simulating detonations in astrophysical environments is often complicated by numerical approximations to shock structure. A common prescription to ensure correct detonation speeds (and associated quantities) is to prohibit burning inside the numerically broadened shock (Fryxell et al. 1989). We have performed a series of simulations to verify the efficacy of this approximation and to understand how resolution and dimensionality might affect its use. Our results show that, in one dimension, prohibiting burning in the shock is important wherever the carbon burning length is not resolved, in keeping with the results of Fryxell et al. (1989). In two dimensions, we find that the prohibition of shock burning effectively inhibits the development of cellular structure for all but the most highly-resolved cases. We discuss the possible impacts this outcome may have on sub-grid models and detonation propagation in Type Ia supernovae.

  18. Numerical Modeling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Numerical Modeling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983)...

  19. Final Report on Experimental and Numerical Modeling Activities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Final Report on Experimental and Numerical Modeling Activities for the Newark Basin Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Final Report on Experimental and ...

  20. Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    transform is employed to characterize guided-wave's velocity-frequency dispersion, and numerical methods are used to simulate the guided-wave propagation. The modeling...

  1. Numerical Modeling At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (O'Brien...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleNumericalModelingAtLightningDockGeothermalArea(O%27Brien,EtAl.,1984)&oldid762871...

  2. Mathematical and Numerical Analyses of Peridynamics for Multiscale Materials Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunzburger, Max

    2015-02-17

    We have treated the modeling, analysis, numerical analysis, and algorithmic development for nonlocal models of diffusion and mechanics. Variational formulations were developed and finite element methods were developed based on those formulations for both steady state and time dependent problems. Obstacle problems and optimization problems for the nonlocal models were also treated and connections made with fractional derivative models.

  3. Numerical modeling of the SNS H{sup ?} ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veitzer, Seth A.; Beckwith, Kristian R. C.; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Stoltz, Peter H.

    2015-04-08

    Ion source rf antennas that produce H- ions can fail when plasma heating causes ablation of the insulating coating due to small structural defects such as cracks. Reducing antenna failures that reduce the operating capabilities of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator is one of the top priorities of the SNS H- Source Program at ORNL. Numerical modeling of ion sources can provide techniques for optimizing design in order to reduce antenna failures. There are a number of difficulties in developing accurate models of rf inductive plasmas. First, a large range of spatial and temporal scales must be resolved in order to accurately capture the physics of plasma motion, including the Debye length, rf frequencies on the order of tens of MHz, simulation time scales of many hundreds of rf periods, large device sizes on tens of cm, and ion motions that are thousands of times slower than electrons. This results in large simulation domains with many computational cells for solving plasma and electromagnetic equations, short time steps, and long-duration simulations. In order to reduce the computational requirements, one can develop implicit models for both fields and particle motions (e.g. divergence-preserving ADI methods), various electrostatic models, or magnetohydrodynamic models. We have performed simulations using all three of these methods and have found that fluid models have the greatest potential for giving accurate solutions while still being fast enough to perform long timescale simulations in a reasonable amount of time. We have implemented a number of fluid models with electromagnetics using the simulation tool USim and applied them to modeling the SNS H- ion source. We found that a reduced, single-fluid MHD model with an imposed magnetic field due to the rf antenna current and the confining multi-cusp field generated increased bulk plasma velocities of > 200 m/s in the region of the antenna where ablation is often observed in the SNS source. We report

  4. Numerical Modeling of Impact Initiation of High Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C J; Piggott, T; Yoh, J; Reaugh, J

    2006-05-31

    We performed continuum mechanics simulations to examine the behavior of energetic materials in Ballistic Chamber Impact (BIC) experiments, using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian code (ALE3D). Our simulations revealed that interface friction plays an important role in inducing the formation of shear bands, which result in 'hot spots' for ignition. The temperature localization during BIC impact was found to be significant in materials with high yield strength. In those materials, there are multiple locations inside shear bands can achieve temperatures exceeding the threshold temperature for reaction. In addition, we investigated the relevant parameters influencing the pressure profile of a BIC test by numerical analysis from a simple phenomenological model. To our surprise, we found that the peaks of BIC pressure profiles not only can be a result of multi-center chemical reactions, but can also arise from factors associated apparatus configuration.

  5. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We investigated whether the West African anvil clouds connected with squall line MCSs passing over the Niamey ARM site could be simulated in a numerical model by comparing the ...

  6. Rapid installation of numerical models in multiple parent codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brannon, R.M.; Wong, M.K.

    1996-10-01

    A set of``model interface guidelines``, called MIG, is offered as a means to more rapidly install numerical models (such as stress-strain laws) into any parent code (hydrocode, finite element code, etc.) without having to modify the model subroutines. The model developer (who creates the model package in compliance with the guidelines) specifies the model`s input and storage requirements in a standardized way. For portability, database management (such as saving user inputs and field variables) is handled by the parent code. To date, NUG has proved viable in beta installations of several diverse models in vectorized and parallel codes written in different computer languages. A NUG-compliant model can be installed in different codes without modifying the model`s subroutines. By maintaining one model for many codes, MIG facilitates code-to-code comparisons and reduces duplication of effort potentially reducing the cost of installing and sharing models.

  7. Numerical Modeling of HCCI Combustion | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HCCI Combustion Numerical Modeling of HCCI Combustion Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006_deer_aceves.pdf (840 KB) More Documents & Publications High Fidelity Modeling of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Engines New Methodologies for Analysis of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Engines Modeling of HCCI and PCCI Combustion Processes

  8. Selection of a numerical unsaturated flow code for tilted capillary barrier performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, S.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geohydrology Dept.

    1996-09-01

    Capillary barriers consisting of tilted fine-over-coarse layers have been suggested as landfill covers as a means to divert water infiltration away from sensitive underground regions under unsaturated flow conditions, especially for arid and semi-arid regions. Typically, the HELP code is used to evaluate landfill cover performance and design. Unfortunately, due to its simplified treatment of unsaturated flow and its essentially one-dimensional nature, HELP is not adequate to treat the complex multidimensional unsaturated flow processes occurring in a tilted capillary barrier. In order to develop the necessary mechanistic code for the performance evaluation of tilted capillary barriers, an efficient and comprehensive unsaturated flow code needs to be selected for further use and modification. The present study evaluates a number of candidate mechanistic unsaturated flow codes for application to tilted capillary barriers. Factors considered included unsaturated flow modeling, inclusion of evapotranspiration, nodalization flexibility, ease of modification, and numerical efficiency. A number of unsaturated flow codes are available for use with different features and assumptions. The codes chosen for this evaluation are TOUGH2, FEHM, and SWMS{_}2D. All three codes chosen for this evaluation successfully simulated the capillary barrier problem chosen for the code comparison, although FEHM used a reduced grid. The numerical results are a strong function of the numerical weighting scheme. For the same weighting scheme, similar results were obtained from the various codes. Based on the CPU time of the various codes and the code capabilities, the TOUGH2 code has been selected as the appropriate code for tilted capillary barrier performance evaluation, possibly in conjunction with the infiltration, runoff, and evapotranspiration models of HELP. 44 refs.

  9. Sandia PV Array Performance Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The photovoltaic array performance model was developed at Sandia National Laboratories over the last twelve years. Electrical, thermal, and optical characteristics for photovoltaic modules are included in the model, and the model is designed to use hourly solar resource and meteorological data. The versatility and accuracy of the model has been validated for flat-plate modules (all technologies) and for concentrator modules, as well as for large arrays of modules. Applications include system design and sizing, ‘translation’ of field performance measurements to standard reporting conditions, system performance optimization, and real-time comparison of measured versus expected system performance.

  10. Numerical Modeling At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (U.S....

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Exploration Technique Numerical Modeling Activity Date 2011 - 2011 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis A numerical reservoir model was created to...

  11. ASSIMILATION OF DOPPLER RADAR DATA INTO NUMERICAL WEATHER MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiswell, S.; Buckley, R.

    2009-01-15

    During the year 2008, the United States National Weather Service (NWS) completed an eight fold increase in sampling capability for weather radars to 250 m resolution. This increase is expected to improve warning lead times by detecting small scale features sooner with increased reliability; however, current NWS operational model domains utilize grid spacing an order of magnitude larger than the radar data resolution, and therefore the added resolution of radar data is not fully exploited. The assimilation of radar reflectivity and velocity data into high resolution numerical weather model forecasts where grid spacing is comparable to the radar data resolution was investigated under a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) 'quick hit' grant to determine the impact of improved data resolution on model predictions with specific initial proof of concept application to daily Savannah River Site operations and emergency response. Development of software to process NWS radar reflectivity and radial velocity data was undertaken for assimilation of observations into numerical models. Data values within the radar data volume undergo automated quality control (QC) analysis routines developed in support of this project to eliminate empty/missing data points, decrease anomalous propagation values, and determine error thresholds by utilizing the calculated variances among data values. The Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) three dimensional variational data assimilation package (WRF-3DVAR) was used to incorporate the QC'ed radar data into input and boundary conditions. The lack of observational data in the vicinity of SRS available to NWS operational models signifies an important data void where radar observations can provide significant input. These observations greatly enhance the knowledge of storm structures and the environmental conditions which influence their development. As the increase in computational power and availability has made higher

  12. Mathematical and Numerical Analyses of Peridynamics for Multiscale Materials Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Qiang

    2014-11-12

    The rational design of materials, the development of accurate and efficient material simulation algorithms, and the determination of the response of materials to environments and loads occurring in practice all require an understanding of mechanics at disparate spatial and temporal scales. The project addresses mathematical and numerical analyses for material problems for which relevant scales range from those usually treated by molecular dynamics all the way up to those most often treated by classical elasticity. The prevalent approach towards developing a multiscale material model couples two or more well known models, e.g., molecular dynamics and classical elasticity, each of which is useful at a different scale, creating a multiscale multi-model. However, the challenges behind such a coupling are formidable and largely arise because the atomistic and continuum models employ nonlocal and local models of force, respectively. The project focuses on a multiscale analysis of the peridynamics materials model. Peridynamics can be used as a transition between molecular dynamics and classical elasticity so that the difficulties encountered when directly coupling those two models are mitigated. In addition, in some situations, peridynamics can be used all by itself as a material model that accurately and efficiently captures the behavior of materials over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Peridynamics is well suited to these purposes because it employs a nonlocal model of force, analogous to that of molecular dynamics; furthermore, at sufficiently large length scales and assuming smooth deformation, peridynamics can be approximated by classical elasticity. The project will extend the emerging mathematical and numerical analysis of peridynamics. One goal is to develop a peridynamics-enabled multiscale multi-model that potentially provides a new and more extensive mathematical basis for coupling classical elasticity and molecular dynamics, thus enabling next

  13. Numerical simulation model for vertical flow in geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tachimori, M.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical simulation model for vertical flow in geothermal wells is presented. The model consists of equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, for thermodynamic state of water, for friction losses, for slip velocity relations, and of the criteria for various flow regimes. A new set of correlations and criteria is presented for two-phase flow to improve the accuracy of predictions; bubbly flow - Griffith and Wallis correlation, slug flow - Nicklin et al. one, annular-mist flow - Inoue and Aoki and modified by the author. The simulation method was verified by data from actual wells.

  14. Numerical Model for Conduction-Cooled Current Lead Heat Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, M.J.; Wang, X.L.; Brueck, H.D.; /DESY

    2011-06-10

    Current leads are utilized to deliver electrical power from a room temperature junction mounted on the vacuum vessel to a superconducting magnet located within the vacuum space of a cryostat. There are many types of current leads used at laboratories throughout the world; however, conduction-cooled current leads are often chosen for their simplicity and reliability. Conduction-cooled leads have the advantage of using common materials, have no superconducting/normal state transition, and have no boil-off vapor to collect. This paper presents a numerical model for conduction-cooled current lead heat loads. This model takes into account varying material and fluid thermal properties, varying thicknesses along the length of the lead, heat transfer in the circumferential and longitudinal directions, electrical power dissipation, and the effect of thermal intercepts. The model is validated by comparing the numerical model results to ideal cases where analytical equations are valid. In addition, the XFEL (X-Ray Free Electron Laser) prototype current leads are modeled and compared to the experimental results from testing at DESY's XFEL Magnet Test Stand (XMTS) and Cryomodule Test Bench (CMTB).

  15. Comparison of numerical models of a pyrotechnic device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, K.G.

    1986-01-01

    The predictions of two numerical models of a hot-wire initiated pyrotechnic device are compared to each other and to experimental results. Both models employ finite difference approximations to the heat diffusion equation in cylindrical coordinates. The temperature dependence of the thermal properties of the pyrotechnic materials and of the bridgewire are modeled. An Arrhenius' model is used to describe the exothermic reaction in the powder. One model employs a single radial coordinate and predicts the radial temperature distribution in the bridgewire and surrounding powder mass. In addition to the radial coordinate, the other model also employs a longitudinal coordinate to predict the temperature distribution parallel to the axis of the bridgewire. The predictions of the two-dimensional model concerning the energy requirements for ignition and the energy losses from the ends of the bridgewire are presented. A comparison of the predictions of the two models and the development of thermal gradients are employed to define the regime where the assumption, in the one-dimensional model, of negligible heat transfer axial to the bridgewire does not lead to significant error. The general problems associated with predicting ignition from a diffusion model are also discussed.

  16. Numerical modeling of solar magnetostatic structures bounded by current sheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pizzo, V.J. )

    1990-12-01

    A numerical method for efficiently determining the magnetostatic equilibrium configuration of erupted solar flux concentrations, such as sunspots and flux tubes, is presented. The magnetic structures are taken to be approximately vertically oriented and axisymmetric in the surface layers and are assumed to be isolated from the surrounding photosphere by a vanishingly thin current sheet. Since the location of the current sheet is initially unknown, the final structure is generated iteratively as a free-surface problem, with the magnetic configuration for each iterate being obtained from the horizontal force balance equation, subject to the appropriate boundary conditions. Multigrid methods are used at each stage to solve the equilibrium equation, which is mapped algebraically into a body-fitted coordinate system via transfinite interpolation techniques. Several model flux tubes and sunspots are computed to illustrate the procedure, and the accuracy of the numerical method is assessed against exact analytic solutions. 32 refs.

  17. Numerical Modeling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Benoit, 1999...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    large geothermal flow test was performed where there was 6 geothermal wells flowing at once and 8 idle wells being monitored. The conceptual model developed from this flow test...

  18. Performance of the Community Earth System Model | Argonne Leadership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing Facility Performance of the Community Earth System Model Authors: Worley, P.H., Craig, A., Dennis, J., Mirin, A.A., Taylor, M.A., Vertenstein, M. The Community Earth System Model (CESM), released in June 2010, incorporates new physical process and new numerical algorithm options, significantly enhancing simulation capabilities over its predecessor, the June 2004 release of the Community Climate System Model. CESM also includes enhanced performance tuning options and performance

  19. Development of a Numerical Simulator for Analyzing the Geomechanical Performance of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rutqvist, J.; Moridis, G.J.

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the development and application of a numerical simulator that analyzes the geomechanical performance of hydrate-bearing sediments, which may become an important future energy supply. The simulator is developed by coupling a robust numerical simulator of coupled fluid flow, hydrate thermodynamics, and phase behavior in geologic media (TOUGH+HYDRATE) with an established geomechanical code (FLAC3D). We demonstrate the current simulator capabilities and applicability for two examples of geomechanical responses of hydrate bearing sediments during production-induced hydrate dissociation. In these applications, the coupled geomechanical behavior within hydrate-bearing seducements are considered through a Mohr-Coulomb constitutive model, corrected for changes in pore-filling hydrate and ice content, based on laboratory data. The results demonstrate how depressurization-based gas production from oceanic hydrate deposits may lead to severe geomechanical problems unless care is taken in designing the production scheme. We conclude that the coupled simulator can be used to design production strategies for optimizing production, while avoiding damaging geomechanical problems.

  20. Progress report on LBL's numerical modeling studies on Cerro Prieto

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halfman-Dooley, S.E.; Lippman, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1989-04-01

    An exploitation model of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system is needed to assess the energy capacity of the field, estimate its productive lifetime and develop an optimal reservoir management plan. The model must consider the natural state (i.e., pre-exploitation) conditions of the system and be able to predict changes in the reservoir thermodynamic conditions (and fluid chemistry) in response to fluid production (and injection). This paper discusses the results of a three-dimensional numerical simulation of the natural state conditions of the Cerro Prieto field and compares computed and observed pressure and temperature/enthalpy changes for the 1973--1987 production period. 16 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. PV Reliability & Performance Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reliability & Performance Model - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs

  2. Numerical modeling of an all vanadium redox flow battery.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clausen, Jonathan R.; Brunini, Victor E.; Moffat, Harry K.; Martinez, Mario J.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a capability to simulate reduction-oxidation (redox) flow batteries in the Sierra Multi-Mechanics code base. Specifically, we focus on all-vanadium redox flow batteries; however, the capability is general in implementation and could be adopted to other chemistries. The electrochemical and porous flow models follow those developed in the recent publication by [28]. We review the model implemented in this work and its assumptions, and we show several verification cases including a binary electrolyte, and a battery half-cell. Then, we compare our model implementation with the experimental results shown in [28], with good agreement seen. Next, a sensitivity study is conducted for the major model parameters, which is beneficial in targeting specific features of the redox flow cell for improvement. Lastly, we simulate a three-dimensional version of the flow cell to determine the impact of plenum channels on the performance of the cell. Such channels are frequently seen in experimental designs where the current collector plates are borrowed from fuel cell designs. These designs use a serpentine channel etched into a solid collector plate.

  3. Current and planned numerical development for improving computing performance for long duration and/or low pressure transients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faydide, B.

    1997-07-01

    This paper presents the current and planned numerical development for improving computing performance in case of Cathare applications needing real time, like simulator applications. Cathare is a thermalhydraulic code developed by CEA (DRN), IPSN, EDF and FRAMATOME for PWR safety analysis. First, the general characteristics of the code are presented, dealing with physical models, numerical topics, and validation strategy. Then, the current and planned applications of Cathare in the field of simulators are discussed. Some of these applications were made in the past, using a simplified and fast-running version of Cathare (Cathare-Simu); the status of the numerical improvements obtained with Cathare-Simu is presented. The planned developments concern mainly the Simulator Cathare Release (SCAR) project which deals with the use of the most recent version of Cathare inside simulators. In this frame, the numerical developments are related with the speed up of the calculation process, using parallel processing and improvement of code reliability on a large set of NPP transients.

  4. A Numerical Model of the Temperature Field of the Cast and Solidified Ceramic Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kavicka, Frantisek; Sekanina, Bohumil; Stransky, Karel; Stetina, Josef [Brno University of Technology, Brno, Technicka 2 (Czech Republic); Dobrovska, Jana [Technical University of Ostrava, Ostrava, Tr. 17.listopadu 17 (Czech Republic)

    2010-06-15

    Corundo-baddeleyit material (CBM)--EUCOR--is a heat- and wear-resistant material even at extreme temperatures. This article introduces a numerical model of solidification and cooling of this material in a non-metallic mould. The model is capable of determining the total solidification time of the casting and also the place of the casting which solidifies last. Furthermore, it is possible to calculate the temperature gradient in any point and time, and also determine the local solidification time and the solidification interval of any point. The local solidification time is one of the input parameters for the cooperating model of chemical heterogeneity. This second model and its application on samples of EUCOR prove that the applied method of measurement of chemical heterogeneity provides detailed quantitative information on the material structure and makes it possible to analyse the solidification process. The analysis of this process entails statistical processing of the results of the measurements of the heterogeneity of the components of EUCOR and performs correlation of individual components during solidification. The crystallisation process seems to be very complicated, where the macro- and microscopic segregations differ significantly. The verification of both numerical models was conducted on a real cast 350x200x400 mm block.

  5. Numerical Modeling of the Lake Mary Road Bridge for Foundation Reuse Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sitek, M. A.; Bojanowski, C.; Lottes, S. A.

    2015-04-01

    This project uses numerical techniques to assess the structural integrity and capacity of the bridge foundations and, as a result, reduces the risk associated with reusing the same foundation for a new superstructure. Nondestructive test methods of different types were used in combination with the numerical modeling and analysis. The onsite tests included visual inspection, tomography, ground penetrating radar, drilling boreholes and coreholes, and the laboratory tests on recovered samples. The results were utilized to identify the current geometry of the structure with foundation, including the hidden geometry of the abutments and piers, and soil and foundation material properties. This data was used to build the numerical models and run computational analyses on a high performance computer cluster to assess the structural integrity of the bridge and foundations including the suitability of the foundation for reuse with a new superstructure and traffic that will increase the load on the foundations. Computational analysis is more cost-effective and gives an advantage of getting more detailed knowledge about the structural response. It also enables to go beyond non-destructive testing and find the failure conditions without destroying the structure under consideration.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Examination of the Thermal Transmittance of High Performance Window Frames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen Ph.D., Arild; Goudey, Howdy; Kohler, Christian; Arasteh P.E., Dariush; Uvslokk, Sivert; Talev, Goce; Petter Jelle Ph.D., Bjorn

    2010-06-17

    While window frames typically represent 20-30percent of the overall window area, their impact on the total window heat transfer rates may be much larger. This effect is even greater in low-conductance (highly insulating) windows which incorporate very low conductance glazings. Developing low-conductance window frames requires accurate simulation tools for product research and development. The Passivhaus Institute in Germany states that windows (glazing and frames, combined) should have U-values not exceeding 0.80 W/(m??K). This has created a niche market for highly insulating frames, with frame U-values typically around 0.7-1.0 W/(m2 cdot K). The U-values reported are often based on numerical simulations according to international simulation standards. It is prudent to check the accuracy of these calculation standards, especially for high performance products before more manufacturers begin to use them to improve other product offerings. In this paper the thermal transmittance of five highly insulating window frames (three wooden frames, one aluminum frame and one PVC frame), found from numerical simulations and experiments, are compared. Hot box calorimeter results are compared with numerical simulations according to ISO 10077-2 and ISO 15099. In addition CFD simulations have been carried out, in order to use the most accurate tool available to investigate the convection and radiation effects inside the frame cavities. Our results show that available tools commonly used to evaluate window performance, based on ISO standards, give good overall agreement, but specific areas need improvement.

  7. Numerical modeling of self-limiting and self-enhancing caprock...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    modeling of self-limiting and self-enhancing caprock alteration induced by CO2 storage in a depleted gas reservoir Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical modeling of ...

  8. Performance and Architecture Lab Modeling Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-06-19

    Analytical application performance models are critical for diagnosing performance-limiting resources, optimizing systems, and designing machines. Creating models, however, is difficult. Furthermore, models are frequently expressed in forms that are hard to distribute and validate. The Performance and Architecture Lab Modeling tool, or Palm, is a modeling tool designed to make application modeling easier. Palm provides a source code modeling annotation language. Not only does the modeling language divide the modeling task into sub problems, itmore » formally links an application's source code with its model. This link is important because a model's purpose is to capture application behavior. Furthermore, this link makes it possible to define rules for generating models according to source code organization. Palm generates hierarchical models according to well-defined rules. Given an application, a set of annotations, and a representative execution environment, Palm will generate the same model. A generated model is a an executable program whose constituent parts directly correspond to the modeled application. Palm generates models by combining top-down (human-provided) semantic insight with bottom-up static and dynamic analysis. A model's hierarchy is defined by static and dynamic source code structure. Because Palm coordinates models and source code, Palm's models are 'first-class' and reproducible. Palm automates common modeling tasks. For instance, Palm incorporates measurements to focus attention, represent constant behavior, and validate models. Palm's workflow is as follows. The workflow's input is source code annotated with Palm modeling annotations. The most important annotation models an instance of a block of code. Given annotated source code, the Palm Compiler produces executables and the Palm Monitor collects a representative performance profile. The Palm Generator synthesizes a model based on the static and dynamic mapping of annotations to program

  9. Performance and Architecture Lab Modeling Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-06-19

    Analytical application performance models are critical for diagnosing performance-limiting resources, optimizing systems, and designing machines. Creating models, however, is difficult. Furthermore, models are frequently expressed in forms that are hard to distribute and validate. The Performance and Architecture Lab Modeling tool, or Palm, is a modeling tool designed to make application modeling easier. Palm provides a source code modeling annotation language. Not only does the modeling language divide the modeling task into sub problems, it formally links an application's source code with its model. This link is important because a model's purpose is to capture application behavior. Furthermore, this link makes it possible to define rules for generating models according to source code organization. Palm generates hierarchical models according to well-defined rules. Given an application, a set of annotations, and a representative execution environment, Palm will generate the same model. A generated model is a an executable program whose constituent parts directly correspond to the modeled application. Palm generates models by combining top-down (human-provided) semantic insight with bottom-up static and dynamic analysis. A model's hierarchy is defined by static and dynamic source code structure. Because Palm coordinates models and source code, Palm's models are 'first-class' and reproducible. Palm automates common modeling tasks. For instance, Palm incorporates measurements to focus attention, represent constant behavior, and validate models. Palm's workflow is as follows. The workflow's input is source code annotated with Palm modeling annotations. The most important annotation models an instance of a block of code. Given annotated source code, the Palm Compiler produces executables and the Palm Monitor collects a representative performance profile. The Palm Generator synthesizes a model based on the static and dynamic mapping of annotations to program behavior

  10. Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    velocity structure have been estimated. It is suggested that the identification and modeling of guided waves is an effective tool to locate fracture-induced, low-velocity...

  11. Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (2010) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    model was developed using Poly3D to simulate the distribution and magnitude of stress concentration in the vicinity of the borehole floor, and determine the conditions...

  12. Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    transport and exchange analysis Notes Finite element models of single-phase, variable-density fluid flow, conductive- convective heat transfer, fluid-rock isotope exchange, and...

  13. Numerical modeling of aerial bursts and ablation melting of Libyan...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 58 GEOSCIENCES; ABLATION; DESERTS; GLASS; MELTING; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; LIBYAN ARAB ...

  14. Numerical studies on the performance of a flow distributor in tank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Soo Jai Kim, Young In; Ryu, Seungyeob; Bae, Youngmin; Kim, Keung Koo

    2015-03-10

    Flow distributors are generally observed in several nuclear power plants. During core make-up tank (CMT) injection into the reactor, the condensation and thermal stratification are observed in the CMT, and rapid condensation disturbs the injection operation. To reduce the condensation phenomena in the tank, CMT was equipped with a flow distributor. The optimal design of the flow distributor is very important to ensure the structural integrity the CMT and its safe operation during certain transient or accident conditions. In the present study, we numerically investigated the performance of a flow distributor in tank with different shape factors such as the total number of holes, pitch-to-hole diameter ratios, diameter of the hole, and the area ratios. These data will contribute to a design of the flow distributor.

  15. Analytic models of supercomputer performance in multiprogramming environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menasce, D.A. ); Almeida, V.A.F. )

    1989-01-01

    Supercomputers run multiprogrammed time-sharing operating systems, so their facilities can be shared by many local and remote users. Therefore, it is important to be able to assess the performance of supercomputers and multiprogrammed environments. Analytic models based on Queueing Networks (QNs) and Stochastic Petri Nets (SPNs) are used in this paper with two purposes: to evaluate the performance of supercomputers in multiprogrammed environments, and to compare, performance-wise, conventional supercomputer architectures with a novel architecture proposed here. It is shown, with the aid of the analytic models, that the proposed architecture is preferable performance-wise over the existing conventional supercomputer architectures. A three-level workload characterization model for supercomputers is presented. Input data for the numerical examples discussed here are extracted from the well-known Los Alamos benchmark, and the results are validated by simulation.

  16. Numerically Solvable Model for Resonant Collisions of Electronswith Diatomic Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houfek, Karel; Rescigno, T.N.; McCurdy, C.W.

    2006-01-27

    We describe a simple model for electron-molecule collisions that has one nuclear and one electronic degree of freedom and that can be solved to arbitrarily high precision, without making the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, by employing a combination of the exterior complex scaling method and a finite-element implementation of the discrete variable representation. We compare exact cross sections for vibrational excitation and dissociative attachment with results obtained using the local complex potential approximation as commonly applied in the ''boomerang'' model, and suggest how this two-dimensional model can be used to test the underpinnings of contemporary nonlocal approximations to resonant collisions.

  17. Sandia Energy - PV Reliability & Performance Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15-06-01T20:13:00+00:00 This Web Demo model is a simplified "player" version of the Photovoltaic Reliability Performance Model (PV-RPM) currently in development at Sandia National...

  18. Three-Dimensional Numerical Evaluation of Thermal Performance of Uninsulated Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridouane, El Hassan; Bianchi, Marcus V.A.

    2011-11-01

    This study describes a detailed 3D computational fluid dynamics model that evaluates the thermal performance of uninsulated wall assemblies. It accounts for conduction through framing, convection, and radiation and allows for material property variations with temperature. This research was presented at the ASME 2011 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exhibition; Denver, Colorado; November 11-17, 2011

  19. Numerical Modeling of the Nucleation Conditions of Petal-Centerline...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    model using Poly3D has been developed to investigate the conditions in which the stress concentration below the floor of a borehole can cause tensile stress necessary to...

  20. Advances in the numerical modeling of field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belova, Elena V.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Ji, Hantao; Yamada, Masaaki

    2006-05-15

    The field-reversed configuration (FRC) is a compact torus with little or no toroidal magnetic field. A theoretical understanding of the observed FRC equilibrium and stability properties presents significant challenges due to the high plasma beta, plasma flows, large ion gyroradius, and the stochasticity of the particle orbits. Advanced numerical simulations are generally required to describe and understand the detailed behavior of FRC plasmas. Results of such simulations are presented in this paper. It is shown that 3D nonlinear hybrid simulations using the HYM code [E. V. Belova et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4996 (2000)] reproduce all major experimentally observed stability properties of elongated (theta-pinch-formed) FRCs. Namely, the scaling of the growth rate of the n=1 tilt mode with the S*/E parameter (S* is the FRC kinetic parameter, E is elongation, and n is toroidal mode number), the nonlinear saturation of the tilt mode, ion toroidal spin-up, and the growth of the n=2 rotational mode have been demonstrated and studied in detail. The HYM code has also been used to study stability properties of FRCs formed by the counterhelicity spheromak merging method. A new stability regime has been found for FRCs with elongation E{approx}1, which requires a close-fitting conducting shell and energetic beam ion stabilization.

  1. Numerical simulations of altocumulus with a cloud resolving model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, S.; Krueger, S.K.

    1996-04-01

    Altocumulus and altostratus clouds together cover approximately 22% of the earth`s surface. They play an important role in the earth`s energy budget through their effect on solar and infrared radiation. However, there has been little altocumulus cloud investigation by either modelers or observational programs. Starr and Cox (SC) (1985a,b) simulated an altostratus case as part of the same study in which they modeled a thin layer of cirrus. Although this calculation was originally described as representing altostratus, it probably better represents altocumulus stratiformis. In this paper, we simulate altocumulus cloud with a cloud resolving model (CRM). We simply describe the CRM first. We calculate the same middle-level cloud case as SC to compare our results with theirs. We will look at the role of cloud-scale processes in response to large-scale forcing. We will also discuss radiative effects by simulating diurnal and nocturnal cases. Finally, we discuss the utility of a 1D model by comparing 1D simulations and 2D simulations.

  2. Joint physical and numerical modeling of water distribution networks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, Adam; O'Hern, Timothy John; Orear, Leslie Jr.; Kajder, Karen C.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Cappelle, Malynda A.; Khalsa, Siri Sahib; Wright, Jerome L.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Chwirka, J. Benjamin; Hartenberger, Joel David; McKenna, Sean Andrew; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and modeling effort undertaken to understand solute mixing in a water distribution network conducted during the last year of a 3-year project. The experimental effort involves measurement of extent of mixing within different configurations of pipe networks, measurement of dynamic mixing in a single mixing tank, and measurement of dynamic solute mixing in a combined network-tank configuration. High resolution analysis of turbulence mixing is carried out via high speed photography as well as 3D finite-volume based Large Eddy Simulation turbulence models. Macroscopic mixing rules based on flow momentum balance are also explored, and in some cases, implemented in EPANET. A new version EPANET code was developed to yield better mixing predictions. The impact of a storage tank on pipe mixing in a combined pipe-tank network during diurnal fill-and-drain cycles is assessed. Preliminary comparison between dynamic pilot data and EPANET-BAM is also reported.

  3. Generic CSP Performance Model for NREL's System Advisor Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, M. J.; Zhu, G.

    2011-08-01

    The suite of concentrating solar power (CSP) modeling tools in NREL's System Advisor Model (SAM) includes technology performance models for parabolic troughs, power towers, and dish-Stirling systems. Each model provides the user with unique capabilities that are catered to typical design considerations seen in each technology. Since the scope of the various models is generally limited to common plant configurations, new CSP technologies, component geometries, and subsystem combinations can be difficult to model directly in the existing SAM technology models. To overcome the limitations imposed by representative CSP technology models, NREL has developed a 'Generic Solar System' (GSS) performance model for use in SAM. This paper discusses the formulation and performance considerations included in this model and verifies the model by comparing its results with more detailed models.

  4. Numerical approaches to combustion modeling. Progress in Astronautics and Aeronautics. Vol. 135

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oran, E.S.; Boris, J.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Various papers on numerical approaches to combustion modeling are presented. The topics addressed include; ab initio quantum chemistry for combustion; rate coefficient calculations for combustion modeling; numerical modeling of combustion of complex hydrocarbons; combustion kinetics and sensitivity analysis computations; reduction of chemical reaction models; length scales in laminar and turbulent flames; numerical modeling of laminar diffusion flames; laminar flames in premixed gases; spectral simulations of turbulent reacting flows; vortex simulation of reacting shear flow; combustion modeling using PDF methods. Also considered are: supersonic reacting internal flow fields; studies of detonation initiation, propagation, and quenching; numerical modeling of heterogeneous detonations, deflagration-to-detonation transition to reactive granular materials; toward a microscopic theory of detonations in energetic crystals; overview of spray modeling; liquid drop behavior in dense and dilute clusters; spray combustion in idealized configurations: parallel drop streams; comparisons of deterministic and stochastic computations of drop collisions in dense sprays; ignition and flame spread across solid fuels; numerical study of pulse combustor dynamics; mathematical modeling of enclosure fires; nuclear systems.

  5. Sensitivity of injection costs to input petrophysical parameters in numerical geologic carbon sequestration models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, C. L.; Gragg, M. J.; Perfect, E.; White, Mark D.; Lemiszki, P. J.; McKay, L. D.

    2013-08-24

    Numerical simulations are widely used in feasibility studies for geologic carbon sequestration. Accurate estimates of petrophysical parameters are needed as inputs for these simulations. However, relatively few experimental values are available for CO2-brine systems. Hence, a sensitivity analysis was performed using the STOMP numerical code for supercritical CO2 injected into a model confined deep saline aquifer. The intrinsic permeability, porosity, pore compressibility, and capillary pressure-saturation/relative permeability parameters (residual liquid saturation, residual gas saturation, and van Genuchten alpha and m values) were varied independently. Their influence on CO2 injection rates and costs were determined and the parameters were ranked based on normalized coefficients of variation. The simulations resulted in differences of up to tens of millions of dollars over the life of the project (i.e., the time taken to inject 10.8 million metric tons of CO2). The two most influential parameters were the intrinsic permeability and the van Genuchten m value. Two other parameters, the residual gas saturation and the residual liquid saturation, ranked above the porosity. These results highlight the need for accurate estimates of capillary pressure-saturation/relative permeability parameters for geologic carbon sequestration simulations in addition to measurements of porosity and intrinsic permeability.

  6. PORFLOW Modeling Supporting The H-Tank Farm Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, J. M.; Flach, G. P.; Westbrook, M. L.

    2012-08-31

    Numerical simulations of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the vadose and saturated zones have been conducted using the PORFLOW code in support of an overall Performance Assessment (PA) of the H-Tank Farm. This report provides technical detail on selected aspects of PORFLOW model development and describes the structure of the associated electronic files. The PORFLOW models for the H-Tank Farm PA, Rev. 1 were updated with grout, solubility, and inventory changes. The aquifer model was refined. In addition, a set of flow sensitivity runs were performed to allow flow to be varied in the related probabilistic GoldSim models. The final PORFLOW concentration values are used as input into a GoldSim dose calculator.

  7. Foundation heat exchangers for residential ground source heat pump systems Numerical modeling and experimental validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing, Lu; Cullin, James; Spitler, Jeffery; Im, Piljae; Fisher, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    A new type of ground heat exchanger that utilizes the excavation often made for basements or foundations has been proposed as an alternative to conventional ground heat exchangers. This article describes a numerical model that can be used to size these foundation heat exchanger (FHX) systems. The numerical model is a two-dimensional finite-volume model that considers a wide variety of factors, such as soil freezing and evapotranspiration. The FHX numerical model is validated with one year of experimental data collected at an experimental house located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The model shows good agreement with the experimental data-heat pump entering fluid temperatures typically within 1 C (1.8 F) - with minor discrepancies due to approximations, such as constant moisture content throughout the year, uniform evapotranspiration over the seasons, and lack of ground shading in the model.

  8. Coupling a Mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction Model with Large-Eddy Simulation for Realistic Wind Plant Aerodynamics Simulations (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draxl, C.; Churchfield, M.; Mirocha, J.; Lee, S.; Lundquist, J.; Michalakes, J.; Moriarty, P.; Purkayastha, A.; Sprague, M.; Vanderwende, B.

    2014-06-01

    Wind plant aerodynamics are influenced by a combination of microscale and mesoscale phenomena. Incorporating mesoscale atmospheric forcing (e.g., diurnal cycles and frontal passages) into wind plant simulations can lead to a more accurate representation of microscale flows, aerodynamics, and wind turbine/plant performance. Our goal is to couple a numerical weather prediction model that can represent mesoscale flow [specifically the Weather Research and Forecasting model] with a microscale LES model (OpenFOAM) that can predict microscale turbulence and wake losses.

  9. About Energy Savings Performance Contracting Model Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides more information about the creation of the Energy Savings Performance Contracting (ESPC) Model Documents to be used when developing or updating procurement and contracting documents for ESPC projects and programs.

  10. A Numerical Model Without Truncation Error for a Steady-State Analysis of a Once-Through Steam Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sim, Yoon Sub; Kim, Eui Kwang; Eoh, Jae Hyuk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    To overcome the drawbacks of conventional schemes for a numerical analysis of a steam generator (SG), an efficient numerical model has been developed to analyze the steady state of a once-through-type SG where the feedwater is heated to superheated steam. In the developed model, the temperature and enthalpy are defined at the boundary of a calculation cell, and the exact solutions for the temperature distribution in a calculation cell are utilized. This feature of the developed model frees calculation from the undesirable effects of numerical diffusion, and only a small number of nodes are required. Also, the developed model removes the ambiguity from the parameter values at the inlet and exit of a calculation.The BoSupSG-SS computer code was developed by using the analysis model, and it performed well with only three calculation nodes to analyze a superheated SG. The developed model can be effectively used for the cases where a fast one-dimensional calculation is required such as an SG or system design analysis.

  11. ARRAY OPTIMIZATION FOR TIDAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN A TIDAL CHANNEL A NUMERICAL MODELING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea

    2014-04-18

    This paper presents an application of a hydrodynamic model to simulate tidal energy extraction in a tidal dominated estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast. A series of numerical experiments were carried out to simulate tidal energy extraction with different turbine array configurations, including location, spacing and array size. Preliminary model results suggest that array optimization for tidal energy extraction in a real-world site is a very complex process that requires consideration of multiple factors. Numerical models can be used effectively to assist turbine siting and array arrangement in a tidal turbine farm for tidal energy extraction.

  12. Numerical modeling of multi-GeV laser wakefield electron acceleration inside a dielectric capillary tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paradkar, B. S.; Cros, B.; Maynard, G.; Mora, P.

    2013-08-15

    Numerical modeling of laser wakefield electron acceleration inside a gas filled dielectric capillary tube is presented. Guiding of a short pulse laser inside a dielectric capillary tube over a long distance (∼1 m) and acceleration of an externally injected electron bunch to ultra-relativistic energies (∼5-10 GeV) are demonstrated in the quasi-linear regime of laser wakefield acceleration. Two dimensional axisymmetric simulations were performed with the code WAKE-EP (Extended Performances), which allows computationally efficient simulations of such long scale plasma. The code is an upgrade of the quasi-static particle code, WAKE [P. Mora and T. M. Antonsen, Jr., Phys. Plasmas 4, 217 (1997)], to simulate the acceleration of an externally injected electron bunch (including beam loading effect) and propagation of the laser beam inside a dielectric capillary. The influence of the transverse electric field of the plasma wake on the radial loss of the accelerated electrons to the dielectric wall is investigated. The stable acceleration of electrons to multi-GeV energy with a non-resonant laser pulse with a large spot-size is demonstrated.

  13. MECHANICAL PROPERTY CHARACTERIZATIONS AND PERFORMANCE MODELING OF SOFC SEALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeppel, Brian J.; Vetrano, John S.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-03-26

    This study provides modeling tools for the design of reliable seals for SOFC stacks. The work consists of 1) experimental testing to determine fundamental properties of SOFC sealing materials, and 2) numerical modeling of stacks and sealing systems. The material tests capture relevant temperature-dependent physical and mechanical data needed by the analytical models such as thermal expansion, strength, fracture toughness, and relaxation behavior for glass-ceramic seals and other materials. Testing has been performed on both homogenous specimens and multiple material assemblies to investigate the effect of interfacial reactions. A viscoelastic continuum damage model for a glass-ceramic seal was developed to capture the nonlinear behavior of this material at high temperatures. This model was implemented in the MSC MARC finite element code and was used for a detailed analysis of a planar SOFC stack under thermal cycling conditions. Realistic thermal loads for the stack were obtained using PNNLs in-house multiphysics solver. The accumulated seal damage and component stresses were evaluated for multiple thermal loading cycles, and regions of high seal damage susceptible to cracking were identified. Selected test results, numerical model development, and analysis results will be presented.

  14. Model Energy Savings Performance Contract, Schedules, and Exhibits...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Model Energy Savings Performance Contract, Schedules, and Exhibits Model Energy Savings Performance Contract, Schedules, and Exhibits An Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) ...

  15. PV performance modeling workshop summary report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Tasca, Coryne Adelle; Cameron, Christopher P.

    2011-05-01

    During the development of a solar photovoltaic (PV) energy project, predicting expected energy production from a system is a key part of understanding system value. System energy production is a function of the system design and location, the mounting configuration, the power conversion system, and the module technology, as well as the solar resource. Even if all other variables are held constant, annual energy yield (kWh/kWp) will vary among module technologies because of differences in response to low-light levels and temperature. A number of PV system performance models have been developed and are in use, but little has been published on validation of these models or the accuracy and uncertainty of their output. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technologies Program, Sandia National Laboratories organized a PV Performance Modeling Workshop in Albuquerque, New Mexico, September 22-23, 2010. The workshop was intended to address the current state of PV system models, develop a path forward for establishing best practices on PV system performance modeling, and set the stage for standardization of testing and validation procedures for models and input parameters. This report summarizes discussions and presentations from the workshop, as well as examines opportunities for collaborative efforts to develop objective comparisons between models and across sites and applications.

  16. Advances in HTGR fuel performance models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stansfield, O.M.; Goodin, D.T.; Hanson, D.L.; Turner, R.F.

    1985-02-01

    Fuel performance models based on empirical evidence are used to predict particle failure and fission product release in the design of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Advances in HTGR fuel performance models have improved the agreement between observed and predicted performance and contributed to an enhanced position of the HTGR with regard to investment risk and passive safety. Heavy metal contamination is the source of about 55% of the circulating activity in the HTGR during normal operation, and the remainder comes primarily from particles which failed because of defective or missing buffer coatings. These failed particles make up about 5 x 10/sup -4/ fraction of the total core inventory. In addition to prediction of fuel performance during normal operation, the models are used to determine fuel failure and fission product release during core heat-up accident conditions. The mechanistic nature of the models, which incorporate all important failure modes, permits the prediction of performance from the relatively modest accident temperatures of a passively safe HTGR to the much more severe accident conditions of the larger 2240-MW(t) HTGR.

  17. Electrochemical Lithium Ion Battery Performance Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-03-29

    The Electrochemical Lithium Ion Battery Performance Model allows for the computer prediction of the basic thermal, electrical, and electrochemical performance of a lithium ion cell with simplified geometry. The model solves governing equations describing the movement of lithium ions within and between the negative and positive electrodes. The governing equations were first formulated by Fuller, Doyle, and Newman and published in J. Electrochemical Society in 1994. The present model solves the partial differential equations governingmore » charge transfer kinetics and charge, species, heat transports in a computationally-efficient manner using the finite volume method, with special consideration given for solving the model under conditions of applied current, voltage, power, and load resistance.« less

  18. Numerical Investigation of Flapwise-Torsional Vibration Model of a Smart Section Blade with Microtab

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Nailu; Balas, Mark J.; Yang, Hua; Jiang, Wei; Magar, Kaman T.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a method to develop an aeroelastic model of a smart section blade equipped with microtab. The model is suitable for potential passive vibration control study of the blade section in classic flutter. Equations of the model are described by the nondimensional flapwise and torsional vibration modes coupled with the aerodynamic model based on the Theodorsen theory and aerodynamic effects of the microtab based on the wind tunnel experimental data. The aeroelastic model is validated using numerical data available in the literature and then utilized to analyze the microtab control capability on flutter instability case and divergence instabilitymore » case. The effectiveness of the microtab is investigated with the scenarios of different output controllers and actuation deployments for both instability cases. The numerical results show that the microtab can effectively suppress both vibration modes with the appropriate choice of the output feedback controller.« less

  19. Proceedings of the Numerical Modeling for Underground Nuclear Test Monitoring Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, S.R.; Kamm, J.R.

    1993-11-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the state-of-the-art in numerical simulations of nuclear explosion phenomenology with applications to test ban monitoring. We focused on the uniqueness of model fits to data, the measurement and characterization of material response models, advanced modeling techniques, and applications of modeling to monitoring problems. The second goal of the symposium was to establish a dialogue between seismologists and explosion-source code calculators. The meeting was divided into five main sessions: explosion source phenomenology, material response modeling, numerical simulations, the seismic source, and phenomenology from near source to far field. We feel the symposium reached many of its goals. Individual papers submitted at the conference are indexed separately on the data base.

  20. Climate Modeling using High-Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirin, A A

    2007-02-05

    The Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) and the LLNL Climate and Carbon Science Group of Energy and Environment (E and E) are working together to improve predictions of future climate by applying the best available computational methods and computer resources to this problem. Over the last decade, researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have developed a number of climate models that provide state-of-the-art simulations on a wide variety of massively parallel computers. We are now developing and applying a second generation of high-performance climate models. Through the addition of relevant physical processes, we are developing an earth systems modeling capability as well.

  1. NUMERICAL VERIFICATION OF THE RELAP-7 CORE CHANNEL SINGLE-PHASE MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; Richard Martineau

    2014-06-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation of nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). All the physics in RELAP-7 are fully coupled and the errors resulted from the traditional operator-splitting approach are eliminated. By using 2nd order methods in both time and space and eliminating operator-splitting errors, the numerical error of RELAP-7 can be minimized. Numerical verification is the process to verify the orders of numerical methods. It is an important part of modern verification and validation process. The core channel component in RELAP-7 is designed to simulate coolant flow as well as the conjugated heat transfer between coolant flow and the fuel rod. A special treatment at fuel centerline to avoid numerical singularity for the cylindrical heat conduction in the continuous finite element mesh is discussed. One steady state test case and one fast power up transient test case are utilized for the verification of the core channel model with single-phase flow. Analytical solution for the fuel pin temperature and figures of merit such as peak clad temperature and peak fuel temperature are used to define numerical errors. These cases prove that the mass and energy are well conserved and 2nd order convergence rates for both time and space are achieved in the core channel model.

  2. System Advisor Model: Flat Plate Photovoltaic Performance Modeling Validation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, J.; Whitmore, J.; Kaffine, L.; Blair, N.; Dobos, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    The System Advisor Model (SAM) is a free software tool that performs detailed analysis of both system performance and system financing for a variety of renewable energy technologies. This report provides detailed validation of the SAM flat plate photovoltaic performance model by comparing SAM-modeled PV system generation data to actual measured production data for nine PV systems ranging from 75 kW to greater than 25 MW in size. The results show strong agreement between SAM predictions and field data, with annualized prediction error below 3% for all fixed tilt cases and below 8% for all one axis tracked cases. The analysis concludes that snow cover and system outages are the primary sources of disagreement, and other deviations resulting from seasonal biases in the irradiation models and one axis tracking issues are discussed in detail.

  3. On Improving Analytical Models of Cosmic Reionization for Matching Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaurov, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    The methods for studying the epoch of cosmic reionization vary from full radiative transfer simulations to purely analytical models. While numerical approaches are computationally expensive and are not suitable for generating many mock catalogs, analytical methods are based on assumptions and approximations. We explore the interconnection between both methods. First, we ask how the analytical framework of excursion set formalism can be used for statistical analysis of numerical simulations and visual representation of the morphology of ionization fronts. Second, we explore the methods of training the analytical model on a given numerical simulation. We present a new code which emerged from this study. Its main application is to match the analytical model with a numerical simulation. Then, it allows one to generate mock reionization catalogs with volumes exceeding the original simulation quickly and computationally inexpensively, meanwhile reproducing large scale statistical properties. These mock catalogs are particularly useful for CMB polarization and 21cm experiments, where large volumes are required to simulate the observed signal.

  4. Appendix MASS: Performance Assessment Modeling Assumptions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Appendix MASS-2014 Performance Assessment Modeling Assumptions United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico Compliance Recertification Application 2014 Appendix MASS Table of Contents MASS-1.0 Introduction MASS-2.0 Summary of Changes in Performance Assessment MASS-2.1 FEPs Assessment MASS-2.2 Monitoring MASS-2.3 Experimental Activities MASS-2.3.1 Steel Corrosion Investigations MASS-2.3.2 Waste Shear Strength Investigations MASS-2.3.3

  5. CHEMICAL TRANSPORT IN A FISSURED BOCK: VERIFICATION OF A NUMERICAL MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmuson, A.; Narasimhan, T.N.; Neretnieks, I.

    1982-04-01

    Numerical models for simulating chemical transport in fissured rocks constitute powerful tools for evaluating the acceptability of geological nuclear waste repositories. Due to the very long-term, high toxicity of some nuclear waste products, the models are required to predict, in certain cases, the spatial and temporal distribution of chemical concentration less than 0.001% of the concentration released from the repository. Whether numerical models can provide such accuracies is a major question addressed in the present work. To this end, we have verified a numerical model, TRUMP, which solves the advective diffusion equation in general three dimensions with or without decay and source terms. The method is based on an integrated finite-difference approach. The model was verified against known analytic solution of the one-dimensional advection-diffusion problem as well as the problem of advection-diffusion in a system of parallel fractures separated by spherical particles. The studies show that as long as the magnitude of advectance is equal to or less than that of conductance for the closed surface bounding any volume element in the region (that is, numerical Peclet number <2), the numerical method can indeed match the analytic solution within errors of ±10{sup -3} % or less. The realistic input parameters used in the sample calculations suggest that such a range of Peclet numbers is indeed likely to characterize deep groundwater systems in granitic and ancient argillaceous systems. Thus TRUMP in its present form does provide a viable tool for use in nuclear waste evaluation studies. A sensitivity analysis based on the analytic solution suggests that the errors in prediction introduced due to uncertainties in input parameters is likely to be larger than the computational inaccuracies introduced by the numerical model. Currently, a disadvantage in the TRUMP model is that the iterative method of solving the set of simultaneous equations is rather slow when time

  6. 5th PV Performance Modeling Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    th PV Performance Modeling Workshop - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs

  7. 2D numerical simulation of the MEP energy-transport model with a finite difference scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romano, V. . E-mail: romano@dmi.unict.it

    2007-02-10

    A finite difference scheme of Scharfetter-Gummel type is used to simulate a consistent energy-transport model for electron transport in semiconductors devices, free of any fitting parameters, formulated on the basis of the maximum entropy principle. Simulations of silicon n{sup +}-n-n{sup +} diodes, 2D-MESFET and 2D-MOSFET and comparisons with the results obtained by a direct simulation of the Boltzmann transport equation and with other energy-transport models, known in the literature, show the validity of the model and the robustness of the numerical scheme.

  8. Using logic models in managing performance of research and technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Using logic models in managing performance of research and technology programs: An example ... Title: Using logic models in managing performance of research and technology programs: An ...

  9. Think Again! A Fresh Look at Home Performance Business Models...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Think Again A Fresh Look at Home Performance Business Models and Service Offerings (301) Think Again A Fresh Look at Home Performance Business Models and Service Offerings (301) ...

  10. Materials Modeling for High-Performance Radiation Detectors ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Materials Modeling for High-Performance Radiation Detectors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Materials Modeling for High-Performance Radiation Detectors ...

  11. Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL, LBNL and SNL for the Used Fuel Disposition Program Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL, LBNL and ...

  12. Recent numerical and algorithmic advances within the volume tracking framework for modeling interfacial flows

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    François, Marianne M.

    2015-05-28

    A review of recent advances made in numerical methods and algorithms within the volume tracking framework is presented. The volume tracking method, also known as the volume-of-fluid method has become an established numerical approach to model and simulate interfacial flows. Its advantage is its strict mass conservation. However, because the interface is not explicitly tracked but captured via the material volume fraction on a fixed mesh, accurate estimation of the interface position, its geometric properties and modeling of interfacial physics in the volume tracking framework remain difficult. Several improvements have been made over the last decade to address these challenges.more » In this study, the multimaterial interface reconstruction method via power diagram, curvature estimation via heights and mean values and the balanced-force algorithm for surface tension are highlighted.« less

  13. Comparison of experimental and numerical studies of the performance characteristics of a pumped counterflow virtual impactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Afchine, Armin; Murphy, Daniel M.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2011-01-03

    Experiments and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations were performed to evaluate the performance characteristics of a Pumped Counterflow Virtual Impactor (PCVI). Tests were conducted for various flow configurations for which the diameter at which 50% of the particles were transmitted was determined. Experimentally determined 50% cutpoints varied from 2.2 to 4.8 micrometers and CFD predicted diameters agreed within ± 0.4 microns. Both experimental and CFD results showed similar transmission efficiency (TE) curves. CFD TE was always greater than experimental results, most likely due to impaction losses in fittings not included in the simulations. Ideal transmission, corresponding to 100% TE, was never realized in either case due to impaction losses and small scale flow features such as eddies. Areas where CFD simulations showed such flow recirculation zones were also found to be the locations where particulate residue was deposited during experiments. CFD parametric tests showed that PCVI performance can be affected by the nozzle geometry and misalignment between the nozzle and collector orifice. We conclude that CFD can be used with confidence for counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) design. Modifications to improve the performance characteristics of the PCVI are suggested.

  14. Generation IV benchmarking of TRISO fuel performance models under accident conditions. Modeling input data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01

    This document presents the benchmark plan for the calculation of particle fuel performance on safety testing experiments that are representative of operational accidental transients. The benchmark is dedicated to the modeling of fission product release under accident conditions by fuel performance codes from around the world, and the subsequent comparison to post-irradiation experiment (PIE) data from the modeled heating tests. The accident condition benchmark is divided into three parts: the modeling of a simplified benchmark problem to assess potential numerical calculation issues at low fission product release; the modeling of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis safety testing experiments; and, the comparison of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis modeling results with PIE data. The simplified benchmark case, thereafter named NCC (Numerical Calculation Case), is derived from ''Case 5'' of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on coated particle fuel technology [IAEA 2012]. It is included so participants can evaluate their codes at low fission product release. ''Case 5'' of the IAEA CRP-6 showed large code-to-code discrepancies in the release of fission products, which were attributed to ''effects of the numerical calculation method rather than the physical model''[IAEA 2012]. The NCC is therefore intended to check if these numerical effects subsist. The first two steps imply the involvement of the benchmark participants with a modeling effort following the guidelines and recommendations provided by this document. The third step involves the collection of the modeling results by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the comparison of these results with the available PIE data. The objective of this document is to provide all necessary input data to model the benchmark cases, and to give some methodology guidelines and recommendations in order to make all results suitable for comparison with each other. The participants should read this document

  15. Performance model assessment for multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Daniel M.; McConnell, Robert.; Sahm, Aaron; Crawford, Clark; King, David L.; Cameron, Christopher P.; Foresi, James S.

    2010-03-01

    Four approaches to modeling multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic system performance are assessed by comparing modeled performance to measured performance. Measured weather, irradiance, and system performance data were collected on two systems over a one month period. Residual analysis is used to assess the models and to identify opportunities for model improvement.

  16. The shallow water equations as a hybrid flow model for the numerical and experimental analysis of hydro power stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostermann, Lars; Seidel, Christian

    2015-03-10

    The numerical analysis of hydro power stations is an important method of the hydraulic design and is used for the development and optimisation of hydro power stations in addition to the experiments with the physical submodel of a full model in the hydraulic laboratory. For the numerical analysis, 2D and 3D models are appropriate and commonly used.The 2D models refer mainly to the shallow water equations (SWE), since for this flow model a large experience on a wide field of applications for the flow analysis of numerous problems in hydraulic engineering already exists. Often, the flow model is verified by in situ measurements. In order to consider 3D flow phenomena close to singularities like weirs, hydro power stations etc. the development of a hybrid fluid model is advantageous to improve the quality and significance of the global model. Here, an extended hybrid flow model based on the principle of the SWE is presented. The hybrid flow model directly links the numerical model with the experimental data, which may originate from physical full models, physical submodels and in-situ measurements. Hence a wide field of application of the hybrid model emerges including the improvement of numerical models and the strong coupling of numerical and experimental analysis.

  17. A numerical investigation of transonic axial compressor rotor flow using a low-Reynolds-number {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arima, T.; Sonoda, T.; Shirotori, M.; Tamura, A.; Kikuchi, K.

    1999-01-01

    The authors have developed a computer simulation code for three-dimensional viscous flow in turbomachinery based on the time-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes equations and a low-Reynolds-number {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model. It is described in detail in this paper. The code is used to compute the flow fields for two types of rotor (a transonic fan NASA Rotor 67 and a transonic axial compressor NASA rotor 37), and numerical results are compared to experimental data based on aerodynamic probe and laser anemometer measurements. In the case of Rotor 67, calculated and experimental results are compared under the design speed to validate the code. The calculated results show good agreement with the experimental data, such as the rotor performance map and the spanwise distribution of total pressure, total temperature, and flow angle downstream of the rotor. In the case of Rotor 37, detailed comparisons between the numerical results and the experimental data are made under the design speed condition to assess the overall quality of the numerical solution. Furthermore, comparisons under the part-speed condition are used to investigate a flow field without passage shock. The results are well predicted qualitatively. However, considerable quantitative discrepancies remain in predicting the flow near the tip. In order to assess the predictive capabilities of the developed code, computed flow structures are presented with the experimental data for each rotor and the cause of the discrepancies is discussed.

  18. A direct numerical simulation-based investigation and modeling of pressure Hessian effects on compressible velocity gradient dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danish, Mohammad Suman, Sawan Srinivasan, Balaji

    2014-12-15

    The pressure Hessian tensor plays a key role in shaping the behavior of the velocity gradient tensor, and in turn, that of many incumbent non-linear processes in a turbulent flow field. In compressible flows, the role of pressure Hessian is even more important because it represents the level of fluid-thermodynamic coupling existing in the flow field. In this work, we first perform a direct numerical simulation-based study to clearly identify, isolate, and understand various important inviscid mechanisms that govern the evolution of the pressure Hessian tensor in compressible turbulence. The ensuing understanding is then employed to introduce major improvements to the existing Lagrangian model of the pressure Hessian tensor (the enhanced Homogenized Euler equation or EHEE) in terms of (i) non-symmetric, non-isentropic effects and (ii) improved representation of the anisotropic portion of the pressure Hessian tensor. Finally, we evaluate the new model extensively by comparing the new model results against known turbulence behavior over a range of Reynolds and Mach numbers. Indeed, the new model shows much improved performance as compared to the EHEE model.

  19. Numerical models for static denting and dynamic puncture of gas transmission linepipe and their validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarea, M.F.; Toumbas, D.N.; Philibert, C.E.; Deo, I.

    1996-12-31

    Gas transmission pipe resistance to external damage is a subject of great attention at Gaz de France and in Europe. Existing results cover part of the necessary criteria for the residual life of damaged pipelines, but more knowledge is needed on defect creation. The authors propose to complement existing experimental work which is limited to the explored range of parameters by validated numerical models. The first, simple static denting model aims at optimizing the conditions for calculating the residual stress distribution needed to assess the fatigue life of dents and dents and gouges. The second, more complex dynamic puncture model calculates both the puncture force and the puncture energy for a given pipe, excavator and tooth geometry. These models can contribute to enhance the external damage prevention policies of transmission pipeline operators.

  20. Monitoring and Numerical Modeling of Shallow CO{sub 2} Injection, Greene County, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rovey, Charles; Gouzie, Douglas; Biagioni, Richard

    2013-09-30

    The project titled Monitoring and Numerical Modeling of Shallow CO{sub 2} Injection, Greene County, Missouri provided training for three graduate students in areas related to carbon capture and storage. Numerical modeling of CO{sub 2} injection into the St. Francois aquifer at the Southwest Power Plant Site in Greene County, Missouri indicates that up to 4.1 x 10{sup 5} metric tons of CO{sub 2} per year could be injected for 30 years without exceeding a 3 MPa differential injection pressure. The injected CO{sub 2} would remain sequestered below the top of the overlying caprock (St. Francois confining unit) for more than 1000 years. Geochemical modeling indicates that portions of the injected CO{sub 2} will react rapidly with trace minerals in the aquifer to form various solid carbonate mineral phases. These minerals would store significant portions of injected CO{sub 2} over geologic time scales. Finally, a GIS data base on the pore-fluid chemistry of the overlying aquifer system in Missouri, the Ozark aquifer, was compiled from many sources. This data base could become useful in monitoring for leakage from future CO{sub 2} sequestration sites.

  1. Modeling and numerical simulation of oscillatory two-phase flows, with application to boiling water nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosa, M.P.; Podowski, M.Z.

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the analysis of dynamics and stability of boiling channels and systems. The specific objectives are two-fold. One of them is to present the results of a study aimed at analyzing the effects of various modeling concepts and numerical approaches on the transient response and stability of parallel boiling channels. The other objective is to investigate the effect of closed-loop feedback on stability of a boiling water reactor (BWR). Various modeling and computational issues for parallel boiling channels are discussed, such as: the impact of the numerical discretization scheme for the node containing the moving boiling boundary on the convergence and accuracy of computations, and the effects of subcooled boiling and other two-phase flow phenomena on the predictions of marginal stability conditions. Furthermore, the effects are analyzed of local loss coefficients around the recirculation loop of a boiling water reactor on stability of the reactor system. An apparent paradox is explained concerning the impact of changing single-phase losses on loop stability. The calculations have been performed using the DYNOBOSS computer code. The results of DYNOBOSS validation against other computer codes and experimental data are shown.

  2. A numerical study of short residence time FCC riser flows with a new flow/kinetics modeling technique.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, S. L.

    1998-08-25

    Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) technology is the most important process used by the refinery industry to convert crude oil to valuable lighter products such as gasoline. New and modified processes are constantly developed by refinery companies to improve their global competitiveness and meet more stringent environmental regulations. Short residence time FCC riser reactor is one of the advanced processes that the refining industry is actively pursuing because it can improve the yield selectivity and efficiency of an FCC unit. However, as the residence time becomes shorter, the impact of the mixing between catalyst and feed oil at the feed injection region on the product yield becomes more significant. Currently, most FCC computer models used by the refineries perform sophisticated kinetic calculations on simplified flow field and can not be used to evaluate the impact of fluid mixing on the performance of an FCC unit. Argonne National Laboratory (AFL) is developing a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code ICRKFLO for FCC riser flow modeling. The code, employing hybrid hydrodynamic-chemical kinetic coupling techniques, is used to investigate the effect of operating and design conditions on the product yields of FCC riser reactors. Numerical calculations were made using the code to examine the impacts of the operating and design conditions on the product yields. The controlling parameters under investigation include the residence time, reaction temperature, and catalyst/oil ratio. This paper describes the CFD code, presents computation results, and discusses the effects of operating conditions on the performance of short residence time FCC riser reactors.

  3. Investigation of the effect of chemistry models on the numerical predictions of the supersonic combustion of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumaran, K.; Babu, V.

    2009-04-15

    In this numerical study, the influence of chemistry models on the predictions of supersonic combustion in a model combustor is investigated. To this end, 3D, compressible, turbulent, reacting flow calculations with a detailed chemistry model (with 37 reactions and 9 species) and the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model have been carried out. These results are compared with earlier results obtained using single step chemistry. Hydrogen is used as the fuel and three fuel injection schemes, namely, strut, staged (i.e., strut and wall) and wall injection, are considered to evaluate the impact of the chemistry models on the flow field predictions. Predictions of the mass fractions of major species, minor species, dimensionless stagnation temperature, dimensionless static pressure rise and thrust percentage along the combustor length are presented and discussed. Overall performance metrics such as mixing efficiency and combustion efficiency are used to draw inferences on the nature (whether mixing- or kinetic-controlled) and the completeness of the combustion process. The predicted values of the dimensionless wall static pressure are compared with experimental data reported in the literature. The calculations show that multi step chemistry predicts higher and more wide spread heat release than what is predicted by single step chemistry. In addition, it is also shown that multi step chemistry predicts intricate details of the combustion process such as the ignition distance and induction distance. (author)

  4. Numerical modeling of the action of an explosion on an iron slab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugak, S.G.; Fortov, V.E.; Kanel', G.I.; Ni, A.L.; Stel'makh, V.G.

    1983-09-01

    This article examines the explosion of a condensed high explosive (HE) by a flat Armco iron slab. The fundamental physical processes accompanying the nonstationary two-dimensional compression pulse propagation in a metal are analyzed, a mathematical model of the process is formulated, and its numerical characteristics are determined. A cylindrical charge of trinitrotoluene of 20 mm diameter and height, initiated at the axial point on the free surface, was mounted on a 10-mm-thick and 120-mm-diameter armco iron disk. A finite-difference method using a quadrangular computational mesh is employed. It is assumed that the process of detonation transformation occurs instantaneously and is characterized only by singularities in the equation of state. Numerical modeling of the loading of an iron slab by an explosion showed that the simple kinetic relationship proposed for the fracture computation will assure a realistic description of the fracture process. It is determined that the progress of a reversible polymorphic transformation in the specimen material substantially influences the nature of its fracture by explosion. The magnitude of the strain on the strength properties of the material must be taken into account in order to achieve a detailed description of the fracture.

  5. Numerical modeling of carrier gas flow in atomic layer deposition vacuum reactor: A comparative study of lattice Boltzmann models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Dongqing; Chien Jen, Tien [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 (United States); Li, Tao [School of Mechanical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Yuan, Chris, E-mail: cyuan@uwm.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 3200 North Cramer Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    This paper characterizes the carrier gas flow in the atomic layer deposition (ALD) vacuum reactor by introducing Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) to the ALD simulation through a comparative study of two LBM models. Numerical models of gas flow are constructed and implemented in two-dimensional geometry based on lattice BhatnagarGrossKrook (LBGK)-D2Q9 model and two-relaxation-time (TRT) model. Both incompressible and compressible scenarios are simulated and the two models are compared in the aspects of flow features, stability, and efficiency. Our simulation outcome reveals that, for our specific ALD vacuum reactor, TRT model generates better steady laminar flow features all over the domain with better stability and reliability than LBGK-D2Q9 model especially when considering the compressible effects of the gas flow. The LBM-TRT is verified indirectly by comparing the numerical result with conventional continuum-based computational fluid dynamics solvers, and it shows very good agreement with these conventional methods. The velocity field of carrier gas flow through ALD vacuum reactor was characterized by LBM-TRT model finally. The flow in ALD is in a laminar steady state with velocity concentrated at the corners and around the wafer. The effects of flow fields on precursor distributions, surface absorptions, and surface reactions are discussed in detail. Steady and evenly distributed velocity field contribute to higher precursor concentration near the wafer and relatively lower particle velocities help to achieve better surface adsorption and deposition. The ALD reactor geometry needs to be considered carefully if a steady and laminar flow field around the wafer and better surface deposition are desired.

  6. Full-Scale Numerical Modeling of Turbulent Processes in the Earth's Ionosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliasson, B.; Stenflo, L.; Shukla, P. K.

    2008-10-15

    We present a full-scale simulation study of ionospheric turbulence by means of a generalized Zakharov model based on the separation of variables into high-frequency and slow time scales. The model includes realistic length scales of the ionospheric profile and of the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields, and uses ionospheric plasma parameters relevant for high-latitude radio facilities such as Eiscat and HAARP. A nested grid numerical method has been developed to resolve the different length-scales, while avoiding severe restrictions on the time step. The simulation demonstrates the parametric decay of the ordinary mode into Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves, followed by a Langmuir wave collapse and short-scale caviton formation, as observed in ionospheric heating experiments.

  7. An improved neutral diffusion model and numerical solution of the two dimensional edge plasma fluid equations. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prinja, A.K.

    1998-09-01

    In this work, it has been shown that, for the given sets of parameters (transport coefficients), the Tangent-Predictor (TP) continuation method, which was used in the coarsest grid, works remarkably well. The problems in finding an initial guess that resides well within Newton`s method radius of convergence are alleviated by correcting the initial guess by the predictor step of the TP method. The TP method works well also in neutral gas puffing and impurity simulations. The neutral gas puffing simulation is performed by systematically increasing the fraction of puffing rate according to the TP method until it reaches a desired condition. Similarly, the impurity simulation characterized by using the fraction of impurity density as the continuation parameter, is carried out in line with the TP method. Both methods show, as expected, a better performance than the classical embedding (CE) method. The convergence criteria {epsilon} is set to be 10{sup {minus}9} based on the fact that lower value of {epsilon} does not alter the solution significantly. Correspondingly, the number of Newton`s iterations in the corrector step of the TP method decrease substantially, an extra point in terms of code speed. The success of the TP method enlarges the possibility of including other sets of parameters (operations and physics). With the availability of the converged coarsest grid solution, the next forward step to the multigrid cycle becomes possible. The multigrid method shows that the memory storage problems that plagued the application of Newton`s method on fine grids, are of no concern. An important result that needs to be noted here is the performance of the FFCD model. The FFCD model is relatively simple and is based on the overall results the model has shown to predict different divertor plasma parameters. The FFCD model treats exactly the implementation of the deep penetration of energetic neutrals emerging from the divertor plate. The resulting ionization profiles are

  8. Precarious Rock Methodology for Seismic Hazard: Physical Testing, Numerical Modeling and Coherence Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anooshehpoor, Rasool; Purvance, Matthew D.; Brune, James N.; Preston, Leiph A.; Anderson, John G.; Smith, Kenneth D.

    2006-09-29

    This report covers the following projects: Shake table tests of precarious rock methodology, field tests of precarious rocks at Yucca Mountain and comparison of the results with PSHA predictions, study of the coherence of the wave field in the ESF, and a limited survey of precarious rocks south of the proposed repository footprint. A series of shake table experiments have been carried out at the University of Nevada, Reno Large Scale Structures Laboratory. The bulk of the experiments involved scaling acceleration time histories (uniaxial forcing) from 0.1g to the point where the objects on the shake table overturned a specified number of times. The results of these experiments have been compared with numerical overturning predictions. Numerical predictions for toppling of large objects with simple contact conditions (e.g., I-beams with sharp basal edges) agree well with shake-table results. The numerical model slightly underpredicts the overturning of small rectangular blocks. It overpredicts the overturning PGA for asymmetric granite boulders with complex basal contact conditions. In general the results confirm the approximate predictions of previous studies. Field testing of several rocks at Yucca Mountain has approximately confirmed the preliminary results from previous studies, suggesting that he PSHA predictions are too high, possibly because the uncertainty in the mean of the attenuation relations. Study of the coherence of wavefields in the ESF has provided results which will be very important in design of the canisters distribution, in particular a preliminary estimate of the wavelengths at which the wavefields become incoherent. No evidence was found for extreme focusing by lens-like inhomogeneities. A limited survey for precarious rocks confirmed that they extend south of the repository, and one of these has been field tested.

  9. Mixture Preparation and Nitric Oxide Formation in a GDI Engine studied by Combined Laser Diagnostics and Numerical Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volker Sick; Dennis N. Assanis

    2002-11-27

    Through the combination of advanced imaging laser diagnostics with multi-dimensional computer models, a new understanding of the performance of direct-injection gasoline engines is pursuit. The work focuses on the fuel injection process, the breakup of the liquid into a fine spray and the mixing of the fuel with the in-cylinder gases. Non-intrusive laser diagnostics will be used to measure the spatial distribution of droplets and vaporized fuel with very high temporal resolution. These data along with temperature measurements will be used to validate a new spray breakup model for gasoline direct-injection. Experimental data on near wall fuel distributions will be used for comparison with a model that predicts the spray-wall interaction and the dynamics of the liquid film on the surface. Quantitative measurements of local nitric oxide concentrations inside the combustion chamber will provide a critical test for a numerical simulation of the nitric oxide formation process. This model is based on a modified flamelet approach and will be used to study the effects of exhaust gas recirculation.

  10. Fuel Performance Modeling: An Overview of Approaches...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Reactor Measurement of Tritium Permeation through Stainless Steel Cladding Presented by ... Outline Motivation Characterize in-reactor tritium permeation performance Observe ...

  11. Multiscale modeling and characterization for performance and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lithium-ion batteries are highly complex electrochemical systems whose performance and safety are governed by coupled nonlinear electrochemical-electrical-thermal-mechanical ...

  12. Positive field-cooled dc susceptibility in granular superconductors interpreted through numerical simulations on a simple Josephson-junction-array model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auletta, C.; Raiconi, G.; De Luca, R.; Pace, S.

    1995-05-01

    We have performed numerical simulations of a field-cooled dc susceptibility experiment carried out for granular superconductors by modeling these systems with a simple Josephson-junction array proposed by the authors. By this analysis the temperature dependence of the positive field-cooled susceptibility at very low values of the applied magnetic field, observed by Braunisch {ital et} {ital al}. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 68, 1908 (1992)] for some ceramic superonductors, has been reproduced and interpreted.

  13. A Numerical Algorithm for the Solution of a Phase-Field Model of Polycrystalline Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorr, M R; Fattebert, J; Wickett, M E; Belak, J F; Turchi, P A

    2008-12-04

    We describe an algorithm for the numerical solution of a phase-field model (PFM) of microstructure evolution in polycrystalline materials. The PFM system of equations includes a local order parameter, a quaternion representation of local orientation and a species composition parameter. The algorithm is based on the implicit integration of a semidiscretization of the PFM system using a backward difference formula (BDF) temporal discretization combined with a Newton-Krylov algorithm to solve the nonlinear system at each time step. The BDF algorithm is combined with a coordinate projection method to maintain quaternion unit length, which is related to an important solution invariant. A key element of the Newton-Krylov algorithm is the selection of a preconditioner to accelerate the convergence of the Generalized Minimum Residual algorithm used to solve the Jacobian linear system in each Newton step. Results are presented for the application of the algorithm to 2D and 3D examples.

  14. Supercomputer and cluster performance modeling and analysis efforts:2004-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturtevant, Judith E.; Ganti, Anand; Meyer, Harold Edward; Stevenson, Joel O.; Benner, Robert E., Jr.; Goudy, Susan Phelps; Doerfler, Douglas W.; Domino, Stefan Paul; Taylor, Mark A.; Malins, Robert Joseph; Scott, Ryan T.; Barnette, Daniel Wayne; Rajan, Mahesh; Ang, James Alfred; Black, Amalia Rebecca; Laub, Thomas William; Vaughan, Courtenay Thomas; Franke, Brian Claude

    2007-02-01

    This report describes efforts by the Performance Modeling and Analysis Team to investigate performance characteristics of Sandia's engineering and scientific applications on the ASC capability and advanced architecture supercomputers, and Sandia's capacity Linux clusters. Efforts to model various aspects of these computers are also discussed. The goals of these efforts are to quantify and compare Sandia's supercomputer and cluster performance characteristics; to reveal strengths and weaknesses in such systems; and to predict performance characteristics of, and provide guidelines for, future acquisitions and follow-on systems. Described herein are the results obtained from running benchmarks and applications to extract performance characteristics and comparisons, as well as modeling efforts, obtained during the time period 2004-2006. The format of the report, with hypertext links to numerous additional documents, purposefully minimizes the document size needed to disseminate the extensive results from our research.

  15. Model Documents for an Energy Savings Performance Contract Project |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Model Documents for an Energy Savings Performance Contract Project Model Documents for an Energy Savings Performance Contract Project This page contains a model contract template and companion documents to help you launch energy efficiency projects through Energy Savings Performance Contracting (ESPC). Read about how these documents were developed. The ESPC Model Documents were prepared as resources that can be used when developing or updating procurement and contracting

  16. Quality Assurance for Performance Assessment Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation from the 2015 Annual Performance and Risk Assessment (P&RA) Community of Practice (CoP) Technical Exchange Meeting held in Richland, Washington on December 15-16, 2015.

  17. Detailed Performance Model for Photovoltaic Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, H.; Mancilla-David, F.; Ellis, K.; Muljadi, E.; Jenkins, P.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a modified current-voltage relationship for the single diode model. The single-diode model has been derived from the well-known equivalent circuit for a single photovoltaic cell. The modification presented in this paper accounts for both parallel and series connections in an array.

  18. A numerical test of KPZ scaling; Potts models coupled to two-dimensional quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baillie, C.F. , 91 - Nozay ); Johnston, D.A. . Dept. of Mathematics)

    1992-06-07

    In this paper, the authors perform Monte-Carlo simulations using the Wolff cluster algorithm of the q = 2 (Ising), 3, 4 and q = 10 Potts models on dynamical phi-cubed graphs of spherical topology with up to 5000 nodes. The authors find that the measured critical exponents are in reasonable agreement with those from the exact solution of the Ising model and with those calculated from KPZ scaling for q = 3, 4 where no exact solution is available. Using Binder's cumulant, the authors find that the q = 10 Potts model displays a first order phase transition on a dynamical graph, as it does on a fixed lattice. The authors also examine the internal geometry of the graphs generated in the simulation, finding a linear relationship between ring length probabilities and the central charge of the Potts model.

  19. Large Eddy Simulation of Wind Turbine Wakes. Detailed Comparisons of Two Codes Focusing on Effects of Numerics and Subgrid Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Tossas, Luis A.; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-18

    In this work we report on results from a detailed comparative numerical study from two Large Eddy Simulation (LES) codes using the Actuator Line Model (ALM). The study focuses on prediction of wind turbine wakes and their breakdown when subject to uniform inflow. Previous studies have shown relative insensitivity to subgrid modeling in the context of a finite-volume code. The present study uses the low dissipation pseudo-spectral LES code from Johns Hopkins University (LESGO) and the second-order, finite-volume OpenFOAMcode (SOWFA) from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. When subject to uniform inflow, the loads on the blades are found to be unaffected by subgrid models or numerics, as expected. The turbulence in the wake and the location of transition to a turbulent state are affected by the subgrid-scale model and the numerics.

  20. Large Eddy Simulation of Wind Turbine Wakes. Detailed Comparisons of Two Codes Focusing on Effects of Numerics and Subgrid Modeling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Martinez-Tossas, Luis A.; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-18

    In this work we report on results from a detailed comparative numerical study from two Large Eddy Simulation (LES) codes using the Actuator Line Model (ALM). The study focuses on prediction of wind turbine wakes and their breakdown when subject to uniform inflow. Previous studies have shown relative insensitivity to subgrid modeling in the context of a finite-volume code. The present study uses the low dissipation pseudo-spectral LES code from Johns Hopkins University (LESGO) and the second-order, finite-volume OpenFOAMcode (SOWFA) from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. When subject to uniform inflow, the loads on the blades are found to bemore » unaffected by subgrid models or numerics, as expected. The turbulence in the wake and the location of transition to a turbulent state are affected by the subgrid-scale model and the numerics.« less

  1. NUMERICAL MODELING OF CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN FRACTURED POROUS MEDIA USING MIXED FINITE ELEMENT AND FINITE VOLUME METHODS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, G.; Dong, C.; Sun, S.

    2010-03-18

    A mathematical model for contaminant species passing through fractured porous media is presented. In the numerical model, we combine two locally conservative methods, i.e. mixed finite element (MFE) and the finite volume methods. Adaptive triangle mesh is used for effective treatment of the fractures. A hybrid MFE method is employed to provide an accurate approximation of velocities field for both the fractures and matrix which are crucial to the convection part of the transport equation. The finite volume method and the standard MFE method are used to approximate the convection and dispersion terms respectively. The model is used to investigate the interaction of adsorption with transport and to extract information on effective adsorption distribution coefficients. Numerical examples in different fractured media illustrate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed numerical model.

  2. Numerical Modeling of Geomechanical Processes Related to CO{sub 2} Injection within Generic Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckert, Andreas

    2013-05-31

    In this project generic anticline structures have been used for numerical modeling analyses to study the influence of geometrical parameters, fluid flow boundary conditions, in situ stress regime and inter-bedding friction coefficient on geomechanical risks such as fracture reactivation and fracture generation. The resulting stress states for these structures are also used to determine safe drilling directions and a methodology for wellbore trajection optimization is developed that is applicable for non-Andersonian stress states. The results of the fluid flow simulation show that the type of fluid flow boundary condition is of utmost importance and has significant impact on all injection related parameters. It is recommended that further research is conducted to establish a method to quantify the fluid flow boundary conditions for injection applications. The results of the geomechanical simulation show that in situ stress regime is a crucial, if not the most important, factor determining geomechanical risks. For extension and strike slip stress regimes anticline structures should be favored over horizontally layered basin as they feature higher ΔP{sub c} magnitudes. If sedimentary basins are tectonically relaxed and their state of stress is characterized by the uni-axial strain model the basin is in exact frictional equilibrium and fluids should not be injected. The results also show that low inter bedding friction coefficients effectively decouple layers resulting in lower ΔP{sub c} magnitudes, especially for the compressional stress regime.

  3. Performance and Degradation Modeling of Batteries | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Model-Experimental Studies on Next-generation Li-ion Materials Development of Si-based High Capacity Anodes Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Silicon-ba...

  4. Developing an Energy Performance Modeling Startup Kit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-10-01

    In 2011, the NAHB Research Center began assessing the needs and motivations of residential remodelers regarding energy performance remodeling. This report outlines: the current remodeling industry and the role of energy efficiency; gaps and barriers to adding energy efficiency into remodeling; and support needs of professional remodelers to increase sales and projects involving improving home energy efficiency.

  5. Palm: Easing the Burden of Analytical Performance Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tallent, Nathan R.; Hoisie, Adolfy

    2014-06-01

    Analytical (predictive) application performance models are critical for diagnosing performance-limiting resources, optimizing systems, and designing machines. Creating models, however, is difficult because they must be both accurate and concise. To ease the burden of performance modeling, we developed Palm, a modeling tool that combines top-down (human-provided) semantic insight with bottom-up static and dynamic analysis. To express insight, Palm defines a source code modeling annotation language. By coordinating models and source code, Palm's models are `first-class' and reproducible. Unlike prior work, Palm formally links models, functions, and measurements. As a result, Palm (a) uses functions to either abstract or express complexity (b) generates hierarchical models (representing an application's static and dynamic structure); and (c) automatically incorporates measurements to focus attention, represent constant behavior, and validate models. We discuss generating models for three different applications.

  6. NUMERICAL MODELING OF THE COAGULATION AND POROSITY EVOLUTION OF DUST AGGREGATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Sakagami, Masa-aki [Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Yoshida-nihonmatsu-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Tanaka, Hidekazu, E-mail: satoshi.okuzumi@ax2.ecs.kyoto-u.ac.j [Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan)

    2009-12-20

    Porosity evolution of dust aggregates is crucial in understanding dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. In this study, we present useful tools to study the coagulation and porosity evolution of dust aggregates. First, we present a new numerical method for simulating dust coagulation and porosity evolution as an extension of the conventional Smoluchowski equation. This method follows the evolution of the mean porosity for each aggregate mass simultaneously with the evolution of the mass distribution function. This method reproduces the results of previous Monte Carlo simulations with much less computational expense. Second, we propose a new collision model for porous dust aggregates on the basis of our N-body experiments on aggregate collisions. As the first step, we focus on 'hit-and-stick' collisions, which involve neither compression nor fragmentation of aggregates. We first obtain empirical data on porosity changes between the classical limits of ballistic cluster-cluster and particle-cluster aggregation. Using the data, we construct a recipe for the porosity change due to general hit-and-stick collisions as well as formulae for the aerodynamical and collisional cross sections. Our collision model is thus more realistic than a previous model of Ormel et al. based on the classical aggregation limits only. Simple coagulation simulations using the extended Smoluchowski method show that our collision model explains the fractal dimensions of porous aggregates observed in a full N-body simulation and a laboratory experiment. By contrast, similar simulations using the collision model of Ormel et al. result in much less porous aggregates, meaning that this model underestimates the porosity increase upon unequal-sized collisions. Besides, we discover that aggregates at the high-mass end of the distribution can have a considerably small aerodynamical cross section per unit mass compared with aggregates of lower masses. This occurs when aggregates drift under uniform

  7. Numerical method to test a theoretical model of the quantum interferen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A numerical method is provided to fit the experimental conductivity to the complicated conductivity expression for the quantum interference effect of Anderson localization. This ...

  8. Modeling the Mechanical Performance of Die Casting Dies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Allen Miller

    2004-02-27

    The following report covers work performed at Ohio State on modeling the mechanical performance of dies. The focus of the project was development and particularly verification of finite element techniques used to model and predict displacements and stresses in die casting dies. The work entails a major case study performed with and industrial partner on a production die and laboratory experiments performed at Ohio State.

  9. Assessment of Land Surface Model Performance in WRF for Simulating...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wind Energy Community Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Assessment of Land Surface Model Performance in WRF for Simulating Wind at Heights Relevant to the Wind Energy ...

  10. Fuel Cell Power Model for CHHP System Economics and Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Power Model for CHHP System Economics and Performance Analysis Presented at the Renewable Hydrogen Workshop, Nov. 16, 2009, in Palm Springs, CA renewablehydrogenworksho...

  11. Assessment of Land Surface Model Performance in WRF for Simulating...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Assessment of Land Surface Model Performance in WRF for Simulating Wind at Heights Relevant to the Wind Energy Community Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Assessment of ...

  12. A Comparison of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kinetic models of fuels are needed to allow the simulation of engine performance for research, design, or verification purposes. PDF icon deer09bunting.pdf More Documents &...

  13. Using logic models in managing performance of research and technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Using logic models in managing performance of research and technology programs: An example for a Federal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy program Citation Details In-Document ...

  14. Performance Modeling for 3D Visualization in a Heterogeneous...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We explore a methodology for building a model of overall application performance using a ... The prediction methodology will form the foundation of a more robust resource management ...

  15. Developing an Energy Performance Modeling Startup Kit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, A.

    2012-10-01

    In 2011, the NAHB Research Center began the first part of the multi-year effort by assessing the needs and motivations of residential remodelers regarding energy performance remodeling. The scope is multifaceted - all perspectives will be sought related to remodeling firms ranging in size from small-scale, sole proprietor to national. This will allow the Research Center to gain a deeper understanding of the remodeling and energy retrofit business and the needs of contractors when offering energy upgrade services. To determine the gaps and the motivation for energy performance remodeling, the NAHB Research Center conducted (1) an initial series of focus groups with remodelers at the 2011 International Builders' Show, (2) a second series of focus groups with remodelers at the NAHB Research Center in conjunction with the NAHB Spring Board meeting in DC, and (3) quantitative market research with remodelers based on the findings from the focus groups. The goal was threefold, to: Understand the current remodeling industry and the role of energy efficiency; Identify the gaps and barriers to adding energy efficiency into remodeling; and Quantify and prioritize the support needs of professional remodelers to increase sales and projects involving improving home energy efficiency. This report outlines all three of these tasks with remodelers.

  16. Performance model assessment for multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Riley, Daniel M.; McConnell, Robert.; Sahm, Aaron; Crawford, Clark; King, David L.; Cameron, Christopher P.; Foresi, James S.

    2010-03-01

    Four approaches to modeling multi-junction concentrating photovoltaic system performance are assessed by comparing modeled performance to measured performance. Measured weather, irradiance, and system performance data were collected on two systems over a one month period. Residual analysis is used to assess the models and to identify opportunities for model improvement. Large photovoltaic systems are typically developed as projects which supply electricity to a utility and are owned by independent power producers. Obtaining financing at favorable rates and attracting investors requires confidence in the projected energy yield from the plant. In this paper, various performance models for projecting annual energy yield from Concentrating Photovoltaic (CPV) systems are assessed by comparing measured system output to model predictions based on measured weather and irradiance data. The results are statistically analyzed to identify systematic error sources.

  17. Aspen: A Domain Specific Language for Performance Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spafford, Kyle L; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2012-01-01

    We present a new approach to analytical performance modeling using Aspen, a domain specific language. Aspen (Abstract Scalable Performance Engineering Notation) fills an important gap in existing performance modeling techniques and is designed to enable rapid exploration of new algorithms and architectures. It includes a formal specification of an application's performance behavior and an abstract machine model. We provide an overview of Aspen's features and demonstrate how it can be used to express a performance model for a three dimensional Fast Fourier Transform. We then demonstrate the composability and modularity of Aspen by importing and reusing the FFT model in a molecular dynamics model. We have also created a number of tools that allow scientists to balance application and system factors quickly and accurately.

  18. Deep geological isolation of nuclear waste: numerical modeling of repository scale hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dettinger, M.D.

    1980-04-01

    The Scope of Work undertaken covers three main tasks, described as follows: (Task 1) CDM provided consulting services to the University on modeling aspects of the study having to do with transport processes involving the local groundwater system near the repository and the flow of fluids and vapors through the various porous media making up the repository system. (Task 2) CDM reviewed literature related to repository design, concentrating on effects of the repository geometry, location and other design factors on the flow of fluids within the repository boundaries, drainage from the repository structure, and the eventual transport of radionucldies away from the repository site. (Task 3) CDM, in a joint effort with LLL personnel, identified generic boundary and initial conditions, identified processes to be modeled, and recommended a modeling approach with suggestions for appropriate simplifications and approximations to the problem and identifiying important parameters necessary to model the processes. This report consists of two chapters and an appendix. The first chapter (Chapter III of the LLL report) presents a detailed description and discussion of the modeling approach developed in this project, its merits and weaknesses, and a brief review of the difficulties anticipated in implementing the approach. The second chapter (Chapter IV of the LLL report) presents a summary of a survey of researchers in the field of repository performance analysis and a discussion of that survey in light of the proposed modeling approach. The appendix is a review of the important physical processes involved in the potential hydrologic transport of radionuclides through, around and away from deep geologic nuclear waste repositories.

  19. Numerical implementation, verification and validation of two-phase flow four-equation drift flux model with Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zou, Ling; Zhao, Haihua; Zhang, Hongbin

    2016-08-24

    This study presents a numerical investigation on using the Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov (JFNK) method to solve the two-phase flow four-equation drift flux model with realistic constitutive correlations (‘closure models’). The drift flux model is based on Isshi and his collaborators’ work. Additional constitutive correlations for vertical channel flow, such as two-phase flow pressure drop, flow regime map, wall boiling and interfacial heat transfer models, were taken from the RELAP5-3D Code Manual and included to complete the model. The staggered grid finite volume method and fully implicit backward Euler method was used for the spatial discretization and time integration schemes, respectively. Themore » Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov method shows no difficulty in solving the two-phase flow drift flux model with a discrete flow regime map. In addition to the Jacobian-free approach, the preconditioning matrix is obtained by using the default finite differencing method provided in the PETSc package, and consequently the labor-intensive implementation of complex analytical Jacobian matrix is avoided. Extensive and successful numerical verification and validation have been performed to prove the correct implementation of the models and methods. Code-to-code comparison with RELAP5-3D has further demonstrated the successful implementation of the drift flux model.« less

  20. Multitasking TORT under UNICOS: Parallel performance models and measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, A.; Azmy, Y.Y.

    1999-09-27

    The existing parallel algorithms in the TORT discrete ordinates code were updated to function in a UNICOS environment. A performance model for the parallel overhead was derived for the existing algorithms. The largest contributors to the parallel overhead were identified and a new algorithm was developed. A parallel overhead model was also derived for the new algorithm. The results of the comparison of parallel performance models were compared to applications of the code to two TORT standard test problems and a large production problem. The parallel performance models agree well with the measured parallel overhead.

  1. Numerical research of the optimal control problem in the semi-Markov inventory model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorshenin, Andrey K.

    2015-03-10

    This paper is devoted to the numerical simulation of stochastic system for inventory management products using controlled semi-Markov process. The results of a special software for the systems research and finding the optimal control are presented.

  2. HELIOSPHERIC PROPAGATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS: COMPARISON OF NUMERICAL WSA-ENLIL+CONE MODEL AND ANALYTICAL DRAG-BASED MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrnak, B.; ic, T.; Dumbovi?, M.; Temmer, M.; Mstl, C.; Veronig, A. M.; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Odstr?il, D. E-mail: tzic@geof.hr E-mail: manuela.temmer@uni-graz.at E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at E-mail: m.leila.mays@nasa.gov

    2014-08-01

    Real-time forecasting of the arrival of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at Earth, based on remote solar observations, is one of the central issues of space-weather research. In this paper, we compare arrival-time predictions calculated applying the numerical ''WSA-ENLIL+Cone model'' and the analytical ''drag-based model'' (DBM). Both models use coronagraphic observations of CMEs as input data, thus providing an early space-weather forecast two to four days before the arrival of the disturbance at the Earth, depending on the CME speed. It is shown that both methods give very similar results if the drag parameter ? = 0.1 is used in DBM in combination with a background solar-wind speed of w = 400 km s{sup 1}. For this combination, the mean value of the difference between arrival times calculated by ENLIL and DBM is ?-bar =0.099.0 hr with an average of the absolute-value differences of |?|-bar =7.1 hr. Comparing the observed arrivals (O) with the calculated ones (C) for ENLIL gives O C = 0.3 16.9 hr and, analogously, O C = +1.1 19.1 hr for DBM. Applying ? = 0.2 with w = 450 km s{sup 1} in DBM, one finds O C = 1.7 18.3 hr, with an average of the absolute-value differences of 14.8 hr, which is similar to that for ENLIL, 14.1 hr. Finally, we demonstrate that the prediction accuracy significantly degrades with increasing solar activity.

  3. Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidball, Rick; Bluestein, Joel; Rodriguez, Nick; Knoke, Stu

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

  4. Maintenance personnel performance simulation (MAPPS): a model for predicting maintenance performance reliability in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knee, H.E.; Krois, P.A.; Haas, P.M.; Siegel, A.I.; Ryan, T.G.

    1983-01-01

    The NRC has developed a structured, quantitative, predictive methodology in the form of a computerized simulation model for assessing maintainer task performance. Objective of the overall program is to develop, validate, and disseminate a practical, useful, and acceptable methodology for the quantitative assessment of NPP maintenance personnel reliability. The program was organized into four phases: (1) scoping study, (2) model development, (3) model evaluation, and (4) model dissemination. The program is currently nearing completion of Phase 2 - Model Development.

  5. Numerical performance analysis of acoustic Doppler velocity profilers in the wake of an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Harding, Samuel F.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2015-09-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) for the characterization of flow conditions in the vicinity of both experimental and full scale marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines is becoming increasingly prevalent. The computation of a three dimensional velocity measurement from divergent acoustic beams requires the assumption that the flow conditions are homogeneous between all beams at a particular axial distance from the instrument. In the near wake of MHK devices, the mean fluid motion is observed to be highly spatially dependent as a result of torque generation and energy extraction. This paper examines the performance of ADCP measurements in such scenarios through the modelling of a virtual ADCP (VADCP) instrument in the velocity field in the wake of an MHK turbine resolved using unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is achieved by sampling the CFD velocity field at equivalent locations to the sample bins of an ADCP and performing the coordinate transformation from beam coordinates to instrument coordinates and finally to global coordinates. The error in the mean velocity calculated by the VADCP relative to the reference velocity along the instrument axis is calculated for a range of instrument locations and orientations. The stream-wise velocity deficit and tangential swirl velocity caused by the rotor rotation lead to significant misrepresentation of the true flow velocity profiles by the VADCP, with the most significant errors in the transverse (cross-flow) velocity direction.

  6. Numerical Study of Coal Gasification Using Eulerian-Eulerian Multiphase Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, S.; Guenther, C.; Orsino, S.

    2007-09-01

    Gasification converts the carbon-containing material into a synthesis gas (syngas) which can be used as a fuel to generate electricity or used as a basic chemical building block for a large number of uses in the petrochemical and refining industries. Based on the mode of conveyance of the fuel and the gasifying medium, gasification can be classified into fixed or moving bed, fluidized bed, and entrained flow reactors. Entrained flow gasifiers normally feature dilute flow with small particle size and can be successfully modeled with the Discrete Phase Method (DPM). For the other types, the Eulerian-Eulerian (E-E) or the so called two-fluid multiphase model is a more appropriate approach. The E-E model treats the solid phase as a distinct interpenetrating granular fluid and it is the most general-purposed multi-fluid model. This approach provides transient, three-dimensional, detailed information inside the reactor which would otherwise be unobtainable through experiments due to the large scale, high pressure and/or temperature. In this paper, a transient, three-dimensional model of the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) transport gasifier will be presented to illustrate how Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can be used for large-scale complicated geometry with detailed physics and chemistry. In the model, eleven species are included in the gas phase while four pseudo-species are assumed in the solid phase. A total of sixteen reactions, both homogeneous (involving only gas phase species) and heterogeneous (involving species in both gas and solid phases), are used to model the coal gasification chemistry. Computational results have been validated against PSDF experimental data from lignite to bituminous coals under both air and oxygen blown conditions. The PSDF gasifier geometry was meshed with about 70,000, hexahedra-dominated cells. A total of six cases with different coal, feed gas, and/or operation conditions have been performed. The predicted and

  7. Final Report: Performance Modeling Activities in PERC2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allan Snavely

    2007-02-25

    Progress in Performance Modeling for PERC2 resulted in: • Automated modeling tools that are robust, able to characterize large applications running at scale while simultaneously simulating the memory hierarchies of mul-tiple machines in parallel. • Porting of the requisite tracer tools to multiple platforms. • Improved performance models by using higher resolution memory models that ever before. • Adding control-flow and data dependency analysis to the tracers used in perform-ance tools. • Exploring and developing several new modeling methodologies. • Using modeling tools to develop performance models for strategic codes. • Application of modeling methodology to make a large number of “blind” per-formance predictions on certain mission partner applications, targeting most cur-rently available system architectures. • Error analysis to correct some systematic biases encountered as part of the large-scale blind prediction exercises. • Addition of instrumentation capabilities for communication libraries other than MPI. • Dissemination the tools and modeling methods to several mission partners, in-cluding DoD HPCMO and two DARPA HPCS vendors (Cray and IBM), as well as to the wider HPC community via a series of tutorials.

  8. Performance modelling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, C.; Li, X.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents a performance model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell that has sufficient accuracy for engineering applications with reduced computational requirements. The model includes electrochemical reaction in the catalyst layers and formulation for electrical resistance in the membrane, electrodes and bipolar plates, and employs engineering correlation for the reactant gas transport in the flow channels and through the electrodes. It is shown that the present model predictions are in reasonable agreement with known experimental observations, indicating that the present model can be employed for fuel cell stack and system modeling. The effect of various operating and design parameters on the cell performance has been investigated. It is found that mass transport limitations are the largest cause of performance loss in the cell when graphite is used as the material for bipolar plates and electrodes. If conducting polymers are substituted as construction materials, cell performance is expected to suffer considerably at high current densities due to their reduced electrical conductivity.

  9. Study on the well-posedness, convergence and the stability of the semi-implicit upwind numerical solver for the multi-fluid model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. Y.; Park, C. E.; Hibiki, T.; Ishii, M.; Ransom, V. H.

    2012-07-01

    The well-posedness, convergence and the stability of the two-fluid code has been studied for a long time. Most of the investigations concern the semi-implicit upwind solution scheme for the six equation two-fluid model such as used in RELAP5 3 or TRACE 21. Since the system code, SPACE 2, adopts one more field, a droplet field, it consists of nine equations (3 mass, 3 momentum and 3 energy balance equations) and thus more involved investigations are necessary to confirm the stability and convergence. For this objective, the old issue of the well-posedness, convergence and the stability is revisited and some general guidelines to develop a well-posed numerical multi-fluid model are derived as follows; (1) Hyperbolicity of the corresponding system of partial differential equations is not a necessary condition for the development of a numerical model for multi-phase flow, but whether or not it is hyperbolic can provide guidance relative to initial conditions, boundary conditions, and expected high frequency behavior of the model. (2) A necessary condition for a well-posed numerical model is stability in the von Neumann sense, i.e. growth factor less than 1.0 for the shortest wave-length, 2{Delta}x. (3) The smallest node size used for convergence studies should be of the order of the characteristic dimension of the average description, i.e. smaller nodes can be used so long as they do not result in unphysical growth of wave-lengths less than the characteristic dimension. The usual mathematical definition of convergence i.e. the behavior of the solution as the node size approaches zero, is not appropriate for the discrete averaged numerical model, since there is diminished physical meaning to behavior at wavelengths less than the characteristic dimension of the average description. Under these guidelines, dispersion analysis and von Neumann stability analysis are performed for the three field multi-fluid, semi-implicit, upwind numerical model to show that the necessary

  10. Numerical modeling of the groundwater contaminant transport for the Lake Karachai Area: The methodological approach and the basic two- dimensional regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrov, A.V.; Samsonova, L.M.; Vasil`kova, N.A.; Zinin, A.I.; Zinina, G.A. |

    1994-06-01

    Methodological aspects of the numerical modeling of the groundwater contaminant transport for the Lake Karachay area are discussed. Main features of conditions of the task are the high grade of non-uniformity of the aquifer in the fractured rock massif and the high density of the waste solutions, and also the high volume of the input data: both on the part of parameters of the aquifer (number of pump tests) and on the part of observations of functions of processes (long-time observations by the monitoring well grid). The modeling process for constructing the two dimensional regional model is described, and this model is presented as the basic model for subsequent full three-dimensional modeling in sub-areas of interest. Original powerful mathematical apparatus and computer codes for finite-difference numerical modeling are used.

  11. Models Used to Assess the Performance of Photovoltaic Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report documents the various photovoltaic (PV) performance models and software developed and utilized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in support of the Photovoltaics and Grid Integration Department. In addition to PV performance models, hybrid system and battery storage models are discussed. A hybrid system using other distributed sources and energy storage can help reduce the variability inherent in PV generation, and due to the complexity of combining multiple generation sources and system loads, these models are invaluable for system design and optimization.

  12. Models used to assess the performance of photovoltaic systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Klise, Geoffrey T.

    2009-12-01

    This report documents the various photovoltaic (PV) performance models and software developed and utilized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in support of the Photovoltaics and Grid Integration Department. In addition to PV performance models, hybrid system and battery storage models are discussed. A hybrid system using other distributed sources and energy storage can help reduce the variability inherent in PV generation, and due to the complexity of combining multiple generation sources and system loads, these models are invaluable for system design and optimization. Energy storage plays an important role in reducing PV intermittency and battery storage models are used to understand the best configurations and technologies to store PV generated electricity. Other researcher's models used by SNL are discussed including some widely known models that incorporate algorithms developed at SNL. There are other models included in the discussion that are not used by or were not adopted from SNL research but may provide some benefit to researchers working on PV array performance, hybrid system models and energy storage. The paper is organized into three sections to describe the different software models as applied to photovoltaic performance, hybrid systems, and battery storage. For each model, there is a description which includes where to find the model, whether it is currently maintained and any references that may be available. Modeling improvements underway at SNL include quantifying the uncertainty of individual system components, the overall uncertainty in modeled vs. measured results and modeling large PV systems. SNL is also conducting research into the overall reliability of PV systems.

  13. Modeling and simulation performance of sucker rod beam pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aditsania, Annisa; Rahmawati, Silvy Dewi Sukarno, Pudjo; Soewono, Edy

    2015-09-30

    Artificial lift is a mechanism to lift hydrocarbon, generally petroleum, from a well to surface. This is used in the case that the natural pressure from the reservoir has significantly decreased. Sucker rod beam pumping is a method of artificial lift. Sucker rod beam pump is modeled in this research as a function of geometry of the surface part, the size of sucker rod string, and fluid properties. Besides its length, sucker rod string also classified into tapered and un-tapered. At the beginning of this research, for easy modeling, the sucker rod string was assumed as un-tapered. The assumption proved non-realistic to use. Therefore, the tapered sucker rod string modeling needs building. The numerical solution of this sucker rod beam pump model is computed using finite difference method. The numerical result shows that the peak of polished rod load for sucker rod beam pump unit C-456-D-256-120, for non-tapered sucker rod string is 38504.2 lb, while for tapered rod string is 25723.3 lb. For that reason, to avoid the sucker rod string breaks due to the overload, the use of tapered sucker rod beam string is suggested in this research.

  14. Advanced Fuel Performance: Modeling and Simulation Light Water Reactor Fuel Performance:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    63 No. 8 * JOM 49 www.tms.org/jom.html Advanced Fuel Performance: Modeling and Simulation Light Water Reactor Fuel Performance: Current Status, Challenges, and Future High Fidelity Modeling K. Edsinger, C.R. Stanek, and B.D. Wirth How would you... ...describe the overall signifcance of this paper? This paper provides a concise description of the nuclear fuel used in pressurized water nuclear reactors and the most commonly observed fuel failure mechanisms. ...describe this work to a materials

  15. PROJECT PROFILE: Performance Models and Standards for Bifacial PV Module

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies | Department of Energy Performance Models and Standards for Bifacial PV Module Technologies PROJECT PROFILE: Performance Models and Standards for Bifacial PV Module Technologies Funding Opportunity: SuNLaMP SunShot Subprogram: Photovoltaics Location: Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM Amount Awarded: $3,000,000 Bifacial PV modules absorb sunlight and produce electricity from both the front and back sides of the module and can take advantage of light reflected from a

  16. Model Financing Solicitation for Energy Savings Performance Contracts |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Financing Solicitation for Energy Savings Performance Contracts Model Financing Solicitation for Energy Savings Performance Contracts Financial firms may be competitively selected to provide financing, where the solicitation can be handled by the end-user or by an Energy Service Company (ESCO) on behalf of an institution as part of an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC). The financing agreement is a stand-alone document, separate from the ESPC, between the

  17. High-Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-11-01

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing (HPC) are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the DOE SciDAC program has produced such accelerator-modeling tools, which have beem employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. In this article we discuss the Synergia beam-dynamics framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation packagemorecapable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. We present the design principles, key physical and numerical models in Synergia and its performance on HPC platforms. Finally, we present the results of Synergia applications for the Fermilab proton source upgrade, known as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).less

  18. High-Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-11-01

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing (HPC) are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the DOE SciDAC program has produced such accelerator-modeling tools, which have beem employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. In this article we discuss the Synergia beam-dynamics framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. We present the design principles, key physical and numerical models in Synergia and its performance on HPC platforms. Finally, we present the results of Synergia applications for the Fermilab proton source upgrade, known as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).

  19. Evaluation of Blade-Strike Models for Estimating the Biological Performance of Large Kaplan Hydro Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2005-11-30

    BioIndex testing of hydro-turbines is sought as an analog to the hydraulic index testing conducted on hydro-turbines to optimize their power production efficiency. In BioIndex testing the goal is to identify those operations within the range identified by Index testing where the survival of fish passing through the turbine is maximized. BioIndex testing includes the immediate tailrace region as well as the turbine environment between a turbine's intake trashracks and the exit of its draft tube. The US Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of Energy have been evaluating a variety of means, such as numerical and physical turbine models, to investigate the quality of flow through a hydro-turbine and other aspects of the turbine environment that determine its safety for fish. The goal is to use these tools to develop hypotheses identifying turbine operations and predictions of their biological performance that can be tested at prototype scales. Acceptance of hypotheses would be the means for validation of new operating rules for the turbine tested that would be in place when fish were passing through the turbines. The overall goal of this project is to evaluate the performance of numerical blade strike models as a tool to aid development of testable hypotheses for bioIndexing. Evaluation of the performance of numerical blade strike models is accomplished by comparing predictions of fish mortality resulting from strike by turbine runner blades with observations made using live test fish at mainstem Columbia River Dams and with other predictions of blade strike made using observations of beads passing through a 1:25 scale physical turbine model.

  20. Performance Models for the Spike Banded Linear System Solver

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Manguoglu, Murat; Saied, Faisal; Sameh, Ahmed; Grama, Ananth

    2011-01-01

    With availability of large-scale parallel platforms comprised of tens-of-thousands of processors and beyond, there is significant impetus for the development of scalable parallel sparse linear system solvers and preconditioners. An integral part of this design process is the development of performance models capable of predicting performance and providing accurate cost models for the solvers and preconditioners. There has been some work in the past on characterizing performance of the iterative solvers themselves. In this paper, we investigate the problem of characterizing performance and scalability of banded preconditioners. Recent work has demonstrated the superior convergence properties and robustness of banded preconditioners,more » compared to state-of-the-art ILU family of preconditioners as well as algebraic multigrid preconditioners. Furthermore, when used in conjunction with efficient banded solvers, banded preconditioners are capable of significantly faster time-to-solution. Our banded solver, the Truncated Spike algorithm is specifically designed for parallel performance and tolerance to deep memory hierarchies. Its regular structure is also highly amenable to accurate performance characterization. Using these characteristics, we derive the following results in this paper: (i) we develop parallel formulations of the Truncated Spike solver, (ii) we develop a highly accurate pseudo-analytical parallel performance model for our solver, (iii) we show excellent predication capabilities of our model – based on which we argue the high scalability of our solver. Our pseudo-analytical performance model is based on analytical performance characterization of each phase of our solver. These analytical models are then parameterized using actual runtime information on target platforms. An important consequence of our performance models is that they reveal underlying performance bottlenecks in both serial and parallel formulations. All of our results are validated

  1. Multi-Scale Multi-Dimensional Ion Battery Performance Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-05-07

    The Multi-Scale Multi-Dimensional (MSMD) Lithium Ion Battery Model allows for computer prediction and engineering optimization of thermal, electrical, and electrochemical performance of lithium ion cells with realistic geometries. The model introduces separate simulation domains for different scale physics, achieving much higher computational efficiency compared to the single domain approach. It solves a one dimensional electrochemistry model in a micro sub-grid system, and captures the impacts of macro-scale battery design factors on cell performance and materialmore » usage by solving cell-level electron and heat transports in a macro grid system.« less

  2. Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics: combat performance-shaping factors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawton, Craig R.; Miller, Dwight Peter

    2006-01-01

    The US military has identified Human Performance Modeling (HPM) as a significant requirement and challenge of future systems modeling and analysis initiatives. To support this goal, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has undertaken a program of HPM as an integral augmentation to its system-of-system (SoS) analytics capabilities. The previous effort, reported in SAND2005-6569, evaluated the effects of soldier cognitive fatigue on SoS performance. The current effort began with a very broad survey of any performance-shaping factors (PSFs) that also might affect soldiers performance in combat situations. The work included consideration of three different approaches to cognition modeling and how appropriate they would be for application to SoS analytics. This bulk of this report categorizes 47 PSFs into three groups (internal, external, and task-related) and provides brief descriptions of how each affects combat performance, according to the literature. The PSFs were then assembled into a matrix with 22 representative military tasks and assigned one of four levels of estimated negative impact on task performance, based on the literature. Blank versions of the matrix were then sent to two ex-military subject-matter experts to be filled out based on their personal experiences. Data analysis was performed to identify the consensus most influential PSFs. Results indicate that combat-related injury, cognitive fatigue, inadequate training, physical fatigue, thirst, stress, poor perceptual processing, and presence of chemical agents are among the PSFs with the most negative impact on combat performance.

  3. Dynamic simulation models and performance of an OTEC power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wormley, D.N.; Carmichael, D.A.; Umans, S.

    1983-08-01

    In this study, the aspects of plant performance which influence the potential for integration of an OTEC plant into a utility grid are considered. A set of simulation models have been developed for the evaluation of OTEC dynamic plant performance. A detailed nonlinear dynamic model has been forumlated which is useful for the assessment of component performance including heat exchangers, turbines, pumps and control systems. A reduced order linear model has been developed which is useful for studies of plant stability, control system development and transient performance of the plant connected to a utility grid. This model is particularly suitable for transient dynamic studies of an OTEC plant as a unit in a utility grid. A quasi-steady power availability model has also been developed which is useful to determine plant ouput power as a function of ocean thermal gradients so that the influence of daily and seasonal temperature variations may be easily computed. The study has found no fundamental technical barriers which would prohibit the interconnection of an OTEC plant into a utility grid. It has also shown that detailed consideration of turbine nozzle angle control is merited and such a control has the potential to provide superior performance in comparison to turbine bypass valve control.

  4. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Home Performance Contractor Business Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The home performance contractor model walks through the “one-stop-shop” model for home energy upgrades. It illustrates both the opportunities and barriers for starting as a home performance contractor company from the beginning, rather than expanding from an existing model, such as a remodeler.

  5. Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics :soldier fatigue.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawton, Craig R.; Campbell, James E.; Miller, Dwight Peter

    2005-10-01

    The military has identified Human Performance Modeling (HPM) as a significant requirement and challenge of future systems modeling and analysis initiatives as can be seen in the Department of Defense's (DoD) Defense Modeling and Simulation Office's (DMSO) Master Plan (DoD 5000.59-P 1995). To this goal, the military is currently spending millions of dollars on programs devoted to HPM in various military contexts. Examples include the Human Performance Modeling Integration (HPMI) program within the Air Force Research Laboratory, which focuses on integrating HPMs with constructive models of systems (e.g. cockpit simulations) and the Navy's Human Performance Center (HPC) established in September 2003. Nearly all of these initiatives focus on the interface between humans and a single system. This is insufficient in the era of highly complex network centric SoS. This report presents research and development in the area of HPM in a system-of-systems (SoS). Specifically, this report addresses modeling soldier fatigue and the potential impacts soldier fatigue can have on SoS performance.

  6. Uncertainty and Sensitivity of Alternative Rn-222 Flux Density Models Used in Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg J. Shott, Vefa Yucel, Lloyd Desotell; Non-Nstec Authors: G. Pyles and Jon Carilli

    2007-06-01

    Performance assessments for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site have used three different mathematical models to estimate Rn-222 flux density. This study describes the performance, uncertainty, and sensitivity of the three models which include the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 3.64 analytical method and two numerical methods. The uncertainty of each model was determined by Monte Carlo simulation using Latin hypercube sampling. The global sensitivity was investigated using Morris one-at-time screening method, sample-based correlation and regression methods, the variance-based extended Fourier amplitude sensitivity test, and Sobol's sensitivity indices. The models were found to produce similar estimates of the mean and median flux density, but to have different uncertainties and sensitivities. When the Rn-222 effective diffusion coefficient was estimated using five different published predictive models, the radon flux density models were found to be most sensitive to the effective diffusion coefficient model selected, the emanation coefficient, and the radionuclide inventory. Using a site-specific measured effective diffusion coefficient significantly reduced the output uncertainty. When a site-specific effective-diffusion coefficient was used, the models were most sensitive to the emanation coefficient and the radionuclide inventory.

  7. Cost and Performance Model for Redox Flow Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Crawford, Aladsair J.; Stephenson, David E.; Kim, Soowhan; Wang, Wei; Li, Bin; Coffey, Greg W.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Graff, Gordon L.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2014-02-01

    A cost model was developed for all vanadium and iron-vanadium redox flow batteries. Electrochemical performance modeling was done to estimate stack performance at various power densities as a function of state of charge. This was supplemented with a shunt current model and a pumping loss model to estimate actual system efficiency. The operating parameters such as power density, flow rates and design parameters such as electrode aspect ratio, electrolyte flow channel dimensions were adjusted to maximize efficiency and minimize capital costs. Detailed cost estimates were obtained from various vendors to calculate cost estimates for present, realistic and optimistic scenarios. The main drivers for cost reduction for various chemistries were identified as a function of the energy to power ratio of the storage system. Levelized cost analysis further guided suitability of various chemistries for different applications.

  8. Experimental and numerical investigations of beryllium strength models using the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry de Frahan, M. T.; Belof, J. L.; Cavallo, R. M.; Raevsky, V. A.; Ignatova, O. N.; Lebedev, A.; Ancheta, D. S.; El-dasher, B. S.; Florando, J. N.; Gallegos, G. F.; Johnsen, E.; LeBlanc, M. M.

    2015-06-14

    A recent collaboration between LLNL and VNIIEF has produced a set of high explosive driven Rayleigh-Taylor strength data for beryllium. Design simulations using legacy strength models from Steinberg-Lund and Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) suggested an optimal design that would delineate between not just different strength models, but different parameters sets of the PTW model. Application of the models to the post-shot results, however, shows close to classical growth. We characterize the material properties of the beryllium tested in the experiments. We also discuss recent efforts to simulate the data using the legacy strength models as well as the more recent RING relaxation model developed at VNIIEF. Finally, we present shock and ramp-loading recovery experiments conducted as part of the collaboration.

  9. Numerical Simulation of the Performance Characteristics, Instability, and Effects of Band Gap Grading in Cadmium Telluride Based Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael David Petersen

    2001-05-01

    Using computer simulations, the performance of several CdTe based photovoltaic structures has been studied. The advantages and disadvantages of band gap grading, through the use of (Zn,Cd)Te, have also been investigated in these structures. Grading at the front interface between a CdS window layer and a CdTe absorber layer, can arise due to interdiffusion between the materials during growth or due to the intentional variation of the material composition. This grading has been shown to improve certain performance metrics, such as the open-circuit voltage, while degrading others, such as the fill factor, depending on the amount and distance of the grading. The presence of a Schottky barrier as the back contact has also been shown to degrade the photovoltaic performance of the device, resulting in a characteristic IV curve. However, with the appropriate band gap grading at the back interface, it has been shown that the performance can be enhanced through more efficient carrier collection. These results were then correlated with experimental observations of the performance degradation in devices subjected to light and heat stress.

  10. Numerical Simulation of the Performance Characteristics, Instability, and Effects of Band Gap Grading in Cadmium Telluride Based Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael David Petersen

    2001-06-27

    Using computer simulations, the performance of several CdTe based photovoltaic structures has been studied. The advantages and disadvantages of band gap grading, through the use of (Zn, Cd)Te, have also been investigated in these structures. Grading at the front interface between a CdS window layer and a CdTe absorber layer, can arise due to interdiffusion between the materials during growth or due to the intentional variation of the material composition. This grading has been shown to improve certain performance metrics, such as the open-circuit voltage, while degrading others, such as the fill factor, depending on the amount and distance of the grading. The presence of a Schottky barrier as the back contact has also been shown to degrade the photovoltaic performance of the device, resulting in a characteristic IV curve. However, with the appropriate band gap grading at the back interface, it has been shown that the performance can be enhanced through more efficient carrier collection. These results were then correlated with experimental observations of the performance degradation in devices subjected to light and heat stress.

  11. Numerical modeling of pulsed laser-material interaction and of laser plume dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Qiang; Shi, Yina

    2015-03-10

    We have developed two-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) code which is used to study the physical processes, the plasma absorption, the crater profile, and the temperature distribution on metallic target and below the surface. The ALE method overcomes problems with Lagrangian moving mesh distortion by mesh smoothing and conservative quantities remapping from Lagrangian mesh to smoothed one. A new second order accurate diffusion solver has been implemented for the thermal conduction and radiation transport on distorted mesh. The results of numerical simulation of pulsed laser ablation are presented. The influences of different processes, such as time evolution of the surface temperature, interspecies interactions (elastic collisions, recombination-dissociation reaction), interaction with an ambient gas are examined. The study presents particular interest for the analysis of experimental results obtained during pulsed laser ablation.

  12. Performance | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Submitted by Ocop(5) Member 15 July, 2014 - 07:07 MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Cost Current DOE LCOE numerical modeling Performance Tidal Wave To normalize competing...

  13. Numerical modeling of the effects of wave energy converter characteristics on nearshore wave conditions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chang, G.; Ruehl, K.; Jones, C. A.; Roberts, J.; Chartrand, C.

    2015-12-24

    Modeled nearshore wave propagation was investigated downstream of simulated wave energy converters (WECs) to evaluate overall near- and far-field effects of WEC arrays. Model sensitivity to WEC characteristics and WEC array deployment scenarios was evaluated using a modified version of an industry standard wave model, Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), which allows the incorporation of device-specific WEC characteristics to specify obstacle transmission. The sensitivity study illustrated that WEC device type and subsequently its size directly resulted in wave height variations in the lee of the WEC array. Wave heights decreased up to 30% between modeled scenarios with and without WECs formore » large arrays (100 devices) of relatively sizable devices (26 m in diameter) with peak power generation near to the modeled incident wave height. Other WEC types resulted in less than 15% differences in modeled wave height with and without WECs, with lesser influence for WECs less than 10 m in diameter. Wave directions and periods were largely insensitive to changes in parameters. Furthermore, additional model parameterization and analysis are required to fully explore the model sensitivity of peak wave period and mean wave direction to the varying of the parameters.« less

  14. Numerical modeling of the effects of wave energy converter characteristics on nearshore wave conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, G.; Ruehl, K.; Jones, C. A.; Roberts, J.; Chartrand, C.

    2015-12-24

    Modeled nearshore wave propagation was investigated downstream of simulated wave energy converters (WECs) to evaluate overall near- and far-field effects of WEC arrays. Model sensitivity to WEC characteristics and WEC array deployment scenarios was evaluated using a modified version of an industry standard wave model, Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), which allows the incorporation of device-specific WEC characteristics to specify obstacle transmission. The sensitivity study illustrated that WEC device type and subsequently its size directly resulted in wave height variations in the lee of the WEC array. Wave heights decreased up to 30% between modeled scenarios with and without WECs for large arrays (100 devices) of relatively sizable devices (26 m in diameter) with peak power generation near to the modeled incident wave height. Other WEC types resulted in less than 15% differences in modeled wave height with and without WECs, with lesser influence for WECs less than 10 m in diameter. Wave directions and periods were largely insensitive to changes in parameters. Furthermore, additional model parameterization and analysis are required to fully explore the model sensitivity of peak wave period and mean wave direction to the varying of the parameters.

  15. Reference Manual for the System Advisor Model's Wind Power Performance Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, J.; Jorgenson, J.; Gilman, P.; Ferguson, T.

    2014-08-01

    This manual describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's System Advisor Model (SAM) wind power performance model. The model calculates the hourly electrical output of a single wind turbine or of a wind farm. The wind power performance model requires information about the wind resource, wind turbine specifications, wind farm layout (if applicable), and costs. In SAM, the performance model can be coupled to one of the financial models to calculate economic metrics for residential, commercial, or utility-scale wind projects. This manual describes the algorithms used by the wind power performance model, which is available in the SAM user interface and as part of the SAM Simulation Core (SSC) library, and is intended to supplement the user documentation that comes with the software.

  16. Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL LBNL and SNL for the UFD Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes laboratory and field observations and numerical modeling related to coupled processes involving brine and vapor migration in geologic salt, focusing on recent developments and studies conducted at Sandia, Los Alamos, and Berkeley National Laboratories. Interest into the disposal of heat-generating waste in salt has led to interest into water distribution and migration in both run-of-mine crushed and intact geologic salt. Ideally a fully coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical simulation is performed using numerical models with validated constitutive models and parameters. When mechanical coupling is not available, mechanical effects are prescribed in hydraulic models as source, boundary, or initial conditions. This report presents material associated with developing appropriate initial conditions for a non-mechanical hydrologic simulation of brine migration in salt. Due to the strong coupling between the mechanical and hydrologic problems, the initial saturation will be low for the excavation disturbed zone surrounding the excavation. Although most of the material in this report is not new, the author hopes it is presented in a format making it useful to other salt researchers.

  17. The value of numerical modeling in understanding the complete load/deformation behavior of cohesive-frictional materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potyondy, D.O.; Fairhurst, C.E.

    1999-07-01

    The post-peak load/deformation behavior of cohesive-frictional materials is an integral part of the overall response of a specimen to compressive loading. A more comprehensive understanding of the pre- and post-peak behavior is necessary. Recent developments in numerical modeling that allow study of the overall response of a synthetic material containing discrete heterogeneities and discontinuities both at the micro (particle) scale and at the larger scale of jointed rock masses can greatly aid the interpretation and application of laboratory test results on these materials.

  18. A Programming Model Performance Study Using the NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shan, Hongzhang; Blagojević, Filip; Min, Seung-Jai; Hargrove, Paul; Jin, Haoqiang; Fuerlinger, Karl; Koniges, Alice; Wright, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01

    Harnessing the power of multicore platforms is challenging due to the additional levels of parallelism present. In this paper we use the NAS Parallel Benchmarks to study three programming models, MPI, OpenMP and PGAS to understand their performance and memory usage characteristics on current multicore architectures. To understand these characteristics we use the Integrated Performance Monitoring tool and other ways to measure communication versus computation time, as well as the fraction of the run time spent in OpenMP. The benchmarks are run on two different Cray XT5 systems and an Infiniband cluster. Our results show that in general the threemore » programming models exhibit very similar performance characteristics. In a few cases, OpenMP is significantly faster because it explicitly avoids communication. For these particular cases, we were able to re-write the UPC versions and achieve equal performance to OpenMP. Using OpenMP was also the most advantageous in terms of memory usage. Also we compare performance differences between the two Cray systems, which have quad-core and hex-core processors. We show that at scale the performance is almost always slower on the hex-core system because of increased contention for network resources.« less

  19. Final Report: A Model Management System for Numerical Simulations of Subsurface Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachmann, David

    2013-10-07

    The DOE and several other Federal agencies have committed significant resources to support the development of a large number of mathematical models for studying subsurface science problems such as groundwater flow, fate of contaminants and carbon sequestration, to mention only a few. This project provides new tools to help decision makers and stakeholders in subsurface science related problems to select an appropriate set of simulation models for a given field application.

  20. Maintenance personnel performance simulation (MAPPS) model: overview and evaluation efforts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knee, H.E.; Haas, P.M.; Siegel, A.I.; Bartter, W.D.; Wolf, J.J.; Ryan, T.G.

    1984-01-01

    The development of the MAPPS model has been completed and the model is currently undergoing evaluation. These efforts are addressing a number of identified issues concerning practicality, acceptability, usefulness, and validity. Preliminary analysis of the evaluation data that has been collected indicates that MAPPS will provide comprehensive and reliable data for PRA purposes and for a number of other applications. The MAPPS computer simulation model provides the user with a sophisticated tool for gaining insights into tasks performed by NPP maintenance personnel. Its wide variety of input parameters and output data makes it extremely flexible for application to a number of diverse applications. With the demonstration of favorable model evaluation results, the MAPPS model will represent a valuable source of NPP maintainer reliability data and provide PRA studies with a source of data on maintainers that has previously not existed.

  1. PHARAO laser source flight model: Design and performances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lévèque, T. Faure, B.; Esnault, F. X.; Delaroche, C.; Massonnet, D.; Grosjean, O.; Buffe, F.; Torresi, P.; Bomer, T.; Pichon, A.; Béraud, P.; Lelay, J. P.; Thomin, S.; Laurent, Ph.

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, we describe the design and the main performances of the PHARAO laser source flight model. PHARAO is a laser cooled cesium clock specially designed for operation in space and the laser source is one of the main sub-systems. The flight model presented in this work is the first remote-controlled laser system designed for spaceborne cold atom manipulation. The main challenges arise from mechanical compatibility with space constraints, which impose a high level of compactness, a low electric power consumption, a wide range of operating temperature, and a vacuum environment. We describe the main functions of the laser source and give an overview of the main technologies developed for this instrument. We present some results of the qualification process. The characteristics of the laser source flight model, and their impact on the clock performances, have been verified in operational conditions.

  2. Numerical modeling of immiscible two-phase flow in micro-models using a commercial CFD code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadia, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.

    2009-01-01

    Off-the-shelf CFD software is being used to analyze everything from flow over airplanes to lab-on-a-chip designs. So, how accurately can two-phase immiscible flow be modeled flowing through some small-scale models of porous media? We evaluate the capability of the CFD code FLUENT{trademark} to model immiscible flow in micro-scale, bench-top stereolithography models. By comparing the flow results to experimental models we show that accurate 3D modeling is possible.

  3. A New Model to Simulate Energy Performance of VRF Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Pang, Xiufeng; Schetrit, Oren; Wang, Liping; Kasahara, Shinichi; Yura, Yoshinori; Hinokuma, Ryohei

    2014-03-30

    This paper presents a new model to simulate energy performance of variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems in heat pump operation mode (either cooling or heating is provided but not simultaneously). The main improvement of the new model is the introduction of the evaporating and condensing temperature in the indoor and outdoor unit capacity modifier functions. The independent variables in the capacity modifier functions of the existing VRF model in EnergyPlus are mainly room wet-bulb temperature and outdoor dry-bulb temperature in cooling mode and room dry-bulb temperature and outdoor wet-bulb temperature in heating mode. The new approach allows compliance with different specifications of each indoor unit so that the modeling accuracy is improved. The new VRF model was implemented in a custom version of EnergyPlus 7.2. This paper first describes the algorithm for the new VRF model, which is then used to simulate the energy performance of a VRF system in a Prototype House in California that complies with the requirements of Title 24 ? the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The VRF system performance is then compared with three other types of HVAC systems: the Title 24-2005 Baseline system, the traditional High Efficiency system, and the EnergyStar Heat Pump system in three typical California climates: Sunnyvale, Pasadena and Fresno. Calculated energy savings from the VRF systems are significant. The HVAC site energy savings range from 51 to 85percent, while the TDV (Time Dependent Valuation) energy savings range from 31 to 66percent compared to the Title 24 Baseline Systems across the three climates. The largest energy savings are in Fresno climate followed by Sunnyvale and Pasadena. The paper discusses various characteristics of the VRF systems contributing to the energy savings. It should be noted that these savings are calculated using the Title 24 prototype House D under standard operating conditions. Actual performance of the VRF systems for real

  4. Synthesis of Numerical Methods for Modeling Wave Energy Converter-Point Absorbers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y.; Yu, Y. H.

    2012-05-01

    During the past few decades, wave energy has received significant attention among all ocean energy formats. Industry has proposed hundreds of prototypes such as an oscillating water column, a point absorber, an overtopping system, and a bottom-hinged system. In particular, many researchers have focused on modeling the floating-point absorber as the technology to extract wave energy. Several modeling methods have been used such as the analytical method, the boundary-integral equation method, the Navier-Stokes equations method, and the empirical method. However, no standardized method has been decided. To assist the development of wave energy conversion technologies, this report reviews the methods for modeling the floating-point absorber.

  5. Numerical model for the vacuum pyrolysis of scrap tires in batch reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, J.; Tanguy, P.A.; Roy, C.

    1995-06-01

    A quantitative model for scrap tire pyrolysis in a batch scale reactor developed comprises the following basic phenomena: conduction inside tire particles; conduction, convection, and radiation between the feedstock particles or between the fluids and the particles; tire pyrolysis reaction; exothermicity and endothermicity caused by tire decomposition and volatilization; and the variation of the composition and the thermal properties of tire particles. This model was used to predict the transient temperature and density distributions in the bed of particles, the volatile product evolution rate, the mass change, the energy consumption during the pyrolysis process, and the pressure history in a tire pyrolysis reactor with a load of 1 kg. The model predictions agree well with independent experimental data.

  6. Numerical Modeling of 90Sr and 137Cs Transport from a Spill in the B-Cell of the 324 Building, Hanford Site 300 Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Bacon, Diana H.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2012-03-19

    To characterize the extent of contamination under the 324 Building, a pit was excavated on the north side of the building in 2010 by Washington Closure Hanford LLC (WCH). Horizontal closed-end steel access pipes were installed under the foundation of the building from this pit and were used for measuring temperatures and exposure rates under the B-Cell. The deployed sensors measured elevated temperatures of up to 61 C (142 F) and exposure rates of up to 8,900 R/hr. WCH suspended deactivation of the facility because it recognized that building safety systems and additional characterization data might be needed for remediation of the contaminated material. The characterization work included additional field sampling, laboratory measurements, and numerical flow and transport modeling. Laboratory measurements of sediment physical, hydraulic, and geochemical properties were performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and others. Geochemical modeling and subsurface flow and transport modeling also were performed by PNNL to evaluate the possible extent of contamination in the unsaturated sand and gravel sediments underlying the building. Historical records suggest that the concentrated 137Cs- and 90Sr-bearing liquid wastes that were spilled in B-Cell were likely from a glass-waste repository testing program associated with the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). Incomplete estimates of the aqueous chemical composition (no anion data provided) of the FRG waste solutions were entered into a geochemical speciation model and were charge balanced with nitrate to estimate waste composition. Additional geochemical modeling was performed to evaluate reactions of the waste stream with the concrete foundation of the building prior to the stream entering the subsurface.

  7. Numerical modeling and experiments of creep crack growth under cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brust, F.W.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a summary of some recent studies of creep crack growth under history dependent load conditions. The effect of a proper constitutive law is illustrated. Moreover, the asymptotic fields are reconsidered under cyclic creep conditions. In addition, several experiments are modeled and the behavior of integral parameters is discussed.

  8. Instruction-level performance modeling and characterization of multimedia applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y.; Cameron, K.W.

    1999-06-01

    One of the challenges for characterizing and modeling realistic multimedia applications is the lack of access to source codes. On-chip performance counters effectively resolve this problem by monitoring run-time behaviors at the instruction-level. This paper presents a novel technique of characterizing and modeling workloads at the instruction level for realistic multimedia applications using hardware performance counters. A variety of instruction counts are collected from some multimedia applications, such as RealPlayer, GSM Vocoder, MPEG encoder/decoder, and speech synthesizer. These instruction counts can be used to form a set of abstract characteristic parameters directly related to a processor`s architectural features. Based on microprocessor architectural constraints and these calculated abstract parameters, the architectural performance bottleneck for a specific application can be estimated. Meanwhile, the bottleneck estimation can provide suggestions about viable architectural/functional improvement for certain workloads. The biggest advantage of this new characterization technique is a better understanding of processor utilization efficiency and architectural bottleneck for each application. This technique also provides predictive insight of future architectural enhancements and their affect on current codes. In this paper the authors also attempt to model architectural effect on processor utilization without memory influence. They derive formulas for calculating CPI{sub 0}, CPI without memory effect, and they quantify utilization of architectural parameters. These equations are architecturally diagnostic and predictive in nature. Results provide promise in code characterization, and empirical/analytical modeling.

  9. Correlation between human observer performance and model observer performance in differential phase contrast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ke; Garrett, John; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: With the recently expanding interest and developments in x-ray differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT), the evaluation of its task-specific detection performance and comparison with the corresponding absorption CT under a given radiation dose constraint become increasingly important. Mathematical model observers are often used to quantify the performance of imaging systems, but their correlations with actual human observers need to be confirmed for each new imaging method. This work is an investigation of the effects of stochastic DPC-CT noise on the correlation of detection performance between model and human observers with signal-known-exactly (SKE) detection tasks.Methods: The detectabilities of different objects (five disks with different diameters and two breast lesion masses) embedded in an experimental DPC-CT noise background were assessed using both model and human observers. The detectability of the disk and lesion signals was then measured using five types of model observers including the prewhitening ideal observer, the nonprewhitening (NPW) observer, the nonprewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (NPWEi), the prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (PWEi), and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). The same objects were also evaluated by four human observers using the two-alternative forced choice method. The results from the model observer experiment were quantitatively compared to the human observer results to assess the correlation between the two techniques.Results: The contrast-to-detail (CD) curve generated by the human observers for the disk-detection experiments shows that the required contrast to detect a disk is inversely proportional to the square root of the disk size. Based on the CD curves, the ideal and NPW observers tend to systematically overestimate the performance of the human observers. The NPWEi and PWEi observers did not predict human performance well either, as the slopes of their CD

  10. One-dimensional numerical fluid dynamics model of the spreading of liquefied gaseous fuel (LGF) on water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, W.; Ermak, D.L.

    1980-11-04

    A computer model has been developed to simulate the spreading of an evaporating liquefied gaseous fuel that has been spilled on the surface of a denser liquid. This would correspond, for example, to the spreading of liquefied natural gas spilled onto water. The model is based on the one-dimensional, time-dependent equations of conservation of mass and momentum, with the assumption that the pool of liquid fuel spreads in a radially symmetric manner. It includes the effects of vaporization, shear at the fuel-liquid interface, and buoyancy due to the density difference between the fuel and the liquid onto which it is spilled. Both instantaneous and continuous spills of finite volume are treated. The height and spreading velocity of the pool of spilled fuel are calculated as functions of time and radius by numerically solving the conservation equations with a finite difference method. Output of the calculations is presented in both tabular and graphical form.

  11. One-dimensional numerical fluid dynamics model of the spreading of liquefied gaseous fuel (LGF) on water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, W.; Ermak, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    A computer model has been developed to simulate the spreading of an evaporating liquefied gaseous fuel that has been spilled on the surface of a denser liquid. This would correspond, for example, to the spreading of liquefied natural gas spilled onto water. The model is based on the one-dimensional, time-dependent equations of conservation of mass and momentum, with the assumption that the pool of liquid fuel spreads in a radially symmetric manner. It includes the effects of vaporization, shear at the fuel-liquid interface, and buoyancy due to the density difference between the fuel and the liquid onto which it is spilled. Both instantaneous and continuous spills of finite volume are treated. The height and spreading velocity of the pool of spilled fuel are calculated as functions of time and radius by numerically solving the conservation equations with a finite difference method.Output of the calculations is presented in both tabular and graphical form.

  12. MEAN-FIELD MODELING OF AN α{sup 2} DYNAMO COUPLED WITH DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF RIGIDLY ROTATING CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masada, Youhei; Sano, Takayoshi E-mail: sano@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2014-10-10

    The mechanism of large-scale dynamos in rigidly rotating stratified convection is explored by direct numerical simulations (DNS) in Cartesian geometry. A mean-field dynamo model is also constructed using turbulent velocity profiles consistently extracted from the corresponding DNS results. By quantitative comparison between the DNS and our mean-field model, it is demonstrated that the oscillatory α{sup 2} dynamo wave, excited and sustained in the convection zone, is responsible for large-scale magnetic activities such as cyclic polarity reversal and spatiotemporal migration. The results provide strong evidence that a nonuniformity of the α-effect, which is a natural outcome of rotating stratified convection, can be an important prerequisite for large-scale stellar dynamos, even without the Ω-effect.

  13. Confidence in Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemez, Francois M.

    2015-02-23

    This PowerPoint presentation offers a high-level discussion of uncertainty, confidence and credibility in scientific Modeling and Simulation (M&S). It begins by briefly evoking M&S trends in computational physics and engineering. The first thrust of the discussion is to emphasize that the role of M&S in decision-making is either to support reasoning by similarity or to “forecast,” that is, make predictions about the future or extrapolate to settings or environments that cannot be tested experimentally. The second thrust is to explain that M&S-aided decision-making is an exercise in uncertainty management. The three broad classes of uncertainty in computational physics and engineering are variability and randomness, numerical uncertainty and model-form uncertainty. The last part of the discussion addresses how scientists “think.” This thought process parallels the scientific method where by a hypothesis is formulated, often accompanied by simplifying assumptions, then, physical experiments and numerical simulations are performed to confirm or reject the hypothesis. “Confidence” derives, not just from the levels of training and experience of analysts, but also from the rigor with which these assessments are performed, documented and peer-reviewed.

  14. Numerical modeling of laser tunneling ionization in explicit particle-in-cell codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, M.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Yu, L.L.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Leemans, W.P.

    2013-03-01

    Methods for the calculation of laser tunneling ionization in explicit particle-in-cell codes used for modeling laserplasma interactions are compared and validated against theoretical predictions. Improved accuracy is obtained by using the direct current form for the ionization rate. Multi level ionization in a single time step and energy conservation have been considered during the ionization process. The effects of grid resolution and number of macro-particles per cell are examined. Implementation of the ionization algorithm in two different particle-in-cell codes is compared for the case of ionization-based electron injection in a laserplasma accelerator.

  15. Duct thermal performance models for large commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, Craig P.

    2003-10-01

    Despite the potential for significant energy savings by reducing duct leakage or other thermal losses from duct systems in large commercial buildings, California Title 24 has no provisions to credit energy-efficient duct systems in these buildings. A substantial reason is the lack of readily available simulation tools to demonstrate the energy-saving benefits associated with efficient duct systems in large commercial buildings. The overall goal of the Efficient Distribution Systems (EDS) project within the PIER High Performance Commercial Building Systems Program is to bridge the gaps in current duct thermal performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of duct thermal performance in California large commercial buildings. As steps toward this goal, our strategy in the EDS project involves two parts: (1) developing a whole-building energy simulation approach for analyzing duct thermal performance in large commercial buildings, and (2) using the tool to identify the energy impacts of duct leakage in California large commercial buildings, in support of future recommendations to address duct performance in the Title 24 Energy Efficiency Standards for Nonresidential Buildings. The specific technical objectives for the EDS project were to: (1) Identify a near-term whole-building energy simulation approach that can be used in the impacts analysis task of this project (see Objective 3), with little or no modification. A secondary objective is to recommend how to proceed with long-term development of an improved compliance tool for Title 24 that addresses duct thermal performance. (2) Develop an Alternative Calculation Method (ACM) change proposal to include a new metric for thermal distribution system efficiency in the reporting requirements for the 2005 Title 24 Standards. The metric will facilitate future comparisons of different system types using a common ''yardstick''. (3) Using the selected near-term simulation approach, assess the impacts of

  16. Optimization and Performance Modeling of Stencil Computations on Modern Microprocessors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datta, Kaushik; Kamil, Shoaib; Williams, Samuel; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John; Yelick, Katherine

    2007-06-01

    Stencil-based kernels constitute the core of many important scientific applications on blockstructured grids. Unfortunately, these codes achieve a low fraction of peak performance, due primarily to the disparity between processor and main memory speeds. In this paper, we explore the impact of trends in memory subsystems on a variety of stencil optimization techniques and develop performance models to analytically guide our optimizations. Our work targets cache reuse methodologies across single and multiple stencil sweeps, examining cache-aware algorithms as well as cache-oblivious techniques on the Intel Itanium2, AMD Opteron, and IBM Power5. Additionally, we consider stencil computations on the heterogeneous multicore design of the Cell processor, a machine with an explicitly managed memory hierarchy. Overall our work represents one of the most extensive analyses of stencil optimizations and performance modeling to date. Results demonstrate that recent trends in memory system organization have reduced the efficacy of traditional cache-blocking optimizations. We also show that a cache-aware implementation is significantly faster than a cache-oblivious approach, while the explicitly managed memory on Cell enables the highest overall efficiency: Cell attains 88% of algorithmic peak while the best competing cache-based processor achieves only 54% of algorithmic peak performance.

  17. Application of numerical modeling in a clean-coal demonstration project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latham, C.E.; Laursen, T.A.; Bellanca, C.; Duong, H.

    1992-11-01

    Currently, utility boilers equipped with cell burners comprise 13% of pre-NSPS coal-fired generating capacity. The cell burner rapidly mixes the pulverized coal and combustion air resulting in rapid combustion and high NO{sub x} generation. A US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean-Coal Technology Demonstration project is underway at Dayton Power & Light`s J. M. Stuart Station to demonstrate the Low-NO{sub x} Cell{trademark} burner (LNCB{trademark}) on a 605-MWe utility boiler originally equipped with cell burners. The LNCB{trademark} is designed to reduce NO{sub x} emissions by delaying the mixing of the coal and the combustion air without boiler pressure part modifications. Preliminary post-retrofit testing results showed unexpectedly high carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) concentrations below the lowest burner row. The substoichiometric operation of the lowest burner row caused the relatively high concentrations in the lower furnace. Babcock & Wilcox`s flow, combustion, and heat transfer models were used to predict the CO concentrations in the lower furnace. The predictions were compared to field measurements for three different operating conditions. Based on this validation, the models were used to evaluate several methods for mitigating the CO concentrations. The results of this analysis are presented and discussed. The most attractive alternative was selected and will be implemented during the spring of 1992. The effectiveness of the new alternative will be available when the installation is complete and testing resumes.

  18. Numerical modeling of a 2K J-T heat exchanger used in Fermilab Vertical Test Stand VTS-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Prabhat Kumar; Rabehl, Roger

    2014-07-01

    Fermilab Vertical Test Stand-1 (VTS-1) is in operation since 2007 for testing the superconducting RF cavities at 2 K. This test stand has single layer coiled finned tubes heat exchanger before J-T valve. A finite difference based thermal model has been developed in Engineering Equation Solver (EES) to study its thermal performance during filling and refilling to maintain the constant liquid level of test stand. The model is also useful to predict its performance under other various operating conditions and will be useful to design the similar kind of heat exchanger for future needs. Present paper discusses the different operational modes of this heat exchanger and its thermal characteristics under these operational modes. Results of this model have also been compared with the experimental data gathered from the VTS-1 heat exchanger and they are in good agreement with the present model.

  19. Numerical comparison between a gyrofluid and gyrokinetic model investigating collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacharias, O.; Kleiber, R.; Borchardt, M.; Comisso, L.; Grasso, D.; Hatzky, R.

    2014-06-15

    The first detailed comparison between gyrokinetic and gyrofluid simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection has been carried out. Both the linear and nonlinear evolution of the collisionless tearing mode have been analyzed. In the linear regime, we have found a good agreement between the two approaches over the whole spectrum of linearly unstable wave numbers, both in the drift kinetic limit and for finite ion temperature. Nonlinearly, focusing on the small-Δ′ regime, with Δ′ indicating the standard tearing stability parameter, we have compared relevant observables such as the evolution and saturation of the island width, as well as the island oscillation frequency in the saturated phase. The results are basically the same, with small discrepancies only in the value of the saturated island width for moderately high values of Δ′. Therefore, in the regimes investigated here, the gyrofluid approach can describe the collisionless reconnection process as well as the more complete gyrokinetic model.

  20. Cross-industry Performance Modeling: Toward Cooperative Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reece, Wendy Jane; Blackman, Harold Stabler

    1998-10-01

    One of the current unsolved problems in human factors is the difficulty in acquiring information from lessons learned and data collected among human performance analysts in different domains. There are several common concerns and generally accepted issues of importance for human factors, psychology and industry analysts of performance and safety. Among these are the need to incorporate lessons learned in design, to carefully consider implementation of new designs and automation, and the need to reduce human performance-based contributions to risk. In spite of shared concerns, there are several roadblocks to widespread sharing of data and lessons learned from operating experience and simulation, including the fact that very few publicly accessible data bases exist (Gertman & Blackman, 1994, and Kirwan, 1997). There is a need to draw together analysts and analytic methodologies to comprise a centralized source of data with sufficient detail to be meaningful while ensuring source anonymity. We propose that a generic source of performance data and a multi-domain data store may provide the first steps toward cooperative performance modeling and analysis across industries.

  1. Subsurface Multiphase Flow and Multicomponent Reactive Transport Modeling using High-Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Lu, Chuan

    2007-07-16

    Numerical modeling has become a critical tool to the U.S. Department of Energy for evaluating the environmental impact of alternative energy sources and remediation strategies for legacy waste sites. Unfortunately, the physical and chemical complexity of many sites overwhelms the capabilities of even most state of the art groundwater models. Of particular concern are the representation of highly-heterogeneous stratified rock/soil layers in the subsurface and the biological and geochemical interactions of chemical species within multiple fluid phases. Clearly, there is a need for higher-resolution modeling (i.e. more spatial, temporal, and chemical degrees of freedom) and increasingly mechanistic descriptions of subsurface physicochemical processes. We present SciDAC-funded research being performed in the development of PFLOTRAN, a parallel multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport model. Written in Fortran90, PFLOTRAN is founded upon PETSc data structures and solvers. We are employing PFLOTRAN in the simulation of uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area, a contaminated site of major concern to the Department of Energy, the State of Washington, and other government agencies. By leveraging the billions of degrees of freedom available through high-performance computation using tens of thousands of processors, we can better characterize the release of uranium into groundwater and its subsequent transport to the Columbia River, and thereby better understand and evaluate the effectiveness of various proposed remediation strategies.

  2. Tall Tower Wind Energy Monitoring and Numerical Model Validation in Northern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koracin, D.; Kaplan, M.; Smith, C.; McCurdy, G.; Wolf, A.; McCord, T.; King, K.; Belu, R.; Horvath, K.

    2015-10-01

    The main objectives of this project were to conduct a tall-tower and sodar field campaign in complex terrain, investigate wind properties relevant to wind energy assessment, and evaluate high-resolution models with fixed and adaptive grid structures. Two 60-m towers at Virginia Peak ridges near Washoe Valley, Nevada, were instrumented with cup and vane anemometers as well as sonic anemometers, and an acoustic sounder (hereafter sodar) was installed near one of the towers. The towers were located 2,700 m apart with a vertical distance of 140 m elevation between their bases. Each tower had a downhill exposure of rolling complex terrain, with the nearby valley floor 3,200 m to the west and 800 m below the summit. Cup anemometers were installed at both towers at 20, 40, and 60 m, wind vanes at 20 and 60 m, and sonic anemometers at 20 and 60 m. The sodar measurements were nominally provided every 10 m in vertical distance from 40 to 200 m with the quality of the data generally decreasing with height. Surface air temperature, atmospheric pressure, and radiation measurements were conducted at 1.5 m AGL at both of the towers. Although the plan was to conduct a 1-year period of data collection, we extended the period (October 5, 2012 through February 24, 2014) to cover for possible data loss from instrument or communication problems. We also present a preliminary analysis of the towers and sodar data, including a detailed inventory of available and missing data as well as outliers. The analysis additionally includes calculation of the Weibull parameters, turbulence intensity, and initial computation of wind power density at various heights.

  3. An analytical model of axial compressor off-design performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camp, T.R.; Horlock, J.H. . Whittle Lab.)

    1994-07-01

    An analysis is presented of the off-design performance of multistage axial-flow compressors. It is based on an analytical solution, valid for small perturbations in operating conditions from the design point, and provides an insight into the effects of choices made during the compressor design process on performance and off-design stage matching. It is shown that the mean design value of stage loading coefficient ([psi] = [Delta]h[sub 0]/U[sup 2]) has a dominant effect on off-design performance, whereas the stage-wise distribution of stage loading coefficient and the design value of flow coefficient have little influence. The powerful effects of variable stator vanes on stage-matching are also demonstrated and these results are shown to agree well with previous work. The slope of the working line of a gas turbine engine, overlaid on overall compressor characteristics, is shown to have a strong effect on the off-design stage-matching through the compressor. The model is also used to analyze design changes to the compressor geometry and to show how errors in estimates of annulus blockage, decided during the design process, have less effect on compressor performance than has previously been thought.

  4. BISON and MARMOT Development for Modeling Fast Reactor Fuel Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence; Williamson, Richard L.; Schwen, Daniel; Zhang, Yongfeng; Novascone, Stephen Rhead; Medvedev, Pavel G.

    2015-09-01

    BISON and MARMOT are two codes under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for engineering scale and lower length scale fuel performance modeling. It is desired to add capabilities for fast reactor applications to these codes. The fast reactor fuel types under consideration are metal (U-Pu-Zr) and oxide (MOX). The cladding types of interest include 316SS, D9, and HT9. The purpose of this report is to outline the proposed plans for code development and provide an overview of the models added to the BISON and MARMOT codes for fast reactor fuel behavior. A brief overview of preliminary discussions on the formation of a bilateral agreement between the Idaho National Laboratory and the National Nuclear Laboratory in the United Kingdom is presented.

  5. Fuel Cell Power Model for CHP and CHHP Economics and Performance Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Penev, M.

    2010-03-30

    This presentation describes the fuel cell power model for CHP and CHHP economics and performance analysis.

  6. ON THE IMPACT OF SUPER RESOLUTION WSR-88D DOPPLER RADAR DATA ASSIMILATION ON HIGH RESOLUTION NUMERICAL MODEL FORECASTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiswell, S

    2009-01-11

    Assimilation of radar velocity and precipitation fields into high-resolution model simulations can improve precipitation forecasts with decreased 'spin-up' time and improve short-term simulation of boundary layer winds (Benjamin, 2004 & 2007; Xiao, 2008) which is critical to improving plume transport forecasts. Accurate description of wind and turbulence fields is essential to useful atmospheric transport and dispersion results, and any improvement in the accuracy of these fields will make consequence assessment more valuable during both routine operation as well as potential emergency situations. During 2008, the United States National Weather Service (NWS) radars implemented a significant upgrade which increased the real-time level II data resolution to 8 times their previous 'legacy' resolution, from 1 km range gate and 1.0 degree azimuthal resolution to 'super resolution' 250 m range gate and 0.5 degree azimuthal resolution (Fig 1). These radar observations provide reflectivity, velocity and returned power spectra measurements at a range of up to 300 km (460 km for reflectivity) at a frequency of 4-5 minutes and yield up to 13.5 million point observations per level in super-resolution mode. The migration of National Weather Service (NWS) WSR-88D radars to super resolution is expected to improve warning lead times by detecting small scale features sooner with increased reliability; however, current operational mesoscale model domains utilize grid spacing several times larger than the legacy data resolution, and therefore the added resolution of radar data is not fully exploited. The assimilation of super resolution reflectivity and velocity data into high resolution numerical weather model forecasts where grid spacing is comparable to the radar data resolution is investigated here to determine the impact of the improved data resolution on model predictions.

  7. Canyon Disposal Initiative - Numerical Modeling of Contaminant Transport from Grouted Residual Waste in the 221-U Facility (U Plant)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; White, Mark D.; Freeman, Eugene J.

    2004-10-12

    This letter report documents initial numerical analyses conducted by PNNL to provide support for a feasibility study on decommissioning of the canyon buildings at Hanford. The 221-U facility is the first of the major canyon buildings to be decommissioned. The specific objective of this modeling effort was to provide estimates of potential rates of migration of residual contaminants out of the 221-U facility during the first 40 years after decommissioning. If minimal contaminant migration is predicted to occur from the facility during this time period, then the structure may be deemed to provide a level of groundwater protection that is essentially equivalent to the liner and leachate collection systems that are required at conventional landfills. The STOMP code was used to simulate transport of selected radionuclides out of a canyon building, representative of the 221-U facility after decommissioning, for a period of 40 years. Simulation results indicate that none of the selected radionuclides that were modeled migrated beyond the concrete structure of the facility during the 40-year period of interest. Jacques (2001) identified other potential contaminants in the 221-U facility that were not modeled, however, including kerosene, phenol, and various metals. Modeling of these contaminants was beyond the scope of this preliminary effort due to increased complexity. Simulation results indicate that contaminant release from the canyon buildings will be diffusion controlled at early times. Advection is expected to become much more important at later times, after contaminants have diffused out of the facility and into the surrounding soil environment. After contaminants have diffused out of the facility, surface infiltration covers will become very important for mitigating further transport of contaminants in the underlying vadose zone and groundwater.

  8. The deposition and burning characteristics during slagging co-firing coal and wood: modeling and numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.H.; Zhao, D.Q.; Jiang, L.Q.; Yang, W.B.

    2009-07-01

    Numerical analysis was used to study the deposition and burning characteristics of combining co-combustion with slagging combustion technologies in this paper. The pyrolysis and burning kinetic models of different fuels were implanted into the WBSF-PCC2 (wall burning and slag flow in pulverized co-combustion) computation code, and then the slagging and co-combustion characteristics (especially the wall burning mechanism of different solid fuels and their effects on the whole burning behavior in the cylindrical combustor at different mixing ratios under the condition of keeping the heat input same) were simulated numerically. The results showed that adding wood powder at 25% mass fraction can increase the temperature at the initial stage of combustion, which is helpful to utilize the front space of the combustor. Adding wood powder at a 25% mass fraction can increase the reaction rate at the initial combustion stage; also, the coal ignitability is improved, and the burnout efficiency is enhanced by about 5% of suspension and deposition particles, which is helpful for coal particles to burn entirely and for combustion devices to minimize their dimensions or sizes. The results also showed that adding wood powder at a proper ratio is helpful to keep the combustion stability, not only because of the enhancement for the burning characteristics, but also because the running slag layer structure can be changed more continuously, which is very important for avoiding the abnormal slag accumulation in the slagging combustor. The theoretic analysis in this paper proves that unification of co-combustion and slagging combustion technologies is feasible, though more comprehensive and rigorous research is needed.

  9. Direct-Steam Linear Fresnel Performance Model for NREL's System Advisor Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, M. J.; Zhu, G.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents the technical formulation and demonstrated model performance results of a new direct-steam-generation (DSG) model in NREL's System Advisor Model (SAM). The model predicts the annual electricity production of a wide range of system configurations within the DSG Linear Fresnel technology by modeling hourly performance of the plant in detail. The quasi-steady-state formulation allows users to investigate energy and mass flows, operating temperatures, and pressure drops for geometries and solar field configurations of interest. The model includes tools for heat loss calculation using either empirical polynomial heat loss curves as a function of steam temperature, ambient temperature, and wind velocity, or a detailed evacuated tube receiver heat loss model. Thermal losses are evaluated using a computationally efficient nodal approach, where the solar field and headers are discretized into multiple nodes where heat losses, thermal inertia, steam conditions (including pressure, temperature, enthalpy, etc.) are individually evaluated during each time step of the simulation. This paper discusses the mathematical formulation for the solar field model and describes how the solar field is integrated with the other subsystem models, including the power cycle and optional auxiliary fossil system. Model results are also presented to demonstrate plant behavior in the various operating modes.

  10. A life-cycle model approach to multimedia waste reduction measuring performance for environmental cleanup projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, B.E. Jr.; George, S.M.

    1993-07-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), Environmental Restoration (ER) Program adopted a Pollution Prevention Program in March 1991. The program`s mission is to minimize waste and prevent pollution in remedial investigations (RIs), feasibility studies, decontamination and decommissioning, and surveillance and maintenance site program activities. Mission success will result in volume and/or toxicity reduction of generated waste. The ER Program waste generation rates are projected to steadily increase through the year 2005 for all waste categories. Standard production units utilized to measure waste minimization apply to production/manufacturing facilities. Since ER inherited contaminated waste from previous production processes, no historical production data can be applied. Therefore, a more accurate measure for pollution prevention was identified as a need for the ER Program. The Energy Systems ER Program adopted a life-cycle model approach and implemented the concept of numerically scoring their waste generators to measure the effectiveness of pollution prevention/waste minimization programs and elected to develop a numerical scoring system (NSS) to accomplish these measurements. The prototype NSS, a computerized, user-friendly information management database system, was designed to be utilized in each phase of the ER Program. The NSS was designed to measure a generator`s success in incorporating pollution prevention in their work plans and reducing investigation-derived waste (IDW) during RIs. Energy Systems is producing a fully developed NSS and actually scoring the generators of IDW at six ER Program sites. Once RI waste generators are scored utilizing the NSS, the numerical scores are distributed into six performance categories: training, self-assessment, field implementation, documentation, technology transfer, and planning.

  11. FASTSim: A Model to Estimate Vehicle Efficiency, Cost and Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooker, A.; Gonder, J.; Wang, L.; Wood, E.; Lopp, S.; Ramroth, L.

    2015-05-04

    The Future Automotive Systems Technology Simulator (FASTSim) is a high-level advanced vehicle powertrain systems analysis tool supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office. FASTSim provides a quick and simple approach to compare powertrains and estimate the impact of technology improvements on light- and heavy-duty vehicle efficiency, performance, cost, and battery batches of real-world drive cycles. FASTSim’s calculation framework and balance among detail, accuracy, and speed enable it to simulate thousands of driven miles in minutes. The key components and vehicle outputs have been validated by comparing the model outputs to test data for many different vehicles to provide confidence in the results. A graphical user interface makes FASTSim easy and efficient to use. FASTSim is freely available for download from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s website (see www.nrel.gov/fastsim).

  12. Computational Human Performance Modeling For Alarm System Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques Hugo

    2012-07-01

    The introduction of new technologies like adaptive automation systems and advanced alarms processing and presentation techniques in nuclear power plants is already having an impact on the safety and effectiveness of plant operations and also the role of the control room operator. This impact is expected to escalate dramatically as more and more nuclear power utilities embark on upgrade projects in order to extend the lifetime of their plants. One of the most visible impacts in control rooms will be the need to replace aging alarm systems. Because most of these alarm systems use obsolete technologies, the methods, techniques and tools that were used to design the previous generation of alarm system designs are no longer effective and need to be updated. The same applies to the need to analyze and redefine operators alarm handling tasks. In the past, methods for analyzing human tasks and workload have relied on crude, paper-based methods that often lacked traceability. New approaches are needed to allow analysts to model and represent the new concepts of alarm operation and human-system interaction. State-of-the-art task simulation tools are now available that offer a cost-effective and efficient method for examining the effect of operator performance in different conditions and operational scenarios. A discrete event simulation system was used by human factors researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop a generic alarm handling model to examine the effect of operator performance with simulated modern alarm system. It allowed analysts to evaluate alarm generation patterns as well as critical task times and human workload predicted by the system.

  13. Subsurface Multiphase Flow and Multicomponent Reactive Transport Modeling using High-Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Lu, Chuan

    2007-08-01

    Numerical modeling has become a critical tool to the Department of Energy for evaluating the environmental impact of alternative energy sources and remediation strategies for legacy waste sites. Unfortunately, the physical and chemical complexity of many sites overwhelms the capabilities of even most state of the art groundwater models. Of particular concern are the representation of highly-heterogeneous stratified rock/soil layers in the subsurface and the biological and geochemical interactions of chemical species within multiple fluid phases. Clearly, there is a need for higher-resolution modeling (i.e. more spatial, temporal, and chemical degrees of freedom) and increasingly mechanistic descriptions of subsurface physicochemical processes. We present research being performed in the development of PFLOTRAN, a parallel multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport model. Written in Fortran90, PFLOTRAN is founded upon PETSc data structures and solvers and has exhibited impressive strong scalability on up to 4000 processors on the ORNL Cray XT3. We are employing PFLOTRAN in the simulation of uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area, a contaminated site of major concern to the Department of Energy, the State of Washington, and other government agencies where overly-simplistic historical modeling erroneously predicted decade removal times for uranium by ambient groundwater flow. By leveraging the billions of degrees of freedom available through high-performance computation using tens of thousands of processors, we can better characterize the release of uranium into groundwater and its subsequent transport to the Columbia River, and thereby better understand and evaluate the effectiveness of various proposed remediation strategies.

  14. Modeling and Performance of Anode-Supported SOFC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chick, Lawrence A.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Simner, Steven P.; Jaffe, John E.; Williford, Rick E.

    2001-02-28

    A "one-dimensional", steady-state model of an SOFC stack was needed to support the design of balance-of-plant components for a 5 kW mobile SOFC system. This "stack module" was required to predict appropriate stack voltage responses to changes in fuel composition, fuel flow rate, stack temperature and current demand, with response characteristics that were adjustable to changes in stack component materials and dimensions as well as to electrode porosity. The spreadsheet-based stack module was derived from the work by Kim, Virkar et al (see J. Electrochem. Soc. 146(1) 69-78 (1999)), with modifications suggested by Riess and Schoonman, p291 in CRC Handbook of Electrochemistry (1997) CRC Press. The usual overpotential terms account for ohmic resistance of the cell components, losses due to charge transfer at the electrodes, and losses due to diffusion of reactants into and products out of the porous electrodes. Response of the module is compared to published cell and stack data. After fitting adjustable parameters to match particular cell performance characteristics, the module responds reasonably well to changes in temperature and fuel concentration. The module is used to analyze the performance of anode-supported cells that were fabricated at PNNL (see abstract submitted by Stevenson, Meinhardt, Simner, Habeger and Canfield, "Fabrication and Testing of Anode-Supported SOFC").

  15. Solutions of the two-dimensional Hubbard model: Benchmarks and results from a wide range of numerical algorithms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    LeBlanc, J. P. F.; Antipov, Andrey E.; Becca, Federico; Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Chung, Chia -Min; Deng, Youjin; Ferrero, Michel; Henderson, Thomas M.; Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; et al

    2015-12-14

    Numerical results for ground-state and excited-state properties (energies, double occupancies, and Matsubara-axis self-energies) of the single-orbital Hubbard model on a two-dimensional square lattice are presented, in order to provide an assessment of our ability to compute accurate results in the thermodynamic limit. Many methods are employed, including auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo, bare and bold-line diagrammatic Monte Carlo, method of dual fermions, density matrix embedding theory, density matrix renormalization group, dynamical cluster approximation, diffusion Monte Carlo within a fixed-node approximation, unrestricted coupled cluster theory, and multireference projected Hartree-Fock methods. Comparison of results obtained by different methods allows for the identification ofmore » uncertainties and systematic errors. The importance of extrapolation to converged thermodynamic-limit values is emphasized. Furthermore, cases where agreement between different methods is obtained establish benchmark results that may be useful in the validation of new approaches and the improvement of existing methods.« less

  16. Solutions of the two-dimensional Hubbard model: Benchmarks and results from a wide range of numerical algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeBlanc, J. P. F.; Antipov, Andrey E.; Becca, Federico; Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Chung, Chia -Min; Deng, Youjin; Ferrero, Michel; Henderson, Thomas M.; Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Kozik, E.; Liu, Xuan -Wen; Millis, Andrew J.; Prokof’ev, N. V.; Qin, Mingpu; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Shi, Hao; Svistunov, B. V.; Tocchio, Luca F.; Tupitsyn, I. S.; White, Steven R.; Zhang, Shiwei; Zheng, Bo -Xiao; Zhu, Zhenyue; Gull, Emanuel

    2015-12-14

    Numerical results for ground-state and excited-state properties (energies, double occupancies, and Matsubara-axis self-energies) of the single-orbital Hubbard model on a two-dimensional square lattice are presented, in order to provide an assessment of our ability to compute accurate results in the thermodynamic limit. Many methods are employed, including auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo, bare and bold-line diagrammatic Monte Carlo, method of dual fermions, density matrix embedding theory, density matrix renormalization group, dynamical cluster approximation, diffusion Monte Carlo within a fixed-node approximation, unrestricted coupled cluster theory, and multireference projected Hartree-Fock methods. Comparison of results obtained by different methods allows for the identification of uncertainties and systematic errors. The importance of extrapolation to converged thermodynamic-limit values is emphasized. Furthermore, cases where agreement between different methods is obtained establish benchmark results that may be useful in the validation of new approaches and the improvement of existing methods.

  17. Thermal effects of groundwater flow through subarctic fens: A case study based on field observations and numerical modeling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sjöberg, Ylva; Coon, Ethan; K. Sannel, A. Britta; Pannetier, Romain; Harp, Dylan; Frampton, Andrew; Painter, Scott L.; Lyon, Steve W.

    2016-02-05

    Modeling and observation of ground temperature dynamics are the main tools for understanding current permafrost thermal regimes and projecting future thaw. Until recently, most studies on permafrost have focused on vertical ground heat fluxes. Groundwater can transport heat in both lateral and vertical directions but its influence on ground temperatures at local scales in permafrost environments is not well understood. In this paper, we combine field observations from a subarctic fen in the sporadic permafrost zone with numerical simulations of coupled water and thermal fluxes. At the Tavvavuoma study site in northern Sweden, ground temperature profiles and groundwater levels weremore » observed in boreholes. These observations were used to set up one- and two-dimensional simulations down to 2 m depth across a gradient of permafrost conditions within and surrounding the fen. Two-dimensional scenarios representing the fen under various hydraulic gradients were developed to quantify the influence of groundwater flow on ground temperature. Our observations suggest that lateral groundwater flow significantly affects ground temperatures. This is corroborated by modeling results that show seasonal ground ice melts 1 month earlier when a lateral groundwater flux is present. Further, although the thermal regime may be dominated by vertically conducted heat fluxes during most of the year, isolated high groundwater flow rate events such as the spring freshet are potentially important for ground temperatures. Finally, as sporadic permafrost environments often contain substantial portions of unfrozen ground with active groundwater flow paths, knowledge of this heat transport mechanism is important for understanding permafrost dynamics in these environments.« less

  18. Model Financing Solicitation for Energy Savings Performance Contracts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    as the performance contract. The financing agreement and the performance contract are linked through the payment schedules and the ESCO's guarantee that the annual guaranteed...

  19. THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.J. Saulnier Jr; W. Statham

    2006-03-10

    The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. the Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site. (1) Analogous source: UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geologic setting: fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash flow tuffs overlying carbonate rocks; (3) Analogous climate: Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous geochemistry: Oxidizing conditions; and (5) Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table. The Nopal I deposit is approximately 8 {+-} 0.5 million years old and has been exposed to oxidizing conditions during the last 3.2 to 3.4 million years. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Model considers that the uranium oxide and uranium silicates in the ore deposit were originally analogous to uranium-oxide spent nuclear fuel. The Pena Blanca site has been characterized using field and laboratory investigations of its fault and fracture distribution, mineralogy, fracture fillings, seepage into the mine adits, regional hydrology, and mineralization that shows the extent of radionuclide migration. Three boreholes were drilled at the Nopal I mine site in 2003 and these boreholes have provided samples for lithologic characterization, water-level measurements, and water samples for laboratory

  20. Performance Evaluation of K-DEMO Cable-in-conduit Conductors Using the Florida Electro-Mechanical Cable Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai, Yuhu

    2013-07-16

    The United States ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for design of the Toroidal Field (TF) insert coil, which will allow validation of the performance of significant lengths of the conductors to be used in the full scale TF coils in relevant conditions of field, current density and mechanical strain. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) will build the TF insert which will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test facility at JAEA, Naka, Japan. Three dimensional mathematical model of TF Insert was created based on the initial design geometry data, and included the following features: orthotropic material properties of superconductor material and insulation; external magnetic field from CSMC, temperature dependent properties of the materials; pre-compression and plastic deformation in lap joint. Major geometrical characteristics of the design were preserved including cable jacket and insulation shape, mandrel outline, and support clamps and spacers. The model is capable of performing coupled structural, thermal, and electromagnetic analysis using ANSYS. Numerical simulations were performed for room temperature conditions; cool down to 4K, and the operating regime with 68kA current at 11.8 Tesla background field. Numerical simulations led to the final design of the coil producing the required strain levels on the cable, while simultaneously satisfying the ITER magnet structural design criteria.

  1. A mixture-energy-consistent six-equation two-phase numerical model for fluids with interfaces, cavitation and evaporation waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelanti, Marica; Shyue, Keh-Ming

    2014-02-15

    We model liquidgas flows with cavitation by a variant of the six-equation single-velocity two-phase model with stiff mechanical relaxation of SaurelPetitpasBerry (Saurel et al., 2009) [9]. In our approach we employ phasic total energy equations instead of the phasic internal energy equations of the classical six-equation system. This alternative formulation allows us to easily design a simple numerical method that ensures consistency with mixture total energy conservation at the discrete level and agreement of the relaxed pressure at equilibrium with the correct mixture equation of state. Temperature and Gibbs free energy exchange terms are included in the equations as relaxation terms to model heat and mass transfer and hence liquidvapor transition. The algorithm uses a high-resolution wave propagation method for the numerical approximation of the homogeneous hyperbolic portion of the model. In two dimensions a fully-discretized scheme based on a hybrid HLLC/Roe Riemann solver is employed. Thermo-chemical terms are handled numerically via a stiff relaxation solver that forces thermodynamic equilibrium at liquidvapor interfaces under metastable conditions. We present numerical results of sample tests in one and two space dimensions that show the ability of the proposed model to describe cavitation mechanisms and evaporation wave dynamics.

  2. AGING PERFORMANCE OF MODEL 9975 PACKAGE FLUOROELASTOMER O-RINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, E.; Daugherty, W.; Skidmore, E.; Dunn, K.; Fisher, D.

    2011-05-31

    The influence of temperature and radiation on Viton{reg_sign} GLT and GLT-S fluoroelastomer O-rings is an ongoing research focus at the Savannah River National Laboratory. The O-rings are credited for leaktight containment in the Model 9975 shipping package used for transportation of plutonium-bearing materials. At the Savannah River Site, the Model 9975 packages are being used for interim storage. Primary research efforts have focused on surveillance of O-rings from actual packages, leak testing of seals at bounding aging conditions and the effect of aging temperature on compression stress relaxation behavior, with the goal of service life prediction for long-term storage conditions. Recently, an additional effort to evaluate the effect of aging temperature on the oxidation of the materials has begun. Degradation in the mechanical properties of elastomers is directly related to the oxidation of the polymer. Sensitive measurements of the oxidation rate can be performed in a more timely manner than waiting for a measurable change in mechanical properties, especially at service temperatures. Measuring the oxidation rate therefore provides a means to validate the assumption that the degradation mechanisms(s) do not change from the elevated temperatures used for accelerated aging and the lower service temperatures. Monitoring the amount of oxygen uptake by the material over time at various temperatures can provide increased confidence in lifetime predictions. Preliminary oxygen consumption analysis of a Viton GLT-based fluoroelastomer compound (Parker V0835-75) using an Oxzilla II differential oxygen analyzer in the temperature range of 40-120 C was performed. Early data suggests oxygen consumption rates may level off within the first 100,000 hours (10-12 years) at 40 C and that sharp changes in the degradation mechanism (stress-relaxation) are not expected over the temperature range examined. This is consistent with the known long-term heat aging resistance of

  3. Using Machine Learning to Create Turbine Performance Models (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifton, A.

    2013-04-01

    Wind turbine power output is known to be a strong function of wind speed, but is also affected by turbulence and shear. In this work, new aerostructural simulations of a generic 1.5 MW turbine are used to explore atmospheric influences on power output. Most significant is the hub height wind speed, followed by hub height turbulence intensity and then wind speed shear across the rotor disk. These simulation data are used to train regression trees that predict the turbine response for any combination of wind speed, turbulence intensity, and wind shear that might be expected at a turbine site. For a randomly selected atmospheric condition, the accuracy of the regression tree power predictions is three times higher than that of the traditional power curve methodology. The regression tree method can also be applied to turbine test data and used to predict turbine performance at a new site. No new data is required in comparison to the data that are usually collected for a wind resource assessment. Implementing the method requires turbine manufacturers to create a turbine regression tree model from test site data. Such an approach could significantly reduce bias in power predictions that arise because of different turbulence and shear at the new site, compared to the test site.

  4. Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM): A Tool to Automate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: SPIE Optics & Photonics Conference, 2005, San ... LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY; OPTICS; PERFORMANCE; PHYSICS; TARGET CHAMBERS; ...

  5. Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL, LBNL and SNL for the Used Fuel Disposition Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The report summarizes laboratory and field observations and numerical modeling related to coupledprocesses involving brine and vapor migration in geologic salt, focusing on recent developments and...

  6. A summary of methods for approximating salt creep and disposal room closure in numerical models of multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeze, G.A.; Larson, K.W.; Davies, P.B.

    1995-10-01

    Eight alternative methods for approximating salt creep and disposal room closure in a multiphase flow model of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were implemented and evaluated: Three fixed-room geometries three porosity functions and two fluid-phase-salt methods. The pressure-time-porosity line interpolation method is the method used in current WIPP Performance Assessment calculations. The room closure approximation methods were calibrated against a series of room closure simulations performed using a creep closure code, SANCHO. The fixed-room geometries did not incorporate a direct coupling between room void volume and room pressure. The two porosity function methods that utilized moles of gas as an independent parameter for closure coupling. The capillary backstress method was unable to accurately simulate conditions of re-closure of the room. Two methods were found to be accurate enough to approximate the effects of room closure; the boundary backstress method and pressure-time-porosity line interpolation. The boundary backstress method is a more reliable indicator of system behavior due to a theoretical basis for modeling salt deformation as a viscous process. It is a complex method and a detailed calibration process is required. The pressure lines method is thought to be less reliable because the results were skewed towards SANCHO results in simulations where the sequence of gas generation was significantly different from the SANCHO gas-generation rate histories used for closure calibration. This limitation in the pressure lines method is most pronounced at higher gas-generation rates and is relatively insignificant at lower gas-generation rates. Due to its relative simplicity, the pressure lines method is easier to implement in multiphase flow codes and simulations have a shorter execution time.

  7. PROJECT PROFILE: Performance Models and Standards for Bifacial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    its performance advantages have not been fully exploited and no commonly-available tools allow it to be considered for major PV projects beyond current niche applications. ...

  8. Campus Energy Model for Control and Performance Validation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-09-19

    The core of the modeling platform is an extensible block library for the MATLAB/Simulink software suite. The platform enables true co-simulation (interaction at each simulation time step) with NREL's state-of-the-art modeling tools and other energy modeling software.

  9. Fuel-efficient cruise performance model for general aviation piston engine airplanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkinson, R.C.H.

    1982-01-01

    The uses and limitations of typical Pilot Operating Handbook cruise performance data, for constructing cruise performance models suitable for maximizing specific range, are first examined. These data are found to be inadequate for constructing such models. A new model of General Aviation piston-prop airplane cruise performance is then developed. This model consists of two subsystem models: the airframe-propeller-atmosphere subsystem model; and the engine-atmosphere subsystem model. The new model facilitates maximizing specific range; and by virtue of its simplicity and low volume data storage requirements, appears suitable for airborne microprocessor implementation.

  10. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houze, Jr., Robert A.

    2013-11-13

    We examined cloud radar data in monsoon climates, using cloud radars at Darwin in the Australian monsoon, on a ship in the Bay of Bengal in the South Asian monsoon, and at Niamey in the West African monsoon. We followed on with a more in-depth study of the continental MCSs over West Africa. We investigated whether the West African anvil clouds connected with squall line MCSs passing over the Niamey ARM site could be simulated in a numerical model by comparing the observed anvil clouds to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model at high resolution using six different ice-phase microphysical schemes. We carried out further simulations with a cloud-resolving model forced by sounding network budgets over the Niamey region and over the northern Australian region. We have devoted some of the effort of this project to examining how well satellite data can determine the global breadth of the anvil cloud measurements obtained at the ARM ground sites. We next considered whether satellite data could be objectively analyzed to so that their large global measurement sets can be systematically related to the ARM measurements. Further differences were detailed between the land and ocean MCS anvil clouds by examining the interior structure of the anvils with the satellite-detected the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR). The satellite survey of anvil clouds in the Indo-Pacific region was continued to determine the role of MCSs in producing the cloud pattern associated with the MJO.

  11. TEG On-Vehicle Performance & Model Validation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TEG On-Vehicle Performance & Model Validation TEG On-Vehicle Performance & Model Validation Details efforts and results of steady-state and transient models validated with bench, engine dynamometer, and on-vehicle tests to measure actual performance deer12_lagrandeur.pdf (1.93 MB) More Documents & Publications Thermoelectric Generator Performance for Passenger Vehicles Combustion Exhaust Gas Heat to Power Using Thermoelectric Engines Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for

  12. Performance model of the Argonne Voyager multimedia server

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Disz, T.; Olson, R.; Stevens, R.

    1997-07-01

    The Argonne Voyager Multimedia Server is being developed in the Futures Lab of the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. As a network-based service for recording and playing multimedia streams, it is important that the Voyager system be capable of sustaining certain minimal levels of performance in order for it to be a viable system. In this article, the authors examine the performance characteristics of the server. As they examine the architecture of the system, they try to determine where bottlenecks lie, show actual vs potential performance, and recommend areas for improvement through custom architectures and system tuning.

  13. PV Performance Modeling Collaborative's New and Improved Website...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling Collaborative's New and Improved Website Is Launched - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & ...

  14. Accelerating Energy Savings Performance Contracting Through Model Statewide Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides information on Energy Savings Performance Contracing (ESPC), including links to best practices and tools as well as the Accelerated ESCP initiative and types of assistance available. Author: Energy Services Coalition

  15. Fish Individual-based Numerical Simulator (FINS): A particle-based model of juvenile salmonid movement and dissolved gas exposure history in the Columbia River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2002-01-30

    This paper describes a numerical model of juvenile salmonid migration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. The model, called the Fish Individual-based Numerical Simulator or FINS, employs a discrete, particle-based approach to simulate the migration and history of exposure to dissolved gases of individual fish. FINS is linked to a two-dimensional (vertically-averaged) hydrodynamic simulator that quantifies local water velocity, temperature, and dissolved gas levels as a function of river flow rates and dam operations. Simulated gas exposure histories can be input to biological mortality models to predict the effects of various river configurations on fish injury and mortality due to dissolved gas supersaturation. Therefore, FINS serves as a critical linkage between hydrodynamic models of the river system and models of biological impacts. FINS was parameterized and validated based on observations of individual fish movements collected using radiotelemetry methods during 1997 and 1998. A quasi-inverse approach was used to decouple fish swimming movements from advection with the local water velocity, allowing inference of time series of non-advective displacements of individual fish from the radiotelemetry data. Statistical analyses of these displacements are presented, and confirm that strong temporal correlation of fish swimming behavior persists in some cases over several hours. A correlated random-walk model was employed to simulate the observed migration behavior, and parameters of the model were estimated that lead to close correspondence between predictions and observations.

  16. Human Performance Modeling for Dynamic Human Reliability Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boring, Ronald Laurids; Joe, Jeffrey Clark; Mandelli, Diego

    2015-08-01

    Part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Light Water Reac- tor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Charac- terization (RISMC) Pathway develops approaches to estimating and managing safety margins. RISMC simulations pair deterministic plant physics models with probabilistic risk models. As human interactions are an essential element of plant risk, it is necessary to integrate human actions into the RISMC risk framework. In this paper, we review simulation based and non simulation based human reliability analysis (HRA) methods. This paper summarizes the founda- tional information needed to develop a feasible approach to modeling human in- teractions in RISMC simulations.

  17. Model Energy Savings Performance Contract, Schedules, and Exhibits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Savings Performance Contract defines the project, establishing how it will be implemented during construction and how it will be managed through the entire term of the agreement, addressing construction details, roles and responsibilities of the ESCO and Institution, and guaranteed savings through measurement and verification.

  18. Addressing numerical challenges in introducing a reactive transport code into a land surface model: a biogeochemical modeling proof-of-concept with CLM–PFLOTRAN 1.0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, Guoping; Yuan, Fengming; Bisht, Gautam; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Kumar, Jitendra; Mills, Richard T.; Xu, Xiaofeng; Andre, Ben; Hoffman, Forrest M.; et al

    2016-03-04

    We explore coupling to a configurable subsurface reactive transport code as a flexible and extensible approach to biogeochemistry in land surface models. A reaction network with the Community Land Model carbon–nitrogen (CLM-CN) decomposition, nitrification, denitrification, and plant uptake is used as an example. We implement the reactions in the open-source PFLOTRAN (massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport) code and couple it with the CLM. To make the rate formulae designed for use in explicit time stepping in CLMs compatible with the implicit time stepping used in PFLOTRAN, the Monod substrate rate-limiting function with a residual concentration is used to represent the limitation ofmore » nitrogen availability on plant uptake and immobilization. We demonstrate that CLM–PFLOTRAN predictions (without invoking PFLOTRAN transport) are consistent with CLM4.5 for Arctic, temperate, and tropical sites.Switching from explicit to implicit method increases rigor but introduces numerical challenges. Care needs to be taken to use scaling, clipping, or log transformation to avoid negative concentrations during the Newton iterations. With a tight relative update tolerance (STOL) to avoid false convergence, an accurate solution can be achieved with about 50 % more computing time than CLM in point mode site simulations using either the scaling or clipping methods. The log transformation method takes 60–100 % more computing time than CLM. The computing time increases slightly for clipping and scaling; it increases substantially for log transformation for half saturation decrease from 10−3 to 10−9 mol m−3, which normally results in decreasing nitrogen concentrations. The frequent occurrence of very low concentrations (e.g. below nanomolar) can increase the computing time for clipping or scaling by about 20 %, double for log transformation. Overall, the log transformation method is accurate and robust, and the clipping and scaling

  19. Addressing numerical challenges in introducing a reactive transport code into a land surface model: A biogeochemical modeling proof-of-concept with CLM PFLOTRAN 1.0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, Guoping; Yuan, Fengming; Bisht, Gautam; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Kumar, Jitendra; Mills, Richard T.; Xu, Xiaofeng; Andre, Ben; Hoffman, Forrest M.; et al

    2016-03-04

    Here, we explore coupling to a configurable subsurface reactive transport code as a flexible and extensible approach to biogeochemistry in land surface models. A reaction network with the Community Land Model carbon nitrogen (CLM-CN) decomposition, nitrification, denitrification, and plant uptake is used as an example. We implement the reactions in the open-source PFLOTRAN (massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport) code and couple it with the CLM. To make the rate formulae designed for use in explicit time stepping in CLMs compatible with the implicit time stepping used in PFLOTRAN, the Monod substrate rate-limiting function with a residual concentration ismore » used to represent the limitation of nitrogen availability on plant uptake and immobilization. We demonstrate that CLM PFLOTRAN predictions (without invoking PFLOTRAN transport) are consistent with CLM4.5 for Arctic, temperate, and tropical sites. Switching from explicit to implicit method increases rigor but introduces numerical challenges. Care needs to be taken to use scaling, clipping, or log transformation to avoid negative concentrations during the Newton iterations. With a tight relative update tolerance (STOL) to avoid false convergence, an accurate solution can be achieved with about 50 % more computing time than CLM in point mode site simulations using either the scaling or clipping methods. The log transformation method takes 60–100 % more computing time than CLM. The computing time increases slightly for clipping and scaling; it increases substantially for log transformation for half saturation decrease from 10–3 to 10–9 mol m–3, which normally results in decreasing nitrogen concentrations. The frequent occurrence of very low concentrations (e.g. below nanomolar) can increase the computing time for clipping or scaling by about 20 %, double for log transformation. Overall, the log transformation method is accurate and robust, and the clipping and scaling methods are

  20. Case Studies Comparing System Advisor Model (SAM) Results to Real Performance Data: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N.; Dobos, A.; Sather, N.

    2012-06-01

    NREL has completed a series of detailed case studies comparing the simulations of the System Advisor Model (SAM) and measured performance data or published performance expectations. These case studies compare PV measured performance data with simulated performance data using appropriate weather data. The measured data sets were primarily taken from NREL onsite PV systems and weather monitoring stations.

  1. As-Built Modeling of Ojbects for Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kokko, E J; Martz, H E; Chinn, D J; Childs, H R; Jackson, J A; Chambers, D H; Schneberk, D J; Clark, G A

    2005-09-12

    The goal of ''as-built'' computational modeling is to incorporate the most representative geometry and material information for an (fabricated or legacy) object into simulations. While most engineering finite element simulations are based on an object's idealized ''as-designed'' configuration with information obtained from technical drawings or computer-aided design models, ''as-built'' modeling uses nondestructive characterization and metrology techniques to provide the feature information. By incorporating more representative geometry and material features as initial conditions, the uncertainty in the simulation results can be reduced, providing a more realistic understanding of the event and object being modeled. In this paper, key steps and technology areas in the as-built modeling framework are: (1) inspection using non-destructive characterization (NDC) and metrology techniques; (2) data reduction (signal and image processing including artifact removal, data sensor fusion, and geometric feature extraction); and (3) engineering and physics analysis using finite element codes. We illustrate the process with a cylindrical phantom and include a discussion of the key concepts and areas that need improvement. Our results show that reasonable as-built initial conditions based on a volume overlap criteria can be achieved and that notable differences between simulations of the as-built and as-designed configurations can be observed for a given load case. Specifically, a volume averaged difference of accumulated plastic strain of 3% and local spatially varying differences up to 10%. The example presented provides motivation and justification to engineering teams for the additional effort required in the as-built modeling of high value parts. Further validation of the approach has been proposed as future work.

  2. Self-Consistant Numerical Modeling of E-Cloud Driven Instability of a Bunch Train in the CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vay, J-L.; Furman, M.A.; Secondo, R.; Venturini, M.; Fox, J.D.; Rivetta, C.H,

    2010-09-01

    The simulation package WARP-POSINST was recently upgraded for handling multiple bunches and modeling concurrently the electron cloud buildup and its effect on the beam, allowing for direct self-consistent simulation of bunch trains generating, and interacting with, electron clouds. We have used the WARP-POSINST package on massively parallel supercomputers to study the growth rate and frequency patterns in space-time of the electron cloud driven transverse instability for a proton bunch train in the CERN SPS accelerator. Results suggest that a positive feedback mechanism exists between the electron buildup and the e-cloud driven transverse instability, leading to a net increase in predicted electron density. Comparisons to selected experimental data are also given. Electron clouds have been shown to trigger fast growing instabilities on proton beams circulating in the SPS and other accelerators. So far, simulations of electron cloud buildup and their effects on beam dynamics have been performed separately. This is a consequence of the large computational cost of the combined calculation due to large space and time scale disparities between the two processes. We have presented the latest improvements of the simulation package WARP-POSINST for the simulation of self-consistent ecloud effects, including mesh refinement, and generation of electrons from gas ionization and impact at the pipe walls. We also presented simulations of two consecutive bunches interacting with electrons clouds in the SPS, which included generation of secondary electrons. The distribution of electrons in front of the first beam was initialized from a dump taken from a preceding buildup calculation using the POSINST code. In this paper, we present an extension of this work where one full batch of 72 bunches is simulated in the SPS, including the entire buildup calculation and the self-consistent interaction between the bunches and the electrons. Comparisons to experimental data are also given.

  3. Direct Numerical Modeling of E-Cloud Driven Instability of a Bunch Train in the CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vay, J-L.; Furman, M.A.; Venturini, M.

    2011-03-01

    The simulation package WARP-POSINST was recently upgraded for handling multiple bunches and modeling concurrently the electron cloud buildup and its effect on the beam, allowing for direct self-consistent simulation of bunch trains generating, and interacting with, electron clouds. We have used the WARP-POSINST package on massively parallel supercomputers to study the buildup and interaction of electron clouds with a proton bunch train in the CERN SPS accelerator. Results suggest that a positive feedback mechanism exists between the electron buildup and the e-cloud driven transverse instability, leading to a net increase in predicted electron density. Electron clouds have been shown to trigger fast growing instabilities on proton beams circulating in the SPS and other accelerators. So far, simulations of electron cloud buildup and their effects on beam dynamics have been performed separately. This is a consequence of the large computational cost of the combined calculation due to large space and time scale disparities between the two processes. We have presented the latest improvements of the simulation package WARP-POSINST for the simulation of self-consistent ecloud effects, including mesh refinement, and generation of electrons from gas ionization and impact at the pipe walls. We also presented simulations of two consecutive bunches interacting with electrons clouds in the SPS, which included generation of secondary electrons. The distribution of electrons in front of the first beam was initialized from a dump taken from a preceding buildup calculation using the POSINST code. In this paper, we present an extension of this work where one full batch of 72 bunches is simulated in the SPS, including the entire buildup calculation and the self-consistent interaction between the bunches and the electrons.

  4. Foundation Heat Exchanger Final Report: Demonstration, Measured Performance, and Validated Model and Design Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Patrick; Im, Piljae

    2012-04-01

    , 50% of which was construction excavation. There are six pipes in all excavations (three parallel circuits - out and back), and the multiple instances of FHX and/or HGHX are all connected in series. The working fluid is 20% by weight propylene glycol in water. Model and design tool development was undertaken in parallel with constructing the houses, installing instrumentation, and monitoring performance for a year. Several detailed numerical models for FHX were developed as part of the project. Essentially the project team was searching for an energy performance model accurate enough to achieve project objectives while also having sufficient computational efficiency for practical use in EnergyPlus. A 3-dimensional, dual-coordinate-system, finite-volume model satisfied these criteria and was included in the October 2011 EnergyPlus Version 7 public release after being validated against measured data.

  5. A Comparison of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling Results

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    over a Wide Rangeof Gasoline Range Surrogate Fuel Blends | Department of Energy A Comparison of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling Results over a Wide Rangeof Gasoline Range Surrogate Fuel Blends A Comparison of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling Results over a Wide Rangeof Gasoline Range Surrogate Fuel Blends Kinetic models of fuels are needed to allow the simulation of engine performance for research, design, or verification purposes. deer09_bunting.pdf

  6. Fuel Cell Power Model for CHHP System Economics and Performance Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.

    2009-11-16

    Presentation about Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model used to analyze the economics and performance of combined heat, hydrogen, and power (CHHP) systems.

  7. Think Again! A Fresh Look at Home Performance Business Models and Service Offerings (301)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Think Again! A Fresh Look at Home Performance Business Models and Service Offerings (301), call slides and discussion summary.

  8. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Houze, Robert, A., Jr.; Zeng, Xiping

    2013-03-14

    observations to evaluate model simulations In cooperation with Profs. Bob Houze at University of Washington and Steven Rutledge at Colorado State University, numerical model results were evaluated with observations from W- and C-band radars and CloudSat/TRMM satellites. These studies exhibited some shortcomings of current numerical models, such as too little of thin anvil clouds, directing the future improvement of cloud microphysics parameterization in CRMs. Two papers of Powell et al (2012) and Zeng et al. (2013), summarizing these studies, were published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. 4. Analyzed the water budgets of MCSs Using ARM data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP and other field campaigns, the Goddard CRM simulations were carried out to analyze the water budgets of clouds from TWP-ICE and AMMA. The simulations generated a set of datasets on clouds and radiation, which are available http://cloud.gsfc.nasa.gov/. The cloud datasets were available for modelers and other researchers aiming to improve the representation of cloud processes in multi-scale modeling frameworks, GCMs and climate models. Special datasets, such as 3D cloud distributions every six minutes for TWP-ICE, were requested and generated for ARM/ASR investigators. Data server records show that 86,206 datasets were downloaded by 120 users between April of 2010 and January of 2012. 5. MMF simulations The Goddard MMF (multi-scale modeling framework) has been improved by coupling with the Goddard Land Information System (LIS) and the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GOES5). It has also been optimized on NASA HEC supercomputers and can be run over 4000 CPUs. The improved MMF with high horizontal resolution (1 x 1 degree) is currently being applied to cases covering 2005 and 2006. The results show that the spatial distribution pattern of precipitation rate is well simulated by the MMF through comparisons with satellite retrievals from the CMOPRH and GPCP data sets. In addition, the MMF results

  9. PV Performance Modeling Collaborative's New and Improved Website Is

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Launched Modeling Collaborative's New and Improved Website Is Launched - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear

  10. A three-dimensional numerical model of predevelopment conditions in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Agnese, F.A.; O'Brien, G.M.; Faunt, C.C.; Belcher, W.R.; San Juan, Carma

    2002-11-22

    In the early 1990's, two numerical models of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy. In general, the two models were based on the same basic hydrogeologic data set. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy requested that the U.S. Geological Survey develop and maintain a ground-water flow model of the Death Valley region in support of U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of developing this ''second-generation'' regional model was to enhance the knowledge and understanding of the ground-water flow system as new information and tools are developed. The U.S. Geological Survey also was encouraged by the U.S. Department of Energy to cooperate to the fullest extent with other Federal, State, and local entities in the region to take advantage of the benefits of their knowledge and expertise. The short-term objective of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system project was to develop a steady-stat e representation of the predevelopment conditions of the ground-water flow system utilizing the two geologic interpretations used to develop the previous numerical models. The long-term objective of this project was to construct and calibrate a transient model that simulates the ground-water conditions of the study area over the historical record that utilizes a newly interpreted hydrogeologic conceptual model. This report describes the result of the predevelopment steady-state model construction and calibration.