National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for numerical model validation

  1. Foundation heat exchangers for residential ground source heat pump systems Numerical modeling and experimental validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing, Lu; Cullin, James; Spitler, Jeffery; Im, Piljae; Fisher, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    A new type of ground heat exchanger that utilizes the excavation often made for basements or foundations has been proposed as an alternative to conventional ground heat exchangers. This article describes a numerical model that can be used to size these foundation heat exchanger (FHX) systems. The numerical model is a two-dimensional finite-volume model that considers a wide variety of factors, such as soil freezing and evapotranspiration. The FHX numerical model is validated with one year of experimental data collected at an experimental house located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The model shows good agreement with the experimental data-heat pump entering fluid temperatures typically within 1 C (1.8 F) - with minor discrepancies due to approximations, such as constant moisture content throughout the year, uniform evapotranspiration over the seasons, and lack of ground shading in the model.

  2. Numerical models for static denting and dynamic puncture of gas transmission linepipe and their validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarea, M.F.; Toumbas, D.N.; Philibert, C.E.; Deo, I.

    1996-12-31

    Gas transmission pipe resistance to external damage is a subject of great attention at Gaz de France and in Europe. Existing results cover part of the necessary criteria for the residual life of damaged pipelines, but more knowledge is needed on defect creation. The authors propose to complement existing experimental work which is limited to the explored range of parameters by validated numerical models. The first, simple static denting model aims at optimizing the conditions for calculating the residual stress distribution needed to assess the fatigue life of dents and dents and gouges. The second, more complex dynamic puncture model calculates both the puncture force and the puncture energy for a given pipe, excavator and tooth geometry. These models can contribute to enhance the external damage prevention policies of transmission pipeline operators.

  3. Tall Tower Wind Energy Monitoring and Numerical Model Validation in Northern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koracin, D.; Kaplan, M.; Smith, C.; McCurdy, G.; Wolf, A.; McCord, T.; King, K.; Belu, R.; Horvath, K.

    2015-10-01

    The main objectives of this project were to conduct a tall-tower and sodar field campaign in complex terrain, investigate wind properties relevant to wind energy assessment, and evaluate high-resolution models with fixed and adaptive grid structures. Two 60-m towers at Virginia Peak ridges near Washoe Valley, Nevada, were instrumented with cup and vane anemometers as well as sonic anemometers, and an acoustic sounder (hereafter sodar) was installed near one of the towers. The towers were located 2,700 m apart with a vertical distance of 140 m elevation between their bases. Each tower had a downhill exposure of rolling complex terrain, with the nearby valley floor 3,200 m to the west and 800 m below the summit. Cup anemometers were installed at both towers at 20, 40, and 60 m, wind vanes at 20 and 60 m, and sonic anemometers at 20 and 60 m. The sodar measurements were nominally provided every 10 m in vertical distance from 40 to 200 m with the quality of the data generally decreasing with height. Surface air temperature, atmospheric pressure, and radiation measurements were conducted at 1.5 m AGL at both of the towers. Although the plan was to conduct a 1-year period of data collection, we extended the period (October 5, 2012 through February 24, 2014) to cover for possible data loss from instrument or communication problems. We also present a preliminary analysis of the towers and sodar data, including a detailed inventory of available and missing data as well as outliers. The analysis additionally includes calculation of the Weibull parameters, turbulence intensity, and initial computation of wind power density at various heights.

  4. Numerical implementation, verification and validation of two-phase flow four-equation drift flux model with Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zou, Ling; Zhao, Haihua; Zhang, Hongbin

    2016-08-24

    This study presents a numerical investigation on using the Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov (JFNK) method to solve the two-phase flow four-equation drift flux model with realistic constitutive correlations (‘closure models’). The drift flux model is based on Isshi and his collaborators’ work. Additional constitutive correlations for vertical channel flow, such as two-phase flow pressure drop, flow regime map, wall boiling and interfacial heat transfer models, were taken from the RELAP5-3D Code Manual and included to complete the model. The staggered grid finite volume method and fully implicit backward Euler method was used for the spatial discretization and time integration schemes, respectively. Themore » Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov method shows no difficulty in solving the two-phase flow drift flux model with a discrete flow regime map. In addition to the Jacobian-free approach, the preconditioning matrix is obtained by using the default finite differencing method provided in the PETSc package, and consequently the labor-intensive implementation of complex analytical Jacobian matrix is avoided. Extensive and successful numerical verification and validation have been performed to prove the correct implementation of the models and methods. Code-to-code comparison with RELAP5-3D has further demonstrated the successful implementation of the drift flux model.« less

  5. Model Verification and Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the decision-making process. Validation should therefore involve the code developers, computer scientists, experimentalists, statisticians, analysts, and application owners....

  6. Structural system identification: Structural dynamics model validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Red-Horse, J.R.

    1997-04-01

    Structural system identification is concerned with the development of systematic procedures and tools for developing predictive analytical models based on a physical structure`s dynamic response characteristics. It is a multidisciplinary process that involves the ability (1) to define high fidelity physics-based analysis models, (2) to acquire accurate test-derived information for physical specimens using diagnostic experiments, (3) to validate the numerical simulation model by reconciling differences that inevitably exist between the analysis model and the experimental data, and (4) to quantify uncertainties in the final system models and subsequent numerical simulations. The goal of this project was to develop structural system identification techniques and software suitable for both research and production applications in code and model validation.

  7. Electromagnetic scattering problems -Numerical issues and new experimental approaches of validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geise, Robert; Neubauer, Bjoern; Zimmer, Georg

    2015-03-10

    Electromagnetic scattering problems, thus the question how radiated energy spreads when impinging on an object, are an essential part of wave propagation. Though the Maxwells differential equations as starting point, are actually quite simple,the integral formulation of an objects boundary conditions, respectively the solution for unknown induced currents can only be solved numerically in most cases.As a timely topic of practical importance the scattering of rotating wind turbines is discussed, the numerical description of which is still based on rigorous approximations with yet unspecified accuracy. In this context the issue of validating numerical solutions is addressed, both with reference simulations but in particular with the experimental approach of scaled measurements. For the latter the idea of an incremental validation is proposed allowing a step by step validation of required new mathematical models in scattering theory.

  8. Advanced Numerical Model for Irradiated Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giorla, Alain B.

    2015-03-01

    In this report, we establish a numerical model for concrete exposed to irradiation to address these three critical points. The model accounts for creep in the cement paste and its coupling with damage, temperature and relative humidity. The shift in failure mode with the loading rate is also properly represented. The numerical model for creep has been validated and calibrated against different experiments in the literature [Wittmann, 1970, Le Roy, 1995]. Results from a simplified model are shown to showcase the ability of numerical homogenization to simulate irradiation effects in concrete. In future works, the complete model will be applied to the analysis of the irradiation experiments of Elleuch et al. [1972] and Kelly et al. [1969]. This requires a careful examination of the experimental environmental conditions as in both cases certain critical information are missing, including the relative humidity history. A sensitivity analysis will be conducted to provide lower and upper bounds of the concrete expansion under irradiation, and check if the scatter in the simulated results matches the one found in experiments. The numerical and experimental results will be compared in terms of expansion and loss of mechanical stiffness and strength. Both effects should be captured accordingly by the model to validate it. Once the model has been validated on these two experiments, it can be applied to simulate concrete from nuclear power plants. To do so, the materials used in these concrete must be as well characterized as possible. The main parameters required are the mechanical properties of each constituent in the concrete (aggregates, cement paste), namely the elastic modulus, the creep properties, the tensile and compressive strength, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the drying shrinkage. These can be either measured experimentally, estimated from the initial composition in the case of cement paste, or back-calculated from mechanical tests on concrete. If some

  9. Modeling Fluid Flow in Natural Systems, Model Validation and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Modeling Fluid Flow in Natural Systems, Model Validation and Demonstration Modeling Fluid Flow in Natural Systems, Model Validation and Demonstration Clay and granitic units are ...

  10. (Validity of environmental transfer models)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Hoffman, F.O.; Gardner, R.H.

    1990-11-07

    BIOMOVS (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) is an international cooperative study initiated in 1985 by the Swedish National Institute of Radiation Protection to test models designed to calculate the environmental transfer and bioaccumulation of radionuclides and other trace substances. The objective of the symposium and workshop was to synthesize results obtained during Phase 1 of BIOMOVS (the first five years of the study) and to suggest new directions that might be pursued during Phase 2 of BIOMOVS. The travelers were an instrumental part of the development of BIOMOVS. This symposium allowed the travelers to present a review of past efforts at model validation and a synthesis of current activities and to refine ideas concerning future development of models and data for assessing the fate, effect, and human risks of environmental contaminants. R. H. Gardner also visited the Free University, Amsterdam, and the National Institute of Public Health and Environmental Protection (RIVM) in Bilthoven to confer with scientists about current research in theoretical ecology and the use of models for estimating the transport and effect of environmental contaminants and to learn about the European efforts to map critical loads of acid deposition.

  11. numerical modeling | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Submitted by Ocop(5) Member 15 July, 2014 - 07:07 MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Cost Current DOE LCOE numerical modeling Performance Tidal Wave To normalize competing...

  12. RELAP-7 Software Verification and Validation Plan: Requirements Traceability Matrix (RTM) Part 1 – Physics and numerical methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Yong Joon; Yoo, Jun Soo; Smith, Curtis Lee

    2015-09-01

    This INL plan comprehensively describes the Requirements Traceability Matrix (RTM) on main physics and numerical method of the RELAP-7. The plan also describes the testing-based software verification and validation (SV&V) process—a set of specially designed software models used to test RELAP-7.

  13. Economic analysis of model validation for a challenge problem

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paez, Paul J.; Paez, Thomas L.; Hasselman, Timothy K.

    2016-02-19

    It is now commonplace for engineers to build mathematical models of the systems they are designing, building, or testing. And, it is nearly universally accepted that phenomenological models of physical systems must be validated prior to use for prediction in consequential scenarios. Yet, there are certain situations in which testing only or no testing and no modeling may be economically viable alternatives to modeling and its associated testing. This paper develops an economic framework within which benefit–cost can be evaluated for modeling and model validation relative to other options. The development is presented in terms of a challenge problem. Asmore » a result, we provide a numerical example that quantifies when modeling, calibration, and validation yield higher benefit–cost than a testing only or no modeling and no testing option.« less

  14. Dynamic Response of a Pulse-Heated, Thick-Walled, Hollow Sphere: Validation of Code Numerics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canaan, R.E.

    2000-01-19

    Volumetric pulse heating of a thick-walled hollow sphere is numerically investigated. The primary objective is to validate a variety of LLNL 30 hydrocodes for modeling the dynamic behavior of fissile/fissionable metals subject to rapid ''fission-heating'' transients. The 30 codes tested include both DYNA3D and NIKE3D, as well as the ''ASCI'' code, ALE3D. The codes are compared ''head-to-head'' and are benchmarked against a 1D finite difference solution to the problem that is derived from basic principles. Three pulse-heating transients are examined with full-width-half-maximum pulse durations of 41{micro}s, 85{micro}s, and 140{micro}s, respectively. These three transients produce a significant range of dynamic responses in the thermo-elastic regime. We present results for dynamic radial displacements and stresses for each pulse, and also discuss which code features/options worked best for these types of calculations. In general, the code results are in excellent agreement for the simple system considered. Validation of code numerics in simple systems is a key first step toward future application of the codes in more complicated geometries (U).

  15. Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominatedgeothermal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominatedgeothermal reservoirs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical modeling of water injection ...

  16. Numerical Modeling Studies of The Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Numerical Modeling Studies of The Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection ProcessDuring CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical Modeling ...

  17. Numerical Modeling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (McKenna ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Numerical Modeling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (McKenna & Blackwell, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Numerical Modeling...

  18. Numerical Model for Conduction-Cooled Current Lead Heat Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, M.J.; Wang, X.L.; Brueck, H.D.; /DESY

    2011-06-10

    Current leads are utilized to deliver electrical power from a room temperature junction mounted on the vacuum vessel to a superconducting magnet located within the vacuum space of a cryostat. There are many types of current leads used at laboratories throughout the world; however, conduction-cooled current leads are often chosen for their simplicity and reliability. Conduction-cooled leads have the advantage of using common materials, have no superconducting/normal state transition, and have no boil-off vapor to collect. This paper presents a numerical model for conduction-cooled current lead heat loads. This model takes into account varying material and fluid thermal properties, varying thicknesses along the length of the lead, heat transfer in the circumferential and longitudinal directions, electrical power dissipation, and the effect of thermal intercepts. The model is validated by comparing the numerical model results to ideal cases where analytical equations are valid. In addition, the XFEL (X-Ray Free Electron Laser) prototype current leads are modeled and compared to the experimental results from testing at DESY's XFEL Magnet Test Stand (XMTS) and Cryomodule Test Bench (CMTB).

  19. Validation of the Hot Strip Mill Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Shulkosky; David Rosberg; Jerrud Chapman

    2005-03-30

    The Hot Strip Mill Model (HSMM) is an off-line, PC based software originally developed by the University of British Columbia (UBC) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) under the AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program. The HSMM was developed to predict the temperatures, deformations, microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of steel strip or plate rolled in a hot mill. INTEG process group inc. undertook the current task of enhancing and validating the technology. With the support of 5 North American steel producers, INTEG process group tested and validated the model using actual operating data from the steel plants and enhanced the model to improve prediction results.

  20. Design, Modeling, and Validation of a Flame Reformer for LNT...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design, Modeling, and Validation of a Flame Reformer for LNT External Bypass Regeneration Design, Modeling, and Validation of a Flame Reformer for LNT External Bypass Regeneration ...

  1. NUMERICAL MODELING OF CATHODE CONTACT MATERIAL DENSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeppel, Brian J.; Liu, Wenning N.; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-11-01

    Numerical modeling was used to simulate the constrained sintering process of the cathode contact layer during assembly of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). A finite element model based on the continuum theory for sintering of porous bodies was developed and used to investigate candidate low-temperature cathode contact materials. Constitutive parameters for various contact materials under investigation were estimated from dilatometry screening tests, and the influence of processing time, processing temperature, initial grain size, and applied compressive stress on the free sintering response was predicted for selected candidate materials. The densification behavior and generated stresses within a 5-cell planar SOFC stack during sintering, high temperature operation, and room temperature shutdown were predicted. Insufficient constrained densification was observed in the stack at the proposed heat treatment, but beneficial effects of reduced grain size, compressive stack preload, and reduced thermal expansion coefficient on the contact layer densification and stresses were observed.

  2. Validation Studies for Numerical Simulations of Flow Phenomena Expected in the Lower Plenum of a Prismatic VHTR Reference Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard W. Johnson

    2005-09-01

    The final design of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) of the fourth generation of nuclear power plants (Gen IV) has not yet been established. The VHTR may be either a prismatic (block) or pebble bed type. It may be either gas-cooled or cooled with an as yet unspecified molten salt. However, a conceptual design of a gas-cooled VHTR, based on the General Atomics GT-MHR, does exist and is called the prismatic VHTR reference design, MacDonald et al [2003], General Atomics [1996]. The present validation studies are based on the prismatic VHTR reference design. In the prismatic VHTR reference design, the flow in the lower plenum will be introduced by dozens of turbulent jets issuing into a large crossflow that must negotiate dozens of cylindrical support columns as it flows toward the exit duct of the reactor vessel. The jets will not all be at the same temperature due to the radial variation of power density expected in the core. However, it is important that the coolant be well mixed when it enters the power conversion unit to ensure proper operation and long life of the power conversion machinery. Hence, it is deemed important to be able to accurately model the flow and mixing of the variable temperature coolant in the lower plenum and exit duct. Accurate flow modeling involves determining modeling strategies including the fineness of the grid needed, iterative convergence tolerance, numerical discretization method used, whether the flow is steady or unsteady, and the turbulence model and wall treatment employed. It also involves validation of the computer code and turbulence model against a series of separate and combined flow phenomena and selection of the data used for the validation. The present report describes progress made to date for the task entitled ‘CFD software validation of jets in crossflow’ which was designed to investigate the issues pertaining to the validation process.

  3. An Updated Numerical Model Of The Larderello-Travale Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Numerical Model Of The Larderello-Travale Geothermal System, Italy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An Updated Numerical Model Of...

  4. Numerical Modeling Of Basin And Range Geothermal Systems | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for extensional geothermal systems that include structure, heat input, and permeability distribution have been established using numerical models. Extensional geothermal...

  5. SPR Hydrostatic Column Model Verification and Validation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettin, Giorgia; Lord, David; Rudeen, David Keith

    2015-10-01

    A Hydrostatic Column Model (HCM) was developed to help differentiate between normal "tight" well behavior and small-leak behavior under nitrogen for testing the pressure integrity of crude oil storage wells at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. This effort was motivated by steady, yet distinct, pressure behavior of a series of Big Hill caverns that have been placed under nitrogen for extended period of time. This report describes the HCM model, its functional requirements, the model structure and the verification and validation process. Different modes of operation are also described, which illustrate how the software can be used to model extended nitrogen monitoring and Mechanical Integrity Tests by predicting wellhead pressures along with nitrogen interface movements. Model verification has shown that the program runs correctly and it is implemented as intended. The cavern BH101 long term nitrogen test was used to validate the model which showed very good agreement with measured data. This supports the claim that the model is, in fact, capturing the relevant physical phenomena and can be used to make accurate predictions of both wellhead pressure and interface movements.

  6. Tidal & Current Modeling Development and Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tidal & Current Modeling Development and Validation - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste

  7. Numerical Modelling of Geothermal Systems a Short Introduction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modelling of Geothermal Systems a Short Introduction Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: Numerical Modelling of Geothermal Systems a Short...

  8. Numerical Modeling of PCCI Combustion | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PCCI Combustion Numerical Modeling of PCCI Combustion 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/University of Michigan 2004_deer_flowers.pdf (252.97 KB) More Documents & Publications Modeling of HCCI and PCCI Combustion Processes Bridging the Gap between Fundamental Physics and Chemistry and Applied Models for HCCI Engines Numerical Modeling of HCCI Combustion

  9. Development of a Two-fluid Drag Law for Clustered Particles using Direct Numerical Simulation and Validation through Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gokaltun, Seckin; Munroe, Norman; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2014-12-31

    This study presents a new drag model, based on the cohesive inter-particle forces, implemented in the MFIX code. This new drag model combines an existing standard model in MFIX with a particle-based drag model based on a switching principle. Switches between the models in the computational domain occur where strong particle-to-particle cohesion potential is detected. Three versions of the new model were obtained by using one standard drag model in each version. Later, performance of each version was compared against available experimental data for a fluidized bed, published in the literature and used extensively by other researchers for validation purposes. In our analysis of the results, we first observed that standard models used in this research were incapable of producing closely matching results. Then, we showed for a simple case that a threshold is needed to be set on the solid volume fraction. This modification was applied to avoid non-physical results for the clustering predictions, when governing equation of the solid granular temperate was solved. Later, we used our hybrid technique and observed the capability of our approach in improving the numerical results significantly; however, improvement of the results depended on the threshold of the cohesive index, which was used in the switching procedure. Our results showed that small values of the threshold for the cohesive index could result in significant reduction of the computational error for all the versions of the proposed drag model. In addition, we redesigned an existing circulating fluidized bed (CFB) test facility in order to create validation cases for clustering regime of Geldart A type particles.

  10. Boron-10 Lined Proportional Counter Model Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2012-06-30

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) is supporting the project “Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology” at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube-based alternative system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report discusses the validation studies performed to establish the degree of accuracy of the computer modeling methods current used to simulate the response of boron-lined tubes. This is the precursor to developing models for the uranium neutron coincidence collar under Task 2 of this project.

  11. Numerical Modeling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Numerical Modeling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983)...

  12. Final Report on Experimental and Numerical Modeling Activities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Final Report on Experimental and Numerical Modeling Activities for the Newark Basin Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Final Report on Experimental and ...

  13. Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    transform is employed to characterize guided-wave's velocity-frequency dispersion, and numerical methods are used to simulate the guided-wave propagation. The modeling...

  14. Numerical Modeling At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (O'Brien...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleNumericalModelingAtLightningDockGeothermalArea(O%27Brien,EtAl.,1984)&oldid762871...

  15. Full-Scale Cookoff Model Validation Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClelland, M A; Rattanapote, M K; Heimdahl, E R; Erikson, W E; Curran, P O; Atwood, A I

    2003-11-25

    This paper presents the experimental results of the third and final phase of a cookoff model validation effort. In this phase of the work, two generic Heavy Wall Penetrators (HWP) were tested in two heating orientations. Temperature and strain gage data were collected over the entire test period. Predictions for time and temperature of reaction were made prior to release of the live data. Predictions were comparable to the measured values and were highly dependent on the established boundary conditions. Both HWP tests failed at a weld located near the aft closure of the device. More than 90 percent of unreacted explosive was recovered in the end heated experiment and less than 30 percent recovered in the side heated test.

  16. Validation of Numerical Two-Fluid and Kinetic Plasma Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel Barnes

    2011-03-25

    This was a four year grant commencing October 1, 2003 and finishing September 30, 2007. The funding was primarily used to support the work of the Principal Investigator, who collaborated with Profs. Scott Parker and John Cary at U. Colorado, and with two students, N. Xiang and J. Cheng also of U. Colorado. The technical accomplishments of this grant can be found in the publications listed in the final Section here. The main accomplishments of the grant work were: (1) Development and implementation of time-implicit two-fluid simulation methods in collaboration with the NIMROD team; and (2) Development and testing of a new time-implicit delta-f, energy-conserving method The basic two-fluid method, with many improvements is used in present NIMROD calculations. The energy-conserving delta-f method is under continuing development under contract between Coronado Consulting, a New Mexico sole proprietorship and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  17. Validating

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Validating extended MHD models for fusion plasmas K. J. McCollam (kmccollam@wisc.edu), D. J. Den Hartog, C. M. Jacobson, J. A. Reusch, J. S. Sarff, and the MST Team, University of Wisconsin-Madison, April 2015 Submitted to the DOE Workshop on Integrated Simulations for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences Primary topic: A (Disruptions); Secondary topic: C (Whole device modeling) Oral presentation requested if time available Motivation: That predictive capability is a major gap in fusion plasma

  18. Numerical prediction of fiber orientation in injection-molded short-fiber/thermoplastic composite parts with experimental validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thi, Thanh Binh Nguyen; Morioka, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Hamanaka, Senji; Yamashita, Katsuhisa; Nonomura, Chisato

    2015-05-22

    Numerical prediction of the fiber orientation in the short-glass fiber (GF) reinforced polyamide 6 (PA6) composites with the fiber weight concentration of 30%, 50%, and 70% manufactured by the injection molding process is presented. And the fiber orientation was also directly observed and measured through X-ray computed tomography. During the injection molding process of the short-fiber/thermoplastic composite, the fiber orientation is produced by the flow states and the fiber-fiber interaction. Folgar and Tucker equation is the well known for modeling the fiber orientation in a concentrated suspension. They included into Jeffreys equation a diffusive type of term by introducing a phenomenological coefficient to account for the fiber-fiber interaction. Our developed model for the fiber-fiber interaction was proposed by modifying the rotary diffusion term of the Folgar-Tucker equation. This model was presented in a conference paper of the 29{sup th} International Conference of the Polymer Processing Society published by AIP conference proceeding. For modeling fiber interaction, the fiber dynamic simulation was introduced in order to obtain a global fiber interaction coefficient, which is sum function of the fiber concentration, aspect ratio, and angular velocity. The fiber orientation is predicted by using the proposed fiber interaction model incorporated into a computer aided engineering simulation package C-Mold. An experimental program has been carried out in which the fiber orientation distribution has been measured in 100 x 100 x 2 mm injection-molded plate and 100 x 80 x 2 mm injection-molded weld by analyzed with a high resolution 3D X-ray computed tomography system XVA-160?, and calculated by X-ray computed tomography imaging. The numerical prediction shows a good agreement with experimental validation. And the complex fiber orientation in the injection-molded weld was investigated.

  19. Mathematical and Numerical Analyses of Peridynamics for Multiscale Materials Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunzburger, Max

    2015-02-17

    We have treated the modeling, analysis, numerical analysis, and algorithmic development for nonlocal models of diffusion and mechanics. Variational formulations were developed and finite element methods were developed based on those formulations for both steady state and time dependent problems. Obstacle problems and optimization problems for the nonlocal models were also treated and connections made with fractional derivative models.

  20. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We investigated whether the West African anvil clouds connected with squall line MCSs passing over the Niamey ARM site could be simulated in a numerical model by comparing the ...

  1. System Advisor Model: Flat Plate Photovoltaic Performance Modeling Validation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, J.; Whitmore, J.; Kaffine, L.; Blair, N.; Dobos, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    The System Advisor Model (SAM) is a free software tool that performs detailed analysis of both system performance and system financing for a variety of renewable energy technologies. This report provides detailed validation of the SAM flat plate photovoltaic performance model by comparing SAM-modeled PV system generation data to actual measured production data for nine PV systems ranging from 75 kW to greater than 25 MW in size. The results show strong agreement between SAM predictions and field data, with annualized prediction error below 3% for all fixed tilt cases and below 8% for all one axis tracked cases. The analysis concludes that snow cover and system outages are the primary sources of disagreement, and other deviations resulting from seasonal biases in the irradiation models and one axis tracking issues are discussed in detail.

  2. Systematic approach to verification and validation: High explosive burn models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph; Scovel, Christina A.

    2012-04-16

    Most material models used in numerical simulations are based on heuristics and empirically calibrated to experimental data. For a specific model, key questions are determining its domain of applicability and assessing its relative merits compared to other models. Answering these questions should be a part of model verification and validation (V and V). Here, we focus on V and V of high explosive models. Typically, model developers implemented their model in their own hydro code and use different sets of experiments to calibrate model parameters. Rarely can one find in the literature simulation results for different models of the same experiment. Consequently, it is difficult to assess objectively the relative merits of different models. This situation results in part from the fact that experimental data is scattered through the literature (articles in journals and conference proceedings) and that the printed literature does not allow the reader to obtain data from a figure in electronic form needed to make detailed comparisons among experiments and simulations. In addition, it is very time consuming to set up and run simulations to compare different models over sufficiently many experiments to cover the range of phenomena of interest. The first difficulty could be overcome if the research community were to support an online web based database. The second difficulty can be greatly reduced by automating procedures to set up and run simulations of similar types of experiments. Moreover, automated testing would be greatly facilitated if the data files obtained from a database were in a standard format that contained key experimental parameters as meta-data in a header to the data file. To illustrate our approach to V and V, we have developed a high explosive database (HED) at LANL. It now contains a large number of shock initiation experiments. Utilizing the header information in a data file from HED, we have written scripts to generate an input file for a hydro code

  3. Validation of model based active control of combustion instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleifil, M.; Ghoneim, Z.; Ghoniem, A.F.

    1998-07-01

    The demand for efficient, company and clean combustion systems have spurred research into the fundamental mechanisms governing their performance and means of interactively changing their performance characteristics. Thermoacoustic instability which is frequently observed in combustion systems with high power density, when burning close to the lean flammability limit, or using exhaust gas recirculation to meet more stringent emissions regulations, etc. Its occurrence and/or means to mitigate them passively lead to performance degradation such as reduced combustion efficiency, high local heat transfer rates, increase in the mixture equivalence ratio or system failure due to structural damage. This paper reports on their study of the origin of thermoacoustic instability, its dependence on system parameters and the means of actively controlling it. The authors have developed an analytical model of thermoacoustic instability in premixed combustors. The model combines a heat release dynamics model constructed using the kinematics of a premixed flame stabilized behind a perforated plate with the linearized conservation equations governing the system acoustics. This formulation allows model based controller design. In order to test the performance of the analytical model, a numerical solution of the partial differential equations governing the system has been carried out using the principle of harmonic separation and focusing on the dominant unstable mode. This leads to a system of ODEs governing the thermofluid variables. Analytical predictions of the frequency and growth ate of the unstable mode are shown to be in good agreement with the numerical simulations as well s with those obtained using experimental identification techniques when applied to a laboratory combustor. The authors use these results to confirm the validity of the assumptions used in formulating the analytical model. A controller based on the minimization of a cost function using the LQR technique has

  4. Numerical Investigation of Flapwise-Torsional Vibration Model of a Smart Section Blade with Microtab

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Nailu; Balas, Mark J.; Yang, Hua; Jiang, Wei; Magar, Kaman T.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a method to develop an aeroelastic model of a smart section blade equipped with microtab. The model is suitable for potential passive vibration control study of the blade section in classic flutter. Equations of the model are described by the nondimensional flapwise and torsional vibration modes coupled with the aerodynamic model based on the Theodorsen theory and aerodynamic effects of the microtab based on the wind tunnel experimental data. The aeroelastic model is validated using numerical data available in the literature and then utilized to analyze the microtab control capability on flutter instability case and divergence instabilitymore » case. The effectiveness of the microtab is investigated with the scenarios of different output controllers and actuation deployments for both instability cases. The numerical results show that the microtab can effectively suppress both vibration modes with the appropriate choice of the output feedback controller.« less

  5. Rapid installation of numerical models in multiple parent codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brannon, R.M.; Wong, M.K.

    1996-10-01

    A set of``model interface guidelines``, called MIG, is offered as a means to more rapidly install numerical models (such as stress-strain laws) into any parent code (hydrocode, finite element code, etc.) without having to modify the model subroutines. The model developer (who creates the model package in compliance with the guidelines) specifies the model`s input and storage requirements in a standardized way. For portability, database management (such as saving user inputs and field variables) is handled by the parent code. To date, NUG has proved viable in beta installations of several diverse models in vectorized and parallel codes written in different computer languages. A NUG-compliant model can be installed in different codes without modifying the model`s subroutines. By maintaining one model for many codes, MIG facilitates code-to-code comparisons and reduces duplication of effort potentially reducing the cost of installing and sharing models.

  6. Numerical Modeling of HCCI Combustion | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HCCI Combustion Numerical Modeling of HCCI Combustion Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006_deer_aceves.pdf (840 KB) More Documents & Publications High Fidelity Modeling of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Engines New Methodologies for Analysis of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Engines Modeling of HCCI and PCCI Combustion Processes

  7. 2D numerical simulation of the MEP energy-transport model with a finite difference scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romano, V. . E-mail: romano@dmi.unict.it

    2007-02-10

    A finite difference scheme of Scharfetter-Gummel type is used to simulate a consistent energy-transport model for electron transport in semiconductors devices, free of any fitting parameters, formulated on the basis of the maximum entropy principle. Simulations of silicon n{sup +}-n-n{sup +} diodes, 2D-MESFET and 2D-MOSFET and comparisons with the results obtained by a direct simulation of the Boltzmann transport equation and with other energy-transport models, known in the literature, show the validity of the model and the robustness of the numerical scheme.

  8. Optical Measurement Methods used in Calibration and Validation of Modeled

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Injection Spray Characteristics | Department of Energy Optical Measurement Methods used in Calibration and Validation of Modeled Injection Spray Characteristics Optical Measurement Methods used in Calibration and Validation of Modeled Injection Spray Characteristics Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. p-07_klyza.pdf (363.89 KB) More Documents & Publications Effect of Ambient Pressure

  9. Numerical Modeling At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (U.S....

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Exploration Technique Numerical Modeling Activity Date 2011 - 2011 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis A numerical reservoir model was created to...

  10. Experiments for foam model development and validation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Mahoney, James F.; Russick, Edward Mark; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Thompson, Kyle Richard; Kraynik, Andrew Michael; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Gorby, Allen D.

    2008-09-01

    A series of experiments has been performed to allow observation of the foaming process and the collection of temperature, rise rate, and microstructural data. Microfocus video is used in conjunction with particle image velocimetry (PIV) to elucidate the boundary condition at the wall. Rheology, reaction kinetics and density measurements complement the flow visualization. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is used to examine the cured foams to determine density gradients. These data provide input to a continuum level finite element model of the blowing process.

  11. Numerical simulations for low energy nuclear reactions including...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Numerical simulations for low energy nuclear reactions including direct channels to validate statistical models Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical simulations for ...

  12. NUMERICAL VERIFICATION OF THE RELAP-7 CORE CHANNEL SINGLE-PHASE MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; Richard Martineau

    2014-06-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation of nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). All the physics in RELAP-7 are fully coupled and the errors resulted from the traditional operator-splitting approach are eliminated. By using 2nd order methods in both time and space and eliminating operator-splitting errors, the numerical error of RELAP-7 can be minimized. Numerical verification is the process to verify the orders of numerical methods. It is an important part of modern verification and validation process. The core channel component in RELAP-7 is designed to simulate coolant flow as well as the conjugated heat transfer between coolant flow and the fuel rod. A special treatment at fuel centerline to avoid numerical singularity for the cylindrical heat conduction in the continuous finite element mesh is discussed. One steady state test case and one fast power up transient test case are utilized for the verification of the core channel model with single-phase flow. Analytical solution for the fuel pin temperature and figures of merit such as peak clad temperature and peak fuel temperature are used to define numerical errors. These cases prove that the mass and energy are well conserved and 2nd order convergence rates for both time and space are achieved in the core channel model.

  13. Validation of nuclear models used in space radiation shielding applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2013-01-15

    A program of verification and validation has been undertaken to assess the applicability of models to space radiation shielding applications and to track progress as these models are developed over time. In this work, simple validation metrics applicable to testing both model accuracy and consistency with experimental data are developed. The developed metrics treat experimental measurement uncertainty as an interval and are therefore applicable to cases in which epistemic uncertainty dominates the experimental data. To demonstrate the applicability of the metrics, nuclear physics models used by NASA for space radiation shielding applications are compared to an experimental database consisting of over 3600 experimental cross sections. A cumulative uncertainty metric is applied to the question of overall model accuracy, while a metric based on the median uncertainty is used to analyze the models from the perspective of model development by examining subsets of the model parameter space.

  14. Dynamic Model Validation with Governor Deadband on the Eastern Interconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kou, Gefei; Hadley, Stanton W; Liu, Yilu

    2014-04-01

    This report documents the efforts to perform dynamic model validation on the Eastern Interconnection (EI) by modeling governor deadband. An on-peak EI dynamic model is modified to represent governor deadband characteristics. Simulation results are compared with synchrophasor measurements collected by the Frequency Monitoring Network (FNET/GridEye). The comparison shows that by modeling governor deadband the simulated frequency response can closely align with the actual system response.

  15. AEETES---A solar reflux receiver thermal performance numerical model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, R.E. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Reflux solar receivers for dish-Stirling electric power generation systems are currently being investigated by several companies and laboratories. In support of these efforts, the AEETES thermal performance numerical model has been developed to predict thermal performance of pool-boiler and heat-pipe reflux receivers. The formulation of the AEETES numerical model, which is applicable to axisymmetric geometries with asymmetric incident fluxes, is presented in detail. Thermal efficiency predictions agree to within 4.1% with test data from on-sun tests of a pool-boiler reflux receiver. Predicted absorber and sidewall temperatures agree with thermocouple data to within 3.3.% and 7.3%, respectively. The importance of accounting for the asymmetric incident fluxes is demonstrated in comparisons with predictions using azimuthally averaged variables. The predicted receiver heat losses are characterized in terms of convective, solar and infrared radiative, and conductive heat transfer mechanisms. 27 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Validation experiment of a numerically processed millimeter-wave interferometer in a laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogi, Y., E-mail: kogi@fit.ac.jp; Higashi, T.; Matsukawa, S. [Department of Information Electronics, Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Mase, A. [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-0811 (Japan); Kohagura, J.; Yoshikawa, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5202 (Japan); Kuwahara, D. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    We propose a new interferometer system for density profile measurements. This system produces multiple measurement chords by a leaky-wave antenna driven by multiple frequency inputs. The proposed system was validated in laboratory evaluation experiments. We confirmed that the interferometer generates a clear image of a Teflon plate as well as the phase shift corresponding to the plate thickness. In another experiment, we confirmed that quasi-optical mirrors can produce multiple measurement chords; however, the finite spot size of the probe beam degrades the sharpness of the resulting image.

  17. ASSIMILATION OF DOPPLER RADAR DATA INTO NUMERICAL WEATHER MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiswell, S.; Buckley, R.

    2009-01-15

    During the year 2008, the United States National Weather Service (NWS) completed an eight fold increase in sampling capability for weather radars to 250 m resolution. This increase is expected to improve warning lead times by detecting small scale features sooner with increased reliability; however, current NWS operational model domains utilize grid spacing an order of magnitude larger than the radar data resolution, and therefore the added resolution of radar data is not fully exploited. The assimilation of radar reflectivity and velocity data into high resolution numerical weather model forecasts where grid spacing is comparable to the radar data resolution was investigated under a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) 'quick hit' grant to determine the impact of improved data resolution on model predictions with specific initial proof of concept application to daily Savannah River Site operations and emergency response. Development of software to process NWS radar reflectivity and radial velocity data was undertaken for assimilation of observations into numerical models. Data values within the radar data volume undergo automated quality control (QC) analysis routines developed in support of this project to eliminate empty/missing data points, decrease anomalous propagation values, and determine error thresholds by utilizing the calculated variances among data values. The Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) three dimensional variational data assimilation package (WRF-3DVAR) was used to incorporate the QC'ed radar data into input and boundary conditions. The lack of observational data in the vicinity of SRS available to NWS operational models signifies an important data void where radar observations can provide significant input. These observations greatly enhance the knowledge of storm structures and the environmental conditions which influence their development. As the increase in computational power and availability has made higher

  18. Mathematical and Numerical Analyses of Peridynamics for Multiscale Materials Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Qiang

    2014-11-12

    The rational design of materials, the development of accurate and efficient material simulation algorithms, and the determination of the response of materials to environments and loads occurring in practice all require an understanding of mechanics at disparate spatial and temporal scales. The project addresses mathematical and numerical analyses for material problems for which relevant scales range from those usually treated by molecular dynamics all the way up to those most often treated by classical elasticity. The prevalent approach towards developing a multiscale material model couples two or more well known models, e.g., molecular dynamics and classical elasticity, each of which is useful at a different scale, creating a multiscale multi-model. However, the challenges behind such a coupling are formidable and largely arise because the atomistic and continuum models employ nonlocal and local models of force, respectively. The project focuses on a multiscale analysis of the peridynamics materials model. Peridynamics can be used as a transition between molecular dynamics and classical elasticity so that the difficulties encountered when directly coupling those two models are mitigated. In addition, in some situations, peridynamics can be used all by itself as a material model that accurately and efficiently captures the behavior of materials over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Peridynamics is well suited to these purposes because it employs a nonlocal model of force, analogous to that of molecular dynamics; furthermore, at sufficiently large length scales and assuming smooth deformation, peridynamics can be approximated by classical elasticity. The project will extend the emerging mathematical and numerical analysis of peridynamics. One goal is to develop a peridynamics-enabled multiscale multi-model that potentially provides a new and more extensive mathematical basis for coupling classical elasticity and molecular dynamics, thus enabling next

  19. Numerical simulation model for vertical flow in geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tachimori, M.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical simulation model for vertical flow in geothermal wells is presented. The model consists of equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, for thermodynamic state of water, for friction losses, for slip velocity relations, and of the criteria for various flow regimes. A new set of correlations and criteria is presented for two-phase flow to improve the accuracy of predictions; bubbly flow - Griffith and Wallis correlation, slug flow - Nicklin et al. one, annular-mist flow - Inoue and Aoki and modified by the author. The simulation method was verified by data from actual wells.

  20. Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Validation in fusion research: Towards guidelines and best practices P. W. Terry, 1 M. Greenwald, 2 J.-N. Leboeuf, 3 G. R. McKee, 4 D. R. Mikkelsen, 5 W. M. Nevins, 6 D. E. Newman, ...

  1. Argonne X-rays validate quantum magnetism model | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory X-rays validate quantum magnetism model May 20, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, Germany have validated a theorized model of quantum magnetism by observing it firsthand in a honeycomb lattice. The research is featured in an article titled "Direct evidence for dominant bond-directional interactions in a honeycomb lattice iridate Na2IrO3" published

  2. Note: Numerical simulation and experimental validation of accelerating voltage formation for a pulsed electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egorov, I.

    2014-06-15

    This paper describes the development of a computation model of a pulsed voltage generator for a repetitive electron accelerator. The model is based on a principle circuit of the generator, supplemented with the parasitics elements of the construction. Verification of the principle model was achieved by comparison of simulation with experimental results, where reasonable agreement was demonstrated for a wide range of generator load resistance.

  3. Comparison of numerical models of a pyrotechnic device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, K.G.

    1986-01-01

    The predictions of two numerical models of a hot-wire initiated pyrotechnic device are compared to each other and to experimental results. Both models employ finite difference approximations to the heat diffusion equation in cylindrical coordinates. The temperature dependence of the thermal properties of the pyrotechnic materials and of the bridgewire are modeled. An Arrhenius' model is used to describe the exothermic reaction in the powder. One model employs a single radial coordinate and predicts the radial temperature distribution in the bridgewire and surrounding powder mass. In addition to the radial coordinate, the other model also employs a longitudinal coordinate to predict the temperature distribution parallel to the axis of the bridgewire. The predictions of the two-dimensional model concerning the energy requirements for ignition and the energy losses from the ends of the bridgewire are presented. A comparison of the predictions of the two models and the development of thermal gradients are employed to define the regime where the assumption, in the one-dimensional model, of negligible heat transfer axial to the bridgewire does not lead to significant error. The general problems associated with predicting ignition from a diffusion model are also discussed.

  4. On Numerical Considerations for Modeling Reactive Astrophysical Shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papatheodore, Thomas L; Messer, Bronson

    2014-01-01

    Simulating detonations in astrophysical environments is often complicated by numerical approximations to shock structure. A common prescription to ensure correct detonation speeds (and associated quantities) is to prohibit burning inside the numerically broadened shock (Fryxell et al. 1989). We have performed a series of simulations to verify the efficacy of this approximation and to understand how resolution and dimensionality might affect its use. Our results show that, in one dimension, prohibiting burning in the shock is important wherever the carbon burning length is not resolved, in keeping with the results of Fryxell et al. (1989). In two dimensions, we find that the prohibition of shock burning effectively inhibits the development of cellular structure for all but the most highly-resolved cases. We discuss the possible impacts this outcome may have on sub-grid models and detonation propagation in Type Ia supernovae.

  5. Numerical modeling of solar magnetostatic structures bounded by current sheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pizzo, V.J. )

    1990-12-01

    A numerical method for efficiently determining the magnetostatic equilibrium configuration of erupted solar flux concentrations, such as sunspots and flux tubes, is presented. The magnetic structures are taken to be approximately vertically oriented and axisymmetric in the surface layers and are assumed to be isolated from the surrounding photosphere by a vanishingly thin current sheet. Since the location of the current sheet is initially unknown, the final structure is generated iteratively as a free-surface problem, with the magnetic configuration for each iterate being obtained from the horizontal force balance equation, subject to the appropriate boundary conditions. Multigrid methods are used at each stage to solve the equilibrium equation, which is mapped algebraically into a body-fitted coordinate system via transfinite interpolation techniques. Several model flux tubes and sunspots are computed to illustrate the procedure, and the accuracy of the numerical method is assessed against exact analytic solutions. 32 refs.

  6. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, N. A. S. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk Correia, T. M. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk; Rokosz, M. K. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk

    2014-07-28

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  7. Progress report on LBL's numerical modeling studies on Cerro Prieto

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halfman-Dooley, S.E.; Lippman, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1989-04-01

    An exploitation model of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system is needed to assess the energy capacity of the field, estimate its productive lifetime and develop an optimal reservoir management plan. The model must consider the natural state (i.e., pre-exploitation) conditions of the system and be able to predict changes in the reservoir thermodynamic conditions (and fluid chemistry) in response to fluid production (and injection). This paper discusses the results of a three-dimensional numerical simulation of the natural state conditions of the Cerro Prieto field and compares computed and observed pressure and temperature/enthalpy changes for the 1973--1987 production period. 16 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Validation of the RRTM Shortwave Radiation Model and Comparison to GCM Shortwave Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Validation of the RRTM Shortwave Radiation Model and Comparison to GCM Shortwave Models M. J. Iacono, E. J. Mlawer, and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts Introduction An important step toward improving radiative transfer codes in general circulation models (GCMs) is to thoroughly evaluate them either by comparison to measurements directly or by comparing them to other data-validated radiation models. The Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTM)

  9. Validation of the SUNY Satellite Model in a Meteosat Evironment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, R.; Schlemmer, J.; Renne, D.; Cowlin, S.; George, R.; Bandyopadhyay, B.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a validation of the SUNY satellite-to-irradiance model against four ground-truth stations from the Indian solar radiation network located in and around the province of Rajasthan, India. The SUNY model had initially been developed and tested to process US weather satellite data from the GOES series and has been used as part of the production of the US National Solar Resource Data Base (NSRDB). Here the model is applied to processes data from the European weather satellites Meteosat 5 and 7.

  10. Rationality Validation of a Layered Decision Model for Network Defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Huaqiang; Alves-Foss, James; Zhang, Du; Frincke, Deb

    2007-08-31

    We propose a cost-effective network defense strategy built on three key: three decision layers: security policies, defense strategies, and real-time defense tactics for countering immediate threats. A layered decision model (LDM) can be used to capture this decision process. The LDM helps decision-makers gain insight into the hierarchical relationships among inter-connected entities and decision types, and supports the selection of cost-effective defense mechanisms to safeguard computer networks. To be effective as a business tool, it is first necessary to validate the rationality of model before applying it to real-world business cases. This paper describes our efforts in validating the LDM rationality through simulation.

  11. Numerical modeling of the SNS H{sup ?} ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veitzer, Seth A.; Beckwith, Kristian R. C.; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Stoltz, Peter H.

    2015-04-08

    Ion source rf antennas that produce H- ions can fail when plasma heating causes ablation of the insulating coating due to small structural defects such as cracks. Reducing antenna failures that reduce the operating capabilities of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator is one of the top priorities of the SNS H- Source Program at ORNL. Numerical modeling of ion sources can provide techniques for optimizing design in order to reduce antenna failures. There are a number of difficulties in developing accurate models of rf inductive plasmas. First, a large range of spatial and temporal scales must be resolved in order to accurately capture the physics of plasma motion, including the Debye length, rf frequencies on the order of tens of MHz, simulation time scales of many hundreds of rf periods, large device sizes on tens of cm, and ion motions that are thousands of times slower than electrons. This results in large simulation domains with many computational cells for solving plasma and electromagnetic equations, short time steps, and long-duration simulations. In order to reduce the computational requirements, one can develop implicit models for both fields and particle motions (e.g. divergence-preserving ADI methods), various electrostatic models, or magnetohydrodynamic models. We have performed simulations using all three of these methods and have found that fluid models have the greatest potential for giving accurate solutions while still being fast enough to perform long timescale simulations in a reasonable amount of time. We have implemented a number of fluid models with electromagnetics using the simulation tool USim and applied them to modeling the SNS H- ion source. We found that a reduced, single-fluid MHD model with an imposed magnetic field due to the rf antenna current and the confining multi-cusp field generated increased bulk plasma velocities of > 200 m/s in the region of the antenna where ablation is often observed in the SNS source. We report

  12. NASPI Synchrophasor Technical Report Model Validation using Synchrophasors

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    North American SynchroPhasor Initiative Technical Report Model Validation Technical Workshop October 22, 2013 Technical Summary Context This technical material was developed in October, 2013 by members of the North American SynchroPhasor Initiative, a collaboration between the North American electric industry (utilities, grid operators, vendors and consultants), the North American Electric Reliability Corporation, academics, and the U.S. Department of Energy, to advance and accelerate the

  13. Numerical Modeling of Impact Initiation of High Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C J; Piggott, T; Yoh, J; Reaugh, J

    2006-05-31

    We performed continuum mechanics simulations to examine the behavior of energetic materials in Ballistic Chamber Impact (BIC) experiments, using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian code (ALE3D). Our simulations revealed that interface friction plays an important role in inducing the formation of shear bands, which result in 'hot spots' for ignition. The temperature localization during BIC impact was found to be significant in materials with high yield strength. In those materials, there are multiple locations inside shear bands can achieve temperatures exceeding the threshold temperature for reaction. In addition, we investigated the relevant parameters influencing the pressure profile of a BIC test by numerical analysis from a simple phenomenological model. To our surprise, we found that the peaks of BIC pressure profiles not only can be a result of multi-center chemical reactions, but can also arise from factors associated apparatus configuration.

  14. Validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model for uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupka, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.; Deutsch, W.J.

    1983-09-01

    As part of the Geochemical Modeling and Nuclide/Rock/Groundwater Interactions Studies Program, a study was conducted to partially validate the WATEQ4 aqueous speciation-solubility geochemical model for uranium. The solubility controls determined with the WATEQ4 geochemical model were in excellent agreement with those laboratory studies in which the solids schoepite (UO/sub 2/(OH)/sub 2/ . H/sub 2/O), UO/sub 2/(OH)/sub 2/, and rutherfordine ((UO/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) were identified as actual solubility controls for uranium. The results of modeling solution analyses from laboratory studies of uranyl phosphate solids, however, identified possible errors in the characterization of solids in the original solubility experiments. As part of this study, significant deficiencies in the WATEQ4 thermodynamic data base for uranium solutes and solids were corrected. Revisions included recalculation of selected uranium reactions. Additionally, thermodynamic data for the hydroxyl complexes of U(VI), including anionic (VI) species, were evaluated (to the extent permitted by the available data). Vanadium reactions were also added to the thermodynamic data base because uranium-vanadium solids can exist in natural ground-water systems. This study is only a partial validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model because the available laboratory solubility studies do not cover the range of solid phases, alkaline pH values, and concentrations of inorganic complexing ligands needed to evaluate the potential solubility of uranium in ground waters associated with various proposed nuclear waste repositories. Further validation of this or other geochemical models for uranium will require careful determinations of uraninite solubility over the pH range of 7 to 10 under highly reducing conditions and of uranyl hydroxide and phosphate solubilities over the pH range of 7 to 10 under oxygenated conditions.

  15. Validation of thermal models for a prototypical MEMS thermal actuator.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John Robert; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Gorby, Allen D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2008-09-01

    This report documents technical work performed to complete the ASC Level 2 Milestone 2841: validation of thermal models for a prototypical MEMS thermal actuator. This effort requires completion of the following task: the comparison between calculated and measured temperature profiles of a heated stationary microbeam in air. Such heated microbeams are prototypical structures in virtually all electrically driven microscale thermal actuators. This task is divided into four major subtasks. (1) Perform validation experiments on prototypical heated stationary microbeams in which material properties such as thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity are measured if not known and temperature profiles along the beams are measured as a function of electrical power and gas pressure. (2) Develop a noncontinuum gas-phase heat-transfer model for typical MEMS situations including effects such as temperature discontinuities at gas-solid interfaces across which heat is flowing, and incorporate this model into the ASC FEM heat-conduction code Calore to enable it to simulate these effects with good accuracy. (3) Develop a noncontinuum solid-phase heat transfer model for typical MEMS situations including an effective thermal conductivity that depends on device geometry and grain size, and incorporate this model into the FEM heat-conduction code Calore to enable it to simulate these effects with good accuracy. (4) Perform combined gas-solid heat-transfer simulations using Calore with these models for the experimentally investigated devices, and compare simulation and experimental temperature profiles to assess model accuracy. These subtasks have been completed successfully, thereby completing the milestone task. Model and experimental temperature profiles are found to be in reasonable agreement for all cases examined. Modest systematic differences appear to be related to uncertainties in the geometric dimensions of the test structures and in the thermal conductivity of the

  16. Numerical experiment to estimate the validity of negative ion diagnostic using photo-detachment combined with Langmuir probing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oudini, N.; Sirse, N.; Ellingboe, A. R.; Benallal, R.; Taccogna, F.; Bendib, A.

    2015-07-15

    This paper presents a critical assessment of the theory of photo-detachment diagnostic method used to probe the negative ion density and electronegativity α = n{sub -}/n{sub e}. In this method, a laser pulse is used to photo-detach all negative ions located within the electropositive channel (laser spot region). The negative ion density is estimated based on the assumption that the increase of the current collected by an electrostatic probe biased positively to the plasma is a result of only the creation of photo-detached electrons. In parallel, the background electron density and temperature are considered as constants during this diagnostics. While the numerical experiments performed here show that the background electron density and temperature increase due to the formation of an electrostatic potential barrier around the electropositive channel. The time scale of potential barrier rise is about 2 ns, which is comparable to the time required to completely photo-detach the negative ions in the electropositive channel (∼3 ns). We find that neglecting the effect of the potential barrier on the background plasma leads to an erroneous determination of the negative ion density. Moreover, the background electron velocity distribution function within the electropositive channel is not Maxwellian. This is due to the acceleration of these electrons through the electrostatic potential barrier. In this work, the validity of the photo-detachment diagnostic assumptions is questioned and our results illustrate the weakness of these assumptions.

  17. Development and validation of a two-dimensional fast-response flood estimation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judi, David R; Mcpherson, Timothy N; Burian, Steven J

    2009-01-01

    A finite difference formulation of the shallow water equations using an upwind differencing method was developed maintaining computational efficiency and accuracy such that it can be used as a fast-response flood estimation tool. The model was validated using both laboratory controlled experiments and an actual dam breach. Through the laboratory experiments, the model was shown to give good estimations of depth and velocity when compared to the measured data, as well as when compared to a more complex two-dimensional model. Additionally, the model was compared to high water mark data obtained from the failure of the Taum Sauk dam. The simulated inundation extent agreed well with the observed extent, with the most notable differences resulting from the inability to model sediment transport. The results of these validation studies complex two-dimensional model. Additionally, the model was compared to high water mark data obtained from the failure of the Taum Sauk dam. The simulated inundation extent agreed well with the observed extent, with the most notable differences resulting from the inability to model sediment transport. The results of these validation studies show that a relatively numerical scheme used to solve the complete shallow water equations can be used to accurately estimate flood inundation. Future work will focus on further reducing the computation time needed to provide flood inundation estimates for fast-response analyses. This will be accomplished through the efficient use of multi-core, multi-processor computers coupled with an efficient domain-tracking algorithm, as well as an understanding of the impacts of grid resolution on model results.

  18. Analytical thermal model validation for Cassini radioisotope thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, E.I.

    1997-12-31

    The Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft is designed to rely, without precedent, on the waste heat from its three radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) to warm the propulsion module subsystem, and the RTG end dome temperature is a key determining factor of the amount of waste heat delivered. A previously validated SINDA thermal model of the RTG was the sole guide to understanding its complex thermal behavior, but displayed large discrepancies against some initial thermal development test data. A careful revalidation effort led to significant modifications and adjustments of the model, which result in a doubling of the radiative heat transfer from the heat source support assemblies to the end domes and bring up the end dome and flange temperature predictions to within 2 C of the pertinent test data. The increased inboard end dome temperature has a considerable impact on thermal control of the spacecraft central body. The validation process offers an example of physically-driven analytical model calibration with test data from not only an electrical simulator but also a nuclear-fueled flight unit, and has established the end dome temperatures of a flight RTG where no in-flight or ground-test data existed before.

  19. Parameter Estimation and Model Validation of Nonlinear Dynamical Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abarbanel, Henry; Gill, Philip

    2015-03-31

    In the performance period of this work under a DOE contract, the co-PIs, Philip Gill and Henry Abarbanel, developed new methods for statistical data assimilation for problems of DOE interest, including geophysical and biological problems. This included numerical optimization algorithms for variational principles, new parallel processing Monte Carlo routines for performing the path integrals of statistical data assimilation. These results have been summarized in the monograph: “Predicting the Future: Completing Models of Observed Complex Systems” by Henry Abarbanel, published by Spring-Verlag in June 2013. Additional results and details have appeared in the peer reviewed literature.

  20. Validation of hydrogen gas stratification and mixing models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Hsingtzu; Zhao, Haihua

    2015-05-26

    Two validation benchmarks confirm that the BMIX++ code is capable of simulating unintended hydrogen release scenarios efficiently. The BMIX++ (UC Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) code has been developed to accurately and efficiently predict the fluid mixture distribution and heat transfer in large stratified enclosures for accident analyses and design optimizations. The BMIX++ code uses a scaling based one-dimensional method to achieve large reduction in computational effort compared to a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Two BMIX++ benchmark models have been developed. One is for a single buoyant jet in an open space and another is for amore » large sealed enclosure with both a jet source and a vent near the floor. Both of them have been validated by comparisons with experimental data. Excellent agreements are observed. The entrainment coefficients of 0.09 and 0.08 are found to fit the experimental data for hydrogen leaks with the Froude number of 99 and 268 best, respectively. In addition, the BIX++ simulation results of the average helium concentration for an enclosure with a vent and a single jet agree with the experimental data within a margin of about 10% for jet flow rates ranging from 1.21 × 10⁻⁴ to 3.29 × 10⁻⁴ m³/s. In conclusion, computing time for each BMIX++ model with a normal desktop computer is less than 5 min.« less

  1. Validation of hydrogen gas stratification and mixing models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Hsingtzu; Zhao, Haihua

    2015-11-01

    Two validation benchmarks confirm that the BMIX++ code is capable of simulating unintended hydrogen release scenarios efficiently. The BMIX++ (UC Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) code has been developed to accurately and efficiently predict the fluid mixture distribution and heat transfer in large stratified enclosures for accident analyses and design optimizations. The BMIX++ code uses a scaling based one-dimensional method to achieve large reduction in computational effort compared to a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Two BMIX++ benchmark models have been developed. One is for a single buoyant jet in an open space and another is for a large sealed enclosure with both a jet source and a vent near the floor. Both of them have been validated by comparisons with experimental data. Excellent agreements are observed. The entrainment coefficients of 0.09 and 0.08 are found to fit the experimental data for hydrogen leaks with the Froude number of 99 and 268 best, respectively. In addition, the BIX++ simulation results of the average helium concentration for an enclosure with a vent and a single jet agree with the experimental data within a margin of about 10% for jet flow rates ranging from 1.21 × 10⁻⁴ to 3.29 × 10⁻⁴ m³/s. Computing time for each BMIX++ model with a normal desktop computer is less than 5 min.

  2. Validation of hydrogen gas stratification and mixing models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Hsingtzu; Zhao, Haihua

    2015-05-26

    Two validation benchmarks confirm that the BMIX++ code is capable of simulating unintended hydrogen release scenarios efficiently. The BMIX++ (UC Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) code has been developed to accurately and efficiently predict the fluid mixture distribution and heat transfer in large stratified enclosures for accident analyses and design optimizations. The BMIX++ code uses a scaling based one-dimensional method to achieve large reduction in computational effort compared to a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Two BMIX++ benchmark models have been developed. One is for a single buoyant jet in an open space and another is for a large sealed enclosure with both a jet source and a vent near the floor. Both of them have been validated by comparisons with experimental data. Excellent agreements are observed. The entrainment coefficients of 0.09 and 0.08 are found to fit the experimental data for hydrogen leaks with the Froude number of 99 and 268 best, respectively. In addition, the BIX++ simulation results of the average helium concentration for an enclosure with a vent and a single jet agree with the experimental data within a margin of about 10% for jet flow rates ranging from 1.21 × 10⁻⁴ to 3.29 × 10⁻⁴ m³/s. In conclusion, computing time for each BMIX++ model with a normal desktop computer is less than 5 min.

  3. ADOPT: A Historically Validated Light Duty Vehicle Consumer Choice Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooker, A.; Gonder, J.; Lopp, S.; Ward, J.

    2015-05-04

    The Automotive Deployment Option Projection Tool (ADOPT) is a light-duty vehicle consumer choice and stock model supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office. It estimates technology improvement impacts on U.S. light-duty vehicles sales, petroleum use, and greenhouse gas emissions. ADOPT uses techniques from the multinomial logit method and the mixed logit method estimate sales. Specifically, it estimates sales based on the weighted value of key attributes including vehicle price, fuel cost, acceleration, range and usable volume. The average importance of several attributes changes nonlinearly across its range and changes with income. For several attributes, a distribution of importance around the average value is used to represent consumer heterogeneity. The majority of existing vehicle makes, models, and trims are included to fully represent the market. The Corporate Average Fuel Economy regulations are enforced. The sales feed into the ADOPT stock model. It captures key aspects for summing petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions This includes capturing the change in vehicle miles traveled by vehicle age, the creation of new model options based on the success of existing vehicles, new vehicle option introduction rate limits, and survival rates by vehicle age. ADOPT has been extensively validated with historical sales data. It matches in key dimensions including sales by fuel economy, acceleration, price, vehicle size class, and powertrain across multiple years. A graphical user interface provides easy and efficient use. It manages the inputs, simulation, and results.

  4. An approach to model validation and model-based prediction -- polyurethane foam case study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowding, Kevin J.; Rutherford, Brian Milne

    2003-07-01

    Enhanced software methodology and improved computing hardware have advanced the state of simulation technology to a point where large physics-based codes can be a major contributor in many systems analyses. This shift toward the use of computational methods has brought with it new research challenges in a number of areas including characterization of uncertainty, model validation, and the analysis of computer output. It is these challenges that have motivated the work described in this report. Approaches to and methods for model validation and (model-based) prediction have been developed recently in the engineering, mathematics and statistical literatures. In this report we have provided a fairly detailed account of one approach to model validation and prediction applied to an analysis investigating thermal decomposition of polyurethane foam. A model simulates the evolution of the foam in a high temperature environment as it transforms from a solid to a gas phase. The available modeling and experimental results serve as data for a case study focusing our model validation and prediction developmental efforts on this specific thermal application. We discuss several elements of the ''philosophy'' behind the validation and prediction approach: (1) We view the validation process as an activity applying to the use of a specific computational model for a specific application. We do acknowledge, however, that an important part of the overall development of a computational simulation initiative is the feedback provided to model developers and analysts associated with the application. (2) We utilize information obtained for the calibration of model parameters to estimate the parameters and quantify uncertainty in the estimates. We rely, however, on validation data (or data from similar analyses) to measure the variability that contributes to the uncertainty in predictions for specific systems or units (unit-to-unit variability). (3) We perform statistical analyses and

  5. Documentation of Hybrid Hydride Model for Incorporation into Moose-Bison and Validation Strategy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weck, Philippe F; Tikare, Veena; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Clark, B; Mitchell, J; Glazoff, Michael V.; Homer, Eric R.

    2014-10-01

    This report documents the development, demonstration and validation of a mesoscale, microstructural evolution model for simulation of zirconium hydride δ-ZrH{sub 1.5} precipitation in the cladding of used nuclear fuels that may occur during long-term dry storage. While the Zr-based claddings are manufactured free of any hydrogen, they absorb hydrogen during service, in the reactor by a process commonly termed ‘hydrogen pick-up’. The precipitation and growth of zirconium hydrides during dry storage is one of the most likely fuel rod integrity failure mechanisms either by embrittlement or delayed hydride cracking of the cladding (Hanson et al., 2011). While the phenomenon is well documented and identified as a potential key failure mechanism during long-term dry storage (Birk et al., 2012 and NUREG/CR-7116), the ability to actually predict the formation of hydrides is poor. The model being documented in this work is a computational capability for the prediction of hydride formation in different claddings of used nuclear fuels. This work supports the Used Fuel Disposition Research and Development Campaign in assessing the structural engineering performance of the cladding during and after long-term dry storage. In this work, a model to numerically simulate hydride precipitation at the microstructural scale, in a wide variety of Zr-based claddings, under dry-storage conditions is being developed. It will be used to aid in the evaluation of the mechanical integrity of used fuel rods during dry storage and transportation by providing the structural conditions from the microstructural scale to the continuum scale to engineering component scale models to predict if the used fuel rods will perform without failure under normal and off-normal conditions. The microstructure, especially, the hydride structure is thought to be a primary determinant of cladding failure, thus this component of UFD’s storage and transportation analysis program is critical. The model

  6. Alaska North Slope Tundra Travel Model and Validation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry R. Bader; Jacynthe Guimond

    2006-03-01

    of variability in snow depth cover throughout the period of field experimentation. The amount of change in disturbance indicators was greater in the tundra communities of the Foothills than in those of the Coastal Plain. However the overall level of change in both community types was less than expected. In Coastal Plain communities, ground hardness and snow slab thickness were found to play an important role in change in active layer depth and soil moisture as a result of treatment. In the Foothills communities, snow cover had the most influence on active layer depth and soil moisture as a result of treatment. Once certain minimum thresholds for ground hardness, snow slab thickness, and snow depth were attained, it appeared that little or no additive effect was realized regarding increased resistance to disturbance in the tundra communities studied. DNR used the results of this modeling project to set a standard for maximum permissible disturbance of cross-country tundra travel, with the threshold set below the widely accepted standard of Low Disturbance levels (as determined by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service). DNR followed the modeling project with a validation study, which seemed to support the field trial conclusions and indicated that the standard set for maximum permissible disturbance exhibits a conservative bias in favor of environmental protection. Finally DNR established a quick and efficient tool for visual estimations of disturbance to determine when investment in field measurements is warranted. This Visual Assessment System (VAS) seemed to support the plot disturbance measurements taking during the modeling and validation phases of this project.

  7. Numerical modeling of self-limiting and self-enhancing caprock...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    modeling of self-limiting and self-enhancing caprock alteration induced by CO2 storage in a depleted gas reservoir Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical modeling of ...

  8. Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    velocity structure have been estimated. It is suggested that the identification and modeling of guided waves is an effective tool to locate fracture-induced, low-velocity...

  9. Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (2010) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    model was developed using Poly3D to simulate the distribution and magnitude of stress concentration in the vicinity of the borehole floor, and determine the conditions...

  10. Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    transport and exchange analysis Notes Finite element models of single-phase, variable-density fluid flow, conductive- convective heat transfer, fluid-rock isotope exchange, and...

  11. Numerical modeling of aerial bursts and ablation melting of Libyan...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 58 GEOSCIENCES; ABLATION; DESERTS; GLASS; MELTING; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; LIBYAN ARAB ...

  12. TEG On-Vehicle Performance & Model Validation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TEG On-Vehicle Performance & Model Validation TEG On-Vehicle Performance & Model Validation Details efforts and results of steady-state and transient models validated with bench, engine dynamometer, and on-vehicle tests to measure actual performance deer12_lagrandeur.pdf (1.93 MB) More Documents & Publications Thermoelectric Generator Performance for Passenger Vehicles Combustion Exhaust Gas Heat to Power Using Thermoelectric Engines Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for

  13. A Workflow for Parameter Calibration and and Model Validation in SST: Interim Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pebay, Philippe Pierre; Wilke, Jeremiah J; Sargsyan, Khachik

    2014-12-01

    This brief report explains the method used for parameter calibration and model validation in SST/Macro and the set of tools and workflow developed for this purpose.

  14. Numerically Solvable Model for Resonant Collisions of Electronswith Diatomic Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houfek, Karel; Rescigno, T.N.; McCurdy, C.W.

    2006-01-27

    We describe a simple model for electron-molecule collisions that has one nuclear and one electronic degree of freedom and that can be solved to arbitrarily high precision, without making the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, by employing a combination of the exterior complex scaling method and a finite-element implementation of the discrete variable representation. We compare exact cross sections for vibrational excitation and dissociative attachment with results obtained using the local complex potential approximation as commonly applied in the ''boomerang'' model, and suggest how this two-dimensional model can be used to test the underpinnings of contemporary nonlocal approximations to resonant collisions.

  15. Numerical Modeling of the Nucleation Conditions of Petal-Centerline...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    model using Poly3D has been developed to investigate the conditions in which the stress concentration below the floor of a borehole can cause tensile stress necessary to...

  16. Numerical Modeling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Benoit, 1999...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    large geothermal flow test was performed where there was 6 geothermal wells flowing at once and 8 idle wells being monitored. The conceptual model developed from this flow test...

  17. Advances in the numerical modeling of field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belova, Elena V.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Ji, Hantao; Yamada, Masaaki

    2006-05-15

    The field-reversed configuration (FRC) is a compact torus with little or no toroidal magnetic field. A theoretical understanding of the observed FRC equilibrium and stability properties presents significant challenges due to the high plasma beta, plasma flows, large ion gyroradius, and the stochasticity of the particle orbits. Advanced numerical simulations are generally required to describe and understand the detailed behavior of FRC plasmas. Results of such simulations are presented in this paper. It is shown that 3D nonlinear hybrid simulations using the HYM code [E. V. Belova et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4996 (2000)] reproduce all major experimentally observed stability properties of elongated (theta-pinch-formed) FRCs. Namely, the scaling of the growth rate of the n=1 tilt mode with the S*/E parameter (S* is the FRC kinetic parameter, E is elongation, and n is toroidal mode number), the nonlinear saturation of the tilt mode, ion toroidal spin-up, and the growth of the n=2 rotational mode have been demonstrated and studied in detail. The HYM code has also been used to study stability properties of FRCs formed by the counterhelicity spheromak merging method. A new stability regime has been found for FRCs with elongation E{approx}1, which requires a close-fitting conducting shell and energetic beam ion stabilization.

  18. Numerical modeling of an all vanadium redox flow battery.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clausen, Jonathan R.; Brunini, Victor E.; Moffat, Harry K.; Martinez, Mario J.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a capability to simulate reduction-oxidation (redox) flow batteries in the Sierra Multi-Mechanics code base. Specifically, we focus on all-vanadium redox flow batteries; however, the capability is general in implementation and could be adopted to other chemistries. The electrochemical and porous flow models follow those developed in the recent publication by [28]. We review the model implemented in this work and its assumptions, and we show several verification cases including a binary electrolyte, and a battery half-cell. Then, we compare our model implementation with the experimental results shown in [28], with good agreement seen. Next, a sensitivity study is conducted for the major model parameters, which is beneficial in targeting specific features of the redox flow cell for improvement. Lastly, we simulate a three-dimensional version of the flow cell to determine the impact of plenum channels on the performance of the cell. Such channels are frequently seen in experimental designs where the current collector plates are borrowed from fuel cell designs. These designs use a serpentine channel etched into a solid collector plate.

  19. Numerical simulations of altocumulus with a cloud resolving model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, S.; Krueger, S.K.

    1996-04-01

    Altocumulus and altostratus clouds together cover approximately 22% of the earth`s surface. They play an important role in the earth`s energy budget through their effect on solar and infrared radiation. However, there has been little altocumulus cloud investigation by either modelers or observational programs. Starr and Cox (SC) (1985a,b) simulated an altostratus case as part of the same study in which they modeled a thin layer of cirrus. Although this calculation was originally described as representing altostratus, it probably better represents altocumulus stratiformis. In this paper, we simulate altocumulus cloud with a cloud resolving model (CRM). We simply describe the CRM first. We calculate the same middle-level cloud case as SC to compare our results with theirs. We will look at the role of cloud-scale processes in response to large-scale forcing. We will also discuss radiative effects by simulating diurnal and nocturnal cases. Finally, we discuss the utility of a 1D model by comparing 1D simulations and 2D simulations.

  20. Joint physical and numerical modeling of water distribution networks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, Adam; O'Hern, Timothy John; Orear, Leslie Jr.; Kajder, Karen C.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Cappelle, Malynda A.; Khalsa, Siri Sahib; Wright, Jerome L.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Chwirka, J. Benjamin; Hartenberger, Joel David; McKenna, Sean Andrew; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and modeling effort undertaken to understand solute mixing in a water distribution network conducted during the last year of a 3-year project. The experimental effort involves measurement of extent of mixing within different configurations of pipe networks, measurement of dynamic mixing in a single mixing tank, and measurement of dynamic solute mixing in a combined network-tank configuration. High resolution analysis of turbulence mixing is carried out via high speed photography as well as 3D finite-volume based Large Eddy Simulation turbulence models. Macroscopic mixing rules based on flow momentum balance are also explored, and in some cases, implemented in EPANET. A new version EPANET code was developed to yield better mixing predictions. The impact of a storage tank on pipe mixing in a combined pipe-tank network during diurnal fill-and-drain cycles is assessed. Preliminary comparison between dynamic pilot data and EPANET-BAM is also reported.

  1. Numerical approaches to combustion modeling. Progress in Astronautics and Aeronautics. Vol. 135

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oran, E.S.; Boris, J.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Various papers on numerical approaches to combustion modeling are presented. The topics addressed include; ab initio quantum chemistry for combustion; rate coefficient calculations for combustion modeling; numerical modeling of combustion of complex hydrocarbons; combustion kinetics and sensitivity analysis computations; reduction of chemical reaction models; length scales in laminar and turbulent flames; numerical modeling of laminar diffusion flames; laminar flames in premixed gases; spectral simulations of turbulent reacting flows; vortex simulation of reacting shear flow; combustion modeling using PDF methods. Also considered are: supersonic reacting internal flow fields; studies of detonation initiation, propagation, and quenching; numerical modeling of heterogeneous detonations, deflagration-to-detonation transition to reactive granular materials; toward a microscopic theory of detonations in energetic crystals; overview of spray modeling; liquid drop behavior in dense and dilute clusters; spray combustion in idealized configurations: parallel drop streams; comparisons of deterministic and stochastic computations of drop collisions in dense sprays; ignition and flame spread across solid fuels; numerical study of pulse combustor dynamics; mathematical modeling of enclosure fires; nuclear systems.

  2. Development and validation of instantaneous risk model in nuclear power plant's risk monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.; Li, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, J.; Hu, L.

    2012-07-01

    The instantaneous risk model is the fundament of calculation and analysis in a risk monitor. This study focused on the development and validation of an instantaneous risk model. Therefore the principles converting from the baseline risk model to the instantaneous risk model were studied and separated trains' failure modes modeling method was developed. The development and validation process in an operating nuclear power plant's risk monitor were also introduced. Correctness of instantaneous risk model and rationality of converting method were demonstrated by comparison with the result of baseline risk model. (authors)

  3. Demonstrating and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Efficient, Low Emissions Diesel Engines | Department of Energy and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller for Fuel Efficient, Low Emissions Diesel Engines Demonstrating and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller for Fuel Efficient, Low Emissions Diesel Engines Fully model-based, practically-mapless engine control concept is viable deer09_allain.pdf (625.73 KB) More Documents & Publications Increased Engine Efficiency via Advancements in Engine Combustion

  4. Implementation and Validation of the BHR Turbulence Model in the FLAG

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hydrocode (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Implementation and Validation of the BHR Turbulence Model in the FLAG Hydrocode Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Implementation and Validation of the BHR Turbulence Model in the FLAG Hydrocode The BHR-2 turbulence model, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for variable density and compressible flows, is implemented in an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian hydrocode, FLAG. The BHR-2 formulation is discussed, with

  5. ARRAY OPTIMIZATION FOR TIDAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN A TIDAL CHANNEL A NUMERICAL MODELING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea

    2014-04-18

    This paper presents an application of a hydrodynamic model to simulate tidal energy extraction in a tidal dominated estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast. A series of numerical experiments were carried out to simulate tidal energy extraction with different turbine array configurations, including location, spacing and array size. Preliminary model results suggest that array optimization for tidal energy extraction in a real-world site is a very complex process that requires consideration of multiple factors. Numerical models can be used effectively to assist turbine siting and array arrangement in a tidal turbine farm for tidal energy extraction.

  6. Demonstrating and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Model-Based Controller for Fuel Efficient, Low Emissions Diesel Engines Fully model-based, practically-mapless engine control concept is viable PDF icon deer09allain.pdf...

  7. A numerical investigation of transonic axial compressor rotor flow using a low-Reynolds-number {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arima, T.; Sonoda, T.; Shirotori, M.; Tamura, A.; Kikuchi, K.

    1999-01-01

    The authors have developed a computer simulation code for three-dimensional viscous flow in turbomachinery based on the time-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes equations and a low-Reynolds-number {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model. It is described in detail in this paper. The code is used to compute the flow fields for two types of rotor (a transonic fan NASA Rotor 67 and a transonic axial compressor NASA rotor 37), and numerical results are compared to experimental data based on aerodynamic probe and laser anemometer measurements. In the case of Rotor 67, calculated and experimental results are compared under the design speed to validate the code. The calculated results show good agreement with the experimental data, such as the rotor performance map and the spanwise distribution of total pressure, total temperature, and flow angle downstream of the rotor. In the case of Rotor 37, detailed comparisons between the numerical results and the experimental data are made under the design speed condition to assess the overall quality of the numerical solution. Furthermore, comparisons under the part-speed condition are used to investigate a flow field without passage shock. The results are well predicted qualitatively. However, considerable quantitative discrepancies remain in predicting the flow near the tip. In order to assess the predictive capabilities of the developed code, computed flow structures are presented with the experimental data for each rotor and the cause of the discrepancies is discussed.

  8. Campus Energy Model for Control and Performance Validation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-09-19

    The core of the modeling platform is an extensible block library for the MATLAB/Simulink software suite. The platform enables true co-simulation (interaction at each simulation time step) with NREL's state-of-the-art modeling tools and other energy modeling software.

  9. Large Eddy Simulation Modeling of Flashback and Flame Stabilization in Hydrogen-Rich Gas Turbines Using a Hierarchical Validation Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clemens, Noel

    2015-09-30

    This project was a combined computational and experimental effort to improve predictive capability for boundary layer flashback of premixed swirl flames relevant to gas-turbine power plants operating with high-hydrogen-content fuels. During the course of this project, significant progress in modeling was made on four major fronts: 1) use of direct numerical simulation of turbulent flames to understand the coupling between the flame and the turbulent boundary layer; 2) improved modeling capability for flame propagation in stratified pre-mixtures; 3) improved portability of computer codes using the OpenFOAM platform to facilitate transfer to industry and other researchers; and 4) application of LES to flashback in swirl combustors, and a detailed assessment of its capabilities and limitations for predictive purposes. A major component of the project was an experimental program that focused on developing a rich experimental database of boundary layer flashback in swirl flames. Both methane and high-hydrogen fuels, including effects of elevated pressure (1 to 5 atm), were explored. For this project, a new model swirl combustor was developed. Kilohertz-rate stereoscopic PIV and chemiluminescence imaging were used to investigate the flame propagation dynamics. In addition to the planar measurements, a technique capable of detecting the instantaneous, time-resolved 3D flame front topography was developed and applied successfully to investigate the flow-flame interaction. The UT measurements and legacy data were used in a hierarchical validation approach where flows with increasingly complex physics were used for validation. First component models were validated with DNS and literature data in simplified configurations, and this was followed by validation with the UT 1-atm flashback cases, and then the UT high-pressure flashback cases. The new models and portable code represent a major improvement over what was available before this project was initiated.

  10. Implementation and Validation of the BHR Turbulence Model in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Turbulence is an often studied and ubiquitous phenomenon in nature, and modeling its effects is essential in many practical applications. Specifically the behavior of turbulence in ...

  11. SPR Hydrostatic Column Model Verification and Validation. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A Hydrostatic Column Model (HCM) was developed to help differentiate between normal "tight" well behavior and small-leak behavior under nitrogen for testing the pressure integrity ...

  12. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Near-shore Wave Fields: Model Generation Validation and Evaluation - Kaneohe Bay HI.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    The numerical model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) , was used to simulate wave conditions in Kaneohe Bay, HI in order to determine the effects of wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices on the propagation of waves into shore. A nested SWAN model was validated then used to evaluate a range of initial wave conditions: significant wave heights (H s ) , peak periods (T p ) , and mean wave directions ( MWD) . Differences between wave height s in the presence and absence of WEC device s were assessed at locations in shore of the WEC array. The maximum decrease in wave height due to the WEC s was predicted to be approximately 6% at 5 m and 10 m water depths. Th is occurred for model initiation parameters of H s = 3 m (for 5 m water depth) or 4 m (10 m water depth) , T p = 10 s, and MWD = 330deg . Subsequently, bottom orbital velocities were found to decrease by about 6%.

  13. Climatically Diverse Data Set for Flat-Plate PV Module Model Validations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marion, B.

    2013-05-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) module I-V curves were measured at Florida, Colorado, and Oregon locations to provide data for the validation and development of models used for predicting the performance of PV modules.

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about validation of material models...

  15. Documentation of Hybrid Hydride Model for Incorporation into Moose-Bison and Validation Strategy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report documents the development, demonstration and validation of a mesoscale, microstructural evolution model for simulation of zirconium hydride d-ZrH1.5 precipitation in the cladding of...

  16. Spatial Statistical Procedures to Validate Input Data in Energy Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johannesson, G.; Stewart, J.; Barr, C.; Brady Sabeff, L.; George, R.; Heimiller, D.; Milbrandt, A.

    2006-01-01

    Energy modeling and analysis often relies on data collected for other purposes such as census counts, atmospheric and air quality observations, economic trends, and other primarily non-energy related uses. Systematic collection of empirical data solely for regional, national, and global energy modeling has not been established as in the abovementioned fields. Empirical and modeled data relevant to energy modeling is reported and available at various spatial and temporal scales that might or might not be those needed and used by the energy modeling community. The incorrect representation of spatial and temporal components of these data sets can result in energy models producing misleading conclusions, especially in cases of newly evolving technologies with spatial and temporal operating characteristics different from the dominant fossil and nuclear technologies that powered the energy economy over the last two hundred years. Increased private and government research and development and public interest in alternative technologies that have a benign effect on the climate and the environment have spurred interest in wind, solar, hydrogen, and other alternative energy sources and energy carriers. Many of these technologies require much finer spatial and temporal detail to determine optimal engineering designs, resource availability, and market potential. This paper presents exploratory and modeling techniques in spatial statistics that can improve the usefulness of empirical and modeled data sets that do not initially meet the spatial and/or temporal requirements of energy models. In particular, we focus on (1) aggregation and disaggregation of spatial data, (2) predicting missing data, and (3) merging spatial data sets. In addition, we introduce relevant statistical software models commonly used in the field for various sizes and types of data sets.

  17. Design, Modeling, and Validation of a Flame Reformer for LNT External

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bypass Regeneration | Department of Energy Design, Modeling, and Validation of a Flame Reformer for LNT External Bypass Regeneration Design, Modeling, and Validation of a Flame Reformer for LNT External Bypass Regeneration 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_midlam-mohler.pdf (432.95 KB) More Documents & Publications Eaton Aftertreatment System (EAS) for On-Highway Diesel Engines Diesel Reformers for On-board Hydrogen Applications

  18. 70 MPa Fast-Fill Modeling and Validation Experiments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    70 MPa Fast-Fill Modeling and Validation Experiments 70 MPa Fast-Fill Modeling and Validation Experiments These slides were presented at the Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on April 29, 2010. mpafastfill_modelingexperiments_ostw.pdf (1.78 MB) More Documents & Publications Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview: 2012 IEA HIA Hydrogen Safety Stakeholder Workshop Bonfire Tests of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tanks International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Proceedings

  19. Modeling and numerical simulation of oscillatory two-phase flows, with application to boiling water nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosa, M.P.; Podowski, M.Z.

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the analysis of dynamics and stability of boiling channels and systems. The specific objectives are two-fold. One of them is to present the results of a study aimed at analyzing the effects of various modeling concepts and numerical approaches on the transient response and stability of parallel boiling channels. The other objective is to investigate the effect of closed-loop feedback on stability of a boiling water reactor (BWR). Various modeling and computational issues for parallel boiling channels are discussed, such as: the impact of the numerical discretization scheme for the node containing the moving boiling boundary on the convergence and accuracy of computations, and the effects of subcooled boiling and other two-phase flow phenomena on the predictions of marginal stability conditions. Furthermore, the effects are analyzed of local loss coefficients around the recirculation loop of a boiling water reactor on stability of the reactor system. An apparent paradox is explained concerning the impact of changing single-phase losses on loop stability. The calculations have been performed using the DYNOBOSS computer code. The results of DYNOBOSS validation against other computer codes and experimental data are shown.

  20. Proceedings of the Numerical Modeling for Underground Nuclear Test Monitoring Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, S.R.; Kamm, J.R.

    1993-11-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the state-of-the-art in numerical simulations of nuclear explosion phenomenology with applications to test ban monitoring. We focused on the uniqueness of model fits to data, the measurement and characterization of material response models, advanced modeling techniques, and applications of modeling to monitoring problems. The second goal of the symposium was to establish a dialogue between seismologists and explosion-source code calculators. The meeting was divided into five main sessions: explosion source phenomenology, material response modeling, numerical simulations, the seismic source, and phenomenology from near source to far field. We feel the symposium reached many of its goals. Individual papers submitted at the conference are indexed separately on the data base.

  1. Foundation Heat Exchanger Final Report: Demonstration, Measured Performance, and Validated Model and Design Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Patrick; Im, Piljae

    2012-04-01

    , 50% of which was construction excavation. There are six pipes in all excavations (three parallel circuits - out and back), and the multiple instances of FHX and/or HGHX are all connected in series. The working fluid is 20% by weight propylene glycol in water. Model and design tool development was undertaken in parallel with constructing the houses, installing instrumentation, and monitoring performance for a year. Several detailed numerical models for FHX were developed as part of the project. Essentially the project team was searching for an energy performance model accurate enough to achieve project objectives while also having sufficient computational efficiency for practical use in EnergyPlus. A 3-dimensional, dual-coordinate-system, finite-volume model satisfied these criteria and was included in the October 2011 EnergyPlus Version 7 public release after being validated against measured data.

  2. Radiation Background and Attenuation Model Validation and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peplow, Douglas E.; Santiago, Claudio P.

    2015-08-05

    This report describes the initial results of a study being conducted as part of the Urban Search Planning Tool project. The study is comparing the Urban Scene Simulator (USS), a one-dimensional (1D) radiation transport model developed at LLNL, with the three-dimensional (3D) radiation transport model from ORNL using the MCNP, SCALE/ORIGEN and SCALE/MAVRIC simulation codes. In this study, we have analyzed the differences between the two approaches at every step, from source term representation, to estimating flux and detector count rates at a fixed distance from a simple surface (slab), and at points throughout more complex 3D scenes.

  3. Numerical simulations used for a validity check on the laser induced photo-detachment diagnostic method in electronegative plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oudini, N.; Taccogna, F.; Aanesland, A.

    2014-06-15

    Laser photo-detachment is used as a method to measure or determine the negative ion density and temperature in electronegative plasmas. In essence, the method consists of producing an electropositive channel (negative ion free region) via pulsed laser photo-detachment within an electronegative plasma bulk. Electrostatic probes placed in this channel measure the change in the electron density. A second pulse might be used to track the negative ion recovery. From this, the negative ion density and temperature can be determined. We study the formation and relaxation of the electropositive channel via a two-dimensional Particle-In-Cell/Mote Carlo collision model. The simulation is mainly carried out in a Hydrogen plasma with an electronegativity of α = 1, with a parametric study for α up to 20. The temporal and spatial evolution of the plasma potential and the electron densities shows the formation of a double layer (DL) confining the photo-detached electrons within the electropositive channel. This DL evolves into two fronts that move in the opposite directions inside and outside of the laser spot region. As a consequence, within the laser spot region, the background and photo-detached electron energy distribution function relaxes/thermalizes via collisionless effects such as Fermi acceleration and Landau damping. Moreover, the simulations show that collisional effects and the DL electric field strength might play a non-negligible role in the negative ion recovery within the laser spot region, leading to a two-temperature negative ion distribution. The latter result might have important effects in the determination of the negative ion density and temperature from laser photo detachment diagnostic.

  4. Vibration Model Validation for Linear Collider Detector Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertsche, Kirk; Amann, J.W.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Oriunno, M.; Weidemann, A.; White, G.; /SLAC

    2012-05-16

    The ILC and CLIC reference designs incorporate reinforced-concrete platforms underneath the detectors so that the two detectors can each be moved onto and off of the beamline in a Push-Pull configuration. These platforms could potentially amplify ground vibrations, which would reduce luminosity. In this paper we compare vibration models to experimental data on reinforced concrete structures, estimate the impact on luminosity, and summarize implications for the design of a reinforced concrete platform for the ILC or CLIC detectors.

  5. Microbial dormancy improves development and experimental validation of ecosystem model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Gangsheng; Jagadamma, Sindhu; Mayes, Melanie; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Steinweg, Jessica M; Gu, Lianhong; Post, Wilfred M

    2015-01-01

    Climate feedbacks from soils can result from environmental change followed by response of plant and microbial communities, and/or associated changes in nutrient cycling. Explicit consideration of microbial life history traits and functions may be necessary to predict climate feedbacks due to changes in the physiology and community composition of microbes and their associated effect on carbon cycling. Here, we enhanced the Microbial-Enzyme-mediated Decomposition (MEND) model by incorporating microbial dormancy and the ability to track multiple isotopes of carbon. We tested two versions of MEND, i.e., MEND with dormancy and MEND without dormancy, against long-term (270 d) lab incubations of four soils with isotopically-labeled substrates. MEND without dormancy adequately fitted multiple observations (total and 14C respiration, and dissolved organic carbon), but at the cost of significantly underestimating the total microbial biomass. The MEND with dormancy improved estimates of microbial biomass by 20 71% over the MEND without dormancy. We observed large differences for two fitted model parameters, the specific maintenance and growth rates for active microbes, depending on whether dormancy was considered. Together our model extrapolations of the incubation study show that long-term soil incubations with observations in multiple carbon pools are necessary to estimate both decomposition and microbial parameters. These efforts should provide essential support to future field- and global-scale simulations and enable more confident predictions of feedbacks between environmental change and carbon cycling.

  6. Microbial dormancy improves development and experimental validation of ecosystem model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Gangsheng; Jagadamma, Sindhu; Mayes, Melanie; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Steinweg, Jessica M.; Gu, Lianhong; Post, Wilfred M.

    2014-07-11

    Climate feedbacks from soils can result from environmental change followed by response of plant and microbial communities, and/or associated changes in nutrient cycling. Explicit consideration of microbial life history traits and functions may be necessary to predict climate feedbacks due to changes in the physiology and community composition of microbes and their associated effect on carbon cycling. Here, we enhanced the Microbial-Enzyme-mediated Decomposition (MEND) model by incorporating microbial dormancy and the ability to track multiple isotopes of carbon. We tested two versions of MEND, i.e., MEND with dormancy and MEND without dormancy, against long-term (270 d) lab incubations of fourmore » soils with isotopically-labeled substrates. MEND without dormancy adequately fitted multiple observations (total and 14C respiration, and dissolved organic carbon), but at the cost of significantly underestimating the total microbial biomass. The MEND with dormancy improved estimates of microbial biomass by 20 71% over the MEND without dormancy. We observed large differences for two fitted model parameters, the specific maintenance and growth rates for active microbes, depending on whether dormancy was considered. Together our model extrapolations of the incubation study show that long-term soil incubations with observations in multiple carbon pools are necessary to estimate both decomposition and microbial parameters. These efforts should provide essential support to future field- and global-scale simulations and enable more confident predictions of feedbacks between environmental change and carbon cycling.« less

  7. Global and Regional Ecosystem Modeling: Databases of Model Drivers and Validation Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, R.J.

    2002-03-19

    Understanding global-scale ecosystem responses to changing environmental conditions is important both as a scientific question and as the basis for making policy decisions. The confidence in regional models depends on how well the field data used to develop the model represent the region of interest, how well the environmental model driving variables (e.g., vegetation type, climate, and soils associated with a site used to parameterize ecosystem models) represent the region of interest, and how well regional model predictions agree with observed data for the region. To assess the accuracy of global model forecasts of terrestrial carbon cycling, two Ecosystem Model-Data Intercomparison (EMDI) workshops were held (December 1999 and April 2001). The workshops included 17 biogeochemical, satellite-driven, detailed process, and dynamic vegetation global model types. The approach was to run regional or global versions of the models for sites with net primary productivity (NPP) measurements (i.e., not fine-tuned for specific site conditions) and analyze the model-data differences. Extensive worldwide NPP data were assembled with model driver data, including vegetation, climate, and soils data, to perform the intercomparison. This report describes the compilation of NPP estimates for 2,523 sites and 5,164 0.5{sup o}-grid cells under the Global Primary Production Data Initiative (GPPDI) and the results of the EMDI review and outlier analysis that produced a refined set of NPP estimates and model driver data. The EMDI process resulted in 81 Class A sites, 933 Class B sites, and 3,855 Class C cells derived from the original synthesis of NPP measurements and associated driver data. Class A sites represent well-documented study sites that have complete aboveground and below ground NPP measurements. Class B sites represent more numerous ''extensive'' sites with less documentation and site-specific information available. Class C cells represent estimates of NPP for 0.5{sup o

  8. 2013 CEF RUN - PHASE 1 DATA ANALYSIS AND MODEL VALIDATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, A.

    2014-05-08

    Phase 1 of the 2013 Cold cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF) test was completed on June 3, 2013 after a 5-day round-the-clock feeding and pouring operation. The main goal of the test was to characterize the CEF off-gas produced from a nitric-formic acid flowsheet feed and confirm whether the CEF platform is capable of producing scalable off-gas data necessary for the revision of the DWPF melter off-gas flammability model; the revised model will be used to define new safety controls on the key operating parameters for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet feeds including total organic carbon (TOC). Whether the CEF off-gas data were scalable for the purpose of predicting the potential flammability of the DWPF melter exhaust was determined by comparing the predicted H{sub 2} and CO concentrations using the current DWPF melter off-gas flammability model to those measured during Phase 1; data were deemed scalable if the calculated fractional conversions of TOC-to-H{sub 2} and TOC-to-CO at varying melter vapor space temperatures were found to trend and further bound the respective measured data with some margin of safety. Being scalable thus means that for a given feed chemistry the instantaneous flow rates of H{sub 2} and CO in the DWPF melter exhaust can be estimated with some degree of conservatism by multiplying those of the respective gases from a pilot-scale melter by the feed rate ratio. This report documents the results of the Phase 1 data analysis and the necessary calculations performed to determine the scalability of the CEF off-gas data. A total of six steady state runs were made during Phase 1 under non-bubbled conditions by varying the CEF vapor space temperature from near 700 to below 300C, as measured in a thermowell (T{sub tw}). At each steady state temperature, the off-gas composition was monitored continuously for two hours using MS, GC, and FTIR in order to track mainly H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and organic gases such as CH{sub 4}. The standard

  9. On Improving Analytical Models of Cosmic Reionization for Matching Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaurov, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    The methods for studying the epoch of cosmic reionization vary from full radiative transfer simulations to purely analytical models. While numerical approaches are computationally expensive and are not suitable for generating many mock catalogs, analytical methods are based on assumptions and approximations. We explore the interconnection between both methods. First, we ask how the analytical framework of excursion set formalism can be used for statistical analysis of numerical simulations and visual representation of the morphology of ionization fronts. Second, we explore the methods of training the analytical model on a given numerical simulation. We present a new code which emerged from this study. Its main application is to match the analytical model with a numerical simulation. Then, it allows one to generate mock reionization catalogs with volumes exceeding the original simulation quickly and computationally inexpensively, meanwhile reproducing large scale statistical properties. These mock catalogs are particularly useful for CMB polarization and 21cm experiments, where large volumes are required to simulate the observed signal.

  10. Mixture Preparation and Nitric Oxide Formation in a GDI Engine studied by Combined Laser Diagnostics and Numerical Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volker Sick; Dennis N. Assanis

    2002-11-27

    Through the combination of advanced imaging laser diagnostics with multi-dimensional computer models, a new understanding of the performance of direct-injection gasoline engines is pursuit. The work focuses on the fuel injection process, the breakup of the liquid into a fine spray and the mixing of the fuel with the in-cylinder gases. Non-intrusive laser diagnostics will be used to measure the spatial distribution of droplets and vaporized fuel with very high temporal resolution. These data along with temperature measurements will be used to validate a new spray breakup model for gasoline direct-injection. Experimental data on near wall fuel distributions will be used for comparison with a model that predicts the spray-wall interaction and the dynamics of the liquid film on the surface. Quantitative measurements of local nitric oxide concentrations inside the combustion chamber will provide a critical test for a numerical simulation of the nitric oxide formation process. This model is based on a modified flamelet approach and will be used to study the effects of exhaust gas recirculation.

  11. CHEMICAL TRANSPORT IN A FISSURED BOCK: VERIFICATION OF A NUMERICAL MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmuson, A.; Narasimhan, T.N.; Neretnieks, I.

    1982-04-01

    Numerical models for simulating chemical transport in fissured rocks constitute powerful tools for evaluating the acceptability of geological nuclear waste repositories. Due to the very long-term, high toxicity of some nuclear waste products, the models are required to predict, in certain cases, the spatial and temporal distribution of chemical concentration less than 0.001% of the concentration released from the repository. Whether numerical models can provide such accuracies is a major question addressed in the present work. To this end, we have verified a numerical model, TRUMP, which solves the advective diffusion equation in general three dimensions with or without decay and source terms. The method is based on an integrated finite-difference approach. The model was verified against known analytic solution of the one-dimensional advection-diffusion problem as well as the problem of advection-diffusion in a system of parallel fractures separated by spherical particles. The studies show that as long as the magnitude of advectance is equal to or less than that of conductance for the closed surface bounding any volume element in the region (that is, numerical Peclet number <2), the numerical method can indeed match the analytic solution within errors of ±10{sup -3} % or less. The realistic input parameters used in the sample calculations suggest that such a range of Peclet numbers is indeed likely to characterize deep groundwater systems in granitic and ancient argillaceous systems. Thus TRUMP in its present form does provide a viable tool for use in nuclear waste evaluation studies. A sensitivity analysis based on the analytic solution suggests that the errors in prediction introduced due to uncertainties in input parameters is likely to be larger than the computational inaccuracies introduced by the numerical model. Currently, a disadvantage in the TRUMP model is that the iterative method of solving the set of simultaneous equations is rather slow when time

  12. Multiphase Flow Modeling - Validation and Application CRADA MC94-019, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhava Syamlal; Philip A. Nicoletti

    1995-08-31

    For the development and validation of multiphase flow modeling capability, a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) is in effect between Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) and Fluent Inc. To validate the Fluent multiphase model, several simulations were conducted at METC and the results were compared with the results of MFIX, a multiphase flow code developed at METC, and with experimental data. The results of these validation studies will be presented. In addition, the application of multiphase flow modeling will be illustrated by presenting the results of simulations of a filter back- flushing and a fluidized bed coal gasifier. These simulations were conducted only with MFIX, since certain features needed in these simulations will be available only in the next release of Fluent.

  13. Verification and validation benchmarks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2007-02-01

    Verification and validation (V&V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V&V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V&V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the level of

  14. Systematic validation of non-equilibrium thermochemical models using Bayesian inference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miki, Kenji; Panesi, Marco; Prudhomme, Serge

    2015-10-01

    The validation process proposed by Babuška et al. [1] is applied to thermochemical models describing post-shock flow conditions. In this validation approach, experimental data is involved only in the calibration of the models, and the decision process is based on quantities of interest (QoIs) predicted on scenarios that are not necessarily amenable experimentally. Moreover, uncertainties present in the experimental data, as well as those resulting from an incomplete physical model description, are propagated to the QoIs. We investigate four commonly used thermochemical models: a one-temperature model (which assumes thermal equilibrium among all inner modes), and two-temperature models developed by Macheret et al. [2], Marrone and Treanor [3], and Park [4]. Up to 16 uncertain parameters are estimated using Bayesian updating based on the latest absolute volumetric radiance data collected at the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) installed inside the NASA Ames Research Center. Following the solution of the inverse problems, the forward problems are solved in order to predict the radiative heat flux, QoI, and examine the validity of these models. Our results show that all four models are invalid, but for different reasons: the one-temperature model simply fails to reproduce the data while the two-temperature models exhibit unacceptably large uncertainties in the QoI predictions.

  15. Recent numerical and algorithmic advances within the volume tracking framework for modeling interfacial flows

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    François, Marianne M.

    2015-05-28

    A review of recent advances made in numerical methods and algorithms within the volume tracking framework is presented. The volume tracking method, also known as the volume-of-fluid method has become an established numerical approach to model and simulate interfacial flows. Its advantage is its strict mass conservation. However, because the interface is not explicitly tracked but captured via the material volume fraction on a fixed mesh, accurate estimation of the interface position, its geometric properties and modeling of interfacial physics in the volume tracking framework remain difficult. Several improvements have been made over the last decade to address these challenges.more » In this study, the multimaterial interface reconstruction method via power diagram, curvature estimation via heights and mean values and the balanced-force algorithm for surface tension are highlighted.« less

  16. Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.

    2013-07-01

    Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the ARBI team validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. In addition to completing validation activities, this project looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. Based on these datasets, we conclude that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws. This has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

  17. Development and validation of a two-phase, three-dimensional model for PEM fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ken Shuang

    2010-04-01

    The objectives of this presentation are: (1) To develop and validate a two-phase, three-dimensional transport modelfor simulating PEM fuel cell performance under a wide range of operating conditions; (2) To apply the validated PEM fuel cell model to improve fundamental understanding of key phenomena involved and to identify rate-limiting steps and develop recommendations for improvements so as to accelerate the commercialization of fuel cell technology; (3) The validated PEMFC model can be employed to improve and optimize PEM fuel cell operation. Consequently, the project helps: (i) address the technical barriers on performance, cost, and durability; and (ii) achieve DOE's near-term technical targets on performance, cost, and durability in automotive and stationary applications.

  18. A Numerical Model of the Temperature Field of the Cast and Solidified Ceramic Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kavicka, Frantisek; Sekanina, Bohumil; Stransky, Karel; Stetina, Josef [Brno University of Technology, Brno, Technicka 2 (Czech Republic); Dobrovska, Jana [Technical University of Ostrava, Ostrava, Tr. 17.listopadu 17 (Czech Republic)

    2010-06-15

    Corundo-baddeleyit material (CBM)--EUCOR--is a heat- and wear-resistant material even at extreme temperatures. This article introduces a numerical model of solidification and cooling of this material in a non-metallic mould. The model is capable of determining the total solidification time of the casting and also the place of the casting which solidifies last. Furthermore, it is possible to calculate the temperature gradient in any point and time, and also determine the local solidification time and the solidification interval of any point. The local solidification time is one of the input parameters for the cooperating model of chemical heterogeneity. This second model and its application on samples of EUCOR prove that the applied method of measurement of chemical heterogeneity provides detailed quantitative information on the material structure and makes it possible to analyse the solidification process. The analysis of this process entails statistical processing of the results of the measurements of the heterogeneity of the components of EUCOR and performs correlation of individual components during solidification. The crystallisation process seems to be very complicated, where the macro- and microscopic segregations differ significantly. The verification of both numerical models was conducted on a real cast 350x200x400 mm block.

  19. The shallow water equations as a hybrid flow model for the numerical and experimental analysis of hydro power stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostermann, Lars; Seidel, Christian

    2015-03-10

    The numerical analysis of hydro power stations is an important method of the hydraulic design and is used for the development and optimisation of hydro power stations in addition to the experiments with the physical submodel of a full model in the hydraulic laboratory. For the numerical analysis, 2D and 3D models are appropriate and commonly used.The 2D models refer mainly to the shallow water equations (SWE), since for this flow model a large experience on a wide field of applications for the flow analysis of numerous problems in hydraulic engineering already exists. Often, the flow model is verified by in situ measurements. In order to consider 3D flow phenomena close to singularities like weirs, hydro power stations etc. the development of a hybrid fluid model is advantageous to improve the quality and significance of the global model. Here, an extended hybrid flow model based on the principle of the SWE is presented. The hybrid flow model directly links the numerical model with the experimental data, which may originate from physical full models, physical submodels and in-situ measurements. Hence a wide field of application of the hybrid model emerges including the improvement of numerical models and the strong coupling of numerical and experimental analysis.

  20. Numerical Modeling of the Lake Mary Road Bridge for Foundation Reuse Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sitek, M. A.; Bojanowski, C.; Lottes, S. A.

    2015-04-01

    This project uses numerical techniques to assess the structural integrity and capacity of the bridge foundations and, as a result, reduces the risk associated with reusing the same foundation for a new superstructure. Nondestructive test methods of different types were used in combination with the numerical modeling and analysis. The onsite tests included visual inspection, tomography, ground penetrating radar, drilling boreholes and coreholes, and the laboratory tests on recovered samples. The results were utilized to identify the current geometry of the structure with foundation, including the hidden geometry of the abutments and piers, and soil and foundation material properties. This data was used to build the numerical models and run computational analyses on a high performance computer cluster to assess the structural integrity of the bridge and foundations including the suitability of the foundation for reuse with a new superstructure and traffic that will increase the load on the foundations. Computational analysis is more cost-effective and gives an advantage of getting more detailed knowledge about the structural response. It also enables to go beyond non-destructive testing and find the failure conditions without destroying the structure under consideration.

  1. Development and Validation of an Advanced Stimulation Prediction Model for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Develop a true 3D hydro-thermal fracturing and proppant flow/transport simulator that is particularly suited for EGS reservoir creation. Perform laboratory scale model tests of hydraulic fracturing and proppant flow/transport using a polyaxial loading device, and use the laboratory results to test and validate the 3D simulator.

  2. Groundwater Model Validation for the Project Shoal Area, Corrective Action Unit 447

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-05-19

    Stoller has examined newly collected water level data in multiple wells at the Shoal site. On the basis of these data and information presented in the report, we are currently unable to confirm that the model is successfully validated. Most of our concerns regarding the model stem from two findings: (1) measured water level data do not provide clear evidence of a prevailing lateral flow direction; and (2) the groundwater flow system has been and continues to be in a transient state, which contrasts with assumed steady-state conditions in the model. The results of DRI's model validation efforts and observations made regarding water level behavior are discussed in the following sections. A summary of our conclusions and recommendations for a path forward are also provided in this letter report.

  3. Verification and validation of the decision analysis model for assessment of tank waste remediation system waste treatment strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awadalla, N.G.; Eaton, S.C.F.

    1996-09-04

    This document is the verification and validation final report for the Decision Analysis Model for Assessment of Tank Waste Remediation System Waste Treatment Strategies. This model is also known as the INSIGHT Model.

  4. Recent Progress Validating the HADES Model of LLNL's HEAF MicroCT Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, W. T.; Bond, K. C.; Lennox, K. P.; Aufderheide, M. B.; Seetho, I. M.; Roberson, G. P.

    2014-07-17

    This report compares recent HADES calculations of x-ray linear attenuation coefficients to previous MicroCT measurements made at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s High Energy Applications Facility (HEAF). The chief objective is to investigate what impact recent changes in HADES modeling have on validation results. We find that these changes have no obvious effect on the overall accuracy of the model. Detailed comparisons between recent and previous results are presented.

  5. Recovery Act. Development and Validation of an Advanced Stimulation Prediction Model for Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutierrez, Marte

    2013-12-31

    This research project aims to develop and validate an advanced computer model that can be used in the planning and design of stimulation techniques to create engineered reservoirs for Enhanced Geothermal Systems. The specific objectives of the proposal are to; Develop a true three-dimensional hydro-thermal fracturing simulator that is particularly suited for EGS reservoir creation; Perform laboratory scale model tests of hydraulic fracturing and proppant flow/transport using a polyaxial loading device, and use the laboratory results to test and validate the 3D simulator; Perform discrete element/particulate modeling of proppant transport in hydraulic fractures, and use the results to improve understand of proppant flow and transport; Test and validate the 3D hydro-thermal fracturing simulator against case histories of EGS energy production; and Develop a plan to commercialize the 3D fracturing and proppant flow/transport simulator. The project is expected to yield several specific results and benefits. Major technical products from the proposal include; A true-3D hydro-thermal fracturing computer code that is particularly suited to EGS; Documented results of scale model tests on hydro-thermal fracturing and fracture propping in an analogue crystalline rock; Documented procedures and results of discrete element/particulate modeling of flow and transport of proppants for EGS applications; and Database of monitoring data, with focus of Acoustic Emissions (AE) from lab scale modeling and field case histories of EGS reservoir creation.

  6. CASL - Initial Validation and Benchmark Study of new 3D CRUD Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Initial Validation and Benchmark Study of new 3D CRUD Model A new 3D CRUD model, known as "MAMBA" (for "MPO Advanced Model for Boron Analysis"), is being developed by the Crud Group within the MPO focus area of CASL. The 3D MAMBA v2.0 computer code was released to CASL on Feb. 28, 2012 and is capable of being run in "stand-alone" mode or in coupled mode with a thermal hydraulics computational fluid dynamics model (e.g., STAR-CCM+) and/or a neutron transport

  7. Numerical modeling of laser tunneling ionization in explicit particle-in-cell codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, M.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Yu, L.L.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Leemans, W.P.

    2013-03-01

    Methods for the calculation of laser tunneling ionization in explicit particle-in-cell codes used for modeling laserplasma interactions are compared and validated against theoretical predictions. Improved accuracy is obtained by using the direct current form for the ionization rate. Multi level ionization in a single time step and energy conservation have been considered during the ionization process. The effects of grid resolution and number of macro-particles per cell are examined. Implementation of the ionization algorithm in two different particle-in-cell codes is compared for the case of ionization-based electron injection in a laserplasma accelerator.

  8. Monitoring and Numerical Modeling of Shallow CO{sub 2} Injection, Greene County, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rovey, Charles; Gouzie, Douglas; Biagioni, Richard

    2013-09-30

    The project titled Monitoring and Numerical Modeling of Shallow CO{sub 2} Injection, Greene County, Missouri provided training for three graduate students in areas related to carbon capture and storage. Numerical modeling of CO{sub 2} injection into the St. Francois aquifer at the Southwest Power Plant Site in Greene County, Missouri indicates that up to 4.1 x 10{sup 5} metric tons of CO{sub 2} per year could be injected for 30 years without exceeding a 3 MPa differential injection pressure. The injected CO{sub 2} would remain sequestered below the top of the overlying caprock (St. Francois confining unit) for more than 1000 years. Geochemical modeling indicates that portions of the injected CO{sub 2} will react rapidly with trace minerals in the aquifer to form various solid carbonate mineral phases. These minerals would store significant portions of injected CO{sub 2} over geologic time scales. Finally, a GIS data base on the pore-fluid chemistry of the overlying aquifer system in Missouri, the Ozark aquifer, was compiled from many sources. This data base could become useful in monitoring for leakage from future CO{sub 2} sequestration sites.

  9. Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.

    2013-07-01

    Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the Building America research team ARBI validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. This project also looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. The team concluded that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws, which has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

  10. Fish Individual-based Numerical Simulator (FINS): A particle-based model of juvenile salmonid movement and dissolved gas exposure history in the Columbia River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2002-01-30

    This paper describes a numerical model of juvenile salmonid migration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. The model, called the Fish Individual-based Numerical Simulator or FINS, employs a discrete, particle-based approach to simulate the migration and history of exposure to dissolved gases of individual fish. FINS is linked to a two-dimensional (vertically-averaged) hydrodynamic simulator that quantifies local water velocity, temperature, and dissolved gas levels as a function of river flow rates and dam operations. Simulated gas exposure histories can be input to biological mortality models to predict the effects of various river configurations on fish injury and mortality due to dissolved gas supersaturation. Therefore, FINS serves as a critical linkage between hydrodynamic models of the river system and models of biological impacts. FINS was parameterized and validated based on observations of individual fish movements collected using radiotelemetry methods during 1997 and 1998. A quasi-inverse approach was used to decouple fish swimming movements from advection with the local water velocity, allowing inference of time series of non-advective displacements of individual fish from the radiotelemetry data. Statistical analyses of these displacements are presented, and confirm that strong temporal correlation of fish swimming behavior persists in some cases over several hours. A correlated random-walk model was employed to simulate the observed migration behavior, and parameters of the model were estimated that lead to close correspondence between predictions and observations.

  11. Solutions of the two-dimensional Hubbard model: Benchmarks and results from a wide range of numerical algorithms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    LeBlanc, J. P. F.; Antipov, Andrey E.; Becca, Federico; Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Chung, Chia -Min; Deng, Youjin; Ferrero, Michel; Henderson, Thomas M.; Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; et al

    2015-12-14

    Numerical results for ground-state and excited-state properties (energies, double occupancies, and Matsubara-axis self-energies) of the single-orbital Hubbard model on a two-dimensional square lattice are presented, in order to provide an assessment of our ability to compute accurate results in the thermodynamic limit. Many methods are employed, including auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo, bare and bold-line diagrammatic Monte Carlo, method of dual fermions, density matrix embedding theory, density matrix renormalization group, dynamical cluster approximation, diffusion Monte Carlo within a fixed-node approximation, unrestricted coupled cluster theory, and multireference projected Hartree-Fock methods. Comparison of results obtained by different methods allows for the identification ofmore » uncertainties and systematic errors. The importance of extrapolation to converged thermodynamic-limit values is emphasized. Furthermore, cases where agreement between different methods is obtained establish benchmark results that may be useful in the validation of new approaches and the improvement of existing methods.« less

  12. Solutions of the two-dimensional Hubbard model: Benchmarks and results from a wide range of numerical algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeBlanc, J. P. F.; Antipov, Andrey E.; Becca, Federico; Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Chung, Chia -Min; Deng, Youjin; Ferrero, Michel; Henderson, Thomas M.; Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Kozik, E.; Liu, Xuan -Wen; Millis, Andrew J.; Prokof’ev, N. V.; Qin, Mingpu; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Shi, Hao; Svistunov, B. V.; Tocchio, Luca F.; Tupitsyn, I. S.; White, Steven R.; Zhang, Shiwei; Zheng, Bo -Xiao; Zhu, Zhenyue; Gull, Emanuel

    2015-12-14

    Numerical results for ground-state and excited-state properties (energies, double occupancies, and Matsubara-axis self-energies) of the single-orbital Hubbard model on a two-dimensional square lattice are presented, in order to provide an assessment of our ability to compute accurate results in the thermodynamic limit. Many methods are employed, including auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo, bare and bold-line diagrammatic Monte Carlo, method of dual fermions, density matrix embedding theory, density matrix renormalization group, dynamical cluster approximation, diffusion Monte Carlo within a fixed-node approximation, unrestricted coupled cluster theory, and multireference projected Hartree-Fock methods. Comparison of results obtained by different methods allows for the identification of uncertainties and systematic errors. The importance of extrapolation to converged thermodynamic-limit values is emphasized. Furthermore, cases where agreement between different methods is obtained establish benchmark results that may be useful in the validation of new approaches and the improvement of existing methods.

  13. EMRinger: side chain–directed model and map validation for 3D cryo-electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barad, Benjamin A.; Echols, Nathaniel; Wang, Ray Yu-Ruei; Cheng, Yifan; DiMaio, Frank; Adams, Paul D.; Fraser, James S.

    2015-08-17

    Advances in high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) require the development of validation metrics to independently assess map quality and model geometry. We report that EMRinger is a tool that assesses the precise fitting of an atomic model into the map during refinement and shows how radiation damage alters scattering from negatively charged amino acids. EMRinger (https://github.com/fraser-lab/EMRinger) will be useful for monitoring progress in resolving and modeling high-resolution features in cryo-EM.

  14. User's Manual for Data for Validating Models for PV Module Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marion, W.; Anderberg, A.; Deline, C.; Glick, S.; Muller, M.; Perrin, G.; Rodriguez, J.; Rummel, S.; Terwilliger, K.; Silverman, T. J.

    2014-04-01

    This user's manual describes performance data measured for flat-plate photovoltaic (PV) modules installed in Cocoa, Florida, Eugene, Oregon, and Golden, Colorado. The data include PV module current-voltage curves and associated meteorological data for approximately one-year periods. These publicly available data are intended to facilitate the validation of existing models for predicting the performance of PV modules, and for the development of new and improved models. For comparing different modeling approaches, using these public data will provide transparency and more meaningful comparisons of the relative benefits.

  15. Numeric-modeling sensitivity analysis of the performance of wind turbine arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lissaman, P.B.S.; Gyatt, G.W.; Zalay, A.D.

    1982-06-01

    An evaluation of the numerical model created by Lissaman for predicting the performance of wind turbine arrays has been made. Model predictions of the wake parameters have been compared with both full-scale and wind tunnel measurements. Only limited, full-scale data were available, while wind tunnel studies showed difficulties in representing real meteorological conditions. Nevertheless, several modifications and additions have been made to the model using both theoretical and empirical techniques and the new model shows good correlation with experiment. The larger wake growth rate and shorter near wake length predicted by the new model lead to reduced interference effects on downstream turbines and hence greater array efficiencies. The array model has also been re-examined and now incorporates the ability to show the effects of real meteorological conditions such as variations in wind speed and unsteady winds. The resulting computer code has been run to show the sensitivity of array performance to meteorological, machine, and array parameters. Ambient turbulence and windwise spacing are shown to dominate, while hub height ratio is seen to be relatively unimportant. Finally, a detailed analysis of the Goodnoe Hills wind farm in Washington has been made to show how power output can be expected to vary with ambient turbulence, wind speed, and wind direction.

  16. Numerical modeling of the action of an explosion on an iron slab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugak, S.G.; Fortov, V.E.; Kanel', G.I.; Ni, A.L.; Stel'makh, V.G.

    1983-09-01

    This article examines the explosion of a condensed high explosive (HE) by a flat Armco iron slab. The fundamental physical processes accompanying the nonstationary two-dimensional compression pulse propagation in a metal are analyzed, a mathematical model of the process is formulated, and its numerical characteristics are determined. A cylindrical charge of trinitrotoluene of 20 mm diameter and height, initiated at the axial point on the free surface, was mounted on a 10-mm-thick and 120-mm-diameter armco iron disk. A finite-difference method using a quadrangular computational mesh is employed. It is assumed that the process of detonation transformation occurs instantaneously and is characterized only by singularities in the equation of state. Numerical modeling of the loading of an iron slab by an explosion showed that the simple kinetic relationship proposed for the fracture computation will assure a realistic description of the fracture process. It is determined that the progress of a reversible polymorphic transformation in the specimen material substantially influences the nature of its fracture by explosion. The magnitude of the strain on the strength properties of the material must be taken into account in order to achieve a detailed description of the fracture.

  17. Numerical modeling of carrier gas flow in atomic layer deposition vacuum reactor: A comparative study of lattice Boltzmann models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Dongqing; Chien Jen, Tien [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 (United States); Li, Tao [School of Mechanical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Yuan, Chris, E-mail: cyuan@uwm.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 3200 North Cramer Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    This paper characterizes the carrier gas flow in the atomic layer deposition (ALD) vacuum reactor by introducing Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) to the ALD simulation through a comparative study of two LBM models. Numerical models of gas flow are constructed and implemented in two-dimensional geometry based on lattice BhatnagarGrossKrook (LBGK)-D2Q9 model and two-relaxation-time (TRT) model. Both incompressible and compressible scenarios are simulated and the two models are compared in the aspects of flow features, stability, and efficiency. Our simulation outcome reveals that, for our specific ALD vacuum reactor, TRT model generates better steady laminar flow features all over the domain with better stability and reliability than LBGK-D2Q9 model especially when considering the compressible effects of the gas flow. The LBM-TRT is verified indirectly by comparing the numerical result with conventional continuum-based computational fluid dynamics solvers, and it shows very good agreement with these conventional methods. The velocity field of carrier gas flow through ALD vacuum reactor was characterized by LBM-TRT model finally. The flow in ALD is in a laminar steady state with velocity concentrated at the corners and around the wafer. The effects of flow fields on precursor distributions, surface absorptions, and surface reactions are discussed in detail. Steady and evenly distributed velocity field contribute to higher precursor concentration near the wafer and relatively lower particle velocities help to achieve better surface adsorption and deposition. The ALD reactor geometry needs to be considered carefully if a steady and laminar flow field around the wafer and better surface deposition are desired.

  18. Full-Scale Numerical Modeling of Turbulent Processes in the Earth's Ionosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliasson, B.; Stenflo, L.; Shukla, P. K.

    2008-10-15

    We present a full-scale simulation study of ionospheric turbulence by means of a generalized Zakharov model based on the separation of variables into high-frequency and slow time scales. The model includes realistic length scales of the ionospheric profile and of the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields, and uses ionospheric plasma parameters relevant for high-latitude radio facilities such as Eiscat and HAARP. A nested grid numerical method has been developed to resolve the different length-scales, while avoiding severe restrictions on the time step. The simulation demonstrates the parametric decay of the ordinary mode into Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves, followed by a Langmuir wave collapse and short-scale caviton formation, as observed in ionospheric heating experiments.

  19. Validation of Global Weather Forecast and Climate Models Over the North

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slope of Alaska Validation of Global Weather Forecast and Climate Models Over the North Slope of Alaska Xie, Shaocheng Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Klein, Stephen Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Boyle, Jim Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Fiorino, Michael DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hnilo, Justin DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Phillips, Thomas PCMDI/LLNL Potter, Gerald Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Beljaars, Anton ECMWF Category:

  20. Thermal Hydraulic Modeling: Cross-Verification, Validation and Co-design |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility computed on Intrepid with Nek5000 Velocity magnitude distribution in a flow through the 25-pin swirl-vane spacer grid of Matis benchmark. Computed on Intrepid with Nek5000 and visualized on Eureka with VisIt at the ALCF. Aleks Obabko, Paul Fischer, and Tim Tautges, Argonne National Laboratory Thermal Hydraulic Modeling: Cross-Verification, Validation and Co-design PI Name: Paul F. Fischer PI Email: fischer@mcs.anl.gov Institution: Argonne National

  1. Precarious Rock Methodology for Seismic Hazard: Physical Testing, Numerical Modeling and Coherence Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anooshehpoor, Rasool; Purvance, Matthew D.; Brune, James N.; Preston, Leiph A.; Anderson, John G.; Smith, Kenneth D.

    2006-09-29

    This report covers the following projects: Shake table tests of precarious rock methodology, field tests of precarious rocks at Yucca Mountain and comparison of the results with PSHA predictions, study of the coherence of the wave field in the ESF, and a limited survey of precarious rocks south of the proposed repository footprint. A series of shake table experiments have been carried out at the University of Nevada, Reno Large Scale Structures Laboratory. The bulk of the experiments involved scaling acceleration time histories (uniaxial forcing) from 0.1g to the point where the objects on the shake table overturned a specified number of times. The results of these experiments have been compared with numerical overturning predictions. Numerical predictions for toppling of large objects with simple contact conditions (e.g., I-beams with sharp basal edges) agree well with shake-table results. The numerical model slightly underpredicts the overturning of small rectangular blocks. It overpredicts the overturning PGA for asymmetric granite boulders with complex basal contact conditions. In general the results confirm the approximate predictions of previous studies. Field testing of several rocks at Yucca Mountain has approximately confirmed the preliminary results from previous studies, suggesting that he PSHA predictions are too high, possibly because the uncertainty in the mean of the attenuation relations. Study of the coherence of wavefields in the ESF has provided results which will be very important in design of the canisters distribution, in particular a preliminary estimate of the wavelengths at which the wavefields become incoherent. No evidence was found for extreme focusing by lens-like inhomogeneities. A limited survey for precarious rocks confirmed that they extend south of the repository, and one of these has been field tested.

  2. Validation and Calibration of Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics Multiscale Multiphysics Models - Subcooled Flow Boiling Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anh Bui; Nam Dinh; Brian Williams

    2013-09-01

    In addition to validation data plan, development of advanced techniques for calibration and validation of complex multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulation codes are a main objective of the CASL VUQ plan. Advanced modeling of LWR systems normally involves a range of physico-chemical models describing multiple interacting phenomena, such as thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, coolant chemistry, etc., which occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. To a large extent, the accuracy of (and uncertainty in) overall model predictions is determined by the correctness of various sub-models, which are not conservation-laws based, but empirically derived from measurement data. Such sub-models normally require extensive calibration before the models can be applied to analysis of real reactor problems. This work demonstrates a case study of calibration of a common model of subcooled flow boiling, which is an important multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon in LWR thermal hydraulics. The calibration process is based on a new strategy of model-data integration, in which, all sub-models are simultaneously analyzed and calibrated using multiple sets of data of different types. Specifically, both data on large-scale distributions of void fraction and fluid temperature and data on small-scale physics of wall evaporation were simultaneously used in this works calibration. In a departure from traditional (or common-sense) practice of tuning/calibrating complex models, a modern calibration technique based on statistical modeling and Bayesian inference was employed, which allowed simultaneous calibration of multiple sub-models (and related parameters) using different datasets. Quality of data (relevancy, scalability, and uncertainty) could be taken into consideration in the calibration process. This work presents a step forward in the development and realization of the CIPS Validation Data Plan at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs to enable

  3. Validation of New Process Models for Large Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastic Composite Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Kunc, Vlastimil; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2012-02-23

    This report describes the work conducted under the CRADA Nr. PNNL/304 between Battelle PNNL and Autodesk whose objective is to validate the new process models developed under the previous CRADA for large injection-molded LFT composite structures. To this end, the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models implemented in the 2013 research version of Moldflow was used to simulate the injection molding of 600-mm x 600-mm x 3-mm plaques from 40% glass/polypropylene (Dow Chemical DLGF9411.00) and 40% glass/polyamide 6,6 (DuPont Zytel 75LG40HSL BK031) materials. The injection molding was performed by Injection Technologies, Inc. at Windsor, Ontario (under a subcontract by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ORNL) using the mold offered by the Automotive Composite Consortium (ACC). Two fill speeds under the same back pressure were used to produce plaques under slow-fill and fast-fill conditions. Also, two gating options were used to achieve the following desired flow patterns: flows in edge-gated plaques and in center-gated plaques. After molding, ORNL performed measurements of fiber orientation and length distributions for process model validations. The structure of this report is as follows. After the Introduction (Section 1), Section 2 provides a summary of the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models. A summary of model implementations in the latest research version of Moldflow is given in Section 3. Section 4 provides the key processing conditions and parameters for molding of the ACC plaques. The validations of the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models are presented and discussed in Section 5. The conclusions will be drawn in Section 6.

  4. Sensitivity of injection costs to input petrophysical parameters in numerical geologic carbon sequestration models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, C. L.; Gragg, M. J.; Perfect, E.; White, Mark D.; Lemiszki, P. J.; McKay, L. D.

    2013-08-24

    Numerical simulations are widely used in feasibility studies for geologic carbon sequestration. Accurate estimates of petrophysical parameters are needed as inputs for these simulations. However, relatively few experimental values are available for CO2-brine systems. Hence, a sensitivity analysis was performed using the STOMP numerical code for supercritical CO2 injected into a model confined deep saline aquifer. The intrinsic permeability, porosity, pore compressibility, and capillary pressure-saturation/relative permeability parameters (residual liquid saturation, residual gas saturation, and van Genuchten alpha and m values) were varied independently. Their influence on CO2 injection rates and costs were determined and the parameters were ranked based on normalized coefficients of variation. The simulations resulted in differences of up to tens of millions of dollars over the life of the project (i.e., the time taken to inject 10.8 million metric tons of CO2). The two most influential parameters were the intrinsic permeability and the van Genuchten m value. Two other parameters, the residual gas saturation and the residual liquid saturation, ranked above the porosity. These results highlight the need for accurate estimates of capillary pressure-saturation/relative permeability parameters for geologic carbon sequestration simulations in addition to measurements of porosity and intrinsic permeability.

  5. A Numerical Algorithm for the Solution of a Phase-Field Model of Polycrystalline Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorr, M R; Fattebert, J; Wickett, M E; Belak, J F; Turchi, P A

    2008-12-04

    We describe an algorithm for the numerical solution of a phase-field model (PFM) of microstructure evolution in polycrystalline materials. The PFM system of equations includes a local order parameter, a quaternion representation of local orientation and a species composition parameter. The algorithm is based on the implicit integration of a semidiscretization of the PFM system using a backward difference formula (BDF) temporal discretization combined with a Newton-Krylov algorithm to solve the nonlinear system at each time step. The BDF algorithm is combined with a coordinate projection method to maintain quaternion unit length, which is related to an important solution invariant. A key element of the Newton-Krylov algorithm is the selection of a preconditioner to accelerate the convergence of the Generalized Minimum Residual algorithm used to solve the Jacobian linear system in each Newton step. Results are presented for the application of the algorithm to 2D and 3D examples.

  6. Validation of detailed thermal hydraulic models used for LMR safety and for improvement of technical specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, F.E.

    1995-12-31

    Detailed steady-state and transient coolant temperatures and flow rates from an operating reactor have been used to validate the multiple pin model in the SASSYS-1 liquid metal reactor systems analysis code. This multiple pin capability can be used for explicit calculations of axial and lateral temperature distributions within individual subassemblies. Thermocouples at a number of axial locations and in a number of different coolant sub-channels m the XXO9 instrumented subassembly in the EBR-II reactor provided temperature data from the Shutdown Heat Removal Test (SHRT) series. Flow meter data for XXO9 and for the overall system are also available from these tests. Results of consistent SASSYS-1 multiple pin analyses for both the SHRT-45 loss-of-flow-without-scram-test and the S14RT-17 protected loss-of-flow test agree well with the experimental data, providing validation of the SASSYS-1 code over a wide range of conditions.

  7. R&D for computational cognitive and social models : foundations for model evaluation through verification and validation (final LDRD report).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slepoy, Alexander; Mitchell, Scott A.; Backus, George A.; McNamara, Laura A.; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2008-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is investing in projects that aim to develop computational modeling and simulation applications that explore human cognitive and social phenomena. While some of these modeling and simulation projects are explicitly research oriented, others are intended to support or provide insight for people involved in high consequence decision-making. This raises the issue of how to evaluate computational modeling and simulation applications in both research and applied settings where human behavior is the focus of the model: when is a simulation 'good enough' for the goals its designers want to achieve? In this report, we discuss two years' worth of review and assessment of the ASC program's approach to computational model verification and validation, uncertainty quantification, and decision making. We present a framework that extends the principles of the ASC approach into the area of computational social and cognitive modeling and simulation. In doing so, we argue that the potential for evaluation is a function of how the modeling and simulation software will be used in a particular setting. In making this argument, we move from strict, engineering and physics oriented approaches to V&V to a broader project of model evaluation, which asserts that the systematic, rigorous, and transparent accumulation of evidence about a model's performance under conditions of uncertainty is a reasonable and necessary goal for model evaluation, regardless of discipline. How to achieve the accumulation of evidence in areas outside physics and engineering is a significant research challenge, but one that requires addressing as modeling and simulation tools move out of research laboratories and into the hands of decision makers. This report provides an assessment of our thinking on ASC Verification and Validation, and argues for further extending V&V research in the physical and engineering sciences toward a broader program of model evaluation in situations of high

  8. Validation of a 2.5D CFD model for cylindrical gas–solids fluidized beds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Tingwen

    2015-09-25

    The 2.5D model recently proposed by Li et al. (Li, T., Benyahia, S., Dietiker, J., Musser, J., and Sun, X., 2015. A 2.5D computational method to simulate cylindrical fluidized beds. Chemical Engineering Science. 123, 236-246.) was validated for two cylindrical gas-solids bubbling fluidized bed systems. Different types of particles tested under various flow conditions were simulated using the traditional 2D model and the 2.5D model. Detailed comparison against the experimental measurements on solid concentration and velocity were conducted. Comparing to the traditional Cartesian 2D flow simulation, the 2.5D model yielded better agreement with the experimental data especially for the solidmore » velocity prediction in the column wall region.« less

  9. Validation of a 2.5D CFD model for cylindrical gas–solids fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Tingwen

    2015-09-25

    The 2.5D model recently proposed by Li et al. (Li, T., Benyahia, S., Dietiker, J., Musser, J., and Sun, X., 2015. A 2.5D computational method to simulate cylindrical fluidized beds. Chemical Engineering Science. 123, 236-246.) was validated for two cylindrical gas-solids bubbling fluidized bed systems. Different types of particles tested under various flow conditions were simulated using the traditional 2D model and the 2.5D model. Detailed comparison against the experimental measurements on solid concentration and velocity were conducted. Comparing to the traditional Cartesian 2D flow simulation, the 2.5D model yielded better agreement with the experimental data especially for the solid velocity prediction in the column wall region.

  10. Formulation, Implementation and Validation of a Two-Fluid model in a Fuel Cell CFD Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunal Jain, Vernon Cole, Sanjiv Kumar and N. Vaidya

    2008-11-01

    more complications. A general approach would be to form a mixture continuity equation by linearly combining the phasic continuity equations using appropriate weighting factors. Analogous to mixture equation for pressure correction, a difference equation is used for the volume/phase fraction by taking the difference between the phasic continuity equations. The relative advantages of the above mentioned algorithmic variants for computing pressure correction and volume fractions are discussed and quantitatively assessed. Preliminary model validation is done for each component of the fuel cell. The two-phase transport in the channel is validated using empirical correlations. Transport in the GDL is validated against results obtained from LBM and VOF simulation techniques. The Channel-GDL interface transport will be validated against experiment and empirical correlation of droplet detachment at the interface. References [1] Y. Wang S. Basu and C.Y. Wang. Modeling two-phase flow in pem fuel cell channels. J. Power Sources, 179:603{617, 2008. [2] P. K. Sinha and C. Y. Wang. Liquid water transport in a mixed-wet gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell. Chem. Eng. Sci., 63:1081-1091, 2008. [3] Guangyu Lin and Trung Van Nguyen. A two-dimensional two-phase model of a pem fuel cell. J. Electrochem. Soc., 153(2):A372{A382, 2006. [4] T. Berning and N. Djilali. A 3d, multiphase, multicomponent model of the cathode and anode of a pem fuel cell. J. Electrochem. Soc., 150(12):A1589{A1598, 2003.

  11. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 4 (Appendix IV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 4 contains the following appendix sections: Radiative heat transfer properties for black liquor combustion -- Facilities and techniques and Spectral absorbance and emittance data; and Radiate heat transfer determination of the optical constants of ash samples from kraft recovery boilers -- Calculation procedure; Computation program; Density determination; Particle diameter determination; Optical constant data; and Uncertainty analysis.

  12. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 1 (Main text and Appendix I, sections 1--4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 1 contains the main body of the report and the first 4 sections of Appendix 1: Modeling of black liquor recovery boilers -- summary report; Flow and heat transfer modeling in the upper furnace of a kraft recovery boiler; Numerical simulation of black liquor combustion; and Investigation of turbulence models and prediction of swirling flows for kraft recovery furnaces.

  13. Validation of the Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model Against Cloud Cascade Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model Against Cloud Cascade Models T. B. Zhuravleva Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Background Starting from a very simple stochastic cloud model by Mullamaa et al. (1972), several different stochastic models have been developed to describe radiative transfer regime in single-layer broken clouds (Kargin 1984; Titov 1990; Malvagi and

  14. Application of numerical modeling in a clean-coal demonstration project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latham, C.E.; Laursen, T.A.; Bellanca, C.; Duong, H.

    1992-11-01

    Currently, utility boilers equipped with cell burners comprise 13% of pre-NSPS coal-fired generating capacity. The cell burner rapidly mixes the pulverized coal and combustion air resulting in rapid combustion and high NO{sub x} generation. A US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean-Coal Technology Demonstration project is underway at Dayton Power & Light`s J. M. Stuart Station to demonstrate the Low-NO{sub x} Cell{trademark} burner (LNCB{trademark}) on a 605-MWe utility boiler originally equipped with cell burners. The LNCB{trademark} is designed to reduce NO{sub x} emissions by delaying the mixing of the coal and the combustion air without boiler pressure part modifications. Preliminary post-retrofit testing results showed unexpectedly high carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) concentrations below the lowest burner row. The substoichiometric operation of the lowest burner row caused the relatively high concentrations in the lower furnace. Babcock & Wilcox`s flow, combustion, and heat transfer models were used to predict the CO concentrations in the lower furnace. The predictions were compared to field measurements for three different operating conditions. Based on this validation, the models were used to evaluate several methods for mitigating the CO concentrations. The results of this analysis are presented and discussed. The most attractive alternative was selected and will be implemented during the spring of 1992. The effectiveness of the new alternative will be available when the installation is complete and testing resumes.

  15. Experiments to populate and validate a processing model for polyurethane foam :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mondy, Lisa Ann; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Shelden, Bion; Soehnel, Melissa Marie; O'Hern, Timothy J.; Grillet, Anne; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Wyatt, Nicholas B.; Russick, Edward Mark; Bauer, Stephen J.; Hileman, Michael Bryan; Urquhart, Alexander; Thompson, Kyle Richard; Smith, David Michael

    2014-03-01

    We are developing computational models to elucidate the expansion and dynamic filling process of a polyurethane foam, PMDI. The polyurethane of interest is chemically blown, where carbon dioxide is produced via the reaction of water, the blowing agent, and isocyanate. The isocyanate also reacts with polyol in a competing reaction, which produces the polymer. Here we detail the experiments needed to populate a processing model and provide parameters for the model based on these experiments. The model entails solving the conservation equations, including the equations of motion, an energy balance, and two rate equations for the polymerization and foaming reactions, following a simplified mathematical formalism that decouples these two reactions. Parameters for the polymerization kinetics model are reported based on infrared spectrophotometry. Parameters describing the gas generating reaction are reported based on measurements of volume, temperature and pressure evolution with time. A foam rheology model is proposed and parameters determined through steady-shear and oscillatory tests. Heat of reaction and heat capacity are determined through differential scanning calorimetry. Thermal conductivity of the foam as a function of density is measured using a transient method based on the theory of the transient plane source technique. Finally, density variations of the resulting solid foam in several simple geometries are directly measured by sectioning and sampling mass, as well as through x-ray computed tomography. These density measurements will be useful for model validation once the complete model is implemented in an engineering code.

  16. Numerical Study of Coal Gasification Using Eulerian-Eulerian Multiphase Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, S.; Guenther, C.; Orsino, S.

    2007-09-01

    Gasification converts the carbon-containing material into a synthesis gas (syngas) which can be used as a fuel to generate electricity or used as a basic chemical building block for a large number of uses in the petrochemical and refining industries. Based on the mode of conveyance of the fuel and the gasifying medium, gasification can be classified into fixed or moving bed, fluidized bed, and entrained flow reactors. Entrained flow gasifiers normally feature dilute flow with small particle size and can be successfully modeled with the Discrete Phase Method (DPM). For the other types, the Eulerian-Eulerian (E-E) or the so called two-fluid multiphase model is a more appropriate approach. The E-E model treats the solid phase as a distinct interpenetrating granular fluid and it is the most general-purposed multi-fluid model. This approach provides transient, three-dimensional, detailed information inside the reactor which would otherwise be unobtainable through experiments due to the large scale, high pressure and/or temperature. In this paper, a transient, three-dimensional model of the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) transport gasifier will be presented to illustrate how Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can be used for large-scale complicated geometry with detailed physics and chemistry. In the model, eleven species are included in the gas phase while four pseudo-species are assumed in the solid phase. A total of sixteen reactions, both homogeneous (involving only gas phase species) and heterogeneous (involving species in both gas and solid phases), are used to model the coal gasification chemistry. Computational results have been validated against PSDF experimental data from lignite to bituminous coals under both air and oxygen blown conditions. The PSDF gasifier geometry was meshed with about 70,000, hexahedra-dominated cells. A total of six cases with different coal, feed gas, and/or operation conditions have been performed. The predicted and

  17. Large Eddy Simulation of Wind Turbine Wakes. Detailed Comparisons of Two Codes Focusing on Effects of Numerics and Subgrid Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Tossas, Luis A.; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-18

    In this work we report on results from a detailed comparative numerical study from two Large Eddy Simulation (LES) codes using the Actuator Line Model (ALM). The study focuses on prediction of wind turbine wakes and their breakdown when subject to uniform inflow. Previous studies have shown relative insensitivity to subgrid modeling in the context of a finite-volume code. The present study uses the low dissipation pseudo-spectral LES code from Johns Hopkins University (LESGO) and the second-order, finite-volume OpenFOAMcode (SOWFA) from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. When subject to uniform inflow, the loads on the blades are found to be unaffected by subgrid models or numerics, as expected. The turbulence in the wake and the location of transition to a turbulent state are affected by the subgrid-scale model and the numerics.

  18. Large Eddy Simulation of Wind Turbine Wakes. Detailed Comparisons of Two Codes Focusing on Effects of Numerics and Subgrid Modeling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Martinez-Tossas, Luis A.; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-18

    In this work we report on results from a detailed comparative numerical study from two Large Eddy Simulation (LES) codes using the Actuator Line Model (ALM). The study focuses on prediction of wind turbine wakes and their breakdown when subject to uniform inflow. Previous studies have shown relative insensitivity to subgrid modeling in the context of a finite-volume code. The present study uses the low dissipation pseudo-spectral LES code from Johns Hopkins University (LESGO) and the second-order, finite-volume OpenFOAMcode (SOWFA) from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. When subject to uniform inflow, the loads on the blades are found to bemore » unaffected by subgrid models or numerics, as expected. The turbulence in the wake and the location of transition to a turbulent state are affected by the subgrid-scale model and the numerics.« less

  19. NUMERICAL MODELING OF CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN FRACTURED POROUS MEDIA USING MIXED FINITE ELEMENT AND FINITE VOLUME METHODS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, G.; Dong, C.; Sun, S.

    2010-03-18

    A mathematical model for contaminant species passing through fractured porous media is presented. In the numerical model, we combine two locally conservative methods, i.e. mixed finite element (MFE) and the finite volume methods. Adaptive triangle mesh is used for effective treatment of the fractures. A hybrid MFE method is employed to provide an accurate approximation of velocities field for both the fractures and matrix which are crucial to the convection part of the transport equation. The finite volume method and the standard MFE method are used to approximate the convection and dispersion terms respectively. The model is used to investigate the interaction of adsorption with transport and to extract information on effective adsorption distribution coefficients. Numerical examples in different fractured media illustrate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed numerical model.

  20. Model Validation and Testing: The Methodological Foundation of ASHRAE Standard 140; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

    2006-07-01

    Ideally, whole-building energy simulation programs model all aspects of a building that influence energy use and thermal and visual comfort for the occupants. An essential component of the development of such computer simulation models is a rigorous program of validation and testing. This paper describes a methodology to evaluate the accuracy of whole-building energy simulation programs. The methodology is also used to identify and diagnose differences in simulation predictions that may be caused by algorithmic differences, modeling limitations, coding errors, or input errors. The methodology has been adopted by ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140 (ANSI/ASHRAE 2001, 2004), Method of Test for the Evaluation of Building Energy Analysis Computer Programs. A summary of the method is included in the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals (ASHRAE 2005). This paper describes the ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140 method of test and its methodological basis. Also discussed are possible future enhancements to Standard 140 and related research recommendations.

  1. Model Validation and Testing: The Methodological Foundation of ASHRAE Standard 140

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

    2006-01-01

    Ideally, whole-building energy simulation programs model all aspects of a building that influence energy use and thermal and visual comfort for the occupants. An essential component of the development of such computer simulation models is a rigorous program of validation and testing. This paper describes a methodology to evaluate the accuracy of whole-building energy simulation programs. The methodology is also used to identify and diagnose differences in simulation predictions that may be caused by algorithmic differences, modeling limitations, coding errors, or input errors. The methodology has been adopted by ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140, Method of Test for the Evaluation of Building Energy Analysis Computer Programs (ASHRAE 2001a, 2004). A summary of the method is included in the 2005 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals (ASHRAE 2005). This paper describes the ASHRAE Standard 140 method of test and its methodological basis. Also discussed are possible future enhancements to ASHRAE Standard 140 and related research recommendations.

  2. Dynamic Model Validation of PV Inverters Under Short-Circuit Conditions: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Bravo, R.; Gevorgian, V.

    2013-03-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) modules have dramatically decreased in price in the past few years, spurring the expansion of photovoltaic deployment. Residential and commercial rooftop installations are connected to the distribution network; large-scale installation PV power plants (PVPs) have benefited from tax incentives and the low cost of PV modules. As the level penetration of PV generation increases, the impact on power system reliability will also be greater. Utility power system planners must consider the role of PV generation in power systems more realistically by representing PV generation in dynamic stability analyses. Dynamic models of PV inverters have been developed in the positive sequence representation. NREL has developed a PV inverter dynamic model in PSCAD/EMTDC. This paper validates the dynamic model with an actual hardware bench test conducted by Southern California Edison's Distributed Energy Resources laboratory. All the fault combinations -- symmetrical and unsymmetrical -- were performed in the laboratory. We compare the simulation results with the bench test results.

  3. Evaluating Domestic Hot Water Distribution System Options with Validated Analysis Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weitzel, E.; Hoeschele, E.

    2014-09-01

    A developing body of work is forming that collects data on domestic hot water consumption, water use behaviors, and energy efficiency of various distribution systems. Transient System Simulation Tool (TRNSYS) is a full distribution system developed that has been validated using field monitoring data and then exercised in a number of climates to understand climate impact on performance. In this study, the Building America team built upon previous analysis modeling work to evaluate differing distribution systems and the sensitivities of water heating energy and water use efficiency to variations of climate, load, distribution type, insulation and compact plumbing practices. Overall, 124 different TRNSYS models were simulated. The results of this work are useful in informing future development of water heating best practices guides as well as more accurate (and simulation time efficient) distribution models for annual whole house simulation programs.

  4. Numerical Modeling of Geomechanical Processes Related to CO{sub 2} Injection within Generic Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckert, Andreas

    2013-05-31

    In this project generic anticline structures have been used for numerical modeling analyses to study the influence of geometrical parameters, fluid flow boundary conditions, in situ stress regime and inter-bedding friction coefficient on geomechanical risks such as fracture reactivation and fracture generation. The resulting stress states for these structures are also used to determine safe drilling directions and a methodology for wellbore trajection optimization is developed that is applicable for non-Andersonian stress states. The results of the fluid flow simulation show that the type of fluid flow boundary condition is of utmost importance and has significant impact on all injection related parameters. It is recommended that further research is conducted to establish a method to quantify the fluid flow boundary conditions for injection applications. The results of the geomechanical simulation show that in situ stress regime is a crucial, if not the most important, factor determining geomechanical risks. For extension and strike slip stress regimes anticline structures should be favored over horizontally layered basin as they feature higher ΔP{sub c} magnitudes. If sedimentary basins are tectonically relaxed and their state of stress is characterized by the uni-axial strain model the basin is in exact frictional equilibrium and fluids should not be injected. The results also show that low inter bedding friction coefficients effectively decouple layers resulting in lower ΔP{sub c} magnitudes, especially for the compressional stress regime.

  5. Thermal Hydraulic Modeling: Cross-Verification, Validation, and Co-Design |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Velocity magnitude distribution in a flow through the 25-pin swirl-vane spacer grid of Matis benchmark Velocity magnitude distribution in a flow through the 25-pin swirl-vane spacer grid of Matis benchmark. Computed on Intrepid with Nek5000 and visualized on Eureka with VisIt at the ALCF. Aleks Obabko, Paul Fischer, and Tim Tautges, Argonne National Laboratory Thermal Hydraulic Modeling: Cross-Verification, Validation, and Co-Design PI Name: Paul Fischer

  6. Importance of Second-Order Difference-Frequency Wave-Diffraction Forces in the Validation of a Fast Semi-Submersible Floating Wind Turbine Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couling, A. J.; Goupee, A. J.; Robertson, A. N.; Jonkman, J. M.

    2013-06-01

    To better access the abundant offshore wind resource, efforts across the world are being undertaken to develop and improve floating offshore wind turbine technologies. A critical aspect of creating reliable, mature floating wind turbine technology is the development, verification, and validation of efficient computer-aided-engineering (CAE) tools that can be relied upon in the design process. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has created a comprehensive, coupled analysis CAE tool for floating wind turbines, FAST, which has been verified and utilized in numerous floating wind turbine studies. Several efforts are currently underway that leverage the extensive 1/50th-scale DeepCwind wind/wave basin model test dataset, obtained at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands (MARIN) in 2011, to validate the floating platform functionality of FAST to complement its already validated aerodynamic and structural simulation capabilities. In this paper, further work is undertaken to continue this validation. In particular, the ability of FAST to replicate global response behaviors associated with dynamic wind forces, second-order difference-frequency wave-diffraction forces and their interaction with one another are investigated.

  7. Contam airflow models of three large buildings: Model descriptions and validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Douglas R.; Price, Phillip N.

    2009-09-30

    Airflow and pollutant transport models are useful for several reasons, including protection from or response to biological terrorism. In recent years they have been used for deciding how many biological agent samplers are needed in a given building to detect the release of an agent; to figure out where those samplers should be located; to predict the number of people at risk in the event of a release of a given size and location; to devise response strategies in the event of a release; to determine optimal trade-offs between sampler characteristics (such as detection limit and response time); and so on. For some of these purposes it is necessary to model a specific building of interest: if you are trying to determine optimal sampling locations, you must have a model of your building and not some different building. But for many purposes generic or 'prototypical' building models would suffice. For example, for determining trade-offs between sampler characteristics, results from one building will carry over other, similar buildings. Prototypical building models are also useful for comparing or testing different algorithms or computational pproaches: different researchers can use the same models, thus allowing direct comparison of results in a way that is not otherwise possible. This document discusses prototypical building models developed by the Airflow and Pollutant Transport Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The models are implemented in the Contam v2.4c modeling program, available from the National Institutes for Standards and Technology. We present Contam airflow models of three virtual buildings: a convention center, an airport terminal, and a multi-story office building. All of the models are based to some extent on specific real buildings. Our goal is to produce models that are realistic, in terms of approximate magnitudes, directions, and speeds of airflow and pollutant transport. The three models vary substantially in detail. The airport model

  8. NUMERICAL MODELING OF THE COAGULATION AND POROSITY EVOLUTION OF DUST AGGREGATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Sakagami, Masa-aki [Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Yoshida-nihonmatsu-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Tanaka, Hidekazu, E-mail: satoshi.okuzumi@ax2.ecs.kyoto-u.ac.j [Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan)

    2009-12-20

    Porosity evolution of dust aggregates is crucial in understanding dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. In this study, we present useful tools to study the coagulation and porosity evolution of dust aggregates. First, we present a new numerical method for simulating dust coagulation and porosity evolution as an extension of the conventional Smoluchowski equation. This method follows the evolution of the mean porosity for each aggregate mass simultaneously with the evolution of the mass distribution function. This method reproduces the results of previous Monte Carlo simulations with much less computational expense. Second, we propose a new collision model for porous dust aggregates on the basis of our N-body experiments on aggregate collisions. As the first step, we focus on 'hit-and-stick' collisions, which involve neither compression nor fragmentation of aggregates. We first obtain empirical data on porosity changes between the classical limits of ballistic cluster-cluster and particle-cluster aggregation. Using the data, we construct a recipe for the porosity change due to general hit-and-stick collisions as well as formulae for the aerodynamical and collisional cross sections. Our collision model is thus more realistic than a previous model of Ormel et al. based on the classical aggregation limits only. Simple coagulation simulations using the extended Smoluchowski method show that our collision model explains the fractal dimensions of porous aggregates observed in a full N-body simulation and a laboratory experiment. By contrast, similar simulations using the collision model of Ormel et al. result in much less porous aggregates, meaning that this model underestimates the porosity increase upon unequal-sized collisions. Besides, we discover that aggregates at the high-mass end of the distribution can have a considerably small aerodynamical cross section per unit mass compared with aggregates of lower masses. This occurs when aggregates drift under uniform

  9. Numerical method to test a theoretical model of the quantum interferen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A numerical method is provided to fit the experimental conductivity to the complicated conductivity expression for the quantum interference effect of Anderson localization. This ...

  10. Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billman, L.; Keyser, D.

    2013-08-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), use input-output methodology to estimate gross (not net) jobs and economic impacts of building and operating selected types of renewable electricity generation and fuel plants. This analysis provides the DOE with an assessment of the value, impact, and validity of the JEDI suite of models. While the models produce estimates of jobs, earnings, and economic output, this analysis focuses only on jobs estimates. This validation report includes an introduction to JEDI models, an analysis of the value and impact of the JEDI models, and an analysis of the validity of job estimates generated by JEDI model through comparison to other modeled estimates and comparison to empirical, observed jobs data as reported or estimated for a commercial project, a state, or a region.

  11. Development and Validation of a Slurry Model for Chemical Hydrogen Storage in Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Pires, Richard P.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2014-07-25

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) is developing models for hydrogen storage systems for fuel cell-based light duty vehicle applications for a variety of promising materials. These transient models simulate the performance of the storage system for comparison to the DOE’s Technical Targets and a set of four drive cycles. The purpose of this research is to describe the models developed for slurry-based chemical hydrogen storage materials. The storage systems of both a representative exothermic system based on ammonia borane and endothermic system based on alane were developed and modeled in Simulink®. Once complete the reactor and radiator components of the model were validated with experimental data. The model was then run using a highway cycle, an aggressive cycle, cold-start cycle and hot drive cycle. The system design was adjusted to meet these drive cycles. A sensitivity analysis was then performed to identify the range of material properties where these DOE targets and drive cycles could be met. Materials with a heat of reaction greater than 11 kJ/mol H2 generated and a slurry hydrogen capacity of greater than 11.4% will meet the on-board efficiency and gravimetric capacity targets, respectively.

  12. Geant4 Model Validation of Compton Suppressed System for Process monitoring of Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, Sarah; Unlu, Kenan; Orton, Christopher R.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2013-05-01

    Nuclear material accountancy is of continuous concern for the regulatory, safeguards, and verification communities. In particular, spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities pose one of the most difficult accountancy challenges: monitoring highly radioactive, fluid sample streams in near real-time. The Multi-Isotope Process monitor will allow for near-real-time indication of process alterations using passive gamma-ray detection coupled with multivariate analysis techniques to guard against potential material diversion or to enhance domestic process monitoring. The Compton continuum from the dominant 661.7 keV 137Cs fission product peak obscures lower energy lines which could be used for spectral and multivariate analysis. Compton suppression may be able to mitigate the challenges posed by the high continuum caused by scattering. A Monte Carlo simulation using the Geant4 toolkit is being developed to predict the expected suppressed spectrum from spent fuel samples to estimate the reduction in the Compton continuum. Despite the lack of timing information between decay events in the particle management of Geant4, encouraging results were recorded utilizing only the information within individual decays without accounting for accidental coincidences. The model has been validated with single and cascade decay emitters in two steps: as an unsuppressed system and with suppression activated. Results of the Geant4 model validation will be presented.

  13. Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Wang, Zhiguo; Prange, Micah P.; Wu, Dangxin

    2014-12-01

    This Final Report presents work carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators” (Project number: PL10-Scin-theor-PD2Jf) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project was divided into four tasks: 1) Electronic response functions (ab initio data model) 2) Electron-hole yield, variance, and spatial distribution 3) Ab initio calculations of information carrier properties 4) Transport of electron-hole pairs and scintillation efficiency Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the four tasks is provided in this Final Report. Furthermore, published peer-reviewed articles based on the work carried under this project are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  14. Seasonal thermal energy storage in unsaturated soils: Model development and field validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, C.; Nir, Aharon, Tsang, Chin-Fu

    1991-06-01

    This report summarizes ten years of activity carried out at the Earth Sciences Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBI) in the subject of seasonal storage of thermal energy in unsaturated soils. The objectives of the work were to make a conceptual study of this type of storage, to offer guidelines for planning and evaluation of the method, to produce models and simulation for an actual field experiment, to participate in an on-line data analysis of experimental results. and to evaluate the results in terms of the validation of the concept, models and the experimental techniques. The actual field experiments were performed in Beer-Sheva, Israel. Details of engineering and field operations are not included in this report.

  15. Numerical modeling of multi-GeV laser wakefield electron acceleration inside a dielectric capillary tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paradkar, B. S.; Cros, B.; Maynard, G.; Mora, P.

    2013-08-15

    Numerical modeling of laser wakefield electron acceleration inside a gas filled dielectric capillary tube is presented. Guiding of a short pulse laser inside a dielectric capillary tube over a long distance (∼1 m) and acceleration of an externally injected electron bunch to ultra-relativistic energies (∼5-10 GeV) are demonstrated in the quasi-linear regime of laser wakefield acceleration. Two dimensional axisymmetric simulations were performed with the code WAKE-EP (Extended Performances), which allows computationally efficient simulations of such long scale plasma. The code is an upgrade of the quasi-static particle code, WAKE [P. Mora and T. M. Antonsen, Jr., Phys. Plasmas 4, 217 (1997)], to simulate the acceleration of an externally injected electron bunch (including beam loading effect) and propagation of the laser beam inside a dielectric capillary. The influence of the transverse electric field of the plasma wake on the radial loss of the accelerated electrons to the dielectric wall is investigated. The stable acceleration of electrons to multi-GeV energy with a non-resonant laser pulse with a large spot-size is demonstrated.

  16. Model calibration and validation for OFMSW and sewage sludge co-digestion reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esposito, G.; Frunzo, L.; Panico, A.; Pirozzi, F.

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > Disintegration is the limiting step of the anaerobic co-digestion process. > Disintegration kinetic constant does not depend on the waste particle size. > Disintegration kinetic constant depends only on the waste nature and composition. > The model calibration can be performed on organic waste of any particle size. - Abstract: A mathematical model has recently been proposed by the authors to simulate the biochemical processes that prevail in a co-digestion reactor fed with sewage sludge and the organic fraction of municipal solid waste. This model is based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model no. 1 of the International Water Association, which has been extended to include the co-digestion processes, using surface-based kinetics to model the organic waste disintegration and conversion to carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. When organic waste solids are present in the reactor influent, the disintegration process is the rate-limiting step of the overall co-digestion process. The main advantage of the proposed modeling approach is that the kinetic constant of such a process does not depend on the waste particle size distribution (PSD) and rather depends only on the nature and composition of the waste particles. The model calibration aimed to assess the kinetic constant of the disintegration process can therefore be conducted using organic waste samples of any PSD, and the resulting value will be suitable for all the organic wastes of the same nature as the investigated samples, independently of their PSD. This assumption was proven in this study by biomethane potential experiments that were conducted on organic waste samples with different particle sizes. The results of these experiments were used to calibrate and validate the mathematical model, resulting in a good agreement between the simulated and observed data for any investigated particle size of the solid waste. This study confirms the strength of the proposed model and calibration procedure, which can

  17. Thermal model development and validation for rapid filling of high pressure hydrogen tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Terry A.; Bozinoski, Radoslav; Ye, Jianjun; Sartor, George; Zheng, Jinyang; Yang, Jian

    2015-06-30

    This paper describes the development of thermal models for the filling of high pressure hydrogen tanks with experimental validation. Two models are presented; the first uses a one-dimensional, transient, network flow analysis code developed at Sandia National Labs, and the second uses the commercially available CFD analysis tool Fluent. These models were developed to help assess the safety of Type IV high pressure hydrogen tanks during the filling process. The primary concern for these tanks is due to the increased susceptibility to fatigue failure of the liner caused by the fill process. Thus, a thorough understanding of temperature changes of the hydrogen gas and the heat transfer to the tank walls is essential. The effects of initial pressure, filling time, and fill procedure were investigated to quantify the temperature change and verify the accuracy of the models. In this paper we show that the predictions of mass averaged gas temperature for the one and three-dimensional models compare well with the experiment and both can be used to make predictions for final mass delivery. Furthermore, due to buoyancy and other three-dimensional effects, however, the maximum wall temperature cannot be predicted using one-dimensional tools alone which means that a three-dimensional analysis is required for a safety assessment of the system.

  18. Validation of the thermospheric vector spherical harmonic (VSH) computer model. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    A semi-empirical computer model of the lower thermosphere has been developed that provides a description of the composition and dynamics of the thermosphere (Killeen et al., 1992). Input variables needed to run the VSH model include time, space and geophysical conditions. One of the output variables the model provides, neutral density, is of particular interest to the U.S. Air Force. Neutral densities vary both as a result of change in solar flux (eg. the solar cycle) and as a result of changes in the magnetosphere (eg. large changes occur in neutral density during geomagnetic storms). Satellites in earth orbit experience aerodynamic drag due to the atmospheric density of the thermosphere. Variability in the neutral density described above affects the drag a satellite experiences and as a result can change the orbital characteristics of the satellite. These changes make it difficult to track the satellite's position. Therefore, it is particularly important to insure that the accuracy of the model's neutral density is optimized for all input parameters. To accomplish this, a validation program was developed to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the model's density output by comparing it to SETA-2 (satellite electrostatic accelerometer) total mass density measurements.

  19. Thermal model development and validation for rapid filling of high pressure hydrogen tanks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, Terry A.; Bozinoski, Radoslav; Ye, Jianjun; Sartor, George; Zheng, Jinyang; Yang, Jian

    2015-06-30

    This paper describes the development of thermal models for the filling of high pressure hydrogen tanks with experimental validation. Two models are presented; the first uses a one-dimensional, transient, network flow analysis code developed at Sandia National Labs, and the second uses the commercially available CFD analysis tool Fluent. These models were developed to help assess the safety of Type IV high pressure hydrogen tanks during the filling process. The primary concern for these tanks is due to the increased susceptibility to fatigue failure of the liner caused by the fill process. Thus, a thorough understanding of temperature changes ofmore » the hydrogen gas and the heat transfer to the tank walls is essential. The effects of initial pressure, filling time, and fill procedure were investigated to quantify the temperature change and verify the accuracy of the models. In this paper we show that the predictions of mass averaged gas temperature for the one and three-dimensional models compare well with the experiment and both can be used to make predictions for final mass delivery. Furthermore, due to buoyancy and other three-dimensional effects, however, the maximum wall temperature cannot be predicted using one-dimensional tools alone which means that a three-dimensional analysis is required for a safety assessment of the system.« less

  20. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling, five-year report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The project originated in October 1990 and was scheduled to run for four years. At that time, there was considerable emphasis on developing accurate predictions of the physical carryover of macroscopic particles of partially burnt black liquor and smelt droplets out of the furnace, since this was seen as the main cause of boiler plugging. This placed a major emphasis on gas flow patterns within the furnace and on the mass loss rates and swelling and shrinking rates of burning black liquor drops. As work proceeded on developing the recovery boiler furnace model, it became apparent that some recovery boilers encounter serious plugging problems even when physical carryover was minimal. After the original four-year period was completed, the project was extended to address this issue. The objective of the extended project was to improve the utility of the models by including the black liquor chemistry relevant to air emissions predictions and aerosol formation, and by developing the knowledge base and computational tools to relate furnace model outputs to fouling and plugging of the convective sections of the boilers. The work done to date includes CFD model development and validation, acquisition of information on black liquor combustion fundamentals and development of improved burning models, char bed model development, and model application and simplification.

  1. Validation testing a contaminant transport and natural attenuation simulation model using field data. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flier, S.J.

    1995-12-01

    This research extends the work begun by Enyeart (1994) which evaluated the process of intrinsic bioremediation, and which developed a model for predicting the velocity of an aerobic degradation front, as it traverses the length of a JP-4 contaminant plume. In the present work, Enyeart`s model was validity tested by comparing its output prediction with field measured values. A methodology was developed to compare the model output with field measured data. The results were analyzed, and the results of this first stage of validity testing show a reasonable basis for accepting the model.

  2. Value of Laboratory Experiments for Code Validations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wawersik, W.R.

    1998-12-14

    Numerical codes have become indispensable for designing underground structures and interpretating the behavior of geologic systems. Because of the complexities of geologic systems, however, code calculations often are associated with large quantitative uncertainties. This papers presents three examples to demonstrate the value of laboratory(or bench scale) experiments to evaluate the predictive capabilities of such codes with five major conclusions: Laboratory or bench-scale experiments are a very cost-effective, controlled means of evaluating and validating numerical codes, not instead of but before or at least concurrent with the implementation of in situ studies. The design of good laboratory validation tests must identifj what aspects of a code are to be scrutinized in order to optimize the size, geometry, boundary conditions, and duration of the experiments. The design of good and sometimes difficult numerical analyses and sensitivity studies. Laboratory validation tests must involve: Good validation experiments will generate independent data sets to identify the combined effect of constitutive models, model generalizations, material parameters, and numerical algorithms. Successfid validations of numerical codes mandate a close collaboration between experimentalists and analysts drawing from the full gamut of observations, measurements, and mathematical results.

  3. CFD Model Development and validation for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, Yassin; Corradini, Michael; Tokuhiro, Akira; Wei, Thomas Y.C.

    2014-07-14

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling Systems (RCCS) is a passive safety system that will be incorporated in the VTHR design. The system was designed to remove the heat from the reactor cavity and maintain the temperature of structures and concrete walls under desired limits during normal operation (steady-state) and accident scenarios. A small scale (1:23) water-cooled experimental facility was scaled, designed, and constructed in order to study the complex thermohydraulic phenomena taking place in the RCCS during steady-state and transient conditions. The facility represents a portion of the reactor vessel with nine stainless steel coolant risers and utilizes water as coolant. The facility was equipped with instrumentation to measure temperatures and flow rates and a general verification was completed during the shakedown. A model of the experimental facility was prepared using RELAP5-3D and simulations were performed to validate the scaling procedure. The experimental data produced during the steady-state run were compared with the simulation results obtained using RELAP5-3D. The overall behavior of the facility met the expectations. The facility capabilities were confirmed to be very promising in performing additional experimental tests, including flow visualization, and produce data for code validation.

  4. Validation of Multiple Tools for Flat Plate Photovoltaic Modeling Against Measured Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, J.; Whitmore, J.; Blair, N.; Dobos, A. P.

    2014-08-01

    This report expands upon a previous work by the same authors, published in the 40th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists conference. In this validation study, comprehensive analysis is performed on nine photovoltaic systems for which NREL could obtain detailed performance data and specifications, including three utility-scale systems and six commercial scale systems. Multiple photovoltaic performance modeling tools were used to model these nine systems, and the error of each tool was analyzed compared to quality-controlled measured performance data. This study shows that, excluding identified outliers, all tools achieve annual errors within +/-8% and hourly root mean squared errors less than 7% for all systems. It is further shown using SAM that module model and irradiance input choices can change the annual error with respect to measured data by as much as 6.6% for these nine systems, although all combinations examined still fall within an annual error range of +/-8.5%. Additionally, a seasonal variation in monthly error is shown for all tools. Finally, the effects of irradiance data uncertainty and the use of default loss assumptions on annual error are explored, and two approaches to reduce the error inherent in photovoltaic modeling are proposed.

  5. From deep TLS validation to ensembles of atomic models built from elemental motions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Afonine, Pavel V.; Van Benschoten, Andrew H.; Fraser, James S.; Adams, Paul D.

    2015-07-28

    The translation–libration–screw model first introduced by Cruickshank, Schomaker and Trueblood describes the concerted motions of atomic groups. Using TLS models can improve the agreement between calculated and experimental diffraction data. Because the T, L and S matrices describe a combination of atomic vibrations and librations, TLS models can also potentially shed light on molecular mechanisms involving correlated motions. However, this use of TLS models in mechanistic studies is hampered by the difficulties in translating the results of refinement into molecular movement or a structural ensemble. To convert the matrices into a constituent molecular movement, the matrix elements must satisfy severalmore » conditions. Refining the T, L and S matrix elements as independent parameters without taking these conditions into account may result in matrices that do not represent concerted molecular movements. Here, a mathematical framework and the computational tools to analyze TLS matrices, resulting in either explicit decomposition into descriptions of the underlying motions or a report of broken conditions, are described. The description of valid underlying motions can then be output as a structural ensemble. All methods are implemented as part of the PHENIX project.« less

  6. Modeling Framework and Validation of a Smart Grid and Demand Response System for Wind Power Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broeer, Torsten; Fuller, Jason C.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, David P.; Djilali, Ned

    2014-01-31

    Electricity generation from wind power and other renewable energy sources is increasing, and their variability introduces new challenges to the power system. The emergence of smart grid technologies in recent years has seen a paradigm shift in redefining the electrical system of the future, in which controlled response of the demand side is used to balance fluctuations and intermittencies from the generation side. This paper presents a modeling framework for an integrated electricity system where loads become an additional resource. The agent-based model represents a smart grid power system integrating generators, transmission, distribution, loads and market. The model incorporates generator and load controllers, allowing suppliers and demanders to bid into a Real-Time Pricing (RTP) electricity market. The modeling framework is applied to represent a physical demonstration project conducted on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington, USA, and validation simulations are performed using actual dynamic data. Wind power is then introduced into the power generation mix illustrating the potential of demand response to mitigate the impact of wind power variability, primarily through thermostatically controlled loads. The results also indicate that effective implementation of Demand Response (DR) to assist integration of variable renewable energy resources requires a diversity of loads to ensure functionality of the overall system.

  7. From deep TLS validation to ensembles of atomic models built from elemental motions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Afonine, Pavel V.; Van Benschoten, Andrew H.; Fraser, James S.; Adams, Paul D.

    2015-07-28

    The translation–libration–screw model first introduced by Cruickshank, Schomaker and Trueblood describes the concerted motions of atomic groups. Using TLS models can improve the agreement between calculated and experimental diffraction data. Because the T, L and S matrices describe a combination of atomic vibrations and librations, TLS models can also potentially shed light on molecular mechanisms involving correlated motions. However, this use of TLS models in mechanistic studies is hampered by the difficulties in translating the results of refinement into molecular movement or a structural ensemble. To convert the matrices into a constituent molecular movement, the matrix elements must satisfy several conditions. Refining the T, L and S matrix elements as independent parameters without taking these conditions into account may result in matrices that do not represent concerted molecular movements. Here, a mathematical framework and the computational tools to analyze TLS matrices, resulting in either explicit decomposition into descriptions of the underlying motions or a report of broken conditions, are described. The description of valid underlying motions can then be output as a structural ensemble. All methods are implemented as part of the PHENIX project.

  8. Numerical research of the optimal control problem in the semi-Markov inventory model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorshenin, Andrey K.

    2015-03-10

    This paper is devoted to the numerical simulation of stochastic system for inventory management products using controlled semi-Markov process. The results of a special software for the systems research and finding the optimal control are presented.

  9. HELIOSPHERIC PROPAGATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS: COMPARISON OF NUMERICAL WSA-ENLIL+CONE MODEL AND ANALYTICAL DRAG-BASED MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrnak, B.; ic, T.; Dumbovi?, M.; Temmer, M.; Mstl, C.; Veronig, A. M.; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Odstr?il, D. E-mail: tzic@geof.hr E-mail: manuela.temmer@uni-graz.at E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at E-mail: m.leila.mays@nasa.gov

    2014-08-01

    Real-time forecasting of the arrival of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at Earth, based on remote solar observations, is one of the central issues of space-weather research. In this paper, we compare arrival-time predictions calculated applying the numerical ''WSA-ENLIL+Cone model'' and the analytical ''drag-based model'' (DBM). Both models use coronagraphic observations of CMEs as input data, thus providing an early space-weather forecast two to four days before the arrival of the disturbance at the Earth, depending on the CME speed. It is shown that both methods give very similar results if the drag parameter ? = 0.1 is used in DBM in combination with a background solar-wind speed of w = 400 km s{sup 1}. For this combination, the mean value of the difference between arrival times calculated by ENLIL and DBM is ?-bar =0.099.0 hr with an average of the absolute-value differences of |?|-bar =7.1 hr. Comparing the observed arrivals (O) with the calculated ones (C) for ENLIL gives O C = 0.3 16.9 hr and, analogously, O C = +1.1 19.1 hr for DBM. Applying ? = 0.2 with w = 450 km s{sup 1} in DBM, one finds O C = 1.7 18.3 hr, with an average of the absolute-value differences of 14.8 hr, which is similar to that for ENLIL, 14.1 hr. Finally, we demonstrate that the prediction accuracy significantly degrades with increasing solar activity.

  10. A Testing Platform for Validation of Overhead Conductor Aging Models and Understanding Thermal Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irminger, Philip; Starke, Michael R; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D; Young II, Marcus Aaron; Rizy, D Tom; Stovall, John P; Overholt, Philip N

    2014-01-01

    Power system equipment manufacturers and researchers continue to experiment with novel overhead electric conductor designs that support better conductor performance and address congestion issues. To address the technology gap in testing these novel designs, Oak Ridge National Laboratory constructed the Powerline Conductor Accelerated Testing (PCAT) facility to evaluate the performance of novel overhead conductors in an accelerated fashion in a field environment. Additionally, PCAT has the capability to test advanced sensors and measurement methods for accessing overhead conductor performance and condition. Equipped with extensive measurement and monitoring devices, PCAT provides a platform to improve/validate conductor computer models and assess the performance of novel conductors. The PCAT facility and its testing capabilities are described in this paper.

  11. Thermodynamic modeling and experimental validation of the Fe-Al-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teng, Zhenke; Zhang, F; Miller, Michael K; Liu, Chain T; Huang, Shenyan; Chou, Y.T.; Tien, R; Chang, Y A; Liaw, Peter K

    2012-01-01

    NiAl-type precipitate-strengthened ferritic steels have been known as potential materials for the steam turbine applications. In this study, thermodynamic descriptions of the B2-NiAl type nano-scaled precipitates and body-centered-cubic (BCC) Fe matrix phase for four alloys based on the Fe-Al-Ni-Cr-Mo system were developed as a function of the alloy composition at the aging temperature. The calculated phase structure, composition, and volume fraction were validated by the experimental investigations using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and atom probe tomography. With the ability to accurately predict the key microstructural features related to the mechanical properties in a given alloy system, the established thermodynamic model in the current study may significantly accelerate the alloy design process of the NiAl-strengthened ferritic steels.

  12. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D.; Rose, Brent S.; Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal; McHale, Michael T.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Vaida, Florin; Mell, Loren K.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI)=1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (?), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

  13. Validation, Proof-of-Concept, and Postaudit of the Groundwater Flow and Transport Model of the Project Shoal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed Hassan

    2004-09-01

    The groundwater flow and radionuclide transport model characterizing the Shoal underground nuclear test has been accepted by the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. According to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) between DOE and the State of Nevada, the next steps in the closure process for the site are then model validation (or postaudit), the proof-of-concept, and the long-term monitoring stage. This report addresses the development of the validation strategy for the Shoal model, needed for preparing the subsurface Corrective Action Decision Document-Corrective Action Plan and the development of the proof-of-concept tools needed during the five-year monitoring/validation period. The approach builds on a previous model, but is adapted and modified to the site-specific conditions and challenges of the Shoal site.

  14. Evaluating Domestic Hot Water Distribution System Options With Validated Analysis Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weitzel, E.; Hoeschele, M.

    2014-09-01

    A developing body of work is forming that collects data on domestic hot water consumption, water use behaviors, and energy efficiency of various distribution systems. A full distribution system developed in TRNSYS has been validated using field monitoring data and then exercised in a number of climates to understand climate impact on performance. This study builds upon previous analysis modelling work to evaluate differing distribution systems and the sensitivities of water heating energy and water use efficiency to variations of climate, load, distribution type, insulation and compact plumbing practices. Overall 124 different TRNSYS models were simulated. Of the configurations evaluated, distribution losses account for 13-29% of the total water heating energy use and water use efficiency ranges from 11-22%. The base case, an uninsulated trunk and branch system sees the most improvement in energy consumption by insulating and locating the water heater central to all fixtures. Demand recirculation systems are not projected to provide significant energy savings and in some cases increase energy consumption. Water use is most efficient with demand recirculation systems, followed by the insulated trunk and branch system with a central water heater. Compact plumbing practices and insulation have the most impact on energy consumption (2-6% for insulation and 3-4% per 10 gallons of enclosed volume reduced). The results of this work are useful in informing future development of water heating best practices guides as well as more accurate (and simulation time efficient) distribution models for annual whole house simulation programs.

  15. A Numerical Model Without Truncation Error for a Steady-State Analysis of a Once-Through Steam Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sim, Yoon Sub; Kim, Eui Kwang; Eoh, Jae Hyuk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    To overcome the drawbacks of conventional schemes for a numerical analysis of a steam generator (SG), an efficient numerical model has been developed to analyze the steady state of a once-through-type SG where the feedwater is heated to superheated steam. In the developed model, the temperature and enthalpy are defined at the boundary of a calculation cell, and the exact solutions for the temperature distribution in a calculation cell are utilized. This feature of the developed model frees calculation from the undesirable effects of numerical diffusion, and only a small number of nodes are required. Also, the developed model removes the ambiguity from the parameter values at the inlet and exit of a calculation.The BoSupSG-SS computer code was developed by using the analysis model, and it performed well with only three calculation nodes to analyze a superheated SG. The developed model can be effectively used for the cases where a fast one-dimensional calculation is required such as an SG or system design analysis.

  16. Numerical modeling of heat-transfer and the influence of process parameters on tailoring the grain morphology of IN718 in electron beam additive manufacturing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Raghavan, Narendran; Dehoff, Ryan; Pannala, Sreekanth; Simunovic, Srdjan; Kirka, Michael; Turner, John; Carlson, Neil; Babu, Sudarsanam S.

    2016-04-26

    The fabrication of 3-D parts from CAD models by additive manufacturing (AM) is a disruptive technology that is transforming the metal manufacturing industry. The correlation between solidification microstructure and mechanical properties has been well understood in the casting and welding processes over the years. This paper focuses on extending these principles to additive manufacturing to understand the transient phenomena of repeated melting and solidification during electron beam powder melting process to achieve site-specific microstructure control within a fabricated component. In this paper, we have developed a novel melt scan strategy for electron beam melting of nickel-base superalloy (Inconel 718) andmore » also analyzed 3-D heat transfer conditions using a parallel numerical solidification code (Truchas) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spatial and temporal variations of temperature gradient (G) and growth velocity (R) at the liquid-solid interface of the melt pool were calculated as a function of electron beam parameters. By manipulating the relative number of voxels that lie in the columnar or equiaxed region, the crystallographic texture of the components can be controlled to an extent. The analysis of the parameters provided optimum processing conditions that will result in columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) during the solidification. Furthermore, the results from the numerical simulations were validated by experimental processing and characterization thereby proving the potential of additive manufacturing process to achieve site-specific crystallographic texture control within a fabricated component.« less

  17. Numerical modeling of the groundwater contaminant transport for the Lake Karachai Area: The methodological approach and the basic two- dimensional regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrov, A.V.; Samsonova, L.M.; Vasil`kova, N.A.; Zinin, A.I.; Zinina, G.A. |

    1994-06-01

    Methodological aspects of the numerical modeling of the groundwater contaminant transport for the Lake Karachay area are discussed. Main features of conditions of the task are the high grade of non-uniformity of the aquifer in the fractured rock massif and the high density of the waste solutions, and also the high volume of the input data: both on the part of parameters of the aquifer (number of pump tests) and on the part of observations of functions of processes (long-time observations by the monitoring well grid). The modeling process for constructing the two dimensional regional model is described, and this model is presented as the basic model for subsequent full three-dimensional modeling in sub-areas of interest. Original powerful mathematical apparatus and computer codes for finite-difference numerical modeling are used.

  18. Rolling Process Modeling Report. Finite-Element Model Validation and Parametric Study on various Rolling Process parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soulami, Ayoub; Lavender, Curt A.; Paxton, Dean M.; Burkes, Douglas

    2015-06-15

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been investigating manufacturing processes for the uranium-10% molybdenum alloy plate-type fuel for high-performance research reactors in the United States. This work supports the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Material Management and Minimization Reactor Conversion Program. This report documents modeling results of PNNL’s efforts to perform finite-element simulations to predict roll-separating forces for various rolling mill geometries for PNNL, Babcock & Wilcox Co., Y-12 National Security Complex, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Idaho National Laboratory. The model developed and presented in a previous report has been subjected to further validation study using new sets of experimental data generated from a rolling mill at PNNL. Simulation results of both hot rolling and cold rolling of uranium-10% molybdenum coupons have been compared with experimental results. The model was used to predict roll-separating forces at different temperatures and reductions for five rolling mills within the National Nuclear Security Administration Fuel Fabrication Capability project. This report also presents initial results of a finite-element model microstructure-based approach to study the surface roughness at the interface between zirconium and uranium-10% molybdenum.

  19. Vaporization dynamics of volatile perfluorocarbon droplets: A theoretical model and in vitro validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doinikov, Alexander A. Bouakaz, Ayache; Sheeran, Paul S.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Perfluorocarbon (PFC) microdroplets, called phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs), are a promising tool in ultrasound imaging and therapy. Interest in PCCAs is motivated by the fact that they can be triggered to transition from the liquid state to the gas state by an externally applied acoustic pulse. This property opens up new approaches to applications in ultrasound medicine. Insight into the physics of vaporization of PFC droplets is vital for effective use of PCCAs and for anticipating bioeffects. PCCAs composed of volatile PFCs (with low boiling point) exhibit complex dynamic behavior: after vaporization by a short acoustic pulse, a PFC droplet turns into a vapor bubble which undergoes overexpansion and damped radial oscillation until settling to a final diameter. This behavior has not been well described theoretically so far. The purpose of our study is to develop an improved theoretical model that describes the vaporization dynamics of volatile PFC droplets and to validate this model by comparison with in vitro experimental data. Methods: The derivation of the model is based on applying the mathematical methods of fluid dynamics and thermodynamics to the process of the acoustic vaporization of PFC droplets. The used approach corrects shortcomings of the existing models. The validation of the model is carried out by comparing simulated results with in vitro experimental data acquired by ultrahigh speed video microscopy for octafluoropropane (OFP) and decafluorobutane (DFB) microdroplets of different sizes. Results: The developed theory allows one to simulate the growth of a vapor bubble inside a PFC droplet until the liquid PFC is completely converted into vapor, and the subsequent overexpansion and damped oscillations of the vapor bubble, including the influence of an externally applied acoustic pulse. To evaluate quantitatively the difference between simulated and experimental results, the L2-norm errors were calculated for all cases where the

  20. Kinetics Study of Solid Ammonia Borane Hydrogen Release Modeling and Experimental Validation for Chemical Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Yong-Joon; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Maupin, Gary D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2014-02-24

    Ammonia borane (AB), NH3BH3, is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage with 19.6 wt% gravimetric hydrogen capacity of which 16.2 wt% hydrogen can be utilized below 200C. We have investigated the kinetics of hydrogen release from AB and from an AB-methyl cellulose (AB/MC) composite at temperatures of 160-300C using both experiments and modeling. The purpose of our study was to show safe hydrogen release without thermal runaway effects and to validate system model kinetics. AB/MC released hydrogen at ~20C lower than neat AB and at a rate that is two times faster. Based on the experimental results, the kinetics equations were revised to better represent the growth and nucleation process during decomposition of AB. We explored two different reactor concepts; Auger and fixed bed. The current Auger reactor concept turned out to not be appropriate, however, we demonstrated safe self-propagation of the hydrogen release reaction of solid AB/MC in a fixed bed reactor.

  1. Coupling a Mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction Model with Large-Eddy Simulation for Realistic Wind Plant Aerodynamics Simulations (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draxl, C.; Churchfield, M.; Mirocha, J.; Lee, S.; Lundquist, J.; Michalakes, J.; Moriarty, P.; Purkayastha, A.; Sprague, M.; Vanderwende, B.

    2014-06-01

    Wind plant aerodynamics are influenced by a combination of microscale and mesoscale phenomena. Incorporating mesoscale atmospheric forcing (e.g., diurnal cycles and frontal passages) into wind plant simulations can lead to a more accurate representation of microscale flows, aerodynamics, and wind turbine/plant performance. Our goal is to couple a numerical weather prediction model that can represent mesoscale flow [specifically the Weather Research and Forecasting model] with a microscale LES model (OpenFOAM) that can predict microscale turbulence and wake losses.

  2. Climatically Diverse Data Set for Flat-Plate PV Module Model Validations (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climatically Diverse Data Set for Flat-Plate PV Module Model Validations Bill Marion 2013 Sandia PV Performance Modeling Workshop Santa Clara, CA, May 1-2, 2013 NREL/PR-5200-58600 2 Background * Work began in FY2011 to fulfill a FY2014 milestone for DOE's System Integration Technology Validation Project o "Comprehensive data set, with low measurement uncertainty, of I-V curves and associated meteorological data for PV modules representing all flat-plate technologies and for weather

  3. Characterization and validation of an in silico toxicology model to predict the mutagenic potential of drug impurities*

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valerio, Luis G.; Cross, Kevin P.

    2012-05-01

    Control and minimization of human exposure to potential genotoxic impurities found in drug substances and products is an important part of preclinical safety assessments of new drug products. The FDA's 2008 draft guidance on genotoxic and carcinogenic impurities in drug substances and products allows use of computational quantitative structureactivity relationships (QSAR) to identify structural alerts for known and expected impurities present at levels below qualified thresholds. This study provides the information necessary to establish the practical use of a new in silico toxicology model for predicting Salmonella t. mutagenicity (Ames assay outcome) of drug impurities and other chemicals. We describe the model's chemical content and toxicity fingerprint in terms of compound space, molecular and structural toxicophores, and have rigorously tested its predictive power using both cross-validation and external validation experiments, as well as case studies. Consistent with desired regulatory use, the model performs with high sensitivity (81%) and high negative predictivity (81%) based on external validation with 2368 compounds foreign to the model and having known mutagenicity. A database of drug impurities was created from proprietary FDA submissions and the public literature which found significant overlap between the structural features of drug impurities and training set chemicals in the QSAR model. Overall, the model's predictive performance was found to be acceptable for screening drug impurities for Salmonella mutagenicity. -- Highlights: ? We characterize a new in silico model to predict mutagenicity of drug impurities. ? The model predicts Salmonella mutagenicity and will be useful for safety assessment. ? We examine toxicity fingerprints and toxicophores of this Ames assay model. ? We compare these attributes to those found in drug impurities known to FDA/CDER. ? We validate the model and find it has a desired predictive performance.

  4. Thermal aging modeling and validation on the Mo containing Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-04-01

    Thermodynamics of intermetallic phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical knowledge to understand thermal aging effect on the phase stability of Mo-containing austenitic steels, which subsequently facilitates alloy design/improvement and degradation mitigation of these materials for reactor applications. Among the intermetallic phases, Chi (χ), Laves, and Sigma (σ) are often of concern because of their tendency to cause embrittlement of the materials. The focus of this study is thermal stability of the Chi and Laves phases as they were less studied compared to the Sigma phase. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, thermal stability of intermetallic phases in Mo containing Fe-Cr-Ni alloys was investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 C for different annealing times. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the precipitates of the intermetallic phases were carefully examined by scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Three key findings resulted from this study. First, the Chi phase is stable at high temperature, and with decreasing temperature it transforms into the Laves phase that is stable at low temperature. Secondly, Cr, Mo, Ni are soluble in both the Chi and Laves phases, with the solubility of Mo playing a major role in the relative stability of the intermetallic phases. Thirdly, in situ transformation from Chi phase to Laves phase was directly observed, which increased the local strain field, generated dislocations in the intermetallic phases, and altered the precipitate phase orientation relationship with the austenitic matrix. The thermodynamic models that were developed and validated were then applied to evaluating the effect of Mo on the thermal stability of intermetallic phases in type 316 and NF709 stainless steels.

  5. Validation of a Fast-Fluid-Dynamics Model for Predicting Distribution of Particles with Low Stokes Number

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuo, Wangda; Chen, Qingyan

    2011-06-01

    To design a healthy indoor environment, it is important to study airborne particle distribution indoors. As an intermediate model between multizone models and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), a fast fluid dynamics (FFD) model can be used to provide temporal and spatial information of particle dispersion in real time. This study evaluated the accuracy of the FFD for predicting transportation of particles with low Stokes number in a duct and in a room with mixed convection. The evaluation was to compare the numerical results calculated by the FFD with the corresponding experimental data and the results obtained by the CFD. The comparison showed that the FFD could capture major pattern of particle dispersion, which is missed in models with well-mixed assumptions. Although the FFD was less accurate than the CFD partially due to its simplification in numeric schemes, it was 53 times faster than the CFD.

  6. Calibration and validation of a spar-type floating offshore wind turbine model using the FAST dynamic simulation tool

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Browning, J. R.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Goupee, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, high-quality computer simulations are required when designing floating wind turbines because of the complex dynamic responses that are inherent with a high number of degrees of freedom and variable metocean conditions. In 2007, the FAST wind turbine simulation tool, developed and maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was expanded to include capabilities that are suitable for modeling floating offshore wind turbines. In an effort to validate FAST and other offshore wind energy modeling tools, DOE funded the DeepCwind project that tested three prototype floating wind turbines at 1/50th scale inmore » a wave basin, including a semisubmersible, a tension-leg platform, and a spar buoy. This paper describes the use of the results of the spar wave basin tests to calibrate and validate the FAST offshore floating simulation tool, and presents some initial results of simulated dynamic responses of the spar to several combinations of wind and sea states. Wave basin tests with the spar attached to a scale model of the NREL 5-megawatt reference wind turbine were performed at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands under the DeepCwind project. This project included free-decay tests, tests with steady or turbulent wind and still water (both periodic and irregular waves with no wind), and combined wind/wave tests. The resulting data from the 1/50th model was scaled using Froude scaling to full size and used to calibrate and validate a full-size simulated model in FAST. Results of the model calibration and validation include successes, subtleties, and limitations of both wave basin testing and FAST modeling capabilities.« less

  7. Calibration and validation of a spar-type floating offshore wind turbine model using the FAST dynamic simulation tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browning, J. R.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Goupee, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, high-quality computer simulations are required when designing floating wind turbines because of the complex dynamic responses that are inherent with a high number of degrees of freedom and variable metocean conditions. In 2007, the FAST wind turbine simulation tool, developed and maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was expanded to include capabilities that are suitable for modeling floating offshore wind turbines. In an effort to validate FAST and other offshore wind energy modeling tools, DOE funded the DeepCwind project that tested three prototype floating wind turbines at 1/50th scale in a wave basin, including a semisubmersible, a tension-leg platform, and a spar buoy. This paper describes the use of the results of the spar wave basin tests to calibrate and validate the FAST offshore floating simulation tool, and presents some initial results of simulated dynamic responses of the spar to several combinations of wind and sea states. Wave basin tests with the spar attached to a scale model of the NREL 5-megawatt reference wind turbine were performed at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands under the DeepCwind project. This project included free-decay tests, tests with steady or turbulent wind and still water (both periodic and irregular waves with no wind), and combined wind/wave tests. The resulting data from the 1/50th model was scaled using Froude scaling to full size and used to calibrate and validate a full-size simulated model in FAST. Results of the model calibration and validation include successes, subtleties, and limitations of both wave basin testing and FAST modeling capabilities.

  8. Experimental and numerical investigations of beryllium strength models using the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry de Frahan, M. T.; Belof, J. L.; Cavallo, R. M.; Raevsky, V. A.; Ignatova, O. N.; Lebedev, A.; Ancheta, D. S.; El-dasher, B. S.; Florando, J. N.; Gallegos, G. F.; Johnsen, E.; LeBlanc, M. M.

    2015-06-14

    A recent collaboration between LLNL and VNIIEF has produced a set of high explosive driven Rayleigh-Taylor strength data for beryllium. Design simulations using legacy strength models from Steinberg-Lund and Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) suggested an optimal design that would delineate between not just different strength models, but different parameters sets of the PTW model. Application of the models to the post-shot results, however, shows close to classical growth. We characterize the material properties of the beryllium tested in the experiments. We also discuss recent efforts to simulate the data using the legacy strength models as well as the more recent RING relaxation model developed at VNIIEF. Finally, we present shock and ramp-loading recovery experiments conducted as part of the collaboration.

  9. Numerical modeling of pulsed laser-material interaction and of laser plume dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Qiang; Shi, Yina

    2015-03-10

    We have developed two-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) code which is used to study the physical processes, the plasma absorption, the crater profile, and the temperature distribution on metallic target and below the surface. The ALE method overcomes problems with Lagrangian moving mesh distortion by mesh smoothing and conservative quantities remapping from Lagrangian mesh to smoothed one. A new second order accurate diffusion solver has been implemented for the thermal conduction and radiation transport on distorted mesh. The results of numerical simulation of pulsed laser ablation are presented. The influences of different processes, such as time evolution of the surface temperature, interspecies interactions (elastic collisions, recombination-dissociation reaction), interaction with an ambient gas are examined. The study presents particular interest for the analysis of experimental results obtained during pulsed laser ablation.

  10. Direct-contact condensers for open-cycle OTEC applications: Model validation with fresh water experiments for structured packings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharathan, D.; Parsons, B.K.; Althof, J.A.

    1988-10-01

    The objective of the reported work was to develop analytical methods for evaluating the design and performance of advanced high-performance heat exchangers for use in open-cycle thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems. This report describes the progress made on validating a one-dimensional, steady-state analytical computer of fresh water experiments. The condenser model represents the state of the art in direct-contact heat exchange for condensation for OC-OTEC applications. This is expected to provide a basis for optimizing OC-OTEC plant configurations. Using the model, we examined two condenser geometries, a cocurrent and a countercurrent configuration. This report provides detailed validation results for important condenser parameters for cocurrent and countercurrent flows. Based on the comparisons and uncertainty overlap between the experimental data and predictions, the model is shown to predict critical condenser performance parameters with an uncertainty acceptable for general engineering design and performance evaluations. 33 refs., 69 figs., 38 tabs.

  11. Development and Validation of Multidimensional Models of Supercritical CO2 Energy Conversion Systems for Nuclear Power Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Podowski, Michael Z.

    2015-01-22

    A general objective of this project was to develop, verify and validate mechanistic multidimensional models of local flow and heat transfer in supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO2) devices and systems, and to demonstrate the application of the new models to selected components of S-CO2 nuclear energy transport systems. Both steady-state and time-dependent operating conditions have been investigated. The overall workscope consisted of the following three major parts: Development, testing and validation of a mechanistic model of forced-convection heat transfer in heated channels cooled using S-CO2 at slightly supercritical pressures; Development, testing and verification/validation of a new model of the dynamics of closed- loop S-CO2 heat transport systems; and, Formulation, testing and verification of a mechanistic model for the analysis of flow and pressure distribution in S-CO2 compressors. The results of the work performed for the project have been documented in several publications.

  12. Numerical modeling of the effects of wave energy converter characteristics on nearshore wave conditions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chang, G.; Ruehl, K.; Jones, C. A.; Roberts, J.; Chartrand, C.

    2015-12-24

    Modeled nearshore wave propagation was investigated downstream of simulated wave energy converters (WECs) to evaluate overall near- and far-field effects of WEC arrays. Model sensitivity to WEC characteristics and WEC array deployment scenarios was evaluated using a modified version of an industry standard wave model, Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), which allows the incorporation of device-specific WEC characteristics to specify obstacle transmission. The sensitivity study illustrated that WEC device type and subsequently its size directly resulted in wave height variations in the lee of the WEC array. Wave heights decreased up to 30% between modeled scenarios with and without WECs formore » large arrays (100 devices) of relatively sizable devices (26 m in diameter) with peak power generation near to the modeled incident wave height. Other WEC types resulted in less than 15% differences in modeled wave height with and without WECs, with lesser influence for WECs less than 10 m in diameter. Wave directions and periods were largely insensitive to changes in parameters. Furthermore, additional model parameterization and analysis are required to fully explore the model sensitivity of peak wave period and mean wave direction to the varying of the parameters.« less

  13. Numerical modeling of the effects of wave energy converter characteristics on nearshore wave conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, G.; Ruehl, K.; Jones, C. A.; Roberts, J.; Chartrand, C.

    2015-12-24

    Modeled nearshore wave propagation was investigated downstream of simulated wave energy converters (WECs) to evaluate overall near- and far-field effects of WEC arrays. Model sensitivity to WEC characteristics and WEC array deployment scenarios was evaluated using a modified version of an industry standard wave model, Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), which allows the incorporation of device-specific WEC characteristics to specify obstacle transmission. The sensitivity study illustrated that WEC device type and subsequently its size directly resulted in wave height variations in the lee of the WEC array. Wave heights decreased up to 30% between modeled scenarios with and without WECs for large arrays (100 devices) of relatively sizable devices (26 m in diameter) with peak power generation near to the modeled incident wave height. Other WEC types resulted in less than 15% differences in modeled wave height with and without WECs, with lesser influence for WECs less than 10 m in diameter. Wave directions and periods were largely insensitive to changes in parameters. Furthermore, additional model parameterization and analysis are required to fully explore the model sensitivity of peak wave period and mean wave direction to the varying of the parameters.

  14. Numerical computation of Pop plot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-03-23

    The Pop plot — distance-of-run to detonation versus initial shock pressure — is a key characterization of shock initiation in a heterogeneous explosive. Reactive burn models for high explosives (HE) must reproduce the experimental Pop plot to have any chance of accurately predicting shock initiation phenomena. This report describes a methodology for automating the computation of a Pop plot for a specific explosive with a given HE model. Illustrative examples of the computation are shown for PBX 9502 with three burn models (SURF, WSD and Forest Fire) utilizing the xRage code, which is the Eulerian ASC hydrocode at LANL. Comparison of the numerical and experimental Pop plot can be the basis for a validation test or as an aid in calibrating the burn rate of an HE model. Issues with calibration are discussed.

  15. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Houze, Robert, A., Jr.; Zeng, Xiping

    2013-03-14

    observations to evaluate model simulations In cooperation with Profs. Bob Houze at University of Washington and Steven Rutledge at Colorado State University, numerical model results were evaluated with observations from W- and C-band radars and CloudSat/TRMM satellites. These studies exhibited some shortcomings of current numerical models, such as too little of thin anvil clouds, directing the future improvement of cloud microphysics parameterization in CRMs. Two papers of Powell et al (2012) and Zeng et al. (2013), summarizing these studies, were published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. 4. Analyzed the water budgets of MCSs Using ARM data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP and other field campaigns, the Goddard CRM simulations were carried out to analyze the water budgets of clouds from TWP-ICE and AMMA. The simulations generated a set of datasets on clouds and radiation, which are available http://cloud.gsfc.nasa.gov/. The cloud datasets were available for modelers and other researchers aiming to improve the representation of cloud processes in multi-scale modeling frameworks, GCMs and climate models. Special datasets, such as 3D cloud distributions every six minutes for TWP-ICE, were requested and generated for ARM/ASR investigators. Data server records show that 86,206 datasets were downloaded by 120 users between April of 2010 and January of 2012. 5. MMF simulations The Goddard MMF (multi-scale modeling framework) has been improved by coupling with the Goddard Land Information System (LIS) and the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GOES5). It has also been optimized on NASA HEC supercomputers and can be run over 4000 CPUs. The improved MMF with high horizontal resolution (1 x 1 degree) is currently being applied to cases covering 2005 and 2006. The results show that the spatial distribution pattern of precipitation rate is well simulated by the MMF through comparisons with satellite retrievals from the CMOPRH and GPCP data sets. In addition, the MMF results

  16. SU-E-T-50: Automatic Validation of Megavoltage Beams Modeled for Clinical Use in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melchior, M; Salinas Aranda, F; Sciutto, S; Dodat, D; Larragueta, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To automatically validate megavoltage beams modeled in XiO 4.50 (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden) and Varian Eclipse Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) (Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA, USA), reducing validation time before beam-on for clinical use. Methods: A software application that can automatically read and analyze DICOM RT Dose and W2CAD files was developed using MatLab integrated development environment.TPS calculated dose distributions, in DICOM RT Dose format, and dose values measured in different Varian Clinac beams, in W2CAD format, were compared. Experimental beam data used were those acquired for beam commissioning, collected on a water phantom with a 2D automatic beam scanning system.Two methods were chosen to evaluate dose distributions fitting: gamma analysis and point tests described in Appendix E of IAEA TECDOC-1583. Depth dose curves and beam profiles were evaluated for both open and wedged beams. Tolerance parameters chosen for gamma analysis are 3% and 3 mm dose and distance, respectively.Absolute dose was measured independently at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 to validate software results. Results: TPS calculated depth dose distributions agree with measured beam data under fixed precision values at all depths analyzed. Measured beam dose profiles match TPS calculated doses with high accuracy in both open and wedged beams. Depth and profile dose distributions fitting analysis show gamma values < 1. Relative errors at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 meet therein recommended tolerances.Independent absolute dose measurements at points proposed in Appendix E of TECDOC-1583 confirm software results. Conclusion: Automatic validation of megavoltage beams modeled for their use in the clinic was accomplished. The software tool developed proved efficient, giving users a convenient and reliable environment to decide whether to accept or not a beam model for clinical use. Validation time before beam-on for clinical use was

  17. A numerical test of KPZ scaling; Potts models coupled to two-dimensional quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baillie, C.F. , 91 - Nozay ); Johnston, D.A. . Dept. of Mathematics)

    1992-06-07

    In this paper, the authors perform Monte-Carlo simulations using the Wolff cluster algorithm of the q = 2 (Ising), 3, 4 and q = 10 Potts models on dynamical phi-cubed graphs of spherical topology with up to 5000 nodes. The authors find that the measured critical exponents are in reasonable agreement with those from the exact solution of the Ising model and with those calculated from KPZ scaling for q = 3, 4 where no exact solution is available. Using Binder's cumulant, the authors find that the q = 10 Potts model displays a first order phase transition on a dynamical graph, as it does on a fixed lattice. The authors also examine the internal geometry of the graphs generated in the simulation, finding a linear relationship between ring length probabilities and the central charge of the Potts model.

  18. The value of numerical modeling in understanding the complete load/deformation behavior of cohesive-frictional materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potyondy, D.O.; Fairhurst, C.E.

    1999-07-01

    The post-peak load/deformation behavior of cohesive-frictional materials is an integral part of the overall response of a specimen to compressive loading. A more comprehensive understanding of the pre- and post-peak behavior is necessary. Recent developments in numerical modeling that allow study of the overall response of a synthetic material containing discrete heterogeneities and discontinuities both at the micro (particle) scale and at the larger scale of jointed rock masses can greatly aid the interpretation and application of laboratory test results on these materials.

  19. Final Report: A Model Management System for Numerical Simulations of Subsurface Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachmann, David

    2013-10-07

    The DOE and several other Federal agencies have committed significant resources to support the development of a large number of mathematical models for studying subsurface science problems such as groundwater flow, fate of contaminants and carbon sequestration, to mention only a few. This project provides new tools to help decision makers and stakeholders in subsurface science related problems to select an appropriate set of simulation models for a given field application.

  20. Texas Panhandle soil-crop-beef food chain for uranium: a dynamic model validated by experimental data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenzel, W.J.; Wallwork-Barber, K.M.; Rodgers, J.C.; Gallegos, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    Long-term simulations of uranium transport in the soil-crop-beef food chain were performed using the BIOTRAN model. Experimental data means from an extensive Pantex beef cattle study are presented. Experimental data were used to validate the computer model. Measurements of uranium in air, soil, water, range grasses, feed, and cattle tissues are compared to simulated uranium output values in these matrices when the BIOTRAN model was set at the measured soil and air values. The simulations agreed well with experimental data even though metabolic details for ruminants and uranium chemical form in the environment remain to be studied.

  1. Numerical modeling of immiscible two-phase flow in micro-models using a commercial CFD code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadia, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.

    2009-01-01

    Off-the-shelf CFD software is being used to analyze everything from flow over airplanes to lab-on-a-chip designs. So, how accurately can two-phase immiscible flow be modeled flowing through some small-scale models of porous media? We evaluate the capability of the CFD code FLUENT{trademark} to model immiscible flow in micro-scale, bench-top stereolithography models. By comparing the flow results to experimental models we show that accurate 3D modeling is possible.

  2. Synthesis of Numerical Methods for Modeling Wave Energy Converter-Point Absorbers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y.; Yu, Y. H.

    2012-05-01

    During the past few decades, wave energy has received significant attention among all ocean energy formats. Industry has proposed hundreds of prototypes such as an oscillating water column, a point absorber, an overtopping system, and a bottom-hinged system. In particular, many researchers have focused on modeling the floating-point absorber as the technology to extract wave energy. Several modeling methods have been used such as the analytical method, the boundary-integral equation method, the Navier-Stokes equations method, and the empirical method. However, no standardized method has been decided. To assist the development of wave energy conversion technologies, this report reviews the methods for modeling the floating-point absorber.

  3. Numerical model for the vacuum pyrolysis of scrap tires in batch reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, J.; Tanguy, P.A.; Roy, C.

    1995-06-01

    A quantitative model for scrap tire pyrolysis in a batch scale reactor developed comprises the following basic phenomena: conduction inside tire particles; conduction, convection, and radiation between the feedstock particles or between the fluids and the particles; tire pyrolysis reaction; exothermicity and endothermicity caused by tire decomposition and volatilization; and the variation of the composition and the thermal properties of tire particles. This model was used to predict the transient temperature and density distributions in the bed of particles, the volatile product evolution rate, the mass change, the energy consumption during the pyrolysis process, and the pressure history in a tire pyrolysis reactor with a load of 1 kg. The model predictions agree well with independent experimental data.

  4. Deep geological isolation of nuclear waste: numerical modeling of repository scale hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dettinger, M.D.

    1980-04-01

    The Scope of Work undertaken covers three main tasks, described as follows: (Task 1) CDM provided consulting services to the University on modeling aspects of the study having to do with transport processes involving the local groundwater system near the repository and the flow of fluids and vapors through the various porous media making up the repository system. (Task 2) CDM reviewed literature related to repository design, concentrating on effects of the repository geometry, location and other design factors on the flow of fluids within the repository boundaries, drainage from the repository structure, and the eventual transport of radionucldies away from the repository site. (Task 3) CDM, in a joint effort with LLL personnel, identified generic boundary and initial conditions, identified processes to be modeled, and recommended a modeling approach with suggestions for appropriate simplifications and approximations to the problem and identifiying important parameters necessary to model the processes. This report consists of two chapters and an appendix. The first chapter (Chapter III of the LLL report) presents a detailed description and discussion of the modeling approach developed in this project, its merits and weaknesses, and a brief review of the difficulties anticipated in implementing the approach. The second chapter (Chapter IV of the LLL report) presents a summary of a survey of researchers in the field of repository performance analysis and a discussion of that survey in light of the proposed modeling approach. The appendix is a review of the important physical processes involved in the potential hydrologic transport of radionuclides through, around and away from deep geologic nuclear waste repositories.

  5. Calibration and Validation of a Spar-Type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Model using the FAST Dynamic Simulation Tool: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browning, J. R.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Goupee, A. J.

    2012-11-01

    In 2007, the FAST wind turbine simulation tool, developed and maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was expanded to include capabilities that are suitable for modeling floating offshore wind turbines. In an effort to validate FAST and other offshore wind energy modeling tools, DOE funded the DeepCwind project that tested three prototype floating wind turbines at 1/50th scale in a wave basin, including a semisubmersible, a tension-leg platform, and a spar buoy. This paper describes the use of the results of the spar wave basin tests to calibrate and validate the FAST offshore floating simulation tool, and presents some initial results of simulated dynamic responses of the spar to several combinations of wind and sea states.

  6. DRSPALL: Impact of the Modification of the Numerical Spallings Model on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Performance Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kicker, Dwayne Curtis; Herrick, Courtney G.; Zeitler, Todd; Malama, Bwalya; Rudeen, David Keith; Gilkey, Amy P.

    2016-01-01

    The numerical code DRSPALL (from direct release spallings) is written to calculate the volume of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) solid waste subject to material failure and transport to the surface as a result of a hypothetical future inadvertent drilling intrusion. An error in the implementation of the DRSPALL finite difference equations was discovered as documented in Software Problem Report (SPR) 13-001. The modifications to DRSPALL to correct the finite difference equations are detailed, and verification and validation testing has been completed for the modified DRSPALL code. The complementary cumulative distribution function (CCDF) of spallings releases obtained using the modified DRSPALL is higher compared to that found in previous WIPP performance assessment (PA) calculations. Compared to previous PAs, there was an increase in the number of vectors that result in a nonzero spallings volume, which generally translates to an increase in spallings releases. The overall mean CCDFs for total releases using the modified DRSPALL are virtually unchanged, thus the modification to DRSPALL did not impact WIPP PA calculation results.

  7. Numerical modeling and experiments of creep crack growth under cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brust, F.W.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a summary of some recent studies of creep crack growth under history dependent load conditions. The effect of a proper constitutive law is illustrated. Moreover, the asymptotic fields are reconsidered under cyclic creep conditions. In addition, several experiments are modeled and the behavior of integral parameters is discussed.

  8. Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models L. Billman and D. Keyser National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-56390 August 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at

  9. Distributed and Electric Power System Aggregation Model and Field Configuration Equivalency Validation Testing: Supplemental Report on Penetration Software Algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.; Costyk, D.; Narang, A.

    2005-03-01

    This report supplements the July 2003 report ''Distributed and Electric Power System Aggregation Model and Field Configuration Equivalency Validation Testing'' (NREL/SR-560-33909). The original report presented methods for calculating penetration limits for distributed energy resources interconnected with distribution circuits of utility-owned electric power systems. This report describes the algorithms required to develop application software to calculate penetration limits. The original report can be found at http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy03osti/33909.pdf.

  10. One-dimensional numerical fluid dynamics model of the spreading of liquefied gaseous fuel (LGF) on water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, W.; Ermak, D.L.

    1980-11-04

    A computer model has been developed to simulate the spreading of an evaporating liquefied gaseous fuel that has been spilled on the surface of a denser liquid. This would correspond, for example, to the spreading of liquefied natural gas spilled onto water. The model is based on the one-dimensional, time-dependent equations of conservation of mass and momentum, with the assumption that the pool of liquid fuel spreads in a radially symmetric manner. It includes the effects of vaporization, shear at the fuel-liquid interface, and buoyancy due to the density difference between the fuel and the liquid onto which it is spilled. Both instantaneous and continuous spills of finite volume are treated. The height and spreading velocity of the pool of spilled fuel are calculated as functions of time and radius by numerically solving the conservation equations with a finite difference method. Output of the calculations is presented in both tabular and graphical form.