Sample records for number natural abundance

  1. Natural occupation numbers: When do they vanish?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesbertz, K J H

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-vanishing of the natural orbital occupation numbers of the one-particle density matrix of many-body systems has important consequences for the existence of a density matrix-potential mapping for nonlocal potentials in reduced density matrix functional theory and for the validity of the extended Koopmans' Theorem. On the basis of Weyl's theorem we give a connection between the differentiability properties of the ground state wave function and the rate at which the natural occupations approach zero when ordered as a descending series. We show, in particular, that the presence of a Coulomb cusp in the wave function leads, in general, to a power law decay of the natural occupations, whereas infinitely differentiable wave-functions typically have natural occupations that decay exponentially. We analyze for a number of explicit examples of two-particle systems that in case the wave function is non-analytic at its spatial diagonal (for instance, due to the presence of a Coulomb cusp) the natural orbital occu...

  2. Small numbers in supersymmetric theories of nature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graesser, Michael L.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standard Model of particle interactions is a successful theory for describing the interactions of quarks, leptons and gauge bosons at microscopic distance scales. Despite these successes, the theory contains many unsatisfactory features. The origin of particle masses is a central mystery that has eluded experimental elucidation. In the Standard Model the known particles obtain their mass from the condensate of the so-called Higgs particle. Quantum corrections to the Higgs mass require an unnatural fine tuning in the Higgs mass of one part in 10{sup {minus}32} to obtain the correct mass scale of electroweak physics. In addition, the origin of the vast hierarchy between the mass scales of the electroweak and quantum gravity physics is not explained in the current theory. Supersymmetric extensions to the Standard Model are not plagued by this fine tuning issue and may therefore be relevant in Nature. In the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model there is also a natural explanation for electroweak symmetry breaking. Supersymmetric Grand Unified Theories also correctly predict a parameter of the Standard Model. This provides non-trivial indirect evidence for these theories. The most general supersymmetric extension to the Standard Model however, is excluded by many physical processes, such as rare flavor changing processes, and the non-observation of the instability of the proton. These processes provide important information about the possible structure such a theory. In particular, certain parameters in this theory must be rather small. A physics explanation for why this is the case would be desirable. It is striking that the gauge couplings of the Standard Model unify if there is supersymmetry close to the weak scale. This suggests that at high energies Nature is described by a supersymmetric Grand Unified Theory. But the mass scale of unification must be introduced into the theory since it does not coincide with the probable mass scale of strong quantum gravity. The subject of this dissertation is both the phenomenology and model-building opportunities that may lie behind the small numbers that appear in supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model.

  3. Neutrino Physics Neutrinos rarely interact despite their vast abundance in nature. To give a sense of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 1 Neutrino Physics Neutrinos rarely interact despite their vast abundance in nature later in 1933, Enrico Fermi devised a theory for beta decays which 1 #12;Chapter 1: Neutrino Physics 2 indicated oscillations [6]. This chapter will describe neutrino physics and some of the experiments

  4. Plant Characteristics Associated with Natural Enemy Abundance at Michigan Native Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    BEHAVIOR Plant Characteristics Associated with Natural Enemy Abundance at Michigan Native Plants A. K. FIEDLER1 AND D. A. LANDIS Department of Entomology, 204 Center for Integrated Plant Systems populations by providing them with plant resources such as pollen and nectar. Insects are known to respond

  5. Maine Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 07,755,432Commercial Consumers (Number

  6. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet)Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

  7. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet)Commercial Consumers (Number of

  8. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessAprilResidential Consumers (Number of

  9. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan FebDecadeDecade217523,552.1Residential Consumers (Number

  10. Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel5,266 6,090Industrial Consumers (Number

  11. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreasesCommercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

  12. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreasesCommercial Consumers (Number of

  13. Georgia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear JanPriceIndustrial Consumers (Number of

  14. Seasonal abundance and nature of damage of insects attacking cultivated sunflowers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Ronnie Lee

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the vacuum sampling and whole-plant sampling methods, respectively, were used to collect injurious insect species associated with cultivated sunflowers. Popula- tion data proved that the whole-plant sampling method was more effective for obtaining insects...SEASONAL ABUNDANCE AND NATURE OF DAMAGE OF INSECTS ATTACKING CULTIVATED SUNFLOWERS A Thesis by Ronnie Lee Phillips Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

  15. Delaware Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0Cubic Feet)Delaware Natural7,541

  16. Number of Natural Gas Commercial Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9 0 1 2 3 4 5 Number of3

  17. Number of Natural Gas Industrial Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9 0 1 2 3 4 5 Number

  18. New Mexico Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New MexicoFeet) WorkingFeet)

  19. Oregon Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand Cubic Feet) DecadeYear JanYear Jan Feb

  20. Pennsylvania Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand CubicFuelDecade Year-0

  1. Time-dependent extinction rate and species abundance in a tangled-nature model of biological evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Kim

    Time-dependent extinction rate and species abundance in a tangled-nature model of biological properties. The macrodynamics exhibit intermittent two-mode switching with a gradually decreasing extinction sense. The form of the species abundance curve compares well with observed func- tional forms. The model

  2. 312 VOLUME 85 NUMBER 3 | MARCH 2009 | www.nature.com/cpt articles nature publishing group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Keun Woo

    Division of Applied Life Sciences (BK21 Program), Environmental Biotechnology, National Core Research312 VOLUME 85 NUMBER 3 | MARCH 2009 | www.nature.com/cpt articles nature publishing group

  3. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of

  4. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number ofIndustrial

  5. NATURE MATERIALS | VOL 13 | MARCH 2014 | www.nature.com/naturematerials 233 hotovoltaic devices --which convert abundant, free solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - and downconversion11 , technologies that, like the multi-junction strategy, offer a roadmap beyond the Shockley dot photovoltaics Xinzheng Lan1,2 , Silvia Masala1,3 and Edward H. Sargent1 * The solar -- which convert abundant, free solar radiation into electric power -- are increasingly required to offer

  6. -Amino acids, although less abundant than their -analogues, are also present in peptides and other natural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . A number of methods for synthesis and transformations leading to -amino acids in diastereomerically as key structural components has recently attracted attention in synthetic organic chemistry because Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are a family of carbon, energy and/or reducing power storage polymers, which

  7. THE COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES By the Numbers . . .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckel, Jeffrey A.

    in the areas of bio-energy and natural resource sciences & policy to businesses, nonprofits and governmental Europe, south and east Asia, Australia, sub-Saharan Africa, and throughout Latin American

  8. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,CubicWithdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural

  9. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb(Million Barrels) NewNatural Gas

  10. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb(Million Barrels) NewNatural

  11. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb(Million Barrels) NewNaturalIndustrial

  12. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers - Sales (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep (Number

  13. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers - Sales (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug (Number

  14. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers - Sales (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug (Number

  15. A newsletter of the Kemp Natural Resources Station Volume 4, Number 1 -Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    raised concern about the potential impacts on sustainable resource use. Such concern often spawnsA newsletter of the Kemp Natural Resources Station Volume 4, Number 1 - Spring 2003 (Continued, and many settlers inundated the area. The poor soils and short growing season caused many farms to fail

  16. OBESITY | VOLUME 18 NUMBER 3 | MARCH 2010 563 nature publishing group ARTICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich, David

    OBESITY | VOLUME 18 NUMBER 3 | MARCH 2010 563 nature publishing group ARTICLES GENETICS INTRODUCTION Obesity is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, increasing the risk), physical inactivity, and excess caloric consumption can a ect an individual's risk of obesity (1). Although

  17. obesity | VOLUME 18 NUMBER 3 | MaRch 2010 489 nature publishing group articles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    obesity | VOLUME 18 NUMBER 3 | MaRch 2010 489 nature publishing group articles integrative Physiology IntroductIon Obesity, a chronic inflammatory condition, is an increasingly important public health issue reaching epidemic proportions (1). Visceral obesity has been defined as an important ele- ment

  18. nature biotechnology volume 27 number 12 december 2009 1063 particularly widespread in Brazil,"saysAntonio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    nature biotechnology volume 27 number 12 december 2009 1063 particularly widespread in Brazil vaccines. For example, Brazil currently faces a widespread epidemic of dengue fever,with insect vectors any patents. Likewise,the tech transfer deal might extend to a vaccine against malaria or the develop

  19. 1128 volume 27 number 12 december 2009 nature biotechnology square meter per day of algae containing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    1128 volume 27 number 12 december 2009 nature biotechnology square meter per day of algae, such as triglycerides from algae or cellulosic biomass from higher plants, as feedstocks for biofuel production. The algal program sought to develop high-oil-content algae that grow at very fast rates. In our report

  20. 308 VOLUME 16 | NUMBER 3 | MARCH 2010 nature medicine l e t t e r S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    308 VOLUME 16 | NUMBER 3 | MARCH 2010 nature medicine l e t t e r S Osteoporosis is a disease whether hampering its biosynthesis could treat osteoporosis through an anabolic mechanism (that is osteoporosis in ovariectomized rodents because of an isolated increase in bone formation. These results provide

  1. The ordered distribution of natural numbers on the square root spiral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry K. Hahn; Kay Schoenberger

    2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural numbers divisible by the same prime factor lie on defined spiral graphs which are running through the Square Root Spiral (also named as the Spiral of Theodorus or Wurzel Spirale or Einstein Spiral). Prime Numbers also clearly accumulate on such spiral graphs. And the square numbers 4, 9, 16, 25, 36,... form a highly three-symmetrical system of three spiral graphs, which divides the square-root-spiral into three equal areas. A mathematical analysis shows that these spiral graphs are defined by quadratic polynomials. Fibonacci number sequences also play a part in the structure of the Square Root Spiral. Fibonacci Numbers divide the Square Root Spiral into areas and angle sectors with constant proportions. These proportions are linked to the golden mean (or golden section), which behaves as a self-avoiding-walk-constant in the lattice-like structure of the square root spiral.

  2. r-Process Abundance Signatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. J. Cowan; C. Sneden

    2002-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Abundance observations indicate the presence of rapid-neutron capture (i.e., r-process) elements in old Galactic halo and globular cluster stars. These observations demonstrate that the earliest generations of stars in the Galaxy, responsible for neutron-capture synthesis and the progenitors of the halo stars, were rapidly evolving. Abundance comparisons among large numbers of stars provide clues about the nature of neutron-capture element synthesis both during the earliest times and throughout the history of the Galaxy. In particular, these comparisons suggest differences in the way the heavier (including Ba and above) and lighter neutron capture elements are synthesized in nature. Understanding these differences will help to identify the astrophysical site (or sites) of and conditions in the r-process. The abundance comparisons also demonstrate a large star-to-star scatter in the neutron-capture/iron ratios at low metallicities- which disappears with increasing [Fe/H]- and suggests an early, chemically unmixed and inhomogeneous Galaxy. The very recent neutron-capture element observations indicate that the early phases of Galactic nucleosynthesis, and the associated chemical evolution, are quite complex, with the yields from different (progenitor) mass-range stars contributing to different chemical mixes. Stellar abundance comparisons suggest a change from the r-process to the slow neutron capture (i.e., s-) process at higher metallicities (and later times) in the Galaxy. Finally, the detection of thorium and uranium in halo and globular cluster stars offers a promising, independent age-dating technique that can put lower limits on the age of the Galaxy and thus the Universe.

  3. The distribution of natural numbers divisible by 2,3,5,11,13 and 17 on the Square Root Spiral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry K. Hahn

    2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The natural numbers divisible by the Prime Factors 2, 3, 5, 11, 13 and 17 lie on defined spiral graphs, which run through the Square Root Spiral. A mathematical analysis shows, that these spiral graphs are defined by specific quadratic polynomials. Basically all natural number which are divisible by the same prime factor lie on such spiral graphs. And these spiral graphs can be assigned to a certain number of Spiral Graph Systems, which have a defined spatial orientation to each other. This document represents a supplementation to my detailed introduction study to the Square Root Spiral, and it contains the missing diagrams and analyses, showing the distribution of the natural numbers divisible by 2, 3, 5, 11, 13 and 17 on the Square Root Spiral. My introduction study to the Square Root Spiral can be found in the arxiv-archive. The title of this study : The ordered distribution of the natural numbers on the Square Root Spiral.

  4. Natural variations of /sup 13/C abundance in coal and bitumen as a tool to monitor co-processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muehlenbachs, K.; Steer, J.G. (Dept. of Geology, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton Alberta, T6G 2E3 (CA)); Hogg, A. (Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton Alberta T6G 2E3 (CA)); Ohuchi, T.; Beaulieu, G. (Coal Dept., Alberta Research Council, Devon, Alberta T0C 1E0 (CA))

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of coal to facilitate the generation of transportation grade fuel bitumen, heavy oil for petroleum resids is a topic of continuing research. In order to optimize the upgrading process one needs to know in what proportion each feedstock contributes to each product fraction. Conventional analytical methods are neither able to distinguish the contribution from either feedstock in the synthetic products, nor measure the subtle changes in product character in response to differing process conditions. The inherent difference in the /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratio between most coals and bitumens can be utilized as an isotopic tracer to assess the efficacy of co-processing. For example Vesta coal and Athabasca bitumen have sufficiently distinct /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratios that the measured /sup 13/C//sup 12/C of any product will accurately reflect the proportion of feed incorporated into the product. From the elemental analysis and the /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratio of the feedstock and products one can calculate the amount of carbon derived from coal (CDC) in each product fraction. Analogously the amount of bitumen derived carbon (BDC) can also be independently calculated. In this study the natural variation in /sup 13/C concentration was utilized as an isotopic tracer to evaluate co-processing efficiency of a one litre stirred autoclave under differing process conditions. Process variables examined were coal concentration, several iron based catalysts (Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/; Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ impregnated with TiO/sub 2/, SnO/sub 2/, or ZnO and a sludge obtained from a nickel refinery) and temperature.

  5. Natural variations of sup 13 C abundance in coal and bitumen as a tool to monitor coprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muehlenbachs, K.; Steer, J.G.; Hogg, A.; Ohuchi, T.; Beaulieu, G. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of coal to facilitate the generation of transportation grade fuel from bitumen, heavy oil or petroleum resids is a topic of continuing research. In order to optimize the upgrading process one needs to know in what proportion each feedstock contributes to each product fraction. Conventional analytical methods are neither able to distinguish the contribution from either feedstock in the synthetic products, nor measure the subtle changes in product character in response to differing process conditions. The inherent difference in the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio between most coals and bitumen can be utilized as an isotopic tracer to assess the efficacy of coprocessing. For example Vesta coal and Athabasca bitumen have sufficiently distinct {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios that the measured {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C of any product will accurately reflect the proportion of feed incorporated into the product. From the elemental analysis and the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio of the feedstock and products one can calculate the amount of carbon derived from coal (CDC) in each product fraction. Analogously the amount of bitumen derived carbon (BDC) can also be independently calculated. In this study the natural variation in {sup 13}C concentration was utilized as an isotopic tracer to evaluate coprocessing efficiency of a one liter stirred autoclave under differing process conditions. Process variables examined were coal concentration, several iron based catalysts (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}; Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} impregnated with TiO{sub 2}, SnO{sub 2}, or ZnO and a sludge obtained from a nickel refinery) and temperature.

  6. NATURE MEDICINE VOLUME 7 NUMBER 5 MAY 2001 521 It is time for the global donor community--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATURE MEDICINE · VOLUME 7 · NUMBER 5 · MAY 2001 521 COMMENTARY It is time for the global donor regress rather than progress. Immunization rates declined in many parts of the continent during the 1990s

  7. 1108 VOLUME 24 NUMBER 9 SEPTEMBER 2006 NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY A framework for the use of genomics data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    1108 VOLUME 24 NUMBER 9 SEPTEMBER 2006 NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY A framework for the use of genomicsClintock, Kerry L Dearfield & William H Farland The US Environmental Protection Agency is developing a new of genomics data for environmental applications. Four years ago, the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA

  8. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb(Million Barrels)of Elements)(Number of

  9. Temporal effects of dredging and dredged material disposal on nekton in the offshore waters of Galveston, Texas, with notes on the natural histories of the most abundant taxa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henningsen, Brandt Flynn

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEHPORAL 11FFEC S Ol DREDGING Ki'P3 DREDGED HATERIAL D. SPCSAL ON NEKTON IN THE OFF SHOPCE WATERS OI' GALVESTON, TEXAS, WITH NOTES ON THE NATLTAL HISTORIES OF THE HOST ABUNDANT 1'AXA A Thesis by BRMlDT FLYNN HENNINGSEN Submitted... to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment or the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1977 Hajor Subject: Biology TEMPORAL EFFECTS OF DREDGING AND DREDGED MATERIAL DISPOSAL ON NEKTON IN THE OFFSHORE WATERS...

  10. A theory of evolving natural constants embracing Einstein's theory of general relativity and Dirac's large number hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. W. Peng

    2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Taking a hint from Dirac's large number hypothesis, we note the existence of cosmic combined conservation laws that work to cosmologically long time. We thus modify or generalize Einstein's theory of general relativity with fixed gravitation constant $G$ to a theory for varying $G$, which can be applied to cosmology without inconsistency, where a tensor arising from the variation of G takes the place of the cosmological constant term. We then develop on this basis a systematic theory of evolving natural constants $m_{e},m_{p},e,\\hslash ,k_{B}$ by finding out their cosmic combined counterparts involving factors of appropriate powers of $G$ that remain truly constant to cosmologically long time. As $G$ varies so little in recent centuries, so we take these natural constants to be constant.

  11. Planetary nebulae: abundances and abundance gradients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. Maciel

    1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, a review is given of some recent results and problems involved in the determination of chemical abundances of galactic planetary nebulae, particularly regarding disk and bulge objects.

  12. Naturally fractured reservoirs contain a significant amount of the world oil reserves. A number of these reservoirs contain several

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arbogast, Todd

    Summary Naturally fractured reservoirs contain a significant amount of the world oil reserves simulation of naturally fractured reservoirs is one of the most important, challenging, and computationally intensive problems in reservoir engineering. Parallel reservoir simulators developed for naturally fractured

  13. Stellar abundances of beryllium and CUBES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smiljanic, R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stellar abundances of beryllium are useful in different areas of astrophysics, including studies of the Galactic chemical evolution, of stellar evolution, and of the formation of globular clusters. Determining Be abundances in stars is, however, a challenging endeavor. The two Be II resonance lines useful for abundance analyses are in the near UV, a region strongly affected by atmospheric extinction. CUBES is a new spectrograph planned for the VLT that will be more sensitive than current instruments in the near UV spectral region. It will allow the observation of fainter stars, expanding the number of targets where Be abundances can be determined. Here, a brief review of stellar abundances of Be is presented together with a discussion of science cases for CUBES. In particular, preliminary simulations of CUBES spectra are presented, highlighting its possible impact in investigations of Be abundances of extremely metal-poor stars and of stars in globular clusters.

  14. Helioseismology and Solar Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

    2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Helioseismology has allowed us to study the structure of the Sun in unprecedented detail. One of the triumphs of the theory of stellar evolution was that helioseismic studies had shown that the structure of solar models is very similar to that of the Sun. However, this agreement has been spoiled by recent revisions of the solar heavy-element abundances. Heavy element abundances determine the opacity of the stellar material and hence, are an important input to stellar model calculations. The models with the new, low abundances do not satisfy helioseismic constraints. We review here how heavy-element abundances affect solar models, how these models are tested with helioseismology, and the impact of the new abundances on standard solar models. We also discuss the attempts made to improve the agreement of the low-abundance models with the Sun and discuss how helioseismology is being used to determine the solar heavy-element abundance. A review of current literature shows that attempts to improve agreement between solar models with low heavy-element abundances and seismic inference have been unsuccessful so far. The low-metallicity models that have the least disagreement with seismic data require changing all input physics to stellar models beyond their acceptable ranges. Seismic determinations of the solar heavy-element abundance yield results that are consistent with the older, higher values of the solar abundance, and hence, no major changes to the inputs to solar models are required to make higher-metallicity solar models consistent with helioseismic data.

  15. The Solar Argon Abundance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katharina Lodders

    2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar argon abundance cannot be directly derived by spectroscopic observations of the solar photosphere. The solar Ar abundance is evaluated from solar wind measurements, nucleosynthetic arguments, observations of B stars, HII regions, planetary nebulae, and noble gas abundances measured in Jupiter's atmosphere. These data lead to a recommended argon abundance of N(Ar) = 91,200(+/-)23,700 (on a scale where Si = 10^6 atoms). The recommended abundance for the solar photosphere (on a scale where log N(H) = 12) is A(Ar)photo = 6.50(+/-)0.10, and taking element settling into account, the solar system (protosolar) abundance is A(Ar)solsys = 6.57(+/-)0.10.

  16. Element Abundances at High Redshifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max Pettini

    1999-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    I review measurements of element abundances in different components of the high redshift universe, including the Lyman alpha forest, damped Lyman alpha systems, and Lyman break galaxies. Although progress is being made in all three areas, recent work has also produced some surprises and shown that established ideas about the nature of the damped Lyman alpha systems in particular may be too simplistic. Overall, our knowledge of metal abundances at high z is still very sketchy. Most significantly, there seems to be an order of magnitude shortfall in the comoving density of metals which have been measured up to now compared with those produced by the star formation activity seen in Lyman break galaxies. At least some of the missing metals are likely to be in hot gas in galactic halos and proto-clusters.

  17. The Primordial Helium Abundance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel Peimbert

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    I present a brief review on the determination of the primordial helium abundance by unit mass, Yp. I discuss the importance of the primordial helium abundance in: (a) cosmology, (b) testing the standard big bang nucleosynthesis, (c) studying the physical conditions in H II regions, (d) providing the initial conditions for stellar evolution models, and (e) testing the galactic chemical evolution models.

  18. The Cleveland MuseuM of naTural hisTorY nuMber 56 GEOLOGY AND PALEONTOLOGY OF LEMUDONG'O, KENYA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hlusko, Leslea J.

    The Cleveland MuseuM of naTural hisTorY nuMber 56 GEOLOGY AND PALEONTOLOGY OF LEMUDONG'O, KENYA HISTORY OF PALEONTOLOGICAL RESEARCH IN THE NAROK DISTRICT OF KENYA 1 Stanley H. Ambrose, Mwanzia David, A LATE MIOCENE TERRESTRIAL FOSSIL SITE IN SOUTHERN KENYA 38 Stanley H. Ambrose, Christopher J. Bell

  19. 1132 nature structural biology volume 6 number 12 december 1999 To be active, proteins must fold into well-defined three-dimen-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matouschek, Andreas

    precursor proteins normally lack all structure during import11, but some proteins assume their native formarticles 1132 nature structural biology · volume 6 number 12 · december 1999 To be active, proteins must fold into well-defined three-dimen- sional structures. However, unfolding of proteins is also

  20. Energy notes: Energy in natural processes and human consumption, some numbers H A&S 220c Fall 2004 19x2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy notes: Energy in natural processes and human consumption, some numbers H A&S 220c Fall 2004 consumption rate per capita U.S. 102 Electric razor 101 Energy Content of Fuels (in Joules) Energy Unit Joules person (Note: MWE is an abbreviation for megawatts-electrical output) Global Energy Consumption Global

  1. The oxygen abundance deficiency in irregular galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin; F. Ferrini

    2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The observed oxygen abundances in a number of irregular galaxies have been compared with predictions of the closed-box model of chemical and photometric evolution of galaxies. Oxygen is found to be deficient with respect to the predicted abundances. This is an indicator in favor of loss of heavy elements via galactic winds or/and of infall of low--abundance gas onto the galaxy. The oxygen abundance deficiency observed within the optical edge of a galaxy cannot be explained by mixing with the gas envelope observed outside the optical limit. We confirm the widespread idea that a significant part of the heavy elements is ejected by irregular galaxies in the intergalactic medium.

  2. NATURE CELL BIOLOGY VOLUME 7 | NUMBER 1 | JANUARY 2005 1 E D I T O R I A L

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    on the block will become an authoritative port of call for coveted bibliometric data. A limitation at present. Meanwhile, Elsevier has launched its own search powerhouse, Scopus (www.scopus.com; see Nature 428, 683. A numberoffactorscanconspiretoresultintherejectionofamanuscript; prominent among these are the novelty, scope and quality of the data. But it is important

  3. nature neuroscience volume 14 | number 8 | AuGuST 2011 947 n e w s an d v i e w s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentner, Timothy

    nature neuroscience volume 14 | number 8 | AuGuST 2011 947 n e w s an d v i e w s 10. Seimiya, H Neurosci. 33, 193­201 (2010). 6. Jho, E.H. et al. Mol. Cell. Biol. 22, 1172­1183 (2002). 7. Azim, K. & Butt, E.B. III & Grinspan, J.B. Mol. Cell. Neurosci. 42, 255­265 (2009). 4. Tawk, M. et al. J. Neurosci

  4. Constraining solar abundances using helioseismology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

    2004-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent analyses of solar photospheric abundances suggest that the oxygen abundance in the solar atmosphere needs to be revised downwards. In this study we investigate the consequence of this revision on helioseismic analyses of the depth of the solar convection zone and the helium abundance in the solar envelope and find no significant effect. We also find that the revised abundances along with the current OPAL opacity tables are not consistent with seismic data. A significant upward revision of the opacity tables is required to make solar models with lower oxygen abundance consistent with seismic observations.

  5. Determining solar abundances using helioseismology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Antia; Sarbani Basu

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent downward revision of solar photospheric abundances of Oxygen and other heavy elements has resulted in serious discrepancies between solar models and solar structure as determined through helioseismology. In this work we investigate the possibility of determining the solar heavy-element abundance without reference to spectroscopy by using helioseismic data. Using the dimensionless sound-speed derivative in the solar convection zone, we find that the heavy element abundance, Z, of 0.0172 +/- 0.002, which is closer to the older, higher value of the abundances.

  6. Europium Isotopic Abundances in Very Metal-poor Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Sneden; John J. Cowan; James E. Lawler; Scott Burles; Timothy C. Beers; George M. Fuller

    2002-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Europium isotopic abundance fractions are reported for the very metal-poor, neutron-capture-rich giant stars CS 22892-052, HD 115444, and BD +17 3248. The abundance fractions, derived from analysis of several strong Eu II lines appearing in high-resolution spectra of these stars, are in excellent agreement with each other and with their values in the Solar System: fraction(\\iso{Eu}{151}) ~= fraction(\\iso{Eu}{153}) ~= 0.5. Detailed abundance studies of very metal-poor stars have previously shown that the total elemental abundances of stable atoms with atomic numbers z >= 56 typically match very closely those of a scaled solar-system r-process abundance distribution. The present results for the first time extend this agreement to the isotopic level.

  7. nature biotechnology volume 27 number 12 december 2009 1 half-life for indications when an extended residence time in the cir-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    and can complicate tight control over plasma Focus on synthetic biology This issue of Nature Biotechnology

  8. Abundance profiling of extremely metal-poor stars and supernova properties in the early universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tominaga, Nozomu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, 8-9-1 Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); Iwamoto, Nobuyuki [Nuclear Data Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nomoto, Ken'ichi, E-mail: tominaga@konan-u.ac.jp, E-mail: iwamoto.nobuyuki@jaea.go.jp, E-mail: nomoto@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2014-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    After the big bang nucleosynthesis, the first heavy element enrichment in the universe was made by a supernova (SN) explosion of a population (Pop) III star (Pop III SN). The abundance ratios of elements produced from Pop III SNe are recorded in abundance patterns of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars. The observations of the increasing number of EMP stars have made it possible to statistically constrain the explosion properties of Pop III SNe. We present Pop III SN models whose nucleosynthesis yields well reproduce, individually, the abundance patterns of 48 such metal-poor stars as [Fe/H] ? – 3.5. We then derive relations between the abundance ratios of EMP stars and certain explosion properties of Pop III SNe: the higher [(C + N)/Fe] and [(C + N)/Mg] ratios correspond to the smaller ejected Fe mass and the larger compact remnant mass, respectively. Using these relations, the distributions of the abundance ratios of EMP stars are converted to those of the explosion properties of Pop III SNe. Such distributions are compared with those of the explosion properties of present day SNe: the distribution of the ejected Fe mass of Pop III SNe has the same peak as that of the present day SNe but shows an extended tail down to ?10{sup –2}-10{sup –5} M {sub ?}, and the distribution of the mass of the compact remnant of Pop III SNe is as wide as that of the present-day, stellar-mass black holes. Our results demonstrate the importance of large samples of EMP stars obtained by ongoing and future EMP star surveys and subsequent high-dispersion spectroscopic observations in clarifying the nature of Pop III SNe in the early universe.

  9. Gd Transition Probabilities and Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. A. Den Hartog; J. E. Lawler; C. Sneden; J. J. Cowan

    2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative lifetimes, accurate to +/- 5%, have been measured for 49 even-parity and 14 odd-parity levels of Gd II using laser-induced fluorescence. The lifetimes are combined with branching fractions measured using Fourier transform spectrometry to determine transition probabilities for 611 lines of Gd II. This work is the largest-scale laboratory study to date of Gd II transition probabilities and the first using a high performance Fourier transform spectrometer. This improved data set has been used to determine a new solar photospheric Gd abundance, log epsilon = 1.11 +/- 0.03. Revised Gd abundances have also been derived for the r-process-rich metal-poor giant stars CS 22892-052, BD+17 3248, and HD 115444. The resulting Gd/Eu abundance ratios are in very good agreement with the solar-system r-process ratio. We have employed the increasingly accurate stellar abundance determinations, resulting in large part from the more precise laboratory atomic data, to predict directly the Solar System r-process elemental abundances for Gd, Sm, Ho and Nd. Our analysis of the stellar data suggests slightly higher recommended values for the r-process contribution and total Solar System values, consistent with the photospheric determinations, for the elements for Gd, Sm, and Ho.

  10. Primordial Lithium Abundance in Catalyzed Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Bird; Kristen Koopmans; Maxim Pospelov

    2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists a well known problem with the Li7+Be7 abundance predicted by standard big bang nucleosynthesis being larger than the value observed in population II stars. The catalysis of big bang nucleosynthesis by metastable, \\tau_X \\ge 10^3 sec, charged particles X^- is capable of suppressing the primordial Li7+Be7, abundance and making it consistent with the observations. We show that to produce the correct abundance, this mechanism of suppression places a requirement on the initial abundance of X^- at temperatures of 4\\times 10^8 K to be on the order of or larger than 0.02 per baryon, which is within the natural range of abundances in models with metastable electroweak-scale particles. The suppression of Li7+Be7, is triggered by the formation of (Be7X^-), compound nuclei, with fast depletion of their abundances by catalyzed proton reactions, and in some models by direct capture of X^- on Be7. The combination of Li7+Be7 and Li6 constraints favours the window of lifetimes, 1000s \\la tau_X \\leq 2000 s.

  11. Hf Transition Probabilities and Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Lawler; E. A. Den Hartog; Z. E. Labby; C. Sneden; J. J. Cowan; I. I. Ivans

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative lifetimes from laser-induced fluorescence measurements, accurate to about +/- 5 percent, are reported for 41 odd-parity levels of Hf II. The lifetimes are combined with branching fractions measured using Fourier transform spectrometry to determine transition probabilities for 150 lines of Hf II. Approximately half of these new transition probabilities overlap with recent independent measurements using a similar approach. The two sets of measurements are found to be in good agreement for measurements in common. Our new laboratory data are applied to refine the hafnium photospheric solar abundance and to determine hafnium abundances in 10 metal-poor giant stars with enhanced r-process abundances. For the Sun we derive log epsilon (Hf) = 0.88 +/- 0.08 from four lines; the uncertainty is dominated by the weakness of the lines and their blending by other spectral features. Within the uncertainties of our analysis, the r-process-rich stars possess constant Hf/La and Hf/Eu abundance ratios, log epsilon (Hf/La) = -0.13 +/- 0.02 (sigma = 0.06) and log epsilon (Hf/Eu) = +0.04 +/- 0.02 (sigma = 0.06). The observed average stellar abundance ratio of Hf/Eu and La/Eu is larger than previous estimates of the solar system r-process-only value, suggesting a somewhat larger contribution from the r-process to the production of Hf and La. The newly determined Hf values could be employed as part of the chronometer pair, Th/Hf, to determine radioactive stellar ages.

  12. Nontoxic and Abundant Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide Nanocrystals for Potential High-Temperature Thermoelectric Energy Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yong P.

    and abundant copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS) nanocrystals for potential thermoelectric applications. The CZTS sulfide (CZTS) as a nontoxic and abundant thermoelectric material and characterized its thermoelectric materials, the elements in the composition of CZTS are in extremely high abundancethe natural reserves

  13. Macroinvertebrate Abundance and Biomass: 2007 Data, BPA-51; Preliminary Report, February 10, 2009..

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holderman, Charles

    2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Four Excel files containing information on the 2007 macroinvertebrate data were initially provided to Statistical Consulting Services (SCS) by EcoAnalysts on 1/27/2009. These data files contained information on abundance and biomass data at the level of taxonomic groups. The data were subsequently reformatted and compiled, and aggregated for analysis by SCS. All descriptions and analyses below relate to this compiled data. Computations were carried out separately for each site over all sample periods. Basic summary information for both the abundance and biomass data is presented in Print Out No.2. The 14 sites varied widely in their minimum, mean, maximum and variance values. The number of observations ranged from 10 to 18. Some large abundance values (abundance > 40,000) were noted for sites KR6 and KR13. A more detailed summary of each site is given in Print Out No.3. Site KR3, for example, had a mean abundance of 6914 with a sample size of 17. The variance was 4591991 and the standard error of the mean was 1643. The skewness value, a measure of symmetry for the frequency distribution, was moderately large at 1.29 indicating an asymmetric distribution. Biomass for KR3 had a mean value of 0.87 g/m{sup 2} with 17 observations. The variance was 0.8872 and the standard error was 0.228 g/m{sup 2}. Skewness for biomass was also high at 1.29. Further examination of the quantiles and frequency plots for abundance and biomass also indicate considerable skewness. The stem and leaf diagram (frequency plot) for abundance in KR3 shows most of the data centered on smaller values with a few very large counts. The distribution for biomass has a similar pattern. Statistical tests for normality are significant for both response variables in KR3, thus, the hypothesis that the data originates from a symmetric normal distribution is rejected. Because sample size estimation and statistical inference assume normally distributed data, a transformation of the data is required prior to further analysis. As was the case for previous years, the natural logarithm was chosen as a transformation to mitigate distributional skewness. Abundance and biomass for the remaining sites were also notably skewed, therefore, these data were also log transformed prior to analysis. Summary information for the transformed data (referred to as L-abun and L-bio for abundance and biomass, respectively) are given in Print Out No.4. For site KR3, the logarithmic transformation reduced skewness value for biomass to -0.66. The distributions of abundance and biomass in the other sites also generally showed improvement as well. Hence, all subsequent statistical analyses reported here will be based on the log transformed data.

  14. Using automatically-triggered cameras to monitor and estimate bobcat abundance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heilbrun, Richard David

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    triggered cameras as part of a mark-recapture study design. I tested the assumptions that bobcats were individually identifiable by their natural markings and that information obtained from camera surveys can contribute to abundance estimates from mark...

  15. Sm Transition Probabilities and Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Lawler; E. A. Den Hartog; C. Sneden; J. J. Cowan

    2005-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative lifetimes, accurate to +/- 5%, have been measured for 212 odd-parity levels of Sm II using laser-induced fluorescence. The lifetimes are combined with branching fractions measured using Fourier-transform spectrometry to determine transition probabilities for more than 900 lines of Sm II. This work is the largest-scale laboratory study to date of Sm II transition probabilities using modern methods. This improved data set has been used to determine a new solar photospheric Sm abundance, log epsilon = 1.00 +/- 0.03, from 26 lines. The spectra of three very metal-poor, neutron-capture-rich stars also have been analyzed, employing between 55 and 72 Sm II lines per star. The abundance ratios of Sm relative to other rare earth elements in these stars are in agreement, and are consistent with ratios expected from rapid neutron-capture nucleosynthesis (the r-process).

  16. Electron Abundance in Protostellar Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Padoan; Karen Willacy; William Langer; Mika Juvela

    2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of the fractional electron abundance, Xe, in protostellar cores relies on observations of molecules, such as DCO+, H13CO+ and CO, and on chemical models to interpret their abundance. Studies of protostellar cores have revealed significant variations of Xe from core to core within a range 10^-8abundance from core to core as the combined effect of visual extinction and age variations. The range of electron abundances predicted by the models is relatively insenstive to density over 10^4 to 10^6 cm^{-3}.

  17. Abundant p-singular elements in finite classical groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niemeyer, Alice C; Praeger, Cheryl E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1995, Isaacs, Kantor and Spaltenstein proved that for a finite simple d-dimensional classical group G, and for any prime divisor p of |G| distinct from the characteristic, the proportion of p-singular elements (elements with order divisible by p) is at least c/d for some constant c. We define a new subfamily of p-singular elements, called p-abundant elements, which leave invariant certain "large" subspaces of the natural G-module. We find explicit upper and lower bounds for the proportion of p-abundant elements in G, and prove that it approaches a (positive) limiting value as d \\rightarrow \\infty. It turns out that the limiting proportion of p-abundant elements is at least a constant multiple of the lower bound for the proportion of all p-singular elements derived by Issacs, Kantor and Spaltenstein.

  18. The oxygen abundance distribution in M101

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin

    2001-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The well-observed spiral galaxy M101 was considered. The radial distributions of oxygen abundances determined in three different ways (with the classic Te - method, with the R23 - method, and with the P -- method) were compared. It was found that the parameters (the central oxygen abundance and the gradient) of the radial O/H(P) abundance distribution are close to those of the O/H(Te) abundance distribution. The parameters of the O/H(R23) abundance distribution differ significantly from those of the O/H(Te) abundance distribution: the central O/H(R23) oxygen abundance is higher by around 0.4dex and the gradient is steeper by a factor of around 1.5 as compared to those values in the O/H(Te) abundance distribution. The dispersion in O/H(P) abundance at fixed radius is rather small, around 0.08 dex, and is equal to that in O/H(Te) abundance. The dispersion in O/H(R23) abundance at fixed radius is appreciably larger, around 0.16 dex, compared to that in O/H(Te) abundance. It has been shown that the extra dispersion in O/H(R23) abundances is an artifact and reflects scatter in excitation parameter P at fixed radius.

  19. Spectroscopic Study on the Beryllium Abundances of Red Giant Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takeda, Yoichi

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extensive spectroscopic study was carried out for the beryllium abundances of 200 red giants (mostly of late G and early K type), which were determined from the near-UV Be II 3131.066 line based on high-dispersion spectra obtained by Subaru/HDS, with an aim of investigating the nature of surface Be contents in these evolved giants; e.g., dependence upon stellar parameters, degree of peculiarity along with its origin and build-up timing. We found that Be is considerably deficient (to widely different degree from star to star) in the photosphere of these evolved giants by ~1-3 dex (or more) compared to the initial abundance. While the resulting Be abundances (A(Be)) appear to weakly depend upon T_eff, log g, [Fe/H], M, age, and v_sin i, this may be attributed to the metallicity dependence of A(Be) coupled with the mutual correlation between these stellar parameters, since such tendencies almost disappear in the metallicity-scaled Be abundance ([Be/Fe]). By comparing the Be abundances (as well as their correl...

  20. The effects of He I 10830 on helium abundance determinations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aver, Erik; Skillman, Evan D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of helium and hydrogen emission lines from metal-poor extragalactic H II regions provide an independent method for determining the primordial helium abundance, Y_p. Traditionally, the emission lines employed are in the visible wavelength range, and the number of suitable lines is limited. Furthermore, when using these lines, large systematic uncertainties in helium abundance determinations arise due to the degeneracy of physical parameters, such as temperature and density. Recently, Izotov, Thuan, & Guseva (2014) have pioneered adding the He 10830 infrared emission line in helium abundance determinations. The strong electron density dependence of He 10830 makes it ideal for better constraining density, potentially breaking the degeneracy with temperature. We revisit our analysis of the dataset published by Izotov, Thuan, & Stasinska (2007) and incorporate the newly available observations of He 10830 by scaling them using the observed-to-theoretical Paschen-gamma ratio. The solutions are b...

  1. Natural Abundance 43Ca NMR Spectroscopy of Tobermorite and Jennite...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which has limited our ability to understand the structure of, for example, Ca–silicate hydrate (C–S–H). 43Ca nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has...

  2. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leone, F. [Università di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sezione Astrofisica, Via S. Sofia 78, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  3. Abundant Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwiki HomeASN Power ProjectsAbraham HotAbundant Power

  4. Surface abundances of ON stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martins, F; Palacios, A; Howarth, I; Georgy, C; Walborn, N R; Bouret, J -C; Barba, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive stars burn hydrogen through the CNO cycle during most of their evolution. When mixing is efficient, or when mass transfer in binary systems happens, chemically processed material is observed at the surface of O and B stars. ON stars show stronger lines of nitrogen than morphologically normal counterparts. Whether this corresponds to the presence of material processed through the CNO cycle or not is not known. Our goal is to answer this question. We perform a spectroscopic analysis of a sample of ON stars with atmosphere models. We determine the fundamental parameters as well as the He, C, N, and O surface abundances. We also measure the projected rotational velocities. We compare the properties of the ON stars to those of normal O stars. We show that ON stars are usually helium-rich. Their CNO surface abundances are fully consistent with predictions of nucleosynthesis. ON stars are more chemically evolved and rotate - on average - faster than normal O stars. Evolutionary models including rotation cann...

  5. Abundance Ratios in Early-Type Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynier Peletier

    1999-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Although evidence is accumulating that abundance ratios in galaxies are often non-solar, they are far from understood. I resume the current evidence for non-solar abundance ratios, supplementing the recent review by Worthey (1998) with some new results. It appears that the Mg/Fe abundance ratio only depends on the mass of the galaxy, not on the formation time-scale. For massive galaxies [Mg/Fe] > 0, while small galaxies show solar abundance ratios. Information about abundances of other element is scarce, but new evidence is given that [Ca/Fe] is solar, or slightly lower than solar, contrary to what is expected for an alpha-element.

  6. Influences of vegetation characteristics and invertebrate abundance of Rio Grande wild turkey populations, Edwards Plateau, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randel, Charles Jack

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1970, Rio Grande wild turkey (Meleagris gallapavo intermedia) numbers in the southern region of the Edwards Plateau of Texas have been declining. Nest-site characteristics and invertebrate abundance were hypothesized as limiting wild turkey...

  7. Natural Gas as a Boiler Fuel of Choice in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kmetz, W. J.

    Natural gas is abundant, clean burning, and cost competitive with other fuels. In addition to superior economic fundamentals, the expanded use of natural gas will be enhanced by political and industry leaders. Natural gas therefore will continue...

  8. Natural Gas as a Boiler Fuel of Choice in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kmetz, W. J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas is abundant, clean burning, and cost competitive with other fuels. In addition to superior economic fundamentals, the expanded use of natural gas will be enhanced by political and industry leaders. Natural gas therefore will continue...

  9. Neutrino Physics and the Primordial Elemental Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Y. Cardall; George M. Fuller

    1997-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Limits can be placed on nonstandard neutrino physics when big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) calculations employing standard neutrino physics agree with the observationally inferred primordial abundances of deuterium (D), $^3$He, $^4$He, and $^7$Li. These constraints depend most sensitively on the abundances of D and $^4$He. New observational determinations of the primordial D and/or $^4$He abundances could force revisions in BBN constraints on nonstandard neutrino physics.

  10. The discrepancy between solar abundances and helioseismology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Antia; Sarbani Basu

    2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been recent downward revisions of the solar photospheric abundances of Oxygen and other heavy elements. These revised abundances along with OPAL opacities are not consistent with seismic constraints. In this work we show that the recently released OP opacity tables cannot resolve this discrepancy either. While the revision in opacities does not seem to resolve this conflict, an upward revision of Neon abundance in solar photosphere offers a possible solution to this problem.

  11. Iowa Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-20Commercial

  12. Iowa Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0Decade Year-0 Year-1

  13. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear

  14. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar

  15. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet) Year Jan

  16. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet) Year JanIndustrial

  17. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1569 0 0Year

  18. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1569 0 0YearIndustrial Consumers

  19. Maine Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 07,755,432Commercial Consumers

  20. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0 0.0 0.0 0.0YearCommercial Consumers

  1. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0 0.0 0.0 0.0YearCommercial

  2. Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0 0.04,0009,929Withdrawals

  3. Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0

  4. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3Exports (NoYear Jan FebFuelCommercial

  5. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3Exports (NoYear Jan

  6. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic Feet) Price AllFuelCommercial Consumers

  7. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic Feet) Price AllFuelCommercial

  8. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic Feet)Same 2011Feet)

  9. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic Feet)Same 2011Feet)Industrial

  10. Montana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic32,876 10,889Decade Year-0and Plant

  11. Montana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic32,876 10,889Decade Year-0and

  12. Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara3,663 3,430Feet)

  13. Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara3,663

  14. South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndia (Million2,116CubicWithdrawals

  15. South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndia

  16. South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6 0.6WithdrawalsElements)

  17. South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6

  18. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet)4. U.S.Decade Year-0Fuel

  19. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet)4. U.S.Decade Year-0FuelIndustrial

  20. Texas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubicSeparation 7,559Nov-14DecadeDecadeFueland

  1. Texas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubicSeparation

  2. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o f lFeet)

  3. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o f lFeet)Elements)

  4. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B uYear JanSalesYear Janand

  5. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B uYear JanSalesYearIndustrial

  6. California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul

  7. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear JanDecadeDecadeYear Jan Feb

  8. Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear21Company LevelInput

  9. Delaware Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear21CompanySFoot) YearResidential

  10. Florida Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot) Year Jan Feb MarYear Jan Feb

  11. Georgia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot) YearNet Withdrawals

  12. Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200Decade Year-0Year Jan Feb

  13. Idaho Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200DecadeCubic1.IV.%

  14. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess thanThousand CubicElements) Gas

  15. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015Year Jan Feb Mar Apr

  16. Iowa Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015Year JanFoot)Residential

  17. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) DecadeYear Jan FebYear

  18. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14 Dec-14Decade Year-0

  19. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14 Dec-14Decade Year-0Industrial Consumers

  20. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14Sales (Billion CubicFeet)

  1. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14Sales (Billion CubicFeet)Industrial

  2. California Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321 2,590Fuel Consumption (Million CubicCommercial

  3. California Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321 2,590Fuel Consumption (Million

  4. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (MillionFeet) DecadeFuelCommercial

  5. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (MillionFeet)

  6. Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain,606,602andDecadeCommercial Consumers

  7. Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain,606,602andDecadeCommercial

  8. Delaware Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1Feet)

  9. Delaware Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1Feet)Industrial Consumers

  10. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough, 2002Decade Year-0DecadeResidential

  11. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough, 2002DecadeYear

  12. New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough,Cubic Foot)

  13. North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May1.878InputElements)

  14. North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear Jan Feb Mar

  15. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear JanYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayResidential

  16. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear JanYear JanYear Jan Feb MarResidential

  17. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear JanYearYear Jan Feb Mar Apr

  18. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear JanYearYearDecade

  19. Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source:Additions to Capacity ForYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May

  20. Texas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun1

  1. Utah Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear JanPropane, No.1Decade Year-0

  2. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear JanPropane, No.1Decade6,393CommercialResidential

  3. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel Consumption (Million Cubic

  4. Washington Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel Consumption0 0Feet) Lease and

  5. West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel Consumption0Feet)9

  6. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996Feet) Year

  7. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessedDecadeFeet)Residential

  8. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1Year Jan Feb MarYearResidential

  9. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1Year% ofInputYear Jan Feb

  10. Washington Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810 0CubicFeet) Lease and

  11. Washington Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810 0CubicFeet) Lease

  12. West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810YearDecadeElements) Commercial

  13. West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810YearDecadeElements)

  14. Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58(MillionYear Jan 201151

  15. Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58(MillionYear Jan 201151Industrial

  16. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (MillionAdjustments (BillionDecadeFeet)Commercial

  17. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (MillionAdjustments

  18. Utah Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreases (Billion CubicYear Jan FebCommercial

  19. Utah Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreases (Billion CubicYear Jan

  20. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3Withdrawalsand

  1. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2

  2. Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUndergroundCubic Feet) Year Jan Feb

  3. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUndergroundCubicDecade Year-0Year Jan Feb

  4. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department2ImportsResidential

  5. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off) Shale% ofElements) Gas

  6. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off)

  7. Montana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of FossilFoot) Year Jan Feb MarYear Jan

  8. Florida Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul

  9. Florida Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun JulIndustrial

  10. Georgia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear JanPrice

  11. Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOW TO OBTAINCommercial Consumers

  12. Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOW TO OBTAINCommercial

  13. Idaho Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-MonthExportsLease and

  14. Idaho Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-MonthExportsLease

  15. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal Consumption (Million381WithdrawalsCommercial

  16. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal Consumption

  17. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal ConsumptionperFeet)Commercial Consumers

  18. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal ConsumptionperFeet)Commercial

  19. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraskaand

  20. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

  1. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawals (MillionYearNADecadeand Plant

  2. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawals (MillionYearNADecadeand

  3. New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawalsYear Jan Feb MarElements)

  4. New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawalsYear Jan Feb

  5. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1(MillionExtensionsThousand Cubic%perYear JanFoot)YearYear

  6. South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan FebDecadeDecade Year-0 Year-1Elements) Residential

  7. South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan FebDecadeDecade Year-0TotalH

  8. North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousandWithdrawals (MillionNine8InputElements)

  9. North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousandWithdrawals

  10. North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996)McGuire"Feet)Feet) DecadeElements)

  11. North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996)McGuire"Feet)Feet)Elements) Industrial

  12. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul9 2010 2011 2012DecadeFueland

  13. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul9 2010 2011Industrial Consumers

  14. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunFeet) DecadeDecadeand Plant

  15. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunFeet) DecadeDecadeandIndustrial

  16. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar AprYearFuel

  17. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar

  18. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYearAdditions (Million

  19. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYearAdditions (MillionElements) Gas

  20. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet)FuelDecade Year-0Input

  1. Maine Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet)FuelDecadePublication andWithdrawalsResidential

  2. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,CubicWithdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland

  3. On the oxygen abundance in our Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin; F. Ferrini; R. V. Shkvarun

    2003-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The compilation of published spectra of Galactic HII regions with available diagnostic [OIII]4363 line has been carried out. Our list contains 71 individual measurements of 13 HII regions in the range of galactocentric distances from 6.6 to 14.8 kpc. The oxygen abundances in all the HII regions were recomputed in the same way, using the classic Te - method. The oxygen abundance at the solar galactocentric distance traced by those HII regions is in agreement with the oxygen abundance in the interstellar medium in the solar vicinity derived with high precision from the interstellar absorption lines towards stars. The derived radial oxygen abundance distribution was compared with that for HII regions from the Shaver et al. (1983) sample which is the basis of many models for the chemical evolution of our Galaxy. It was found that the original Shaver et al.'s oxygen abundances are overestimated by 0.2-0.3 dex. Oxygen abundances in HII regions from the Shaver et al. sample have been redetermined with the recently suggested P - method. The radial distribution of oxygen abundances from the Shaver et al. sample redetermined with the P - method is in agreement with our radial distribution of (O/H)_Te abundances.

  4. On the solar nickel and oxygen abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pat Scott; Martin Asplund; Nicolas Grevesse; A. Jacques Sauval

    2009-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Determinations of the solar oxygen content relying on the neutral forbidden transition at 630 nm depend upon the nickel abundance, due to a Ni I blend. Here we rederive the solar nickel abundance, using the same ab initio 3D hydrodynamic model of the solar photosphere employed in the recent revision of the abundances of C, N, O and other elements. Using 17 weak, unblended lines of Ni I together with the most accurate atomic and observational data available we find log epsilon_Ni = 6.17 +/- 0.02 (statistical) +/- 0.05 (systematic), a downwards shift of 0.06 to 0.08 dex relative to previous 1D-based abundances. We investigate the implications of the new nickel abundance for studies of the solar oxygen abundance based on the [O I] 630 nm line in the quiet Sun. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the oxygen abundance implied by the recent sunspot spectropolarimetric study of Centeno & Socas-Navarro needs to be revised downwards from log epsilon_O = 8.86 +/- 0.07 to 8.71 +/- 0.10. This revision is based on the new nickel abundance, application of the best available gf-value for the 630 nm forbidden oxygen line, and a more transparent treatment of CO formation. Determinations of the solar oxygen content relying on forbidden lines now appear to converge around log epsilon_O = 8.7.

  5. Helioseismological Implications of Recent Solar Abundance Determinations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John N. Bahcall; Sarbani Basu; Marc Pinsonneault; Aldo M. Serenelli

    2004-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that standard solar models are in good agreement with the helioseismologically determined sound speed and density as a function of solar radius, the depth of the convective zone, and the surface helium abundance, as long as those models do not incorporate the most recent heavy element abundance determinations. However, sophisticated new analyses of the solar atmosphere infer lower abundances of the lighter metals (like C, N, O, Ne, and Ar) than the previously widely used surface abundances. We show that solar models that include the lower heavy element abundances disagree with the solar profiles of sound speed and density as well as the depth of the convective zone and the helium abundance. The disagreements for models with the new abundances range from factors of several to many times the quoted uncertainties in the helioseismological measurements. The disagreements are at temperatures below what is required for solar interior fusion reactions and therefore do not significantly affect solar neutrino emission. If errors in thecalculated OPAL opacities are solely responsible for the disagreements, then the corrections in the opacity must extend from 2 times 10^6 K (R = 0.7R_Sun)to 5 times 10^6 K (R = 0.4 R_Sun), with opacity increases of order 10%.

  6. Natural Gas Supply in Denmark -A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the economic structure of the Danish natural gas market is formulated mathematically giving a descriptionNatural Gas Supply in Denmark - A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the Liberalized Gas Market of the markets of natural gas and electricity and the existence of an abundance of de-centralized combined heat

  7. On the solar abundance of indium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Vitas; I. Vince; M. Lugaro; O. Andriyenko; M. Gosic; R. J. Rutten

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The generally adopted value for the solar abundance of indium is over six times higher than the meteoritic value. We address this discrepancy through numerical synthesis of the 451.13 nm line on which all indium abundance studies are based, both for the quiet-sun and the sunspot umbra spectrum, employing standard atmosphere models and accounting for hyperfine structure and Zeeman splitting in detail. The results, as well as a re-appraisal of indium nucleosynthesis, suggest that the solar indium abundance is close to the meteoritic value, and that some unidentified ion line causes the 451.13 nm feature in the quiet-sun spectrum.

  8. Indiana Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0 0.0Decade4Year JanSame Month1,678,158

  9. Iowa Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0Decade Year-0Base Gas)872,980 875,781

  10. Kansas Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0DecadeYearDecade Year-0 Year-1853,125

  11. Kentucky Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet)YearSeparationYear

  12. Louisiana Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1569Decade886,084 889,570 893,400

  13. Maine Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 07,755,432Commercial10.99Maine

  14. Maryland Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0 0.0 0.05.03057,521 1,067,807

  15. Massachusetts Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar Apr236,480

  16. Michigan Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3Exports

  17. Minnesota Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet)Commercial

  18. Mississippi Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic Feet)Same Month443,025 437,715 436,840

  19. Missouri Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic Feet)SameThousandYearBaseYear Jan

  20. Montana Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic32,876 10,889Decade03Decade Year-0253,122

  1. Rhode Island Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara3,663(Million24,103 224,846

  2. South Carolina Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet) (MillionFeet)Year

  3. South Dakota Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6Feet) VehicleYear Jan

  4. Tennessee Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet)4. U.S.DecadeFuel2009YearYear

  5. Number of Natural Gas Residential Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9 0 1 2 3 4 5

  6. Arizona Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14 Dec-14DecadeDecade Year-0,128,264

  7. Arkansas Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14SalesSame Month Previous Year556,746

  8. California Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321 2,590FuelDecade Year-00,515,162 10,510,950

  9. Colorado Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain,606,602 1,622,434 1,634,587 1,645,716

  10. Connecticut Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4487,320

  11. Washington Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810Year Jan Feb Mar AprSame

  12. West Virginia Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58(MillionYear Jan Feb

  13. Wisconsin Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58(MillionYearVehicle Fuel Price

  14. Wyoming Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (MillionAdjustments (MillionYearYear Jan Feb Mar

  15. Texas Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugDecadeDecade

  16. Utah Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreases (Billion

  17. Vermont Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreasesCommercial Consumers35,929 37,242 38,047

  18. Virginia Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-11,113,016 1,124,717 1,133,103

  19. Florida Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear Jan Feb Mar AprVented andDecade679,265

  20. Georgia Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear

  1. Hawaii Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOW TOTotal ConsumptionVehicle

  2. Idaho Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal Consumption (Million Cubic

  3. Illinois Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal Consumption

  4. Nebraska Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawals (MillionYear Jan Feb MarDecade512,013

  5. Nevada Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawalsYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear

  6. New Hampshire Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawalsYear Jan FebFeet)TotalYear

  7. New Jersey Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawalsYear Jan1 0.2TotalDecade

  8. Alabama Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building Floorspace (Square Feet)SalesYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May

  9. Alaska Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building Floorspace (Square Feet)SalesYear JanFeet) Working119,039 120,124

  10. New York Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousand CubicSeparation 29 0Year Jan FebSame4,303,342

  11. North Carolina Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousand CubicSeparationTotal ConsumptionDecade,095,362

  12. North Dakota Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousandDecade Year-0 Year-1 (MillionFeet)Feet) Year

  13. Number of Natural Gas Commercial Sales Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousandDecade Year-0 Year-1(Million1. Capacity and43 43 4334

  14. Number of Natural Gas Commercial Transported Consumer

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousandDecade Year-0 Year-1(Million1. Capacity and43 43

  15. Number of Natural Gas Industrial Sales Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousandDecade Year-0 Year-1(Million1. Capacity and43 43129,119

  16. Number of Natural Gas Industrial Transported Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousandDecade Year-0 Year-1(Million1. Capacity and43

  17. Number of Natural Gas Residential Sales Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousandDecade Year-0 Year-1(Million1. Capacity and4360,267,648

  18. Number of Natural Gas Residential Transported Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousandDecade Year-0 Year-1(Million1. Capacity

  19. Ohio Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousandDecade Year-0Separation3,262,716 3,253,184 3,240,619

  20. Oklahoma Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousandDecadeSales (Billion CubicDecadeSame MonthDecade923,650

  1. Beryllium abundances in metal-poor stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. F. Tan; J. R. Shi; G. Zhao

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have determined beryllium abundances for 25 metal-poor stars based on the high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectra from the VLT/UVES database. Our results confirm that Be abundances increase with Fe, supporting the global enrichment of Be in the Galaxy. Oxygen abundances based on [O I] forbidden line implies a linear relation with a slope close to one for the Be vs. O trend, which indicates that Be is probably produced in a primary process. Some strong evidences are found for the intrinsic dispersion of Be abundances at a given metallicity. The deviation of HD132475 and HD126681 from the general Be vs. Fe and Be vs. O trend favours the predictions of the superbubble model, though the possibility that such dispersion originates from the inhomogeneous enrichment in Fe and O of the protogalactic gas cannot be excluded.

  2. Permanent Home Number: Residential Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viglas, Anastasios

    Permanent Home Number: Residential Number: Mobile: Please update my contact details. Signature nominated correspondence address as indicated below. Permanent Home Adress Residential Address Other Address (Must not be a PO Box) Residential Address (Must not be a PO Box) Other - Postal/Optional Address

  3. UNIT NUMBER:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    193 UNIT NUMBER: 197 UNIT NAME: CONCRETE RUBBLE PILE (30) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security fence, north of the plant on Big Bayou Creek on private property....

  4. Oxygen abundance of open cluster dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. -X. Shen; X. -W. Liu; H. -W. Zhang; B. Jones; D. N. C. Lin

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present oxygen abundances of dwarfs in the young open cluster IC 4665 deduced from the OI $\\lambda$7774 triplet lines and of dwarfs in the open cluster Pleiades derived from the [OI] $\\lambda$6300 forbidden line. Stellar parameters and oxygen abundances were derived using the spectroscopic synthesis tool SME (Spectroscopy Made Easy). We find a dramatic increase in the upper boundary of the OI triplet abundances with decreasing temperature in the dwarfs of IC 4665, consistent with the trend found by Schuler et al. in the open clusters Pleiades and M 34, and to a less extent in the cool dwarfs of Hyades (Schuler et al. 2006a) and UMa (King & Schuler 2005). By contrast, oxygen abundances derived from the [OI] $\\lambda$6300 forbidden line for stars in Pleiades and Hyades (Schuler et al. 2006b) are constant within the errors. Possible mechanisms that may lead a varying oxygen triplet line abundance are examined, including systematic errors in the stellar parameter determinations, the NLTE effects, surface activities and granulation. The age-related effects stellar surface activities (especially the chromospheric activities) are suggested by our analysis to blame for the large spreads of oxygen triplet line abundances.

  5. Element abundances in solar energetic particles: two physical processes, two abundance patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reames, Donald V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abundances of elements comprising solar energetic particles (SEPs) come with two very different patterns. Historically called "impulsive" and "gradual" events, they have been studied for 40 years, 20 years by the Wind spacecraft. Gradual SEP events measure coronal abundances. They are produced when shock waves, driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), accelerate the ambient coronal plasma; we discuss the average abundances of 21 elements that differ from corresponding solar photospheric abundances by a well-known dependence on the first ionization potential (FIP) of the element. The smaller impulsive ("3He-rich") SEP events are associated with magnetic reconnection involving open field lines from solar flares or jets that also eject plasma to produce accompanying CMEs. These events produce striking heavy-element abundance enhancements, relative to coronal abundances, by an average factor of 3 at Ne, 9 at Fe, and 900 for elements with 76 0.1 are even more strongly associated with narrow, slow CMEs, cooler coro...

  6. Dual spatial maps of transcript and protein abundance in the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dual spatial maps of transcript and protein abundance in the mouse brain. Dual spatial maps of transcript and protein abundance in the mouse brain. Abstract: Integrating...

  7. Mapping protein abundance patterns in the brain using voxelation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    protein abundance patterns in the brain using voxelation combined with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Mapping protein abundance patterns in the brain using voxelation...

  8. Topological Analysis of Protein Co-Abundance Networks Identifies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topological Analysis of Protein Co-Abundance Networks Identifies Novel Host Targets Important for HCV Infection and Pathogenesis Topological Analysis of Protein Co-Abundance...

  9. Engineering Density of States of Earth Abundant Semiconductors...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of States of Earth Abundant Semiconductors for Enhanced Thermoelectric Power Factor Engineering Density of States of Earth Abundant Semiconductors for Enhanced Thermoelectric...

  10. abundance life history: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of ectoparasite community and abundance across life history stages of avian host Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and abundance are often associated with the...

  11. A MASS-DEPENDENT YIELD ORIGIN OF NEUTRON-CAPTURE ELEMENT ABUNDANCE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ULTRA-FAINT DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Duane M.; Johnston, Kathryn V. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York City, NY 10027 (United States); Tumlinson, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Sen, Bodhisattva [Department of Statistics, Columbia University, New York City, NY 10027 (United States); Simon, Joshua D. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    One way to constrain the nature of the high-redshift progenitors of the Milky Way (MW) is to look at the low-metallicity stellar populations of the different Galactic components today. For example, high-resolution spectroscopy of very metal poor (VMP) stars demonstrates remarkable agreement between the distribution of [Ti/Fe] in the stellar populations of the MW halo and ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies. In contrast, for the neutron-capture (nc) abundance ratio distributions [(Sr, Ba)/Fe], the peak of the small UFD sample (6 stars) exhibits a significant under-abundance relative to the VMP stars in the larger MW halo sample ({approx}300 stars). We present a simple scenario that can simultaneously explain these similarities and differences by assuming: (1) that the MW VMP stars were predominately enriched by a prior generation of stars which possessed a higher total mass than the prior generation of stars that enriched the UFD VMP stars; and (2) a much stronger mass-dependent yield (MDY) for nc-elements than for the (known) MDY for Ti. Simple statistical tests demonstrate that conditions (1) and (2) are consistent with the observed abundance distributions, albeit without strong constraints on model parameters. A comparison of the broad constraints for these nc-MDY with those derived in the literature seems to rule out Ba production from low-mass supernovae (SNe) and affirms models that primarily generate yields from high-mass SNe. Our scenario can be confirmed by a relatively modest (factor of {approx}3-4) increase in the number of high-resolution spectra of VMP stars in UFDs.

  12. Abundant C4 plants on the Tibetan Plateau during the Lateglacial and early Holocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Covino, Tim

    Abundant C4 plants on the Tibetan Plateau during the Lateglacial and early Holocene Elizabeth K t Plants using the C4 (Hatch-Slack) photosynthetic pathway are key for global food production and account of modern naturally-occurring C4 plant species at elevations up to 4500 m in Tibet and 3000 m in Africa

  13. Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas Pennsylvania, ex- amining natural gas concentrations and isotopic signatures with proximity to shale gas wells this transformation, with shale gas and other unconventional sources now yielding more than one- half of all US

  14. Abundance of narwhals (Monodon monoceros) on the hunting grounds in Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidre, Kristin L.

    Abundance of narwhals (Monodon monoceros) on the hunting grounds in Greenland M. P. HEIDE Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, Bok 570, 3900 Nuuk, Greenland (MPH, KLL, RGH) RUWPA, University to subsistence hunting by Inuit in Greenland and Canada. Scientific advice on the sustainable levels of removals

  15. NREL Explores Earth-Abundant Materials for Future Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are using a theory-driven technique - sequential cation mutation - to understand the nature and limitations of promising solar cell materials that can replace today's technologies. Finding new materials that use Earth-abundant elements and are easily manufactured is important for large-scale solar electricity deployment.

  16. Abundances of massive stars: some recent developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Morel

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Thanks to their usefulness in various fields of astrophysics (e.g. mixing processes in stars, chemical evolution of galaxies), the last few years have witnessed a large increase in the amount of abundance data for early-type stars. Two intriguing results emerging since the last reviews on this topic will be discussed: (a) nearby OB stars exhibit metal abundances generally lower than the solar/meteoritic estimates; (b) evolutionary models of single objects including rotation are largely unsuccessful in explaining the CNO properties of stars in the Galaxy and in the Magellanic clouds.

  17. Stochastic chemical enrichment in metal-poor systems II. Abundance ratios and scatter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Karlsson; B. Gustafsson

    2005-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A stochastic model of the chemical enrichment of metal-poor systems by core-collapse supernovae is used to study the scatter in stellar abundance ratios. The resulting scatter in abundance ratios, e.g. as functions of the overall metallicity, is demonstrated to be crucially dependent on the as yet uncertain supernovae yields. The observed abundance ratios and their scatters therefore have diagnostic power as regards the yields. The relatively small star-to-star scatter observed in many chemical abundance ratios, e.g. by Cayrel et al. (2004) for stars down to [Fe/H] = -4, is tentatively explained by the averaging of a large number of contributing supernovae and by the cosmic selection effects favoring contributions from supernovae in a certain mass range for the most metal-poor stars. The scatter in observed abundances of alpha-elements is understood in terms of observational errors only, while additional spread in yields or sites of nucleosynthesis may affect the odd-even elements Na and Al. For the iron-group elements we find systematically too high predicted Cr/Fe and Cr/Mg ratios, as well as differences between the different sets of yields, both in terms of predicted abundance ratios and scatter. The semi-empirical yields recently suggested by Francois et al. (2004) are found to lead to scatter in abundance ratios significantly greater than observed, when applied in the inhomogeneous models. "Spurs", very narrow sequences in abundance-ratio diagrams, may disclose a single-supernova origin of the elements of the stars on the sequence. Verification of the existence of such features, called single supernova sequences (SSSs), is challenging. This will require samples of several hundred stars with abundance ratios observed to accuracies of 0.05 dex or better.

  18. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamos LaboratoryCertified Reference6-02-01Change Number

  19. Inferring Ecological Networks From Species Abundance Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    (LASSO), Sparse Bayesian Regression (SBR), Graphical Gaussian Models (GGMs) and Bayesian Networks (BNs to thank Marco Grzegorczyk for the answering my question about Bayesian networks and the MCMC methodsInferring Ecological Networks From Species Abundance Data Frank Dondelinger Master of Science

  20. Discovery of interstellar ketenyl (HCCO), a surprisingly abundant radical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agundez, Marcelino; Guelin, Michel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted radioastronomical observations of 9 dark clouds with the IRAM 30m telescope. We present the first identification in space of the ketenyl radical (HCCO) toward the starless core Lupus-1A and the molecular cloud L483, and the detection of the related molecules ketene (H2CCO) and acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) in these two sources and 3 additional dark clouds. We also report the detection of the formyl radical (HCO) in the 9 targeted sources and of propylene (CH2CHCH3) in 4 of the observed sources, which extends significantly the number of dark clouds where these molecules are known to be present. We derive a beam-averaged column density of HCCO of 5e11 cm-2 in both Lupus-1A and L483, which means that the ketenyl radical is just 10 times less abundant than ketene in these sources. The non-negligible abundance of HCCO found implies that there must be a powerful formation mechanism able to counterbalance the efficient destruction of this radical through reactions with neutral atoms. The column densities d...

  1. The Isotopic Abundances of Magnesium in Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pamela Gay; David L. Lambert

    1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Isotopic abundance ratios 24^Mg:25^Mg:26^Mg are derived for 20 stars from high- resolution spectra of the MgH A-X 0-0 band at 5140AA. With the exception of the weak g-band giant HR 1299, the stars are dwarfs that sample the metallicity range -1.8 < [Fe/H] <0.0. The abundance of 25^Mg amd 26^Mg relative to the dominant isotope 24^Mg decreases with decreasing [Fe/H] in fair accord with predictions from a recent model of galactic chemical evolution in which the Mg isotopes are synthesised by massive stars. Several stars appear especially enriched in the heavier Mg isotopes suggesting contamination by material from the envelopes of intermediate-mass AGB stars.

  2. Topology in QCD and the axion abundance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryuichiro Kitano; Norikazu Yamada

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The temperature dependence of the topological susceptibility (chi_t) in QCD essentially determines the abundance of the QCD axion in the Universe, and is commonly estimated, based on the instanton picture, to be a certain negative power of temperature. While lattice QCD should be able to check the instanton picture in principle, the region of the temperature where lattice calculations of chi_t are reliable is rather limited in practice, because existing methods on the lattice will probably fail when chi_t decreases rapidly with temperatures. In this work, two exploratory studies are presented. First, to realize the limitation of temperature we perform lattice calculations of chi_t in the quenched approximation and find that it becomes difficult with a given resource when T > 2 T_c. A possible way out is proposed and some test calculations are given. The absolute value and the temperature dependence of chi_t in real QCD can be significantly different from that in the quenched approximation, and is not well established over a wide range of the temperature above its critical value. Motivated by this fact and precedent arguments which disagree with the conventional instanton picture, we estimate the axion abundance in an extreme case where chi_t decreases much faster than the conventional power-like function. We find a significant enhancement of the axion abundance in such a case.

  3. Relative Abundance Measurements in Plumes and Interplumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guennou, Chloé; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) 10 eV). We have used EIS spectroscopic observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over an ~24 hour period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we have used a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We have used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we have estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These res...

  4. Lithium abundances in globular cluster giants: NGC 1904, NGC 2808, and NGC 362

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Orazi, V; Angelou, G C; Bragaglia, A; Carretta, E; Lattanzio, J C; Lucatello, S; Momany, Y; Sollima, A; Beccari, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of multiple populations in globular clusters has been well established thanks to high-resolution spectroscopy. It is widely accepted that distinct populations are a consequence of different stellar generations: intra-cluster pollution episodes are required to produce the peculiar chemistry observed in almost all clusters. Unfortunately, the progenitors responsible have left an ambiguous signature and their nature remains unresolved. To constrain the candidate polluters, we have measured lithium and aluminium abundances in more than 180 giants across three systems: NGC~1904, NGC~2808, and NGC~362. The present investigation along with our previous analysis of M12 and M5 affords us the largest database of simultaneous determinations of Li and Al abundances. Our results indicate that Li production has occurred in each of the three clusters. In NGC~362 we detected an M12-like behaviour, with first and second-generation stars sharing very similar Li abundances favouring a progenitor that is able to pro...

  5. High Dispersion Spectroscopy of Solar-type Superflare Stars. III. Lithium Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the abundance analysis of Li in solar-type (G-type main sequence) superflare stars which were found by the analysis of Kepler photometric data. Li is a key element to understand the evolution of the stellar convection zone which reflects the age of solar-type stars. We performed the high dispersion spectroscopy of solar-type superflare stars with Subaru/HDS, and confirmed that 34 stars show no evidence of binarity in our previous study. In this study, we derived the Li abundances of these 34 objects. We investigate correlations of Li abundance with stellar atmospheric parameters, rotational velocity, and superflare activities to understand the nature of superflare stars and the possibility of the nucleosynthesis of Li by superflares. We confirm the large dispersion in the Li abundance, and the correlation with stellar parameters is not seen. As compared with the Li abundance in Hyades cluster which is younger than the Sun, it is suggested that half of the observed stars are younger than Hyades cl...

  6. abundance depth distribution: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12: 488-501 I N T R O DU C T I O N The species abundance distribution (SAD Enquist, Brian Joseph 4 Fauna, Distribution, Habitat Preference and Abundance CiteSeer Summary:...

  7. abundance distribution composition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12: 488-501 I N T R O DU C T I O N The species abundance distribution (SAD Enquist, Brian Joseph 6 Fauna, Distribution, Habitat Preference and Abundance CiteSeer Summary:...

  8. abundance distribution results: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12: 488-501 I N T R O DU C T I O N The species abundance distribution (SAD Enquist, Brian Joseph 4 Fauna, Distribution, Habitat Preference and Abundance CiteSeer Summary:...

  9. Oxygen abundances in planet-harbouring stars. Comparison of different abundance indicators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ecuvillon; G. Israelian; N. C. Santos; N. G. Shchukina; M. Mayor; R. Rebolo

    2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed and uniform study of oxygen abundances in 155 solar type stars, 96 of which are planet hosts and 59 of which form part of a volume-limited comparison sample with no known planets. EW measurements were carried out for the [O I] 6300 \\AA line and the O I triplet, and spectral synthesis was performed for several OH lines. NLTE corrections were calculated and applied to the LTE abundance results derived from the O I 7771-5 \\AA\\ triplet. Abundances from [O I], the O I triplet and near-UV OH were obtained in 103, 87 and 77 dwarfs, respectively. We present the first detailed and uniform comparison of these three oxygen indicators in a large sample of solar-type stars. There is good agreement between the [O/H] ratios from forbidden and OH lines, while the NLTE triplet shows a systematically lower abundance. We found that discrepancies between OH, [O I] and the O I triplet do not exceed 0.2 dex in most cases. We have studied abundance trends in planet host and comparison sample stars, and no obvious anomalies related to the presence of planets have been detected. All three indicators show that, on average, [O/Fe] decreases with [Fe/H] in the metallicity range -0.8oxygen overabundance of 0.1-0.2dex with respect to the comparison sample.

  10. CHAOS I: Direct Chemical Abundances for HII Regions in NGC 628

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, Danielle A; Skillman, Evan D; Pogge, Richard W; Moustakas, John; Groh-Johnson, Mara

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CHemical Abundances of Spirals (CHAOS) project leverages the combined power of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) with the broad spectral range and sensitivity of the Multi Object Double Spectrograph (MODS) to measure "direct" abundances in large samples of HII regions in spiral galaxies. We present LBT MODS observations of 62 HII regions in the nearby NGC628. We measure one or more auroral lines ([OIII] 4363, [NII] 5755, [SIII] 6312, or [OII] 7320,7330) in a large number of HII regions (40). Comparing derived temperatures from multiple auroral line measurements, we find: a strong correlation between temperatures based on [SIII] and [NII]; and large discrepancies for some temperatures based on [OII] and [OIII]. These trends are consistent with other observations in the literature, yet, given the widespread use and acceptance of [OIII] as a temperature determinant, the magnitude of the T[OIII] discrepancies still came as a surprise. Based on these results, we conduct a uniform abundance analysis using the...

  11. Existence of long-lived isotopes of a superheavy element in natural Au

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Marinov; I. Rodushkin; A. Pape; Y. Kashiv; D. Kolb; R. Brandt; R. V. Gentry; H. W. Miller; L. Halicz; I. Segal

    2007-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Evidence for the existence of long-lived isotopes with atomic mass numbers 261 and 265 and abundance of (1-10)x10$^{-10}$ relative to Au has been found in a study of natural Au using an inductively coupled plasma - sector field mass spectrometer. The measured masses fit the predictions made for the masses of $^{261}$Rg and $^{265}$Rg (Z=111) and for some isotopes of nearby elements. The possibility that these isotopes belong to the recently discovered class of long-lived high spin super- and hyperdeformed isomeric states is discussed.

  12. Primordial Li abundance and massive particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latin-Capital-Letter-Eth apo, H. [Department of Physics, Akdeniz University, TR-07058, Antalya (Turkey)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of the observed lithium abundance coming from the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis is as of yet unsolved. One of the proposed solutions is including relic massive particles into the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. We investigated the effects of such particles on {sup 4}HeX{sup -}+{sup 2}H{yields}{sup 6}Li+X{sup -}, where the X{sup -} is the negatively charged massive particle. We demonstrate the dominance of long-range part of the potential on the cross-section.

  13. Lithium abundances in exoplanet-hosts stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Castro; S. Vauclair; O. Richard; N. C. Santos

    2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Exoplanet-host stars (EHS) are known to present surface chemical abundances different from those of stars without any detected planet (NEHS). EHS are, on the average, overmetallic compared to the Sun. The observations also show that, for cool stars, lithium is more depleted in EHS than in NEHS. The overmetallicity of EHS may be studied in the framework of two different scenarii. We have computed main sequence stellar models with various masses, metallicities and accretion rates. The results show different profiles for the lithium destruction according to the scenario. We compare these results to the spectroscopic observations of lithium.

  14. SAFS-UW-1001 Abundance of Adult Hatchery and Wild

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    SAFS-UW-1001 July 2010 Abundance of Adult Hatchery and Wild Salmon by Region of the North Pacific Moore Foundation #12;Hatchery and Wild Salmon Abundance Page ii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 1 Approaches to estimating wild salmon spawner abundances......................................... 1

  15. The circulating hemocytes of the white shrimp, Penaeus setiferus: origin, abundance, morphology, and function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontaine, Clark Timothy

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mechanism contributing to the maintenance of hematological equilibrium. Research of this nature is needed for penaeid shrimp. The fall in hemocyte count could be due to retirement of hemocytes from circulation. Cells thus retired may adhere to tissues...THE CIRCULATING HENOCYTFS OF THE MH1TE SHRIMP& Penaeus seti. ferus: ORIGIN, ABUNDANCE, NORPHOLOGY, AND I'UNCTION A Thesis by Clark Timothy Fontaine Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&N University in Partial fulfillment...

  16. Relationship of Course Woody Debris to Red-Cockaded Woodpecker Prey Diversity and Abundance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, G.S.

    1999-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The abundance of diversity of prey commonly used by the red-cockaded woodpecker were monitored in experimental plots in which course woody debris was manipulated. In one treatment, all the woody debris over four inches was removed. In the second treatment, the natural amount of mortality remained intact. The overall diversity of prey was unaffected; however, wood roaches were significantly reduced by removal of woody debris. The latter suggests that intensive utilizations or harvesting practices may reduce foraging.

  17. Element Abundances through the Cosmic Ages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max Pettini

    2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The horizon for studies of element abundances has expanded dramatically in the last ten years. Once the domain of astronomers concerned chiefly with stars and nearby galaxies, this field has now become a key component of observational cosmology, as technological advances have made it possible to measure the abundances of several chemical elements in a variety of environments at redshifts up to z = 4, when the universe was in its infancy. In this series of lectures I summarise current knowledge on the chemical make-up of distant galaxies observed directly in their starlight, and of interstellar and intergalactic gas seen in absorption against the spectra of bright background sources. The picture which is emerging is one where the universe at z = 3 already included many of the constituents of today's galaxies-even at these early times we see evidence for Population I and II stars, while the `smoking gun' for Population III objects may be hidden in the chemical composition of the lowest density regions of the intergalactic medium, yet to be deciphered.

  18. Beryllium abundances in stars hosting giant planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. C. Santos; R. J. Garcia Lopez; G. Israelian; M. Mayor; R. Rebolo; A. Garcia-Gil; M. R. Perez de Taoro; S. Randich

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We have derived beryllium abundances in a wide sample of stars hosting planets, with spectral types in the range F7V-K0V, aimed at studying in detail the effects of the presence of planets on the structure and evolution of the associated stars. Predictions from current models are compared with the derived abundances and suggestions are provided to explain the observed inconsistencies. We show that while still not clear, the results suggest that theoretical models may have to be revised for stars with Teff<5500K. On the other hand, a comparison between planet host and non-planet host stars shows no clear difference between both populations. Although preliminary, this result favors a ``primordial'' origin for the metallicity ``excess'' observed for the planetary host stars. Under this assumption, i.e. that there would be no differences between stars with and without giant planets, the light element depletion pattern of our sample of stars may also be used to further investigate and constraint Li and Be depletion mechanisms.

  19. Oxygen Abundance Measurements of SHIELD Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haurberg, Nathalie C; Cannon, John M; Marshall, Melissa V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have derived oxygen abundances for 8 galaxies from the Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs (SHIELD). The SHIELD survey is an ongoing study of very low-mass galaxies, with M$_{\\rm HI}$ between 10$^{6.5}$ and 10$^{7.5}$ M$_{\\odot}$, that were detected by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. H$\\alpha$ images from the WIYN 3.5m telescope show that these 8 SHIELD galaxies each possess one or two active star-forming regions which were targeted with long-slit spectral observations using the Mayall 4m telescope at KPNO. We obtained a direct measurement of the electron temperature by detection of the weak [O III] $\\lambda$4363 line in 2 of the HII regions. Oxygen abundances for the other HII regions were estimated using a strong-line method. When the SHIELD galaxies are plotted on a B-band luminosity-metallicity diagram they appear to suggest a slightly shallower slope to the relationship than normally seen. However, that offset is systematically reduced when the near-infrared luminosity is used ins...

  20. ON STIRLING NUMBERS FOR COMPLEX ARGUMENTS AND HANKEL CONTOURS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodinger, Helmut

    ON STIRLING NUMBERS FOR COMPLEX ARGUMENTS AND HANKEL CONTOURS provide a natural generalization of Stirling numbers for unrestricted complex values. Introduction Richmond and Merlini have introduced in [5] an extension of Stirling's subset numbers xy

  1. The Solar Heavy Element Abundances: I. Constraints from Stellar Interiors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delahaye, F; Delahaye, Franck; Pinsonneault, Marc

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The latest solar atmosphere models include non-LTE corrections and 3D hydrodynamic convection simulations. These models predict a significant reduction in the solar metal abundance, which leads to a serious conflict between helioseismic data and the predictions of solar interiors models. We demonstrate that the helioseismic constraints on the surface convection zone depth and helium abundance combined with stellar interiors models can be used to define the goodness of fit for a given chemical composition. After a detailed examination of the errors in the theoretical models we conclude that models constructed with the older solar abundances are consistent (seismic data. Models constructed with the proposed new low abundance scale are strongly disfavored, disagreeing at the 15 \\sigma level. We then use the sensitivity of the seismic properties to abundance changes to invert the problem and infer a seismic solar heavy element abundance mix with two components: meteoritic abundances, and th...

  2. Abundance ratios in hierarchical galaxy formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Thomas

    1999-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical enrichment and stellar abundance ratios of galaxies which form in a hierarchical clustering scheme are calculated. For this purpose I adopt the star formation histories (SFH) as they are delivered by semi-analytic models in Kauffmann (1996}. It turns out that the average SFH of cluster ellipticals does not yield globally alpha-enhanced stellar populations. The star burst that occurs when the elliptical forms in the major merger plays therefore a crucial role in producing alpha-enhancement. Only under the assumption that the IMF is significantly flattened with respect to the Salpeter value during the burst, a Mg/Fe overabundant population can be obtained. In particular for the interpretation of radial gradients in metallicity and alpha-enhancement, the mixing of global and burst populations are of great importance. The model predicts bright field galaxies to be less alpha-enhanced than their counterparts in clusters.

  3. Early solar mass loss, opacity uncertainties, and the solar abundance problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzik, Joyce Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keady, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kilcrease, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar models calibrated with the new element abundance mixture of Asplund et al. published in 2005 no longer produce good agreement with the sound speed, convection zone depth, and convection zone helium abundance inferred from solar oscillation data. Attempts to modify the input physics of the standard model, for example, by including enhanced diffusion, increased opacities, accretion, convective overshoot, or gravity waves have not restored the good agreement attained with the prior abundances. Here we present new models including early mass loss via a stronger solar wind. Early mass loss has been investigated prior to the solar abundance problem to deplete lithium and resolve the 'faint early sun problem'. We find that mass loss modifies the core structure and deepens the convection zone, and so improves agreement with oscillation data using the new abundances: however the amount of mass loss must be small to avoid destroying all of the surface lithium, and agreement is not fully restored. We also considered the prospects for increasing solar interior opacities. In order to increase mixture opacities by the 30% required to mitigate the abundance problem, the opacities of individual elements (e.g., O, N, C, and Fe) must be revised by a factor of two to three for solar interior conditions: we are investigating the possibility of broader calculated line wings for bound-bound transitions at the relevant temperatures to enhance opacity. We find that including all of the elements in the AGS05 opacity mixture (through uranium at atomic number Z=92) instead of only the 17 elements in the OPAL opacity mixture increases opacities by a negligible 0.2%.

  4. The Solar Heavy Element Abundances: I. Constraints from Stellar Interiors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franck Delahaye; Marc Pinsonneault

    2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The latest solar atmosphere models include non-LTE corrections and 3D hydrodynamic convection simulations. These models predict a significant reduction in the solar metal abundance, which leads to a serious conflict between helioseismic data and the predictions of solar interiors models. We demonstrate that the helioseismic constraints on the surface convection zone depth and helium abundance combined with stellar interiors models can be used to define the goodness of fit for a given chemical composition. After a detailed examination of the errors in the theoretical models we conclude that models constructed with the older solar abundances are consistent (seismic data. Models constructed with the proposed new low abundance scale are strongly disfavored, disagreeing at the 15 \\sigma level. We then use the sensitivity of the seismic properties to abundance changes to invert the problem and infer a seismic solar heavy element abundance mix with two components: meteoritic abundances, and the light metals CNONe. Seismic degeneracies between the best solutions for the elements arise for changes in the relative CNONe abundances and their effects are quantified. We obtain Fe/H=7.50+/-0.045+/-0.003(CNNe) and O/H=8.86+/-0.041+/-0.025(CNNe) for the relative CNNe in the GS98 mixture. The inferred solar oxygen abundance disagree with the abundance inferred from the 3D hydro models. Changes in the Ne abundance can mimic changes in O for the purposes of scalar constraints.Models constructed with low oxygen and high neon are inconsistent with the solar sound speed profile. The implications for the solar abundance scale are discussed.

  5. Planning Amid Abundance: Alaska’s FY 2013 Budget Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBeath, Jerry

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    state’s incentives for oil investment are excessive” (FDNM,increased oil industry investment. Planning Amid Abundance:oil corporations said that additional investment was

  6. Earth's most abundant mineral finally has a name | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    clarified the definition of Bridgmanite, a high-density form of magnesium iron silicate and the Earth's most abundant mineral - using Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced...

  7. Oxygen abundances in the most oxygen-rich spiral galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin; T. X. Thuan; J. M. Vilchez

    2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen abundances in the spiral galaxies expected to be richest in oxygen are estimated. The new abundance determinations are based on the recently discovered ff-relation between auroral and nebular oxygen line fluxes in HII regions. We find that the maximum gas-phase oxygen abundance in the central regions of spiral galaxies is 12+log(O/H)~8.75. This value is significantly lower than the previously accepted value. The central oxygen abundance in the Milky Way is similar to that in other large spirals.

  8. Enhanced Detection of Low Abundant Human Plasma Proteins using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    it especially difficult to detect low-abundant proteins in human biofluids such as blood plasma, an essential aspect for successful biomarker discovery efforts. Here we...

  9. High-Performance Thermoelectric Devices Based on Abundant Silicide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development of high-performance thermoelectric devices for vehicle waste heat recovery will include fundamental research to use abundant promising low-cost thermoelectric...

  10. Comparing halo bias from abundance and clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, Kai; Gaztanaga, Enrique

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We model the abundance of haloes in the $\\sim(3 \\ \\text{Gpc}/h)^3$ volume of the MICE Grand Challenge simulation by fitting the universal mass function with an improved Jack-Knife error covariance estimator that matches theory predictions. We present unifying relations between different fitting models and new predictions for linear ($b_1$) and non-linear ($c_2$ and $c_3$) halo clustering bias. Different mass function fits show strong variations in their overall poor performance when including the low mass range ($M_h \\lesssim 3 \\ 10^{12} \\ M_{\\odot}/h$) in the analysis, which indicates noisy friends-of-friends halo detection given the MICE resolution ($m_p \\simeq 3 \\ 10^{10} \\ M_{\\odot}$/h). Together with fits from the literature we find an overall variance in the amplitudes of around $10%$ in the low mass and up to $50%$ in the high mass (galaxy cluster) range ($M_h > 10^{14} \\ M_{\\odot}/h$). These variations propagate into a $10%$ change in $b_1$ predictions and a $50%$ change in $c_2$ or $c_3$. Despite the...

  11. Topology in QCD and the axion abundance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitano, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The temperature dependence of the topological susceptibility (chi_t) in QCD essentially determines the abundance of the QCD axion in the Universe, and is commonly estimated, based on the instanton picture, to be a certain negative power of temperature. While lattice QCD should be able to check the instanton picture in principle, the region of the temperature where lattice calculations of chi_t are reliable is rather limited in practice, because existing methods on the lattice will probably fail when chi_t decreases rapidly with temperatures. In this work, two exploratory studies are presented. First, to realize the limitation of temperature we perform lattice calculations of chi_t in the quenched approximation and find that it becomes difficult with a given resource when T > 2 T_c. A possible way out is proposed and some test calculations are given. The absolute value and the temperature dependence of chi_t in real QCD can be significantly different from that in the quenched approximation, and is not well est...

  12. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesca Matteucci; Brad K. Gibson

    1995-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the origin of iron and alpha-elements (O, Mg, Si) in clusters of galaxies. In particular, we discuss the [O/Fe] ratio and the iron mass-to-luminosity ratio in the intracluster medium (ICM) and their link to the chemical and dynamical evolution of elliptical and lenticular galaxies. We adopt a detailed model of galactic evolution incorporating the development of supernovae- driven galactic winds which pollute the ICM with enriched ejecta. We demonstrate \\it quantitatively \\rm the crucial dependence upon the assumed stellar initial mass function in determining the evolution of the mass and abundances ratios of heavy elements in typical model ICMs. We show that completely opposite behaviours of [alpha/Fe] ratios (\\ie positive versus negative ratios) can be obtained by varying the initial mass function without altering the classic assumptions regarding type Ia supernovae progenitors or their nucleosynthesis. Our results indicate that models incorporating somewhat flatter-than-Salpeter initial mass functions (ie x approx 1, as opposed to x=1.35) are preferred, provided the intracluster medium iron mass-to-luminosity ratio, preliminary [alpha/Fe]>0 ASCA results, and present-day type Ia supernovae rates, are to be matched. A simple Virgo cluster simulation which adheres to these constraints shows that approx 70% of the measured ICM iron mass has its origin in type II supernovae, with the remainder being synthesized in type Ia systems.

  13. The bends in the slopes of radial abundance gradients in the disks of spiral galaxies -- do they exist?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin

    2002-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Spiral galaxies with a reported bend in the slope of gradient in the oxygen abundances (O/H)_R23, derived with traditionally used R23 - method, were examined. It is shown that the artificial origin of the reported bends can be naturally explained. Two reasons that result in a false bend in the slope of (O/H)_R23 gradient are indicated. It is concluded that at the present time there is no example of a galaxy with an undisputable established bend in the slope of the oxygen abundance gradient.

  14. Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Project Number 200845800 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    proposes to take advantage of iteroparity in natural-origin (NOR) steelhead populations to increase,000 fish) between 1941-1954 (Mullan et al. 1992). Subsequent to this dramatic increase, wild stock escapements to the Columbia Basin have fluctuated widely. Wild stock productivity and abundance declined again

  15. Understanding the use of natural gas storage for generators of electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckman, K.L. [International Gas Consulting, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Underground natural gas storage is aggressively used by a handful of utility electric generators in the United States. While storage facilities are often utilized by the natural gas pipeline industry and the local distribution companies (LDCs), regional electric generators have taken advantgage of abundant storage and pipeline capacity to develop very cost efficient gas fired electric generating capacity, especially for peaking demand. Most types of natural gas storage facilities are located underground, with a few based above-ground. These facilities have served two basic types of natural gas storage service requirements: seasonal baseload and needle peakshaving. Baseload services are typically developed in depleted oil and gas reservoirs and aquifers while mined caverns and LNG facilities (also Propane-air facilities) typically provide needle peakshaving services. Reengineering of the natural gas infrastructure will alter the historical use patterns, and will provide the electric industry with new gas supply management tools. Electric generators, as consumers of natural gas, were among the first open access shippers and, as a result of FERC Order 636, are now attempting to reposition themselves in the {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} gas industry. Stated in terms of historical consumption, the five largest gas burning utilities consume 40% of all the gas burned for electric generation, and the top twenty accounted for approximately 70%. Slightly more than 100 utilities, including municipals, have any gas fired generating capacity, a rather limited number. These five are all active consumers of storage services.

  16. Heat distribution by natural convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection can provide adequate heat distribution in many situtations that arise in buildings. This is appropriate, for example, in passive solar buildings where some rooms tend to be more strongly solar heated than others or to reduce the number of heating units required in a building. Natural airflow and heat transport through doorways and other internal building apertures is predictable and can be accounted for in the design. The nature of natural convection is described, and a design chart is presented appropriate to a simple, single-doorway situation. Natural convective loops that can occur in buildings are described and a few design guidelines are presented.

  17. Copy number: Efficient algorithms for single- and multi-track copy number segmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Gro; Liestøl, Knut; Loo, Peter Van; Moen Vollan, Hans Kristian; Eide, Marianne B; Rueda, Oscar M; Chin, Suet-Feung; Russell, Roslin; Baumbusch, Lars O; Caldas, Carlos; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Lingjærde, Ole Christian

    2012-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    C, Shah SP, Chin SF et al. The genomic and transcriptomic architecture of 2,000 breast tumours reveals novel subgroups. Nature 2012. doi:10.1038/nature10983. Mathiesen RR, Fjelldal R, Liestøl K et al. High resolution analysis of copy number... C, Shah SP, Chin SF et al. The genomic and transcriptomic architecture of 2,000 breast tumours reveals novel subgroups. Nature 2012. doi:10.1038/nature10983. Mathiesen RR, Fjelldal R, Liestøl K et al. High resolution analysis of copy number...

  18. Constraints on the relic neutrino abundance and implications for cosmological neutrino mass limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Nicole F.; /Fermilab

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors examine a mechanism which can lead to flavor transformation of neutrino-antineutrino asymmetries in the early universe, a process which is unavoidable when the neutrino mixing angles are large. This sets the best limit on the lepton number of the universe, and hence on the relic neutrino abundance. They also consider the consequences for the relic neutrino abundance if extra neutrino interactions are allowed, e.g., the coupling of the neutrinos to a light (compared to m{sub {nu}}) boson. For a wide range of couplings not excluded by other considerations, the relic neutrinos would annihilate to bosons at late times, and thus make a negligible contribution to the matter density today. This mechanism evades the neutrino mass limits arising from large scale structure.

  19. Natural Gas Exports from Iran

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This assessment of the natural gas sector in Iran, with a focus on Iran’s natural gas exports, was prepared pursuant to section 505 (a) of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (Public Law No: 112-158). As requested, it includes: (1) an assessment of exports of natural gas from Iran; (2) an identification of the countries that purchase the most natural gas from Iran; (3) an assessment of alternative supplies of natural gas available to those countries; (4) an assessment of the impact a reduction in exports of natural gas from Iran would have on global natural gas supplies and the price of natural gas, especially in countries identified under number (2); and (5) such other information as the Administrator considers appropriate.

  20. Planning Amid Abundance: Alaska’s FY 2013 Budget Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBeath, Jerry

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    government revenues: heavy oil and natural gas” (FDNM,for new light crude from heavy oil, natural gas and shale

  1. Beryllium Abundances in Stars of One-Solar-Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ann Merchant Boesgaard; Julie A. Krugler

    2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We have determined Be abundances in 50 F and G dwarfs in the mass range of 0.9 $\\leq$ M$_\\odot$ $\\leq$ 1.1 as determined by Lambert & Reddy. The effective temperatures are 5600 to 6400 K and metallicities from $-$0.65 to +0.11. The spectra were taken primarily with Keck I + HIRES. The Be abundances were found via spectral synthesis of Be II lines near 3130 \\AA. The Be abundances were investigated as a function of age, temperature, metallicity and Li abundance in this narrow mass range. Even though our stars are similar in mass, they show a range in Be abundances of a factor of $>$40. We find that [Be/Fe] has no dependence on temperature, but does show a spread of a factor of 6 at a given temperature. The reality of the spread is shown by two identical stars which differ from each other by a factor of two only in their abundances of Li and Be. Our thin-disk-star sample fits the trend between Be abundance and [Fe/H] found for halo and thick disk stars, extending it to about 4 orders of magnitude in the two logarithmic quantities. Both Fe and Be appear to increase similarly over time in the Galaxy. One-third of our sample may be classified as subgiants; these more-evolved stars have lower Be abundances than the dwarfs. They have undergone Be depletion by slow mixing on the main sequence and Be dilution during their trip toward the red giant base. There are both Li and Be detections in 60 field stars in the "Li-plateau" of 5900 - 6300 K now and the abundances of the two light elements are correlated with a slope of 0.34 $\\pm$0.05, with greater Li depletion than Be depletion.

  2. Oxygen and nitrogen abundances in Virgo and field spirals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin; Mercedes Molla; Federico Ferrini; Jose M. Vilchez

    2001-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The oxygen and nitrogen abundances in the HII regions of the nine Virgo spirals of the sample from Skillman et al (1996) and in nine field spiral galaxies are re-determined with the recently suggested P - method. We confirm that there is an abundance segregation in the sample of Virgo spirals in the sense that the HI deficient Virgo spirals near the core of the cluster have higher oxygen abundances in comparison to the spirals at the periphery of the Virgo cluster. At the same time both the Virgo periphery and core spirals have counterparts among field spirals. We conclude that if there is a difference in the abundance properties of the Virgo and field spirals, this difference appears to be small and masked by the observational errors.

  3. astrophysically abundant atoms: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atomic data available so far and check the Mg abundances from individual lines in the Sun, four well studied A-type stars, and three reference metal-poor stars. With the adopted...

  4. abundance element: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    physics, enable us to infer the temperature and hydrogen abundance profiles inside the Sun. These profiles also help in setting constraints on the input physics as well as on...

  5. Fundamental constraints on the abundances of chemotaxis proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flagellated bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, perform directed motion in gradients of concentration of attractants and repellents in a process called chemotaxis. The E. coli chemotaxis signaling pathway is a model for signal transduction, but it has unique features. We demonstrate that the need for fast signaling necessitates high abundances of the proteins involved in this pathway. We show that further constraints on the abundances of chemotaxis proteins arise from the requirements of self-assembly, both of flagellar motors and of chemoreceptor arrays. All these constraints are specific to chemotaxis, and published data confirm that chemotaxis proteins tend to be more highly expressed than their homologs in other pathways. Employing a chemotaxis pathway model, we show that the gain of the pathway at the level of the response regulator CheY increases with overall chemotaxis protein abundances. This may explain why, at least in one E. coli strain, the abundance of all chemotaxis proteins is higher in media w...

  6. animal prey abundance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    overall abundance was higher overall during the August 1997 cruise than during the October 1996 cruise... Cady, Robert B 2012-06-07 42 The camp will expose students to local...

  7. abundance mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between 55 and 72 Sm II lines per star. The abundance ratios of Sm relative to other rare earth elements in these stars are in agreement, and are consistent with ratios...

  8. Relative abundance of desert tortoises on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautenstrauch, K.R.; O`Farrell, T.P.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Seven hundred fifty-nine transects having a total length of 1,191 km were walked during 1981--1986 to determine the distribution and relative abundance of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The abundance of tortoises on NTS was low to very low relative to other populations in the Mojave Desert. Sign of tortoises was found from 880 to 1,570 m elevation and was more abundant above 1,200 m than has been reported previously for Nevada. Tortoises were more abundant on NTS on the upper alluvial fans and slopes of mountains than in valley bottoms. They also were more common on or near limestone and dolomite mountains than on mountains of volcanic origin.

  9. A Temperature and Abundance Retrieval Method for Exoplanet Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madhusudhan, Nikku

    We present a new method to retrieve molecular abundances and temperature profiles from exoplanet atmosphere photometry and spectroscopy. We run millions of one-dimensional (1D) atmosphere models in order to cover the large ...

  10. Relationships between body size and abundance in ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enquist, Brian Joseph

    , but interrelated, relation- ships between size and abundance that are often con- fused in the literature. Here, we and the structure and dynamics of eco- logical communities [3­5]. In addition, because body size is one

  11. Planning Amid Abundance: Alaska’s FY 2013 Budget Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBeath, Jerry

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2011) “The Outlier State: Alaska’s FY 2012 Budget,” AnnualWestern States Budget Review. New York Times, selectedAbundance: Alaska’s FY 2013 Budget Process Abstract: This

  12. abundance isotopic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24 Abundances and Isotope Ratios in the Magellanic Clouds: The Star Forming Environment of N113 Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: With the goal of deriving the physical and...

  13. Beryllium, Lithium and Oxygen Abundances in F-type Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Garcia Lopez; M. C. Dominguez Herrera; M. R. Perez de Taoro; C. Casares; J. L. Rasilla; R. Rebolo; C. Allende Prieto

    1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Beryllium and oxygen abundances have been derived in a sample of F-type field stars for which lithium abundances had been measured previously, with the aim of obtaining observational constraints to discriminate between the different mixing mechanisms proposed. Mixing associated with the transport of angular momentum in the stellar interior and internal gravity waves within the framework of rotating evolutionary models, appear to be promising ways to explain the observations.

  14. Massive stars vs. nebular abundances in the Orion nebula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio Simón Díaz

    2006-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The search of consistency between nebular and massive star abundances has been a longstanding problem. I briefly review what has been done regarding to this topic, also presenting a recent study focused on the Orion nebula: the O and Si stellar abundances resulting from a detailed and fully consistent spectroscopic analysis of the group of B stars associated with the Orion nebula are compared with the most recent nebular gas-phase results.

  15. Rate Analysis or a Possible Interpretation of Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miklos Kiss

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy elements are formed in nucleosynthesis processes. Abundances of these elements can be classified as elemental abundance, isotopic abundance, and abundance of nuclei. In this work we propose to change nucleon identification from the usual (Z,A) to (Z,N), which allows reading out new information from the measured abundances. We are interested in the neutron density required to reproduce the measured abundance of nuclei assuming equilibrium processes. This is only possible when two stable nuclei are separated by an unstable nucleus. At these places we investigated the neutron density required for equilibrium nucleosynthesis both isotopically and isotonically at temperatures of AGB interpulse and thermal pulse phases. We obtained an estimate for equilibrium nucleosynthesis neutron density in most of the cases. Next we investigated the possibility of partial formation of nuclei. We analyzed the meaning of the branching factor. We found a mathematical definition for the unified interpretation of a branching point closed at isotonic case and open at isotopic case. We introduce a more expressive variant of branching ratio called partial formation rate. With these we are capable of determining the characteristic neutron density values.

  16. DIRECT EVALUATION OF THE HELIUM ABUNDANCES IN OMEGA CENTAURI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupree, A. K.; Avrett, E. H., E-mail: dupree@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: eavrett@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct measure of the helium abundances from the near-infrared transition of He I at 1.08 {mu}m is obtained for two nearly identical red giant stars in the globular cluster Omega Centauri. One star exhibits the He I line; the line is weak or absent in the other star. Detailed non-local thermal equilibrium semi-empirical models including expansion in spherical geometry are developed to match the chromospheric H{alpha}, H{beta}, and Ca II K lines, in order to predict the helium profile and derive a helium abundance. The red giant spectra suggest a helium abundance of Y {<=} 0.22 (LEID 54064) and Y = 0.39-0.44 (LEID 54084) corresponding to a difference in the abundance {Delta}Y {>=} 0.17. Helium is enhanced in the giant star (LEID 54084) that also contains enhanced aluminum and magnesium. This direct evaluation of the helium abundances gives observational support to the theoretical conjecture that multiple populations harbor enhanced helium in addition to light elements that are products of high-temperature hydrogen burning. We demonstrate that the 1.08 {mu}m He I line can yield a helium abundance in cool stars when constraints on the semi-empirical chromospheric model are provided by other spectroscopic features.

  17. Carbon and Strontium Abundances of Metal-Poor Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David K. Lai; Jennifer A. Johnson; Michael Bolte; Sara Lucatello

    2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present carbon and strontium abundances for 100 metal-poor stars measured from R$\\sim $7000 spectra obtained with the Echellette Spectrograph and Imager at the Keck Observatory. Using spectral synthesis of the G-band region, we have derived carbon abundances for stars ranging from [Fe/H]$=-1.3$ to [Fe/H]$=-3.8$. The formal errors are $\\sim 0.2$ dex in [C/Fe]. The strontium abundance in these stars was measured using spectral synthesis of the resonance line at 4215 {\\AA}. Using these two abundance measurments along with the barium abundances from our previous study of these stars, we show it is possible to identify neutron-capture-rich stars with our spectra. We find, as in other studies, a large scatter in [C/Fe] below [Fe/H]$ = -2$. Of the stars with [Fe/H]$carbon-rich metal-poor stars. The Sr and Ba abundances show that three of the carbon-rich stars are neutron-capture-rich, while two have normal Ba and Sr. This fraction of carbon enhanced stars is consistent with other studies that include this metallicity range.

  18. Hyper Space Complex Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shanguang Tan

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A new kind of numbers called Hyper Space Complex Numbers and its algebras are defined and proved. It is with good properties as the classic Complex Numbers, such as expressed in coordinates, triangular and exponent forms and following the associative and commutative laws of addition and multiplication. So the classic Complex Number is developed from in complex plane with two dimensions to in complex space with N dimensions and the number system is enlarged also.

  19. ISO/GUM UNCERTAINTIES AND CIAAW (UNCERTAINTY TREATMENT FOR RECOMMENDED ATOMIC WEIGHTS AND ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has published a Guide to the expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM). The IUPAC Commission on Isotopic Abundance and Atomic Weight (CIAAW) began attaching uncertainty limits to their recommended values about forty years ago. CIAAW's method for determining and assigning uncertainties has evolved over time. We trace this evolution to their present method and their effort to incorporate the basic ISO/GUM procedures into evaluations of these uncertainties. We discuss some dilemma the CIAAW faces in their present method and whether it is consistent with the application of the ISO/GUM rules. We discuss the attempt to incorporate variations in measured isotope ratios, due to natural fractionation, into the ISO/GUM system. We make some observations about the inconsistent treatment in the incorporation of natural variations into recommended data and uncertainties. A recommendation for expressing atomic weight values using a tabulated range of values for various chemical elements is discussed.

  20. Constraining the abundances of complex organics in the inner regions of solar-type protostars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taquet, Vianney; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Neri, Roberto; Kahane, Claudine; Charnley, Steven B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high abundances of Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) with respect to methanol, the most abundant COM, detected towards low-mass protostars, tend to be underpredicted by astrochemical models. This discrepancy might come from the large beam of the single-dish telescopes, encompassing several components of the studied protostar, commonly used to detect COMs. To address this issue, we have carried out multi-line observations of methanol and several COMs towards the two low-mass protostars NGC1333-IRAS2A and -IRAS4A with the Plateau de Bure interferometer at an angular resolution of 2 arcsec, resulting in the first multi-line detection of the O-bearing species glycolaldehyde and ethanol and of the N-bearing species ethyl cyanide towards low-mass protostars other than IRAS 16293. The high number of detected transitions from COMs (more than 40 methanol transitions for instance) allowed us to accurately derive the source size of their emission and the COMs column densities. The COMs abundances with respect to meth...

  1. Prompt Iron Enrichment, Two r-Process Components, and Abundances in Very Metal-Poor Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. J. Wasserburg; Y. -Z. Qian

    1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model to explain the wide range of abundances for heavy r-process elements (mass number A > 130) at low [Fe/H]. This model requires rapid star formation and/or an initial population of supermassive stars in the earliest condensed clots of matter to provide a prompt or initial Fe inventory. Subsequent Fe and r-process enrichment was provided by two types of supernovae: one producing heavy r-elements with no Fe on a rather short timescale and the other producing light r-elements (A < or = 130) with Fe on a much longer timescale.

  2. Source apportionment of atmospheric PAHs in the Western Balkans by natural abundance radiocarbon analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zdenek Zencak; Jana Klanova; Ivan Holoubek; Oerjan Gustafsson [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden). Department of Applied Environmental Science

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in source apportionment of priority combustion-derived atmospheric pollutants can be made by an inverse approach to inventory emissions, namely, receptor-based compound class-specific radiocarbon analysis (CCSRA) of target pollutants. In the present study, CCSRA of the combustion-derived polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in the atmosphere of the countries of the former republic of Yugoslavia was performed. The carbon stable isotope composition ({delta}{sup 13}C) of PAHs varied between -27.68 and -27.19{per_thousand}, whereas {Delta}{sup 14}C values ranged from -568{per_thousand} for PAHs sampled in Kosovo to -288{per_thousand} for PAHs sampled in the Sarajevo area. The application of an isotopic mass balance model to these {Delta}{sup 14}C data revealed a significant contribution (35-65%) from the combustion of non-fossil material to the atmospheric PAH pollution, even in urban and industrialized areas. Furthermore, consistency was observed between the isotopic composition of PAHs obtained by high-volume sampling and those collected by passive sampling. This encourages the use of passive samplers for CCSRA applications. This marks the first time that a CCSRA investigation could be executed on a geographically wide scale, providing a quantitative field-based source apportionment, which points out that also non-fossil combustion processes should be targeted for remedial action. 36 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. Natural Abundance Radiocarbon Studies of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) in the Marine Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Jesus, Roman P

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Press, San Diego. Bruland, K.W. , (1989) Complexation of6624), 480-482. Rue, E.L. , Bruland, K.W. , (1997) The rolemetal binding ligands (Bruland, 1989; Rue and Bruland, 1997;

  4. Natural abundance radiocarbon studies of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the marine environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jesus, Roman Paul

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Press, San Diego. Bruland, K.W. , (1989) Complexation of6624), 480-482. Rue, E.L. , Bruland, K.W. , (1997) The rolemetal binding ligands (Bruland, 1989; Rue and Bruland, 1997;

  5. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite...

  6. Sugar in Two Steps Hexose sugars are naturally abundant, but it is often useful to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Karsten

    on the decay of U isotopes to Pb can be problematic if damaged parts of zircons, the primary uranium that was quickly depleted. Observations of molecular clouds indicate that ultraviolet radiation selectively depleted in 16O. Yurimoto and Kuramoto (p. 1763; see the Perspective by Yin) have developed a model

  7. A search for stars of very low metal abundance. VI. Detailed abundances of 313 metal-poor stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roederer, Ian U.; Preston, George W.; Thompson, Ian B.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Burley, Gregory S.; Kelson, Daniel D. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Sneden, Christopher, E-mail: iur@umich.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present radial velocities, equivalent widths, model atmosphere parameters, and abundances or upper limits for 53 species of 48 elements derived from high resolution optical spectroscopy of 313 metal-poor stars. A majority of these stars were selected from the metal-poor candidates of the HK Survey of Beers, Preston, and Shectman. We derive detailed abundances for 61% of these stars for the first time. Spectra were obtained during a 10 yr observing campaign using the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle spectrograph on the Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory, the Robert G. Tull Coudé Spectrograph on the Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory, and the High Resolution Spectrograph on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory. We perform a standard LTE abundance analysis using MARCS model atmospheres, and we apply line-by-line statistical corrections to minimize systematic abundance differences arising when different sets of lines are available for analysis. We identify several abundance correlations with effective temperature. A comparison with previous abundance analyses reveals significant differences in stellar parameters, which we investigate in detail. Our metallicities are, on average, lower by ?0.25 dex for red giants and ?0.04 dex for subgiants. Our sample contains 19 stars with [Fe/H] ?–3.5, 84 stars with [Fe/H] ?–3.0, and 210 stars with [Fe/H] ?–2.5. Detailed abundances are presented here or elsewhere for 91% of the 209 stars with [Fe/H] ?–2.5 as estimated from medium resolution spectroscopy by Beers, Preston, and Shectman. We will discuss the interpretation of these abundances in subsequent papers.

  8. Mimicking Nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into lakes and rivers, and the impact different water management decisions could have. ?We?re trying to mimic nature,? said Dr. Jeff Arnold, research leader and agricultural engineer for the Grassland Soil and Water Research Laboratory in Temple, part..., director of Texas A&M University?s Spatial Sciences Laboratory and professor in the Departments of Ecosystem Science and MIMICKING NATURE Computer model helps manage nation?s, world?s waters #2; Management, and Biological and Agricultural Engineering...

  9. The melting and abundance of open charm hadrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bazavov; H. -T. Ding; P. Hegde; O. Kaczmarek; F. Karsch; E. Laermann; Y. Maezawa; Swagato Mukherjee; H. Ohno; P. Petreczky; C. Schmidt; S. Sharma; W. Soeldner; M. Wagner

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ratios of cumulants of conserved net charge fluctuations are sensitive to the degrees of freedom that are carriers of the corresponding quantum numbers in different phases of strong interaction matter. Using lattice QCD with 2+1 dynamical flavors and quenched charm quarks we calculate second and fourth order cumulants of net charm fluctuations and their correlations with other conserved charges such as net baryon number, electric charge and strangeness. Analyzing appropriate ratios of these cumulants we probe the nature of charmed degrees of freedom in the vicinity of the QCD chiral crossover region. We show that for temperatures above the chiral crossover transition temperature, charmed degrees of freedom can no longer be described by an uncorrelated gas of hadrons. This suggests that the dissociation of open charm hadrons and the emergence of deconfined charm states sets in just near the chiral crossover transition. Till the crossover region we compare these lattice QCD results with two hadron resonance gas models --including only the experimentally established charmed resonances and also including additional states predicted by quark model and lattice QCD calculations. This comparison provides evidence for so far unobserved charmed hadrons that contribute to the thermodynamics in the crossover region.

  10. Naturalness redux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Fabbrichesi; Alfredo Urbano

    2015-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea of naturalness, as originally conceived, refers only to the finite renormalization of the Higgs boson mass induced by the introduction of heavier states. In this respect, naturalness is still a powerful heuristic principle in model building beyond the standard model whenever new massive states are coupled to the Higgs field. The most compelling case is provided by the generation of neutrino masses. In this paper we confront this problem from a new perspective. The right-handed sector responsible for the seesaw mechanism---which introduces a large energy threshold above the electroweak scale---is made supersymmetric to comply with naturalness while the standard model is left unchanged and non-supersymmetric. Cancellations necessary to the naturalness requirement break down only at two loops, thus offering the possibility to increase the right-handed neutrino mass scale up to one order of magnitude above the usual values allowed by naturalness. If also the weak boson sector of the standard model is made supersymmetric, cancellations break down at three loops and the scale of new physics can be further raised. In the type-I seesaw, this implementation provides right-handed neutrino masses that are natural and at the same time large enough to give rise to baryogenesis (via leptogenesis). The model contains a dark matter candidate and distinctive new physics in the leptonic sector.

  11. Lithium Abundances of the Local Thin Disk Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David L. Lambert; Bacham E. Reddy

    2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium abundances are presented for a sample of 181 nearby F and G dwarfs with accurate {\\it Hipparcos} parallaxes. The stars are on circular orbits about the Galactic centre and, hence, are identified as belonging to the thin disk. This sample is combined with two published surveys to provide a catalogue of lithium abundances, metallicities ([Fe/H]), masses, and ages for 451 F-G dwarfs, almost all belonging to the thin disk. The lithium abundances are compared and contrasted with published lithium abundances for F and G stars in local open clusters. The field stars span a larger range in [Fe/H] than the clusters for which [Fe/H] $\\simeq 0.0\\pm0.2$. The initial (i.e., interstellar) lithium abundance of the solar neighborhood, as derived from stars for which astration of lithium is believed to be unimportant, is traced from $\\log\\epsilon$(Li) = 2.2 at [Fe/H] = -1 to $\\log\\epsilon$(Li) = 3.2 at $+0.1$. This form for the evolution is dependent on the assumption that astration of lit hium is negligible for the stars defining the relation. An argument is advanced that this latter assumption may not be entirely correct, and, the evolution of lithium with [Fe/H] may be flatter than previously supposed. A sharp Hyades-like Li-dip is not seen among the field stars and appears to be replaced by a large spread among lithium abundances of stars more massive than the lower mass limit of the dip. Astration of lithium by stars of masses too low to participate in the Li-dip is discussed. These stars show little to no spread in lithium abundance at a given [Fe/H] and mass.

  12. Spatial Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by Voxelation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by Voxelation Integrated with High-Throughput Liquid Chromatography Spatial Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by...

  13. An empirical analysis on the adoption of alternative fuel vehicles:The case of natural gas vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Sonia

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    579–594. IANGV, 1997. Natural Gas Vehicle Industry Positionmarket penetration of natural gas vehicles in Switzerland.of NGVs versus number of natural gas refueling stations in

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Earth Abundant and Nontoxic Metal Chalcogenides Produced via Aerosol Spray Pyrolysis for Photovoltaic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Patrick John

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Characterization of Earth Abundant and Nontoxic Metaland Characterization of Earth Abundant and Nontoxic Metalalternatives to CIGS with all earth abundant and non-toxic

  15. New solar opacities, abundances, helioseismology, and neutrino fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John N. Bahcall; Aldo M. Serenelli; Sarbani Basu

    2005-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct solar models with the newly calculated radiative opacities from the Opacity Project (OP) and recently determined (lower) heavy element abundances. We compare results from the new models with predictions of a series of models that use OPAL radiative opacities, older determinations of the surface heavy element abundances, and refinements of nuclear reaction rates. For all the variations we consider, solar models that are constructed with the newer and lower heavy element abundances advocated by Asplund et al. (2005) disagree by much more than the estimated measuring errors with helioseismological determinations of the depth of the solar convective zone, the surface helium composition, the internal sound speeds, and the density profile. Using the new OP radiative opacities, the ratio of the 8B neutrino flux calculated with the older and larger heavy element abundances (or with the newer and lower heavy element abundances) to the total neutrino flux measured by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is 1.09 (0.87) with a 9% experimental uncertainty and a 16% theoretical uncertainty, 1 sigma errors.

  16. Oxygen abundance in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Shi; X. Kong; F. Z. Cheng

    2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present two samples of $\\hii$ galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic observations data release 3. The electron temperatures($T_e$) of 225 galaxies are calculated with the photoionized $\\hii$ model and $T_e$ of 3997 galaxies are calculated with an empirical method. The oxygen abundances from the $T_e$ methods of the two samples are determined reliably. The oxygen abundances from a strong line metallicity indicator, such as $R_{23}$, $P$, $N2$, and $O3N2$, are also calculated. We compared oxygen abundances of $\\hii$ galaxies obtained with the $T_e$ method, $R_{23}$ method, $P$ method, $N2$ method, and $O3N2$method. The oxygen abundances derived with the $T_e$ method are systematically lower by $\\sim$0.2 dex than those derived with the $R_{23}$ method, consistent with previous studies based on $\\hii$ region samples. No clear offset for oxygen abundance was found between $T_e$ metallicity and $P$, $N2$ and $O3N2$ metallicity. When we studied the relation between N/O and O/H, we found that in the metallicity regime of $\\zoh > 7.95$, the large scatter of the relation can be explained by the contribution of small mass stars to the production of nitrogen. In the high metallicity regime, $\\zoh > 8.2$, nitrogen is primarily a secondary element produced by stars of all masses.

  17. Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin Natural Gas Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    1 Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin Natural Gas Trends LNG 17 NYC, June the market will bear. #12;2 Dr. Michelle Michot Foss, CEE/BEG/JSG/UT Natural Gas Can Bring Multiple Benefits we get there? "Safe clean affordable Natural gas is a desirableSafe, clean, affordable, (abundant

  18. Heat distribution by natural convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection can provide adequate heat distribution in many situations that arise in buildings. This is appropriate, for example, in passive solar buildings where some rooms tend to be more strongly solar heated than others. Natural convection can also be used to reduce the number of auxiliary heating units required in a building. Natural airflow and heat transport through doorways and other internal building apertures are predictable and can be accounted for in the design. The nature of natural convection is described, and a design chart is presented appropriate to a simple, single-doorway situation. Experimental results are summarized based on the monitoring of 15 passive solar buildings which employ a wide variety of geometrical configurations including natural convective loops.

  19. Natural Predator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 10 Natural Predator Story by Kathy Wythe Natural Predator Foreign beetle shows promise for controlling saltcedar In the northern part of the Texas Panhandle andalong the West Texas banks of the Colorado andPecos rivers, Texas... scientists are successfully intro- ducing a foreign beetle to help control an invasive and exotic water-thirsty plant. Saltcedar, or Tamarix, was introduced to the western United States in the 1800s from central Asia as an ornamental tree and planted...

  20. What Is The Neon Abundance Of The Sun?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John N. Bahcall; Sarbani Basu; Aldo M. Serenelli

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We have evolved a series of thirteen complete solar models that utilize different assumed heavy element compositions. Models that are based upon the heavy element abundances recently determined by Asplund, Grevesse, and Sauval (2005) are inconsistent with helioseismological measurements. However, models in which the neon abundance is increased by 0.4-0.5 dex to log N(Ne) = 8.29 +- 0.05 (on the scale in which log N(H) = 12) are consistent with the helioseismological measurements even though the other heavy element abundances are in agreement with the determinations of Asplund et al. (2005). These results sharpen and strengthen an earlier study by Antia and Basu (2005). The predicted solar neutrino fluxes are affected by the uncertainties in the composition by less than their 1sigma theoretical uncertainties.

  1. The chemical abundances of the Ap star HD94660

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giarrusso, M. [Università di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sezione Astrofisica, Via S. Sofia 78, 95123 Catania (Italy); INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, via S. Sofia 78, 95123 Catania (Italy); INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work I present the determination of chemical abundances of the Ap star HD94660, a possible rapid oscillating star. As all the magnetic chemically peculiar objects, it presents CNO underabundance and overabundance of iron peak elements of ?100 times and of rare earths up to 4 dex with respect to the Sun. The determination was based on the conversion of the observed equivalent widths into abundances simultaneously to the determination of effective temperature and gravity. Since the Balmer lines of early type stars are very sensitive to the surface gravity while the flux distribution is sensitive to the effective temperature, I have adopted an iterative procedure to match the H{sub ?} line profile and the observed UV-Vis-NIR magnitudes of HD94660 looking for a consistency between the metallicity of the atmosphere model and the derived abundances. From my spectroscopic analysis, this star belongs to the no-rapid oscillating class.

  2. Spectroscopic Abundances and Membership in the Wolf 630 Moving Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bubar, Eric J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of kinematic assemblages evolving from dispersed stellar clusters has remained contentious since Eggen's initial formulation of moving groups in the 1960's. With high quality parallaxes from the Hipparcos space astrometry mission, distance measurements for thousands of nearby, seemingly isolated stars are currently available. With these distances, a high resolution spectroscopic abundance analysis can be brought to bear on the alleged members of these moving groups. If a structure is a relic of an open cluster, the members can be expected to be monolithic in age and abundance inasmuch as homogeneity is observed in young open clusters. In this work we have examined 34 putative members of the proposed Wolf 630 moving group using high resolution stellar spectroscopy. The stars of the sample have been chemically tagged to determine abundance homogeneity and confirm the existence of a homogeneous subsample of 19 stars. Fitting the homogeneous subsample with Yale-Yonsei isochrones yields a single evolut...

  3. Use of a fictitious Marangoni number for natural convection simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arias, Francisco J.; Parks, Geoffrey T.

    2015-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , boilers, nuclear reactor systems, energy storage devices, etc. In the design of such systems numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and experimental testing of prototypes are exten- sively used. However, these methods are not well... theory and to recent research outputs [5–14] and the book by Lappa [15] to obtain an overview of thermal convec- tion and the state of the art. II. THEORETICAL BACKGROUND A. The fictitious Marangoni approach (FMA) Let us start by considering the Navier...

  4. District of Columbia Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0CubicCubic Feet)Cubic--2,819 143,436

  5. U.S. Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional UsersDecadeYear JanMonthYear

  6. Total Number of Existing Underground Natural Gas Storage Fields

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul2011DryTop 100 Oil and GasTop

  7. Number of Existing Natural Gas Aquifers Storage Fields

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousandDecade Year-0 Year-1(Million1. Capacity and43 43 43 43

  8. Number of Existing Natural Gas Depleted Fields Storage

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousandDecade Year-0 Year-1(Million1. Capacity and43 43 43

  9. Number of Existing Natural Gas Salt Caverns Storage Fields

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousandDecade Year-0 Year-1(Million1. Capacity and43 43 4334 35

  10. Stratigraphic and Geographic Bryozoan Abundance Gradients in the Calcareous Shales of the Wreford Megacyclothem (Lower Permian, Kansas)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachut, J. F.; Cuffey, Roger J.

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS August 1999 Number 10 STRATIGRAPHIC AND GEOGRAPHIC BRYOZOAN ABUNDANCE GRADIENTS IN THE CALCAREOUS SHALES OF THE WREFORD MEGACYCLOTHEM (LOWER PERMIAN, KANSAS) Joseph F. Pachut and Roger J... or taphonomic processes. With minor exceptions involving the uppermost Speiser Shale and Schroyer Limestone Member of the Wreford Limestone, detrended correspondence analysis did not segregate any distinctive groupings of beds or lithologies. Speiser assemblages...

  11. DETERMINING THE INITIAL HELIUM ABUNDANCE OF THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serenelli, Aldo M. [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl Schwarzschild Str. 1, Garching D-85471 (Germany); Basu, Sarbani, E-mail: aldos@mpa-garching.mpg.d [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the dependence of the initial helium abundance and the present-day helium abundance in the convective envelope of solar models (Y {sub ini} and Y {sub surf}, respectively) on the parameters that are used to construct the models. We do so by using reference standard solar models (SSMs) to compute the power-law coefficients of the dependence of Y {sub ini} and Y {sub surf} on the input parameters. We use these dependencies to determine the correlation between Y {sub ini} and Y {sub surf} and use this correlation to eliminate uncertainties in Y {sub ini} from all solar model input parameters except the microscopic diffusion rate. We find an expression for Y {sub ini} that depends only on Y {sub surf} and the diffusion rate. By adopting the helioseismic determination of solar surface helium abundance, Y {sup surf} {sub sun} = 0.2485 {+-} 0.0035, and an uncertainty of 20% for the diffusion rate, we find that the initial solar helium abundance, Y {sup ini} {sub sun}, is 0.278 {+-} 0.006 independently of the reference SSMs (and particularly on the adopted solar abundances) used in the derivation of the correlation between Y {sub ini} and Y {sub surf}. When non-SSMs with extra mixing are used, then we derive Y {sup ini} {sub sun} = 0.273 {+-} 0.006. In both cases, the derived Y {sup ini} {sub sun} value is higher than that directly derived from solar model calibrations when the low-metallicity solar abundances (e.g., by Asplund et al.) are adopted in the models.

  12. The Formation of the First Low-Mass Stars From Gas With Low Carbon and Oxygen Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volker Bromm; Abraham Loeb

    2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The first stars in the Universe are predicted to have been much more massive than the Sun. Gravitational condensation accompanied by cooling of the primordial gas due to molecular hydrogen, yields a minimum fragmentation scale of a few hundred solar masses. Numerical simulations indicate that once a gas clump acquires this mass, it undergoes a slow, quasi-hydrostatic contraction without further fragmentation. Here we show that as soon as the primordial gas - left over from the Big Bang - is enriched by supernovae to a carbon or oxygen abundance as small as ~0.01-0.1% of that found in the Sun, cooling by singly-ionized carbon or neutral oxygen can lead to the formation of low-mass stars. This mechanism naturally accommodates the discovery of solar mass stars with unusually low (10^{-5.3} of the solar value) iron abundance but with a high (10^{-1.3} solar) carbon abundance. The minimum stellar mass at early epochs is partially regulated by the temperature of the cosmic microwave background. The derived critical abundances can be used to identify those metal-poor stars in our Milky Way galaxy with elemental patterns imprinted by the first supernovae.

  13. Multispecies weighted Hurwitz numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harnad, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of hypergeometric 2D Toda $\\tau$-functions as generating functions for weighted Hurwitz numbers is extended to multispecies families. Both the enumerative geometrical significance of multispecies weighted Hurwitz numbers as weighted enumerations of branched coverings of the Riemann sphere and their combinatorial significance in terms of weighted paths in the Cayley graph of $S_n$ are derived. The particular case of multispecies quantum weighted Hurwitz numbers is studied in detail.

  14. Curvature and Tachibana numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepanov, Sergey E [Finance Academy under the Government of the Russian Federation, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to define the rth Tachibana number t{sub r} of an n-dimensional compact oriented Riemannian manifold as the dimension of the space of conformally Killing r-forms, for r=1,2,...,n-1. We also describe properties of these numbers, by analogy with properties of the Betti numbers b{sub r} of a compact oriented Riemannian manifold. Bibliography: 25 titles.

  15. Asteroseismic determination of helium abundance in stellar envelopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu; Anwesh Mazumdar; H. M Antia; Pierre Demarque

    2004-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Intermediate degree modes of the solar oscillations have previously been used to determine the solar helium abundance to a high degree of precision. However, we cannot expect to observe such modes in other stars. In this work we investigate whether low degree modes that should be available from space-based asteroseismology missions can be used to determine the helium abundance, Y, in stellar envelopes with sufficient precision. We find that the oscillatory signal in the frequencies caused by the depression in \\Gamma_1 in the second helium ionisation zone can be used to determine the envelope helium abundance of low mass main sequence stars. For frequency errors of 1 part in 10^4, we expect errors \\sigma_Y in the estimated helium abundance to range from 0.03 for 0.8M_sun stars to 0.01 for 1.2M_sun stars. The task is more complicated in evolved stars, such as subgiants, but is still feasible if the relative errors in the frequencies are less than 10^{-4}.

  16. Coronae of Stars with Super Solar Elemental Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peretz, Uria; Drake, Stephen A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coronal elemental abundances are known to deviate from the photospheric values of their parent star, with the degree of deviation depending on the First Ionization Potential (FIP). This study focuses on the coronal composition of stars with super-solar photospheric abundances. We present the coronal abundances of six such stars: 11 LMi, $\\iota$ Hor, HR 7291, $\\tau$ Boo, and $\\alpha$ Cen A and B. These stars all have high-statistics X-ray spectra, three of which are presented for the first time. The abundances measured in this paper are obtained using the line-resolved spectra of the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) in conjunction with the higher throughput EPIC-pn camera spectra on board the XMM-Newton observatory. A collisionally ionized plasma model with two or three temperature components is found to represent the spectra well. All elements are found to be consistently depleted in the coronae compared to their respective photospheres. For 11 LMi and $\\tau$ Boo no FIP effect is present, while $\\iota$ H...

  17. Implications of Elemental Abundances in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takuji Tsujimoto

    2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Unusual elemental abundance patterns observed for stars belonging to nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are discussed. Analysis of the [alpha/H] vs. [Fe/H] diagrams where alpha represents Mg or average of alpha-elements reveals that Fe from Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) does not contribute to the stellar abundances in the dSph galaxies where the member stars exhibit low alpha/Fe ratios except for the most massive dSph galaxy, the Sagitarrius. The more massive dwarf (irregular) galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud, also have an SNe Ia signature in the stellar abundances. These findings suggest that the condition of whether SNe Ia contribute to chemical evolution in dwarf galaxies is likely to depend on the mass scale of galaxies. Unusual Mg abundances in some dSph stars are also found to be the origin of the large scatter in the [Mg/Fe] ratios and responsible for a seemingly decreasing [Mg/Fe] feature with increasing [Fe/H]. In addition, the lack of massive stars in the dSph galaxies does not satisfactorily account for the low-alpha signature. Considering the assemblage of deficient elements (O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, and Zn), all of which are synthesized in pre-SN massive stars and in SN explosions, the low-alpha signature appears to reflect the heavy-element yields of massive stars with smaller rotation compared to solar neighborhood stars.

  18. Implications of Elemental Abundances in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, T

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unusual elemental abundance patterns observed for stars belonging to nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are discussed. Analysis of the [alpha/H] vs. [Fe/H] diagrams where alpha represents Mg or average of alpha-elements reveals that Fe from Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) does not contribute to the stellar abundances in the dSph galaxies where the member stars exhibit low alpha/Fe ratios except for the most massive dSph galaxy, the Sagitarrius. The more massive dwarf (irregular) galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud, also have an SNe Ia signature in the stellar abundances. These findings suggest that the condition of whether SNe Ia contribute to chemical evolution in dwarf galaxies is likely to depend on the mass scale of galaxies. Unusual Mg abundances in some dSph stars are also found to be the origin of the large scatter in the [Mg/Fe] ratios and responsible for a seemingly decreasing [Mg/Fe] feature with increasing [Fe/H]. In addition, the lack of massive stars in the dSph galaxies does not satisfactorily a...

  19. abundant energy source: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    abundant energy source First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 The SolarWiki Solar energy is...

  20. Are beryllium abundances anomalous in stars with giant planets?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. C. Santos; G. Israelian; R. J Garcia Lopez; M. Mayor; R. Rebolo; S. Randich; A. Ecuvillon; C. Dominguez Cerdena

    2004-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present beryllium (Be) abundances in a large sample of 41 extra-solar planet host stars, and for 29 stars without any known planetary-mass companion, spanning a large range of effective temperatures. The Be abundances were derived through spectral synthesis done in standard Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium, using spectra obtained with various instruments. The results seem to confirm that overall, planet-host stars have ``normal'' Be abundances, although a small, but not significant, difference might be present. This result is discussed, and we show that this difference is probably not due to any stellar ``pollution'' events. In other words, our results support the idea that the high-metal content of planet-host stars has, overall, a ``primordial'' origin. However, we also find a small subset of planet-host late-F and early-G dwarfs that might have higher than average Be abundances. The reason for the offset is not clear, and might be related either to the engulfment of planetary material, to galactic chemical evolution effects, or to stellar-mass differences for stars of similar temperature.

  1. abundant nuclear copies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    abundant nuclear copies First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Author's personal copy Nuclear...

  2. GASEOUS CO ABUNDANCE-AN EVOLUTIONARY TRACER FOR MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei, E-mail: liutiepku@gmail.com, E-mail: ywu@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Planck cold clumps are among the most promising objects to investigate the initial conditions of the evolution of molecular clouds. In this work, by combing the dust emission data from the survey of the Planck satellite with the molecular data of {sup 12}CO/{sup 13}CO/C{sup 18}O (1-0) lines from observations with the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m telescope, we investigate the CO abundance, CO depletion, and CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor of 674 clumps in the early cold cores sample. The median and mean values of the CO abundance are 0.89 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} and 1.28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, respectively. The mean and median of CO depletion factor are 1.7 and 0.9, respectively. The median value of X{sub CO-to-H{sub 2}} for the whole sample is 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} K{sup -1} km{sup -1} s. The CO abundance, CO depletion factor, and CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor are strongly (anti-)correlated to other physical parameters (e.g., dust temperature, dust emissivity spectral index, column density, volume density, and luminosity-to-mass ratio). To conclude, the gaseous CO abundance can be used as an evolutionary tracer for molecular clouds.

  3. INTRODUCTION Information on the abundance of large whales in Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidre, Kristin L.

    INTRODUCTION Information on the abundance of large whales in Greenland waters, including fin whales surveys were conducted in West Greenland by the Greenland Fisheries Research Institute (m/v Regina Maris when survey conditions are optimal in Greenlandic waters. Between 1983 and 1993, visual aerial surveys

  4. abundance bed net: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    abundance bed net First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Open Access Impact of...

  5. Carbon Abundances in the Galactic Thin and Thick Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Bensby; S. Feltzing

    2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Although carbon is, together with oxygen and nitrogen, one of the most important elements in the study of galactic chemical evolution its production sites are still poorly known and have been much debated (see e.g. Gustafsson et al. 1999; Chiappini et al. 2003). To trace the origin and evolution of carbon we have determined carbon abundances from the forbidden [C I] line at 8727 A and made comparisons to oxygen abundances from the forbidden [O I] line at 6300 A in a sample of 51 nearby F and G dwarf stars. These data and the fact that the forbidden [C I] and [O I] lines are very robust abundance indicators (they are essentially insensitive to deviations from LTE and uncertainties in the stellar parameters, see, e.g., Gustafsson et al. 1999; Asplund et al. 2005) enable us to very accurately measure the C/O ratio as well as individual C and O abundances. Our first results indicate that the time-scale for the main source that contribute to the carbon enrichment of the interstellar medium operate on the same time-scale as those that contribute to the iron enrichment (and can possibly be AGB stars...)

  6. RECYCLABILITY CHALLENGES IN "ABUNDANT" MATERIAL-BASED TECHNOLOGIES Annick Anctila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RECYCLABILITY CHALLENGES IN "ABUNDANT" MATERIAL-BASED TECHNOLOGIES Annick Anctila and Fthenakisa of photovoltaic installations grow, greatly displacing traditional power- generation infrastructures, recycling a take-back- or recycling-program ahead of time. Our work explores the potential for material recycling

  7. Zirconium, barium, lanthanum, and europium abundances in open clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friel, Eileen D.

    We present an analysis of the s-process elements Zr, Ba, and La and the r-process element Eu in a sample of 50 stars in 19 open clusters. Stellar abundances of each element are based on measures of a minimum of two lines ...

  8. DOE/ID-Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of synthetic fuels from natural gas, cogeneration of electricity and steam, and oil shale and oil sand processing varies from 750 to 950C. Additional study is required to...

  9. DOE/ID-Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of primary energy resources in the forms of coal, natural gas, wind, uranium, and oil shale. Most of Wyoming's coal and gas resources are exported from the state in their...

  10. ZIRCONIUM, BARIUM, LANTHANUM, AND EUROPIUM ABUNDANCES IN OPEN CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Heather R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States); Friel, Eileen D., E-mail: jacob189@msu.edu, E-mail: efriel@indiana.edu, E-mail: hrj@mit.edu [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the s-process elements Zr, Ba, and La and the r-process element Eu in a sample of 50 stars in 19 open clusters. Stellar abundances of each element are based on measures of a minimum of two lines per species via both equivalent width and spectrum synthesis techniques. We investigate cluster mean neutron-capture abundance trends as a function of cluster age and location in the Milky Way disk and compare them to results found in other studies in the literature. We find a statistically significant trend of increasing cluster [Ba/Fe] as a function of decreasing cluster age, in agreement with recent findings for other open cluster samples, supporting the increased importance of low-mass asymptotic giant branch stars to the generation of s-process elements. However, the other s-process elements, [La/Fe] and [Zr/Fe], do not show similar dependences, in contrast to theoretical expectations and the limited observational data from other studies. Conversely, cluster [Eu/Fe] ratios show a slight increase with increasing cluster age, although with marginal statistical significance. Ratios of [s/r]-process abundances, [Ba/Eu] and [La/Eu], however, show more clearly the increasing efficiency of s-process relative to r-process enrichment in open cluster chemical evolution, with significant increases among younger clusters. Last, cluster neutron-capture element abundances appear to be independent of Galactocentric distance. We conclude that a homogeneous analysis of a larger sample of open clusters is needed to resolve the apparent discrepant conclusions between different studies regarding s-process element abundance trends with age to better inform models of galactic chemical evolution.

  11. Definitions Numbered Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    Definitions · Numbered Space ­ a single space marked with a number and reserved for a single permit 24/7 · Unnumbered Space ­ a space which can be used by any customer allowed to park in that lot. High Low Average Question 4: If I buy a staff permit for an UNNUMBERED* space in a non-gated surface

  12. California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug

  13. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear JanDecadeDecadeYear Jan Feb Mar

  14. District of Columbia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127 1,710,513June

  15. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess thanThousand CubicElements) Gas and

  16. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear

  17. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril

  18. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) DecadeYear Jan FebYear Jan

  19. District of Columbia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0CubicCubic Feet)

  20. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough, 2002Decade Year-0Decade

  1. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough, 2002DecadeYear JanNElements)

  2. New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough,Cubic

  3. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(Billion Cubic Feet) Gas,DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar

  4. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(Billion Cubic Feet) Gas,DecadeYear Jan Feb

  5. New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(Billion CubicProductionFoot)InputDecade

  6. New York Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(Billion CubicProductionFoot)InputDecadeResidential

  7. North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear Jan Feb Mar AprYearofProductionYear

  8. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear JanYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May

  9. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear JanYear JanYear Jan Feb Mar

  10. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear JanYearYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear

  11. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear JanYearYearDecade Year-0Decade

  12. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan FebDecadeDecade217523,552.1 TableAdditionsElements)

  13. Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun1 1,030Decadeand

  14. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb(Million Barrels)

  15. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Number

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb(Million Barrels)of Elements) Acquifers

  16. Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear JanPropane, No.1Decade Year-0 Year-1Elements) Gas

  17. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)Elements) Gas

  18. West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel Consumption0Feet)9 2010Feet)

  19. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996Feet) Year JanYearYear

  20. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessedDecadeFeet)

  1. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1Year Jan Feb MarYear

  2. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1Year% ofInputYear Jan Feb Mar

  3. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUndergroundCubicDecade Year-0Year Jan Feb Mar

  4. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off) Shale% ofElements) Gas and

  5. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off) Shale%73Thousand%YearYear

  6. Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of FossilFoot) Year Jan Feb MarYear Jan Feb

  7. New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawalsYear Jan1 0.2 0.1Commercial Consumers

  8. New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawalsYear Jan1 0.2 0.1Commercial

  9. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1(MillionExtensionsThousand Cubic%perYear JanFoot)YearYear Jan

  10. South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan FebDecadeDecade Year-0TotalH BVElements)

  11. New York Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousandWithdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) New Yorkand

  12. New York Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousandWithdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) NewIndustrial

  13. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet)FuelDecade Year-0Input Supplementaland

  14. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers - Transported (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep

  15. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers - Transported (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug

  16. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers - Transported (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug

  17. ORIGIN OF THE UNUSUALLY LOW NITROGEN ABUNDANCES IN YOUNG POPULATIONS OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekki, Kenji [ICRAR, M468, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is a longstanding problem that H II regions and very young stellar populations in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have nitrogen abundances ([N/H]) that are a factor of {approx}7 lower than the solar value. We here discuss a new scenario in which the observed unusually low nitrogen abundances can be closely associated with recent collisions and subsequent accretion of H I high velocity clouds (HVCs) that surround the Galaxy and have low nitrogen abundances. We show that if the observed low [N/H] is limited to very young stars with ages less than {approx}10{sup 7} yr, then the collision/accretion rate of the HVCs onto the LMC needs to be {approx}0.2 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} (corresponding to the total HVC mass of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} M{sub sun}) to dilute the original interstellar medium (ISM) before star formation. The required accretion rate means that even if the typical mass of HVCs accreted onto the LMC is {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun}, the Galaxy needs to have {approx}2500 massive HVCs within the LMC's orbital radius with respect to the Galactic center. The rather large number of required massive HVCs drives us to suggest that the HVCs are not likely to efficiently dilute the ISM of the LMC and consequently lower the [N/H]. We thus suggest the transfer of gas with low [N/H] from the Small Magellanic Cloud to the LMC as a promising scenario that can explain the observed low [N/H].

  18. THE FIRST FLUORINE ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS IN EXTRAGALACTIC ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH CARBON STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abia, C.; Cristallo, S.; Dominguez, I. [Dpto. Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Cunha, K.; Smith, V. V. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); De Laverny, P.; Recio-Blanco, A. [University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS (UMR 6202), Cassiopee, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, B.P. 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Straniero, O., E-mail: cabia@ugr.es [INAF-Osservatorio di Collurania, 64100 Teramo (Italy)

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluorine ({sup 19}F) abundances (or upper limits) are derived in six extragalactic asymptotic giant branch (AGB) carbon stars from the HF(1-0) R9 line at 2.3358 {mu}m in high-resolution spectra. The stars belong to the Local Group galaxies, Large Magellanic Cloud, Small Magellanic Cloud, and Carina dwarf spheroidal, spanning more than a factor of 50 in metallicity. This is the first study to probe the behavior of F with metallicity in intrinsic extragalactic C-rich AGB stars. Fluorine could be measured only in four of the target stars, showing a wide range in F enhancements. Our F abundance measurements together with those recently derived in Galactic AGB carbon stars show a correlation with the observed carbon and s-element enhancements. The observed correlations, however, display a different dependence on the stellar metallicity with respect to theoretical predictions in low-mass, low-metallicity AGB models. We briefly discuss the possible reasons for this discrepancy. If our findings are confirmed in a larger number of metal-poor AGBs, the issue of F production in AGB stars will need to be revisited.

  19. Line temperatures and elemental abundances in HII galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrique Perez-Montero; Angeles I. Diaz

    2003-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present long-slit spectrophotometric observations in the red and near infrared of 12 HII galaxies. The spectral range includes the sulphur lines [SII] at wavelengths 6716, 6731 angstroms and [SIII] at 6312 angstroms and 9069, 9532 angstroms. For all of the observed galaxies, at least three ion-weighted temperatures from forbidden auroral to nebular line ratios have been obtained and the relations between the different line temperatures have been discussed. It is found that, for some objects, the [OII] temperatures derived from those of [OIII] through the use of photo-ionisation models, without taking into account the effect of density, can lead to a significant underestimate of the O+/H+ ionic abundance and hence of the total oxygen abundance.

  20. Beryllium abundance in turn-off stars of NGC 6752

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Pasquini; Piercarlo Bonifacio; Sofia Randich; Daniele Galli; Raffaele G. Gratton; B. Wolff

    2006-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: To measure the beryllium abundance in two TO stars of the Globular Cluster NGC 6752, one oxygen rich and sodium poor, the other presumably oxygen poor and sodium rich. Be abundances in these stars are used to put on firmer grounds the hypothesis of Be as cosmochronometer and to investigate the formation of Globular Clusters. Method:We present near UV spectra with resolution R$\\sim 45000$ obtained with the UVES spectrograph on the 8.2m VLT Kueyen telescope, analysed with spectrum synthesis based on plane parallel LTE model atmospheres. Results:Be is detected in the O rich star with log(Be/H)=-12.04 $\\pm$0.15, while Be is not detected in the other star for which we obtain the upper limit log(Be/H)$<$-12.2. A large difference in nitrogen abundance (1.6 dex) is found between the two stars. Conclusions:The Be measurement is compatible with what found in field stars with the same [Fe/H] and [O/H]. The 'Be age' of the cluster is found to be 13.3 Gyrs, in excellent agreement with the results from main sequence fitting and stellar evolution. The presence of Be confirms the results previously obtained for the cluster NGC 6397 and supports the hypothesis that Be can be used as a clock for the early formation of the Galaxy. Since only an upper limit is found for the star with low oxygen abundance, we cannot decide between competing scenarios of Globular Cluster formation, but we can exclude that 'polluted' stars are substantially younger than 'unpolluted' ones. We stress that the Be test might be the only measurement capable of distinguishing between these scenarios.

  1. Distribution and Abundance Patterns of Spiders Inhabiting Cotton in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, D.A.; Sterling, W.L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . L. Sterling Department of Entomology Texas A&M University Abstract Patterns of the distribution and abundance of spiders were determined in the major cotton growing areas of Texas during 1982-83. M isumenops spp., Oxyopes saiticus Hentz... to predict this neutrality is important since spiders could then be eliminated as an important factor in predicting the dynamics of other arthropods. The cotton fleahopper (Pseudatomoscelis seriatus [Reuter]) model (Hartstack and Sterling 1986) uses...

  2. Europium abundances in F and G disk dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Koch; B. Edvardsson

    2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Europium abundances for 74 F and G dwarf stars of the galactic disk have been determined from the 4129.7 A Eu II line. The stars were selected from the sample of Edvardsson et al. (1993) and [Eu/Fe] shows a smaller scatter and a slightly weaker trend with [Fe/H] than found by Woolf et al. (1995). The data of the two analyses are homogenized and merged. We also discuss the adopted effective temperature scale.

  3. THE RAVE CATALOG OF STELLAR ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES: FIRST DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boeche, C.; Williams, M.; De Jong, R. S.; Steinmetz, M. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Siebert, A.; Bienayme, O. [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Fulbright, J. P.; Ruchti, G. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bland-Hawthorn, J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Campbell, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States); Freeman, K. C. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australia National University, Weston Creek, Canberra ACT 2611 (Australia); Gibson, B. K. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Gilmore, G. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Grebel, E. K. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Helmi, A. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Munari, U. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Asiago I-36012 (Italy); Navarro, J. F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Seabroke, G. M. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury, St. Mary RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); and others

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present chemical elemental abundances for 36,561 stars observed by the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), an ambitious spectroscopic survey of our Galaxy at Galactic latitudes |b| > 25 Degree-Sign and with magnitudes in the range 9 abundances for the elements Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, and Ni, with a mean error of {approx}0.2 dex, as judged from accuracy tests performed on synthetic and real spectra. Abundances are estimated through a dedicated processing pipeline in which the curve of growth of individual lines is obtained from a library of absorption line equivalent widths to construct a model spectrum that is then matched to the observed spectrum via a {chi}{sup 2} minimization technique. We plan to extend this pipeline to include estimates for other elements, such as oxygen and sulfur, in future data releases.

  4. CHAOS II: Gas-Phase Abundances in NGC 5194

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Croxall, Kevin V; Berg, Danielle; Skillman, Evan D; Moustakas, John

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed NGC5194 (M51a) as part of the CHemical Abundances of Spirals (CHAOS) project. Using the Multi Object Double Spectrographs (MODS) on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) we are able to measure one or more of the temperature-sensitive auroral lines ([O III] 4363, [N II] 5755, [S III] 6312) and thus measure "direct" gas-phase abundances in 29 individual HII regions. [O III] 4363 is only detected in two HII regions both of which show indications of excitation by shocks. We compare our data to previous direct abundances measured in NGC5194 and find excellent agreement for all but one region (Delta[log(O/H)] ~ 0.04). We find no evidence of trends in Ar/O, Ne/O, or S/O within NGC5194 or compared to other galaxies. We find modest negative gradients in both O/H and N/O with very little scatter (sigma = -0.62) suggests secondary nitrogen production is responsible for a significantly larger fraction of nitrogen (e.g., factor of 8-10) relative to primary production mechanisms than predicted by theoretica...

  5. Lithium abundance in a sample of solar-like stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López-Valdivia, R; Bertone, E; Chávez, M; de Miera, F Cruz-Saenz; Amazo-Gómez, E M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the determination of the lithium abundance [A(Li)] of 52 solar-like stars. For 41 objects the A(Li) here presented corresponds to the first measurement. We have measured the equivalent widths of the 6708\\AA\\ lithium feature in high-resolution spectroscopic images ($R \\sim 80\\,000$), obtained at the Observatorio Astrof\\'isico Guillermo Haro (Sonora, Mexico), as part of the first scientific observations of the revitalized Lunar and Planetary Laboratory (LPL) Echelle Spectrograph, now known as the Cananea High-resolution Spectrograph (CanHiS). Lithium abundances were derived with the Fortran code MOOG, using as fundamental input a set of atmospheric parameters recently obtained by our group. With the help of an additional small sample with previous A(Li) determinations, we demonstrate that our lithium abundances are in agreement, to within uncertainties, with other works. Two target objects stand out from the rest of the sample. The star BD+47 3218 ($T_{\\rm eff}$ = 6050$\\pm$52 K, A(Li) = 1.86$\\pm$ 0...

  6. Oxygen abundance methods in the SDSS: view from modern statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Shi; G. Zhao; James Wicker

    2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Our purpose is to find which is the most reliable one among various oxygen abundance determination methods. We will test the validity of several different oxygen abundance determination methods using methods of modern statistics. These methods include Bayesian analysis and information scoring. We will analyze a sample of $\\sim$6000 $\\hii$ galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic observations data release four. All methods that we used drew the same conclusion that the $T_e$ method is a more reliable oxygen abundance determination methods than the Bayesian metallcity method under the existing telescope ability. The ratios of the likelihoods between the different kinds of methods tell us that the $T_e$, $P$, and $O3N2$ methods are consistent with each other because the $P$ and $O3N2$ method are calibrated by $T_e$-method. The Bayesian and $R_{23}$ method are consistent with each other because both are calibrated by a galaxy model. In either case, the $N2$ method is an {\\it unreliable} method.

  7. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE PATTERNS AND THE EARLY ENVIRONMENT OF DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corlies, Lauren; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Bryan, Greg [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Tumlinson, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations suggest that abundance pattern differences exist between low metallicity stars in the Milky Way stellar halo and those in the dwarf satellite galaxies. This paper takes a first look at what role the early environment for pre-galactic star formation might have played in shaping these stellar populations. In particular, we consider whether differences in cross-pollution between the progenitors of the stellar halo and the satellites could help to explain the differences in abundance patterns. Using an N-body simulation, we find that the progenitor halos of the main halo are primarily clustered together at z = 10 while the progenitors of the satellite galaxies remain on the outskirts of this cluster. Next, analytically modeled supernova-driven winds show that main halo progenitors cross-pollute each other more effectively while satellite galaxy progenitors remain more isolated. Thus, inhomogeneous cross-pollution as a result of different high-z spatial locations of each system's progenitors can help to explain observed differences in abundance patterns today. Conversely, these differences are a signature of the inhomogeneity of metal enrichment at early times.

  8. Report number codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.N. (ed.)

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  9. In-pile measurements of the decay constants and relative abundances of delayed neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spriggs, G.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-pile experimental technique to measure the decay constants and the relative abundances of the delayed neutron groups applicable for a given reactor system is presented. The method is based on a least-squares-fitting technique that simultaneously fits a series of transients produced by small reactivity perturbations to a reactor operating initially at delayed critical. The function that is least-squares fit is the analytic solution (written in terms of an arbitrary number of delayed neutron groups) as obtained by the point reactor model for the reactor response following a step change in reactivity. The application of the method does not require any knowledge of the size of the reactivity perturbations, and the method is independent of the detector efficiency. The results are based solely on the measurable quantities of relative power, time, and one measurable root of the Inhour equation.

  10. The surface carbon and nitrogen abundances in models of ultra metal-poor stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Schlattl; M. Salaris; S. Cassisi; A. Weiss

    2002-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate whether the observed high number of carbon- and nitrogen-enhanced extremely metal-poor stars could be explained by peculiar evolutionary properties during the core He flash at the tip of the red giant branch. For this purpose we compute a series of detailed stellar models expanding upon our previous work; in particular, we investigate if during the major He flash the penetration of the helium convective zone into the overlying hydrogen-rich layers can produce carbon- and nitrogen-rich abundances in agreement with current spectroscopic observations. The dependence of this phenomenon on selected model input parameters, such as initial metallicity and treatment of convection is examined in detail.

  11. Record of Cycling Operation of the Natural Nuclear Reactor in the Oklo/Okelobondo Area in Gabon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Record of Cycling Operation of the Natural Nuclear Reactor in the Oklo/Okelobondo Area in Gabon A billion yr old Oklo natural nuclear reactor. In addition to elevated abundances of fission-produced Zr, Ce nuclear chain reaction was predicted by Kuroda [1] 20 years before the remnants of the natural reactor

  12. Monash researchers led by Dr. Dan Li have developed a novel method for converting natural graphite into highly porous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albrecht, David

    natural graphite into highly porous graphene film for advanced applications. Figure 1: illustrates the conversion of inexpensive & abundant graphite into highly porous, mechanically robust conductive films (eg capacitors, batteries and fuel cells) n LCD displays and photovoltaic devices n Composites

  13. NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

  14. Natural attenuation: Chlorinated and recalcitrant compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural, or intrinsic, attenuation is an increasingly important component of site closure strategy. At first maligned as a do-nothing alternative, natural attenuation is now being recognized as a legitimate approach that can supplement and sometimes even supplant more costly approaches. Having gained more widespread acceptance as an option at hydrocarbon-contaminated sites, natural attenuation is now beginning to emerge as an option for sites contaminated with chlorinated solvents and other recalcitrant compounds such as MTBE. This book brings together the latest research and field applications, with chapters covering field characterization and monitoring, transformation processes, natural attenuation of MTBE, and a number of natural attenuation case studies.

  15. Constraining Primordial Non-Gaussianity With the Abundance of High Redshift Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Robinson; Eric Gawiser; Joseph Silk

    2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how observations of the evolution of the galaxy cluster number abundance can be used to constrain primordial non-Gaussianity in the universe. We carry out a maximum likelihood analysis incorporating a number of current datasets and accounting for a wide range of sources of systematic error. Under the assumption of Gaussianity, the current data prefer a universe with matter density $\\Omega_m\\simeq 0.3$ and are inconsistent with $\\Omega_m=1$ at the $2\\sigma$ level. If we assume $\\Omega_m=1$, the predicted degree of cluster evolution is consistent with the data for non-Gaussian models where the primordial fluctuations have at least two times as many peaks of height $3\\sigma$ or more as a Gaussian distribution does. These results are robust to almost all sources of systematic error considered: in particular, the $\\Omega_m=1$ Gaussian case can only be reconciled with the data if a number of systematic effects conspire to modify the analysis in the right direction. Given an independent measurement of $\\Omega_m$, the techniques described here represent a powerful tool with which to constrain non-Gaussianity in the primordial universe, independent of specific details of the non-Gaussian physics. We discuss the prospects and strategies for improving the constraints with future observations.

  16. The Formation of the First Low-Mass Stars From Gas With Low Carbon and Oxygen Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bromm, V; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first stars in the Universe are predicted to have been much more massive than the Sun. Gravitational condensation accompanied by cooling of the primordial gas due to molecular hydrogen, yields a minimum fragmentation scale of a few hundred solar masses. Numerical simulations indicate that once a gas clump acquires this mass, it undergoes a slow, quasi-hydrostatic contraction without further fragmentation. Here we show that as soon as the primordial gas - left over from the Big Bang - is enriched by supernovae to a carbon or oxygen abundance as small as ~0.01-0.1% of that found in the Sun, cooling by singly-ionized carbon or neutral oxygen can lead to the formation of low-mass stars. This mechanism naturally accommodates the discovery of solar mass stars with unusually low (10^{-5.3} of the solar value) iron abundance but with a high (10^{-1.3} solar) carbon abundance. The minimum stellar mass at early epochs is partially regulated by the temperature of the cosmic microwave background. The derived critical...

  17. Re-examining High Abundance SDSS Mass-Metallicity Outliers: High N/O, Evolved Wolf-Rayet Galaxies?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, Danielle A; Marble, Andrew R

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new MMT spectroscopic observations of four dwarf galaxies representative of a larger sample observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and identified by Peeples et al. (2008) as low-mass, high oxygen abundance outliers from the mass-metallicity relation. Peeples et al. (2008) showed that these four objects (with metallicity estimates of 8.5 =~ 0.10), each of which tend to bias estimates based on strong emission lines toward high oxygen abundances. These spectra all fall in a regime where the "standard" strong line methods for metallicity determinations are not well calibrated either empirically or by photoionization modeling. By comparing our spectra directly to photoionization models, we estimate oxygen abundances in the range of 7.9 =< 12 + log(O/H) =< 8.4, consistent with the scatter of the mass-metallicity relation. We discuss the physical nature of these galaxies that leads to their unusual spectra (and previous classification as outliers), finding their low excitation, elevated N/O...

  18. A number of organizations,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    installed solar electric systems on a number of the city's buildings, including the Chicago Center for Green Technology shown here. CityofChicago Aggregated Purchasing--A Clean Energy Strategy SOLAR TODAY Aggregated Purchasing--A Clean Energy Strategy by Lori A. Bird and Edward A. Holt #12;November/December 2002 35 Power

  19. ALARA notes, Number 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Beckman, M.C. [eds.] [eds.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains information dealing with the lessons learned from the experience of nuclear plants. In this issue the authors tried to avoid the `tyranny` of numbers and concentrated on the main lessons learned. Topics include: filtration devices for air pollution abatement, crack repair and inspection, and remote handling equipment.

  20. Probing lepton number violation on three frontiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deppisch, Frank F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double beta decay constitutes the main probe for lepton number violation at low energies, motivated by the expected Majorana nature of the light but massive neutrinos. On the other hand, the theoretical interpretation of the (non-)observation of this process is not straightforward as the Majorana neutrinos can destructively interfere in their contribution and many other New Physics mechanisms can additionally mediate the process. We here highlight the potential of combining neutrinoless double beta decay with searches for Tritium decay, cosmological observations and LHC physics to improve the quantitative insight into the neutrino properties and to unravel potential sources of lepton number violation.

  1. Region-Specific Protein Abundance Changes in the Brain of MPTP...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Region-Specific Protein Abundance Changes in the Brain of MPTP-induced Parkinson’s Disease Mouse Model . Region-Specific Protein Abundance Changes in the Brain of...

  2. 1074 volume 27 number 12 december 2009 nature biotechnology Improving on nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    ,"saysVerdezyneCSOStephen Picataggio. Cellulosic ethanol, produced from plant waste and other nonfood sources, offers a more attractive greenhouse gas emissions profile than its corn-derived counterpart, and the first com- mercial quantities of cellulosic ethanol are due to come online in 2010.One recent report indicates that some producers have either

  3. Remarkable Amphibian Biomass and Abundance in an Isolated Wetland: Implications for Wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    -1739.2006.00443.x #12;1458 Amphibian Biomass and Abundance Gibbons et al. Biomasa y Abundancia de Anfibios

  4. DIVERSITY OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IMPRINTED IN CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Shigeyama, Toshikazu, E-mail: taku.tsujimoto@nao.ac.jp [Research Center for the Early Universe, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A time delay of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosions hinders the imprint of their nucleosynthesis on stellar abundances. However, some occasional cases give birth to stars that avoid enrichment of their chemical compositions by massive stars and thereby exhibit an SN-Ia-like elemental feature including a very low [Mg/Fe] ( Almost-Equal-To - 1). We highlight the elemental feature of Fe-group elements for two low-Mg/Fe objects detected in nearby galaxies, and propose the presence of a class of SNe Ia that yield the low abundance ratios of [Cr, Mn, Ni/Fe]. Our novel models of chemical evolution reveal that our proposed class of SNe Ia (slow SNe Ia) is associated with ones exploding on a long timescale after their stellar birth and give a significant impact on the chemical enrichment in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). In the Galaxy, on the other hand, this effect is unseen due to the overwhelming enrichment by the major class of SNe Ia that explode promptly (prompt SNe Ia) and eject a large amount of Fe-group elements. This nicely explains the different [Cr, Mn, Ni/Fe] features between the two galaxies as well as the puzzling feature seen in the LMC stars exhibiting very low Ca but normal Mg abundances. Furthermore, the corresponding channel of slow SN Ia is exemplified by performing detailed nucleosynthesis calculations in the scheme of SNe Ia resulting from a 0.8 + 0.6 M{sub Sun} white dwarf merger.

  5. Abundances of metal-weak thick-disc candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bonifacio; M. Centurion; P. Molaro

    1999-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution spectra of 5 candidate metal-weak thick-disc stars suggested by Beers & Sommer-Larsen (1995) are analyzed to determine their chemical abundances. The low abundance of all the objects has been confirmed with metallicity reaching [Fe/H]=-2.9. However, for three objects, the astrometric data from the Hipparcos catalogue suggests they are true halo members. The remaining two, for which proper-motion data are not available, may have disc-like kinematics. It is therefore clear that it is useful to address properties of putative metal-weak thick-disc stars only if they possess full kinematic data. For CS 22894-19 the abundance pattern similar to those of typical halo stars is found, suggesting that chemical composition is not a useful discriminant between thick-disc and halo stars. CS 29529-12 is found to be C enhanced with [C/Fe]=+1.0; other chemical peculiarities involve the s process elements: [Sr/Fe]=-0.65 and [Ba/Fe]=+0.62, leading to a high [Ba/Sr] considerably larger than what is found in more metal-rich carbon-rich stars, but similar to LP 706-7 and LP 625-44 discussed by Norris et al (1997a). Hipparcos data have been used to calculate the space velocities of 25 candidate metal-weak thick-disc stars, thus allowing us to identify 3 bona fide members, which support the existence of a metal-poor tail of the thick-disc, at variance with a claim to the contrary by Ryan & Lambert (1995).

  6. MANGANESE ABUNDANCES IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER {omega} CENTAURI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ, 85719 (United States); Bergemann, Maria [Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild Str. 1, 85741 Garching (Germany); Suntzeff, Nicholas B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); Lambert, David L. [University of Texas, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present manganese abundances in 10 red giant members of the globular cluster {omega} Centauri; eight stars are from the most metal-poor population (RGB MP and RGB MInt1) while two targets are members of the more metal-rich groups (RGB MInt2 and MInt3). This is the first time Mn abundances have been studied in this peculiar stellar system. The LTE values of [Mn/Fe] in {omega} Cen overlap those of Milky Way stars in the metal-poor {omega} Cen populations ([Fe/H] {approx}-1.5 to -1.8), however unlike what is observed in Milky Way halo and disk stars, [Mn/Fe] declines in the two more metal-rich RGB MInt2 and MInt3 targets. Non-LTE calculations were carried out in order to derive corrections to the LTE Mn abundances. The non-LTE results for {omega} Cen in comparison with the non-LTE [Mn/Fe] versus [Fe/H] trend obtained for the Milky Way confirm and strengthen the conclusion that the manganese behavior in {omega} Cen is distinct. These results suggest that low-metallicity supernovae (with metallicities {<=} -2) of either Type II or Type Ia dominated the enrichment of the more metal-rich stars in {omega} Cen. The dominance of low-metallicity stars in the chemical evolution of {omega} Cen has been noted previously in the s-process elements where enrichment from metal-poor asymptotic giant branch stars is indicated. In addition, copper, which also has metallicity-dependent yields, exhibits lower values of [Cu/Fe] in the RGB MInt2 and MInt3 {omega} Cen populations.

  7. Abundance profile and stellar content of IZw18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Legrand

    1997-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    New spectroscopic observations of the metal poor galaxy IZw 18 are discussed. Wolf-Rayet stars of WC type have been detected in the NW-HII region contrary to evolutionary synthesis model predictions. Implications on the mass loss rate and on the formation processes of WR stars are discussed. A very homogeneous metal abundance is observed within the HII region. This emphasizes the problem of the dispersal and mixing of new synthesized element in a starburst. Different scenarios are discussed, showing that metals remain most likely hidden in a hot phase and that the observed present metallicity is the result of a previous star formation event.

  8. Non-LTE Abundances of Magnesium, Aluminum and Sulfur in OB Stars Near the Solar Circle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Daflon; K. Cunha; V. V. Smith; K. Butler

    2002-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-LTE abundances of magnesium, aluminum and sulfur are derived for a sample of 23 low-v \\sin i stars belonging to six northern OB associations of the Galactic disk within 1 kpc of the Sun. The abundances are obtained from the fitting of synthetic line profiles to high resolution spectra. A comparison of our results with HII region abundances indicates good agreement for sulfur while the cepheid abundances are higher. The derived abundances of Mg show good overlap with the cepheid results. The aluminum abundances for OB stars are significantly below the cepheid values. But, the OB star results show a dependence with effective temperature and need further investigation. The high Al abundances in the cepheids could be the result of mixing. A discussion of the oxygen abundance in objects near the solar circle suggests that the current mean galactic oxygen abundance in this region is 8.6-8.7 and in agreement with the recently revised oxygen abundance in the solar photosphere. Meaningful comparisons of the absolute S, Al and Mg abundances in OB stars with the Sun must await a reinvestigation of these elements, as well as the meteoritic reference element Si, with 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres for the Sun. No abundance gradients are found within the limited range in galactocentric distances in the present study. Such variations would be expected only if there were large metallicity gradients in the disk.

  9. Abundances of Vanadium and Bromine in 3 Cen A: Additional Odd-Z Anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. R. Cowley; G. M. Wahlgren

    2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report abundance excesses of 1.2 and 2.6 dex, respectively, for vanadium and bromine in the hot, peculiar star 3 Cen A. Abundances for these two odd-Z elements have not been previously reported for this star. Taken with previous work, they strengthen the case of the origin of the abundance peculiarities by diffusion.

  10. OXYGEN GAS-PHASE ABUNDANCE REVISITED M. K. Andre,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howk, Jay Christopher

    OXYGEN GAS-PHASE ABUNDANCE REVISITED M. K. Andre´,1,2 C. M. Oliveira,2 J. C. Howk,2 R. Ferlet,1 J gas-phase oxygen abundance along the sight lines toward 19 early-type Galactic stars at an average magÀ1 with a standard deviation of 15% is consistent with previous surveys. The mean oxygen abundance

  11. ORIGINAL PAPER Extinction debt in naturally contracting mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of meadow habitat, resulting in an extinction debt. In contrast, abundance of herb-feeding moths and species conservation. Extinction debt refers to the number of extant specialist species of a habitat expected to become al. 2010; Bommarco et al. 2014). However, while some groups of species experience extinction debt

  12. Diversity of Type Ia Supernovae Imprinted in Chemical Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, Takuji

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A time delay of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosions hinders the imprint of their nucleosynthesis on stellar abundances. However, some occasional cases give birth to stars that avoid enrichment of their chemical compositions by massive stars and thereby exhibit a SN Ia-like elemental feature including a very low [Mg/Fe] (~-1). We highlight the elemental feature of Fe-group elements for two low-Mg/Fe objects detected in nearby galaxies, and propose the presence of a class of SNe Ia that yield the low abundance ratios of [Cr,Mn,Ni/Fe]. Our novel models of chemical evolution reveal that our proposed class of SNe Ia (slow SNe Ia) is associated with ones exploding on a long timescale after their stellar birth, and gives a significant impact on the chemical enrichment in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). In the Galaxy, on the other hand, this effect is unseen due to the overwhelming enrichment by the major class of SNe Ia that explode promptly (prompt SNe Ia) and eject a large amount of Fe-group elements. This nice...

  13. Elemental Abundances from Intrinsic QSO Emission and Absorption Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Hamann

    1998-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Several studies have shown that the column densities inferred from broad absorption lines (BALs) require extremely high metallicities and phosphorus overabundances -- apparently in conflict with other abundance diagnostics. Here I use HST spectroscopy of the BALQSO PG 1254+047 to argue that the BALs abundance estimates are incorrect, because partial line-of-sight coverage of the continuum source(s) has led to gross underestimates of the line optical depths and column densities. I claim that the significant presence of PV 1118,1128 absorption in this and other BALQSOs identifies the saturated absorption-line spectrum. This interpretation implies that the total column densities are at least ten times larger than previous estimates, namely log N_H(cm-2) > 22. The outflowing BAL gas, at velocities from -15,000 to -27,000 km/s in PG 1254+047, is therefore a strong candidate for the X-ray absorber in BALQSOs. If this high-column density outflow is radiately accelerated, it must originate <0.1 pc from the QSO.

  14. The element abundance FIP effect in the quiet Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Young

    2005-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mg/Ne abundance ratio in the quiet Sun is measured in both network and supergranule cell centre regions through EUV spectra from the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer on SOHO. Twenty four sets of data over the period 1996 March to 1998 June (corresponding to solar minimum) are studied. Emission lines of the sequences Ne IV-VII and Mg V-VIII are simultaneously analysed by comparing with theoretical emissivities from the CHIANTI database to yield the Mg/Ne abundance and emission measure over the temperature region 5.0 Sun connects into the solar wind. The quiet Sun spectra are also utilised to determine the coronal density and temperature, leading to average values of 2.6^+0.5_-0.4 x 10^8 cm^-3 and log (T/K)=5.95 +/- 0.02. No significant trend with the rise in solar activity during 1996--98 is found for any of the derived quantities, implying that quiet Sun regions show little dependence on the solar cycle.

  15. Lithium abundances in exoplanet-host stars : modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Castro; S. Vauclair; O. Richard; N. C. Santos

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims. Exoplanet-host stars (EHS) are known to present superficial chemical abundances different from those of stars without any detected planet (NEHS). EHS are, on the average, overmetallic compared to the Sun. The observations also show that, for cool stars, lithium is more depleted in EHS than in NEHS. The aim of this paper is to obtain constraints on possible models able to explain this difference, in the framework of overmetallic models compared to models with solar abundances. Methods. We have computed main sequence stellar models with various masses and metallicities. The results show different behaviour for the lithium destruction according to those parameters. We compare these results to the spectroscopic observations of lithium. Results. Our models show that the observed lithium differences between EHS and NEHS are not directly due to the overmetallicity of the EHS: some extra mixing is needed below the convective zones. We discuss possible explanations for the needed extra mixing, in particular an increase of the mixing efficiency associated with the development of shear instabilities below the convective zone, triggered by angular momentum transfer due to the planetary migration.

  16. HNCO abundances in galaxies: Tracing the evolutionary state of starbursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio Martin; J. Martin-Pintado; R. Mauersberger

    2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemistry in the central regions of galaxies is expected to be strongly influenced by their nuclear activity. To find the best tracers of nuclear activity is of key importance to understand the processes taking place in the most obscured regions of galactic nuclei. In this work we present multi-line observations of CS, C34S, HNCO and C18O in a sample of 11 bright galaxies prototypical for different types of activity. The 32S/34S isotopic ratio is ~10, supporting the idea of an isotopical 34S enrichment due to massive star formation in the nuclear regions of galaxies. Although C32S and C34S do not seem to be significantly affected by the activity type, the HNCO abundance appears highly contrasted among starburst. We observed HNCO abundance variations of nearly two orders of magnitude. The HNCO molecule is shown to be a good tracer of the amount of molecular material fueling the starburst and therefore can be used as a diagnostics of the evolutionary state of a nuclear starburst.

  17. Zirconium, Barium, Lanthanum and Europium Abundances in Open Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, H R; 10.1088/0004-6256/145/4/107

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the s-process elements Zr, Ba, and La and the r-process element Eu in a sample of 50 stars in 19 open clusters. Stellar abundances of each element are based on measures of a minimum of two lines per species via both equivalent width and spectrum synthesis techniques. We investigate cluster mean neutron-capture abundance trends as a function of cluster age and location in the Milky Way disk and compare them to results found in other studies in the literature. We find a statistically significant trend of increasing cluster [Ba/Fe] as a function of decreasing cluster age, in agreement with recent findings for other open cluster samples, supporting the increased importance of low-mass asymptotic giant branch stars to the generation of s-process elements. However, the other s-process elements, [La/Fe] and [Zr/Fe], do not show similar dependences, in contrast to theoretical expectations and the limited observational data from other studies. Conversely, cluster [Eu/Fe] ratios show a slight ...

  18. 2005NaturePublishingGrouphttp://www.nature.com/naturemedicine 4 VOLUME 11 | NUMBER 1 | JANUARY 2005 NATURE MEDICINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    against the H5N1 strain.The powder may eliminate the restrictive need for cold storage. Progress.Thosevaccinesaren'tlicensedintheUS,but thecompanyhopestogainapprovalfromtheUS Food and Drug Administration by 2007. Pandemic fears hatch new methods in flu vaccine industry

  19. NSR Key Number Retrieval

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota PriusNSR Key Number Retrieval Pease

  20. Carbon stars in local group dwarf galaxies: C and O abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Wahlin; K. Eriksson; B. Gustafsson; K. H. Hinkle; D. L. Lambert; N. Ryde; B. Westerlund

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present abundances of carbon and oxygen as well as abundance ratios 12C/13C for a sample of carbon stars in the LMC, SMC, Carina, Sculptor and Fornax dwarf galaxies. The overall metallicities in these dwarf galaxies are lower than in the galactic disc. The observations cover most of the AGB and we discuss the abundance patterns in different regions along the AGB. The abundances are determined from infrared spectra obtained with the ISAAC spectrometer on VLT (R=1500) and the Phoenix Spectrometer on Gemini South (R=50000). The synthetic spectra used in the analysis were computed with MARCS model atmospheres. We find that the oxygen abundance is decreasing with decreasing overall metallicity of the system while the C/O ratio at a given evolutionary phase is increasing with decreasing oxygen abundance. keywords Stars: abundances -- Stars: carbon -- Stars: AGB and post-AGB -- Galaxies: dwarf -- Local Group -- Infrared: stars