Sample records for nucleic acids research

  1. Nucleic Acids Research, 2009, 112 doi:10.1093/nar/gkp675

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassibi, Arjang

    Nucleic Acids Research, 2009, 1­12 doi:10.1093/nar/gkp675 Real-time DNA microarray analysis Arjang for the analysis of complex nucleic acid samples, use the base pairing of nucleic acid molecules (3) as both uncertainty associated with tar- get analyte capturing and detection, in all practical biosensors, binding

  2. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor L. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James E. (Madison, WI)

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  3. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James L. (Madison, WI)

    2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  4. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Waunakee, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow; Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James E. (Madison, WI)

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  5. Nucleic acid detection assays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  6. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  7. Nucleic Acids Research, 2009, 114 doi:10.1093/nar/gkn1064

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamir, Ron

    Nucleic Acids Research, 2009, 1­14 doi:10.1093/nar/gkn1064 Allegro: Analyzing expression- ulate. We present Allegro, a method for de-novo dis- covery of cis-regulatory transcriptional programs by a group of co-regulated genes. We show that Allegro is more accurate and sensitive than existing

  8. 1997 Oxford University Press49945002 Nucleic Acids Research, 1997, Vol. 25, No. 24 Information analysis of Fis binding sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Thomas D.

    © 1997 Oxford University Press4994­5002 Nucleic Acids Research, 1997, Vol. 25, No. 24 Information to fit into two successive major grooves on straight B-form DNA, suggesting that the DNA bends

  9. Invasive cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James E. (Madison, WI)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  10. 1996 Oxford University Press 47094718Nucleic Acids Research, 1996, Vol. 24, No. 23 Logitlinear models for the prediction of splice sites in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brendel, Volker

    © 1996 Oxford University Press 4709­4718Nucleic Acids Research, 1996, Vol. 24, No. 23 Logitlinear the degree of fit to some average signal pattern around known splice sites in a learning set (e.g., 3

  11. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cantor, Charles R. (Boston, MA); Niemeyer, Christof M. (Bremen, DE); Smith, Cassandra L. (Boston, MA); Sano, Takeshi (Boston, MA); Hnatowich, Donald J. (Brookline, MA); Rusckowski, Mary (Southborough, MA)

    1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products.

  12. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cantor, Charles R. (Boston, MA); Niemeyer, Christof M. (Bremen, DE); Smith, Cassandra L. (Boston, MA); Sano, Takeshi (Boston, MA); Hnatowich, Donald J. (Brookline, MA); Rusckowski, Mary (Southborough, MA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products.

  13. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cantor, C.R.; Niemeyer, C.M.; Smith, C.L.; Sano, Takeshi; Hnatowich, D.J.; Rusckowski, M.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products. 5 figs.

  14. Double stranded nucleic acid biochips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chernov, Boris; Golova, Julia

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention describes a new method of constructing double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) microarrays based on the use of pre-synthesized or natural DNA duplexes without a stem-loop structure. The complementary oligonucleotide chains are bonded together by a novel connector that includes a linker for immobilization on a matrix. A non-enzymatic method for synthesizing double-stranded nucleic acids with this novel connector enables the construction of inexpensive and robust dsDNA/dsRNA microarrays. DNA-DNA and DNA-protein interactions are investigated using the microarrays.

  15. Optimization of Encoded Hydrogel Particles for Nucleic Acid Quantification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pregibon, Daniel C.

    The accurate quantification of nucleic acids is of utmost importance for clinical diagnostics, drug discovery, and basic science research. These applications require the concurrent measurement of multiple targets while ...

  16. Published online 17 April 2014 Nucleic Acids Research, 2014, Vol. 42, No. 10 e83 doi: 10.1093/nar/gku250

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Published online 17 April 2014 Nucleic Acids Research, 2014, Vol. 42, No. 10 e83 doi: 10.1093/nar onto either magnetic beads or gold nanoparticles grafted with the com- plementary ODN, as shown variety of applications, among which is the indirect functionalization of the MPs they bind to (3

  17. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  18. Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, George M. (Brookline, MA); Mitra, Robi D. (Chestnut Hill, MA)

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are improved methods of making and using immobilized arrays of nucleic acids, particularly methods for producing replicas of such arrays. Included are methods for producing high density arrays of nucleic acids and replicas of such arrays, as well as methods for preserving the resolution of arrays through rounds of replication. Also included are methods which take advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays for increased sensitivity in detection of sequences on arrays. Improved methods of sequencing nucleic acids immobilized on arrays utilizing single copies of arrays and methods taking further advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays are disclosed. The improvements lead to higher fidelity and longer read lengths of sequences immobilized on arrays. Methods are also disclosed which improve the efficiency of multiplex PCR using arrays of immobilized nucleic acids.

  19. Methods for analyzing nucleic acid sequences

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korlach, Jonas (Ithaca, NY); Webb, Watt W. (Ithaca, NY); Levene, Michael (Ithaca, NY); Turner, Stephen (Ithaca, NY); Craighead, Harold G. (Ithaca, NY); Foquet, Mathieu (Ithaca, NY)

    2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid. The method provides a complex comprising a polymerase enzyme, a target nucleic acid molecule, and a primer, wherein the complex is immobilized on a support Fluorescent label is attached to a terminal phosphate group of the nucleotide or nucleotide analog. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The time duration of the signal from labeled nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated is distinguished from freely diffusing labels by a longer retention in the observation volume for the nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated than for the freely diffusing labels.

  20. Amplification of trace amounts of nucleic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, George M. (Brookline, MA); Zhang, Kun (Brighton, MA)

    2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of reducing background during amplification of small amounts of nucleic acids employ careful analysis of sources of low level contamination. Ultraviolet light can be used to reduce nucleic acid contaminants in reagents and equipment. "Primer-dimer" background can be reduced by judicious design of primers. We have shown clean signal-to-noise with as little as starting material as one single human cell (.about.6 picogram), E. coli cell (.about.5 femtogram) or Prochlorococcus cell (.about.3 femtogram).

  1. Nucleic acid based fluorescent sensor for copper detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Yi; Liu, Juewen

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A nucleic acid enzyme responsive to copper, comprising an oligonucleotide comprising a nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO:1, wherein the nucleic acid enzyme is not self-cleaving.

  2. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucas, Joe N. (San Ramon, CA); Straume, Tore (Tracy, CA); Bogen, Kenneth T. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe.

  3. Method for nucleic acid isolation using supercritical fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nivens, David E. (11912 Kingsgate Rd., Knoxville, TN 37911); Applegate, Bruce M. (3700 Sutherland Ave. #Q2, Knoxville, TN 37911)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting the presence of a microorganism in an environmental sample involves contacting the sample with a supercritical fluid to isolate nucleic acid from the microorganism, then detecting the presence of a particular sequence within the isolated nucleic acid. The nucleic acid may optionally be subjected to further purification.

  4. Nucleic acid analysis using terminal-phosphate-labeled nucleotides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korlach, Jonas (Ithaca, NY); Webb, Watt W. (Ithaca, NY); Levene, Michael (Ithaca, NY); Turner, Stephen (Ithaca, NY); Craighead, Harold G. (Ithaca, NY); Foquet, Mathieu (Ithaca, NY)

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  5. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Jeff G; Lyamichev, Victor I; Mast, Andrea L; Brow, Mary Ann D

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  6. Method for analyzing nucleic acids by means of a substrate having a microchannel structure containing immobilized nucleic acid probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for analyzing nucleic acids includes immobilizing nucleic probes at specific sites within a microchannel structure and moving target nucleic acids into proximity to the probes in order to allow hybridization and fluorescence detection of specific target sequences.

  7. Nucleic acids, compositions and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Preston, III, James F. (Micanopy, FL); Chow, Virginia (Gainesville, FL); Nong, Guang (Gainesville, FL); Rice, John D. (Gainesville, FL); St. John, Franz J. (Baltimore, MD)

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  8. Nucleic acid compositions and the encoding proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D.; St. John, Franz J.

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  9. Ramon Eritja Nucleic Acid Chemistry Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritort, Felix

    Ramon Eritja Nucleic Acid Chemistry Group Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology Dpt. IRB Barcelona nanoparticle assemblies. #12;The DNA can be used as template for the fabrication of silver nanowires between;Preparation of thiol-functionalized arrays N N O NH S-St Bu N N O NH S-St Bu N N O NH S-St BuO DMT-O O P O N

  10. Nucleic Acid Database: a Repository of Three-Dimensional Information about Nucleic Acids

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Berman, H. M.; Olson, W. K.; Beveridge, D. L.; Westbrook, J.; Gelbin, A.; Demeny, T.; Hsieh, S. H.; Srinivasan, A. R.; Schneider, B.

    The Nucleic Acid Database (NDB) provides 3-D structural information about nucleic acids.  It is a relational database designed to facilitate the easy search for nucleic acid structures using any of the stored primary or derived structural features. Reports can then be created describing any properties of the selected structures and structures may be viewed in several different formats, including the mmCIF format, the NDB Atlas format, the NDB coordinate format, or the PDB coordinate format. Browsing structure images created directly from coordinates in the repository can also be done. More than 7000 structures have been released as of May 2014. This website also includes a number of specialized tools and interfaces. The NDB Project is funded by the National Institutes of Health and has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy in the past.

  11. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  12. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  13. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  14. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  15. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  16. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides an endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  17. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  18. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  19. Nucleic acid amplification using modular branched primers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ulanovsky, Levy (Westmont, IL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and compositions expand the options for making primers for use in amplifying nucleic acid segments. The invention eliminates the step of custom synthesis of primers for Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR). Instead of being custom-synthesized, a primer is replaced by a combination of several oligonucleotide modules selected from a pre-synthesized library. A modular combination of just a few oligonucleotides essentially mimics the performance of a conventional, custom-made primer by matching the sequence of the priming site in the template. Each oligonucleotide module has a segment that matches one of the stretches within the priming site.

  20. Nucleic acids encoding metal uptake transporters and their uses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Julian I. (La Jolla, CA); Antosiewicz, Danuta M. (Warsaw, PL); Schachtman, Daniel P. (Tranmere, AU); Clemens, Stephan (San Diego, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides LCT1 nucleic acids which encode metal ion uptake transporters. The invention also provides methods of modulating heavy metal and alkali metal uptake in plants. The methods involve producing transgenic plants comprising a recombinant expression cassette containing an LCT1 nucleic acid linked to a plant promoter.

  1. Digital MDA for enumeration of total nucleic acid contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Digital MDA for enumeration of total nucleic acid contamination Paul C. Blainey and Stephen R; Accepted October 14, 2010 ABSTRACT Multiple displacement amplification (MDA) is an iso- thermal, sequence). Here we report digital MDA (dMDA), an ultrasensitive method for quantifying nucleic acid fragments

  2. Oligonucleoside alkyl or arylphosphonate derivatives capable of crosslinking with or cleaving nucleic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Paul S. (Baltimore, MD); Ts'o, Paul O.P. (Lutherville, MD)

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for inactivating a target nucleic acid which comprises an oligonucleoside alkyl or arylphosphonate analogue which is complementary to the sequence of the target nucleic acid and includes a functional group which reacts with the target nucleic acid to render the target nucleic acid inactive or nonfunctional.

  3. Nucleic Acid Conformational Changes Essential for HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein-mediated Inhibition of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Judith G.

    and a TAR-containing acceptor RNA molecule, we find that when both nucleic acids are present, NC facilitatesNucleic Acid Conformational Changes Essential for HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein-mediated Inhibition) is a nucleic acid chaperone protein that has been shown to greatly facilitate the nucleic acid rearrangements

  4. Oligonucleoside alkyl or arylphosphonate derivatives capable of crosslinking with or cleaving nucleic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, P.S.; Ts'o, P.O.P.

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for inactivating a target nucleic acid which comprises an oligonucleoside alkyl or arylphosphonate analogue which is complementary to the sequence of the target nucleic acid is provided. It includes a functional group which reacts with the target nucleic acid to render the target nucleic acid inactive or nonfunctional. 16 figs.

  5. Isolated menthone reductase and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides isolated menthone reductase proteins, isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding menthone reductase proteins, methods for expressing and isolating menthone reductase proteins, and transgenic plants expressing elevated levels of menthone reductase protein.

  6. Nucleic Acids Research, 1993, Vol. 21, No. 9 2247-2248 The nucleosome repeat length of Kluyveromyces lactis is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the production of heterologous proteins like prochymosin (7), human serum albumin (8), and human interleukin 1,B each pellet was resuspended in 125 ml TESM. After 10 minutes at room temperature, the cells were spun down, each pellet washed with 225 ml SCE (1 M sorbitol, 0.1 M citric acid, 0.06 M EDTA, pH = 5

  7. Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic beads for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz (Livermore, CA)

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic beads; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic beads. The magnetic beads with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reaction chamber is amplified. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic beads and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.

  8. Thermoplastic Microfluidic Device for On-Chip Purification of Nucleic Acids for Disposable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermoplastic Microfluidic Device for On-Chip Purification of Nucleic Acids for Disposable, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446 A polymeric microfluidic device for solid-phase extraction (SPE applications. Microfluidic approaches to nucleic acid isolation have therefore received great attention

  9. Methods of staining target chromosomal DNA employing high complexity nucleic acid probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Ol'li-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  10. Mosaic protein and nucleic acid vaccines against hepatitis C virus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette T. M.; Kuiken, Carla L.; Fischer, William M.

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to immunogenic compositions useful as HCV vaccines. Provided are HCV mosaic polypeptide and nucleic acid compositions which provide higher levels of T-cell epitope coverage while minimizing the occurrence of unnatural and rare epitopes compared to natural HCV polypeptides and consensus HCV sequences.

  11. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  12. Cell cycle nucleic acids, polypeptides and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon-Kamm, William J. (Urbandale, IA); Lowe, Keith S. (Johnston, IA); Larkins, Brian A. (Tucson, AZ); Dilkes, Brian R. (Tucson, AZ); Sun, Yuejin (Westfield, IN)

    2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides isolated nucleic acids and their encoded proteins that are involved in cell cycle regulation. The invention further provides recombinant expression cassettes, host cells, transgenic plants, and antibody compositions. The present invention provides methods and compositions relating to altering cell cycle protein content, cell cycle progression, cell number and/or composition of plants.

  13. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  14. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  15. Isolated nucleic acids encoding antipathogenic polypeptides and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Altier, Daniel J.; Crane, Virginia C.; Ellanskaya, Irina; Ellanskaya, Natalia; Gilliam, Jacob T.; Hunter-Cevera, Jennie; Presnail, James K.; Schepers, Eric J.; Simmons, Carl R.; Torok, Tamas; Yalpani, Nasser

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and methods for protecting a plant from a pathogen, particularly a fungal pathogen, are provided. Compositions include amino acid sequences, and variants and fragments thereof, for antipathogenic polypeptides that were isolated from fungal fermentation broths. Nucleic acids that encode the antipathogenic polypeptides are also provided. A method for inducing pathogen resistance in a plant using the nucleotide sequences disclosed herein is further provided. The method comprises introducing into a plant an expression cassette comprising a promoter operably linked to a nucleotide sequence that encodes an antipathogenic polypeptide of the invention. Compositions comprising an antipathogenic polypeptide or a transformed microorganism comprising a nucleic acid of the invention in combination with a carrier and methods of using these compositions to protect a plant from a pathogen are further provided. Transformed plants, plant cells, seeds, and microorganisms comprising a nucleotide sequence that encodes an antipathogenic polypeptide of the invention are also disclosed.

  16. Nucleic acids encoding antifungal polypeptides and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Altier, Daniel J. (Granger, IA); Ellanskaya, I. A. (Kyiv, UA); Gilliam, Jacob T. (Norwalk, IA); Hunter-Cevera, Jennie (Elliott City, MD); Presnail, James K (Avondale, PA); Schepers, Eric (Port Deposit, MD); Simmons, Carl R. (Des Moines, IA); Torok, Tamas (Richmond, CA); Yalpani, Nasser (Johnston, IA)

    2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and methods for protecting a plant from a pathogen, particularly a fungal pathogen, are provided. Compositions include an amino acid sequence, and variants and fragments thereof, for an antipathogenic polypeptide that was isolated from a fungal fermentation broth. Nucleic acid molecules that encode the antipathogenic polypeptides of the invention, and antipathogenic domains thereof, are also provided. A method for inducing pathogen resistance in a plant using the nucleotide sequences disclosed herein is further provided. The method comprises introducing into a plant an expression cassette comprising a promoter operably linked to a nucleotide sequence that encodes an antipathogenic polypeptide of the invention. Compositions comprising an antipathogenic polypeptide or a transformed microorganism comprising a nucleic acid of the invention in combination with a carrier and methods of using these compositions to protect a plant from a pathogen are further provided. Transformed plants, plant cells, seeds, and microorganisms comprising a nucleotide sequence that encodes an antipathogenic polypeptide of the invention are also disclosed.

  17. Method and apparatus for staining immobilized nucleic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Jacobson, Stephen C. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for staining immobilized nucleic acids includes the steps of affixing DNA probes to a solid substrate, moving target DNA material into proximity with the DNA probes, whereby the target DNA hybridized with specific ones of the DNA probes, and moving a fluorescent dye into proximity with the hybridized target DNA, whereby the fluorescent dye binds to the hybridized DNA to enable subsequent detection of fluorescence.

  18. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucas, Joe N. (San Ramon, CA); Straume, Tore (Tracy, CA); Bogen, Kenneth T. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration.

  19. Nucleic acid modifications in bacterial pathogens - impact on pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Brandon S. (Brandon Skylur)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nucleic acids are subject to extensive chemical modification by all organisms. These modifications display incredible structural diversity, and some are essential for survival. Intriguingly, several of these modifications ...

  20. BGL6 .beta.-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  1. BGL6 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  2. BGL7 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl7, and the corresponding BGL7 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL7, recombinant BGL7 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  3. BGL7 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl7, and the corresponding BGL7 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL7, recombinant BGL7 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  4. BGL6 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA)

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  5. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  6. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  7. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  8. BGL4 .beta.-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl4, and the corresponding BGL4 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL4, recombinant BGL4 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  9. BGL5 .beta.-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl5, and the corresponding BGL5 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL5, recombinant BGL5 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  10. BGL4 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA) [Los Gatos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL) [Vlaardingen, NL; Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA) [San Francisco, CA; Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA) [Sunnyvale, CA

    2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl4, and the corresponding BGL4 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL4, recombinant BGL4 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  11. BGL5 .beta.-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl5, and the corresponding BGL5 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL5, recombinant BGL5 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  12. BGL7 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA)

    2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl7, and the corresponding BGL7 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL7, recombinant BGL7 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  13. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  14. BGL4 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA); Yao, Jian (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl4, and the corresponding BGL4 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL4, recombinant BGL4 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  15. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Glen A. (Encinitas, CA); Djabali, Malek (Marseilles, FR); Selleri, Licia (Del Mar, CA); Parry, Pauline (San Diego, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  16. Structure and function of circadian clock proteins and deuterium isotope effects in nucleic acid hydrogen bonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vakonakis, Ioannis

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    -terminal domain. Hydrogen bonds are of paramount importance in nucleic acid structure and function. Here we show that changes in the width and anharmonicity of vibrational potential energy wells of hydrogen bonded groups can be measured in nucleic acids and can...

  17. A Standard Reference Frame for the Description of Nucleic Acid Base-pair Geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstein, Mark

    uncertainties in this data set closely match numerical values reported in the recent survey of nucleic acid baseA Standard Reference Frame for the Description of Nucleic Acid Base-pair Geometry These preliminary (Rockefeller University), Richard E. Dickerson (University of California, Los Angeles), Mark Gerstein (Yale

  18. Electrochemical control of reversible DNA hybridisation : for future use in nucleic acid amplification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Syed, Shahida Nina

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Denaturation and renaturation is indispensable for the biological function of nucleic acids in many cellular processes, such as for example transcription for the synthesis of RNA and DNA replication during cell division. ...

  19. Development of polymer and lipid materials for enhanced delivery of nucleic acids and proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eltoukhy, Ahmed Atef

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of synthetic vectors enabling efficient intracellular delivery of macromolecular therapeutics such as nucleic acids and proteins could potentially catalyze the clinical translation of many gene and protein-based ...

  20. Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of nucleic acids : application to tautomerism and DNA aptamer unfolding dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Chunte Sam

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural dynamics of nucleic acids are intimately related to their biological functions; however, our ability to study these molecular dynamics has been largely impeded by the lack of techniques that possess both ...

  1. Plants having modified response to ethylene by transformation with an ETR nucleic acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyerowitz, Elliott M. (Pasadena, CA); Chang, Caren (Pasadena, CA); Bleecker, Anthony B. (Madison, WI)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype.

  2. Studies toward biomimetic claisen condensation using nucleic acid templates and ribozyme catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Youngha

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Many different experimental approaches were attempted to achieve carbon-carbon bond formation by nucleic acid template-directed reactions and ribozyme catalysis as potential lipid synthesizing machineries in the RNA world. A novel biomimetic...

  3. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using a bifunctional hybridization probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucas, Joe N. (San Ramon, CA); Straume, Tore (Tracy, CA); Bogen, Kenneth T. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting and isolating a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids is provided using a bifunctional hybridization probe capable of hybridizing to the target sequence that includes a detectable marker and a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent. A kit is also provided for detecting a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids using a bifunctional hybridization probe according to this method.

  4. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided. 7 figs.

  5. Method for producing labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, John J. (Bellport, NY); Quesada, Mark A. (Middle Island, NY); Randesi, Matthew (Upton, NY)

    1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method for the introduction of unidirectional deletions in a cloned DNA segment. More specifically, the method comprises providing a recombinant DNA construct comprising a DNA segment of interest inserted in a cloning vector, the cloning vector having an f1 endonuclease recognition sequence adjacent to the insertion site of the DNA segment of interest. The recombinant DNA construct is then contacted with the protein pII encoded by gene II of phage f1 thereby generating a single-stranded nick. The nicked DNA is then contacted with E. coli Exonuclease III thereby expanding the single-stranded nick into a single-stranded gap. The single-stranded gapped DNA is then contacted with a single-strand-specific endonuclease thereby producing a linearized DNA molecule containing a double-stranded deletion corresponding in size to the single-stranded gap. The DNA treated in this manner is then incubated with DNA ligase under conditions appropriate for ligation. Also disclosed is a method for producing single-stranded DNA probes. In this embodiment, single-stranded gapped DNA, produced as described above, is contacted with a DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides to fill in the gap. This DNA is then linearized by digestion with a restriction enzyme which cuts outside the DNA segment of interest. The product of this digestion is then denatured to produce a labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probe.

  6. DimaSense™: A Novel Nucleic Acid Detection System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, A.

    2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, we developed a suite of methods for the rational design and fabrication of well-defined nanoparticle architectures, including clusters using bio-encoded nanoscale building blocks and layer-by-layer stepwise assembly on a solid support. In particular, the Nano-Assembly platform using Encoded Solid Supports (NAESS) allows for controlled interactions, purification of side products, modularity of design, and the construction of complex nanoparticle architectures. This approach offers several advantages over the current art of designing nanoparticle clusters, which include the high-yield synthesis of desired architectures, a 'plug-and-play' design allowing for the introduction of a variety of sensing modalities, and ease of scalability in high-throughput and synthesis yield. As a utility proof of concept, we implemented our unique cluster fabrication platform to design gold nanoparticle dimers which are linked via a single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide recognition motif. The design of this motif is such that binding of complementary nucleic acids results in specific, selective and rapid dimer dissociation, which can be monitored by dynamic light scattering (DLS). We demonstrated single level mismatch selectivity using this approach. The limit of detection was determined to be 1011 molecules of synthetic target RNA or DNA within 30 minutes of incubation at 33 C. This detection limit is determined by the dimer's concentration which can be probed by currently used standard DLS instruments. We also demonstrated a specific detection of target RNA in a solution containing competing 1,000-fold excess of non-complementary DNA fragments, 10% BSA, and endonucleases. Molecular diagnostic companies, RNA-based technology developers, and personalized medicine companies have applications that could benefit from using DimaSense{trademark}. The technology represents a platform which enables the simple and reasonably inexpensive design and fabrication of highly selective genetic sensors. These sensors operate with very low concentrations of target, can utilize standard instrumentation, produce detection results rapidly, and are robust enough to function in the presence of many competing genetic targets. Many current genetic target detection products/approaches/technologies rely upon methods (such as qPCR) which are more complicated, cumbersome, and costly to perform, and are not well suited to point-of-care diagnostic applications. Several clinical diagnostic applications, particularly point-of-care (POC) diagnostics for infectious diseases, are possible and appear to be a good fit for the technology. In addition, the advent of personalized medicine will create opportunities for molecular diagnostic companies with the capabilities of rapidly and quantitatively detecting nucleic acid sequences. The global POC market was {approx}$7.7B in 2010, with a recent annual growth rate of {approx}7%. A specific disease or disease-class diagnostic would need to be identified before a more meaningful sub-market value could be stated. Additional validation of the technology to show that it displays appropriate performance parameters for a commercial application on 'real world' samples is required for true commercial readiness. In addition, optimization of sensor design parameters, to effect a 10-fold increase in sensitivity, may be required to produce a commercially ready sensor system. These validation and sensor design optimization are estimated to require 3-4 months and {approx}$75k. For an unregulated product to give this sensor system a distinct competitive advantage, 2-3 years of product development and $1.5-3M are likely required. For regulated markets, time to market (through clinic) and cost would depend upon the product.

  7. Published online 14 May 2008 Nucleic Acids Research, 2008, Vol. 36, Web Server issue W97W103 doi:10.1093/nar/gkn280

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Doheon

    algorithms by statistical analysis with the pub- lished experimental data and derived a new efficient method Genomics Research Center, KRIBB, Daejeon 305-806, 2 Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon and FASTA algo- rithms and checking the folding secondary structure energy of siRNAs. To do this, we

  8. Methods and kits for nucleic acid analysis using fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwok, Pui-Yan (Clayton, MO); Chen, Xiangning (St. Louis, MO)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting the presence of a target nucleotide or sequence of nucleotides in a nucleic acid is disclosed. The method is comprised of forming an oligonucleotide labeled with two fluorophores on the nucleic acid target site. The doubly labeled oligonucleotide is formed by addition of a singly labeled dideoxynucleoside triphosphate to a singly labeled polynucleotide or by ligation of two singly labeled polynucleotides. Detection of fluorescence resonance energy transfer upon denaturation indicates the presence of the target. Kits are also provided. The method is particularly applicable to genotyping.

  9. Structural aspects of catalytic mechanisms of endonucleases and their binding to nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Balaev, V. V.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A., E-mail: alashkov83@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Endonucleases (EC 3.1) are enzymes of the hydrolase class that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids at any region of the polynucleotide chain. Endonucleases are widely used both in biotechnological processes and in veterinary medicine as antiviral agents. Medical applications of endonucleases in human cancer therapy hold promise. The results of X-ray diffraction studies of the spatial organization of endonucleases and their complexes and the mechanism of their action are analyzed and generalized. An analysis of the structural studies of this class of enzymes showed that the specific binding of enzymes to nucleic acids is characterized by interactions with nitrogen bases and the nucleotide backbone, whereas the nonspecific binding of enzymes is generally characterized by interactions only with the nucleic-acid backbone. It should be taken into account that the specificity can be modulated by metal ions and certain low-molecular-weight organic compounds. To test the hypotheses about specific and nonspecific nucleic-acid-binding proteins, it is necessary to perform additional studies of atomic-resolution three-dimensional structures of enzyme-nucleic-acid complexes by methods of structural biology.

  10. Adsorption of Nucleic Acid Components on Rutile (TiO2) Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sverjensky, Dimitri A.

    Adsorption of Nucleic Acid Components on Rutile (TiO2) Surfaces H. James Cleaves II,1 Caroline M and horizontal gene transfer. The adsorption of mono-, oligo-, and polynucleotides and their components obtained from studies of other minerals. In contrast with recent studies of nucleotide adsorption on Zn

  11. Do Electrostatic Interactions Destabilize ProteinNucleic Acid Binding? Sanbo Qin,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    interaction energies between proteins and nucleic acids are positive, meaning that electrostatic interactions as the boundary between the solute low dielectric and the solvent dielectric. We have explored an alternative choice, i.e., the van der Waals (vdW) surface, and found that the electrostatic interaction energy

  12. Nucleosides, Nucleotides, and Nucleic Acids, 25:915, 2006 Copyright C Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    Nucleosides, Nucleotides, and Nucleic Acids, 25:9­15, 2006 Copyright C Taylor & Francis Group, LLC-LABELED NUCLEOTIDE SPACER ARM ON INCORPORATION BY THERMOPHILIC DNA POLYMERASES Christopher J. Lacenere 2 Division incor- porate fluorescently labeled nucleotides sequentially was analyzed by a gel based primer

  13. Nucleic acid molecules conferring enhanced ethanol tolerance and microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Steven; Guss, Adam; Yang, Shihui; Karpinets, Tatiana; Lynd, Lee; Shao, Xiongjun

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules which encode a mutant acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase or mutant alcohol dehydrogenase and confer enhanced tolerance to ethanol. The invention also provides related expression vectors, genetically engineered microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol, as well as methods of making and using such genetically modified microorganisms for production of biofuels based on fermentation of biomass materials.

  14. Nucleic Acid Encoding A Lectin-Derived Progenitor Cell Preservation Factor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colucci, M. Gabriella (Dugenta, IT); Chrispeels, Maarten J. (La Jolla, CA); Moore, Jeffrey G. (New York, NY)

    2001-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to an isolated nucleic acid molecule that encodes a protein that is effective to preserve progenitor cells, such as hematopoietic progenitor cells. The nucleic acid comprises a sequence defined by SEQ ID NO:1, a homolog thereof, or a fragment thereof. The encoded protein has an amino acid sequence that comprises a sequence defined by SEQ ID NO:2, a homolog thereof, or a fragment thereof that contains an amino acid sequence TNNVLQVT. Methods of using the encoded protein for preserving progenitor cells in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo are also described. The invention, therefore, include methods such as myeloablation therapies for cancer treatment wherein myeloid reconstitution is facilitated by means of the specified protein. Other therapeutic utilities are also enabled through the invention, for example, expanding progenitor cell populations ex vivo to increase chances of engraftation, improving conditions for transporting and storing progenitor cells, and facilitating gene therapy to treat and cure a broad range of life-threatening hematologic diseases.

  15. Method for high-volume sequencing of nucleic acids: random and directed priming with libraries of oligonucleotides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Studier, F. William (Stony Brook, NY)

    1995-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Random and directed priming methods for determining nucleotide sequences by enzymatic sequencing techniques, using libraries of primers of lengths 8, 9 or 10 bases, are disclosed. These methods permit direct sequencing of nucleic acids as large as 45,000 base pairs or larger without the necessity for subcloning. Individual primers are used repeatedly to prime sequence reactions in many different nucleic acid molecules. Libraries containing as few as 10,000 octamers, 14,200 nonamers, or 44,000 decamers would have the capacity to determine the sequence of almost any cosmid DNA. Random priming with a fixed set of primers from a smaller library can also be used to initiate the sequencing of individual nucleic acid molecules, with the sequence being completed by directed priming with primers from the library. In contrast to random cloning techniques, a combined random and directed priming strategy is far more efficient.

  16. Method for high-volume sequencing of nucleic acids: random and directed priming with libraries of oligonucleotides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Studier, F.W.

    1995-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Random and directed priming methods for determining nucleotide sequences by enzymatic sequencing techniques, using libraries of primers of lengths 8, 9 or 10 bases, are disclosed. These methods permit direct sequencing of nucleic acids as large as 45,000 base pairs or larger without the necessity for subcloning. Individual primers are used repeatedly to prime sequence reactions in many different nucleic acid molecules. Libraries containing as few as 10,000 octamers, 14,200 nonamers, or 44,000 decamers would have the capacity to determine the sequence of almost any cosmid DNA. Random priming with a fixed set of primers from a smaller library can also be used to initiate the sequencing of individual nucleic acid molecules, with the sequence being completed by directed priming with primers from the library. In contrast to random cloning techniques, a combined random and directed priming strategy is far more efficient. 2 figs.

  17. Methods of combined bioprocessing and related microorganisms, thermophilic and/or acidophilic enzymes, and nucleic acids encoding said enzymes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, David N; Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S; Ward, Thomas E

    2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A genetically modified organism comprising: at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid isolated from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and encoding a polypeptide involved in at least partially degrading, cleaving, transporting, metabolizing, or removing polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups; and at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid encoding a polypeptide involved in fermenting sugar molecules to a product. Additionally, enzymatic and/or proteinaceous extracts may be isolated from one or more genetically modified organisms. The extracts are utilized to convert biomass into a product. Further provided are methods of converting biomass into products comprising: placing the genetically modified organism and/or enzymatic extracts thereof in fluid contact with polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, and/or xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups.

  18. Methods of combined bioprocessing and related microorganisms, thermophilic and/or acidophilic enzymes, and nucleic acids encoding said enzymes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, David N; Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S; Ward, Thomas E

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A genetically modified organism comprising: at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid isolated from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and encoding a polypeptide involved in at least partially degrading, cleaving, transporting, metabolizing, or removing polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups; and at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid encoding a polypeptide involved in fermenting sugar molecules to a product. Additionally, enzymatic and/or proteinaceous extracts may be isolated from one or more genetically modified organisms. The extracts are utilized to convert biomass into a product. Further provided are methods of converting biomass into products comprising: placing the genetically modified organism and/or enzymatic extracts thereof in fluid contact with polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, and/or xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups.

  19. Alteration of Nucleic Acid Structure and Stability Modulates the Efficiency of Minus-Strand Transfer Mediated by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Judith G.

    Alteration of Nucleic Acid Structure and Stability Modulates the Efficiency of Minus destabilizes the highly structured complementary trans-activation response ele- ment (TAR) stem-loop (TAR DNA) at the 3 -end of ( ) SSDNA and inhibits TAR-induced self-priming, a dead- end reaction that competes

  20. Site-Selective Binding of Nanoparticles to Double-Stranded DNA via Peptide Nucleic Acid "Invasion"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, A.L.; van der Lelie, D.; Sun, D.; Maye, M. M.; Gang, O.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a novel method for by-design placement of nano-objects along double-stranded (ds) DNA. A molecular intercalator, designed as a peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-DNA chimera, is able to invade dsDNA at the PNA-side due to the hybridization specificity between PNA and one of the duplex strands. At the same time, the single-stranded (ss) DNA tail of the chimera, allows for anchoring of nano-objects that have been functionalized with complementary ssDNA. The developed method is applied for interparticle attachment and for the fabrication of particle clusters using a dsDNA template. This method significantly broadens the molecular toolbox for constructing nanoscale systems by including the most conventional not yet utilized DNA motif, double helix DNA.

  1. Quantification of false positive reduction in nucleic acid purification on hemorrhagic fever DNA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, Conrad D.; Pohl, Kenneth Roy; Derzon, Mark Steven; McClain, Jaime; Achyuthan, Komandoor

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Columbia University has developed a sensitive highly multiplexed system for genetic identification of nucleic acid targets. The primary obstacle to implementing this technology is the high rate of false positives due to high levels of unbound reporters that remain within the system after hybridization. The ability to distinguish between free reporters and reporters bound to targets limits the use of this technology. We previously demonstrated a new electrokinetic method for binary separation of kb pair long DNA molecules and oligonucleotides. The purpose of this project 99864 is to take these previous demonstrations and further develop the technique and hardware for field use. Specifically, our objective was to implement separation in a heterogeneous sample (containing target DNA and background oligo), to perform the separation in a flow-based device, and to develop all of the components necessary for field testing a breadboard prototype system.

  2. Aptamer- and nucleic acid enzyme-based systems for simultaneous detection of multiple analytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Yi (Champaign, IL); Liu, Juewen (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides aptamer- and nucleic acid enzyme-based systems for simultaneously determining the presence and optionally the concentration of multiple analytes in a sample. Methods of utilizing the system and kits that include the sensor components are also provided. The system includes a first reactive polynucleotide that reacts to a first analyte; a second reactive polynucleotide that reacts to a second analyte; a third polynucleotide; a fourth polynucleotide; a first particle, coupled to the third polynucleotide; a second particle, coupled to the fourth polynucleotide; and at least one quencher, for quenching emissions of the first and second quantum dots, coupled to the first and second reactive polynucleotides. The first particle includes a quantum dot having a first emission wavelength. The second particle includes a second quantum dot having a second emission wavelength different from the first emission wavelength. The third polynucleotide and the fourth polynucleotide are different.

  3. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1996. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, G.; Foley, B.; Korber, B. [eds.] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.] [eds.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.; Mellors, J.W. [ed.] [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [ed.; Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Jeang, K.T. [ed.] [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States). Molecular Virology Section] [ed.; National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States). Molecular Virology Section; Wain-Hobson, S. [Pasteur Inst., Paris (France)] [ed.] [Pasteur Inst., Paris (France); ed.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) Nuclear Acid Alignments and Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Alignments; (3) Analysis; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. In addition to the general descriptions of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  4. Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kingsley, Mark T.

    2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, and analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: 1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, 2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and 3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

  5. Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kingsley, Mark T

    2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, an d analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: (1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, (2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and (3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

  6. SAGE-Hindawi Access to Research Journal of Nucleic Acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgstahl, Gloria

    Replication Protein A That Recognize G-Quadruplex DNA Aishwarya Prakash,1 Amarnath Natarajan,1 Luis A. Marky,1

  7. Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Patel, Kamlesh D [Ken]; SNL,

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Kamlesh (Ken) Patel from Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, California) presents "Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology " at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  8. A Highly Salt-Dependent Enthalpy Change for Escherichia coli SSB Protein-Nucleic Acid Binding Due to Ion-Protein Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lohman, Timothy M.

    A Highly Salt-Dependent Enthalpy Change for Escherichia coli SSB Protein-Nucleic Acid Binding Due ReceiVed February 5, 1996X ABSTRACT: We have examined the linkage between salt concentration association constant, Kobs, decreases with increasing salt concentration at all temperatures examined

  9. Nucleic acid sequences encoding D1 and D1/D2 domains of human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides recombinant human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) polypeptides which bind adenovirus. Specifically, polypeptides corresponding to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2 are provided. In another aspect, the invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains and expression vectors for producing the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. The invention also includes an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide fused to a polypeptide which facilitates folding of D1 when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a CAR D1-binding virus, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. The invention also provides a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  10. Production of extracellular nucleic acids by genetically altered bacteria in aquatic-environment microcosms. [Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Pseudomonas cepacia, Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, J.H.; David, A.W. (Univ. of South Florida, St. Petersburg (USA))

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The factors which affect the production of extracellular DNA by genetically altered strains of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas cepacia, and Bradyrhizobium japonicum in aquatic environments were investigated. Cellular nucleic acids were labeled in vivo by incubation with ({sup 3}H)thymidine or ({sup 3}H)adenine, and production of extracellular DNA in marine waters, artificial seawater, or minimal salts media was determined by detecting radiolabeled macromolecules in incubation filtrates. The presence or absence of the ambient microbial community had little effect on the production of extracellular DNA. Three of four organisms produced the greatest amounts of extracellular nucleic acids when incubated in low-salinity media (2% artificial seawater) rather than high-salinity media (10 to 50% artificial seawater). The greatest production of extracellular nucleic acids by P. cepacia occurred at pH 7 and 37{degree}C, suggesting that extracellular-DNA production may be a normal physiologic function of the cell. Incubation of labeled P. cepacia cells in water from Bimini Harbor, Bahamas, resulted in labeling of macromolecules of the ambient microbial population. Collectively these results indicate that (i) extracellular-DNA production by genetically altered bacteria released into aquatic environments is more strongly influenced by physicochemical factors than biotic factors, (ii) extracellular-DNA production rates are usually greater for organisms released in freshwater than marine environments, and (iii) ambient microbial populations can readily utilize materials released by these organisms.

  11. Accurate small and wide angle x-ray scattering profiles from atomic models of proteins and nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Hung T. [BioMaPS Institute for Quantitative Biology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Pabit, Suzette A.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Pollack, Lois [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Case, David A., E-mail: case@biomaps.rutgers.edu [BioMaPS Institute for Quantitative Biology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

    2014-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method is introduced to compute X-ray solution scattering profiles from atomic models of macromolecules. The three-dimensional version of the Reference Interaction Site Model (RISM) from liquid-state statistical mechanics is employed to compute the solvent distribution around the solute, including both water and ions. X-ray scattering profiles are computed from this distribution together with the solute geometry. We describe an efficient procedure for performing this calculation employing a Lebedev grid for the angular averaging. The intensity profiles (which involve no adjustable parameters) match experiment and molecular dynamics simulations up to wide angle for two proteins (lysozyme and myoglobin) in water, as well as the small-angle profiles for a dozen biomolecules taken from the BioIsis.net database. The RISM model is especially well-suited for studies of nucleic acids in salt solution. Use of fiber-diffraction models for the structure of duplex DNA in solution yields close agreement with the observed scattering profiles in both the small and wide angle scattering (SAXS and WAXS) regimes. In addition, computed profiles of anomalous SAXS signals (for Rb{sup +} and Sr{sup 2+}) emphasize the ionic contribution to scattering and are in reasonable agreement with experiment. In cases where an absolute calibration of the experimental data at q = 0 is available, one can extract a count of the excess number of waters and ions; computed values depend on the closure that is assumed in the solution of the Ornstein–Zernike equations, with results from the Kovalenko–Hirata closure being closest to experiment for the cases studied here.

  12. Nucleic acid molecules encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, and methods of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Croteau, Rodney B. (Pullman, WA); Lange, Bernd M. (Pullman, WA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase (IPK) from peppermint (Mentha x piperita) has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID NO:1) is provided which codes for the expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase (SEQ ID NO:2), from peppermint (Mentha x piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant isopentenyl monophosphate kinase that may be used to facilitate its production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant isopentenyl monophosphate kinase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase in plants in order to enhance the production of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or isoprenoids derived therefrom, or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or the production of its products.

  13. Nucleic and amino acid sequences relating to a novel transketolase, and methods for the expression thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce (Pullman, WA); Wildung, Mark Raymond (Colfax, WA); Lange, Bernd Markus (Pullman, WA); McCaskill, David G. (Pullman, WA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cDNAs encoding 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase from peppermint (Mentha piperita) have been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequences have been determined. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences (SEQ ID NO:3, SEQ ID NO:5, SEQ ID NO:7) are provided which code for the expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase from plants. In another aspect the present invention provides for isolated, recombinant DXPS proteins, such as the proteins having the sequences set forth in SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:6 and SEQ ID NO:8. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for plant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthases, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding a plant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate its production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate, or its derivatives such as isopentenyl diphosphate (BP), or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase, or the production of its products.

  14. Synthesis, Improved Antisense Activity and Structural Rationale for the Divergent RNA Affinities of 3;#8242;-Fluoro Hexitol Nucleic Acid (FHNA and Ara-FHNA) Modified Oligonucleotides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egli, Martin; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Allerson, Charles R.; Prakash, Thazha P.; Berdeja, Andres; Yu, Jinghua; Lee, Sam; Watt, Andrew; Gaus, Hans; Bhat, Balkrishen; Swayze, Eric E.; Seth, Punit P. (Isis Pharm.); (Vanderbilt)

    2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The synthesis, biophysical, structural, and biological properties of both isomers of 3'-fluoro hexitol nucleic acid (FHNA and Ara-FHNA) modified oligonucleotides are reported. Synthesis of the FHNA and Ara-FHNA thymine phosphoramidites was efficiently accomplished starting from known sugar precursors. Optimal RNA affinities were observed with a 3'-fluorine atom and nucleobase in a trans-diaxial orientation. The Ara-FHNA analog with an equatorial fluorine was found to be destabilizing. However, the magnitude of destabilization was sequence-dependent. Thus, the loss of stability is sharply reduced when Ara-FHNA residues were inserted at pyrimidine-purine (Py-Pu) steps compared to placement within a stretch of pyrimidines (Py-Py). Crystal structures of A-type DNA duplexes modified with either monomer provide a rationalization for the opposing stability effects and point to a steric origin of the destabilization caused by the Ara-FHNA analog. The sequence dependent effect can be explained by the formation of an internucleotide C-F {hor_ellipsis} H-C pseudo hydrogen bond between F3' of Ara-FHNA and C8-H of the nucleobase from the 3'-adjacent adenosine that is absent at Py-Py steps. In animal experiments, FHNA-modified antisense oligonucleotides formulated in saline showed a potent downregulation of gene expression in liver tissue without producing hepatotoxicity. Our data establish FHNA as a useful modification for antisense therapeutics and also confirm the stabilizing influence of F(Py) {hor_ellipsis} H-C(Pu) pseudo hydrogen bonds in nucleic acid structures.

  15. acid adenine dinucleotide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theoretical Determination of One-Electron Oxidation Potentials for Nucleic Acid Bases Brian T potentials for N-methyl substituted nucleic acid bases guanine, adenine, cytosine,...

  16. volume 17 Number 12 1989 Nucleic Acids Research The 5S RNA gene minichromosome of Euplotes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olins, Ada L.

    extract and 1.33 g/L anhydrous sodium acetate. Algae were harvested and resuspended in Pringsheim solution boiled wheat seeds in Carolina Spring-water. Large-scale cultures of Euplotes were grown in trays

  17. Nucleic Acids Research doi:10.1093/nar/gkn305

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Guohui

    server for rapidly generating accurate 3D protein structures using only assigned nuclear magnetic no NOE and/or J-coupling data to perform its calculations. CS23D accepts chemical shift files in either. Tests conducted on more than 100 proteins from the BioMagResBank indicate that CS23D converges (i

  18. Nucleic Acids Research, 2008, 19 doi:10.1093/nar/gkn836

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dekker, Nynke

    and 2 Institute of Biotechnology and Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Viikki active mode. INTRODUCTION Template-directed polymerization of nucleotides (NTPs) is an essential process in all living entities. Accordingly, enzymes catalyzing these processes operate in both cel- lular

  19. Nucleic Acids Research, 2014 1 doi: 10.1093/nar/gku645

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mühlemann, Oliver

    -independent interaction between SMG6 and UPF1 is essential for human NMD Pamela Nicholson1 , Christoph Josi1 , Hitomi be degraded by different routes that all require phosphorylated UPF1 (P-UPF1) as a starting point to be recruited to non- sense mRNAs via an interaction with P-UPF1, leading to eventual mRNA degradation

  20. Structural Rationalization of a Large Difference in RNA Affinity Despite a Small Difference in Chemistry between Two 2'-O-Modified Nucleic Acid Analogs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pattanayek, R.; Sethaphong, L.; Pan, C.; Prhavc, M.; Prakash, T.P.; Manoharan, M.; Egli, M. (Tennessee); (Isis Pharmaceuticals Inc.); (Alnylam Pharmaceuticals,); (Vanderbilt)

    2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical modification of nucleic acids at the 2'-position of ribose has generated antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) with a range of desirable properties. Electron-withdrawing substituents such as 2'-O-[2-(methoxy)ethyl] (MOE) confer enhanced RNA affinity relative to that of DNA by conformationally preorganizing an AON for pairing with the RNA target and by improving backbone hydration. 2'-Substitution of the ribose has also been shown to increase nuclease resistance and cellular uptake via changes in lipophilicity. Interestingly, incorporation of either 2'-O-[2-(methylamino)-2-oxoethyl]- (NMA) or 2'-O-(N-methylcarbamate)-modified (NMC) residues into AONs has divergent effects on RNA affinity. Incorporation of 2'-O-NMA-T considerably improves RNA affinity while incorporation of 2'-O-NMC-T drastically reduces RNA affinity. Crystal structures at high resolution of A-form DNA duplexes containing either 2'-O-NMA-T or 2'-O-NMC-T shed light on the structural origins of the surprisingly large difference in stability given the relatively minor difference in chemistry between NMA and NMC. NMA substituents adopt an extended conformation and use either their carbonyl oxygen or amino nitrogen to trap water molecules between phosphate group and sugar. The conformational properties of NMA and the observed hydration patterns are reminiscent of those found in the structures of 2'-O-MOE-modified RNA. Conversely, the carbonyl oxygen of NMC and O2 of T are in close contact, providing evidence that an unfavorable electrostatic interaction and the absence of a stable water structure are the main reasons for the loss in thermodynamic stability as a result of incorporation of 2'-O-NMC-modified residues.

  1. Final Scientific/Technical Report, DE-FG02-06ER64171, Integrated Nucleic Acid System for In-Field Monitoring of Microbial Community Dynamics and Metabolic Activity – Subproject to Co-PI Eric E. Roden

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric E. Roden

    2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes research conducted in conjunction with a project entitled “Integrated Nucleic Acid System for In-Field Monitoring of Microbial Community Dynamics and Metabolic Activity”, which was funded through the Integrative Studies Element of the former NABIR Program (now the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program) within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Dr. Darrell Chandler (originally at Argonne National Laboratory, now with Akonni Biosystems) was the overall PI/PD for the project. The overall project goals were to (1) apply a model iron-reducer and sulfate-reducer microarray and instrumentation systems to sediment and groundwater samples from the Scheibe et al. FRC Area 2 field site, UMTRA sediments, and other DOE contaminated sites; (2) continue development and expansion of a 16S rRNA/rDNA¬-targeted probe suite for microbial community dynamics as new sequences are obtained from DOE-relevant sites; and (3) address the fundamental molecular biology and analytical chemistry associated with the extraction, purification and analysis of functional genes and mRNA in environmental samples. Work on the UW subproject focused on conducting detailed batch and semicontinuous culture reactor experiments with uranium-contaminated FRC Area 2 sediment. The reactor experiments were designed to provide coherent geochemical and microbiological data in support of microarray analyses of microbial communities in Area 2 sediments undergoing biostimulation with ethanol. A total of four major experiments were conducted (one batch and three semicontinuous culture), three of which (the batch and two semicontinuous culture) provided samples for DNA microarray analysis. A variety of other molecular analyses (clone libraries, 16S PhyloChip, RT-PCR, and T-RFLP) were conducted on parallel samples from the various experiments in order to provide independent information on microbial community response to biostimulation.

  2. Human Retroviruses and AIDS. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences: I--II; III--V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, G.; Korber, B. [eds.] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [eds.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wain-Hobson, S. [ed.] [Laboratory of Molecular Retrovirology, Pasteur Inst.] [ed.; Laboratory of Molecular Retrovirology, Pasteur Inst.; Smith, R.F. [ed.] [Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Pharmacology] [ed.; Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Pharmacology; Pavlakis, G.N. [ed.] [National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States). Cancer Research Facility] [ed.; National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States). Cancer Research Facility

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (I) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Sequences; (III) Analyses; (IV) Related Sequences; and (V) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium.

  3. 1998 Oxford University Press42804290 Nucleic Acids Research, 1998, Vol. 26, No. 18 A database of macromolecular motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstein, Mark

    to implement the database. However, the complexity and heterogeneity of the information kept in the database, are involved in many basic functions such as catalysis, regulation of activity, transport of metabolites

  4. 2001 Oxford University Press Nucleic Acids Research, 2001, Vol. 29, No. 22 46634673 Importance of the conserved nucleotides around the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the conserved nucleotides around the tRNA-like structure of Escherichia coli transfer- messenger RNA for protein nucleotide stretches 16­20 and 333­335 seriously impair protein tagging with only minor changes nucleotides next to the tRNA-like portion is proposed. Overall, the highly conserved nucleotides around the t

  5. Nucleic Acids Research, 1994, Vol. 22, No. 11 1981 -1987 Interaction between the first and last nucleotides of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanfreau, Guillaume

    nucleotides of pre-mRNA introns is a determinant of 3' splice site selection in S.cerevisiae Guillaume be reactivated by a G to C substitution of the last intron nucleotide. These results demonstrate that the inter- action between the first and last intron nucleotides is a conserved feature of nuclear pre-mRNA splicing

  6. Volume 15 Number 19 1987 Nucleic Acids Research Deduced prducts of C4-dkarboxylate tranort regultory genes of Rukobium kgminowsaum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ausubel, Frederick M.

    of the dctD gene poduct (DctD)was strongly conserved with N-terminal domains of theproducts of several

  7. Volume 4 Number 6 June 1977 Nucleic Acids Research Conformational states of chromatin v bodies induced by urea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olins, Ada L.

    and 7 M urea. Companion studies on the conformation of the inner histone "heterotypic tetramer" also pairs. The inner histone "heterotypic tetramer" (one each of H4, H3, H2A, and H2B, devoid of DNA/ml solution A^o =3.5 (12). The heterotypic tetramer was fractionated from HI and H5 by layering 0.5 ml

  8. Geochemical Rate/RNA Integration Study (GRIST): A Pilot Field Experiment for Inter-Calibration of Biogeochemistry and Nucleic Acid Measurements Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronk, Deborah

    2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geochemical Rate/RNA Integration Study (GRIST) project sought to correlate biogeochemical flux rates with measurements of gene expression and mRNA abundance to demonstrate the application of molecular approaches to estimate the presence and magnitude of a suite of biogeochemical processes. The study was headed by Lee Kerkhoff of Rutgers University. In this component of the GRIST study, we characterized ambient nutrient concentrations and measured uptake rates for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, ammonium, nitrate and nitrite) and dissolved organic nitrogen (urea and dissolved free amino acids) during two diel studies at the Long-Term Ecosystem Observatory (LEO-15) on the New Jersey continental shelf.

  9. Biomedical Research Advisory Group: Critical Areas of Research Chemical Biology/Pharmacology/Therapeutics White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodrich, Lisa V.

    or prevent disease. This includes small molecules, but also proteins, nucleic acids, other macromolecules and perhaps nanoparticles, also research on drug delivery. This document does not explicitly consider medical Opportunities The confluence of genomic information, broad understanding of how biological systems function

  10. Isolated nucleic acids encoding antipathogenic polypeptides and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    compositions to protect a plant from a pathogen are further provided. Transformed plants, plant cells, seeds, and microorganisms comprising a nucleotide sequence that encodes...

  11. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  12. Diagnostic method employing MSH2 nucleic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapelle, A. de la; Vogelstein, B.; Kinzler, K.W.

    1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error{sup +}(RER{sup +}) tumor cells. 19 figs.

  13. Diagnostic method employing MSH2 nucleic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    de la Chapelle, Albert (Helsingfors, FI); Vogelstein, Bert (Baltimore, MD); Kinzler, Kenneth W. (Baltimore, MD)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  14. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1996-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

  15. acid biosensor based: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biosensors of nucleic acids and proteins for point- of-care (POC. The merger of microfluidics and advanced biosensor technolo- gies offers new promises for POC diagnostics...

  16. acids structures applied: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Treatment of software French, James C. 5 Parsing nucleic acid pseudoknotted secondary structure: algorithm and applications Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

  17. acid rain research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in rain falling over industrial decline of fish populations in the lakes of southern Norway and traced the problem to acid rain. Similar Jacob, Daniel J. 5 Long range transport...

  18. Research Report Oral supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtman, Richard

    cognitive ability with a diet enriched in DHA. Various cellular mechanisms have been proposed for DHA phosphatides and in pre- and post-synaptic proteins within the hippocampus. Hence, oral DHA may promote, is synthesized from its precursor -linolenic acid, which cannot be synthesized in mammals (mammals lack

  19. acid research frontiers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (NSF), Department of Energy (DOE), National Institutes of Health (NIH) and NASA, are funding the necessary cyberinfrastructure to empower e-science research and allied education...

  20. Published online 11 August 2009 Nucleic Acids Research, 2009, Vol. 37, No. 18 61616173 doi:10.1093/nar/gkp597

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glover, Mark

    . N. M. Glover1, * 1 Department of Biochemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2H7 whom correspondence should be addressed. Tel: +1 780 492 2136; Fax: +1 780 492 0886; Email: mark.glover

  1. W238W244 Nucleic Acids Research, 2007, Vol. 35, Web Server issue doi:10.1093/nar/gkm308

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stormo, Gary

    to biological processes or to disease states, the determination of the transcriptional regulation of these co a comprehensive, user-friendly web application suite termed the Promoter Analysis Pipeline (PAP). PAP is available of the genetic program. Aberrant regulation at different stages of these processes may result in differential

  2. Published online 21 April 2009 Nucleic Acids Research, 2009, Vol. 37, No. 10 31253133 doi:10.1093/nar/gkp250

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    reactions of break- ing and rejoining DNA strands can be performed without consumption of external energy without energy consumption as well. The energy is required, however, to shift a system away from topoisomerases Alexander Vologodskii* Department of Chemistry, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA

  3. Single-cell transfection tool enables added control for biological studies May 21, 2013 Northwestern University researchers have developed a new method for delivering molecu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    , such as nucleic acids or proteins, into change its properties.) However, because bulk electroporation applies-speed nanopatterning of proteins and nanoparticles for drug delivery studies. The new single-cell transfection to be available in late 2013. The technique is proving to be extremely robust and multi-functional. Researchers

  4. acid transporter specifically: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nucleic acid concentrations from 1 nM to 5 m Zhang, David Yu 3 Long range transport of acid rain precursors MIT - DSpace Summary: A model of the long range transport of primary...

  5. Research paper The determination of labile Fe in ferrihydrite by ascorbic acid extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benning, Liane G.

    , grain-sizes and crystallinity. Furthermore the extraction of bioavailable Fe from potential mineral). No simple chemical extraction can replicate the diversity of these processes, nevertheless extractionsResearch paper The determination of labile Fe in ferrihydrite by ascorbic acid extraction

  6. Thermal and acid tolerant beta xylosidases, arabinofuranosidases, genes encoding, related organisms, and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, David N; Thompson, Vicki S; Schaller, Kastli D; Apel, William A; Reed, David W; Lacey, Jeffrey A

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof are provided. Further provided are methods of at least partially degrading xylotriose, xylobiose, and/or arabinofuranose-substituted xylan using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof.

  7. Thermal and acid tolerant beta-xylosidases, genes encoding, related organisms, and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, David N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thompson, Vicki S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Schaller, Kastli D. (Ammon, ID); Apel, William A. (Jackson, WY); Lacey, Jeffrey A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reed, David W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof are provided. Further provided are methods of at least partially degrading xylotriose and/or xylobiose using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof.

  8. THE INTERACTIONS OF 4-NITROQUINOLINE-1-OXIDE WITH NUCLEIC ACIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkle, Stephen Alan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    r C2 " C4 CS C6 G2 G4 G5 G6 G8 A6 A8 lS8.06 IS 8.14 IS 6. 43Dimer C2 C4 C5 C6 G2 G4 G5 G6 G8 CpG C T2 T4 T5 T6 A2 A4 A5shift was observed for G8 relative to the other guanine base

  9. Targeting unique nucleic acid structures with small molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Victor Kin-man

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of mono- and disubstitued anthraquinone derivatives with anat opposite ends of the anthraquinone scaffold are employed.

  10. Scanning probe microscopy of nucleic acids and thin organic films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marat Olegovich Gallyamov

    2011-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed the models and algorithms to describe two main artefacts of AFM: (i) broadening effect and (ii) decreased heights of profiles for individual objects adsorbed on a hard substrate. It was shown how to measure elastic properties of a single adsorbed microobject. From the viewpoint of contact deformation theory we analysed mechanism of AFM visualisation of an atomic (molecular) structure of a flat surface. We tested technique of immobilisation on a substrate for free single-stranded RNA molecules in an extended state. Using AFM we visualised stages of processes of RNA release from protein coat of tobacco mosaic virus particles. The asymmetry of this process regarding two ends of a macromolecule was confirmed. The dynamics of compaction for DNA T4 molecules was traced using AFM in real time regime. The partially compacted macromolecules were clearly resolved. We detected that the partially compacted structures consisted of toroidal parts formed by different macromolecular strands. The real geometry of the compacted structures was reconstructed on the basis of systematic AFM measurements. That allowed us to calculate the amount of molecules combining each condensed DNA particle. We demonstrated clear benefits of horizontal deposition method for formation of LB films. Using AFM we achieved molecular resolution for some thin film coating and detected lattice parameters with the precision determined by the errors within a few percent. We demonstrated that the structure of the film is determined by the concurrence of several factors: by the closest packing principle for hydrocarbon tails, by the values of surface areas of polar heads at water subphase as well as by the substrate influence.

  11. AminoglycosideNucleic Acid Interactions: The Case for Neomycin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 3.4 Thermodynamics of Drug Binding to the DNA Triplex (ITC) . . . . . . . . . . 157 3.5 CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 5.2 The Common Thread that Holds Together RNA Duplex/Triplex, DNA-RNA Hybrid Duplexes, DNA

  12. Producing dicarboxylic acids using polyketide synthases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a dicarboxylic acid (diacid). Such diacids include diketide-diacids and triketide-diacids. The invention includes recombinant nucleic acid encoding the PKS, and host cells comprising the PKS. The invention also includes methods for producing the diacids.

  13. Correlation analysis of tree growth, climate, and acid deposition in the Lake States. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdaway, M.R.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report describes research designed to detect subtle regional tree growth trends related to sulfate (SO{sub 4}) deposition in the Lake States. Correlation methods were used to analyze climatic and SO{sub 4} deposition. Effects of SO{sub 4} deposition are greater on climatically stressed trees, especially pine species on dry sites, than on unstressed trees. Jack pine growth shows the strongest correlation to both climate and acid deposition.

  14. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 25, NO. 22, PAGES4185-4188,NOVEMBER 15, 1998 Nitric acid scavengingby mineral and biomassburning aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 25, NO. 22, PAGES4185-4188,NOVEMBER 15, 1998 Nitric acid by the American GeophysicalUnion. Paper number 1998GL900062. 0094-8276/98/1998 GL900062505.00 Data Presentation

  15. Initial results from the Pawnee Eddy Correlation system for dry acid-deposition research. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeller, K.; Massman, W.; Stocker, D.; Fox, D.G.; Stedman, D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pawnee Grassland Eddy Correlation Dry Deposition Project is described. Instrumentation, methods of analysis, and initial data and research findings are presented. Data from this eddy correlation system show agreement with: previously observations of deposition velocities for atmospheric ozone, NO/sub 2/ and NOx; micrometeorological theory; micrometeorological site characteristics.

  16. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  17. Research, development, and demonstration of lead-acid batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress and status of Eltra's Electric Vehicle Battery Program during FY-80 are presented under five divisional headings: Research on Components and Processes; Development of Cells and Modules for Electric Vehicle Propulsion; Sub-Systems; Pilot Line Production of Electric Vehicle Battery Prototypes; and Program Management.

  18. acid amplification test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    amplification test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Diagnostic Accuracy of Nucleic Acid...

  19. Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jessen, Holly Jean (Chanhassen, MN); Liao, Hans H. (Eden Prairie, MN); Gort, Steven John (Apple Valley, MN); Selifonova, Olga V. (Plymouth, MN)

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

  20. Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jessen, Holly Jean; Liao, Hans H; Gort, Steven John; Selifonova, Olga V

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

  1. The integrated microbial genomes (IMG) system in 2007: data content and analysis tool extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for genome annotation: PRIAM. Nucleic Acids Research 31 (EC numbers are computed using PRIAM (13), as a complement to

  2. UBC Centre for Blood Research: Fermentation Suite Brom A5 (F4) PDF.xls: FermentationProfile Air O2 rpm N2 Base Acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    UBC Centre for Blood Research: Fermentation Suite Brom A5 (F4) PDF.xls: FermentationProfile Air O2 rpm N2 Base Acid NH4OH Acetic Acid 8.6 16.0 Configuration 1 SP 4 - - - SP - 2 SP 3 0.000 Temp (oC) dO2 Fermentation (Hrs) pH rpm Temp Do OD CK (mg/50-L) MeOH (ml) dO2 (%)Temp (C) 40 20 60 80 0 100 6 8 4 2 0 10 28

  3. Adding sodium hydroxide to study metal removal in a stream affected by acid mine drainage. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amacher, M.C.; Brown, R.W.; Kotubi-Amacher, J.; Willis, A.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fisher Creek, a stream affected by acid mine drainage in the Beartooth Mountains of Montana, was studied to determine the extent to which copper and zinc would be removed from stream water when pH was increased by a pulse of sodium hydroxide. As stream pH increased, copper and zinc were rapidly and completely removed from stream water by adsorption or coprecipitation with freshly precipitated hydrous ferric oxide. In practice, the best way of increasing the pH of streams impacted by acid mine drainage would be to increase the alkalinity of tributaries by lining their channels with limestone rock.

  4. Research and development of a phosphoric acid fuel cell/battery power source integrated in a test-bed bus. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project, the research and development of a phosphoric acid fuel cell/battery power source integrated into test-bed buses, began as a multi-phase U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project in 1989. Phase I had a goal of developing two competing half-scale (25 kW) brassboard phosphoric acid fuel cell systems. An air-cooled and a liquid-cooled fuel cell system were developed and tested to verify the concept of using a fuel cell and a battery in a hybrid configuration wherein the fuel cell supplies the average power required for operating the vehicle and a battery supplies the `surge` or excess power required for acceleration and hill-climbing. Work done in Phase I determined that the liquid-cooled system offered higher efficiency.

  5. Type I Interferon is Not Just for Viruses: Cytosolic Sensing of Bacterial Nucleic Acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monroe, Kathryn McGee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the recognition of Helicobacter pylori. Gastroenterologypneumophila, Helicobacter pylori, Francisella tularensis,the focus of Chapter 3. Helicobacter pylori is another gram-

  6. Relations between intraruminal protein and nucleic acid synthesis and forms of urinary nitrogen excreted by sheep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razzaque, Md. Abdur

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alcohol. The samples were coils. cted in duplicates. An attempt was made to determine the volume of the rumen digesta and its passage out of the reticulo-rumen by usi. ng polyethylene glycol. An appropriate amount of polyethylene glycol (2 gm... procedure for poly- ethylene glycol it was not possible to determine the volume of the rumen digesta and rate of passage out of the reticulo-rumen. Fasting Animals At the end of all experimer. . tal feeding and collection periods, the rumens of two...

  7. DOI: 10.1002/cbic.200600435 Duplex Formation of the Simplified Nucleic Acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meggers, Eric

    ) with a stripped-down acyclic backbone can form stable duplexes.[8,9] The propylene glycol nucleotide building sequence and the painstaking separation of anomeric mixtures, this is not the case for GNA. Propylene (GNA) has an acyclic backbone of propylene glycol nucleosides that are connected by phosphodiester

  8. Stable nitrogen isotope measurements of marine bacterial proteins and nucleic acids: tracers of microbial activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kovacs, Jeffrey Paul

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stable nitrogen isotopes ([]15N) can trace elemental cycling in aquatic ecosystems if the enzyme mediated fractionations associated with nutrient uptake and assimilation are negligible or consistently predictable. In this study, bacterial proteins...

  9. Nucleic acids encoding phloem small RNA-binding proteins and transgenic plants comprising them

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucas, William J.; Yoo, Byung-Chun; Lough, Tony J.; Varkonyi-Gasic, Erika

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a polynucleotide sequence encoding a component of the protein machinery involved in small RNA trafficking, Cucurbita maxima phloem small RNA-binding protein (CmPSRB 1), and the corresponding polypeptide sequence. The invention also provides genetic constructs and transgenic plants comprising the polynucleotide sequence encoding a phloem small RNA-binding protein to alter (e.g., prevent, reduce or elevate) non-cell autonomous signaling events in the plants involving small RNA metabolism. These signaling events are involved in a broad spectrum of plant physiological and biochemical processes, including, for example, systemic resistance to pathogens, responses to environmental stresses, e.g., heat, drought, salinity, and systemic gene silencing (e.g., viral infections).

  10. Cellulases, nucleic acids encoding them and methods for making and using them

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blum, David; Gemsch Cuenca, Joslin; Dycaico, Mark

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to molecular and cellular biology and biochemistry. In one aspect, the invention provides polypeptides having cellulase activity, e.g., endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, mannanase and/or .beta.-glucosidase activity, polynucleotides encoding these polypeptides, and methods of making and using these polynucleotides and polypeptides. In one aspect, the invention is directed to polypeptides cellulase activity, e.g., endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, mannanase and/or .beta.-glucosidase activity, including thermostable and thermotolerant activity, and polynucleotides encoding these enzymes, and making and using these polynucleotides and polypeptides. The polypeptides of the invention can be used in a variety of pharmaceutical, agricultural, food and feed processing and industrial contexts.

  11. Cellulolytic enzymes, nucleic acids encoding them and methods for making and using them

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Kevin A. (San Diego, CA); Zhao, Lishan (Emeryville, CA); Cayouette, Michelle H. (San Diego, CA)

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides polypeptides having any cellulolytic activity, e.g., a cellulase activity, a endoglucanase, a cellobiohydrolase, a beta-glucosidase, a xylanase, a mannanse, a .beta.-xylosidase, an arabinofuranosidase, and/or an oligomerase activity, polynucleotides encoding these polypeptides, and methods of making and using these polynucleotides and polypeptides. In one aspect, the invention is directed to polypeptides having any cellulolytic activity, e.g., a cellulase activity, e.g., endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, beta-glucosidase, xylanase, mannanse, .beta.-xylosidase, arabinofuranosidase, and/or oligomerase activity, including thermostable and thermotolerant activity, and polynucleotides encoding these enzymes, and making and using these polynucleotides and polypeptides. In one aspect, the invention provides polypeptides having an oligomerase activity, e.g., enzymes that convert recalcitrant soluble oligomers to fermentable sugars in the saccharification of biomass. The polypeptides of the invention can be used in a variety of pharmaceutical, agricultural, food and feed processing and industrial contexts. The invention also provides compositions or products of manufacture comprising mixtures of enzymes comprising at least one enzyme of this invention.

  12. Identification and analysis of hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase inhibitors using nucleic acid binding assays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukherjee, Sourav; Hanson, Alica M.; Shadrick, William R.; Ndjomou, Jean; Sweeney, Noreena L.; Hernadez, John J.; Bartczak, Diana; Li, Kelin; Frankowski, Kevin J.; Heck, Julie A.; Arnold, Leggy A.; Schoenen, Frank; Frick, David N,

    2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Typical assays used to discover and analyze small molecules that inhibit the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 helicase yield few hits and are often confounded by compound interference. Oligonucleotide binding assays are examined ...

  13. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldo, Geoffrey S; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Production of extracellular nucleic acids by genetically altered bacteria in aquatic-environment microcosms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, J.H.; David, A.W.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factors which affect the production of extracellular DNA by genetically altered strains of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas cepacia, and Bradyrhizobium japonicum in aquatic environments were investigated. The presence or absence of the ambient microbial community had little effect on the production of extracellular DNA. Results indicate the extracellular-DNA production by genetically altered bacteria released into aquatic environments is more strongly influenced by physiochemical factors than biotic factors; extracellular-DNA production rates are usually greater for organisms released in freshwater than marine environments; and ambient microbial populations can readily utilize materials released by these organisms.

  15. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldo, Geoffrey S. (Santa Fe, NM); Cabantous, Stephanie (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Response of DNA repair and replication systems to exocyclic nucleic acid base damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?r?v?stava, Nidhi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Genomes experience an often hostile environment that creates a vast array of damages that can give rise to myriad biological outcomes. Fortunately, cells are equipped with networks such as direct reversal, base excision ...

  17. Progress Report No. AT(11-1)-3083-6 RE: Nucleic Acids and Protein...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chiu, N., Chiu, A. & Suyama, Y. (1974). J. Mol. Biol. (In the ress). 4. Elder, K.T. & Smith, A.E. (1973). Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A . 70, .. 1 2823-2826. ' 5. Gillespie, D. &...

  18. BGL7 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel (Los Gatos, CA); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA)

    2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides BGL7 polypeptides with the biological activity of a .beta.-glucosidase and a method of producing a recombinant enzyme having .beta.-glucosidase activity.

  19. Xylanases, nucleic acids encoding them and methods for making and using them

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Kevin A; Dirmeier, Reinhard

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to enzymes having xylanase, mannanase and/or glucanase activity, e.g., catalyzing hydrolysis of internal .beta.-1,4-xylosidic linkages or endo-.beta.-1,4-glucanase linkages; and/or degrading a linear polysaccharide beta-1,4-xylan into xylose. Thus, the invention provides methods and processes for breaking down hemicellulose, which is a major component of the cell wall of plants, including methods and processes for hydrolyzing hemicelluloses in any plant or wood or wood product, wood waste, paper pulp, paper product or paper waste or byproduct. In addition, methods of designing new xylanases, mannanases and/or glucanases and methods of use thereof are also provided. The xylanases, mannanases and/or glucanases have increased activity and stability at increased pH and temperature.

  20. Reducible Poly(amido ethylenimine)s for Nucleic Acid Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Lane

    2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    is reduced 1 2 4 8 16 32 64 -50 -25 0 25 50 EDA/CBA DETA/CBA TETA/CBA n = 5 ? SEM w/DTT w/w Z e t a P o t e n t i a l ( m V ) Bioconjugate Chemistry (2006) 17; 1233-1240. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14... in fluorescence #1; Due to reducible disulfide bonds? 12 0 50 250 500 1.0?10 07 1.0?10 08 1.0?10 09 1.0?10 10 SS-PAED bPEI mM BSO R L U / m g P r o t e i n Effect on the Presence of GSH Inhibitor DL -Buthionine Sulfoxamine (BSO) ? BSO decreases intracellular GSH...

  1. Method for the detection of specific nucleic acid sequences by polymerase nucleotide incorporation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Castro, Alonso

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for rapid and efficient detection of a target DNA or RNA sequence is provided. A primer having a 3'-hydroxyl group at one end and having a sequence of nucleotides sufficiently homologous with an identifying sequence of nucleotides in the target DNA is selected. The primer is hybridized to the identifying sequence of nucleotides on the DNA or RNA sequence and a reporter molecule is synthesized on the target sequence by progressively binding complementary nucleotides to the primer, where the complementary nucleotides include nucleotides labeled with a fluorophore. Fluorescence emitted by fluorophores on single reporter molecules is detected to identify the target DNA or RNA sequence.

  2. Structure-based model for light-harvesting properties of nucleic acid nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Keyao

    Programmed self-assembly of DNA enables the rational design of megadalton-scale macromolecular assemblies with sub-nanometer scale precision. These assemblies can be programmed to serve as structural scaffolds for secondary ...

  3. MOLPROBITY: structure validation and all-atom contact analysis for nucleic acids and their complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    is the addition and full optimization of all hydrogen atoms, bothpolar and nonpolar.The results are reported. The all-atom contact analysis (7) featured on the MOLPROBITY site provides a simple but powerful system uses the information from both hydro- gen bonding and all-atom steric compatibility to fully

  4. An unprecedented nucleic acid capture mechanism for excision of DNA damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinson, Emily H.; Prakasha Gowda, A.S.; Spratt, Thomas E.; Gold, Barry; Eichmanbrand, Brandt F. (Pitt); (Vanderbilt); (Penn)

    2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    DNA glycosylases that remove alkylated and deaminated purine nucleobases are essential DNA repair enzymes that protect the genome, and at the same time confound cancer alkylation therapy, by excising cytotoxic N3-methyladenine bases formed by DNA-targeting anticancer compounds. The basis for glycosylase specificity towards N3- and N7-alkylpurines is believed to result from intrinsic instability of the modified bases and not from direct enzyme functional group chemistry. Here we present crystal structures of the recently discovered Bacillus cereus AlkD glycosylase in complex with DNAs containing alkylated, mismatched and abasic nucleotides. Unlike other glycosylases, AlkD captures the extrahelical lesion in a solvent-exposed orientation, providing an illustration for how hydrolysis of N3- and N7-alkylated bases may be facilitated by increased lifetime out of the DNA helix. The structures and supporting biochemical analysis of base flipping and catalysis reveal how the HEAT repeats of AlkD distort the DNA backbone to detect non-Watson-Crick base pairs without duplex intercalation.

  5. Thermo-Biolithography: A Technique for Patterning Nucleic Acids and Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    fluorescent protein (using tyrosinase-initiated conjugation). Because gelatin can be applied and removed under

  6. STRUCTURAL EFFECTS ON THE CIRCULAR DICHROISM OF ETHIDIUM-NUCLEIC ACID COMPLEXES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahl, Kenneth Steven

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    trup et al. (1978) examined dye binding with pdC- dG-dC-dG (2 dC-dG sites), pdC-dC-dG-dG (l dC-dG site), pdG-dG-dC-dC,1 dC-dG Site). For dye plus pdC-dG-dC-dG, both dC-dG sites

  7. Simultaneous purification and fractionation of nucleic acids and proteins from complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santiago, Juan G.

    . Santiago1 * 1 Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2 Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford, Sterling Heights, MI). We captured images using a 1300 × 1030, 12-bit, interline CCD camera (MicroMAX-1300Y

  8. Disposable and removable nucleic acid extraction and purification cartridges for automated flow-through systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Regan, John Frederick

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Removable cartridges are used on automated flow-through systems for the purpose of extracting and purifying genetic material from complex matrices. Different types of cartridges are paired with specific automated protocols to concentrate, extract, and purifying pathogenic or human genetic material. Their flow-through nature allows large quantities sample to be processed. Matrices may be filtered using size exclusion and/or affinity filters to concentrate the pathogen of interest. Lysed material is ultimately passed through a filter to remove the insoluble material before the soluble genetic material is delivered past a silica-like membrane that binds the genetic material, where it is washed, dried, and eluted. Cartridges are inserted into the housing areas of flow-through automated instruments, which are equipped with sensors to ensure proper placement and usage of the cartridges. Properly inserted cartridges create fluid- and air-tight seals with the flow lines of an automated instrument.

  9. Three- and four-body nonadditivities in nucleic acid tetramers: a CCSD(T) study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitonak, Michal; Neogrady, Pavel; Hobza, Pavel

    2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Three- and four-body nonadditivities in the uracil tetramer (in DNA-like geometry) and the GC step (in crystal geometry) were investigated at various levels of the wave-function theory: HF, MP2, MP3, L-CCD, CCSD and CCSD(T). All of the calculations were performed using the 6-31G**(0.25,0.15) basis set, whereas the HF, MP2 and the MP3 nonadditivities were, for the sake of comparison, also determined with the much larger aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. The HF and MP2 levels do not provide reliable values for many-body terms, making it necessary to go beyond the MP2 level. The benchmark CCSD(T) three- and four-body nonadditivities are reasonably well reproduced at the MP3 level, and almost quantitative agreement is obtained (fortuitously) either on the L-CCD level or as an average of the MP3 and the CCSD results. Reliable values of many-body terms (especially their higher-order correlation contributions) are obtained already when the rather small 6-31G**(0.25,0.15) basis set is used. The four-body term is much smaller when compared to the three-body terms, but it is definitely not negligible, e.g. in the case of the GC step it represents about 16% of all of the three- and four-body terms. While investigating the geometry dependence of many-body terms for the GG step at the MP3/6-31G**(0.25,0.15) level, we found that it is necessary to include at least three-body terms in the determination of optimal geometry parameters.

  10. Multiscale structures of lipids in foods & Fatty acid metabolism Revised version submitted to Progress in Lipid Research March 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -Ferrand, France; * RMT LISTRAL: Mixed Technological Network combining academic and industrial partners, devoted On a nutritional standpoint, lipids are now being studied beyond their energy content and fatty acid (FA) profiles in native and formulated food products and (iv) the food matrix. Further work should be accomplished now

  11. Use of plant fatty acyl hydroxylases to produce hydroxylated fatty acids and derivatives in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Lexington, KY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to the identification of nucleic acid sequences and constructs, and methods related thereto, and the use of these sequences and constructs to produce genetically modified plants for the purpose of altering the composition of plant oils, waxes and related compounds.

  12. Use of plant fatty acyl hydroxylases to produce hydroxylated fatty acids and derivatives in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Lexington, KY)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to the identification of nucleic acid sequences and constructs, and methods related thereto, and the use of these sequences and constructs to produce genetically modified plants for the purpose of altering the composition of plant oils, waxes and related compounds.

  13. Use of plant fatty acyl hydroxylases to produce hydroxylated fatty acids and derivatives in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Lexington, KY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to the identification of nucleic acid sequences and constructs, and methods related thereto, and the use of these sequences and constructs to produce genetically modified plants for the purpose of altering the composition of plant oils, waxes and related compounds.

  14. acid docosahexaenoic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 38 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  15. acid aspartic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 20 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  16. acid caffeic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 11 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  17. acid propionic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 19 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  18. acid sorbic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 9 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  19. acid benzoic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 24 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  20. acid propanoic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 9 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  1. acid methoxyacetic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  2. acid eicosapentaenoic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 18 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  3. acids eicosapentaenoic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 18 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  4. acid acetylsalicylic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 10 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  5. acid dichloroacetic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  6. acid oleic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 31 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  7. Site specific incorporation of heavy atom-containing unnatural amino acids into proteins for structure determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xie, Jianming (San Diego, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA); Wu, Ning (Boston, MA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Translation systems and other compositions including orthogonal aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases that preferentially charge an orthogonal tRNA with an iodinated or brominated amino acid are provided. Nucleic acids encoding such synthetases are also described, as are methods and kits for producing proteins including heavy atom-containing amino acids, e.g., brominated or iodinated amino acids. Methods of determining the structure of a protein, e.g., a protein into which a heavy atom has been site-specifically incorporated through use of an orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA-synthetase pair, are also described.

  8. Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliabilityPrincipal Investigators PostdoctoralResearch

  9. Research passes media's acid Research passes media's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    and discussion boards--all have touted his work combining RFID and sensor technologies to create a less't discriminate: Men, women and children suffer. More than 4.5 million U.S. doctor visits each year are GERD." ­ WBAP radio "The RFID-enabled sensor can be inserted into the esophagus and attached to the esophagus

  10. Methods and compounds for chemical ligation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, George M.; Sismour, A. Michael

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and methods for chemical ligation are provided. Methods for nucleic acid sequencing, nucleic acid assembly and nucleic acid synthesis are also provided.

  11. HexServer: an FFT-based protein docking server powered by graphics processors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MACINDOE, G.; MAVRIDIS, L.; VENKATRAMAN, V.; DEVIGNES, M.; RITCHIE, D.W.; Nucleic Acids Research Oxford University Press [More Details

    MACINDOE,G. MAVRIDIS,L. VENKATRAMAN,V. DEVIGNES,M. RITCHIE,D.W. Nucleic Acids Research Oxford University Press

  12. Strategies for enhancing the effectiveness of metagenomic-based enzyme discovery in lignocellulytic microbial communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeAngelis, K.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for genome annotation: PRIAM. Nucleic Acids Research 31:November 2008 release of PRIAM [12], modified for nucleotide232,025) at EPRIAM enzyme-specific sequence profiles

  13. Using IMG: Comparative Analysis with the Integrated Microbial Genomes System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for genome annotation: PRIAM. Nucleic Acids Research 31 (RPS-BLAST against the PRIAM database (12), as a complementBLAST computations. Computation COG PRIAM Tool Low- Maximum

  14. acid soil tolerance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Websites Summary: 1980; however, soils collected during the earlier phases of acid rain research have led to a growing Indications of Soil Recovery from Acidic...

  15. Quantifying foliar responses of white ash to ozone and simulated acid precipitation: An assessment proposal for forest exposure studies. Forest Service research paper. (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dochinger, L.S.; Jensen, K.F.

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seedlings populations represent an important linkage for assessing the effect of air pollution on forests. The study examines the foliar responses of white ash seedlings to ozone and acid precipitation as a means of identifying atmospheric deposition effects on forests.

  16. acidization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  17. acids: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  18. Experimental Study of Acid Fracture Conductivity of Austin Chalk Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nino Penaloza, Andrea

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to those in actual acid fracture treatments. After acid etching, fracture conductivity is measured at different closure stresses. This research work presents a systematic study to investigate the effect of temperature, rock-acid contact time and initial...

  19. Thermodynamics and Enzymatic Polymerization of Artificial Metallo-Nucleic Acids AND Investigation of Duplex Formation between GAN and RNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Eun Kyong

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cells on a Varian Cary 500 UV-Vis spectrophotometer equipped with a Peltiercell on a Varian Cary 500 UV-Vis spectrophotometer equipped with a Peltier

  20. Electrical Detection of Nucleic Acid Amplification Using an On-Chip Quasi-Reference Electrode and a PVC REFET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, Rashid

    and a PVC REFET Eric Salm,, Yu Zhong,,§ Bobby Reddy, Jr.,,§ Carlos Duarte-Guevara,,§ Vikhram Swaminathan that utilizes a platinum QRE to establish a pH-sensitive fluid gate potential and a PVC membrane REFET to enable

  1. Calibration and Testing of a Water Model for Simulation of the Molecular Dynamics of Proteins and Nucleic Acids in Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levitt, Michael

    Calibration and Testing of a Water Model for Simulation of the Molecular Dynamics of Proteins important in biological macromolecules, where fewer experimental results are available for calibration. Our

  2. Electronic structure and spectroscopy of nucleic acid bases: Ionization energies, ionization-induced structural changes, and photoelectron spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kostko, Oleg; Dolgikh, Stanislav; Landau, Arie; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We report high-level ab initio calculations and single-photon ionization mass spectrometry study of ionization of adenine (A), thymine (T), cytosine (C) and guanine (G). For thymine and adenine, only the lowest-energy tautomers were considered, whereas for cytosine and guanine we characterized five lowest-energy tautomeric forms. The first adiabatic and several vertical ionization energies were computed using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method for ionization potentials with single and double substitutions. Equilibrium structures of the cationic ground states were characterized by DFT with the {omega}B97X-D functional. The ionization-induced geometry changes of the bases are consistent with the shapes of the corresponding molecular orbitals. For the lowest-energy tautomers, the magnitude of the structural relaxation decreases in the following series G > C > A > T, the respective relaxation energies being 0.41, 0.32, 0.25 and 0.20 eV. The computed adiabatic ionization energies (8.13, 8.89, 8.51-8.67 and 7.75-7.87 eV for A,T,C and G, respectively) agree well with the onsets of the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves (8.20 {+-} 0.05, 8.95 {+-} 0.05, 8.60 {+-} 0.05 and 7.75 {+-} 0.05 eV). Vibrational progressions for the S{sub 0}-D{sub 0} vibronic bands computed within double-harmonic approximation with Duschinsky rotations are compared with previously reported experimental photoelectron spectra.

  3. Discrimination of Alternative Spliced Isoforms by Real-Time PCR Using Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) Substituted Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Guoqiang

    Determination of quantitative expression levels of alternatively spliced isoforms provides an important approach to the understanding of the functional significance of each isoform. Real-time PCR using exon junction ...

  4. Array of nucleic acid probes on biological chips for diagnosis of HIV and methods of using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chee, Mark (Palo Alto, CA); Gingeras, Thomas R. (Santa Clara, CA); Fodor, Stephen P. A. (Palo Alto, CA); Hubble, Earl A. (Mountain View, CA); Morris, MacDonald S. (San Jose, CA)

    1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides an array of oligonucleotide probes immobilized on a solid support for analysis of a target sequence from a human immunodeficiency virus. The array comprises at least four sets of oligonucleotide probes 9 to 21 nucleotides in length. A first probe set has a probe corresponding to each nucleotide in a reference sequence from a human immunodeficiency virus. A probe is related to its corresponding nucleotide by being exactly complementary to a subsequence of the reference sequence that includes the corresponding nucleotide. Thus, each probe has a position, designated an interrogation position, that is occupied by a complementary nucleotide to the corresponding nucleotide. The three additional probe sets each have a corresponding probe for each probe in the first probe set. Thus, for each nucleotide in the reference sequence, there are four corresponding probes, one from each of the probe sets. The three corresponding probes in the three additional probe sets are identical to the corresponding probe from the first probe or a subsequence thereof that includes the interrogation position, except that the interrogation position is occupied by a different nucleotide in each of the four corresponding probes.

  5. Activation of nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like receptors requires cleavage by endolysosomal proteases: a mechanism to avoid autoimmunity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewald, Sarah Elisabeth

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    receptor DC: dendritic cell pDC: plasmacytoid dendritic celltaken up by plasmacytoid DCs (pDC) and elicit large amountsare also components of the pDC-MyD88 signaling complex (

  6. acid-dependent ribonucleic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 40 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  7. acid n-glycolylneuraminic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  8. Cost Effective Bioethanol via Acid Pretreatment of Corn Stover, Saccharification, and Conversion via a Novel Fermentation Organism: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-12-485

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowe, N.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research program will convert acid pretreated corn stover to sugars at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and then transfer these sugars to Honda R&D and its partner the Green Earth Institute (GEI) for conversion to ethanol via a novel fermentation organism. In phase one, NREL will adapt its pretreatment and saccharification process to the unique attributes of this organism, and Honda R&D/GEI will increase the sugar conversion rate as well as the yield and titer of the resulting ethanol. In later phases, NREL, Honda R&D, and GEI will work together at NREL to optimize and scale-up to pilot-scale the Honda R&D/GEI bioethanol production process. The final stage will be to undertake a pilot-scale test at NREL of the optimized bioethanol conversion process.

  9. Research Activities of Prof. Albert Yee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    ;·Nanostructures and devices from polymers ·Nanocomposites and nanomechanics ·Cell interaction with nanotextured -terthiophene acetic acid. Research Highlight 2: Nanostructured Organic or Hybrid Solar Cells #12;Research

  10. Investigating acid rain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A report is given of an address by Kathleen Bennett, Assistant Administrator of Air, Noise and Radiation, Environmental Protection Agency which was presented to the US Senate Committee on the Environment and Public Works. Bennet explained that in view of the many unknowns about acid rain, and the possible substantial cost burden of additional controls, EPA is proceeding with its program to investigate this environmental malady over a 10-year period. The three major areas of the research program are (1) transport, transformation, and deposition processes, (2) effects of acid deposition, and (3) assessments and policy studies. Other issues discussed were global transboundary air pollution and Senate amendments addressing long-range transport. (JMT)

  11. acid mononucleotide adenylyltransferase: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 14 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  12. aminoadipic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  13. aminocaproic acid eaca: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  14. acid hydrazone dpktch: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 11 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  15. acids povedenie monatsita: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  16. aminolevulinic acid dehydratase: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 18 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  17. aminobutyric acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 36 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  18. acid permease aap6: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 14 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  19. asparagic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 8 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  20. acroleic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  1. alkenoic acids: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  2. acidic meglcua xylotetrasaccharide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  3. acid dicamba dicloran: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 10 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  4. aminolevulinic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 12 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  5. acid riboside salvage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 30 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  6. acid sulfites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 18 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  7. acid hydroperoxide lyase1: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 25 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  8. anf 4-hydroxyhomocitric acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 15 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  9. acid dioxygenase hpd: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 37 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  10. acid ascorbyl palmitate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 27 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  11. amoxicillin clavulanic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 13 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  12. acid dehydratase alad: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 15 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  13. acetoacetic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 8 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  14. acetylsalicylic acid aspirin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 29 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  15. acid vliyanie sernoj: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  16. azo barbituric acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 35 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  17. acephate cacodylic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 9 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  18. acid lna taqman: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 46 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  19. amygdalic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 8 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  20. acid phytases paphy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 18 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  1. arachidic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 30 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  2. acid phenylmethyl eater: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 14 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  3. acid phosphoribosyltransferase 1-deficient: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 19 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  4. acid desaturases fad2: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 35 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  5. adipic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 11 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  6. acid dmsa renography: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 8 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  7. anthranilic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 10 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  8. acid hiryusan hasseigata: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  9. ameliorates subsoil acidity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 32 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  10. aminocaproic acids: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  11. aldehydo acids: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  12. arundic acid ono-2506: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  13. acid glycosaminoglycan mucopolysaccharide: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 34 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  14. acidic oligosaccharides paos: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 40 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  15. acid anhydrases: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 42 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  16. aminobutyric acids: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 36 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  17. asparaginic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 17 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  18. alginic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 33 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  19. alkanoic acids: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 15 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  20. arsonic acids: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 10 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  1. aminosalicylic acids: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 9 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  2. aminobenzoic acids: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 12 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  3. aminosuccinic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  4. anthraquinonic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 12 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  5. aristolochic acid nephropathy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 28 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  6. aminoethanesulfonic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  7. aspirin acetylsalicylic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 29 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  8. adenylic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 27 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  9. acetylsalicylic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 11 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  10. acid decarboxylase hgad65: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 32 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  11. aminoacetic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  12. alkylphosphoric acid dehpa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 8 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  13. Acid rain information book. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acid rain is one of the most widely publicized environmental issues of the day. The potential consequences of increasingly widespread acid rain demand that this phenomenon be carefully evaluated. Reveiw of the literature shows a rapidly growing body of knowledge, but also reveals major gaps in understanding that need to be narrowed. This document discusses major aspects of the acid rain phenomenon, points out areas of uncertainty, and summarizes current and projected research by responsible government agencies and other concerned organizations.

  14. Prolactin messenger ribonucleic acid concentrations throughout the ovine estrous cycle: Assessment relative to prolactin serum and pituitary amounts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landefeld, T.; Roulia, V.; Bagnell, T.; Ballard, T.; Levitan, I. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prolactin (PRL) mRNA concentrations were assessed by nucleic acid hybridization assays in pituitaries of ewes representing the defined stages of the ovine estrous cycle. Concomitantly, pituitary and serum PRL concentrations were measured in these ewes using radioimmunoassays. It was observed that PRL serum, pituitary and mRNA concentrations tended to increase near the time of the gonadotropin preovulatory surge, particularly between 24 hrs before behavioral estrus to 5 hours after estrus. However, the changes in PRL mRNA, serum and pituitary concentrations were shown not to be statistically significant. These data suggest that PRL production during the sheep estrous cycle is maintained without dramatic changes in synthesis or secretion.

  15. Acid deposition in Maryland: Summary of results through 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMuro, J.; Bowman, M.; Maxwell, C.; Asante-Duah, D.; Meyers, S.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chesapeake Bay Research and Monitoring Program coordinates Maryland's acid deposition research and reports research results annually. The report evaluates several major topic areas including transport and chemistry of acid deposition, its potential impacts on the State's streams and fish, possible impacts on terrestrial resources such as crops and forests and on materials, the ability of energy conservation programs to reduce emissions of acid-forming pollutants, and mitigation techniques for neutralizing acid waters.

  16. Astrobiology Biogeocatalysis Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    H 1 pH 2 pH 3 pH 4 pH 5 pH 6 pH 7 pH 8 pH 9 pH 10 pH 11 pH 12 pH 13 pH 14 battery acid black coffee to resemble conditions of early Earth.Yellowstone's abundant and unique thermal features give researchers; Emerald Spring, Norris Battery acid, stomach acid, black coffee, orange juice, citrus fruit, soda 2. Give

  17. The organization of RNA contacts by PTB for regulation of FAS splicing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mickleburgh, Ian; Kafasla, Panagiota; Cherny, Dmitry; Llorian, Miriam; Curry, Stephen; Jackson, Richard J.; Smith, W.J.

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    address: Panagiota Kafasla, Institute of Immunology, BSRC “Alexander FLEMING”, Vari 16672, Greece. C© The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms...

  18. A New Heat Shock Protein That Binds Nucleic Acids* (Received for publication, August 20, 1998, and in revised form, September 28, 1998)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardwell, James

    production of a number of proteins termed heat shock proteins (Hsps).1 Although heat shock pro- teins were Hsp15-P2 (5 - TCTTGCAGGATCCAGTTATTCACT-3 ), and Taq polymerase (Strat- agene). The PCR product g, 4 °C). All further steps were performed at 4 °C. The cell pellet was resuspended in cold buffer

  19. 2013 METALS IN BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JANUARY 20-25, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenzweig, Amy

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Typical topics for lectures and posters include: biochemical and biophysical characterization of new metal containing proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, factors, and chelators from all forms of life; synthesis, detailed characterization, and reaction chemistry of biomimetic compounds; novel crystal and solution structures of biological molecules and synthetic metal-chelates; discussions of the roles that metals play in medicine, maintenance of the environment, and biogeochemical processes; metal homeostasis; application of theory and computations to the structure and mechanism of metal-containing biological systems; and novel applications of spectroscopy to metals in biological systems.

  20. RESEARCH REPORT 2012 ResearchResearchResearch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    research on batteries and energy storage, and are part of a multimillion- dollar investment by Johnson Controls that aims to make Wisconsin a hub for energy-storage technology. #12;Chancellor's Welcome A great powerful UW-MILWAUKEE RESEARCH REPORT 2012 As Wisconsin's premier public urban institution, the University

  1. RegPredict: an integrated system for regulon inference in prokaryotes by comparative genomics approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novichkov, Pavel S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    motifs by comparative genomics. Nucleic Acids Res. , 28,M.S. (2009) Comparative genomics of regulation of fatty acidcomparative and functional genomics. Nucleic Acids Res. ,

  2. Production of Succinic Acid for Lignocellulosic Hydrolysates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davison, B.H.; Nghiem, J.

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is to add and test new metabolic activities to existing microbial catalysts for the production of succinic acid from renewables. In particular, they seek to add to the existing organism the ability to utilize xylose efficiently and simultaneously with glucose in mixtures of sugars or to add succinic acid production to another strain and to test the value of this new capability for production of succinic acid from industrial lignocellulosic hydrolyasates. The Contractors and Participant are hereinafter jointly referred to as the 'Parties'. Research to date in succinic acid fermentation, separation and genetic engineering has resulted in a potentially economical process based on the use of an Escherichia coli strain AFP111 with suitable characteristics for the production of succinic acid from glucose. Economic analysis has shown that higher value commodity chemicals can be economically produced from succinic acid based on repliminary laboratory findings and predicted catalytic parameters. The initial target markets include succinic acid itself, succinate salts, esters and other derivatives for use as deicers, solvents and acidulants. The other commodity products from the succinic acid platform include 1,4-butanediol, {gamma}-butyrolactone, 2-pyrrolidinone and N-methyl pyrrolidinone. Current economic analyses indicate that this platform is competitive with existing petrochemical routes, especially for the succinic acid and derivatives. The report presents the planned CRADA objectives followed by the results. The results section has a combined biocatalysis and fermentation section and a commercialization section. This is a nonproprietary report; additional proprietary information may be made available subject to acceptance of the appropriate proprietary information agreements.

  3. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  4. Effect of droplet size on the behavior and characteristics of emulsified acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almutairi, Saleh Haif

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Emulsified acids have been extensively used in the oil industry since 1933. Most of the available research and publications discussed mainly the application of emulsified acid in the field. A fair number of the published work also discussed in depth...

  5. acids syn anti-1-amino-3-2-iodoethenyl-cyclobutane-1-carboxylic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 43 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  6. ariab acidic min-influenced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  7. acidic pathogenesis-related pr-1: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 23 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  8. acid nda 22-562: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 17 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  9. acid desaturase sfat-1-transgenic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 34 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  10. acid 3-np-induced neurotoxicity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 30 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  11. air-spun polyl-lactic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  12. alkylphosphonic acid ehehpa-pc: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 8 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  13. acid ehehpa-pc 88a: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 12 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  14. acid o-methyltransferase activity1: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 39 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  15. alpha-oxo acid decarboxylase: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 32 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  16. anti-psoriatic fumaric acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 15 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  17. alpha2-6-linked sialic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 33 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  18. anti-proliferative acidic meglcua: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 12 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  19. anorogenic acid volcano-plutonic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 8 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  20. abscisic acid receptor1oa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 44 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

  1. An investigation of the effectiveness of anhydrous mud acid to remove damage in sandstone formations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Dalan David

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this experimental research was to determine the reactivity of anhydrous mud acid with clay minerals present in sandstone formations and its ability to remove damage in sandstone acidizing. Berea core flood experiments were conducted...

  2. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  3. Reactive Distillation for Esterification of Bio-based Organic Acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, Nathan; Miller, Dennis J.; Asthana, Navinchandra S.; Kolah, Aspi K.; Vu, Dung; Lira, Carl T.

    2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The following is the final report of the three year research program to convert organic acids to their ethyl esters using reactive distillation. This report details the complete technical activities of research completed at Michigan State University for the period of October 1, 2003 to September 30, 2006, covering both reactive distillation research and development and the underlying thermodynamic and kinetic data required for successful and rigorous design of reactive distillation esterification processes. Specifically, this project has led to the development of economical, technically viable processes for ethyl lactate, triethyl citrate and diethyl succinate production, and on a larger scale has added to the overall body of knowledge on applying fermentation based organic acids as platform chemicals in the emerging biorefinery. Organic acid esters constitute an attractive class of biorenewable chemicals that are made from corn or other renewable biomass carbohydrate feedstocks and replace analogous petroleum-based compounds, thus lessening U.S. dependence on foreign petroleum and enhancing overall biorefinery viability through production of value-added chemicals in parallel with biofuels production. Further, many of these ester products are candidates for fuel (particularly biodiesel) components, and thus will serve dual roles as both industrial chemicals and fuel enhancers in the emerging bioeconomy. The technical report from MSU is organized around the ethyl esters of four important biorenewables-based acids: lactic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, and propionic acid. Literature background on esterification and reactive distillation has been provided in Section One. Work on lactic acid is covered in Sections Two through Five, citric acid esterification in Sections Six and Seven, succinic acid in Section Eight, and propionic acid in Section Nine. Section Ten covers modeling of ester and organic acid vapor pressure properties using the SPEAD (Step Potential Equilibrium and Dynamics) method.

  4. EMSL - Nuclei acid structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet...

  5. Nuclei acid structure | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet...

  6. Recovery of organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verser, Dan W. (Menlo Park, CA); Eggeman, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  7. Recovery of organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verser, Dan W. (Golden, CO); Eggeman, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  8. Reversible Acid Gas Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dave Heldebrant

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist David Heldebrant demonstrates how a new process called reversible acid gas capture works to pull carbon dioxide out of power plant emissions.

  9. Emerging catalytic processes for the production of adipic acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van de Vyver, Stijn

    Research efforts to find more sustainable pathways for the synthesis of adipic acid have led to the introduction of new catalytic processes for producing this commodity chemical from alternative resources. With a focus on ...

  10. Acid Fracture and Fracture Conductivity Study of Field Rock Samples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underwood, Jarrod

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    carbonate reservoir were labeled A through F to protect proprietary information included in this research. A 2% potassium chloride solution was used for the acid system and fracture conductivity measurements to prevent clay swelling. Injection temperature...

  11. Controlling acid rain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, James A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn the northeastern USA are caused by the large scale combustion of fossil fuels within this region. Average precipitation acidity is pH 4.2, but spatial and temporal ...

  12. The cationic amino acid transporter 2 is induced in inflammatory lung models and regulates lung fibrosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niese, Kathryn A; Chiaramonte, Monica G; Ellies, Lesley G; Rothenberg, Marc E; Zimmermann, Nives

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    acid transporter 2 is induced in inflammatory lung modelsand regulates lung fibrosis Respiratory Research 2010, 11:872 is induced in inflammatory lung models and regulates lung

  13. ATMOSPHERIC ~ ~ RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moelders, Nicole

    . 1. Introduction Air pollution and acid rain have become the subject of (not only) scientific within the troposphere and the transport of pollutants as well as acid rain even in rural regions

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program: Annual report to the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project program summaries are presented for: effect of bacterial spore protein on mutagenesis; cellular toxicity of coaine and cocaethylene; calcinfication in marine alga (global carbon cycling); advanced permanent magnet materials; a high flux neutron source; genetics of drug addiction; microdialysis; analysis of powder diffraction data; accelerator technology; nucleic acids and proteins and their interactions, by small-angle XRD; enhancement of microplanar beam radiation therapy of gliosarcoma; relaxographic and functional MRI; low-temperature infrared laser absorption spectroscopy; photodesorption of H{sub 2}; helical magnet for RHIC; novel microporous solids; chemistry and physics of stratospheric aerosols (ozone depletion); rf source for linear colliders; resonance Raman detection of VOCs; synthesis of plant fatty acids with unusual double bond positions; outer surface proteins of the Lyme disease spirochete; multiwire proportional chambers for collider muons; self-organized criticality; PCR-SSCP detection of genetic changes at single cell level; proton facility for cancer therapy; and visible free-electron laser experiment.

  15. IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; William A. Goddard; Yongchun Tang

    2004-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In the first year of this project, we have established our experimental and theoretical methodologies for studies of the catalytic decarboxylation process. We have developed both glass and stainless steel micro batch type reactors for the fast screening of various catalysts with reaction substrates of model carboxylic acid compounds and crude oil samples. We also developed novel product analysis methods such as GC analyses for organic acids and gaseous products; and TAN measurements for crude oil. Our research revealed the effectiveness of several solid catalysts such as NA-Cat-1 and NA-Cat-2 for the catalytic decarboxylation of model compounds; and NA-Cat-5{approx}NA-Cat-9 for the acid removal from crude oil. Our theoretical calculations propose a three-step concerted oxidative decarboxylation mechanism for the NA-Cat-1 catalyst.

  16. Focus Sheet | Hydrofluoric Acid Health hazards of hydrofluoric acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    Focus Sheet | Hydrofluoric Acid Health hazards of hydrofluoric acid Hydrofluoric acid (HF characterized by weight loss, brittle bones, anemia, and general ill health. Safe use If possible, avoid working to exposures. #12;Focus Sheet | Hydrofluoric Acid Environmental Health and Safety Environmental Programs Office

  17. 'Wume '14 Number 13 1986 Nucleic Aclds Research Specific cleavage of lunetoplast minicircle DNA ft-om Leishmania tarentolae by mung bean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, Larry

    -om Leishmania tarentolae by mung bean nuclease and identification of several additional minicircle sequence££ were cleaved by mung bean nuclease in the presence of formamide, yielding unit length linear molecules was not a requirement for cleavage, as linearized network-derived or cloned minicircles were also cleaved by mung bean

  18. A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arceo, Elena; Ellman, Jonathan; Bergman, Robert

    2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An alternative biomass-based route to benzoic acid from the renewable starting materials quinic acid and shikimic acid is described. Benzoic acid is obtained selectively using a highly efficient, one-step formic acid-mediated deoxygenation method.

  19. Asphaltene damage in matrix acidizing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinojosa, Roberto Antonio

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REVIEW CONSTRUCTION OF APPARATUS . DESCRIPTION OF CORE SAMPLES DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTAL ACID TREATMENT . . . ACIDIZING RESULTS BRINE SATURATED CORE L1D ACIDIZING RESULTS BRINE/CRUDE OIL SATURATED CORE S2A . . . ACIDIZING RESULTS BRINE/KEROSENE OIL... experiment they used HCl saturated kerosene to test the same crude samples. Deposition occurred with the HCl saturated acid. The authors concluded, though deposition at an interface was preferential, sludge formation did not require an interface. Moore et...

  20. Optical high acidity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, B.S.; Nekimken, H.L.; Carey, W.P.; O`Rourke, P.E.

    1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber. 10 figs.

  1. Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

    2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a solvent selected from the group consisting of water, ethyl acetate, chloroform, acetone, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile, to form a quaternary ammonium salt of the lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate; and b) hydrolyzing the quaternary ammonium salt with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid.

  2. acid succinic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulated the laser heating of the succinic acid (this data is still simulation is that infrared heating generates about 10-15 more succinic acid molecules bound to the analyte...

  3. Recovery of Carboxylic Acids from Fermentation Broth via Acid Springing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Jipeng

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    RECOVERY OF CARBOXYLIC ACIDS FROM FERMENTATION BROTH VIA ACID SPRINGING A Thesis by JIPENG DONG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2008 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering RECOVERY OF CARBOXYLIC ACIDS FROM FERMENTATION BROTH VIA ACID SPRINGING A Thesis by JIPENG DONG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...

  4. Acid placement and coverage in the acid jetting process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhailov, Miroslav I.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many open-hole acid treatments are being conducted by pumping acid through jetting ports placed at the end of coiled tubing or drill pipe. The filter-cake on the bore-hole is broken by the jet; the acid-soluble material is dissolved, creating...

  5. Z .Brain Research 803 1998 4453 Research report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtman, Richard

    Z .Brain Research 803 1998 44­53 Research report Nerve growth factor stimulates diacylglycerol de the effects of NGF treatment on the w3 x Z . w3 x w3 xconversion of H oleic acid OA or H glycerol to H glycerolipids, and the turnover of these products in PC12 cells. In kinetic studies w3 x w3 x w3 xon H OA

  6. Method for isolating chromosomal DNA in preparation for hybridization in suspension

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucas, Joe N. (San Ramon, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. Chromosomal DNA in a sample containing cell debris is prepared for hybridization in suspension by treating the mixture with RNase. The treated DNA can also be fixed prior to hybridization.

  7. Lubrication with boric acid additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-lubricating resin compositions including a boric acid additive and a synthetic polymer including those thermoset materials.

  8. Pantothenic acid biosynthesis in zymomonas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Luan; Tomb, Jean-Francois; Viitanen, Paul V.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zymomonas is unable to synthesize pantothenic acid and requires this essential vitamin in growth medium. Zymomonas strains transformed with an operon for expression of 2-dehydropantoate reductase and aspartate 1-decarboxylase were able to grow in medium lacking pantothenic acid. These strains may be used for ethanol production without pantothenic acid supplementation in seed culture and fermentation media.

  9. GE, University of Washington Disease Detection | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    excited about this team's unique ability to combine new designs for paper-based microfluidics with new nucleic amplification methods and GE's novel paper chemistries to help...

  10. Research Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    entries in the natural numbers, into an undergraduate research project. ..... and developing the undergraduate research project described at the end of Section 2,

  11. Viral RNA testing and automation on the bead-based CBNE detection microsystem.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galambos, Paul C.; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Farrell, Cara M.; Rossito, Paul (University of California at Davis); McClain, Jaime L.; Derzon, Mark Steven; Cullor, James Sterling (University of California at Davis); Rahimian, Kamayar

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed prototype chemistry for nucleic acid hybridization on our bead-based diagnostics platform and we established an automatable bead handling protocol capable of 50 part-per-billion (ppb) sensitivity. We are working towards a platform capable of parallel, rapid (10 minute), raw sample testing for orthogonal (in this case nucleic acid and immunoassays) identification of biological (and other) threats in a single sensor microsystem. In this LDRD we developed the nucleic acid chemistry required for nucleic acid hybridization. Our goal is to place a non-cell associated RNA virus (Bovine Viral Diarrhea, BVD) on the beads for raw sample testing. This key pre-requisite to showing orthogonality (nucleic acid measurements can be performed in parallel with immunoassay measurements). Orthogonal detection dramatically reduces false positives. We chose BVD because our collaborators (UC-Davis) can supply samples from persistently infected animals; and because proof-of-concept field testing can be performed with modification of the current technology platform at the UC Davis research station. Since BVD is a cattle-prone disease this research dovetails with earlier immunoassay work on Botulinum toxin simulant testing in raw milk samples. Demonstration of BVD RNA detection expands the repertoire of biological macromolecules that can be adapted to our bead-based detection. The resources of this late start LDRD were adequate to partially demonstrate the conjugation of the beads to the nucleic acids. It was never expected to be adequate for a full live virus test but to motivate that additional investment. In addition, we were able to reduce the LOD (Limit of Detection) for the botulinum toxin stimulant to 50 ppb from the earlier LOD of 1 ppm. A low LOD combined with orthogonal detection provides both low false negatives and low false positives. The logical follow-on steps to this LDRD research are to perform live virus identification as well as concurrent nucleic acid and immunoassay detection.

  12. Fatty Acid Carcass Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turk, Stacey N.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    calves as yearlings optimizes beef fatty acid composition. M.S. thesis, College Station: Texas A&M University. Chung, K.Y., Lunt, D.K., Choi, C.B., Chae, S.H., Rhoades, R.D., Adams, T.H., Booren, B., & Smith, S.B. (2006). Lipid characteristics... of subcutaneous adipose tissue and M. longissiumus thoracis of Angus and Wagyu steers fed to U.S. and Japanese endpoints. Meat Science, 73(3), 432-441. Chung, K.Y., Lunt, D.K., Kawachi, H., Yano, H., & Smith, S.B. (2005). Stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase...

  13. acid acetic acid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of asphaltene deposition that occurs during acid treatments of oil reservoirs. Asphaltenes are present to some degree in most hydrocarbons. Due to the molecular weight of the...

  14. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for fast DNA analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C.H.; Ch`ang, L.Y.; Taranenko, N.I.; Allman, S.L.; Tang, K.; Matteson, K.J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past few years, major effort has been directed toward developing mass spectrometry to measure biopolymers because of the great potential benefit to biomedical research. Hellenkamp and his co-workers were the first to report that large polypeptide molecules can be ionized and detected without significant fragmentation when a greater number of nicotinic acid molecules are used as a matrix. This method is now well known as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Since then, various groups have reported measurements of very large proteins by MALDI. Reliable protein analysis by MALDI is more or less well established. However, the application of MALDI to nucleic acids analysis has been found to be much more difficult. Most research on the measurement of nucleic acid by MALDI were stimulated by the Human Genome Project. Up to now, the only method for reliable routine analysis of nucleic acid is gel electrophoresis. Different sizes of nucleic acids can be separated in gel medium when a high electric field is applied to the gel. However, the time needed to separate different sizes of DNA segments usually takes from several minutes to several hours. If MALDI can be successfully used for nucleic acids analysis, the analysis time can be reduced to less than I millisecond. In addition, no tagging with radioactive materials or chemical dyes is needed. In this work, we will review recent progress related to MALDI for DNA analysis.

  15. Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Joseph...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Joseph Mondloch Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Joseph Mondloch Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Joseph Mondloch poster presentation....

  16. Function and regulation of the Super Elongation Complexes in HIV-1 transcription

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Joanne H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydroxamic acid SEC Super Elongation Complex TAR Trans-and binding of HEXIM1 to TAR. Nucleic Acids Res 85. Shah M,TAR RNA: critical spacing between the bulge and loop recognition domains. Nucleic Acids

  17. Acidic gas capture by diamines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary (Austin, TX); Hilliard, Marcus (Missouri City, TX)

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and methods related to the removal of acidic gas. In particular, the present disclosure relates to a composition and method for the removal of acidic gas from a gas mixture using a solvent comprising a diamine (e.g., piperazine) and carbon dioxide. One example of a method may involve a method for removing acidic gas comprising contacting a gas mixture having an acidic gas with a solvent, wherein the solvent comprises piperazine in an amount of from about 4 to about 20 moles/kg of water, and carbon dioxide in an amount of from about 0.3 to about 0.9 moles per mole of piperazine.

  18. Theoretical Population Biology 54, 257 269 (1998) Acidic Deposition, Plant Pests, and the Fate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gatto, Marino

    with power plants, smelters or factories. More recent research developments have evidenced the existenceTheoretical Population Biology 54, 257 269 (1998) Acidic Deposition, Plant Pests, and the Fate the abundance of predators is not too small. Numerical simulation shows that increasing acidic load can lead

  19. Organic Phosphoric Acid of the Soil.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1911-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . ................................................ introduction 5 .............................. hmmonia-Soluble Phosphoric Acid 5 ................ Solubility of Phosphates in Ammonia 6 I Fixation of Phosphoric Acid from Ammonia .......... 7 Effect of Ratio of Soil to Solvent in Extraction of Phos- I I... .............. phoric Acid by Acid and Ammonia 7 I ........ Other Soil Constituents Dissolved by Ammonia 8 ................... Solution of Fixed Phosphoric Acid 10 ................ ormation of Ammonia-Solubla Phosphoric Acid 11 ....... hosphoric Acid Dissolved...

  20. MFR PAPER 1033 Research determin es fatty aCid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ~1 Preparation of Esters \\leth) I e\\ler lIere preparuJ u\\lng the mClhod :r, "ere \\cparated an d Idenlilied u\\lng , Zook E J Powell B Hackley J Emerson J Brooker. and G M Knobl

  1. acids research database: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sensitive data. The security of the data depends on physical security, OS security and DBMS security. Database security can be compromised by obtaining sensitive data, changing...

  2. acidic alpha-amino acids: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acid indicated that more succinic acid... Gilliland, Patti Lynn 2012-06-07 24 A ACID RAIN Audrey Gibson Geosciences Websites Summary: , oxygen, and oxidants to form...

  3. Microbiological Research ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Gerald K.

    ) or to expand on previous research addressing the fate of nitrogen from agrochemicals (Bichat et al., 1999

  4. Carbonic Acid Pretreatment of Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Peter van Walsum; Kemantha Jayawardhana; Damon Yourchisin; Robert McWilliams; Vanessa Castleberry

    2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. 1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO2/H2O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. 2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. 3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. 4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. 5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic acid compared to water alone. 6) Determine optimal conditions for carbonic acid pretreatment of aspen wood. Optimal severities appeared to be in the mid range tested. ASPEN-Plus modeling and economic analysis of the process indicate that the process could be cost competitive with sulfuric acid if the concentration of solids in the pretreatment is maintained very high (~50%). Lower solids concentrations result in larger reactors that become expensive to construct for high pressure applications.

  5. A ACID RAIN Audrey Gibson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    acid and nitric acid. Sunlight increases the rate of most of these reactions. Electric utility plants;Gas Natural Sources Concentration Carbon dioxide CO2 Decomposition 355 ppm Nitric oxide NO Electric, 2010 #12;Gas Non-Natural Sources Concentration Nitric oxide NO Internal Combustion (cars) 0.2 ppm

  6. An integrated bioconversion process for the production of L-lactic acid from starchy feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, S.P.; Moon, S.H.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential market for lactic acid as the feedstock for biodegradable polymers, oxygenated chemicals, and specialty chemicals is significant. L-lactic acid is often the desired enantiomer for such applications. However, stereospecific lactobacilli do not metabolize starch efficiently. In this work, Argonne researchers have developed a process to convert starchy feedstocks into L-lactic acid. The processing steps include starch recovery, continuous liquefaction, and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. Over 100 g/L of lactic acid was produced in less than 48 h. The optical purity of the product was greater than 95%. This process has potential economical advantages over the conventional process.

  7. Metabolism of Thioctic Acid in Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grisebach, Hans; Fuller, R.C.; Calvin, M.

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    METABOLISM OF THlOCTlC ACID IN ALGAE TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY ThisMETABOLISM OF THIOCTIC ACID IN ALGAE Hans Grisebach, R. , C.METABOLISM OF THIOCTIC ACID IN ALGAE Hans Grisebach, R. C.

  8. acetic acid solutions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  9. arachidonic acid activation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  10. acid inertness studies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  11. acid alleviates decreases: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  12. acid activated montmorillonite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  13. acid amide hydrolase: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been studied....

  14. acid chelation phototherapeutic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  15. acid phosphatase activity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  16. acetic acid solution: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  17. acid 2-benzothiazolylthiomethyl ester: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  18. acetic acid operational: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  19. acid phosphatase activities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  20. acid sphingomyelinase activity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  1. acids decreases fibrinolysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  2. acid potassium glycyrrhetinate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  3. arachidonic acid activates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  4. acid decarboxylase activity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  5. acid activates nrf2: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  6. acid processing activity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  7. ascorbic acid enhances: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  8. acid incorporating poloxamer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  9. acid cupric chloride: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  10. acids increase cardiovascular: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the present study, bonding among formic, acetic and benzoic acids, sulfuric acid, ammonia, acetic, and benzoic acids with free and hydrated sulfuric acid has been...

  11. Research Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Monitoring and Research Nanotechnology: The Science of the Small Algae to Biofuels: Squeezing Power from Pond Scum Living with Wildfire: A Shared Community...

  12. In vivo incorporation of unnatural amino acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA); Anderson, John Christopher (San Diego, CA); Chin, Jason W. (Cambridge, GB); Liu, David R. (Lexington, MA); Magliery, Thomas J. (North Haven, CT); Meggers, Eric L. (Philadelphia, PA); Mehl, Ryan Aaron (Lancaster, PA); Pastrnak, Miro (San Diego, CA); Santoro, Stephen William (Cambridge, MA); Zhang, Zhiwen (San Diego, CA)

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides methods and compositions for in vivo incorporation of unnatural amino acids. Also provided are compositions including proteins with unnatural amino acids.

  13. Carbonic Acid Shows Promise in Geology, Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Probing the Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Berkeley Lab Study Holds Implications for Geological and Biological Processes October 23,...

  14. Researchers, Appointments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Aviation Gas Turbine Combustion/Emissions Research and Design System Optimization (UTIAS) Luca ScardoviInnovative Researchers, Devoted Educators Academic Appointments 2009­2012 #12;Innovative is a centre of immense inspiration, remarkable innovation and endless possibilities. And since 2009, we have

  15. Research paper Drug diffusion and binding in ionizable interpenetrating networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peppas, Nicholas A.

    Research paper Drug diffusion and binding in ionizable interpenetrating networks from poly) (PVA), poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), and their interpenetrating networks (IPNs) were prepared using by measuring their equilibrium polymer volume fraction, equilibrium swelling ratio, and mesh size. Drug

  16. Controlling acid rain : policy issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, James A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The policy and regulatory ramifications of U.S. acid rain control programs are examined; particularly, the alternative of a receptor-oriented strategy as constrasted to emission-oriented proposals (e.g., the Mitchell bill) ...

  17. Nitrate and Prussic Acid Poisoning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stichler, Charles; Reagor, John C.

    2001-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrate and prussic acid poisoning in cattle are noninfectious conditions that can kill livestock. This publication explains the causes and symptoms of these conditions as well as preventive measures and sampling and testing steps....

  18. Seasonalepisodic control of acid deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, James A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the climatological, technical and economic factors for episodic and seasonal control of emissions in existing power plants. Analyzing a large data set of acid deposition for the years 1982-85, we find ...

  19. Nitrate and Prussic Acid Poisoning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stichler, Charles; Reagor, John C.

    2001-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrate and prussic acid poisoning in cattle are noninfectious conditions that can kill livestock. This publication explains the causes and symptoms of these conditions as well as preventive measures and sampling and testing steps....

  20. High-Fidelity DNA Hybridization Using Programmable Molecular DNA Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    of complementary nucleic acid strands is the most basic of all reactions involving nucleic acids, but has a major specific high-fidelity DNA hybridization reactions for tar- get strands of arbitrary length. Our protocol acid strands is the most basic of all reactions involving nucleic acids and a major component of most

  1. Jointly Sponsored Research Program Energy Related Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Western Research Institute

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooperative Agreement, DE-FC26-98FT40323, Jointly Sponsored Research (JSR) Program at Western Research Institute (WRI) began in 1998. Over the course of the Program, a total of seventy-seven tasks were proposed utilizing a total of $23,202,579 in USDOE funds. Against this funding, cosponsors committed $26,557,649 in private funds to produce a program valued at $49,760,228. The goal of the Jointly Sponsored Research Program was to develop or assist in the development of innovative technology solutions that will: (1) Increase the production of United States energy resources - coal, natural gas, oil, and renewable energy resources; (2) Enhance the competitiveness of United States energy technologies in international markets and assist in technology transfer; (3) Reduce the nation's dependence on foreign energy supplies and strengthen both the United States and regional economies; and (4) Minimize environmental impacts of energy production and utilization. Under the JSR Program, energy-related tasks emphasized enhanced oil recovery, heavy oil upgrading and characterization, coal beneficiation and upgrading, coal combustion systems development including oxy-combustion, emissions monitoring and abatement, coal gasification technologies including gas clean-up and conditioning, hydrogen and liquid fuels production, coal-bed methane recovery, and the development of technologies for the utilization of renewable energy resources. Environmental-related activities emphasized cleaning contaminated soils and waters, processing of oily wastes, mitigating acid mine drainage, and demonstrating uses for solid waste from clean coal technologies, and other advanced coal-based systems. Technology enhancement activities included resource characterization studies, development of improved methods, monitors and sensors. In general the goals of the tasks proposed were to enhance competitiveness of U.S. technology, increase production of domestic resources, and reduce environmental impacts associated with energy production and utilization. This report summarizes the accomplishments of the JSR Program.

  2. Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Padmaja...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Padmaja Gunda Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Padmaja Gunda Poster Presentation at 2012 EERE Annual Research Meeting, Postdoctoral Research Awards, from the...

  3. Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Brandon...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Brandon Mercado Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Brandon Mercado Poster Presentation at 2012 EERE Annual Research Meeting, Postdoctoral Research Awards, from...

  4. High Level Waste System Impacts from Acid Dissolution of Sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KETUSKY, EDWARD

    2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This research evaluates the ability of OLI{copyright} equilibrium based software to forecast Savannah River Site High Level Waste system impacts from oxalic acid dissolution of Tank 1-15 sludge heels. Without further laboratory and field testing, only the use of oxalic acid can be considered plausible to support sludge heel dissolution on multiple tanks. Using OLI{copyright} and available test results, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Material and energy balances, coupled with the model, identify potential safety concerns. Overpressurization and overheating are shown to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen could, however, overwhelm the tank ventilation. While pH adjustment can restore the minimal hydrogen generation, resultant precipitates will notably increase the sludge volume. OLI{copyright} is used to develop a flowsheet such that additional sludge vitrification canisters and other negative system impacts are minimized. Sensitivity analyses are used to assess the processability impacts from variations in the sludge/quantities of acids.

  5. Research | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn the Inorganic PV thrust,ResearchResearch

  6. Citation: Molecular Therapy--Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e107; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.37 2013 The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy All rights reserved 2162-2531/12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    drugs that have serious systemic toxicities, such as doxorubicin (Dox). Dox is among the most widely.37 Treatment with doxorubicin (Dox) results in serious systemic toxicities that limit effectiveness for cancer-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) using fixed sequences to promote Dox binding and developed dimeric aptamer

  7. University of California, Irvine Environmental Health and Safety www.ehs.uci.edu Questions Call: (949) 824-6200 Version 2.1 Ethidium bromide is a commonly used stain for identifying nucleic acids in electrophoresis gels. It is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven C.

    &S hazardous waste label and placed in secondary containment. Do not use a biohazardous waste bag to package bromide solutions must be treated as part of the experimental protocol or managed as a hazardous chemical is saturated, the charcoal must be managed as a hazardous chemical waste and disposed of through EH&S. Charcoal

  8. AR Researchers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for fixed-wing unmanned aerial vehicles with an emphasis in cooperative unmanned vehicle research and intelligent remote sensing. Cal Christensen, M.S., P.E., P.M.P Cal...

  9. Succinic acid production by Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , succinic acid has been produced commercially by chemical processes. Recently, however, fermentative of bacteria produce succinic acid as a fermentation end product,4 7 few species can produce it as the major 10 Previous studies showed that A. succiniciproducens produces succinic acid and acetic acid

  10. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A test program is being sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), EPRI, FirstEnergy, and TVA to investigate furnace injection of alkaline sorbents as a means of reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in the flue gas from coal-fired boilers. This test program is being conducted at the FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP), although later testing will be conducted at a TVA plant. A sorbent injection test was conducted the week of April 18, 2000. The test was the first of several short-term (one- to two-week duration) tests to investigate the effectiveness of various alkaline sorbents for sulfuric acid control and the effects of these sorbents on boiler equipment performance. This first short-term test investigated the effect of injecting dry dolomite powder (CaCO{sub 3} {center_dot} MgCO{sub 3}), a mineral similar to limestone, into the furnace of Unit 2. During the test program, various analytical techniques were used to assess the effects of sorbent injection. These primarily included sampling with the controlled condensation system (CCS) for determining flue gas SO{sub 3} content and an acid dew-point (ADP) meter for determining the sulfuric acid dew point (and, indirectly, the concentration of sulfuric acid) of the flue gas. EPA Reference Method 26a was used for determining hydrochloric acid (HCl) and hydrofluoric acid (HF), as well and chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) and fluorine (F{sub 2}) concentrations in the flue gas. Fly ash resistivity was measured using a Southern Research Institute (SRI) point-to-plane resistivity probe, and unburned carbon in fly ash was determined by loss on ignition (LOI). Coal samples were also collected and analyzed for a variety of parameters. Finally, visual observations were made of boiler furnace and convective pass surfaces prior to and during sorbent injection.

  11. Phytozome: A Comparative Platform for Green Plant Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodstein, David M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a growing plant comparative genomics resource. Nucleic AcidsL.A. (2011) The Sol Genomics Network (solgenomics.net):for comparative plant genomics. Nucleic Acids Res, 36, D959-

  12. Process for the reclamation of battery acid and fluid from expended lead-acid batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitz, R.A.

    1990-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method for recycling contaminated sulfuric acid from lead acid batteries to reclaimed sulfuric acid fore reuse in the batteries by removing contaminating iron impurities. It comprises: diluting the contaminated sulfuric acid to a concentration between 150 and 230 grams per liter; filtering the sulfuric acid through a first filter means to remove solid impurities.

  13. Method for production of petroselinic acid and OMEGA12 hexadecanoic acid in transgenic plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohlrogge, John B. (Okemos, MI); Cahoon, Edgar B. (Lansing, MI); Shanklin, John (Upton, NY); Somerville, Christopher R. (Okemos, MI)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a process for producing lipids containing the fatty acid petroselinic acid in plants. The production of petroselinic acid is accomplished by genetically transforming plants which do not normally accumulate petroselinic acid with a gene for a .omega.12 desaturase from another species which does normally accumulate petroselinic acid.

  14. Method for production of petroselinic acid and OMEGA12 hexadecanoic acid in transgenic plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohlrogge, J.B.; Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Somerville, C.R.

    1995-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a process for producing lipids containing the fatty acid, petroselinic acid, in plants. The production of petroselinic acid is accomplished by genetically transforming plants which do not normally accumulate petroselinic acid with a gene for a {omega}12 desaturase from another species which does normally accumulate petroselinic acid. 19 figs.

  15. Chromosome-Specific Staining To Detect Genetic Rearrangements Associated With Chromosome 3 And/Or Chromosone 17

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray; Joe W. (Livermore, CA); Pinkel; Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA); Kallioniemi; Olli-Pekka (Tampere, FI); Kallioniemi; Anne (Tampere, FI); Sakamoto; Masaru (Tokyo, JP)

    2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  16. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas; Westbrook, Carol

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  17. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  18. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Joe W. (San Francisco, CA); Pinkel, Daniel (Lafayette, CA); Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka (Turku, FI); Kallioniemi, Anne (Tampere, FI); Sakamoto, Masaru (Tokyo, JP)

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ .[.nudeic.]. .Iadd.nucleic .Iaddend.acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  19. Method of detecting genetic translocations identified with chromosomal abnormalities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Joe W. (Livermore, CA); Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA); Tkachuk, Douglas (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  20. Method of detecting genetic deletions identified with chromosomal abnormalities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Joe W; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acids probes are typically of a complexity greater tha 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particlularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar ut genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  1. Assessing the benefits of OHER (Office of Health and Environmental Research) research: Three case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesse, R.J.; Callaway, J.M.; Englin, J.E.; Klan, M.S.; Nicholls, A.K.; Serot, D.E.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was undertaken to estimate the societal benefits and costs of selected past research performed for the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Three case studies of representative OHER and DOE research were performed. One of these, the acid rain case study, includes research conducted elsewhere in DOE. The other two cases were the OHER marine research program and the development of high-purity germanium that is used in radiation detectors. The acid rain case study looked at the research benefits and costs of furnace sorbent injection and duct injection, technologies that might reduce acid deposition precursors. Both appear to show benefits in excess of costs. We examined in detail one of the OHER marine research program's accomplishments - the increase in environmental information used by the Outer Continental Shelf leasing program to manage bidding for off-shore oil drilling. The results of an econometric model show that environmental information of the type supported by OHER is unequivocally linked to government and industry leasing decisions. The germanium case study indicated that the benefits of germanium radiation detectors were significant.

  2. Interview of Dan Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Dan

    2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    .W. Cook, was a good chemist and he had been associated with the Chester Beatty Research Institute in London and had been involved in the chemistry of carcinogens from coal tar and soot from which were extracted several pure crystalline compounds which when... Beatty for a further year and read a lot; got interested in certain aspects of nucleic acid chemistry; the subject was in confusion; the head of Chester Beatty said I should go to Cambridge for a while and learn some nucleic acid chemistry with Alexander...

  3. Cryptosporidium parvum: enhancing our understanding of its unique fatty acid metabolism and the elucidation of putative new inhibitors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritzler, Jason Michael

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    of this parasitic protist is increasing at a rapid rate due to recent molecular and genetic advances. The topic of our research is in the area of C. parvum fatty acid metabolism, which is highly streamlined in this parasite. In addition to a type I fatty acid...

  4. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press Releases 2014References by WebsitehomeResearch Areas

  5. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press Releases 2014References by WebsitehomeResearch

  6. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press Releases 2014References byLaboratoryResearchRegime

  7. Research Help

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliabilityPrincipalResearch Finds VitaminResearch

  8. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliabilityPrincipalResearch Finds VitaminResearchClouds,

  9. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 % A PB 2 7 7Research Form Research

  10. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 % A PB 2 7 7Research Form ResearchThe

  11. RRDistMaps: a UCSF Chimera tool for viewing and comparing protein distance maps.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, JE; Huang, CC; Ferrin, TE

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhancing UCSF Chimera through web services. Nucleic Acids2004) via an online RBVI web service (Huang, 2014). In both

  12. Multiplex automated genome engineering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, George M; Wang, Harris H; Isaacs, Farren J

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to automated methods of introducing multiple nucleic acid sequences into one or more target cells.

  13. HYDROFLUORIC ACID FIRST AID INSTRUCTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalali. Bahram

    with large amounts of cool running water. Immediately washing off the acid is of primary importance. 2.Remove Immediately flush eyes for at least 15 minutes with copious cool flowing water. 2 If only one eye is affected by a glass of milk or milk of magnesia. 3 Call 911 for immediate medical assistance. REMEMBER, ALL PERSONNEL

  14. Research | Energy Frontier Research Centers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn the Inorganic PV thrust,Research Home Below

  15. Introduction of biotin or folic acid into polypyrrole magnetite core-shell nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nan, Alexandrina; Turcu, Rodica [National Institute of Research and Development for Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Donath 65-103, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute of Research and Development for Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Donath 65-103, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Liebscher, Jürgen [National Institute of Research and Development for Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Donath 65-103, Cluj-Napoca, Romania and Institute of Chemistry, Humboldt-University Berlin, Brook-Taylor 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)] [National Institute of Research and Development for Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Donath 65-103, Cluj-Napoca, Romania and Institute of Chemistry, Humboldt-University Berlin, Brook-Taylor 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to contribute to the trend in contemporary research to develop magnetic core shell nanoparticles with better properties (reduced toxicity, high colloidal and chemical stability, wide scope of application) in straightforward and reproducible methods new core shell magnetic nanoparticles were developed based on polypyrrole shells functionalized with biotin and folic acid. Magnetite nanoparticles stabilized by sebacic acid were used as magnetic cores. The morphology of magnetite was determined by transmission electron microscopy TEM, while the chemical structure investigated by FT-IR.

  16. Instrument Application Capabilities Advantages Disadvantages Recommendations Contact Qiagen Qiacube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    @uthsc.edu Agilent Bioanalyzer Quality control Profiles for total RNA; enriched mRNA; enriched small RNA; DNA Nucleic acid isolation and purification Total RNA; miRNA; DNA; All prep (all nucleic acid) 2-12 samples Felicia Waller fwaller@uthsc.edu Nanodrop Spectrophotometer Nucleic acids quantification and quality

  17. Biomedical Microdevices 7:1, 712, 2005 C 2005SpringerScience+BusinessMedia, Inc. ManufacturedinTheNetherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boppart, Stephen

    hybridization to its tar- get nucleic acid (Tyagi et al., 1998; Tyagi and Kramer 1996 hybridization to a target nucleic acid, can be used in microflu- idic devices to detect and quantify nucleic acids in solution as well as inside bacterial cells. Three essential steps towards the development

  18. JOURNAL OF VIROLOGY, 0022-538X/98/$04.00 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Judith G.

    (a nucleic acid chaperone catalyzing nucleic acid rearrangements which lead to more thermodynamically stable conformations) dramatically stimulates HIV-1 minus-strand transfer by pre- venting TAR conclude that actinomycin D inhibits minus-strand transfer by blocking the nucleic acid chaperone activity

  19. Methods for making nucleotide probes for sequencing and synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, George M; Zhang, Kun; Chou, Joseph

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and methods for making a plurality of probes for analyzing a plurality of nucleic acid samples are provided. Compositions and methods for analyzing a plurality of nucleic acid samples to obtain sequence information in each nucleic acid sample are also provided.

  20. 3284 E Exobiology (theoretical), Complexity in Exobiology (theoretical),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandenburg, Axel

    to as enzymes. Nucleotides and nucleic acids Nucleotides are mono- mers of nucleic acids, e. g., of RNA bases) that can pair in a specific way. Nucleotides can form polymers, and their sequence carries water molecule is removed in this step. Other nucleotides of interest include peptide nucleic acid

  1. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliabilityPrincipalResearch

  2. Research and Development with Full Scale Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sijpheer, N.; Bakker, E.J.; Opstelten, I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the research programs of the Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) concerns the built environment. Several facilities to conduct the research activities are at ECN's disposal. One of these facilities, are five research dwellings...

  3. Summary of Research Instruction Research Instruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaji, Hajime

    for Passive corium cooling system under severe accident and reactor components (e.g. Fuel assembly, Steam Master's Program Doctoral Program Summary of Research Instruction Research Instruction Doctoral Program Summary of Research Instruction Research Instruction Application Code Name

  4. 1,425 Views Healthcare Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    is the introduction of molecules, such as nucleic acids or proteins, into a cell to change its properties.) However has previously been used for high-speed nanopatterning of proteins and nanoparticles for drug delivery. The technique is proving to be extremely robust and multi-functional. Researchers have used the NFP-E chip

  5. Transfection of the dextran Alexa Fluor 488 dye into a targeted HeLa cell using Nanofountain Probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    transfection is the introduction of molecules, such as nucleic acids or proteins, into a cell to change its channels. The probe has previously been used for high-speed nanopatterning of proteins and nanoparticles to be extremely robust and multi-functional. Researchers have used the NFP-E chip to transfect HeLa cells

  6. Site Welcome Rebecca | My A Single-Cell Transfection Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    is the introduction of molecules, such as nucleic acids or proteins, into a cell to change its properties.) However has previously been used for high-speed nanopatterning of proteins and nanoparticles for drug delivery to be available in late 2013. The technique is proving to be extremely robust and multi-functional. Researchers

  7. TweetTweet 13 Share This

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    , such as nucleic acids or proteins, into a cell to change its properties.) However, because bulk electroporation for high-speed nanopatterning of proteins and nanoparticles for drug delivery studies. The new single is proving to be extremely robust and multi- functional. Researchers have used the NFP-E chip to transfect He

  8. Cancer Biomarkers 4 (2008) 307319 307 Quantum dot bioconjugates for in vitro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Jianghong

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nanoparticles that are covalently linked to biologi- cal molecules such as peptides, proteins, nucleic acids nanoparticles possess novel optical, elec- tronic, magnetic, and structural properties that are often not available from single individual molecules or bulk solids [1]. Recent research has developed function- al

  9. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 94: 1454214546.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberts, Susan C

    in the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. Nucleic Acids Research 20: 6221­6225. Albert, T. J. et al. (2005). Mutation discovery in bacte- rial genomes: metronidazole resistance in Helicobacter pylori. Nature Methods. (1999a). Recombination and clonal groupings within Helicobacter pylori from different geo- graphical

  10. Forschung und EU-Hochschulbro, Technologietransfer September 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nejdl, Wolfgang

    Nachwuchswissenschaftler/innen 4 1.2. LEIT: Information and communication technologies 4 1.2.1. Öffentliche Konsultation zu Programme Chemical Biology of Native Nucleic Acid Modifications (SPP 1784) 13 4.1.4. Volkswagen.1.8. NIH: Research Grants 16 5. Umweltwissenschaften und Energie 16 5.1.1. EU/KIC InnoEnergy: Call

  11. Parallel Picoliter RT-PCR Assays Using Microfluidics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Parallel Picoliter RT-PCR Assays Using Microfluidics Joshua S. Marcus,, W. French Anderson The development of microfluidic tools for high-throughput nucleic acid analysis has become a burgeoning area of research in the post-genome era. Here, we have developed a microfluidic chip to perform 72 parallel 450-p

  12. Philip E. Bourne is a Professor of Pharmacology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourne, Philip E.

    interests include bioinformatics, computational biology and ontology management. Helen M. Berman is a Board interests include structural biology and bioinformatics, with a special focus on protein­nucleic acid at SDSC, and a Co-Director of the PDB. His research interests focus on structural bioinformatics and high

  13. Acid Ions are More Than Spectators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gas-phase studies. The discovery suggests that it is not simply the release of protons - hydrogen ions - that is important for the properties of acids. When a strong acid, such as...

  14. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    1987-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and thence quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal. 1 fig.

  15. Fuel cell electrolyte membrane with acidic polymer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamrock, Steven J. (Stillwater, MN); Larson, James M. (Saint Paul, MN); Pham, Phat T. (Little Canada, MN); Frey, Matthew H. (Cottage Grove, MN); Haugen, Gregory M. (Edina, MN); Lamanna, William M. (Stillwater, MN)

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrolyte membrane is formed by an acidic polymer and a low-volatility acid that is fluorinated, substantially free of basic groups, and is either oligomeric or non-polymeric.

  16. amino acid intake: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    protein intake (PDI) and net portal appearance rate of amino acids by continuous infusion of para-aminohippuric acid via the mesenteric catheter. The amino-acid appearance...

  17. Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymers for Chemical Vapor Sensing. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Acidic Polymers for Chemical Vapor Sensing. Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymers for Chemical Vapor Sensing. Abstract: A review with 171 references. Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers for...

  18. Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in...

  19. acid anew insights: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is the sequence of amino acids produced, and because amino acids average about Texas at San Antonio, University of 290 Combined Acid Catalysis for Asymmetric Synthesis Chemistry...

  20. acid synthase impacts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acid utilization and glucose oxidation. Glucose... Adhikari, Sean 2006-10-30 246 ANTIBODY PURIFICATION USING CAPRYLIC ACID In mildly acidic conditions, the addition of short-chain...

  1. Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research Supporting researchers in low- and middle-income countries to carry out health- related research within their own countries. Gl bal Health #12;3 | Global Health Research #12;Global Health Research | 4 We are a global charitable foundation dedicated

  2. Quarterly technical progress report - base program on energy related research. Quarterly report, May 1--July 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research is presented on oil and gas technologies, advanced systems, soil remediation and remediation of acid mine drainage, applied science research in plastics and petroleum coprocessing, and fossil fuel and hydrocarbon conversion using a hydrogen rich plasmas.

  3. Chemical Additive Selection in Matrix Acidizing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, Jason 1981-

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    critical detail of weak acid chemistry. One concern when using any acid in oilfield operations is the corrosion of well tubulars. Thus operators often choose to pump corrosion inhibitor, a chemical additive electrostatically attracted... to the negative charge of the well casing or production tubing, to decrease the rate at which the acid accesses well tubular surfaces (Crowe and Minor 1985). A typical working concentration of corrosion inhibitor is 1-2 wt% of injected acid (Smith et al. 1978...

  4. Organic Acid Production by Filamentous Fungi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -being. Indeed, organic acid fermentations are often not even identified as fungal bioprocesses, having been Aspergillus niger in aerated stirred-tank-reactors can convert glucose to citric acid with greater than 80 lipolytica, and related yeast species, may be in use commercially to produce citric acid (Lopez-Garcia, 2002

  5. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deiters, Alexander (La Jolla, CA); Cropp, T. Ashton (Bethesda, MD); Chin, Jason W. (Cambridge, GB); Anderson, J. Christopher (San Francisco, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNAsyn-thetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  6. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, Ashton T; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, Christopher J; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  7. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  8. Synthesis of an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid comprising: dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and an alkali metal diformylamide in an organic solvent selected from the group consisting of acetonitrile, methanol, tetrahydrofuran, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and methylformate or mixtures thereof to form a suspension of an alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate ester; and hydrolyzing said alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-amino levulinic acid.

  9. Synthesis of an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moens, L.

    1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid comprising. The process involves dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and an alkali metal diformylamide in an organic solvent selected from the group consisting of acetonitrile, methanol, tetrahydrofuran, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and methylformate or mixtures to form a suspension of an alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate ester; and hydrolyzing the alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-amino levulinic acid.

  10. CHAPTER 13. ACID RAIN Acid rain was discovered in the 19th century by Robert Angus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    247 CHAPTER 13. ACID RAIN Acid rain was discovered in the 19th century by Robert Angus Smith, a pharmacist from Manchester (England), who measured high levels of acidity in rain falling over industrial decline of fish populations in the lakes of southern Norway and traced the problem to acid rain. Similar

  11. Fate of Acids in Clouds 1. Combination with bases dissolved in clouds: acids neutralized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    problems. E#11;ects of Acid Rain 1. Vegetation: SO 2 is toxic to plants #15; Leaves damaged below pH 3 rain { Athens and Rome cathedrals and statues: pollution leads to acid rain #15; SteelFate of Acids in Clouds 1. Combination with bases dissolved in clouds: acids neutralized NH 3 (g

  12. Evaluation of acid fracturing based on the "acid fracture number" concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alghamdi, Abdulwahab

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................................. 29 4.2.1 Initial Pad Volume ........................................................................... 29 4.2.2 Acid Strength and Volume...............................................................30 V... stages of pad fluids and acids.11 The reaction of HCl with carbonate formations is fast, especially at high temperatures. This means that the acid will not be able to penetrate deeply down the fracture, which may affect the outcome of acid fracturing...

  13. PNNL: Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics OneOutreach EffortsSearch Welcome to

  14. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  16. Research Highlights

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  17. Research Library

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  18. Research Opportunities

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  19. Research Techniques

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  20. Research Tools

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  1. UNIRIB: Research

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  2. Research Gallery

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  5. Research Highlight

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  6. Research Highlight

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  7. Research Highlight

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  18. Research Highlight

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  19. Research Highlight

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  20. Research Highlight

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