Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Cloud Condensation Nuclei Profile Value-Added Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration at cloud base is the most relevant measure of the aerosol that influences droplet formation in clouds. Since the CCN concentration depends on supersaturation, a more general measure of the CCN concentration is the CCN spectrum (values at multiple supersaturations). The CCN spectrum is now measured at the surface at several fixed ARM sites and by the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF), but is not measured at the cloud base. Rather than rely on expensive aircraft measurements for all studies of aerosol effects on clouds, a way to project CCN measurements at the surface to cloud base is needed. Remote sensing of aerosol extinction provides information about the vertical profile of the aerosol, but cannot be directly related to the CCN concentration because the aerosol extinction is strongly influenced by humidification, particularly near cloud base. Ghan and Collins (2004) and Ghan et al. (2006) propose a method to remove the influence of humidification from the extinction profiles and tie the “dry extinction” retrieval to the surface CCN concentration, thus estimating the CCN profile. This methodology has been implemented as the CCN Profile (CCNPROF) value-added product (VAP).

McFarlane, S; Sivaraman, C; Ghan, S

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

2

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-103 Cloud Condensation Nuclei Profile Value-Added  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 Cloud Condensation Nuclei Profile Value-Added Product S McFarlane C Sivaraman S Ghan October 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

3

Recent Developments on the Broadband Heating Rate Profile Value-Added Product  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Recent Developments on the Recent Developments on the Broadband Heating Rate Profile Value-Added Product E. J. Mlawer, J. S. Delamere, and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts M. A. Miller and K. L. Johnson Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York T. R. Shippert and C. N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington R. G. Ellingson Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida M. H. Zhang State University of New York - Stony Brook Albany, New York R. A. Ferrare National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia R. T. Cederwall and S. C. Xie Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico J. A. Ogren National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

4

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-100 Raman Lidar Profiles Best Estimate Value-Added Product Technical Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 Raman Lidar Profiles Best Estimate Value-Added Product Technical Report R Newsom January 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and

5

Aerosol Best Estimate Value-Added Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) value-added product (VAP) is to provide vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo, asymmetry parameter, and Angstroem exponents for the atmospheric column above the Central Facility at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. We expect that AEROSOLBE will provide nearly continuous estimates of aerosol optical properties under a range of conditions (clear, broken clouds, overcast clouds, etc.). The primary requirement of this VAP was to provide an aerosol data set as continuous as possible in both time and height for the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP in order to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Even though BBHRP has been completed, AEROSOLBE results are very valuable for environmental, atmospheric, and climate research.

Flynn, C; Turner, D; Koontz, A; Chand, D; Sivaraman, C

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

6

ARM - Value-Added Product Status Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Status Reports Status Reports Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Value-Added Product Status Reports ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report July 1-September 30, 2013 (PDF, 1MB) ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report April 1-June 30, 2013 (PDF, 1MB) ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report January 1-March 31, 2013 (PDF, 268KB) ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report October 1-December 31, 2012 (PDF, 271KB) ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report

7

ARM KAZR-ARSCL Value Added Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ka-band ARM Zenith Radars (KAZRs) have replaced the long-serving Millimeter Cloud Radars, or MMCRs. Accordingly, the primary MMCR Value Added Product (VAP), the Active Remote Sensing of CLouds (ARSCL) product, is being replaced by a KAZR-based version, the KAZR-ARSCL VAP. KAZR-ARSCL provides cloud boundaries and best-estimate time-height fields of radar moments.

Michael Jensen

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

8

The Value of Economic Reality: Applying Economic Value Added.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The concept of Economic Value Added (EVA) is a revolutionary way to measure the value of a business. In its simplest form, EVA is a… (more)

Phillips, David M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

ARSCL Cloud Statistics - A Value-Added Product  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARSCL Cloud Statistics - A Value-Added Product Y. Shi Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington M. A. Miller Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York...

10

Value-Added Stock Loan Participation Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Value-Added Stock Loan Participation Program Value-Added Stock Loan Participation Program Value-Added Stock Loan Participation Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Bioenergy Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Maximum Rebate RFA provides up to 45% of the loan up to $40,000 of loan principal Program Info Start Date 1994 State Minnesota Program Type State Loan Program Provider Minnesota Department of Agriculture The Value-Added Stock Loan Participation Program was created in 1994 and is designed to help farmers finance the purchase of stock in certain types of cooperative, limited liability company, or limited liability partnership that will produce a "value-added agricultural product." This may include wind energy and anaerobic-digestion cooperatives if they meet the

11

Missouri Value-Added Grant Program (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Value-Added Grant Program (Missouri) Value-Added Grant Program (Missouri) Missouri Value-Added Grant Program (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Program Info State Missouri Program Type Grant Program Provider Missouri Department of Agriculture The Missouri Value-Added Grant Program provides grants for projects that add value to Missouri agricultural products and aid the economy of a rural community. Grant applications will be considered for value-added agricultural business concepts that: (a) Lead to and result in development, processing and marketing of new or expanded uses or technologies for agricultural products; and (b) Foster agricultural economic development in Missouri's rural communities. Applications will be considered for

12

Enriched arabinoxylan in corn fiber for value-added products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A two-step process is evaluated to separate the hexose component in wet milling corn fibers from the pentose component for production of value-added products. Corn fibers were first pretreated with hot water ... ...

Bin Wang; Biao Cheng; Hao Feng

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Missouri Value-Added Loan Guarantee Program (Missouri)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Missouri Value-Added Loan Guarantee Program provides a 50% first-loss guarantee to lenders who make agricultural business development loans for the acquisition, construction, improvement, or...

14

ARM Value-Added Cloud Products: Description and Status  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Value-Added Cloud Products: Value-Added Cloud Products: Description and Status M. A. Miller, K. L. Johnson, and D. T. Troyan Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York E. E. Clothiaux Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania E. J. Mlawer Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program operates a variety of state-of-the-art active and passive remote sensors at its sites. These sensors provide information about the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere and the structure of the clouds that are present above the site. Families of value- added products (VAPs) that contain geophysically relevant data are produced from the electronic

15

NETL: Utilization Projects - Value Added Products from FGD Sulfite rich  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Value Added Products from FGD Sulfite rich Scrubber Material Value Added Products from FGD Sulfite rich Scrubber Material In pursuit of developing value added products from sulfite-rich scrubber material, e.g., low-density panels, carpet underlayment, siding, pre-cast building material, lumber panels, particle and wafer type boards, the following four experimental tasks are proposed: A comprehensive characterization of sulfite-rich scrubber materials produced by power plant generation. Specifically, the mercury, selenium, arsenic, boron, and organic content will be monitored The sulfite-rich scrubber material will be combined with cheap but renewable agricultural byproducts like micronized core fibers and/or micronized wheat straw, and the composites will be formulated by exploiting the natural polymers of the byproducts. The conditions under which structural composites can be formulated using injection molding and compressive molding will be evaluated.

16

ARM - Evaluation Product - Droplet Number Concentration Value-Added Product  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsDroplet Number Concentration Value-Added ProductsDroplet Number Concentration Value-Added Product Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Droplet Number Concentration Value-Added Product 2005.01.01 - 2010.12.30 Site(s) SGP General Description Cloud droplet number concentration is an important factor in understanding aerosol-cloud interactions. As aerosol concentration increases, it is expected that droplet number concentration, Nd, will increase and droplet size decrease, for a given liquid water path (Twomey 1977), which will greatly affect cloud albedo as smaller droplets reflect more shortwave radiation. However, the magnitude and variability of these processes under different environmental conditions is still uncertain. McComiskey et al.

17

Training Needs in Louisiana's Value-Added Forest Products Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training Needs in Louisiana's Value-Added Forest Products Industry Richard VloskyRichard Vlosky Director, Louisiana Forest Products Development CenterDirector, Louisiana Forest Products DevelopmentLSU Agricultural Center England Air ParkEngland Air Park--January 18, 2005January 18, 2005 Louisiana Forest

18

Wood Products Marketing And Value-Added Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood Products Marketing And Value-Added Opportunities Richard Vlosky, Ph.D. Professor-Forest Products Marketing Interim Director-Louisiana Forest Products Laboratory School of Renewable Natural, R.E. Taylor & Associates Ltd. Forest Industry Strategic Services & Publisher: WOOD Markets Monthly

19

Wood Products Marketing And Value-Added Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood Products Marketing And Value-Added Opportunities In Latin America: A Focus on Brazil Richard Vlosky, Ph.D. Professor-Forest Products Marketing Interim Director-Louisiana Forest Products Laboratory Industry Strategic Services & Publisher: WOOD Markets Monthly newsletter WOOD Markets 2002 - The Solid Wood

20

Marketing Basics for Value-added Agriculture Chuck Willoughby  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

171-1 Marketing Basics for Value-added Agriculture Chuck Willoughby FAPC Business & Marketing of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Many people think of marketing either as selling or advertising. Some might include both components, but that is not all there is to marketing according to Jay Levinson

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Value Added Energy Information Systems VAEIS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Value Added Energy Information Systems VAEIS Value Added Energy Information Systems VAEIS Jump to: navigation, search Name Value Added Energy Information Systems (VAEIS) Place Arlington, New Hampshire Zip 2474 Sector Solar, Wind energy Product Provides turn-key monitoring systems for the performance of solar, wind, fuel cell and other distributed generation installations. Coordinates 43.337585°, -89.379449° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.337585,"lon":-89.379449,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

Techniques and Methods Used to Determine the Aerosol Best Estimate Value-Added Product at SGP Central Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Determine the Aerosol Best Estimate Value-Added Product at SGP Central Facility C. Sivaraman, D. D. Turner, and C. J. Flynn Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Objective Profiles of aerosol optical properties are needed for radiative closure exercises such as the broadband heating rate profile (BBHRP) project (Mlawer et al. 2002) and the Shortwave Quality Measurement Experiment (QME). Retrieving cloud microphysical properties using radiation measurements in the shortwave, such as the spectral retrieval technique described in Daniel et al. (2002), also require the optical properties of the aerosols so that they can be accounted for in the retrieval process. The objective of the aerosol best estimate (ABE) value-added procedure (VAP) is to provide profiles of

23

USDA Webinar: Value-Added Producer Grants for Tribal Entities | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

USDA Webinar: Value-Added Producer Grants for Tribal Entities USDA Webinar: Value-Added Producer Grants for Tribal Entities USDA Webinar: Value-Added Producer Grants for Tribal Entities January 14, 2014 11:00AM to 12:30PM MST Webinar Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development, this tribal-specific training will provide an overview of the FY14 Funding Opportunity and the Value-Added Producer Grants (VAPG) program and provide information about tribal entity eligibility and documentation requirements. Prospective tribal applicants, technical assistance providers, and interested USDA field staff will find the information helpful. Conference Call Information: Toll-free number: +1 800-981-3173 Toll number for DC area: +1 202-720-7039 Participant code: 4248 Join the LiveMeeting Webinar here. For more information, contact Tedd Buelow at 720-544-2911.

24

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United...

25

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-129 Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Optical Depth Value-Added Product A Koontz C Flynn G Hodges J Michalsky J Barnard March 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S....

26

USDA Webinar: Value-Added Producer Grants for Tribal Entities | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

USDA Webinar: Value-Added Producer Grants for Tribal Entities USDA Webinar: Value-Added Producer Grants for Tribal Entities USDA Webinar: Value-Added Producer Grants for Tribal Entities January 14, 2014 1:00PM EST FY2014 Training Schedule Tuesday, January 14 9:00 - 10:30 AM Alaska Standard Time 10:00 - 11:30 AM Pacific Standard Time 11:00 AM-12:30 PM Mountain Standard Time 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM Central Standard Time 1:00 PM-2:30 PM Eastern Standard Time Topics: FY 14 Funding Opportunity, overview of VAPG program, tribal entity eligibility and documentation requirements. Who should attend: Prospective Tribal applicants, technical assistance providers, interested USDA field staff. Conference Call Information: Toll-free number: +1 800-981-3173 Toll number for DC area: +1 202-720-7039 Participant code: 4248 Join the LiveMeeting Webinar here:

27

Value-Added Attributes of the QA Requirements | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Value-Added Attributes of the QA Requirements Value-Added Attributes of the QA Requirements Value-Added Attributes of the QA Requirements Senior Management Ownership Senior management must take full ownership of the quality assurance program. These managers should establish policies and objectives focused on achieving the organization's mission while improving the quality of the organization's products and services. They must create an environment that promotes quality and the improvement of quality throughout the entire organization. Line Organization Responsibility People who perform the work have the greatest affect on item and process quality. They should be empowered. They determine the extent to which management's objectives are met. Individual employees should seek ways to improve the quality of their work by suggesting product and process

28

Analyses of Value-added for Case-ready Beef, with Special Emphasis on Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

beef at retail and increasing the value-added from beef at the packer /processor level. Adoption of case-ready packaging technology by the beef industry trans fers the function of retail cutting and packaging of fresh beef from the retail store... beef at retail and increasing the value-added from beef at the packer /processor level. Adoption of case-ready packaging technology by the beef industry trans fers the function of retail cutting and packaging of fresh beef from the retail store...

Dietrich, R.A.; Farris, D.E.; Ward, J.B

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Best Estimate Radiation Flux Value-Added Procedure: Algorithm Operational Details and Explanations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 Best Estimate Radiation Flux Value-Added Procedure: Algorithm Operational Details and Explanations October 2002 Y. Shi and C. N. Long DOE, ARM, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Research, Office of Health and Environmental Research Contents 1. Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 1 2. Input Data ............................................................................................................................................... 1 3. Configuration Files.................................................................................................................................

30

G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) Value-Added Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) value-added product (VAP) computes precipitable water vapor using neural network techniques from data measured by the GVR. The GVR reports time-series measurements of brightness temperatures for four channels located at 183.3 ± 1, 3, 7, and 14 GHz.

Koontz, A; Cadeddu, M

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

31

Microsoft Word - ARM Value-Added Product_tech_rpt_v2.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

77 77 An Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Value-Added Product to Retrieve Optically Thin Cloud Visible Optical Depth using Micropulse Lidar October 2006 Chaomei Lo Jennifer M. Comstock Connor Flynn Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Research, Office of Biological and Environmental Research C Lo, JM Comstock, C Flynn, October 2006, ARM TR-077 iii Contents 1 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 1 2 Input Data.............................................................................................................................................

32

Method for conversion of carbohydrate polymers to value-added chemical products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are described for conversion of carbohydrate polymers in ionic liquids, including cellulose, that yield value-added chemicals including, e.g., glucose and 5-hydroxylmethylfurfural (HMF) at temperatures below 120.degree. C. Catalyst compositions that include various mixed metal halides are described that are selective for specified products with yields, e.g., of up to about 56% in a single step process.

Zhang, Zongchao C. (Norwood, NJ); Brown, Heather M. (Kennewick, WA); Su, Yu (Richland, WA)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

33

Comparison of value-added models for school ranking and classification: a Monte Carlo study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARISON OF VALUE-ADDED MODELS FOR SCHOOL RANKING AND CLASSIFICATION: A MONTE CARLO STUDY A Dissertation by ZHONGMIAO WANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... AND CLASSIFICATION: A MONTE CARLO STUDY A Dissertation by ZHONGMIAO WANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Co...

Wang, Zhongmiao

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Functionally gradient material for membrane reactors to convert methane gas into value-added products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A functionally gradient material for a membrane reactor for converting methane gas into value-added-products includes an outer tube of perovskite, which contacts air; an inner tube which contacts methane gas, of zirconium oxide, and a bonding layer between the perovskite and zirconium oxide layers. The bonding layer has one or more layers of a mixture of perovskite and zirconium oxide, with the layers transitioning from an excess of perovskite to an excess of zirconium oxide. The transition layers match thermal expansion coefficients and other physical properties between the two different materials. 7 figs.

Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Kobylinski, T.P.

1996-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

35

Functionally gradient material for membrane reactors to convert methane gas into value-added products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A functionally gradient material for a membrane reactor for converting methane gas into value-added-products includes an outer tube of perovskite, which contacts air; an inner tube which contacts methane gas, of zirconium oxide, and a bonding layer between the perovskite and zirconium oxide layers. The bonding layer has one or more layers of a mixture of perovskite and zirconium oxide, with the layers transitioning from an excess of perovskite to an excess of zirconium oxide. The transition layers match thermal expansion coefficients and other physical properties between the two different materials.

Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Dusek, Joseph T. (Lombard, IL); Kleefisch, Mark S. (Napersville, IL); Kobylinski, Thadeus P. (Lisle, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Value Added Products from Hemicellulose Utilization in Dry Mill Ethanol Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Iowa Corn Promotion Board is the principal contracting entity for this grant funded by the US Department of Agriculture and managed by the US Department of Energy. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board subcontracted with New Jersey Institute of Technology, KiwiChem, Pacific Northwest National Lab and Idaho National Lab to conduct research for this project. KiwiChem conducted the economic engineering assessment of a dry-mill ethanol plant. New Jersey Institute of Technology conducted work on incorporating the organic acids into polymers. Pacific Northwest National Lab conducted work in hydrolysis of hemicellulose, fermentation and chemical catalysis of sugars to value-added chemicals. Idaho National Lab engineered an organism to ferment a specific organic acid. Dyadic, an enzme company, was a collaborator which provided in-kind support for the project. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board collaborated with the Ohio Corn Marketing Board and the Minnesota Corn Merchandising Council in providing cost share for the project. The purpose of this diverse collaboration was to integrate the hydrolysis, the conversion and the polymer applications into one project and increase the likelihood of success. This project had two primary goals: (1) to hydrolyze the hemicellulose fraction of the distillers grain (DG) coproduct coming from the dry-mill ethanol plants and (2) convert the sugars derived from the hemicellulose into value-added co-products via fermentation and chemical catalysis.

Rodney Williamson, ICPB; John Magnuson, PNNL; David Reed, INL; Marco Baez, Dyadic; Marion Bradford, ICPB

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Value-Added Products from FGD Sulfite-Rich Scrubber Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to the American Coal Ash Association, about 29.25 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts were produced in the USA in 2003. Out of 29.25 million tons, 17.35 million tons were sulfite-rich scrubber materials. At present, unlike its cousin FGD gypsum, the prospect for effective utilization of sulfite-rich scrubber materials is not bright. In fact, almost 16.9 million tons are leftover every year. In our pursuit to mitigate the liability of sulfite-rich FGD scrubber materials' disposal, we are attempting to develop value-added products that can commercially compete. More specifically, for this Innovative Concept Phase I project, we have the following objectives: to characterize the sulfite-rich scrubber material for toxic metals; to optimize the co-blending and processing of scrubber material and natural byproducts; to formulate and develop structural composites from sulfite-rich scrubber material; and to evaluate the composites' mechanical properties and compare them with current products on the market. After successfully demonstrating the viability of our research, a more comprehensive approach will be proposed to take these value-added materials to fruition.

Vivak Malhotra

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-087 Merged Sounding Value-Added Product D Troyan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 Merged Sounding Value-Added Product D Troyan March 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and

39

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-128 Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio Value-Added  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio Value-Added Product April 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and

40

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-115 Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) Value-Added Product  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) Value-Added Product C Flynn D Turner A Koontz D Chand C Sivaraman July 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 3d. Value Added by Selected Industries, 1998,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

d d Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3d. Value Added1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Brillion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 173 205 233 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 62 67 79 313 Textile Mills 24 19 17 314 Textile Product Mills 13 13 15 315 Apparel Manufacturing 32 21 16 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 5 3 3 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 34 35 44 322 Paper Manufacturing 73 76 80 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 60 59 60 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 32 37 126 325 Chemical Manufacturing 230 254 340 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 86 92 99 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Product Manufacturing 53 55 72 331 Primary Metal Manufacturing 69 57 84 332 Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing

42

Sequential fractionation of value-added coconut products using membrane processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The coconut waste-skimmed coconut milk was employed for sequential fractionation using UF and NF membranes to produce value-added products (coconut proteins, plant hormones – kinetin and zeatin). The retention factors achieved by UF membrane (PS10): albumin (0.9822 ± 0.0799) and globulin (0.9975 ± 0.0783); NF membrane (NF1): kinetin (0.9238 ± 0.0345) and zeatin (0.9511 ± 0.0355). Coconut protein powder was obtained after spray-drying process using concentrated coconut protein (UF retentate). SDS-PAGE showed that molecular weights of the coconut proteins were 17, 34, 55 and 150 kDa. Proximate and HPLC analyses revealed that the obtained samples were enriched with basic nutrients and well-balanced amino acids composition, respectively.

Ching Yin Ng; Abdul Wahab Mohammad; Law Yong Ng; Jamaliah Md Jahim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 4d. Value Added by Selected Industries, 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

d d Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4d. Value Added1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Billion 2000 Dollars 2) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 193 182 214 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 70 59 73 313 Textile Mills 23 18 17 314 Textile Product Mills 13 13 15 315 Apparel Manufacturing 32 22 17 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 5 3 3 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 35 35 37 322 Paper Manufacturing 84 77 85 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 62 56 59 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 38 46 53 325 Chemical Manufacturing 225 248 291 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 84 88 99 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Product Manufacturing 55 54 66

44

ARM Climate Research Facility Spectral Surface Albedo Value-Added Product (VAP) Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the input requirements, output data products, and methodology for the Spectral Surface Albedo (SURFSPECALB) value-added product (VAP). The SURFSPECALB VAP produces a best-estimate near-continuous high spectral resolution albedo data product using measurements from multifilter radiometers (MFRs). The VAP first identifies best estimates for the MFR downwelling and upwelling shortwave irradiance values, and then calculates narrowband spectral albedo from these best-estimate irradiance values. The methodology for finding the best-estimate values is based on a simple process of screening suspect data and backfilling screened and missing data with estimated values when possible. The resulting best-estimate MFR narrowband spectral albedos are used to determine a daily surface type (snow, 100% vegetation, partial vegetation, or 0% vegetation). For non-snow surfaces, a piecewise continuous function is used to estimate a high spectral resolution albedo at 1 min temporal and 10 cm-1 spectral resolution.

McFarlane, S; Gaustad, K; Long, C; Mlawer, E

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

EFFECTS OF AN ACCRETION DISK WIND ON THE PROFILE OF THE BALMER EMISSION LINES FROM ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore the connection between active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with single- and double-peaked broad Balmer emission lines by using models dealing with radiative transfer effects through a disk wind. Our primary goal is to assess the applicability of the Murray and Chiang model by making an extensive and systematic comparison of the model predictions with data. In the process, we also verify the original derivation and evaluate the importance of general relativistic effects. As the optical depth through the emission layer increases, the peaks of a double-peaked profile move closer and eventually merge, producing a single peak. The properties of the emission line profile depend as sensitively on the geometric parameters of the line-emitting portion of the disk as they do on the disk-wind parameters. Using a parameter range that encompasses the expected characteristics of the broad-line regions in AGNs, we construct a database of model profiles and measure a set of diagnostic properties. Comparisons of the model profiles with emission lines from a subset of Sloan digital Sky Survey quasars show that observed lines are consistent with moderately large optical depth in the disk wind and a range of disk inclinations i {approx}< 45 Degree-Sign . Including relativistic effects is necessary to produce the asymmetries of observed line profiles.

Flohic, Helene M. L. G. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio, 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Eracleous, Michael [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Center for Gravitational Wave Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Bogdanovic, Tamara, E-mail: flohic@das.uchile.cl, E-mail: mce@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: tamarab@astro.umd.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, 1204 CSS Building 224, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

46

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-124 Interpolated Sounding Value-Added Product  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1. INTERPSONDE output profiles for temperature, relative humidity, wind direction, and wind speed at the SGP Central Facility on October 2, 2009 ......

47

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.1;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",3.8,4.3,4.1 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",8.2,5.8,5.6 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0 31131," Sugar Manufacturing",0,0,0 3114," Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods ",7.3,6.7,6.2

48

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Impact Study of Value-Added Functionality on Inverters in ESS - Eric Green & Vivek Ramachandran, NC State  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Results (Model Validation) Results (Model Validation) Figure 6: Real and Reactive Power Reference vs. Output Figure 7: IGBT and Diode Loss from Manufacturer (Fuji) Figure 8: IGBT and Diode Loss from Simulation Impact Study of Value-Added Functionality on Inverters in Energy Storage Systems Motivation Power conversion systems (PCS) developers are incorporating value-added functions; little is known about the on overall PCS reliability. Objective Develop electrical models to gain an understanding of the degradation of a PCS and its internal components due to value- added functionality; primarily VAR generation. Investigation and modeling of frequency support applications may be considered as a secondary objective.

49

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-095 The Microbase Value-Added Product: A Baseline Retrieval of Cloud  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 The Microbase Value-Added Product: A Baseline Retrieval of Cloud Microphysical Properties M Dunn K Johnson M Jensen May 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

50

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-005.1 ARM Value-Added Product (VAP) Monthly Status Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 ARM Value-Added Product (VAP) Monthly Status Report ARM Translator Team J. Comstock C. Flynn M. Jensen C. Long D. Turner S. Xie March 13, 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

51

CEICEI--BoisBois European Confederation of Woodworking IndustriesEuropean Confederation of Woodworking Industries ValueValue--added wood productsadded wood products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Woodworking Industries ValueValue--added wood productsadded wood products markets: flooringmarkets: flooring of Woodworking Industries Wood flooring and woodWood flooring and wood--based flooringbased flooring · "Genuine" wood ­ Solid products (parquet, planks, ...) ­ Products with a "genuine" top layer · Multilayer parquet

52

EMSL - nuclei  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nuclei en Diffusional Motion of Redox Centers in Carbonate Electrolytes . http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsdiffusional-motion-redox-centers-carbonate-electrolytes

53

Superdeformed nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the most recent advances in the understanding of the physics of superdeformed nuclei from the point of view of the experimentalists. It covers among other subjects the following topics: (1) the discovery of a new region of superdeformed nuclei near A=190, (2) the surprising result of the occurrence of bands with identical transition energies in neighboring superdeformed nuclei near A=150 and A=190, (3) the importance of octupole degrees of freedom at large deformation and (4) the properties associated with the feeding and the decay of superdeformed bands. The text presented hereafter will appear as a contribution to the Annual Review of Nuclear and Particle Science, Volume 41. 88 refs., 11 figs.

Janssens, R.V.F.; Khoo, Teng Lek.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Fermentation of Barley by Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Examination of Barley as a Feedstock for Bioethanol Production and Value-Added Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...significance. Cereal grains are high in starch and are currently...2006 at the Kaun Seed Farm in Red Deer...profile of selected seeds, grains, and...technology. Cereal Chem. 72: 360-364...using a granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme. Cereal Chem. 82: 734-738...

Amera Gibreel; James R. Sandercock; Jingui Lan; Laksiri A. Goonewardene; Ruurd T. Zijlstra; Jonathan M. Curtis; David C. Bressler

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

55

Testing a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Remote Sensing Method  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a Cloud Condensation Nuclei a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Remote Sensing Method S. J. Ghan Climate Physics Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington D. R. Collin Department of Atmospheric Sciences Texas A&M University College Station, Texas Introduction Under certain conditions vertical profiles of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra can be retrieved from ground-based measurements (Ghan and Collins 2003). Surface measurements of the CCN spectrum are scaled by the ratio of the 180 backscatter (or extinction) profile to the surface backscatter (or extinction). The backscatter (or extinction) profile is measured by Raman lidar (RL), and is corrected to dry conditions using the vertical profile of relative humidity (calculated from the absolute

56

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",3,3,3 " 20-49",5,5,4 " 50-99",6,5,4 " 100-249",5,5,4 " 250-499",7,9,7 " 500 and Over",3,2,2 "Total",2,2,2

57

ARM - Value-Added Products - Status  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Process Status Software Status Status Updated On Notes Released Version SGP C1 Green led Running Green led Released 2012-08-06 SGP.C1 (Lamont, OK) 1997-2009 v2.0:...

58

ARM - Value-Added Product (VAP) Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EE, MA Miller, RC Perez, DD Turner, KP Moran, BE Martner, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, RT Marchand, KB Widener, DJ Rodriguez, T Uttal, JH Mather, CJ Flynn, KL Gaustad, and B Ermold...

59

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",2.5,2.5,2.4 " 20-49",5,5,4.3 " 50-99",5.8,5.8,5.3 " 100-249",6.2,6.2,5.3 " 250-499",8.2,8,7.1 " 500 and Over",4.3,3,2.7

60

EMSL - quadrupolar nuclei  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

quadrupolar-nuclei en Diffusional Motion of Redox Centers in Carbonate Electrolytes . http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsdiffusional-motion-redox-centers-carbonate-electr...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Testing a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Remote Sensing Method  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a Cloud Condensation Nuclei a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Remote Sensing Method S. J. Ghan Climate Dynamics Group Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Under certain conditions vertical profiles of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra can be retrieved from ground-based measurements. Surface measurements of the CCN spectrum are scaled by the ratio of the backscatter (or extinction) profile to the surface backscatter (or extinction). The backscatter (or extinction) profile is measured by Raman lidar, and is corrected to dry conditions using the vertical profile of relative humidity (also measured by Raman Lidar) and surface measurements of the dependence of backscatter (or extinction) on relative humidity. This method should be accurate up to

62

Silicate absorption in heavily obscured galaxy nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectroscopy at 8-13 microns with T-ReCS on Gemini-S is presented for 3 galaxies with substantial silicate absorption features, NGC 3094, NGC 7172 and NGC 5506. In the galaxies with the deepest absorption bands, the silicate profile towards the nuclei is well represented by the emissivity function derived from the circumstellar emission from the red supergiant, mu Cephei which is also representative of the mid-infrared absorption in the diffuse interstellar medium in the Galaxy. There is spectral structure near 11.2 microns in NGC 3094 which may be due to a component of crystalline silicates. In NGC 5506, the depth of the silicate absorption increases from north to south across the nucleus, suggestive of a dusty structure on scales of 10s of parsecs. We discuss the profile of the silicate absorption band towards galaxy nuclei and the relationship between the 9.7 micron silicate and 3.4 micron hydrocarbon absorption bands.

P. F. Roche; C. Packham; D. K. Aitken; R. E. Mason

2006-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

63

Symmetries in nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of dynamical symmetries or spectrum generating algebras for the solution of the nuclear many-body problem is reviewed. General notions of symmetry and dynamical symmetry in quantum mechanics are introduced and illustrated with simple examples such as the SO(4) symmetry of the hydrogen atom and the isospin symmetry in nuclei. Two nuclear models, the shell model and the interacting boson model, are reviewed with particular emphasis on their use of group-theoretical techniques.

Van Isacker, P. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3 BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

64

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Value of Shipments and Receipts" ,"(million dollars)" ," Under 20",3,3,3

65

Antiproton Absorption in Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the analysis of experimental data on forward antiproton production on nuclei. The calculations are done in the framework of a folding model which takes properly into account both incoherent direct proton-nucleon and cascade pion-nucleon antiproton production processes as well as internal nucleon momentum distribution. The effective antiproton-nucleon cross section in nuclear matter and the imaginary part of the antiproton nuclear optical potential are estimated to be 25-45 mb and -(38-56) MeV at normal nuclear matter density, respectively. The results of the performed analysis evidence for the decreasing of antiproton absorption in the nuclear medium.

Yu. T. Kiselev; E. Ya. Paryev

2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

66

Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo and asymmetry parameter at Barrow. Sivaraman, Chitra Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Flynn, Connor Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Category: Aerosols Efforts are currently underway to run and evaluate the Broadband Heating Rate Profile project at the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site for the time period March 2004 - February 2005. The Aerosol Best-Estimate (ABE) Value-Added Procedure (VAP) is to provide continuous estimates of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single-scatter albedo, and asymmetry parameter above the Northern Slopes of Alaska (NSA) facility. In the interest of temporal continuity, we have developed an algorithm that

67

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Employment Size" ," Under 50",3,4,4 ," 50-99",5,5,5 ," 100-249",4,4,3

68

ARM - Measurement - Cloud condensation nuclei  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

condensation nuclei condensation nuclei ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud condensation nuclei Small particles (typically 0.0002 mm, or 1/100 th the size of a cloud droplet) about which cloud droplets coalesce. Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CCN : Cloud Condensation Nuclei Particle Counter Field Campaign Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System

69

Value-Added Attributes of the QA Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

1. Senior Management Ownership Senior management must take full ownership of the quality assurance program. These managers should establish policies and objectives focused on achieving the organization's mission while improving the quality of the organization's products and services. They must create an environment that promotes quality and the improvement of quality throughout the entire organization.

70

Understanding transit travel behavior : value added by smart cards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Travel behavior represents a particularly complex area of research in transportation given the interaction between transport supply characteristics and the user perceptions which guide his/her decisions. Thanks to the ...

Gupta, Saumya, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

ARM Evaluation Product : Droplet Number Concentration Value-Added Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cloud droplet number concentration is an important factor in understanding aerosol-cloud interactions. As aerosol concentration increases, it is expected that droplet number concentration, Nd, will increase and droplet size decrease, for a given liquid water path (Twomey 1977), which will greatly affect cloud albedo as smaller droplets reflect more shortwave radiation. However, the magnitude and variability of these processes under different environmental conditions is still uncertain. McComiskey et al. (2009) have implemented a method, based on Boers and Mitchell (1994), for calculating Nd from ground-based remote sensing measurements of optical depth and liquid water path. They show that the magnitude of the aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) varies with a range of factors, including the relative value of the cloud liquid water path (LWP), the aerosol size distribution, and the cloud updraft velocity. Estimates of Nd under a range of cloud types and conditions and at a variety of sites are needed to further quantify the impacts of aerosol cloud interactions.

Riihimaki, Laura

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Commercial Demonstration of Wood Recovery, Recycling, and Value Adding Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This commercial demonstration project demonstrated the technical feasibility of converting low-value, underutilized and waste stream solid wood fiber material into higher valued products. With a growing need to increase product/production yield and reduce waste in most sawmills, few recovery operations and practically no data existed to support the viability of recovery operations. Prior to our efforts, most all in the forest products industry believed that recovery was difficult, extremely labor intensive, not cost effective, and that recovered products had low value and were difficult to sell. This project provided an opportunity for many within the industry to see through demonstration that converting waste stream material into higher valued products does in fact offer a solution. Our work, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, throughout the project aimed to demonstrate a reasonable approach to reducing the millions of recoverable solid wood fiber tons that are annually treated as and converted into low value chips, mulch and fuel. Consequently sawmills continue to suffer from reduced availability of forest resources, higher raw material costs, growing waste disposal problems, increased global competition, and more pressure to operate in an Environmentally Friendly manner. It is our belief (based upon the experience of this project) that the successful mainstreaming of the recovery concept would assist in alleviating this burden as well as provide for a realistically achievable economic benefit to those who would seriously pursue the concept and tap into the rapidly growing ''GREEN'' building marketplace. Ultimately, with participation and aggressive pursuit of the recovery concept, the public would benefit in that: (1) Landfill/disposal waste volume could be reduced adding greater life to existing municipal landfill sites thereby minimizing the need to prematurely license and open added facilities. Also, there would be a cost avoidance benefit associated to what would have been the added municipal (community) management costs involved with maintaining closed landfills. (2) With greater quantities of recovered material being returned to and integrated into manufacturing and the marketplace, reduced demand upon virgin wood sources could help lead the way to promoting improved relations and environmental balance between producers and consumers further expanding the value of our natural resource without adding environmental burden.

Auburn Machinery, Inc.

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Photoproduction of mesons off nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent results for the photoproduction of mesons off nuclei are reviewed. These experiments have been performed for two major lines of research related to the properties of the strong interaction. The investigation of nucleon resonances requires light nuclei as targets for the extraction of the isospin composition of the electromagnetic excitations. This is done with quasi-free meson photoproduction off the bound neutron and supplemented with the measurement of coherent photoproduction reactions, serving as spin and/or isospin filters. Furthermore, photoproduction from light and heavy nuclei is a very efficient tool for the study of the interactions of mesons with nuclear matter and the in-medium properties of hadrons. Experiments are currently rapidly developing due to the combination of high quality tagged (and polarized) photon beams with state-of-the-art 4pi detectors and polarized targets.

B. Krusche

2011-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

74

Muon Capture in Heavy Nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The systematics of muon capture rates in complex nuclei is discussed in the closure approximation. It is shown that for calculations in infinite nuclear matter, the nuclear ground state can be reasonably approximated by an infinite Fermi gas. The closure approximation and Fermi-gas model for the nuclear ground state are then used in an analysis of the experimental capture rates in a large number of nuclei. We find that this procedure does allow one to satisfactorily interpret quantitatively the muon-capture rates in the heavier nuclei and that it is possible to interpret the analysis in a manner which is not inconsistent with a universal Fermi interaction. The possibility of using muon capture rates to determine a neutron-proton nuclear-radius difference is also explored but with negative results.

R. Klein

1966-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

75

Neutron scattering on deformed nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of neutron elastic and inelastic differential cross sections around 14 MeV for 9Be C 181 Ta 232Th 238U and 239Pu have been analyzed using a coupled channel (CC) formalism for deformed nuclei and phenomenological global optical model potentials (OMP). For the actinide targets these results are compared with the predictions of a semi?microscopic calculation using Jeukenne Lejeune and Mahaux (JLM) microscopic OMP and a deformed ground state nuclear density. The overall agreement between calculations and the measurements is reasonably good even for the very light nuclei where the quality of the fits is better than those obtained with spherical OMP.

L. F. Hansen; R. C. Haight; B. A. Pohl; C. Wong; Ch. Lagrange

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Proton Distribution in Heavy Nuclei  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

It is reasoned that, from considerations connected with beta-decay stability and Coulomb repulsion forces, a neutron excess is developed on the surface of heavy nuclei. Several consequences of this qualitative analysis in nucleon interactions are briefly noted. (K.S.)

Johnson, M. H; Teller, E.

1953-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

77

Electrons and Nuclei: Fundamental Interactions and Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Examples are given of the usefulness of electrons in interaction with nuclei for probing fundamental interactions and structure

Ernest M. Henley

1998-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

78

Neutron-deficient nuclei studied with stable and radioactive beams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...radioactive nuclei compiled by W. Gelletly Neutron-deficient nuclei studied with stable and radioactive beams Neutron-deficient nuclei close to the proton...proton drip-line|radioactive beams| Neutron-deficient nuclei studied with stable...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

People Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What Is NIF? How NIF Works Seven Wonders Beamline NIF Construction Who Works for NIF & PS? People Profiles Management Awards Honors Fellows Who Partners with NIF? FAQs Visit Us...

80

Mentee Profile  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mentee Profile Mentee Profile The information you provide on this form will assist us in providing you with a list of prospective mentor from which to choose the most appropriate match. Once you've completed the form, please email it to doementoringprogram@hq.doe.gov . Thank you for your interest in the DOE Mentoring Program. Name (last/first): Phone Number: Job Title/Series/Grade: Organization (indicate HQ or field - complete address): Email Address: Are you a Veteran? If yes, do want a veteran mentee? If yes, which branch of the service? Are you student or intern? Do you have a preference on mentor? For example, male, female, particular career field, specific person or other? If so, what or who? Do you want a mentor in your career field? What are your career goals?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Mentor Profile  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mentor Profile Mentor Profile The information you provide on this form will assist us in providing you with a list of prospective mentee from which to choose the most appropriate match. Once you've completed the form, please email it to doementoringprogram@hq.doe.gov . Thank you for your interest in the DOE Mentoring Program. Name (last/first): Phone Number: Job Title/Series/Grade: Organization (indicate HQ or field - complete address): Email Address: Are you a Veteran? If yes, do want a veteran mentee? If yes, which branch of the service? Do you want a student or intern mentee? Do you have a preference on mentee? For example, male, female, particular career field or other? If so, what or state name of pre selected mentee? Do you want a mentee in your career field? What are your hobbies?

82

Nuclei embedded in an electron gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The properties of nuclei embedded in an electron gas are studied within the relativistic mean-field approach. These studies are relevant for nuclear properties in astrophysical environments such as neutron-star crusts and supernova explosions. The electron gas is treated as a constant background in the Wigner-Seitz cell approximation. We investigate the stability of nuclei with respect to alpha and beta decay. Furthermore, the influence of the electronic background on spontaneous fission of heavy and superheavy nuclei is analyzed. We find that the presence of the electrons leads to stabilizing effects for both $\\alpha$ decay and spontaneous fission for high electron densities. Furthermore, the screening effect shifts the proton dripline to more proton-rich nuclei, and the stability line with respect to beta decay is shifted to more neutron-rich nuclei. Implications for the creation and survival of very heavy nuclear systems are discussed.

Thomas J. Buervenich; Igor N. Mishustin; Walter Greiner

2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

83

Radiative muon capture in nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy spectra of photons following negative muon absorption in C12, O16, Al27, Ca40, Fenat, Ho165, and Bi209 have been measured with two NaI spectrometers. The branching ratios for the emission of high energy photons give information on the induced pseudoscalar coupling constant gP in nuclear matter. The data for light nuclei are in agreement with the theoretical calculations using the nucleonic value of gP?7gA predicted by the partially conserved axial vector current hypothesis, while significantly lower values of gP are required to fit the data of the heavier elements with presently existing theoretical predictions. Disregarding the remaining theoretical uncertainties, these results can be interpreted as a further indication of the renormalization of the nucleonic form factors inside the nucleus.

M. Döbeli; M. Doser; L. van Elmbt; M. W. Schaad; P. Truöl; A. Bay; J. P. Perroud; J. Imazato; T. Ishikawa

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Non-classical nuclei and growth kinetics of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys during ageing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this manuscript, we quantitatively calculated the thermodynamic properties of critical nuclei of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys. The concentration profiles of the critical nuclei and nucleation energy barriers were predicted by the constrained shrinking dimer dynamics (CSDD) method. It is found that Cr concentration distribution in the critical nuclei strongly depend on the overall Cr concentration as well as temperature. The critical nuclei are non-classical because the concentration in the nuclei is smaller than the thermodynamic equilibrium value. These results are in agreement with atomic probe observation. The growth kinetics of both classical and non-classical nuclei was investigated by the phase field approach. The simulations of critical nucleus evolution showed a number of interesting phenomena: 1) a critical classical nucleus first shrinks toward its non-classical nucleus and then grows; 2) a non-classical nucleus has much slower growth kinetics at its earlier growth stage compared to the diffusion-controlled growth kinetics. 3) a critical classical nucleus grows faster at the earlier growth stage than the non-classical nucleus. All of these results demonstrate that it is critical to introduce the correct critical nuclei in order to correctly capture the kinetics of precipitation.

Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Xin

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

85

Separating Cloud Forming Nuclei from Interstitial Aerosol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has become important to characterize the physicochemical properties of aerosol that have initiated the warm and ice clouds. The data is urgently needed to better represent the aerosol-cloud interaction mechanisms in the climate models. The laboratory and in-situ techniques to separate precisely the aerosol particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), termed as cloud nuclei (CN) henceforth, have become imperative in studying aerosol effects on clouds and the environment. This review summarizes these techniques, design considerations, associated artifacts and challenges, and briefly discusses the need for improved designs to expand the CN measurement database.

Kulkarni, Gourihar R.

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

86

Fusion Reactor Plasmas with Polarized Nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear fusion rates can be enhanced or suppressed by polarization of the reacting nuclei. In a magnetic fusion reactor, the depolarization time is estimated to be longer than the reaction time.

R. M. Kulsrud; H. P. Furth; E. J. Valeo; M. Goldhaber

1982-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

87

From Nucleons To Nuclei To Fusion Reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclei are prototypes of many-body open quantum systems. Complex aggregates of protons and neutrons that interact through forces arising from quantum chromo-dynamics, nuclei exhibit both bound and unbound states, which can be strongly coupled. In this respect, one of the major challenges for computational nuclear physics, is to provide a unified description of structural and reaction properties of nuclei that is based on the fundamental underlying physics: the constituent nucleons and the realistic interactions among them. This requires a combination of innovative theoretical approaches and high-performance computing. In this contribution, we present one of such promising techniques, the ab initio no-core shell model/resonating-group method, and discuss applications to light nuclei scattering and fusion reactions that power stars and Earth-base fusion facilities.

Quaglioni, S; Navratil, P; Roth, R; Horiuchi, W

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Spectroscopy of gallium selenide nanoparticle nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the presence of GaSe nanoparticle nuclei which are non-Superradiance in GaSe Nanoparticle Aggregates”, Journal ofStrongly-Coupled GaSe Nanoparticle Aggregates”, Journal of

Lair, Deborah L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Cloud Condensation Nuclei Retrievals at Cloud Base in North Dakota  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Condensation Nuclei Retrievals at Cloud Base in North Dakota · Mariusz Starzec #12;Motivation Compare University of Wyoming (UWyo) and Droplet Measurement Technologies (DMT) cloud condensation nuclei condensation nuclei concentration (CCNC) at any supersaturation (SS) #12;Background Aerosols act as nuclei

Delene, David J.

90

Nuclear structure and reactions with stored nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of ion-storage rings is discussed for studies of nuclear reactions and structure, with emphasis on energetic beams of short- lived, radioactive nuclei. Aspects of internal versus external luminosity are considered as well as other issues connected with the inverse kinematics of reactions induced by a circulating beam of complex nuclei. Some of the physics motivation that is driving studies with radioactive beams is described.

Henning, W.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy...

92

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw)...

93

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer...

94

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer...

95

Jacobi shape transition in fp shell nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jacobi shape transition from noncollective oblate to super or hyperdeformed collective prolate or triaxial shape taking place in rotating nuclei as in the case of gravitating rotating stars is studied in fp shell nuclei 44Ti, 48Cr, 52Fe, and 56Ni. The cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky method is used to detect such transition. The method of tuning the angular velocity to get fixed spin is utilized in these calculations. Pairing is not taken into account since Jacobi transition occurs only at very high spin where pairing correlations would have already vanished. Our results show that all the four nuclei considered in this work are good candidates for detecting the Jacobi shape transition.

G. Shanmugam; V. Ramasubramanian; S. N. Chintalapudi

2001-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

96

Structure and spectroscopy of transcurium nuclei.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stability of the superheavy elements depends on the shell corrections which are governed by the single-particle spectra. Ideally one would like to experimentally determine the single-particle levels in the superheavy nuclei but the production of only a few atoms of these nuclides precludes such measurements. One therefore has to identify single-particle levels in the heaviest nuclei which are available in at least nanoCurie amounts. They have studied the structure of such heavy nuclei in the Z=98 region and identified many single-particle states. In particular, they have studied the structure of {sup 251}Cf and {sup 249}Bk by measuring the radiations emitted in the {alpha} decay of {sup 255}Fm and {sup 253}Es. These single-particle spectra can be used to test theoretical models for superheavy elements.

Ahmad, I.

2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

97

User_TalentProfile  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of accessing their talent profiles, adding information to their profiles, and editing existing talent profile information. Task A. Access Talent Profile Enter the web address (URL) of the user application into your browser Address field and press the Enter key. Enter your user ID in the User ID textbox. Enter your password in the Password textbox. Click Sign In. Access Talent Profile 4 Steps Task A Add Information to Talent Profile Sections 5 Steps Task B Edit Talent Profile Sections

98

Searching for X(5) behavior in nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have searched even-even nuclei with Z>~20, N>~20 to find examples displaying the predicted characteristics of X(5) critical point behavior. On the basis of the yrast state energies and yrast intraband transition strengths, the best candidates are 126Ba, 130Ce, and the previously suggested examples of the N=90 isotones of Nd, Sm, Gd, and Dy.

R. M. Clark; M. Cromaz; M. A. Deleplanque; M. Descovich; R. M. Diamond; P. Fallon; R. B. Firestone; I. Y. Lee; A. O. Macchiavelli; H. Mahmud; E. Rodriguez-Vieitez; F. S. Stephens; D. Ward

2003-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

99

Transfer-induced fission of superheavy nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Possibilities of transfer-induced fission of new isotopes of superheavy nuclei with charge numbers 103-108 are studied for the first time in the reactions {sup 48}Ca+{sup 244,246,248}Cm at energies near the corresponding Coulomb barriers. The predicted cross sections are found to be measurable with the detection of three-body final states.

Adamian, G. G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute of Nuclear Physics, Tashkent, UZ-702132 Uzbekistan (Uzbekistan); Antonenko, N. V.; Zubov, A. S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Sargsyan, V. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Yerevan State University, Yerevan (Armenia); Scheid, W. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik der Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, D-35392 Giessen (Germany)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Magnetic field outflows from active galactic nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine several models of injecting magnetic fields into clusters of galaxies from active galactic nuclei, which are the powerful outflows associated with supermassive black holes in the centers of clusters. Shown are magnetic field lines after six ... Keywords: scientific visualization

David Pugmire; Paul Sutter; Paul Ricker; Hsiang-Yi (Karen) Yang; George Foreman

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Thermodynamics of nuclei in thermal contact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The behaviour of a di-nuclear system in the regime of strong pairing correlations is studied with the methods of statistical mechanics. It is shown that the thermal averaging is strong enough to assure the application of thermodynamical methods to the energy exchange between the two nuclei in contact. In particular, thermal averaging justifies the definition of a nuclear temperature.

Karl-Heinz Schmidt; Beatriz Jurado

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

102

Four-body correlations in nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-energy spectra of 4$n$ nuclei are described with high accuracy in terms of four-body correlated structures ("quartets"). The states of all $N\\geq Z$ nuclei belonging to the $A=24$ isobaric chain are represented as a superposition of two-quartet states, with quartets being characterized by isospin $T$ and angular momentum $J$. These quartets are assumed to be those describing the lowest states in $^{20}$Ne ($T_z$=0), $^{20}$F ($T_z$=1) and $^{20}$O ($T_z$=2). We find that the spectrum of the self-conjugate nucleus $^{24}$Mg can be well reproduced in terms of $T$=0 quartets only and that, among these, the $J$=0 quartet plays by far the leading role in the structure of the ground state. The same conclusion is drawn in the case of the three-quartet $N=Z$ nucleus $^{28}$Si. As an application of the quartet formalism to nuclei not confined to the $sd$ shell, we provide a description of the low-lying spectrum of the proton-rich $^{92}$Pd. The results achieved indicate that, in 4$n$ nuclei, four-body degrees of f...

Sambataro, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Nuclear Shell Structure and Beta Decay I. Odd A Nuclei II. Even A Nuclei  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

In Part I a systematics is given of all transitions for odd A nuclei for which sufficiently reliable data are available. The allowed or forbidden characters of the transitions are correlated with the positions of the initial and final odd nucleon groups in the nuclear shell scheme. The nuclear shells show definite characteristics with respect to parity of the ground states. The latter is the same as the one obtained from known spins and magnetic moments in a one-particle interpretation. In Part II a systematics of the beta transitions of even-A nuclei is given. An interpretation of the character of the transitions in terms of nuclear shell structure is achieved on the hypothesis that the odd nucleon groups have the same structure as in odd-A nuclei, together with a simple coupling rule between the neutron and proton groups in odd-odd nuclei.

Mayer, M.G.; Moszkowski, S.A.; Nordheim, L.W.

1951-05-00T23:59:59.000Z

104

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-120 Raman Lidar Profiles-Temperature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 Raman Lidar Profiles-Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) Value-Added Product RK Newsom C Sivaraman SA McFarlane October 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

105

Photoproduction of pi0-mesons from nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photoproduction of neutral pions from nuclei (carbon, calcium, niobium, lead) has been studied for incident photon energies from 200 MeV to 800 MeV with the TAPS detector using the Glasgow photon tagging spectrometer at the Mainz MAMI accelerator. Data were obtained for the inclusive photoproduction of neutral pions and the partial channels of quasifree single pi0, double pi0, and pi0pi+/- photoproduction. They have been analyzed in terms of the in-medium behavior of nucleon resonances and the pion - nucleus interaction. They are compared to earlier measurements from the deuteron and to the predictions of a Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) transport model for photon induced pion production from nuclei.

B. Krusche; J. Lehr; J. Ahrens; J. R. M. Annand; R. Beck; F. Bloch; L. S. Fog; D. Hornidge; S. Janssen; M. Kotulla; J. C. McGeorge; I. J. D. MacGregor; J. Messchendorp; V. Metag; U. Mosel; R. Novotny; R. O. Owens; M. Pfeiffer; R. Sanderson; S. Schadmand; D. P. Watts

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Isovector excitations of N?Z nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that the method based on the tensor coupling of an appropriate family of isovector excitation operators to the parent isospin multiplet can be used to advantage for the correct treatment of the isospin degree of freedom in nonisoscalar nuclei. This method is applicable to any isovector excitation operator and for parent states which need not be of the closed subshells type. As an illustration we apply it to the study of the Gamow-Teller transition strength in Zr90.

E. J. V. de Passos; D. P. Menezes; A. P. N. R. Galeao

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Polarization of Nucleons Elastically Scattered by Nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The polarization of 424-Mev nucleons elastically scattered by nuclei is calculated by a method which is similar to the Born approximation, but in which the phase shifts of the incident plane wave due to the scattering potential is taken into consideration. A qualitative agreement with the experimental result is obtained if one uses the well parameters determined by Riesenfeld and Watson. Poor agreement at the diffraction minimum may be attributed to the existence of inelastic scattering in the experimental data.

Keiichi Nishimura

1958-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Magnetic excitations in nuclei with neutron excess  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The excitation of the $1^+$, $2^-$ and $3^+$ modes in $^{16}$O, $^{22}$O, $^{24}$O, $^{28}$O, $^{40}$Ca, $^{48}$Ca, $^{52}$Ca and $^{60}$Ca nuclei is studied with self-consistent random phase approximation calculations. Finite-range interactions of Gogny type, containing also tensor-isospin terms, are used. We analyze the evolution of the magnetic resonances with the increasing number of neutrons, the relevance of collective effects, the need of a correct treatment of the continuum and the role of the tensor force.

G. Co'; V. De Donno; M. Anguiano; A. M. Lallena

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

109

Thermodynamics of nuclei in thermal contact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermodynamic properties of a dinuclear system are studied with the methods of statistical mechanics. A schematic model calculation shows that the excitation-energy transfer proceeds in energy steps of considerable amount which are subject to large fluctuations. As a consequence, thermal averaging is strong enough to assure the application of thermodynamical methods for describing the energy exchange between the two nuclei in contact. In particular, thermal averaging justifies the definition of a nuclear temperature. The division of excitation energy in thermal equilibrium is derived for several analytical descriptions of the level density.

Karl-Heinz Schmidt and Beatriz Jurado

2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

110

Electromagnetic Dipole Strength in Transitional Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electromagnetic dipole absorption cross-sections of transitional nuclei with large-amplitude shape fluctuations are calculated in a microscopic way by introducing the concept of Instantaneous Shape Sampling. The concept bases on the slow shape dynamics as compared to the fast dipole vibrations. The elctromagnetic dipole strength is calculated by means of RPA for the instantaneous shapes, the probability of which is obtained by means of IBA. Very good agreement with the experimental absorption cross sections near the nucleon emission threshold is obtained.

S. Q. Zhang; I. Bentley; S. Brant; F. Dönau; S. Frauendorf; B. Kämpfer; R. Schwengner; A. Wagner

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

111

LANSCE | News & Media | Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Profiles Shea Mosby: Lighting the way for nuclear science discoveries By Diana Del Mauro ADEPS Communications Photos by Richard Robinson, IRM-CAS Shea Mosby Cradling a heavy...

112

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERCSPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)...

113

Management's Discussion & Analysis Profile  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7-26-2013. Management's Discussion & Analysis Profile The Bonneville Power Administration is a federal agency under the Department of Energy. BPA markets wholesale electrical power...

114

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERCSPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity...

115

Cloud condensation nuclei in Western Colorado : observations and model predictions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Variations in the warm cloud?active portion of atmospheric aerosols, or cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), have been shown to impact cloud droplet number concentration and subsequently… (more)

Ward, Daniel Stewart

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Local Fermi gas in inclusive muon capture from nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compare local Fermi gas and shell model in muon capture in nuclei in order to estimate the effect of finite nuclear size in low energy weak reactions.

J. E. Amaro; J. Nieves; M. Valverde; C. Maieron

2006-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

117

Nuclear Computational Low Energy Initiative (NUCLEI) | The Ames...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in nuclei, few body systems, and electroweak processes), NIF (light-ion thermonuclear reactions in a terrestrially controlled plasma environment), MAJORANA and FNPB...

118

Neutron-halo nuclei in cold synthesis and cluster decay of heavy nuclei: Z=104 nucleus as an example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclei at the neutron-drip line are studied. The light neutron-halo nuclei are found to play an important role for both cold fusion reactions and exotic cluster decay studies of heavy nuclei at the neutron-drip line. For cold fusion reactions, beams of neutron-halo nuclei are shown to occur as natural extensions of the conventional lighter beams but with the corresponding target nuclei as the heavy neutron-rich radioactive nuclei. Thus, in synthesizing the various isotopes of a neutron-rich cool compound nucleus, both the target and projectile nuclei have to be richer in neutrons, with their proton numbers remaining the same. On the other hand, neutron-halo (cluster) decays are favored for a relatively less neutron-rich parent nucleus. Possible consequences of this work for the shell structure effects in neutron-rich heavy nuclei are also pointed out. This follows from the fact that the so far observed phenomena of both cold fusion and cluster radioactivity are associated with closed or nearly closed shell nuclei. Calculations are made for 104274,288, using the quantum mechanical fragmentation theory for cold fusion reaction studies and a performed cluster model for cluster decay studies.

Raj K. Gupta; Sarbjit Singh; Gottfried Münzenberg; Werner Scheid

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Nuclear induced breakup of halo nuclei H. Esbensen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear induced breakup of halo nuclei H. Esbensen Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 G. F. Bertsch Institute for Nuclear Theory, University of Washington, Seattle made in calculating the nuclear induced breakup of halo nuclei. We find that a truncated coupled

Bertsch George F.

120

Fusion Reaction of Halo Nuclei: Proton Halo versus Neutron Halo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......February 2004 research-article Articles Fusion Reaction of Halo Nuclei: Proton Halo...Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571, Japan. The fusion reaction of halo nuclei on heavy target...Schrodinger equation. We find that the fusion probability is enhanced by the presence......

Takashi Nakatsukasa; Kazuhiro Yabana; Makoto Ito; Minoru Kobayashi; Manabu Ueda

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Nucleons, Nuclei, and Atoms 1.1 Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Nucleons, Nuclei, and Atoms 1.1 Overview Despite the success of the Standard Model in explaining is the theme of this chapter: ultrasensitive techniques in atomic, nuclear, and particle physics that might of fundamental symmetries in experiments involving nucleons, nuclei, and atoms have played an essential role

122

Fragmentation Barriers of Toroidal and Bubble Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

those estimated recently from liquid-drop models [24,25]. We simulate the dynamics of nucleus-nucleus collisions with the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation [27] Bt " (27r)s dB+ v V?f~ ?V?U V'zfq ? d k2dO ""v12[fsf4(l ?f1)(1?f2) ?f~f2(1 ?fs)(1 ?f4.../49(4)/1778(5)/$06. 00 R1778 1994 The American Physical Society 49 FRAGMENTATION BARRIERS OF TOROIDAL AND BUBBLE NUCLEI R1779 TOP VIEW FRONT VIEW and 2 for 2Mo+ 2Mo collisions at E/A =75 MeV and b=0, for both the stifF (Fig. 1) and the soft (Fig. 2) equa- tions...

Xu, HM; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Tribble, Robert E.; Wong, C. Y.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Mean field and collisions in hot nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Collisions between heavy nuclei produce nuclear matter of high density and excitation. Brueckner methods are used to calculate the momentum and temperature dependent mean field for nucleons propagating through nuclear matter during these collisions. The mean field is complex and the imaginary part is related to the ''two-body'' collision, while the real part relates to ''one-body'' collisions. A potential model for the N-N interactions is avoided by calculating the Reaction matrix directly from the T-matrix (i.e., N-N phase shifts) using a version of Brueckner theory previously published by the author. Results are presented for nuclear matter at normal and twice normal density and for temperatures up to 50 MeV. 23 refs., 7 figs.

K /umlt o/hler, H.S.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic nuclei produced Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: . The dependence of obtained values for superheavy nuclei produced in cold fusion reactions on di27;erent... values for superheavy nuclei produced in cold...

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - amphoter target nuclei Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Exotic Nuclei... of short-lived, unstable (radioactive) nuclei for ... Source: TRIUMF Isotope Separation and ACceleration (ISAC) facility, beta-NMR Group Collection: Physics 28...

126

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

127

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

128

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

129

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

130

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,392 15 Electric Utilities 20,115 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 6,277 16 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,750,957 12 Electric Utilities 91,232,664 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 20,518,293 17 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 33 33 Nitrogen Oxide 57 17 Carbon Dioxide 55,683 15 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 43 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 31 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,099 35 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 21 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 20

131

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

132

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

133

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

134

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

135

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

136

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

137

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

138

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

139

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

140

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

142

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

143

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

144

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

145

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

146

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

147

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

148

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (West Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 16,495 24 Electric Utilities 11,719 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,775 19 Net Generation (megawatthours) 80,788,947 20 Electric Utilities 56,719,755 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 24,069,192 13 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 105 20 Nitrogen Oxide 49 23 Carbon Dioxide 74,283 12 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 20 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 25 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,027 5 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 34 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 33

149

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,128 50 Electric Utilities 260 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 868 43 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,619,990 49 Electric Utilities 720,853 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,899,137 35 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide * 51 Nitrogen Oxide 1 50 Carbon Dioxide 8 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 51 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3 51 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 51 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 48 Direct Use (megawatthours) 19,806 47

150

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

151

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

152

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

153

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

154

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

155

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

156

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

157

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

158

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,739 18 Electric Utilities 20,360 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,378 39 Net Generation (megawatthours) 92,312,989 18 Electric Utilities 90,176,805 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,136,184 46 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 233 8 Nitrogen Oxide 56 18 Carbon Dioxide 78,815 10 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 6 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 26 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,882 7 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 17 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 15

159

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

160

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

162

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

163

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

164

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

165

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

166

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

167

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

168

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New York) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 39,357 6 Electric Utilities 11,032 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 28,325 5 Net Generation (megawatthours) 136,961,654 9 Electric Utilities 34,633,335 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 102,328,319 5 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 62 25 Nitrogen Oxide 44 28 Carbon Dioxide 41,584 22 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 40 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 44 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 669 42 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,623,573 7 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 79,119,769 18

169

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

170

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

171

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

172

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric Utilities 12,418,332 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 188,933,540 3 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 232 9 Nitrogen Oxide 83 8 Carbon Dioxide 103,128 6 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 25 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 38 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,129 34 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,760,674 6 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 77,890,532 19

173

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

174

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

175

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,623 45 Electric Utilities 2,994 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 629 48 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,049,636 46 Electric Utilities 8,682,448 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,367,188 47 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 43 Nitrogen Oxide 12 43 Carbon Dioxide 3,611 47 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 23 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 8 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 792 41 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 46 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 42

176

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

177

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,697 31 Electric Utilities 937 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,760 8 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,804,824 34 Electric Utilities 802,906 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 42,001,918 10 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 35 31 Nitrogen Oxide 17 38 Carbon Dioxide 20,291 36 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 34 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 39 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,045 38 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,123,422 26 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 31,822,942 34

178

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

179

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

180

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

182

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

183

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

184

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

185

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

186

profiles | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

profiles profiles Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

187

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

188

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

189

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

190

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 790 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 790 46 Net Generation (megawatthours) 199,858 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 199,858 51 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 1 49 Nitrogen Oxide * 51 Carbon Dioxide 191 50 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 8.8 2 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.0 3 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,104 1 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,876,995 43 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 3,388,490 50 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 8,488,505 12

191

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

192

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

193

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

194

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

195

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

196

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

197

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

198

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

199

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

200

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,837 14...

202

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,587...

203

Profiling for Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Performance and profiling are critical words in our everyday conversations in the office where I work, in our engagements with clients, and in our teaching. Both words apply equally well to all aspec...

Ron Crisco

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

205

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

206

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

207

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

208

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

209

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

210

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

211

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

212

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,638 13 Electric Utilities 23,008 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,630 23 Net Generation (megawatthours) 125,180,739 11 Electric Utilities 107,852,560 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,328,179 20 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 385 4 Nitrogen Oxide 120 4 Carbon Dioxide 116,283 5 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 6.8 4 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 12 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,048 4 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 11 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 8

213

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

214

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

215

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

216

Evaluation of GCM Column Radiation Models Under Cloudy Conditions with The Arm BBHRP Value Added Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overarching goal of the project was to improve the transfer of solar and thermal radiation in the most sophisticated computer tools that are currently available for climate studies, namely Global Climate Models (GCMs). This transfer can be conceptually separated into propagation of radiation under cloudy and under cloudless conditions. For cloudless conditions, the factors that affect radiation propagation are gaseous absorption and scattering, aerosol particle absorption and scattering and surface albedo and emissivity. For cloudy atmospheres the factors are the various cloud properties such as cloud fraction, amount of cloud condensate, the size of the cloud particles, and morphological cloud features such as cloud vertical location, cloud horizontal and vertical inhomogeneity and cloud shape and size. The project addressed various aspects of the influence of the above contributors to atmospheric radiative transfer variability. In particular, it examined: (a) the quality of radiative transfer for cloudless and non-complex cloudy conditions for a substantial number of radiation algorithms used in current GCMs; (b) the errors in radiative fluxes from neglecting the horizontal variabiity of cloud extinction; (c) the statistical properties of cloud horizontal and vertical cloud inhomogeneity that can be incorporated into radiative transfer codes; (d) the potential albedo effects of changes in the particle size of liquid clouds; (e) the gaseous radiative forcing in the presence of clouds; and (f) the relative contribution of clouds of different sizes to the reflectance of a cloud field. To conduct the research in the various facets of the project, data from both the DOE ARM project and other sources were used. The outcomes of the project will have tangible effects on how the calculation of radiative energy will be approached in future editions of GCMs. With better calculations of radiative energy in GCMs more reliable predictions of future climate states will be attainable, thus affecting public policy decisions with great impact to public life.

Dr. Lazaros Oreopoulos and Dr. Peter M. Norris

2010-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

217

Catalytic Transformations of Biomass-Derived Materials into Value-Added Chemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This manuscript reviews recent literatures on synthesis of furfurals (5-hydroxymethylfurfural, furfural, 5-methyl-2-furaldehyde) from...d-galactose, d-arabinose, xylose, l-rhamnose, lactose, cellobiose, sucrose) ...

Atsushi Takagaki; Shun Nishimura; Kohki Ebitani

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Novel catalysts for valorization of biomass to value-added chemicals and fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

? Biomass valorization to get platform chemicals and fuels such as HMF, FDCA and DMF is discussed. Solid acids w...

NISHITA LUCAS; NARASIMHA RAO KANNA; ATUL S NAGPURE…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Market Channels and Value Added to Fish Landed at Monterey Bay Area Ports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sample Input-Output Data to Port Level Summaries with PacFINMonterey Bay area (MBA) ports: Moss Landing, Monterey andlanded at Monterey Bay ports (i.e. , Moss Landing, Monterey

Pomeroy, Caroline; Dalton, Michael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Process Design for the Biocatalysis of Value-Added Chemicals from Carbon Dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes results toward developing a process to sequester CO{sub 2} centered on the enzymes PEP carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase. The process involves the use of bacteria to convert CO{sub 2} and glucose as a co-substrate and generates succinic acid as a commodity chemical product. The study reports on strain development and process development. In the area of strain development, knockouts in genes which divert carbon from the enzymatic steps involved in CO{sub 2} consumption were completed, and were shown not to affect significantly the rate of CO{sub 2} sequestration and succinic acid generation. Furthermore, the pyc gene encoding for pyruvate carboxylase proved to be unstable when integrated onto the chromosome. In the area of process development, an optimal medium, pH and base counterion were obtained, leading to a sequestration rate as great as 800 mg/Lh. Detailed studies of gas phase composition demonstrated that CO{sub 2} composition has a significant affect on CO{sub 2} sequestration, while the presence of 'toxic' compounds in the gas, including NO{sub 2}, CO and SO{sub 2} did not have a detrimental effect on sequestration. Some results on prolonging the rate of sequestration indicate that enzyme activities decrease with time, suggesting methods to prolong enzyme activity may benefit the overall process.

Mark Eiteman

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Integrated Biorefinery: Conversion of Corn Fiber to Value-added Chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation provides a summary of Michigan Biotechnology Institute's efforts to employ the corn fiber fraction of a dry grind ethanol plant as a feedstock to produce succinic acid which has potential as a building block intermediate for a wide range of commodity chemicals.

Susanne Kleff

2007-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

222

How Do Patents Shape Global Value Chains? International and Domestic Patenting and Value-Added Trade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an important role in the global economy through its impact on technology diffusion, knowledge transfer they critically shape technology transfer. Coe and Helpman (1995) demonstrate the important effects of foreign R1 How Do Patents Shape Global Value Chains? International and Domestic Patenting and Value

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

223

Identifying Employment Structure and Training Needs In the Louisiana Value-Added Wood Products Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Manufacturing Today ___________________________ 62 Most Pressing Issues in Manufacturing in 5 Years ................................................................................70 VI. References and Additional Literature..........................................................................71 References _____________________________________________________ 71 Additional Literature

224

Enzymatic Grafting of Peptides from Casein Hydrolysate to Chitosan. Potential for Value-Added Byproducts from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-3). The conventional approach to lessening such burdens is to institute better waste-management practices (e.g. composting or activated sludge treatments). These concerns are providing a renewed incentive for generating

Raghavan, Srinivasa

225

Assessing the Economic Viability of Bio-based Products for Missouri Value-added Crop Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While research and development on biobased products has continued strong over the years, parallel attention on the economics and management of such product innovation has been lacking. With the financial support of the Department of Energy, the Economics and Management of Agrobiotechnology Center at the University of Missouri-Columbia has launched a pilot graduate education program that seeks to fill the gap. Within this context, a multi-disciplinary research and teaching program has been structured with an emphasis on new product and innovation economics and management. More specifically, this pilot graduate education program has the following major objectives: (1) To provide students with a strong background in innovation economics, management, and strategy. (2) To diversify the students academic background with coursework in science and technology. (3) To familiarize the student with biobased policy initiatives through interaction with state and national level organizations and policymakers. (4) To facilitate active collaboration with industry involved in the development and production of biobased products. The pilot education program seeks to develop human capital and research output. Although the research is, initially, focused on issues related to the State of Missouri, the results are expected to have national implications for the economy, producers, consumers and environment.

Nicholas Kalaitzandonakes

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

Evaluating Your Value-Added Business Plan: Questions a Producer Needs to Ask  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for implementing a HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points) program to address food safety issues and liabilities? a19 If the venture involves exporting, have you consid- ered ISO 9000 and/or ISO 14000 certification? a19 If you will be acquiring an existing... ideas can fail simply because they are implemented at the wrong time or in the wrong place. In analyzing trends and drivers, it is important to recognize that the rate of change can be exponential rather than linear. a19 Is the proposed plan in a...

Klinefelter, Danny A.

2003-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

227

Mobile home automation: merging mobile value added services and home automation technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we study mobile home automation, a field that emerges from an integration of mobile application platforms and home automation technologies. We motivate our research and provide ... options of how he...

Goetz Botterweck; J. Felix Hampe…

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Market Channels and Value Added to Fish Landed at Monterey Bay Area Ports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Barbara, CA: California Seafood Council. \\ Skinner, Linda.1996. The Seafood Handbook: Everything You Needto Know to Buy Seafood. Journal Publications: Seattle.

Pomeroy, Caroline; Dalton, Michael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Market Channels and Value Added to Fish Landed at Monterey Bay Area Ports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

local harbormasters, seafood buyers and vendors whopackagers, distributors and seafood retailers. Anotherrevenues, and local retail seafood prices. Processors were

Pomeroy, Caroline; Dalton, Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Chapter 11 - Hydrothermal Upgradation of Algae into Value-added Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Energy security, increasing oil prices, fossil resource depletion, and climate change are some of the greatest challenges faced by mankind at present. Third-generation biofuel feedstock and micro-and macroalgae have many advantages over the first and second generations of biofuels. In addition, defatted algae can also be used as a feedstock for production of hydrocarbons. Thermochemical methods are more efficient than any other routes for conversion of algae. Among thermochemical methods, hydrothermal upgradation is the most promising because it can process feedstock such as algae with very high moisture content. Various reactors, catalysts, and operating parameters have been tested to valorize algae by liquefaction and gasification, and promising results have been obtained. Breakthroughs in reactors and/or catalysts for hydrothermal upgradation, proper utilization of the side products obtained, and integration with various other methods to extract high-value hydrocarbons/products from algae would help make algal biorefinery economical and sustainable.

Rawel Singh; Thallada Bhaskar; Bhavya Balagurumurthy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Top Value Added Chemicals from Biomass: Volume I--Results of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

building block chemicals that can be produced from sugars via biological or chemical conversions. 35523.pdf More Documents & Publications Myriant Succinic Acid Biorefinery Hydrogen...

232

DEVELOPMENT OF FUEL AND VALUE-ADDED CHEMICALS FROM PYROLYSIS OF WOOD/WASTE PLASTIC MIXTURE.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Highly oxygenated compounds in bio-oil produce negative properties that have hampered fuel development. Copyrolysis with plastics has increased hydrogen content in past research. Py-GC/MS analyses… (more)

Bhattacharya, Priyanka

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Process design and evaluation of value-added chemicals production from biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three different biodiesel production processes were simulated using the SuperPro Designer program. The process for producing biodiesel from soybean oil and methanol was designed using commercial chemical catal...

A. -Ra Go; Jae Wook Ko; Sang Jun Lee…

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Super Heavy Nuclei over Critical Fields and their Conections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low energy collisions of very heavy nuclei (238U+238U, 232Th+250Cf and 238U+248Cm) have been studied within the realistic dynamical model based on multi-dimensional Langevin equations. Large charge and mass transfer was found due to the 'inverse quasi-fission' process leading to formation of survived superheavy long-lived neutron-rich nuclei. In many events lifetime of the composite system consisting of two touching nuclei turns out to be rather long; sufficient for spontaneous positron formation from super-strong electric field, a fundamental QED process.

Greiner, Walter [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, J.W. Goethe-Universitaet, 60325 Frankfurt (Germany); Zagrebaev, Valery [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reaction, JINR, Dubna, 141980, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

2007-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

235

Spontaneous-fission half-lives of deformed superheavy nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spontaneous-fission half-lives of the heaviest nuclei are analyzed in a multidimensional deformation space. They are calculated in a dynamical approach, without any adjustable parameters. The potential energy is obtained by the macroscopic-microscopic method and the inertia tensor by the cranking method. The action integral is minimized by a variational procedure. Even-even nuclei with proton number Z=104–114 and neutron number N=142–176 are considered. The results reproduce existing experimental data rather well. Relatively long half-lives are predicted for many unknown nuclei, sufficient to detect them if synthesized in a laboratory.

R. Smola?czuk; J. Skalski; A. Sobiczewski

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Theory of deep-inelastic scattering from light nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a theory of deep-inelastic scattering from light nuclei that may be formulated in the target rest frame. (In our approach we can avoid the ambiguities that arise when boosting wave functions of light nuclei to an infinite momentum frame.) The resulting theory is applicable at relatively low values of momentum transfer and allows for a systematic treatment of off-mass-shell effects. We calculate the asymmetry in polarized leptoproduction from polarized H2 and He3 targets and also provide expressions for the spin-independent and spin-dependent structure functions of these nuclei.

L. S. Celenza; A. Pantziris; C. M. Shakin

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

High spins in gamma-soft nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclei which are soft with respect to the ..gamma.. shape degree of freedom are expected to have many different structures coexisting in the near-yrast regime. In particular, the lowest rotational quasi-particle in a high-j shell exerts a strong polarizing effect on ..gamma... The ..gamma.. to which it drives is found to vary smoothly over a 180/sup 0/ range as the position of the Fermi level varies. This simple rule is seen to have a direct connection with the energy staggering of alternate spin states in rotational bands. A diagram is presented which provides a general theoretical reference for experimental tests of the relation between ..gamma.., spin staggering, configuration, and nucleon number. In a quasicontinuum spectrum, the coexistence of different structures are expected to make several unrelated features appear within any one slice of sum energy and multiplicity. However, it is also seen that the in-band moment of inertia may be similar for many bands of different ..gamma...

Leander, G.A.; Frauendorf, S.; May, F.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Electromagnetic Studies of Mesons, Nucleons, and Nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Professor Baker was a faculty member at Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia, and, jointly, a Staff Physicist at Jefferson Lab in nearby Newport News from September 1989 to July 2006. The Department of Energy (DOE) funded the grant DE-FG02-97ER41035 Electromagnetic Studies of Mesons, Nucleons, and Nuclei, while Baker was in this joint appointment. Baker sent a closeout report on these activities to Hampton University’s Sponsored Research Office some years ago, shortly after joining Yale University in 2006. In the period around 2001, the research grant with Baker as the Principal Investigator (PI) was put under the supervision of Professor Liguang Tang at Hampton University. Baker continued to pursue the research while in this join appointment, however the administrative responsibilities with the DOE and with Hampton University rested with Professor Tang after 2001, to my recollection. What is written in this document is from Baker’s memory of the research activities, which he has not pursued since joining the Yale University faculty.

Baker, Oliver K.

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

239

Nuclear structure/nuclei far from stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines some of the nuclear structure topics discussed at the Los Alamos Workshop on the Science of Intense Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB). In it we also tried to convey some of the excitement of the participants for utilizing RIBs in their future research. The introduction of radioactive beams promises to be a major milestone for nuclear structure perhaps even more important than the last such advance in beams based on the advent of heavy-ion accelerators in the 1960's. RIBs not only will allow a vast number of new nuclei to be studies at the extremes of isospin, but the variety of combinations of exotic proton and neutron configurations should lead to entirely new phenomena. A number of these intriguing new studies and the profound consequences that they promise for understanding the structure of the atomic nucleus, nature's only many-body, strongly-inteacting quantum system, are discussed in the preceeding sections. However, as with any scientific frontier, the most interesting phenomena probably will be those that are not anticipated--they will be truly new.

Casten, R.F.; Garrett, J.D.; Moller, P.; Bauer, W.W.; Brenner, D.S.; Butler, G.W.; Crawford, J.E.; Davids, C.N.; Dyer, P.L.; Gregorich, K.; Hagbert, E.G.; Hamilton, W.D.; Harar, S.; Haustein, P.E.; Hayes, A.C.; Hoffman, D.C.; Hsu, H.H.; Madland, D.G.; Myers, W.D.; Penttila, H.T.; Ragnarsson, I.; Reeder, P.L.; Robertson, G.H.; Rowley, N.; Schreiber, F.; Seifert, H.L.; Sherrill, B.M.; Siciliano, E.R.; Sprouse, G.D.; Stephens, F

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

THEORETICAL STUDIES OF HADRONS AND NUCLEI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details final research results obtained during the 9 year period from June 1, 1997 through July 15, 2006. The research project, entitled â?ťTheoretical Studies of Hadrons and Nucleiâ?ť, was supported by grant DE-FG02-97ER41048 between North Carolina State University [NCSU] and the U. S. Department of Energy [DOE]. In compliance with grant requirements the Principal Investigator [PI], Professor Stephen R. Cotanch, conducted a theoretical research program investigating hadrons and nuclei and devoted to this program 50% of his time during the academic year and 100% of his time in the summer. Highlights of new, significant research results are briefly summarized in the following three sections corresponding to the respective sub-programs of this project (hadron structure, probing hadrons and hadron systems electromagnetically, and many-body studies). Recent progress is also discussed in a recent renewal/supplemental grant proposal submitted to DOE. Finally, full detailed descriptions of completed work can be found in the publications listed at the end of this report.

STEPHEN R COTANCH

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Performance profiles style sheet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2009 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2009 vii Major Findings This edition of Performance Profiles reviews financial and operating data for the calendar year 2009 and discusses important trends and emerging issues relevant to U.S. energy company operations. Major U.S.-based oil and natural gas producers and petroleum refiners submit the data in this report annually on Form EIA-28, the Financial Reporting System (FRS). FRS companies' net income declined to the lowest level since 2002.  Net income fell 66 percent (in constant 2009 dollars) to $30 billion in 2009 from $88 billion in 2008. Substantial reductions in oil and natural gas prices in 2009 slowed revenue growth. FRS companies cut operating costs but by less than the decline in revenue, resulting in a 69-percent drop in operating income.

242

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Nuclear Profiles 2010 State Nuclear Profiles 2010 April 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Nuclear Profiles 2010 i Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity,

243

Production and propagation of mesons in complex nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The propagation of unstable mesons in nuclei is considered with regard to the use of the nucleus as a micro-laboratory. Specific problems considered are those of the nu and the S*/delta systems. 17 refs., 12 figs.

Gibbs, W.R.; Kaufmann, W.B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Application of chiral nuclear forces to light nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In these proceedings, we discuss the current status of nuclear bound state predictions based on chiral nuclear interactions. Results of ordinary $s$- and $p$-shell nuclei and light hypernuclei are shown.

A. Nogga

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

245

Cirrus cloud formation and the role of heterogeneous ice nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Composition, size, and phase are key properties that define the ability of an aerosol particle to initiate ice in cirrus clouds. Properties of cirrus ice nuclei (IN) have not been well constrained due to a lack of systematic ...

Froyd, Karl D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Description of isoscalar giant dipole resonance in nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

collective and microscopic transition densities. Possible underestimations of the energy weighted sum rule for the case of the ISGDR are reported. An alternative description for the ISGDR in nuclei based on the Fermi liquid drop model (FLDM...

Pochivalov, Oleksiy Grigorievich

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

Electric Dipole Moments of Neutron-Odd Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electric dipole moments (EDMs) of neutron-odd nuclei with even protons are systematically evaluated. We first derive the relation between the EDM and the magnetic moment operators by making use of the core polarization scheme. This relation enables us to calculate the EDM of neutron-odd nuclei without any free parameters. From this calculation, one may find the best atomic system suitable for future EDM experiments.

Takehisa Fujita; Sachiko Oshima

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

The Production and Study of Neutron-rich Nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last few years there has been a great increase in our knowledge of neutron-rich nuclei resulting from the use of large {gamma}-ray arrays to investigate prompt {gamma} rays from fission and deep inelastic reactions. In this paper we shall discuss various aspects of the physics underling the fission and deep-inelastic reaction mechanisms that are relevant to the spectroscopic investigation of neutron-rich nuclei.

Durell, J.L.

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Transverse polarization of $?$ hyperons from quasireal photoproduction on nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transverse polarization of $\\Lambda$ hyperons was measured in inclusive quasireal photoproduction for various target nuclei ranging from hydrogen to xenon. The data were obtained by the HERMES experiment at HERA using the 27.6 GeV lepton beam and nuclear gas targets internal to the lepton storage ring. The polarization observed is positive for light target nuclei and is compatible with zero for krypton and xenon.

The HERMES Collaboration; A. Airapetian; N. Akopov; Z. Akopov; E. C. Aschenauer; W. Augustyniak; R. Avakian; A. Avetissian; E. Avetisyan; S. Belostotski; N. Bianchi; H. P. Blok; A. Borissov; J. Bowles; I. Brodski; V. Bryzgalov; J. Burns; M. Capiluppi; G. P. Capitani; E. Cisbani; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. F. Dalpiaz; W. Deconinck; R. De Leo; L. De Nardo; E. De Sanctis; M. Diefenthaler; P. Di Nezza; M. Düren; M. Ehrenfried; G. Elbakian; F. Ellinghaus; R. Fabbri; A. Fantoni; L. Felawka; S. Frullani; D. Gabbert; G. Gapienko; V. Gapienko; F. Garibaldi; G. Gavrilov; V. Gharibyan; F. Giordano; S. Gliske; M. Golembiovskaya; C. Hadjidakis; M. Hartig; D. Hasch; A. Hillenbrand; M. Hoek; Y. Holler; I. Hristova; Y. Imazu; A. Ivanilov; H. E. Jackson; H. S. Jo; S. Joosten; R. Kaiser; G. Karyan; T. Keri; E. Kinney; A. Kisselev; N. Kobayashi; V. Korotkov; V. Kozlov; P. Kravchenko; V. G. Krivokhijine; L. Lagamba; L. Lapikás; I. Lehmann; P. Lenisa; A. López Ruiz; W. Lorenzon; X. -G. Lu; B. -Q. Ma; D. Mahon; N. C. R. Makins; S. I. Manaenkov; Y. Mao; B. Marianski; A. Martinez de la Ossa; H. Marukyan; C. A. Miller; Y. Miyachi; A. Movsisyan; V. Muccifora; M. Murray; A. Mussgiller; E. Nappi; Y. Naryshkin; A. Nass; M. Negodaev; W. -D. Nowak; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Perez-Benito; P. E. Reimer; A. R. Reolon; C. Riedl; K. Rith; G. Rosner; A. Rostomyan; J. Rubin; D. Ryckbosch; Y. Salomatin; F. Sanftl; A. Schäfer; G. Schnell; K. P. Schüler; B. Seitz; T. -A. Shibata; V. Shutov; M. Stancari; M. Statera; E. Steffens; J. J. M. Steijger; J. Stewart; F. Stinzing; S. Taroian; A. Terkulov; R. Truty; A. Trzcinski; M. Tytgat; A. Vandenbroucke; Y. Van Haarlem; C. Van Hulse; D. Veretennikov; V. Vikhrov; I. Vilardi; S. Wang; S. Yaschenko; Z. Ye; W. Yu; V. Zagrebelnyy; D. Zeiler; B. Zihlmann; P. Zupranski

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

250

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

251

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

252

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 63,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

253

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 128,698 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

254

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

255

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409 1.2 Total 8,284 100.0 33,350 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

256

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,942 14.2 659 1.5 Natural Gas 6,063 44.3 25,582 59.8 Other 1 3 * 771 1.8 Other Renewable1 304 2.2 1,274 3.0 Petroleum 3,031 22.1 296 0.7 Total 13,697 100.0 42,805 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

257

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

258

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

259

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

260

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

262

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

263

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

264

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0 72 0.3 Total 4,180 100.0 22,196 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

265

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

266

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0 72 0.3 Total 4,180 100.0 22,196 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

267

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 128,698 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

268

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

269

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (nw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand nwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,142 8.0 18,639 18.1 Coal 3,417 12.8 23,924 23.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 192 0.7 1,109 1.1 Natural Gas 19,574 73.2 51,344 49.9 Other 1 213 0.8 2,120 2.1 Other Renewable1 325 1.2 2,468 2.4 Petroleum 881 3.3 3,281 3.2 Total 26,744 100.0 102,885 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

270

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110 0.1 Total 44,127 100.0 201,352 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

271

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

272

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 144 1.0 948 1.6 Natural Gas 2,299 15.8 1,312 2.3 Other Renewable1 3,584 24.6 9,360 16.3 Petroleum 1,007 6.9 154 .0.3 Total 14,592 100.0 57,509 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

273

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

274

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

275

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

276

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

277

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

278

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

279

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

280

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,134 6.5 15,805 11.0 Coal 21,360 64.6 117,828 82.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 101 0.3 429 0.3 Natural Gas 8,203 24.8 7,128 5.0 Other 1 123 0.4 266 0.2 Other Renewable1 130 0.4 700 0.5 Petroleum 1,019 3.1 1,442 1.0 Total 33,071 100.0 143,598 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

282

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

283

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

284

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

285

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

286

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

287

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 63,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

288

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

289

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409 1.2 Total 8,284 100.0 33,350 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

290

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile New York total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 13,583 9.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 5,714 14.5 24,942 18.2 Natural Gas 17,407 44.2 48,916 35.7 Other 1 45 0.1 832 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,719 4.4 4,815 3.5 Petroleum 6,421 16.3 2,005 1.5 Total 39,357 100.0 136,962 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

291

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

292

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

293

Performance profiles style sheet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

06) 06) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2006 December 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2006 is prepared by the Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division, Financial

294

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

295

Chemical profiles of switchgrass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

profiles profiles of switchgrass Zhoujian Hu a,b , Robert Sykes a,c , Mark F. Davis a,c , E. Charles Brummer a,d , Arthur J. Ragauskas a,b,e, * a BioEnergy Science Center, USA b School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA c National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, CO 80401, USA d Institute for Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Genomics, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA e Forest Products and Chemical Engineering Department, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 15 April 2009 Received in revised form 10 December 2009 Accepted 10 December 2009 Available online 13 January 2010 Keywords: Switchgrass Morphological components Chemical

296

Temperature profile detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a temperature profile detector shown as a tubular enclosure surrounding an elongated electrical conductor having a plurality of meltable conductive segments surrounding it. Duplicative meltable segments are spaced apart from one another along the length of the enclosure. Electrical insulators surround these elements to confine molten material from the segments in bridging contact between the conductor and a second electrical conductor, which might be the confining tube. The location and rate of growth of the resulting short circuits between the two conductors can be monitored by measuring changes in electrical resistance between terminals at both ends of the two conductors. Additional conductors and separate sets of meltable segments operational at differing temperatures can be monitored simultaneously for measuring different temperature profiles. 8 figs.

Tokarz, R.D.

1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

297

The quest for novel modes of excitation in exotic nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article provides an insight into several open problems in the quest for novel modes of excitation in nuclei with isospin asymmetry, deformation and finite temperature characteristic in stellar environment. Major unsolved problems include the nature of pygmy dipole resonances, the quest for various multipole and spin-isospin excitations both in neutron-rich and proton drip-line nuclei mainly driven by loosely bound nucleons, excitations in unstable deformed nuclei and evolution of their properties with the shape phase transition. Exotic modes of excitation in nuclei at finite temperatures characteristic for supernova evolution present open problems with possible impact in modeling astrophysically relevant weak interaction rates. All these issues challenge self-consistent many body theory frameworks at the frontiers of on-going research, including nuclear energy density functionals, both phenomenological and constrained by the strong interaction physics of QCD, models based on low-momentum two-nucleon interaction V_{low-k} and correlated realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction V_{UCOM}, supplemented by three-body force, as well as two-nucleon and three-nucleon interactions derived from the chiral effective field theory. Joined theoretical and experimental efforts, including research with radioactive isotope beams, are needed to provide insight into dynamical properties of nuclei away from the valley of stability, involving the interplay of isospin asymmetry, deformation and finite temperature.

N. Paar

2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

298

NOTES ON NEUTRON DEPTH PROFILING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOTES ON NEUTRON DEPTH PROFILING by J.K. Shultis Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering College of Engineering Kansas State University Manhattan, Kansas 66506 Dec. 2003 #12;Notes on Neutron Depth Profiling J. Kenneth Shultis December 2003 1 Introduction The purpose of neutron depth profiling

Shultis, J. Kenneth

299

ARM - Field Campaign - MASRAD: Cloud Condensate Nuclei Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsMASRAD: Cloud Condensate Nuclei Chemistry Measurements govCampaignsMASRAD: Cloud Condensate Nuclei Chemistry Measurements Campaign Links AMF Point Reyes Website Related Campaigns MArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) IOP 2005.03.14, Miller, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : MASRAD: Cloud Condensate Nuclei Chemistry Measurements 2005.07.01 - 2005.07.30 Lead Scientist : Carl Berkowitz For data sets, see below. Description Principal Investigators: J. Ogren, C. Berkowitz, R. Halthore, A. Laskin, A. Strawa, J. Wang, A. Wexler As part of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment to Point Reyes, CA in the spring and summer of 2005, a suite of instrumentation was installed to measure the chemical, physical and optical properties of aerosol particles

300

Shell model Monte Carlo investigation of rare earth nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We utilize the shell model Monte Carlo method to study the structure of rare earth nuclei. This work demonstrates the first systematic full oscillator shell with intruder calculations in such heavy nuclei. Exact solutions of a pairing plus quadrupole Hamiltonian are compared with the static path approximation in several dysprosium isotopes from A=152 to 162, including the odd mass A=153. Some comparisons are also made with Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov results from Baranger and Kumar. Basic properties of these nuclei at various temperatures and spin are explored. These include energy, deformation, moments of inertia, pairing channel strengths, band crossing, and evolution of shell model occupation numbers. Exact level densities are also calculated and, in the case of 162Dy, compared with experimental data.

J. A. White; S. E. Koonin; D. J. Dean

2000-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118 and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

Feng, Zhao-Qing; Li, Jun-Qing; Scheid, Werner

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118 and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

Zhao-Qing Feng; Gen-Ming Jin; Jun-Qing Li; Werner Scheid

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

303

Neutron skin of nuclei near the neutron drip line  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Performing Skyrme-type deformed Hartree-Fock calculations, the possible presence of neutron skin in nuclei towards neutron drip line is studied. The thickness of the neutron skin is found to be nearly constant in all directions if it is measured perpendicular to the surface, and in a given nucleus the number of neutrons being inside of the neutron skin is almost independent of the deformation (namely, spherical shape or normal deformation or superdeformation). In the region of medium-heavy nuclei our calculation shows the presence of a series of neutron-rich nuclei, in which a neutron skin is present and yet the neutron one-particle spectra are far from those in a harmonic oscillator (plus spin-orbit) potential.

I. Hamamoto and X. Z. Zhang

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Light radioactive nuclei capture reactions with phenomenological potential models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light radioactive nuclei play an important role in many astrophysical environments. Due to very low cross sections of some neutron and proton capture reactions by these radioactive nuclei at energies of astrophysical interest, direct laboratory measurements are very difficult. For radioactive nuclei such as 8Li and 8B, the direct measurement of neutron capture reactions is impossible. Indirect methods have been applied to overcome these difficulties. In this work we will report on the results and discussion of phenomenological potential models used to determine some proton and neutron capture reactions. As a test we show the results for the 16O(p,g)17F_gs(5/2+) and 16O(p,g)17F_ex(1/2+) capture reactions.We also computed the nucleosynthesis cross sections for the 7Li(n,g)8Li, 8Li(n,g)9Li and 8B(p,g)9C capture reactions.

V. Guimaraes; C. A. Bertulani

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

K- absorption in nuclei by two and three nucleons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It will be shown that the peaks in the (Lambda p) and (Lambda d) invariant mass distributions, observed in recent FINUDA experiments and claimed to be signals of deeply bound kaonic states, are naturally explained in terms of K- absorption by two or three nucleons leaving the rest of the original nuclei as spectator. For reactions on heavy nuclei, the subsequent interactions of the particles produced in the primary absorption process with the residual nucleus play an important role. Our analyses leads to the conclusion that at present there is no experimental evidence of deeply bound K- state in nuclei. Although the FINUDA experiments have been done for reasons which are not supported a posteriori, some new physics can be extracted from the data.

V. K. Magas; E. Oset; A. Ramos

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

306

Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet.xlsx More Documents & Publications Statement of Work (SOW) Template (Combined...

307

Nuclear Fusion for Bose Nuclei Confined in Ion Traps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fusion of integer spin nuclei confined in an isotropic ion trap is investigated. Solutions of the ground state for charged bosons trapped in the isotropic harmonic oscillator potential are calculated using the equivalent linear two-body method for many-body problems, which is based on an approximate reduction of the many-body Schroedinger equation by the use of a variational principle. Using the ground-state wave function, theoretical estimates of probabilities and rates for nuclear fusion for Bose nuclei confined in ion traps are obtained. Numerical estimates for fusion rates are presented for the case of deuteron-deuteron fusion.

Kim, Yeong E.; Zubarev, Alexander L. [Purdue University (United States)

2000-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Observable consequences of Langmuir turbulence in active galactic nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors discuss in detail the observable consequences of non-linear microscopic plasma processes in active galactic nuclei. The combination of several elementary momentum gain (shock acceleration and stochastic acceleration) and loss processes (synchroton radiation, inverse Compton scattering) produces an almost monoenergetic distribution function of relativistic electrons - the pile-up - which excites Langmuir waves. Turbulent wave-wave and wave-particle interactions lead to nonlinear stabilization of the pile-up. The temporal and spatial evolution of the Langmuir waves and the relativistic electrons determine the shape and time scale of the spectral variations. The model is applied to extragalactic nuclei and to the galactic center as well.

Lesch, H.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

JUSTIPEN: Japan US Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The grant “JUSTIPEN: Japan US Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei ” (DOE DE?FG02?06ER41407) ran from 02/01/2006 thru 12/31/2013. JUSTIPEN is a venue for international collaboration between U.S.?based and Japanese scientists who share an interest in theory of rare isotopes. Since its inception JUSTIPEN has supported many visitors, fostered collaborations between physicists in the U.S. and Japan, and enabled them to deepen our understanding of exotic nuclei and their role in cosmos.

Papenbrock, Thomas

2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

310

Spontaneous Onion-Structure Formation from Planar Lamellar Nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nucleation and growth are a basic elementary process of ordering. The nucleation process is controlled by a competition between interfacial and bulk energy. Thus an ordered structure of a nucleus at its birth is not necessarily the most stable thermodynamically: Ostwald step rule. In addition to this, we found the topological transformation of nuclei from the most stable bulk structure (planar lamella) to a metastable one (onion) in a lyotropic liquid crystal. This indicates that the fate of nuclei of low-dimensional internal order can also be seriously affected by an additional competition between interfacial and elastic deformation energy.

Yasutaka Iwashita and Hajime Tanaka

2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

311

Proton capture resonance spins by multidimensional scaling: fp nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The method of nonmetric multidimensional scaling has been used to attribute spins to a large number of proton capture resonances in five fp-shell nuclei, V47, Mn51, Mn53, Co55, and Cu61, using as input information only the gamma decay branching ratios. The calibration of the method relies on the measured spins of a number of the resonances. In more than half the cases, a unique spin is found. The results of the analysis allow a reappraisal of analog states in the five nuclei.

J. A. Cameron

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Texas Crop Profile: Potatoes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

175 pounds of nitrogen, 80 pounds of phosphorus, and 80 pounds of potassium. Potassium is generally not needed in the High Plains, although many growers apply it. Texas Crop Profile P O T A T O E S E-19 3-00 Prepared by Kent D. Hall, Rodney L. Holloway..., following drag-off or after potato plants have fully emerged. Controls weeds by disrupting growth process during germination. Does not control established weeds. State Contacts Rodney L. Holloway Extension Specialist 2488 TAMU College Station, Texas 77843...

Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.; Smith, Dudley

2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

313

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia profile Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

314

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin profile Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

315

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas profile Texas profile Texas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6 1,262 0.3 Natural Gas 69,291 64.0 186,882 45.4 Other 1 477 0.4 3,630 0.9 Other Renewable1 10,295 9.5 27,705 6.7 Petroleum 204 0.2 708 0.2 Total 108,258 100.0 411,695 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

316

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont profile Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind.

317

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont profile Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind.

318

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee profile Tennessee profile Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,277 20.0 7,416 9.0 Natural Gas 4,655 21.7 2,302 2.8 Other 1 - - 16 * Other Renewable1 222 1.0 988 1.2 Petroleum 58 0.3 217 0.3 Total 21,417 100.0 82,349 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

319

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia profile Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

320

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

South Carolina profile South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982 100.0 104,153 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington profile Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

322

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington profile Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

323

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina profile South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982 100.0 104,153 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported.

324

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin profile Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

325

E-Print Network 3.0 - asymmetric colliding nuclei Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

colliding nuclei Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: asymmetric colliding nuclei Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 managed for the U.S....

326

Atmospheric sulphur and cloud condensation nuclei in marine air in the Southern Hemisphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...that control cloud depth, solar radiation and drizzle. Profound...condensation nuclei, drizzle, and solar radiation, on marine stratocumulus...pp. 185195. Norwell, Massachusetts: Kluwer Academic. Yin, F...condensation nuclei, drizzle, and solar radiation, on marine stratocumulus...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Approximate Stokes Drift Profiles in Deep Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A deep-water approximation of the Stokes drift velocity profile is explored as an alternative to the monochromatic profile. The alternative profile investigated relies on the same two quantities required for the monochromatic profile, namely, the ...

Řyvind Breivik; Peter A. E. M. Janssen; Jean-Raymond Bidlot

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_001b.htm06/07/2004 13:02:41 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - Income 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18 Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_001d.htm06/07/2004 13:02:52 #12;5 Year

329

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_0029.htm06/07/2004 13:01:23 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - Income 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18 Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_002d.htm06/07/2004 13:01:34 #12;5 Year

330

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities & Reserves http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_0067.htm06/07/2004 13 Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_006b.htm06/07/2004 13:04:46 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - Assets 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Assets Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18

331

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities & Reserves http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_0079.htm06/07/2004 13 Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_007b.htm06/07/2004 13:05:59 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - Assets 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Assets Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18

332

Electric dipole moments of light nuclei from {chi}EFT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I present recent calculations of EDMs of light nuclei using chiral effective field theory techniques. At leading-order, we argue that they can be expressed in terms of six CP-violating low-energy constants. With our expressions, eventual non-zero measurements of EDMs of deuteron, helion, and triton can be combined to disentangle the different sources of CP-violation.

Higa, Renato [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05314-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

333

Binary Black Hole Accretion Flows in Merged Galactic Nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......for Theoretical Physics, Oiwake-cho...when the gas can pass across the maximum...mass-capture rates are eventually...holes|black hole physics|galaxies: nuclei...when the gas can pass across the maximum...mass-capture rates exhibit little...for Theoretical Physics (YITP) of Kyoto......

Kimitake Hayasaki; Shin Mineshige; Hiroshi Sudou

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

334

Thermal Neutron Capture for Nuclei A = 3 - 20  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermal Neutron Capture Evaluated Data for Nuclei A 3 - 20 Go to the Text Only below if you prefer to view the nuclides in a text list. 19Ne 20Ne 18F 19F 20F 15O 16O 17O 18O 19O...

335

General Properties of Fermi/LAT Active Galactic Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Second Catalog of Blazars and other Active Galactic Nuclei detected by the Fermi/LAT (2LAC) includes about 1100 sources, 886 of which comprise the Clean Sample. The general properties of the different populations of sources classified according to the strength of their emission lines (FSRQs, BL Lacs) or the estimated position of the synchrotron peak are reviewed.

Lott, B; Cutini, S; Gasparrini, D; Dermer, C D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Trends in the study of light proton rich nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent work in light proton-rich nuclei is reviewed. Evidence for the first T/sub z/ = -5/2 nuclide, /sup 35/Ca, is presented. The mechanisms of two-proton emission following beta-decay is investigated. Future directions in this field are discussed. 23 refs., 5 figs. (WRF)

Moltz, D.M.; Aysto, J.; Hotchkis, M.A.C.; Cerny, J.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Decoupling electrons and nuclei without the Born-Oppenheimer approximation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decoupling electrons and nuclei without the Born-Oppenheimer approximation Patrick Cassam. The EN-GMFCI is a new paradigm for quantum chemistry that bypasses the tradi- tional Born-Oppenheimer (BO;1 Introduction The Born-Oppenheimer (BO) potential energy surface (PES) is one of the main paradigm of quantum

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

338

Band structure of doubly-odd nuclei around mass 130  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear structure of the doublet bands in the doubly-odd nuclei with mass A{approx}130 is studied in terms of a pair-truncated shell model. The model reproduces quite well the energy levels of the doublet bands and the electromagnetic transitions. The analysis of the electromagnetic transitions reveals new band structure of the doublet bands.

Higashiyama, Koji [Department of Physics, Chiba Institute of Technology, Narashino, Chiba 275-0023 (Japan); Yoshinaga, Naotaka [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama City 338-8570 (Japan)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

339

Active Galactic Nuclei Shed Light on Axionlike Particles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate that the scatter in the luminosity relations of astrophysical objects can be used to search for axionlike particles. This analysis is applied to observations of active galactic nuclei, where we find evidence highly suggestive of the existence of a very light axionlike particle.

Clare Burrage; Anne-Christine Davis; Douglas J. Shaw

2009-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

340

THE STRUCTURE AND REACTIONS OF NEUTRON-RICH NUCLEI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dissociation experiments 351 2.3. Low-energy behaviour of "Li dissociation cross 6.2. Direct measurements 355 of the understanding of the structure and reactions of neutron-rich nuclei. The properties of the low-lying soft giant and total nuclear reaction cross section isalso calculated using the microscopic tp, p 2-Glauber theory

Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Scattering of light nuclei S. Quaglioni1,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nuclear reactions. Indeed, low-energy fusion reactions represent the primary energy-generation mech- anism in the ab initio calculation of low-energy scattering of light nuclei. 1.1 Overview of reaction approaches physics. Above all nuclear scattering and reactions, which require the solution of the many-body quantum

Roth, Robert

342

Beam Profile Monitor With Accurate Horizontal And Vertical Beam Profiles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A widely used scanner device that rotates a single helically shaped wire probe in and out of a particle beam at different beamline positions to give a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is modified by the addition of a second wire probe. As a result, a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a first beamline position, and a second pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a second beamline position. The simple modification not only provides more accurate beam profiles, but also provides a measurement of the beam divergence and quality in a single compact device.

Havener, Charles C [Knoxville, TN; Al-Rejoub, Riad [Oak Ridge, TN

2005-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

343

Energy Density Functional for Nuclei and Neutron Stars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: Recent observational data on neutron star masses and radii provide stringent constraints on the equation of state of neutron rich matter [ Annu. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci. 62 485 (2012)]. Purpose: We aim to develop a nuclear energy density functional that can be simultaneously applied to finite nuclei and neutron stars. Methods: We use the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory (DFT) with Skyrme energy density functionals and covariance analysis to assess correlations between observables for finite nuclei and neutron stars. In a first step two energy functionals a high density energy functional giving reasonable neutron properties, and a low density functional fitted to nuclear properties are matched. In a second step, we optimize a new functional using exactly the same protocol as in earlier studies pertaining to nuclei but now including neutron star data. This allows direct comparisons of performance of the new functional relative to the standard one. Results: The new functional TOV-min yields results for nuclear bulk properties (energy, rms radius, diffraction radius, and surface thickness) that are of the same quality as those obtained with the established Skyrme functionals, including SV-min. When comparing SV-min and TOV-min, isoscalar nuclear matter indicators vary slightly while isovector properties are changed considerably. We discuss neutron skins, dipole polarizability, separation energies of the heaviest elements, and proton and neutron drip lines. We confirm a correlation between the neutron skin of 208Pb and the neutron star radius. Conclusions: We demonstrate that standard energy density functionals optimized to nuclear data do not carry information on the expected maximum neutron star mass, and that predictions can only be made within an extremely broad uncertainty band. For atomic nuclei, the new functional TOV-min performs at least as well as the standard nuclear functionals, but it also reproduces expected neutron star data within assumed error bands. This functional is expected to yield more reliable predictions in the region of very neutron rich heavy nuclei.

Erler, J. [UTK/ORNL/German Cancer Research Center-Heidelberg; Horowitz, C. J. [UTK/ORNL/Indiana University; Nazarewicz, Witold [UTK/ORNL/University of Warsaw; Rafalski, M. [UTK/ORNL; Reinhard, P.-G. [Universitat Erlangen, Germany

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Microscopic description of neutron emission rates in compound nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The neutron emission rates in thermal excited nuclei are conventionally described by statistical models with a phenomenological level density parameter that depends on excitation energies, deformations and mass regions. In the microscopic view of hot nuclei, the neutron emission rates can be determined by the external neutron gas densities without any free parameters. Therefore the microscopic description of thermal neutron emissions is desirable that can impact several understandings such as survival probabilities of superheavy compound nuclei and neutron emissivity in reactors. To describe the neutron emission rates microscopically, the external thermal neutron gases are self-consistently obtained based on the Finite-Temperature Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (FT-HFB) approach. The results are compared with the statistical model to explore the connections between the FT-HFB approach and the statistical model. The Skyrme FT-HFB equation is solved by HFB-AX in deformed coordinate spaces. Based on the FT-HFB approach, the thermal properties and external neutron gas are properly described with the self-consistent gas substraction procedure. Then neutron emission rates can be obtained based on the densities of external neutron gases. The thermal statistical properties of $^{238}$U and $^{258}$U are studied in detail in terms of excitation energies. The thermal neutron emission rates in $^{238, 258}$U and superheavy compound nuclei $_{112}^{278}$Cn and $_{114}^{292}$Fl are calculated, which agree well with the statistical model by adopting an excitation-energy-dependent level density parameter. The coordinate-space FT-HFB approach can provide reliable microscopic descriptions of neutron emission rates in hot nuclei, as well as microscopic constraints on the excitation energy dependence of level density parameters for statistical models.

Yi Zhu; Junchen Pei

2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

345

Dynamic-angle spinning and double rotation of quadrupolar nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei is complicated by the coupling of the electric quadrupole moment of the nucleus to local variations in the electric field. The quadrupolar interaction is a useful source of information about local molecular structure in solids, but it tends to broaden resonance lines causing crowding and overlap in NMR spectra. Magic- angle spinning, which is routinely used to produce high resolution spectra of spin-{1/2} nuclei like carbon-13 and silicon-29, is incapable of fully narrowing resonances from quadrupolar nuclei when anisotropic second-order quadrupolar interactions are present. Two new sample-spinning techniques are introduced here that completely average the second-order quadrupolar coupling. Narrow resonance lines are obtained and individual resonances from distinct nuclear sites are identified. In dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) a rotor containing a powdered sample is reoriented between discrete angles with respect to high magnetic field. Evolution under anisotropic interactions at the different angles cancels, leaving only the isotropic evolution of the spin system. In the second technique, double rotation (DOR), a small rotor spins within a larger rotor so that the sample traces out a complicated trajectory in space. The relative orientation of the rotors and the orientation of the larger rotor within the magnetic field are selected to average both first- and second-order anisotropic broadening. The theory of quadrupolar interactions, coherent averaging theory, and motional narrowing by sample reorientation are reviewed with emphasis on the chemical shift anisotropy and second-order quadrupolar interactions experienced by half-odd integer spin quadrupolar nuclei. The DAS and DOR techniques are introduced and illustrated with application to common quadrupolar systems such as sodium-23 and oxygen-17 nuclei in solids.

Mueller, K.T. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Spin-dependent scattering and absorption of thermal neutrons on dynamically polarized nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

957 Spin-dependent scattering and absorption of thermal neutrons on dynamically polarized nuclei H neutrons and polarized nuclei have been used to measure spin-dependent scattering lengths and absorption cross sections of slow (S-wave) neutrons on nuclei. In order to obtain those scattering lengths

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

347

Communication Coherence transfer between spy nuclei and nitrogen-14 in solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communication Coherence transfer between spy nuclei and nitrogen-14 in solids Simone Cavadini a Coherence transfer from `spy nuclei' such as 1 H or 13 C (S = 1/2) was used to excite single- or double-quantum coherences of 14 N nuclei (I = 1) while the S spins were aligned along the static field, in the manner

348

New measurements of high-momentum nucleons and short-range structures in nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new measurements of electron scattering from high-momentum nucleons in nuclei. These data allow an improved determination of the strength of two-nucleon correlations for several nuclei, including light nuclei where clustering effects can, for the first time, be examined. The data also include the kinematic region where three-nucleon correlations are expected to dominate.

N. Fomin; J. Arrington; R. Asaturyan; F. Benmokhtar; W. Boeglin; P. Bosted; A. Bruell; M. H. S. Bukhari; E. Chudakov; B. Clasie; S. H. Connell; M. M. Dalton; A. Daniel; D. B. Day; D. Dutta; R. Ent; L. El Fassi; H. Fenker; B. W. Filippone; K. Garrow; D. Gaskell; C. Hill; R. J. Holt; T. Horn; M. K. Jones; J. Jourdan; N. Kalantarians; C. E. Keppel; D. Kiselev; M. Kotulla; R. Lindgren; A. F. Lung; S. Malace; P. Markowitz; P. McKee; D. G. Meekins; H. Mkrtchyan; T. Navasardyan; G. Niculescu; A. K. Opper; C. Perdrisat; D. H. Potterveld; V. Punjabi; X. Qian; P. E. Reimer; J. Roche; V. M. Rodriguez; O. Rondon; E. Schulte; J. Seely; E. Segbefia; K. Slifer; G. R. Smith; P. Solvignon; V. Tadevosyan; S. Tajima; L. Tang; G. Testa; R. Trojer; V. Tvaskis; W. F. Vulcan; C. Wasko; F. R. Wesselmann; S. A. Wood; J. Wright; X. Zheng

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

349

Scholarship Search Profile Personal Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scholarship Search Profile Personal Information Name: ____________________________________ Address) ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ Work Experience: List most recent job first Employer/Company Name _______________________________________________________________ Reference: Name and telephone _____________________________________________ Employer/Company Name

Mather, Patrick T.

350

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluating a Federal agency's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile means getting a solid understanding of the organization's largest emission categories, largest emission sources, and its potential for improvement.

351

On Tensor Forces and the Theory of Light Nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The quadrupole moment of the deuteron indicates the existence of non-central tensor forces in nuclei which destroy the constancy of the total orbital angular momentum. With simple operational representations of the wave functions, the influence of two-body tensor forces on the ground state eigenfunctions of the light nuclei H3 and He4 has been calculated. In H3 the tensor forces directly couple to the fundamental S122 state a D124 state, which in turn interacts with P122 and P124. To the fundamental S01 state of He4 is admixed a D05 state which is coupled by the tensor forces with P03. All states consistent with the total angular momentum and parity conservation rules occur in the ground state eigenfunctions, and these nuclei therefore constitute the simplest examples of the complete break-down of spin and orbital angular momentum conservation laws. Rarita and Schwinger have satisfactorily accounted for the properties of the deuteron by including the tensor force in a simple interaction represented by a rectangular well potential. With this interaction to describe the forces between all pairs of nuclear particles, the binding energies of H3 and He4 have been estimated by a variation method The trial functions are of the form S122+D124 for H3 and S01+D05 for He4, with Gaussian radial functions. The calculations yield 32 and 50 percent of the binding energy for H3 and He4, respectively, while a similar test calculation for the deuteron gives 54 percent of the binding energy. The probability that these nuclei are in a D state is found to be 4 percent for all three nuclei, in agreement with the exact deuteron computations. Improvement of the radial dependence of the trial functions increases the estimated binding energy of the deuteron to 76 percent of the known value but does not materially affect either the estimated binding energies of H3 and He4, or the amount of D state admixture of the three nuclei. An analysis of the results shows that the tensor forces, which produce all the binding in the deuteron, are relatively ineffective in binding H3 and He4. This apparently indicates that the assumption of ordinary and tensor forces of the same range is not adequate to represent the properties of H3 and He4.

Edward Gerjuoy and Julian Schwinger

1942-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Downstream Heat Flux Profile vs. Midplane T Profile in Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relationship between the midplane scrape-off-layer electron temperature profile and the parallel heat flux profile at the divertor in tokamaks is investigated. A model is applied which takes into account anisotropic thermal diffusion, in a rectilinear geometry with constant density. Eigenmode analysis is applied to the simplified problem with constant thermal diffusivities. A self-similar nonlinear solution is found for the more realistic problem with anisotropically temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities. Numerical solutions are developed for both cases, with spatially dependent heat flux emerging from the plasma. For both constant and temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities it is found that, below about one-half of its peak, the heat flux profile shape at the divertor, compared with the midplane temperature profile shape, is robustly described by the simplest two-point model. However the physical processes are not those assumed in the simplest two-point model, nor is the numerical coefficient relating q||div to Tmp ?||mp/L|| as predicted. For realistic parameters the peak in the heat flux, moreover, can be reduced by a factor of two or more from the two-point model scaling which fits the remaining profile. For temperature profiles in the SOL region above the x-point set by marginal stability, the heat flux profile to the divertor can be largely decoupled from the prediction of the two-point model. These results suggest caveats for data interpretation, and possibly favorable outcomes for divertor configurations with extended field lines.

Robert J. Goldston

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

353

Role of shapes in the identification of superheavy nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The synthesis and identification of superheavy nuclei have taken a dramatic turn recently with the emergence of hot fusion reactions. Such new methods have enabled the synthesis and identification of superheavy elements with Z=114-116 and 118. The identification of such elements is mainly done by observing their {alpha}-decay chains terminating with spontaneous fission events. In such studies, the role played by the shapes of superheavy elements has assumed great significance. In this work, we use the Shanmugam-Kamalaharan model for {alpha} decay, which is versatile in accounting for the shapes and deformations of the parent and the daughter nuclei as well as the charge redistribution (also termed charge equilibration) process during the decay. Our calculations turn out to be very useful for the identification of superheavy elements.

Shanmugam, G.; Sudhakar, S.; Niranjani, S. [SK Institute of Higher Studies, S-2, Lotus Colony, Nandanam, Chennai - 600 035 (India)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Magnetic Moments of Light Nuclei from Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We present the results of lattice QCD calculations of the magnetic moments of the lightest nuclei, the deuteron, the triton and 3He, along with those of the neutron and proton. These calculations, performed at quark masses corresponding to m_pi ~ 800 MeV, reveal that the structure of these nuclei at unphysically heavy quark masses closely resembles that at the physical quark masses. In particular, we find that the magnetic moment of 3He differs only slightly from that of a free neutron, as is the case in nature, indicating that the shell-model configuration of two spin-paired protons and a valence neutron captures its dominant structure. Similarly a shell-model-like moment is found for the triton, mu_^3H ~ mu_p. The deuteron magnetic moment is found to be equal to the nucleon isoscalar moment within the uncertainties of the calculations.

Beane, S. R.; Chang, E.; Cohen, S.; Detmold, W.; Lin, H W.; Orginos, K.; Parreno, A; Savage, M J.; Tiburzi, B C.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Interacting boson models for N{approx}Z nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This contribution discusses the use of boson models in the description of N{approx}Z nuclei. A brief review is given of earlier attempts, initiated by Elliott and co-workers, to extend the interacting boson model of Arima and Iachello by the inclusion of neutron-proton s and d bosons with T = 1 (IBM-3) as well as T = 0 (IBM-4). It is argued that for the N{approx}Z nuclei that are currently studied experimentally, a different approach is needed which invokes aligned neutron-proton pairs with angular momentum J = 2j and isospin T = 0. This claim is supported by an analysis of shell-model wave functions in terms of pair states. Results of this alternative version of the interacting boson model are compared with shell-model calculations in the 1g{sub 9/2} shell.

Van Isacker, P. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3 BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

356

Delta resonance and nonlocal effects in pion photoproduction from nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The photoproduction of charged pions from light nuclei is investigated in a distorted wave impulse approximation carried out in momentum space. This permits a straightforward inclusion of nonlocal terms in the pion production operator such as that of Blomqvist and Laget. The interaction of the outgoing pion with the residual nuclear state is described by the optical potential of Stricker, McManus, and Carr. The cross section for pion production from p-shell nuclei is decomposed into partial cross sections labeled by transition angular momenta and spin which are almost independent of nuclear structure. Using the reaction /sup 13/C(..gamma..,..pi../sup -/) /sup 13/N /sup g.s./, the effects of the delta isobar in the production operator on these partial cross sections is investigated. The same reaction is used to demonstrate the inadequacy of local coordinate space analyses.

Tiator, L.; Wright, L.E.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Influence of light nuclei on neutrino-driven supernova outflows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the composition of the outer layers of a protoneutron star and show that light nuclei are present in substantial amounts. The composition is dominated by nucleons, deuterons, tritons and alpha particles; 3He is present in smaller amounts. This composition can be studied in laboratory experiments with new neutron-rich radioactive beams that can reproduce similar densities and temperatures. After including the corresponding neutrino interactions, we demonstrate that light nuclei have a small impact on the average energy of the emitted electron neutrinos, but are significant for the average energy of antineutrinos. During the early post-explosion phase, the average energy of electron antineutrinos is slightly increased, while at later times during the protoneutron star cooling it is reduced by about 1 MeV. The consequences of these changes for nucleosynthesis in neutrino-driven supernova outflows are discussed.

A. Arcones; G. Martinez-Pinedo; E. O'Connor; A. Schwenk; H. -Th. Janka; C. J. Horowitz; K. Langanke

2008-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

358

Stability of bubble nuclei through Shell-Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the shell structure of bubble nuclei in simple phenomenological shell models and study their binding energy as a function of the radii and of the number of neutron and protons using Strutinsky's method. Shell effects come about, on the one hand, by the high degeneracy of levels with large angular momentum and, on the other, by the big energy gaps between states with a different number of radial nodes. Shell energies down to -40 MeV are shown to occur for certain magic nuclei. Estimates demonstrate that the calculated shell effects for certain magic numbers of constituents are probably large enough to produce stability against fission, alpha-, and beta-decay. No bubble solutions are found for mass number A < 450.

Klaus Dietrich; Krzysztof Pomorski

1997-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

359

Unresolved issues in the search for eta-mesic nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Even if the theoretical definition of an unstable state is straightforward, its experimental identification often depends on the method used in the analysis and extraction of data. A good example is the case of eta mesic nuclei where strong hints of their existence led to about three decades of extensive theoretical and experimental searches. Considering the still undecided status of these states and the limitations in the understanding of the eta-nucleon as well as the eta-nucleus interaction, the present article tries to look back at some unresolved problems in the production mechanism and final state interaction of the eta mesons and nuclei. An unconventional perspective which provides a physical insight into the nature of the eta-nucleus interaction is also presented using quantum time concepts.

Kelkar, N G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_004b.htm06/07/2004 12:57:08 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_004c.htm06 http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_004d.htm06/07/2004 12:57:19 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_008b.htm06/07/2004 12:51:21 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_008c.htm06 http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_008d.htm06/07/2004 12:51:31 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5

362

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_010b.htm06/07/2004 10:57:23 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_010c.htm06 http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_010d.htm06/07/2004 12:40:15 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5

363

The distribution of nuclear quantum states in cold'' rotating nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A statistical analysis of the distribution of level spacings for states with the same spin and parity is described in which the average spacing is calculated for the total ensemble. The resulting distribution of level spacings for states of deformed nuclei with A = 155--185 and Z = 62--77 is the closest to that of a Poisson distribution yet obtained for nuclear levels. However, when only the even-spin, positive-parity data for even-even nuclei are considered, the level-spacing distribution becomes double peaked. The anomalously-large separations are shown to be the result of the low energy of the strongly-correlated, completely-paired yrast configuration of even-even nuclei. Average values of the level spacings also are discussed as a function of spin, parity, and nuclear type (even-even, even-Z- odd-N, etc.). Likewise, deviations from a Poisson distribution for several spacings (s) less than about 60 keV are compared with similar values for {sup 116}Sn on an absolute scale. Such discrepancies are attributed to interactions (level repulsions) which become increasingly significant for s {le} 60 keV. 18 refs., 10 figs.

Garrett, J.D.; German, J.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Courtney, L. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Espino, J.M. (Seville Univ. (Spain))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Incoherent photoproduction of pseudoscalar mesons off nuclei at forward angles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advances in the photon tagging facilities together with the novel, high-resolution fast calorimetry make it possible to perform photoproduction cross section measurements of pseudoscalar mesons on nuclei with a percent level accuracy. The extraction of the radiative decay widths, needed for testing the symmetry breaking effects in QCD, from these measurements at small angles is done by the Primakoff method. This method requires theoretical treatment of all processes participating in these reactions at the same percent level. The most updated description of general processes, including the nuclear coherent amplitude, is done in our previous paper. In this work, in the framework of the Glauber multiple scattering theory, we obtain analytical expressions for the incoherent cross section of the photoproduction of pseudoscalar mesons off nuclei accounting for the mesons absorption in nuclei and the Pauli suppression at forward production angles. As illustrations of the obtained formulas, we calculate the incoherent cross section for photoproduction from a closed shell nucleus, {sup 16}O, and from an unclosed shell nucleus, {sup 12}C. These calculations allow one to compare different approaches and estimate their impact on the incoherent cross section of the processes under consideration.

Gevorgyan, Sergey [JINR; Gasparian, Ashot H. [North Carolina Ag. and Tech. St. U; Gan, Liping [University of North Carolina at Wilmington; Larin, Ilya F. [ITEP, Moscow; Khandaker, Mahbubul A. [Idaho State U

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Muon capture on nuclei: random phase approximation evaluation versus data for 6 $\\le$ Z $\\le$ 94 nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the random phase approximation to systematically describe the total muon capture rates on all nuclei where they have been measured. We reproduce the experimental values on these nuclei to better than 15% accuracy using the free nucleon weak form factors and residual interactions with a mild $A$ dependency. The isospin dependence and the effects associated with shell closures are fairly well reproduced as well. However, the calculated rates for the same residual interactions would be significantly lower than the data if the in-medium quenching of the axial-vector coupling constant is employed to other than the true Gamow-Teller amplitudes. Our calculation thus suggests that no quenching is needed in the description of semileptonic weak processes involving higher multipole transitions and momentum transfer $\\sim m_{\\mu}$, with obvious importance to analogous weak processes.

Nikolaj Thomas Zinner; Karlheinz Langanke; Petr Vogel

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities Income Breakdown Expenditure Breakdown http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18 Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_005b.htm06/07/2004 13:00:29 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_005c.htm06

367

SPEAK UP, EPPING! COMMUNITY PROFILE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPEAK UP, EPPING! COMMUNITY PROFILE REPORT Epping, New Hampshire April 14, 2007 #12;TABLE ............................................................................................. 21 6. Community Services, Facilities and Utilities........................................................................................................................... 38 1. Natural Resources & Environment 2. Communication 3. Infrastructure & Public Safety 4

New Hampshire, University of

368

Profile of Alec J. Jeffreys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Profile of Alec J. Jeffreys 10.1073/pnas.0603953103 Nick Zagorski As one of the great contributors to modern genetics...the forensic sciences. That achievement alone is worthy of merit, contributing to Jeffreys' receiving three high distinctions...

Nick Zagorski

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Neuropsychological Profile of Stuttering Children  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to analyze the cognitive profile of stuttering children. A sample of 290 children was ... classified as stutterers. In general, performance in stuttering children was similar to the ...

Alfredo Ardila; Mónica Rosselli…

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Energy Consumption Profile for Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

317 Chapter 12 Energy Consumption Profile for Energy Harvested WSNs T. V. Prabhakar, R Venkatesha.............................................................................................318 12.2 Energy Harvesting ...................................................................................318 12.2.1 Motivations for Energy Harvesting...............................................319 12

Langendoen, Koen

371

Vibration of Tethered Microstructure Profilers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although loosely tethered turbulence profilers have many advantages, they are prone to resonant vibrations at frequencies in the dissipation range when they are falling rapidly or when the tether is strummed. Using the Advanced Microstructure ...

Jack B. Miller; M. C. Gregg; Vernon W. Miller; Gordon L. Welsh

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

JOBAID-ACCESSING AND MODIFYING TALENT PROFILE  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of accessing their talent profiles, adding information to their profiles, and editing existing talent profile...

373

Muon multiplicity at high energy proton-nuclei collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimation of multiplicity of muons and pions production at high energy proton-nuclei collisions is given. Both QED and QCD contributions are considered for peripheral kinematics of muon pair and $\\sigma$-meson production, keeping in mind it's final conversion to muons. An attempt to explain the excess of positive charged muons compared to negative one in cosmic muon showers is given. We derive the dependence of cross-section of $n$ pairs as a function of $n$ at large n as $d^n(n!n^2)^{-1}$.

E. A. Kuraev; S. Bakmaev; V. Bytev; E. Kokoulina

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

374

Neutron Radii in Nuclei and the Neutron Equation of State  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The root-mean-square radius for neutrons in nuclei is investigated in the Skyrme Hartree-Fock model. The main source of theoretical variation comes from the exchange part of the density-dependent interaction which can be related to a basic property of the neutron equation of state. A precise measurement of the neutron radius in 208Pb would place an important new constraint on the equation of state for neutron matter. The Friedman-Pandharipande neutron equation of state would lead to a very precise value of 0.16±0.02 fm for the difference between the neutron and the proton root-mean-square radius in 208Pb.

B. Alex Brown

2000-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

375

Neutron-Neutron Correlations in the Dissociation of Halo Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies attempting to probe the spatial configuration of the valence neutrons in two-neutron halo nuclei using the technique of intensity interferometry are described. Following a brief review of the method and its application to earlier measurements of the breakup of 6He, 11Li and 14Be, the results of the analysis of a high statistics data set for 6He are presented. The limitations of the technique, including the assumption of incoherent emission in the breakup and the sensitivity to the continuum states populated in the dissociation rather than the ground state, are discussed.

N. A. Orr

2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

376

Cluster approach to the structure of nuclei with Z {>=} 96  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of alternating parity bands in heavy nuclei {sup 234}Th, {sup 239-242}U, {sup 241-245}Pu, {sup 243-248}Cm, {sup 245-250}Cf, {sup 248-251}Fm, {sup 249-254}No, {sup 253-256}Rf, and {sup 258}Sg are analyzed within the dinuclearsystem model. The model is based on the assumption that the cluster-type shapes are produced by the motion of the nuclear system in the mass-asymmetry coordinate. The energies of the low-lying states whose parity is opposite to the parity of the ground state are predicted for the first time.

Shneidman, T. M., E-mail: shneyd@theor.jinr.ru; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Jolos, R. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Bogolyubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics (Russian Federation)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Giant Monopole Resonance in Transitional and Deformed-Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

=129 MeV on ' ' Sm and ' ' ' Nd to investigate the giant monopole resonance in transitional and deformed nuclei. The experimental data reveal a mixing of I.=0 and I.=2 modes in '" Sm resulting in almost identi- cal angular distributions for the two... components of the giant resonance peaks in the angular range 2'?6. A "splitting" of the giant monopole resonance is observed in ' Nd; the extent of this split- ting is sma11er than that reported for ' "Sm. Comparison is made with the predictions of various...

Garg, U.; Bogucki, P.; Bronson, J. D.; Lui, YW; Youngblood, David H.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Toward a New Theory of Spherical Nuclei. II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study is carried out of one of several possible mechanisms contributing to the quadrupole moment of the first excited (2+) state of spherical nuclei. The possibility of a deformed solution is investigated for a set of Hartree-Bogoliubov equations describing the 2+ state in an angular-momentum-conserving approximation. In the pairing-plus-quadrupole-quadrupole model, a sharp transition from spherical to deformed density distribution is shown to occur just beyond the value of the quadrupole coupling strength necessary to yield the 2+ excitation energy.

R. M. Dreizler; A. Klein; Chi-Shiang Wu; G. Do Dang

1967-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

379

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic nuclei poisk Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Institute Collection: Physics 88 Fast Ignition: Nuclear Fusion with UltraFast Ignition: Nuclear Fusion with Ultra--intenseintense LASERsLASERs Summary: core Atomic nuclei are...

380

Protons hog the momentum in neutron-rich nuclei | Argonne National...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a greater fraction of the protons than neutrons to have high momentum in relatively neutron-rich nuclei. The CLAS detector completely surrounds an experimental target and is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Medium-Heavy Nuclei from Nucleon-Nucleon Interactions in Lattice QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the basis of the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock method with the nucleon-nucleon forces obtained from lattice QCD simulations, the properties of the medium-heavy doubly-magic nuclei such as 16^O and 40^Ca are investigated. We found that those nuclei are bound for the pseudo-scalar meson mass M_PS ~ 470 MeV. The mass number dependence of the binding energies, single-particle spectra and density distributions are qualitatively consistent with those expected from empirical data at the physical point, although these hypothetical nuclei at heavy quark mass have smaller binding energies than the real nuclei.

Inoue, Takashi; Charron, Bruno; Doi, Takumi; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Ikeda, Yoichi; Ishii, Noriyoshi; Murano, Keiko; Nemura, Hidekatsu; Sasaki, Kenji

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Medium-Heavy Nuclei from Nucleon-Nucleon Interactions in Lattice QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the basis of the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock method with the nucleon-nucleon forces obtained from lattice QCD simulations, the properties of the medium-heavy doubly-magic nuclei such as 16^O and 40^Ca are investigated. We found that those nuclei are bound for the pseudo-scalar meson mass M_PS ~ 470 MeV. The mass number dependence of the binding energies, single-particle spectra and density distributions are qualitatively consistent with those expected from empirical data at the physical point, although these hypothetical nuclei at heavy quark mass have smaller binding energies than the real nuclei.

Takashi Inoue; Sinya Aoki; Bruno Charron; Takumi Doi; Tetsuo Hatsuda; Yoichi Ikeda; Noriyoshi Ishii; Keiko Murano; Hidekatsu Nemura; Kenji Sasaki

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

383

E-Print Network 3.0 - atom nuclei isotopes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

decay... the name Borromean nuclei. The heaviest neutron rich carbon ... Source: TRIUMF Isotope Separation and ACceleration (ISAC) facility, beta-NMR Group Collection: Physics 27...

384

Microscopic and self-consistent description for neutron halo in deformed nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A deformed relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov theory in continuum has been developed for the study of neutron halos in deformed nuclei and the halo phenomenon in deformed weakly bound nuclei is investigated. Magnesium and neon isotopes are studied and some results are presented for the deformed neutron-rich and weakly bound nuclei {sup 44}Mg and {sup 36}Ne. The core of the former nucleus is prolate, but the halo has a slightly oblate shape. This indicates a decoupling of the halo orbitals from the deformation of the core. The generic conditions for the existence of halos in deformed nuclei and for the occurrence of this decoupling effect are discussed.

Li Lulu [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Meng Jie [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) and Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Zhao Enguang; Zhou Shangui [State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China) and Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

385

Superscaling in Nuclei: A Search for Scaling Function Beyond the Relativistic Fermi Gas Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct a scaling function $f(\\psi^{\\prime})$ for inclusive electron scattering from nuclei within the Coherent Density Fluctuation Model (CDFM). The latter is a natural extension to finite nuclei of the Relativistic Fermi Gas (RFG) model within which the scaling variable $\\psi^{\\prime}$ was introduced by Donnelly and collaborators. The calculations show that the high-momentum components of the nucleon momentum distribution in the CDFM and their similarity for different nuclei lead to quantitative description of the superscaling in nuclei. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data for different transfer momenta showing superscaling for negative values of $\\psi^{\\prime}$, including those smaller than -1.

A. N. Antonov; M. K. Gaidarov; D. N. Kadrev; M. V. Ivanov; E. Moya de Guerra; J. M. Udias

2004-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

386

E-Print Network 3.0 - active galactic nuclei Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclei by Bradley M. Peterson (Cambridge U. Press). Course Web Page: http... phenomenology of observational cosmology and ... Source: Martini, Paul - Department of...

387

Determination of the Central Mass in Active Galactic Nuclei Using Cross-Correlation Lags and Velocity Dispersions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We here estimate the mass M of the central object in five active galactic nuclei (AGNs), using the most recent reverberation data obtained by the AGN Watch Consortium. The cross-correlation function (CCF) centroids of the broad Ly-alpha 1216 and C IV 1549 lines are used to estimate the size of the broad-line region (BLR) in these sources. We calculate the velocity dispersions of these lines in the root mean square (rms) spectra and then use our results to estimate M. We argue that our technique of calculating the velocity dispersion should work in the general case of an arbitrary line profile, unlike methods that depend on the measurement of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the broad line. We also show that our results agree with the FWHM method in the limit of a normal (Gaussian) line profile. The masses calculated here are considerably smaller than those calculated with the previous generation of reverberation data.

Michael J. Fromerth; Fulvio Melia

2003-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

388

Symmetry energy of deformed neutron-rich nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The symmetry energy, the neutron pressure and the asymmetric compressibility of deformed neutron-rich even-even nuclei are calculated on the examples of Kr and Sm isotopes within the coherent density fluctuation model using the symmetry energy as a function of density within the Brueckner energy-density functional. The correlation between the thickness of the neutron skin and the characteristics related with the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy is investigated for isotopic chains of these nuclei in the framework of the self-consistent Skyrme-Hartree-Fock plus BCS method. Results for an extended chain of Pb isotopes are also presented. A remarkable difference is found in the trend followed by the different isotopic chains: the studied correlations reveal a smoother behavior in the Pb case than in the other cases. We also notice that the neutron skin thickness obtained for $^{208}$Pb with SLy4 force is found to be in a good agreement with recent data.

Gaidarov, M K; Sarriguren, P; de Guerra, E Moya

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Ice Nuclei in Marine Air: Biogenic Particles or Dust?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ice nuclei impact clouds, but their sources and distribution in the atmosphere are still not well known. Particularly little attention has been paid to IN sources in marine environments, although evidence from field studies suggests that IN populations in remote marine regions may be dominated by primary biogenic particles associated with sea spray. In this exploratory model study, we aim to bring attention to this long-neglected topic and identify promising target regions for future field campaigns. We assess the likely global distribution of marine biogenic ice nuclei using a combination of historical observations, satellite data and model output. By comparing simulated marine biogenic immersion IN distributions and dust immersion IN distributions, we predict strong regional differences in the importance of marine biogenic IN relative to dust IN. Our analysis suggests that marine biogenic IN are most likely to play a dominant role in determining IN concentrations in near-surface-air over the Southern Ocean, so future field campaigns aimed at investigating marine biogenic IN should target that region. Climate related changes in the abundance and emission of biogenic marine IN could affect marine cloud properties, thereby introducing previously unconsidered feedbacks that influence the hydrological cycle and the Earth’s energy balance. Furthermore, marine biogenic IN may be an important aspect to consider in proposals for marine cloud brightening by artificial sea spray production.

Burrows, Susannah M.; Hoose, C.; Poschl, U.; Lawrence, M.

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

390

Alpha particle cluster states in fp-shell nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Alpha particle cluster structure is known experimentally to persist throughout the mass range 16?A?20, and has been very successfully described in this region in terms of the Buck-Dover-Vary local potential cluster model. It is argued that an analogous cluster structure should be present in nuclei at the beginning of the fp shell, and the available experimental data are examined to determine likely alpha particle cluster state candidates in the mass range 40?A?44. Calculations of the cluster state spectra and mean square cluster-core separation distances (which may be readily used to evaluate E2 electromagnetic transition rates) for Ca40, Ca42, Sc42, Sc43, Ti43, and Ti44 using the above-mentioned model are presented, and compared with experimental measurements where possible. The agreement between theory and experiment is generally good (although inferior to that obtained in the sd shell), and points to the desirability of an extension and improvement of the measurements of the properties of the excited states in these nuclei.

A. C. Merchant

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Strictly finite-range potential for light and heavy nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Strictly finite-range (SFR) potentials are exactly zero beyond their finite range. Single-particle energies and densities, as well as S-matrix pole trajectories, are studied in a few SFR potentials suited for the description of neutrons interacting with light and heavy nuclei. The SFR potentials considered are the standard cutoff Woods-Saxon (CWS) potentials and two potentials approaching zero smoothly: the SV potential introduced by Salamon and Vertse [Phys. Rev. C 77, 037302 (2008)] and the SS potential of Sahu and Sahu [Int. J. Mod. Phys. E 21, 1250067 (2012)]. The parameters of these latter potentials were set so that the potentials may be similar to the CWS shape. The range of the SV and SS potentials scales with the cube root of the mass number of the core like the nuclear radius itself. For light nuclei a single term of the SV potential (with a single parameter) is enough for a good description of the neutron-nucleus interaction. The trajectories are compared with a benchmark for which the starting points (belonging to potential depth zero) can be determined independently. Even the CWS potential is found to conform to this benchmark if the range is identified with the cutoff radius. For the CWS potentials some trajectories show irregular shapes, while for the SV and SS potentials all trajectories behave regularly.

P. Salamon; R. G. Lovas; R. M. Id Betan; T. Vertse; L. Balkay

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

392

Phenotype MicroArray Profiling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MicroArray MicroArray Profiling of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 Barry Bochner & Vanessa Gomez & Michael Ziman & Shihui Yang & Steven D. Brown Received: 22 May 2009 / Accepted: 26 October 2009 # The Author(s) 2009. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Abstract In this study, we developed a Phenotype MicroArray(tm) (PM) protocol to profile cellular phenotypes in Zymomonas mobilis, which included a standard set of nearly 2,000 assays for carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur source utilization, nutrient stimulation, pH and osmotic stresses, and chemical sensitivities with 240 inhibitory chemicals. We observed two positive assays for C-source utilization (fructose and glucose) using the PM screen, which uses redox chemistry and cell respiration as a universal reporter to profile growth phenotypes in a high-throughput 96-well plate-based format.

393

Industry Profile | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Industry Profile Industry Profile Industry Profile November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis The largest energy consuming industrial sectors account for the largest share of CHP capacity; namely: Chemicals (30%), Petroleum Refining (17%), and Paper Products (14%). Other industrial sectors include: Commercial/Institutional (12%), Food (8%), Primary Metals (5%), Other Manufacturing (8%), and Other Industrial (6%). Combined heat and power (CHP)-sometimes referred to as cogeneration-involves the sequential process of producing and utilizing electricity and thermal energy from a single fuel. CHP is widely recognized to save energy and costs, while reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) and other pollutants. CHP is a realistic, near-term option for large energy efficiency improvements and significant CO2 reductions.

394

Top Value Added Chemicals from Biomass: Volume I--Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report identifies twelve building block chemicals that can be produced from sugars via biological or chemical conversions.

395

Top Value Added Chemicals From Biomass: I. Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies twelve building block chemicals that can be produced from sugars via biological or chemical conversions. The twelve building blocks can be subsequently converted to a number of high-value bio-based chemicals or materials. Building block chemicals, as considered for this analysis, are molecules with multiple functional groups that possess the potential to be transformed into new families of useful molecules. The twelve sugar-based building blocks are 1,4-diacids (succinic, fumaric and malic), 2,5-furan dicarboxylic acid, 3-hydroxy propionic acid, aspartic acid, glucaric acid, glutamic acid, itaconic acid, levulinic acid, 3-hydroxybutyrolactone, glycerol, sorbitol, and xylitol/arabinitol. In addition to building blocks, the report outlines the central technical barriers that are preventing the widespread use of biomass for products and chemicals.

Werpy, Todd A.; Holladay, John E.; White, James F.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Production of coal-based fuels and value-added products: coal to liquids using petroleum refinery streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are studying several processes that utilize coal, coal-derived materials, or biomass in existing refining facilities. A major emphasis is the production of a coal-based replacement for JP-8 jet fuel. This fuel is very similar to Jet A and jet A-1 in commercial variation, so this work has significant carry-over into the private sector. We have been focusing on three processes that would be retrofitted into a refinery: (1) coal tar/refinery stream blending and hydro-treatment; (2) coal extraction using refinery streams followed by hydro-treatment; and (3) co-coking of coal blended with refinery streams. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Clifford, C.E.B.; Schobert, H.H. [Pennsylvania State University, PA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Verh. Zool.-Bot. Ges. sterreich 147, 2010, 9398 Value-adding application of micro-CT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Keywords: Pragmites australis, knot sections, transverse sections, micro-tomography. Introduction rigid plant tissues: Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. Ex Steud. knot sections Gabriele OkOrn, Brian australis Cav. Trin ex Steud.), grown in natural habitats and in constructed wetlands, authors tried

Metscher, Brian

398

gprof Profiling Tools | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tuning MPI on BG/Q Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) HPCToolkit HPCTW mpiP gprof Profiling Tools Darshan PAPI BG/Q Performance Counters BGPM Openspeedshop Scalasca BG/Q DGEMM Performance Software & Libraries IBM References Intrepid/Challenger/Surveyor Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] gprof Profiling Tools Contents Introduction Profiling on the Blue Gene Enabling Profiling Collecting Profile Information Profiling Threaded Applications Using gprof Routine Level Flat Profile Line Level Flat Profile Call Graph Analysis Routine Execution Count List Annotated Source Listing Issues in Interpreting Profile Data Profiling Concepts Programs in Memory

399

MOLECULAR GAS IN LUMINOUS GALACTIC NUCLEI N. Z. SCOVILLE AND A. J. BAKER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MOLECULAR GAS IN LUMINOUS GALACTIC NUCLEI N. Z. SCOVILLE AND A. J. BAKER California Institute­wave interferometry has clearly shown the existence of enormous masses (10 9 \\Gamma 10 10 M fi ) of molecular gas. In these systems, molecular gas is an obvious source of fuel for nuclear starbursts and active galactic nuclei (AGN

Baker, Andrew J.

400

Neutron-induced cross sections of short-lived nuclei via the surrogate reaction method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron-induced cross sections of short-lived nuclei via the surrogate reaction method G. Boutoux1 Abstract. The measurement of neutron-induced cross sections of short-lived nuclei is extremely difficult for a neutron-induced measurement. We have successfully used the surrogate reaction method to extract neutron

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Multicomponent density-functional theory for electrons and nuclei Thomas Kreibich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multicomponent density-functional theory for electrons and nuclei Thomas Kreibich Institut fĂĽr a general multicomponent density-functional theory in which electrons and nuclei are treated completely , 71.10. w I. INTRODUCTION Density-functional theory DFT is among the most suc- cessful approaches

Gross, E.K.U.

402

Nuclear Physics A 587 (1995) 787-801 (3He,t) reactions on unstable nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELSEVIER NUCLEAR PHYSICS A Nuclear Physics A 587 (1995) 787-801 (3He,t) reactions on unstable,t) reactions on unstable nuclei theoretically. Since this charge-exchange reaction takes place on the nuclear in nuclear physics since we got a new tool, "beams of unstable nuclei" [1,2]. Many experimentalists have

Fernández de Córdoba, Pedro

403

SPIN-DEPENDENT SCATTERING LENGTHS OF SLOW NEUTRONS WITH NUCLEI BY PSEUDOMAGNETIC MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L-263 SPIN-DEPENDENT SCATTERING LENGTHS OF SLOW NEUTRONS WITH NUCLEI BY PSEUDOMAGNETIC MEASUREMENTS vu par les noyaux. Abstract. - The spin-dependent scattering length of slow neutrons by the nuclei 23 can be of practical importance in many thermal neutron scattering experiments. A new method, called

Boyer, Edmond

404

CLOUD CONDENSATION NUCLEI IN CUMULUS HUMILIS --SELECTED CASE STUDY DURING THE CHAPS CAMPAIGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLOUD CONDENSATION NUCLEI IN CUMULUS HUMILIS -- SELECTED CASE STUDY DURING THE CHAPS CAMPAIGN X and condensation as well as activation and impact scavenging. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft and residuals of activated condensation cloud nuclei were conducted simultaneously. The interstitial aerosols

405

Central Appalachia: Coal industry profile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Central Appalachia, the most complex and diverse coal-producing region in the United States, is also the principal source of very low sulfur coal in the East. This report provides detailed profiles of companies and facilities responsible for about 90% of the area's production, conveying a unique view of the aggregate industry as well as its many parts.

McMahan, R.L.; Kendall, L.K. (Resource Data International, Inc., Boulder, CO (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Microfluidics and Nanoscale Research Profile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microfluidics and Nanoscale Science Research Profile Our research group is engaged in a broad range of activities in the general area of microfluidics and nanoscale science. At a primary level, our interest that when compared to macroscale tech- nology, microfluidic systems engender a number of distinct advantages

407

Turfgrass Disease Profiles Brown Patch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turfgrass Disease Profiles Brown Patch Richard Latin, Professor of Plant Pathology Brown patch to algae and moss infestation. Even mild brown patch outbreaks can spoil the appearance of golf greens and perennial ryegrass) also may sustain damage from brown patch infection. Disease Characteristics and Symptom

408

MODELING OF CHANGING ELECTRODE PROFILES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for simulating the transient behavior of solid electrodes undergoing deposition or dissolution has been developed. The model accounts for ohmic drop, charge transfer overpotential, and mass transport limitations. The finite difference method, coupled with successive overrelaxation, was used as the basis of the solution technique. An algorithm was devised to overcome the computational instabilities associated with the calculations of the secondary and tertiary current distributions. Simulations were performed on several model electrode profiles: the sinusoid, the rounded corner, and the notch. Quantitative copper deposition data were obtained in a contoured rotating cylinder system, Sinusoidal cross-sections, machined on stainless steel cylinders, were used as model geometries, Kinetic parameters for use in the simulation were determined from polarization curves obtained on copper rotating cylinders, These parameters, along with other physical property and geometric data, were incorporated in simulations of growing sinusoidal profiles. The copper distributions on the sinusoidal cross-sections were measured and found to compare favorably with the simulated results. At low Wagner numbers the formation of a slight depression at the profile peak was predicted by the simulation and observed on the profile. At higher Wagner numbers, the simulated and experimental results showed that the formation of a depression was suppressed. This phenomenon was shown to result from the competition between ohmic drop and electrode curvature.

Prentice, Geoffrey Allen

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Distribution of nanoscale nuclei in the amorphous dome of a phase change random access memory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nanoscale crystal nuclei in an amorphous Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} bit in a phase change memory device were evaluated by fluctuation transmission electron microscopy. The quench time in the device (?10 ns) afforded more and larger nuclei in the melt-quenched state than in the as-deposited state. However, nuclei were even more numerous and larger in a test structure with a longer quench time (?100 ns), verifying the prediction of nucleation theory that slower cooling produces more nuclei. It also demonstrates that the thermal design of devices will strongly influence the population of nuclei, and thus the speed and data retention characteristics.

Lee, Bong-Sub, E-mail: bongsub@gmail.com; Darmawikarta, Kristof; Abelson, John R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Coordinated Sciences Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Raoux, Simone; Shih, Yen-Hao; Zhu, Yu [IBM/Macronix PCRAM Joint Project, IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Bishop, Stephen G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Coordinated Sciences Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Coordinated Sciences Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

410

A NEW COSMOLOGICAL DISTANCE MEASURE USING ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate distances to celestial objects are key to establishing the age and energy density of the universe and the nature of dark energy. A distance measure using active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has been sought for more than 40 years, as they are extremely luminous and can be observed at very large distances. We report here the discovery of an accurate luminosity distance measure using AGNs. We use the tight relationship between the luminosity of an AGN and the radius of its broad-line region established via reverberation mapping to determine the luminosity distances to a sample of 38 AGNs. All reliable distance measures up to now have been limited to moderate redshift-AGNs will, for the first time, allow distances to be estimated to z {approx} 4, where variations of dark energy and alternate gravity theories can be probed.

Watson, D.; Denney, K. D.; Vestergaard, M. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Oe (Denmark); Davis, T. M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

411

Isovector potential of $?$ in nuclei and neutron star matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We determine the coupling constants of $\\Sigma$ hyperon with mesons in relativistic mean field (RMF) models using $\\Sigma^-$ atomic shift data and examine the effects of $\\Sigma$ on the neutron star maximum mass. We find that we need to reduce the vector-isovector meson coupling with $\\Sigma$ ($g_{\\rho\\Sigma}$) from the value constrained by the SU(3)v symmetry in order to explain the $\\Sigma^-$ atomic shifts for light symmetric and heavy asymmetric nuclei simultaneously. With the atomic shift fit value of $g_{\\rho\\Sigma}$, $\\Sigma^-$ can emerge in neutron star matter overcoming the repulsive isoscalar potential for $\\Sigma$ hyperons. Admixture of $\\Sigma^-$ in neutron stars is found to reduce the neutron star maximum mass slightly.

K. Tsubakihara; A. Ohnishi; T. Harada

2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

412

Relativistic density functional theory for finite nuclei and neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main goal of the present contribution is a pedagogical introduction to the fascinating world of neutron stars by relying on relativistic density functional theory. Density functional theory provides a powerful--and perhaps unique--framework for the calculation of both the properties of finite nuclei and neutron stars. Given the enormous densities that may be reached in the core of neutron stars, it is essential that such theoretical framework incorporates from the outset the basic principles of Lorentz covariance and special relativity. After a brief historical perspective, we present the necessary details required to compute the equation of state of dense, neutron-rich matter. As the equation of state is all that is needed to compute the structure of neutron stars, we discuss how nuclear physics--particularly certain kind of laboratory experiments--can provide significant constrains on the behavior of neutron-rich matter.

Piekarewicz, J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Heavy Cosmic Ray Nuclei from Extragalactic Sources above 'The Ankle'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A very recent observation by the Auger Observatory group claims strong evidence for cosmic rays above 56 EeV being protons from Active Galactic Nuclei. If, as would be expected, the particles above the ankle at about 2 EeV are almost all of extragalactic origin then it follows that the characteristics of the nuclear interactions of such particles would need to be very different from conventional expectation -- a result that follows from the measured positions of 'shower maximum' in the Auger' work. Our own analysis gives a different result, viz that the detected particles are still 'massive' specifically with a mean value of = 2.2 +- 0.8. The need for a dramatic change in the nuclear physics disappears.

Tadeusz Wibig; Arnold W. Wolfendale

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

414

Heavy Cosmic Ray Nuclei from Extragalactic Sources above 'The Ankle'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A very recent observation by the Auger Observatory group claims strong evidence for cosmic rays above 56 EeV being protons from Active Galactic Nuclei. If, as would be expected, the particles above the ankle at about 2 EeV are almost all of extragalactic origin then it follows that the characteristics of the nuclear interactions of such particles would need to be very different from conventional expectation -- a result that follows from the measured positions of 'shower maximum' in the Auger' work. Our own analysis gives a different result, viz that the detected particles are still 'massive' specifically with a mean value of = 2.2 +- 0.8. The need for a dramatic change in the nuclear physics disappears.

Wibig, Tadeusz

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Shell-Model Analysis for Brueckner Calculations in Light Nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Brueckner self-consistent calculations are performed for O16, H3, and He4 nuclei with various modern hard-core interactions. Elements of the G matrix are calculated by the reference-spectrum method, while Q-1 corrections are made by matrix inversion in the proper single-particle space. Thus, it is not assumed that Q commutes with the center-of-mass motion. The prescription for selecting the appropriate spectrum of single-particle excited states is investigated by comparing results of the Brueckner method with other calculations. These comparisons indicate that the particle spectrum should be left unperturbed. One then finds that the Hamada-Johnston, Yale, and Reid (hard-core) interactions yield about one half the binding energy of O16. The calculated results are dissected into shell-model components. This analysis indicates that the short-range part of the hard-core interaction is too strongly repulsive.

Ram K. Tripathi and Paul Goldhammer

1972-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Advanced modeling of reaction cross sections for light nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The shell model/R-matrix technique of calculating nuclear reaction cross sections for light projectiles incident on light nuclei is discussed, particularly in the application of the technique to thermonuclear reactions. Details are presented on the computational methods for the shell model which display how easily the calculations can be performed. Results of the shell model/R-matrix technique are discussed as are some of the problems encountered in picking an appropriate nucleon-nucleon interaction for the large model spaces which must be used for current problems. The status of our work on developing an effective nucleon-nucleon interaction for use in large-basis shell model calculations is presented. This new interaction is based on a combination of global constraints and microscopic nuclear data. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Resler, D.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Toward open-shell nuclei with coupled-cluster theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop a method based on equation-of-motion coupled-cluster theory to describe properties of open-shell nuclei with A{+-}2 nucleons outside a closed shell. We perform proof-of-principle calculations for the ground states of the helium isotopes {sup 3-6}He and the first excited 2{sup +} state in {sup 6}He. The comparison with exact results from matrix diagonalization in small model spaces demonstrates the accuracy of the coupled-cluster methods. Three-particle-one-hole excitations of {sup 4}He play an important role for the accurate description of {sup 6}He. For the open-shell nucleus {sup 6}He, the computational cost of the method is comparable with the coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles approximation while its accuracy is similar to the coupled-cluster with singles, doubles, and triples excitations.

Jansen, G. R.; Hjorth-Jensen, M. [Department of Physics and Center of Mathematics for Applications, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Hagen, G. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Papenbrock, T. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Tidal waves as yrast states in transitional nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The yrast states of transitional nuclei are described as quadrupole waves running over the nuclear surface, which we call tidal waves. In contrast to a rotor, which generates angular momentum by increasing the angular velocity at approximately constant deformation, a tidal wave generates angular momentum by increasing the deformation at approximately constant angular velocity. The properties of the tidal waves are calculated by means of the cranking model in a microscopic way. The calculated energies and E2 transition probabilities of the yrast states in the transitional nuclides with $Z$= 44, 46, 48 and $N=56, 58, ..., 66$ reproduce the experiment in detail. The nonlinear response of the nucleonic orbitals results in a strong coupling between shape and single particle degrees of freedom.

S. Frauendorf; Y. Gu; J. Sun

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

419

Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay in Heavy Deformed Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The zero neutrino mode of the double beta decay in heavy deformed nuclei is investigated in the framework of the pseudo SU(3) model, which has provided an accurate description of collective nuclear structure and predicted half-lives for the two neutrino mode in good agreement with experiments. In the case of $^{238}U$ the calculated zero neutrino half-life is at least three orders of magnitude greater than the two neutrino one, giving strong support of the identification of the radiochemically determined half-life as being the two neutrino double beta decay. For $^{150}Nd$ the zero neutrino matrix elements are of the order of magnitude of, but lesser than, those evaluated using the QRPA. This result confirms that different nuclear models produce similar zero neutrino matrix elements, contrary to the two neutrino case. Using these pseudo SU(3) results and the upper limit for the neutrino mass we estimate the $\\beta\\beta_{0\

Jorge G. Hirsch; O. Castańos; P. O. Hess

1994-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

420

Nuclear shell effect and collinear tripartition of nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A possibility of formation of the three reaction products having comparable masses at the spontaneous fission of $^{252}$Cf is theoretically explored. This work is aimed to study the mechanism leading to observation of the reaction products with masses $M_1=$136---140 and $M_2=$68---72 in coincidence by the FOBOS group in JINR. The same type of ternary fission decay has been observed in the reaction $^{235}$U(n$_{\\rm th}$,fff). The potential energy surface for the ternary system forming a collinear nuclear chain is calculated for the wide range of mass and charge numbers of constituent nuclei. The results of the PES for the tripartition of $^{252}$Cf(sf,fff) shows, that we have favorable dynamical conditions for the formation of fragments with mass combinations of clusters $^{68-70}$Ni with $^{130-132}$Sn and with missing cluster $^{48-52}$Ca.

Nasirov, A K; Tashkhodjaev, R B

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Studies of Relativistic Jets in Active Galactic Nuclei with SKA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei (AGN) are among the most powerful astrophysical objects discovered to date. Indeed, jetted AGN studies have been considered a prominent science case for SKA, and were included in several different chapters of the previous SKA Science Book (Carilli & Rawlings 2004). Most of the fundamental questions about the physics of relativistic jets still remain unanswered, and await high-sensitivity radio instruments such as SKA to solve them. These questions will be addressed specially through analysis of the massive data sets arising from the deep, all-sky surveys (both total and polarimetric flux) from SKA1. Wide-field very-long-baseline-interferometric survey observations involving SKA1 will serve as a unique tool for distinguishing between extragalactic relativistic jets and star forming galaxies via brightness temperature measurements. Subsequent SKA1 studies of relativistic jets at different resolutions will allow for unprecedented cosmological studies of AGN jets up...

Agudo, Ivan; Falcke, Heino; Georganopoulos, Markos; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Giovannini, Gabriele; Giroletti, Marcello; Gomez, Jose L; Gurvits, Leonid; Laing, Robert; Lister, Matthew; Marti, Jose-Maria; Meyer, Eileen T; Mizuno, Yosuke; O'Sullivan, Shane; Padovani, Paolo; Paragi, Zsolt; Perucho, Manel; Schleicher, Dominik; Stawarz, Lukasz; Vlahakis, Nektarios; Wardle, John

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Definition: Electrical Profiling Configurations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Profiling Configurations Profiling Configurations Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electrical Profiling Configurations Electrical profiling is a DC resistivity survey which aims to trace lateral variations in the apparent resistivity structure of the subsurface. Traditionally, electrical profiling provides qualitative information of relative apparent resistivity values in order to detect anomalous geological features.[1] Also Known As Electrical mapping References ↑ http://www.amazon.com/Principles-Electric-Borehole-Geophysics-Geochemistry/dp/0444529942 Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Electrical_Profiling_Configurations&oldid=596184" Category: Definitions

423

IPM Profiling Tool at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IPM IPM IPM Description and Overview IPM is a portable profiling infrastructure which provide a high level report on the execution of a parallel job. IPM reports hardware counters data, MPI function timings, and memory usage. It provides a low overhead means to generate scaling studies or performance data for ERCAP submissions. When you run a job using the IPM module you will get a performance summary (see below) to stdout as well as a web accessible summary of all your IPM jobs. The two main objectives of IPM are ease-of-use and scalability in performance analysis. Usage % module load ipm On HPC architectures that support shared libraries that's all you need to do. Once the module is loaded you can run as you normally and get a performance profile once the job has successfully completed. You do not

424

Production of heavy and superheavy neutron-rich nuclei in neutron capture processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The neutron capture process is considered as an alternative method for production of superheavy (SH) nuclei. Strong neutron fluxes might be provided by nuclear reactors and nuclear explosions in the laboratory frame and by supernova explosions in nature. All these cases are discussed in the paper. There are two gaps of short-lived nuclei (one is the well-known fermium gap and the other one is located in the region of Z=106–108 and N?170) which impede the formation of SH nuclei by rather weak neutron fluxes realized at available nuclear reactors. We find that in the course of multiple (rather “soft”) nuclear explosions these gaps may be easily bypassed, and thus, a measurable amount of the neutron-rich long-living SH nuclei located at the island of stability may be synthesized. Existing pulsed reactors do not allow one to bypass these gaps. We formulate requirements for the pulsed reactors of the next generation that could be used for production of long-living SH nuclei. Natural formation of SH nuclei (in supernova explosions) is also discussed. The yield of SH nuclei relative to lead is estimated to be about 10?12, which is not beyond the experimental sensitivity for a search of SH elements in cosmic rays.

V. I. Zagrebaev; A. V. Karpov; I. N. Mishustin; Walter Greiner

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

425

Future of superheavy element research: Which nuclei could be synthesized within the next few years?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low values of the fusion cross sections and very short half-lives of nuclei with Z$>$120 put obstacles in synthesis of new elements. Different nuclear reactions (fusion of stable and radioactive nuclei, multi-nucleon transfers and neutron capture), which could be used for the production of new isotopes of superheavy (SH) elements, are discussed in the paper. The gap of unknown SH nuclei, located between the isotopes which were produced earlier in the cold and hot fusion reactions, can be filled in fusion reactions of $^{48}$Ca with available lighter isotopes of Pu, Am, and Cm. Cross sections for the production of these nuclei are predicted to be rather large, and the corresponding experiments can be easily performed at existing facilities. For the first time, a narrow pathway is found to the middle of the island of stability owing to possible $\\beta^+$-decay of SH isotopes which can be formed in ordinary fusion reactions of stable nuclei. Multi-nucleon transfer processes at near barrier collisions of heavy (and very heavy, U-like) ions are shown to be quite realistic reaction mechanism allowing us to produce new neutron enriched heavy nuclei located in the unexplored upper part of the nuclear map. Neutron capture reactions can be also used for the production of the long-living neutron rich SH nuclei. Strong neutron fluxes might be provided by pulsed nuclear reactors and by nuclear explosions in laboratory conditions and by supernova explosions in nature. All these possibilities are discussed in the paper.

Valeriy Zagrebaev; Alexander Karpov; Walter Greiner

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

426

Benchmarking optimization software with performance profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: We propose performance profiles -- probability distribution functions for a performance metric -- as a tool for benchmarking and comparing optimization ...

Elizabeth Dolan

427

Light Nuclei and Isotope Abundances in Cosmic Rays. Results from AMS-01  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations of the chemical and isotopic composition of light cosmic-ray nuclei can be used to constrain the astrophysical models of cosmic-ray transport and interactions in the Galaxy. Nearly 200,000 light nuclei (Z>2) have been observed by AMS-01 during the 10-day flight STS-91 in June 1998. Using these data, we have measured the relative abundance of light nuclei Li, Be, B and C in the kinetic energy range 0.35 - 45 GeV/nucleon.

N. Tomassetti

2011-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

428

Energy-weighted sum rules connecting ?Z?=?2 nuclei within the SO(8) model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy-weighted sum rules associated with ?Z?=?2 nuclei are obtained for the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller operators within the SO(8) model. It is found that there is a dominance of contribution of a single state of the intermediate nucleus to the sum rule. The results confirm founding obtained within the SO(5) model that the energy-weighted sum rules of ?Z?=?2 nuclei are governed by the residual interactions of nuclear Hamiltonian. A short discussion concerning some aspects of energy weighted sum rules in the case of realistic nuclei is included.

Štefánik, Dušan [Comenius University, Mlynská dolina F1, SK-842 48 Bratislava (Slovenia); Šimkovic, Fedor [IEAP CTU, CZ-128 00 Prague, Czech Republic and BLTP, JINR, 141980 Dubna, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Faessler, Amand [Inst. of Theor. Phys., University of Tuebingen, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

429

ENSEMBLE VARIABILITY OF NEAR-INFRARED-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the properties of the ensemble variability V for nearly 5000 near-infrared active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the catalog of Quasars and Active Galactic Nuclei (13th Edition) and the SDSS-DR7 quasar catalog. From three near-infrared point source catalogs, namely, Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), Deep Near Infrared Survey (DENIS), and UKIDSS/LAS catalogs, we extract 2MASS-DENIS and 2MASS-UKIDSS counterparts for cataloged AGNs by cross-identification between catalogs. We further select variable AGNs based on an optimal criterion for selecting the variable sources. The sample objects are divided into subsets according to whether near-infrared light originates by optical emission or by near-infrared emission in the rest frame; and we examine the correlations of the ensemble variability with the rest-frame wavelength, redshift, luminosity, and rest-frame time lag. In addition, we also examine the correlations of variability amplitude with optical variability, radio intensity, and radio-to-optical flux ratio. The rest-frame optical variability of our samples shows negative correlations with luminosity and positive correlations with rest-frame time lag (i.e., the structure function, SF), and this result is consistent with previous analyses. However, no well-known negative correlation exists between the rest-frame wavelength and optical variability. This inconsistency might be due to a biased sampling of high-redshift AGNs. Near-infrared variability in the rest frame is anticorrelated with the rest-frame wavelength, which is consistent with previous suggestions. However, correlations of near-infrared variability with luminosity and rest-frame time lag are the opposite of these correlations of the optical variability; that is, the near-infrared variability is positively correlated with luminosity but negatively correlated with the rest-frame time lag. Because these trends are qualitatively consistent with the properties of radio-loud quasars reported by some previous studies, most of our sample objects are probably radio-loud quasars. Finally, we also discuss the negative correlations seen in the near-infrared SFs.

Kouzuma, S. [School of International Liberal Studies, Chukyo University, Toyota 470-0393 (Japan); Yamaoka, H., E-mail: skouzuma@lets.chukyo-u.ac.jp, E-mail: yamaoka@phys.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

EQPT: Ecological Quality Profiling Tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EQPT uses"Habitat Value Units" to assess the ecological quality of selected areas. A Habitat Value Unit is equal to one unit area of pristine or desired habitat. The proximity of waste reduces the value of the habitat. The GIS uses a proximity-based iterative algorithm to aggregate similarly classified waste sites. A variable size buffering algorithm is then used to approximate the effects of the waste on the environmental quality of the surrounding areas. The user designated areas are analyzed, and the resulting quality profiles are presented quantitatively in tabular summaries and graphically as grids on vector base maps.

Tzemos, Spyridon (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Sackschewsky, Michael R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Bilyard, Gordon R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2002-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

431

Texas Crop Profile: Sweet Potatoes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is between 120 to 135 days. Texas Crop Profile S W E E T P O T A T O E S E-22 3-00 Prepared by Rodney L. Holloway, Kent D. Hall and Dudley T. Smith 1 In collaboration with James V. Robinson, George Philley and Marvin Baker 2 1 Extension Specialist, Extension... Command will not. Rodney L. Holloway Extension Specialist 2488 TAMU College Station, Texas 77843-2488 979-845-3849 rholloway@tamu.edu Kent D. Hall Extension Associate 2488 TAMU College Station, Texas 77843-2488 979-845-3849 kd-hall@tamu.edu Dudley Smith...

Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.; Smith, Dudley

2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

432

Self-absorbed synchroton sources in active galactic nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of compact, homogeneous self-absorbed synchroton sources in active galactic nuclei are explored, calculating the time evolution of such sources after an impulsive injection of relativistic electrons, and the steady state properties in the case of steady injection. The models include synchroton self-Compton losses in a self consistent way. The behavior of the models is determined mainly by the relative importance of synchroton and inverse Compton energy losses. It is found that pure self-absorbed synchroton self-Compton models always predict a continuum spectral slope which is flatter than observed. The problem can be resolved either by including another cooling mechanism for the relativistic electrons, which operates preferentially at low gamma, such as Coulomb collisions with thermal background electrons, or by assuming that there is an external source of primary photons with a luminosity greater than the energy injection rate in relativistic electrons, e.g., the 'UV bump'. The latter possibility, however, predicts an X-ray luminosity which is higher than observed. 30 references.

De kool, M.; Begelman, M.C.; Sikora, M.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Calculation of Helium nuclei in quenched lattice QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results for the binding energies for ^4He and ^3He nuclei calculated in quenched lattice QCD at the lattice spacing of a =0.128 fm with a heavy quark mass corresponding to m_pi = 0.8 GeV. Enormous computational cost for the nucleus correlation functions is reduced by avoiding redundancy of equivalent contractions stemming from permutation symmetry of protons or neutrons in the nucleus and various other symmetries. To distinguish a bound state from an attractive scattering state, we investigate the volume dependence of the energy difference between the ground state energy of the nucleus channel and the free multi-nucleon states by changing the spatial extent of the lattice from 3.1 fm to 12.3 fm. A finite energy difference left in the infinite spatial volume limit leads to the conclusion that the measured ground states are bounded. It is also encouraging that the measured binding energies and the experimental ones show the same order of magnitude.

T. Yamazaki

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

434

Neutron-Rich Nuclei in Heaven and Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An accurately calibrated relativistic parametrization is introduced to compute the ground state properties of finite nuclei, their linear response, and the structure of neutron stars. While similar in spirit to the successful NL3 parameter set, it produces an equation of state that is considerably softer -- both for symmetric nuclear matter and for the symmetry energy. This softening appears to be required for an accurate description of several collective modes having different neutron-to-proton ratios. Among the predictions of this model are a symmetric nuclear-matter incompressibility of K=230 MeV and a neutron skin thickness in 208Pb of Rn-Rp=0.21 fm. Further, the impact of such a softening on the properties of neutron stars is as follows: the model predicts a limiting neutron star mass of Mmax=1.72 Msun, a radius of R=12.66 km for a ``canonical'' M=1.4 Msun neutron star, and no (nucleon) direct Urca cooling in neutrons stars with masses below M=1.3 Msun.

B. G. Todd-Rutel; J. Piekarewicz

2005-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

435

Ionization and maximum energy of nuclei in shock acceleration theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the acceleration of heavy nuclei at SNR shocks when the process of ionization is taken into account. Heavy atoms ($Z_N >$ few) in the interstellar medium which start the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) are never fully ionized at the moment of injection. The ionization occurs during the acceleration process, when atoms already move relativistically. For typical environment around SNRs the photo-ionization due to the background galactic radiation dominates over Coulomb collisions. The main consequence of ionization is the reduction of the maximum energy which ions can achieve with respect to the standard result of the DSA. In fact the photo-ionization has a timescale comparable to the beginning of the Sedov-Taylor phase, hence the maximum energy is no more proportional to the nuclear charge, as predicted by standard DSA, but rather to the effective ions' charge during the acceleration process, which is smaller than the total nuclear charge $Z_N$. This result can have a direct consequence in the pred...

Morlino, Giovanni

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

SECULAR DYNAMICAL ANTI-FRICTION IN GALACTIC NUCLEI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We identify a gravitational-dynamical process in near-Keplerian potentials of galactic nuclei that occurs when an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) is migrating on an eccentric orbit through the stellar cluster towards the central supermassive black hole. We find that, apart from conventional dynamical friction, the IMBH experiences an often much stronger systematic torque due to the secular (i.e., orbit-averaged) interactions with the cluster's stars. The force which results in this torque is applied, counterintuitively, in the same direction as the IMBH's precession and we refer to its action as 'secular dynamical anti-friction' (SDAF). We argue that SDAF, and not the gravitational ejection of stars, is responsible for the IMBH's eccentricity increase seen in the initial stages of previous N-body simulations. Our numerical experiments, supported by qualitative arguments, demonstrate that (1) when the IMBH's precession direction is artificially reversed, the torque changes sign as well, which decreases the orbital eccentricity; (2) the rate of eccentricity growth is sensitive to the IMBH migration rate, with zero systematic eccentricity growth for an IMBH whose orbit is artificially prevented from inward migration; and (3) SDAF is the strongest when the central star cluster is rapidly rotating. This leads to eccentricity growth/decrease for the clusters rotating in the opposite/same direction relative to the IMBH's orbital motion.

Madigan, Ann-Marie; Levin, Yuri, E-mail: madigan@strw.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

Star Formation in the Nuclei of Spiral Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have revealed that a large fraction of late-type (Sc and later) spiral galaxies harbor a bright, compact stellar cluster in their dynamical centers. Statistics of the mass, age, and star formation history of these clusters as a function of their host galaxy's Hubble type can be used to constrain models of secular galaxy evolution. Since late-type spirals by definition do not possess a prominent bulge, their nuclear clusters are more easily separated from the underlying disk population. Their spectroscopic properties can thus be studied from ground-based observations. Here, I will discuss plans for, and first results of, a program to study a sample of known nuclear clusters in late-type spirals. For one galaxy (IC 342), we have used high-resolution near infrared spectroscopy to determine the cluster mass directly via its stellar velocity dispersion. The analysis conclusively shows a very low mass-to-light ratio for the nuclear cluster in IC 342, indicative of a young cluster age (about 50 Myrs). From probability arguments, this result favors the scenario that such bursts are a recurrent phenomenon in late-type spiral nuclei.

T. Boeker

1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

438

Surface properties of neutron-rich exotic nuclei: A source for studying the nuclear symmetry energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the correlation between the thickness of the neutron skin in finite nuclei and the nuclear symmetry energy for isotopic chains of even-even Ni, Sn, and Pb nuclei in the framework of the deformed self-consistent mean-field Skyrme HF+BCS method. The symmetry energy, the neutron pressure and the asymmetric compressibility in finite nuclei are calculated within the coherent density fluctuation model using the symmetry energy as a function of density within the Brueckner energy-density functional. The mass dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy and the neutron skin thickness are also studied together with the role of the neutron-proton asymmetry. A correlation between the parameters of the equation of state (symmetry energy and its density slope) and the neutron skin is suggested in the isotopic chains of Ni, Sn, and Pb nuclei.

Gaidarov, M K; Sarriguren, P; de Guerra, E Moya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Mechanisms of neutrinoless double-beta decay: A comparative analysis of several nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The neutrinoless double beta decay of several nuclei that are of interest...76Ge, 82Se, 100Mo, 130Te, and 136Xe) is investigated on the basis of a general Lorentzinvariant effective Lagrangian describing physics ...

A. Ali; A. V. Borisov; D. V. Zhuridov

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Microscopic description of isoscalar giant resonance excitations in ??Ca and ąą?SN nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a microscopic description of isoscalar giant resonance excitations in ??Ca and ąą? Sn nuclei within the self-consistent Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Random-Phase-Approximation (HF-RPA) theory. Such characteristic features...

Karki, Bhishma

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

1d5/2-2s1/2 splitting in light nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy differences between 1d5/2 and 2s1/2 states in light nuclei are reviewed and systematized. A simple model accounts for the Coulomb shifts.

H. T. Fortune

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Brueckner—Hartree—Fock Methods for Nuclear Matter and Finite Nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present chapter we consider some methods developed during recent years for considering correlations in the relativistic description of the properties of nuclear matter and finite nuclei. First of all, w...

Professor Lev N. Savushkin…

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

The splitting of hyperfine lines of57Fe nuclei in RF magnetic field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown experimentally, that for Moessbauer nuclei affected by the radio-frequency (RF) magnetic field of sufficient intensity at frequencies corresponding to ... occurs. Depending on the frequency of alterna...

F. G. Vagizov

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Studies of exotic nuclei with few-nucleon transfer reactions Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the activities conducted under DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER41320, titled "Study of exotic nuclei with few-nucleon transfer reactions," A. H. Wuosmaa Principal Investigator.

Wuosmaa, Alan H. [Western Michigan University

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

445

Spin-rotor Interpretation of Identical Bands and Quantized Alignment in Superdeformed A $\\approx$ 190 Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ``identical'' bands in superdeformed mercury, thallium, and lead nuclei are interpreted as examples of orbital angular momentum rotors with the weak spin-orbit coupling of pseudo-$SU(3)$ symmetries and supersymmetries.

J. A. Cizewski; R. Bijker

1995-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

446

E-Print Network 3.0 - az nuclei application Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: indicates less apoptotic nuclei in QHREDGS compared to the RGDS modified Az-chitosan. See DOI: 10.1039c0sm... on a photocrosslinked form of chitosan, Az-chitosan,...

447

Nonperturbative renormalization of the neutrinoless double-beta operator in p-shell nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use Lee-Suzuki mappings and related techniques to construct effective two-body p-shell interactions and neutrinoless double-beta operators that exactly reproduce the results of large no-core-shell-model calculations of double-beta decay in nuclei with mass number A=6. We then apply the effective operators to the decay of nuclei with A=7, 8, and 10, again comparing with no-core calculations in much larger spaces. The results with the effective two-body operators are generally good. In some cases, however, they differ non-negligibly from the full no-core results, suggesting that three-body corrections to the decay operator in heavier nuclei may be important. An application of our procedure and related ideas to fp-shell nuclei such as 76Ge should be feasible within coupled-cluster theory.

Deepshikha Shukla; Jonathan Engel; Petr Navratil

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

X–rays from active galactic nuclei: relativistically broadened emission lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...galactic nuclei: relativistically broadened emission lines A. C. Fabian Institute of Astronomy, University...many Seyfert 1 galaxies show an iron-K emission line. Some of these lines are broad and skew, reflecting the rapid motion of...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic nuclei issue Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: the atomic electric dipole moment especially in heavy nuclei is a sensitive test for CP- viloation... . Schematic layout of an advanced ISOL facility 1. 26 12;40 W...

450

PWR AXIAL BURNUP PROFILE ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this activity is to develop a representative ''limiting'' axial burnup profile for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), which would encompass the isotopic axial variations caused by different assembly irradiation histories, and produce conservative isotopics with respect to criticality. The effect that the low burnup regions near the ends of spent fuel have on system reactivity is termed the ''end-effect''. This calculation will quantify the end-effects associated with Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies emplaced in a hypothetical 21 PWR waste package. The scope of this calculation covers an initial enrichment range of 3.0 through 5.0 wt% U-235 and a burnup range of 10 through 50 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the process for ensuring conservative generation of spent fuel isotopics with respect to criticality safety applications, and the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel. The intended use of these results will be in the development of PWR waste package loading curves, and applications involving burnup credit. Limitations of this evaluation are that the limiting profiles are only confirmed for use with the B&W 15 x 15 fuel assembly design. However, this assembly design is considered bounding of all other typical commercial PWR fuel assembly designs. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) because this activity supports investigations of items or barriers on the Q-list (YMP 2001).

J.M. Acaglione

2003-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

451

Synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions using radioactive beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chances of synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions (one-neutron-out reactions) using radioactive beams are evaluated. Because in most of the cases intensities of radioactive beams are significantly less than those of the stable beams, reactions with the greatest radioactive-beam intensities for the particular elements are considered. The results are compared with the recent ones obtained by Loveland [Phys. Rev. C 76, 014612 (2007)], who investigated the same nuclei.

Smolanczuk, Robert [Theoretical Physics Department, Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warszawa (Poland)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions using radioative beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chances of synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions (one-neutron-out) reactions using radioactive beams are evaluated. Because intensities of radioactive beams are in most of the cases significantly lower than the ones of the stable beams, reactions with the highest radioactive beam intensities for the particular elements are considered. The results are compared with the recent ones obtained by Loveland who investigated the same nuclei.

Smolanczuk, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Transverse polarization of $\\Lambda$ hyperons from quasi-real photoproduction on nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transverse polarization of $\\Lambda$ hyperons was measured in inclusive quasi-real photoproduction for various target nuclei ranging from hydrogen to xenon. The data were obtained by the HERMES experiment at HERA using the 27.6 GeV lepton beam and nuclear gas targets internal to the lepton storage ring. The polarization observed is positive for light target nuclei and is compatible with zero for krypton and xenon.

Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetissian, A; Avetisyan, E; Belostotski, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Borissov, A; Bowles, J; Brodski, I; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Gabbert, D; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gavrilov, G; Gharibyan, V; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Golembiovskaya, M; Hadjidakis, C; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hristova, I; Imazu, Y; Ivanilov, A; Jackson, H E; Jo, H S; Joosten, S; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kisselev, A; Kobayashi, N; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhijine, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikás, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Ruiz, A López; Lorenzon, W; Lu, X -G; Ma, B -Q; Mahon, D; Makins, N C R; Manaenkov, S I; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; de la Ossa, A Martinez; Marukyan, H; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Movsisyan, A; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Mussgiller, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Y; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W -D; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Reimer, P E; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanftl, F; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seitz, B; Shibata, T -A; Shutov, V; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Taroian, S; Terkulov, A; Truty, R; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van Haarlem, Y; Van Hulse, C; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Vilardi, I; Wang, S; Yaschenko, S; Ye, Z; Yu, W; Zagrebelnyy, V; Zeiler, D; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions using radioative beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chances of synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions (one-neutron-out) reactions using radioactive beams are evaluated. Because intensities of radioactive beams are in most of the cases significantly lower than the ones of the stable beams, reactions with the highest radioactive beam intensities for the particular elements are considered. The results are compared with the recent ones obtained by Loveland who investigated the same nuclei.

Robert Smolanczuk

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

455

Elimination of influence of neutron-skin size difference of initial colliding nuclei in Pb+Pb collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within an isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model using as an input nucleon density profiles from Hartree-Fock calculations based on a modified Skyrme-like (MSL) model, we study how to eliminate the influence of neutron-skin size difference of initial colliding nuclei in probing the nuclear symmetry energy. Within the current experimental uncertainty range of neutron-skin size of $^{208}$Pb, the Pb+Pb collisions are performed in semicentral and peripheral collisions with impact parameters of 5 and 9fm and at beam energies from 50 MeV/nucleon to 1000 MeV/nucleon, respectively. It is shown that combination of neutron and proton collective flows, i.e., neutron-proton differential elliptic flow, neutron-proton elliptic flow difference, neutron-proton differential transverse flow and neutron-proton transverse flow difference, can effectively eliminate the effects of neutron-skin size difference and thus can be as useful sensitive observables in probing nuclear matter symmetry energy in heavy-ion collisions...

Wei, Gao-Feng

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

THE EVOLUTION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND THEIR SPINS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Massive black holes (MBHs), in contrast to stellar mass black holes, are expected to substantially change their properties over their lifetime. MBH masses increase by several orders of magnitude over a Hubble time, as illustrated by So?tan's argument. MBH spins also must evolve through the series of accretion and mergers events that increase the masses of MBHs. We present a simple model that traces the joint evolution of MBH masses and spins across cosmic time. Our model includes MBH-MBH mergers, merger-driven gas accretion, stochastic fueling of MBHs through molecular cloud capture, and a basic implementation of accretion of recycled gas. This approach aims at improving the modeling of low-redshift MBHs and active galactic nuclei (AGNs), whose properties can be more easily estimated observationally. Despite the simplicity of the model, it does a good job capturing the global evolution of the MBH population from z ? 6 to today. Under our assumptions, we find that the typical spin and radiative efficiency of MBHs decrease with cosmic time because of the increased incidence of stochastic processes in gas-rich galaxies and MBH-MBH mergers in gas-poor galaxies. At z = 0, the spin distribution in gas-poor galaxies peaks at spins 0.4-0.8 and is not strongly mass dependent. MBHs in gas-rich galaxies have a more complex evolution, with low-mass MBHs at low redshift having low spins and spins increasing at larger masses and redshifts. We also find that at z > 1 MBH spins are on average the highest in high luminosity AGNs, while at lower redshifts these differences disappear.

Volonteri, M.; Lasota, J.-P. [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, 98bis Bd. Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Sikora, M. [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); Merloni, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstr., D-85741 Garching (Germany)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

THE EFFECT OF THE PRE-DETONATION STELLAR INTERNAL VELOCITY PROFILE ON THE NUCLEOSYNTHETIC YIELDS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A common model of the explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae is based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf. A variety of models differ primarily in the method by which the deflagration leads to a detonation. A common feature of the models, however, is that all of them involve the propagation of the detonation through a white dwarf that is either expanding or contracting, where the stellar internal velocity profile depends on both time and space. In this work, we investigate the effects of the pre-detonation stellar internal velocity profile and the post-detonation velocity of expansion on the production of {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, which are the primary nuclei produced by the detonation wave. We perform one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the explosion phase of the white dwarf for center and off-center detonations with five different stellar velocity profiles at the onset of the detonation. In order to follow the complex flows and to calculate the nucleosynthetic yields, approximately 10,000 tracer particles were added to every simulation. We observe two distinct post-detonation expansion phases: rarefaction and bulk expansion. Almost all the burning to {sup 56}Ni occurs only in the rarefaction phase, and its expansion timescale is influenced by pre-existing flow structure in the star, in particular by the pre-detonation stellar velocity profile. We find that the mass fractions of the {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, are tight functions of the empirical physical parameter {rho}{sub up}/v{sub down}, where {rho}{sub up} is the mass density immediately upstream of the detonation wave front and v{sub down} is the velocity of the flow immediately downstream of the detonation wave front. We also find that v{sub down} depends on the pre-detonation flow velocity. We conclude that the properties of the pre-existing flow, in particular the internal stellar velocity profile, influence the final isotopic composition of burned matter produced by the detonation.

Kim, Yeunjin; Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, Carlo; Lamb, D. Q.; Truran, J. W. [Astronomy Department, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Meyer, B. S. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

ARM - Campaign Instrument - s-band-profiler  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govInstrumentss-band-profiler govInstrumentss-band-profiler Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : NOAA S-band (2835 Mhz) Profiler (S-BAND-PROFILER) Instrument Categories Cloud Properties, Atmospheric Profiling Campaigns CRYSTAL-FACE [ Download Data ] Off Site Campaign : various, including non-ARM sites, 2002.06.26 - 2002.08.01 Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 2011.04.22 - 2011.06.06 Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) [ Download Data ] Tropical Western Pacific, 2006.01.21 - 2006.02.13 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers for the list of all available

459

Definition: Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Electromagnetic profiling techniques map lateral variations in subsurface resistivity.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Exploration geophysics is the applied branch of geophysics which uses surface methods to measure the physical properties of the subsurface Earth, along with the anomalies in these properties, in order to detect or infer the presence and position of ore minerals, hydrocarbons, geothermal reservoirs, groundwater reservoirs, and other geological structures. Exploration geophysics is the practical application of physical methods (such as seismic, gravitational, magnetic, electrical and electromagnetic) to measure the physical properties of rocks, and in particular, to detect

460

Project Profile: Forecasting and Influencing Technological Progress...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Forecasting and Influencing Technological Progress in Solar Energy Project Profile: Forecasting and Influencing Technological Progress in Solar Energy Logos of the University of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Project Profile: Regenerative Carbonate-Based Thermochemical...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Regenerative Carbonate-Based Thermochemical Energy Storage System for Concentrating Solar Power Project Profile: Regenerative Carbonate-Based Thermochemical Energy Storage System...

462

Project Profile: Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solar Thermoelectric Power Project Profile: Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power MIT logo The Rohsenow-Kendall Heat Transfer Lab at Massachusetts Institute of...

463

Plant Energy Profiler | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Profiler Pumping System Assessment Tool Process Heating Assessment and Survey Tool Steam System Modeler Advanced Manufacturing Home Key Activities Research &...

464

TAU Portable Performance Profiling Tools Sameer Shende  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory sameer@cs.uoregon.edu Tuning and Analysis Utilities http:www.acl.lanl.govtau TAU Profiling Team Members (In alphabetical order) Peter...

465

THE SURVIVAL OF NUCLEI IN JETS ASSOCIATED WITH CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heavy nuclei such as nickel-56 are synthesized in a wide range of core-collapse supernovae (CCSN), including energetic supernovae associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Recent studies suggest that jet-like outflows are a common feature of CCSN. These outflows may entrain synthesized nuclei at launch or during propagation, and provide interesting multi-messenger signals including heavy ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. Here, we investigate the destruction processes of nuclei during crossing from the stellar material into the jet material via a cocoon, and during propagation after being successfully loaded into the jet. We find that nuclei can survive for a range of jet parameters because collisional cooling is faster than spallation. While canonical high-luminosity GRB jets may contain nuclei, magnetic-dominated models or low-luminosity jets with small bulk Lorentz factors are more favorable for having a significant heavy nuclei component.

Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Murase, Kohta [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Ioka, Kunihito [KEK Theory Center and Graduate University for Advanced Studies (Sokendai), Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Meszaros, Peter [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics and Center for Particle Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Parent and Teacher Report: Comparing Results from the Sensory Profile and the Sensory Profile School Companion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBJECTIVE. This study investigated the similarities and differences between parent and teacher report on the Sensory Profile and the Sensory Profile School Companion (School Companion). METHOD. Using data gathered during ...

Clark, Jessica Saiter

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

467

Hidden pseudospin and spin symmetries and their origins in atomic nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Symmetry plays a fundamental role in physics. The quasi-degeneracy between single-particle orbitals $(n, l, j = l + 1/2)$ and $(n-1, l + 2, j = l + 3/2)$ indicates a hidden symmetry in atomic nuclei, the so-called pseudospin symmetry (PSS). Since the introduction of the concept of PSS in atomic nuclei, there have been comprehensive efforts to understand its origin. Both splittings of spin doublets and pseudospin doublets play critical roles in the evolution of magic numbers in exotic nuclei discovered by modern spectroscopic studies with radioactive ion beam facilities. Since the PSS was recognized as a relativistic symmetry in 1990s, many special features, including the spin symmetry (SS) for anti-nucleon, and many new concepts have been introduced. In the present Review, we focus on the recent progress on the PSS and SS in various systems and potentials, including extensions of the PSS study from stable to exotic nuclei, from non-confining to confining potentials, from local to non-local potentials, from central to tensor potentials, from bound to resonant states, from nucleon to anti-nucleon spectra, from nucleon to hyperon spectra, and from spherical to deformed nuclei. Open issues in this field are also discussed in detail, including the perturbative nature, the supersymmetric representation with similarity renormalization group, and the puzzle of intruder states.

Haozhao Liang; Jie Meng; Shan-Gui Zhou

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

468

Pair-truncated shell-model analysis of nuclei around mass 130  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-lying states for even-even, odd-mass, and doubly odd nuclei in the mass A{approx}130 region are systematically investigated using a pair-truncated shell model. In this model the collective nucleon pairs with angular momenta zero and two are the basic ingredients for even-even nuclei. Additional unpaired nucleons are added to the even-even core for a description of odd-mass and doubly odd nuclei. The effective interactions consist of single-particle energies and monopole and quadrupole pairing plus quadrupole-quadrupole interactions, whose strengths are assumed to be linearly changed as functions of the number of nucleons so as to describe the level schemes of the even-even and odd-mass nuclei. Energy levels of the low-lying collective states for even-even Xe, Ba, Ce, and Nd isotopes are reproduced very well along with intraband and interband B(E2) values, which simulate the typical features of the O(6) limit of the interacting boson model. For odd-mass and doubly odd nuclei, complicated level schemes and electromagnetic moments are in excellent agreement with the experimental data.

Higashiyama, Koji [Department of Physics, Chiba Institute of Technology, Narashino, Chiba 275-0023 (Japan); Yoshinaga, Naotaka [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama City 338-8570 (Japan)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

The cluster-core model for halo-structure of light nuclei at the drip lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclei at both the neutron- and proton-drip lines are studied. In the cluster-core model, the halo-structure of all the observed and proposed cases of neutron- or proton-halos is investigated in terms of simple potential energy surfaces calculated as the sum of binding energies, Coulomb repulsion, nuclear proximity attraction and the centrifugal potential for all the possible cluster+core configurations of a nucleus. The clusters of neutrons and protons are taken to be unbound, with additional Coulomb energy added for proton-clusters. The model predictions agree with the available experimental studies but show some differences with the nucleon separation energy hypothesis, particularly for proton-halo nuclei. Of particular interest are the halo-structures of $^{11}N$ and $^{20}Mg$. The calculated potential energy surfaces are also useful to identify the new magic numbers and molecular structures in exotic nuclei. In particular, N=6 is a possible new magic number for very neutron-deficient nuclei, but Z=N=2 and Z=8 seem to remain magic even for such nuclei, near the drip line.

Raj K. Gupta; Sushil Kumar; M. Balasubramaniam; G. Munzenberg; Werner Scheid

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

470

A framework for nonparametric profile monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Control charts have been widely used for monitoring the functional relationship between a response variable and some explanatory variable(s) (called profile) in various industrial applications. In this article, we propose an easy-to-implement framework ... Keywords: B-spline, Block bootstrap, Confidence band, Curve depth, Nonparametric profile monitoring

Shih-Chung Chuang; Ying-Chao Hung; Wen-Chi Tsai; Su-Fen Yang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Research profiling for `standardization and innovation'  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper addresses the profiling of research papers on `standardization and innovation'--exploring major topics and arguments in this field. Drawing on 528 papers retrieved from the database, Web of Science, we employed trend, factor, and clustering ... Keywords: Bibliometrics, Clustering analysis, Innovation, Publication analysis, Research profiling, Standardization, Taxonomy

Dong Geun Choi; Heesang Lee; Tae-Kyung Sung

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

A PROFILE OF KENTUCKY MEDICAID MENTAL HEALTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can be advanced--among patients, health care providers, and the community at large. This workA PROFILE OF KENTUCKY MEDICAID MENTAL HEALTH DIAGNOSES, 2000-2010 #12; #12; i A Profile of Kentucky Medicaid Mental Health Diagnoses, 20002010 BY Michael T. Childress

Hayes, Jane E.

473

TOF Profile function used at POWGEN  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TOF Profile function used at POWGEN: TOF Profile function used at POWGEN: Powgen uses a TOF profile function which is a variation on the standard profile function originally derived by VonDreele, Jorgensen and Windsor (VonDreele RB, Jorgensen JD and Windsor CG, "Rietveld Refinement with Spallation Neutron Powder Diffraction Data", J. Appl. Cryst. 15, 581 (1982). This function is implemented in GSAS (profile function 3, 4 & 5) and Fullprof NPROF 9 and is most applicable to diffractometers viewing ambient polyethylene or water moderators. The POWGEN diffractometer, however, views a poisoned cryogenic H 2 (liquid) moderator. The variation in peak shape and peak position with TOF (or d-spacing d) is calculated using a more complex function related to thermal and epithermal components of the neutron spectrum that was

474

Giant quadrupole resonance in rotating light nuclei in the calcium region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quadrupole vibrations of rotating light nuclei around calcium are analyzed in the framework of the Fermi liquid drop model. The input parameters of shape and deformation are those obtained by the Mottelson-Nilsson method for the rotating light nuclei. The surface diffuseness and its changes with spin which could affect the giant resonances in the light nuclei are automatically taken care of in this method. The experimental energies of the giant quadrupole resonance are reproduced in the Fermi liquid drop model for the nonrotating case. The rotation produces the expected splitting of the giant quadrupole resonance modes with the appearance of soft modes. The nature of such splitting may explain the observed changes in the widths of giant resonances at high spins.

Shanmugam, G.; Ramamurthi, K.; Kamalaharan, B.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Superheavy nuclei and quasi-atoms produced in collisions of transuranium ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low energy collisions of very heavy nuclei ({sup 238}U+{sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th+{sup 250}Cf, and {sup 238}U+{sup 248}Cm) have been studied within the realistic dynamical model based on multidimensional Langevin equations. Large charge and mass transfer was found to result from the 'inverse quasi-fission' process leading to the formation of the surviving superheavy long-lived neutron-rich nuclei. In many events, the lifetime of the composite system consisting of two touching nuclei turns out to be rather long; sufficiently long for the spontaneous formation of positrons to occur from a super-strong electric field - a fundamental QED process.

Zagrebaev, V.I. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Itkis, M.G. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reaction, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Greiner, Walter [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, J.W. Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

Upper bounds on parity-violating ?-ray asymmetries in compound nuclei from polarized cold neutron capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Parity-odd asymmetries in the electromagnetic decays of compound nuclei can sometimes be amplified above values expected from simple dimensional estimates by the complexity of compound nuclear states. Using a statistical approach, we estimate the root-mean-square of the distribution of expected parity-odd correlations s?n·k??, where s?n is the neutron spin and k?? is the momentum of the ?, in the integrated ? spectrum from the capture of cold polarized neutrons on Al, Cu, and In. We present measurements of the asymmetries in these and other nuclei. Based on our calculations, large enhancements of asymmetries were not predicted for the studied nuclei and the statistical estimates are consistent with our measured upper bounds on the asymmetries.

M. T. Gericke et al. (NPDGamma Collaboration)

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

477

Building relativistic mean field models for finite nuclei and neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: Theoretical approaches based on density functional theory provide the only tractable method to incorporate the wide range of densities and isospin asymmetries required to describe finite nuclei, infinite nuclear matter, and neutron stars. Purpose: A relativistic energy density functional (EDF) is developed to address the complexity of such diverse nuclear systems. Moreover, a statistical perspective is adopted to describe the information content of various physical observables. Methods: We implement the model optimization by minimizing a suitably constructed chi-square objective function using various properties of finite nuclei and neutron stars. The minimization is then supplemented by a covariance analysis that includes both uncertainty estimates and correlation coefficients. Results: A new model, FSUGold2, is created that can well reproduce the ground-state properties of finite nuclei, their monopole response, and that accounts for the maximum neutron star mass observed up to date. In particul...

Chen, Wei-Chia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Nuclear structure studies of medium-mass nuclei using large Ge arrays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advent of large Ge arrays and their ancillary detectors has greatly advanced spectroscopic studies of the medium-mass nuclei. These nuclei undergo rapid shape changes as a function of spin, excitation energy and particle number and, thus, provide a unique laboratory to test and refine a variety of theoretical models. Following a brief review of the physics motivation, some of the highlights of the experimental results obtained with the help of these powerful detector systems will be discussed. Among results presented here are the newly-discovered island of superdeformation in the A{approximately}80 mass region, and the high-spin band structures in the N{approximately}Z nuclei. These band structures may be understood in the framework of the conventional cranking models, without the introduction of additional T=0 neutron-proton pairing correlations.

Baktash, C.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

479

Scaling of the F_2 structure function in nuclei and quark distributions at x>1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new data on electron scattering from a range of nuclei taken in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. For heavy nuclei, we observe a rapid falloff in the cross section for $x>1$, which is sensitive to short range contributions to the nuclear wave-function, and in deep inelastic scattering corresponds to probing extremely high momentum quarks. This result agrees with higher energy muon scattering measurements, but is in sharp contrast to neutrino scattering measurements which suggested a dramatic enhancement in the distribution of the `super-fast' quarks probed at x>1. The falloff at x>1 is noticeably stronger in ^2H and ^3He, but nearly identical for all heavier nuclei.

N. Fomin; J. Arrington; D. B. Day; D. Gaskell; A. Daniel; J. Seely; R. Asaturyan; F. Benmokhtar; W. Boeglin; B. Boillat; P. Bosted; A. Bruell; M. H. S. Bukhari; M. E. Christy; E. Chudakov; B. Clasie; S. H. Connell; M. M. Dalton; D. Dutta; R. Ent; L. El Fassi; H. Fenker; B. W. Filippone; K. Garrow; C. Hill; R. J. Holt; T. Horn; M. K. Jones; J. Jourdan; N. Kalantarians; C. E. Keppel; D. Kiselev; M. Kotulla; R. Lindgren; A. F. Lung; S. Malace; P. Markowitz; P. McKee; D. G. Meekins; T. Miyoshi; H. Mkrtchyan; T. Navasardyan; G. Niculescu; Y. Okayasu; A. K. Opper; C. Perdrisat; D. H. Potterveld; V. Punjabi; X. Qian; P. E. Reimer; J. Roche; V. M. Rodriguez; O. Rondon; E. Schulte; E. Segbefia; K. Slifer; G. R. Smith; P. Solvignon; V. Tadevosyan; S. Tajima; L. Tang; G. Testa; R. Trojer; V. Tvaskis; W. F. Vulcan; C. Wasko; F. R. Wesselmann; S. A. Wood; J. Wright; X. Zheng

2010-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

480

Superdeformed structures and low $?$ parity doublet in Ne$-$S nuclei near neutron drip-line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The structure of Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P and S nuclei near the neutron drip-line region is investigated in the frame-work of relativistic mean field theory and non-relativistic Skyrme Hartree-Fock formalism. The recently discovered nuclei $^{40}$Mg and $^{42}$Al, which are beyond the drip-line predicted by various mass formulae are located within these models. We find many largely deformed neutron-rich nuclei, whose structures are analyzed. From the structure anatomy, we find that at large deformation, low $\\Omega$ orbits of opposite parities (e.g. $\\frac{1}{2}^+$ and $\\frac{1}{2}^-$) occur close to each other in energy.

Shailesh K. Singh; S. K. Patra; C. R. Praharaj

2014-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

The structural evolution in transitional nuclei of mass 80 $\\leq$ A $\\leq$ 132  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this theoretical study, we report an investigation on the behavior of two neutron separation energy, differential variation of the separation energy and the abnormality in nuclear charge radius along the isotopic and isotonic chains of transition nuclei. We have used relativistic mean field formalism with NL3 and NL3$^*$ forces for this present analysis. The study refers to {\\it even-even} nuclei such as Zr, Mo, Ru and Pd with $N$ = 40$-$ 86, where a rich collective phenomena such as proton radioactivity, cluster or nucleus radioactivity, exotic shapes, {\\it Island of Inversion} and etc. are observed. These non-monotonic aspects over the isotopic chain are mainly correlated with the structural properties like shell/sub-shell closures, shape transition, clustering and magicity etc. In addition to these, we have shown the internal configuration of these nuclei to get a further insight into the reason for these discrepancies.

Bhuyan, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

LINER/H II "Transition" Nuclei and the Nature of NGC 4569  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by the discovery of young, massive stars in the nuclei of some LINER/H II ``transition'' nuclei such as NGC 4569, we have computed photoionization models to determine whether some of these objects may be powered solely by young star clusters rather than by accretion-powered active nuclei. The models were calculated with the photoionization code CLOUDY, using evolving starburst continua generated by the the STARBURST99 code of Leitherer et al. (1999). We find that the models are able to reproduce the emission-line spectra of transition nuclei, but only for instantaneous bursts of solar or higher metallicity, and only for ages of ~3-5 Myr, the period when the extreme-ultraviolet continuum is dominated by emission from Wolf-Rayet stars. For clusters younger than 3 Myr or older than 6 Myr, and for models with a constant star-formation rate, the softer ionizing continuum results in an emission spectrum more typical of H II regions. This model predicts that Wolf-Rayet emission features should appear in the spectra of transition nuclei. While such features have not generally been detected to date, they could be revealed in observations having higher spatial resolution. Demographic arguments suggest that this starburst model may not apply to the majority of transition nuclei, particularly those in early-type host galaxies, but it could account for some members of the transition class in hosts of type Sa and later. The starburst models during the Wolf-Rayet-dominated phase can also reproduce the narrow-line spectra of some LINERs, but only under conditions of above-solar metallicity and only if high-density gas is present (n_e >~ 10^5 cm^{-3}). This scenario could be applicable to some ``Type 2'' LINERs which do not show any clear signs of nonstellar activity.

A. J. Barth; J. C. Shields

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

483

Symmetry-dictated trucation: Solutions of the spherical shell model for heavy nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Principles of dynamical symmetry are used to simplify the spherical shell model. The resulting symmetry-dictated truncation leads to dynamical symmetry solutions that are often in quantitative agreement with a variety of observables. Numerical calculations, including terms that break the dynamical symmetries, are shown that correspond to shell model calculations for heavy deformed nuclei. The effective residual interaction is simple, well-behaved, and can be determined from basic observables. With this approach, we intend to apply the shell model in systematic fashion to all nuclei. The implications for nuclear structure far from stability and for nuclear masses and other quantities of interest in astrophysics are discussed.

Guidry, M.W. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

484

Searches for proton radioactivity in odd Z drip-line nuclei from Z=61 to 67  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Beams of 185–204 MeV Ca40 ions have been used to bombard Mo92, Ru96, Pd102, and Cd106 targets in order to produce the proton-decay candidate nuclei Pm128, Eu132, Tb138, and Ho142 via the 1p3n fusion evaporation channel. In each case no evidence for proton radioactivity was found. On the basis of mass model systematics it was concluded that the odd proton is not sufficiently unbound in these nuclei for proton emission to compete successfully with ? decay.

K. Livingston; P. J. Woods; T. Davinson; N. J. Davis; A. N. James; R. D. Page; P. J. Sellin; A. C. Shotter

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Isolation and partial characterization of the nuclei of the unicellular marine alga Olisthodiscus luteus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Sherri Sutton Symank, B. S. , Texas AQf University Chariman of Advisory Committee: Dr. P. J. Rizzo The development of a nuclear isolation procedure for nuclei from Olisthodiscus luteus is described. Several parameters of the isola-' tion medium were... varied in order to obtain maximum purity and yield of nuclei. Selection of optimal conditions was made on the basis of nuclear yield, RNA/DNA ratios, and light microscopy. The final iso- lation medium contained 1. 0 M hexylene glycol, 1. 0 mM CaC12, 1...

Symank, Sherri Sutton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

486

Symmetry energy of hot nuclei in the relativistic Thomas-Fermi approximation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a self-consistent description of hot nuclei within the relativistic Thomas--Fermi approximation using the relativistic mean-field model for nuclear interactions. The temperature dependence of the symmetry energy and other physical quantities of a nucleus are calculated by employing the subtraction procedure in order to isolate the nucleus from the surrounding nucleon gas. It is found that the symmetry energy coefficient of finite nuclei is significantly affected by the Coulomb polarization effect. We also examine the dependence of the results on nuclear interactions and make a comparison between the results obtained from relativistic and nonrelativistic Thomas-Fermi calculations.

Zhang, Z W; Hu, J N; Shen, H

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

The energy dependence of the electric dipole strength in heavy nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the basis of new photon scattering measurements and a reevaluation of average neutron resonance capture data we investigate how well Lorentzians adjusted to photo-neutron data in the giant dipole resonances give a good description of the photon strength also below the neutron threshold. If deformation effects are properly taken into account this is verified down to about 5 MeV for various nuclei with A>80 such that the previously employed differentiation between deformed and non-deformed nuclei is no longer necessary.

Eckart Grosse; Frantisek Becvar; Arnd R. Junghans; Gencho Rusev; Ronald Schwengner; Andreas Wagner

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

488

A description of the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei of the bovine hypothalamus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Brettscbneider (19S4) observed the eccentric lecatioa of the nucleus vithin ths supreoptic and paraventriculsr nuclei of the horse. He casqssred tbe cells to those of Clsrhe's col~ of the spinel cord snd to cells undergoing degeneration. Vcn Vier ling (1956.... Brettscbneider (19S4) observed the eccentric lecatioa of the nucleus vithin ths supreoptic and paraventriculsr nuclei of the horse. He casqssred tbe cells to those of Clsrhe's col~ of the spinel cord snd to cells undergoing degeneration. Vcn Vier ling (1956...

Talukdar, Amir Hussain

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

489

Short Range Correlations in Nuclei at Large xbj through Inclusive Quasi-Elastic Electron Scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experiment, E08-014, in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab aims to study the short-range correlations (SRC) which are necessary to explain the nuclear strength absent in the mean field theory. The cross sections for 2H, 3He, 4He, 12C, 40Ca and 48Ca, were measured via inclusive quasi-elastic electron scattering from these nuclei in a Q2 range between 0.8 and 2.8 (GeV/c)^2 for x>1. The cross section ratios of heavy nuclei to 2H were extracted to study two-nucleon SRC for 1

Ye, Zhihong [UVA

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Parametrization of light nuclei quasiparticle energy shifts and composition of warm and dense nuclear matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Correlations and the formation of bound states (nuclei) are essential for the properties of nuclear matter in equilibrium as well as in nonequilibrium. In a quantum statistical approach, quasiparticle energies are obtained for the light elements that reflect the influence of the medium. We present analytical fits for the quasiparticle energy shifts of light nuclei that can be used in various applications. This is a prerequisite for the investigation of warm and dense matter that reproduces the nuclear statistical equilibrium and virial expansions in the low-density limit as well as relativistic mean field and Brueckner Hartree-Fock approaches near saturation density.

G. Röpke

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

491

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3) 3) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 ii This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 iii The Financial Reporting System, 1977-1993 diskette is available from the Energy Information Administration.

492

Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Ground Electromagnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

493

Vertical Seismic Profiling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Seismic Profiling Vertical Seismic Profiling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Seismic Profiling Details Activities (4) Areas (3) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

494

Electrical Profiling Configurations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrical Profiling Configurations Electrical Profiling Configurations Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electrical Profiling Configurations Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

495

Secondary nuclear fragment beams for investigations of relativistic fragmentation of light radioactive nuclei using nuclear photoemulsion at Nuclotron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slowly extracted relativistic beams of light nuclei and a beam transportation line net system constitute a good base for secondary nuclear beams forming at the LHE accelerator facility. A recent years activity in the field at the Laboratory is connected with a project on study light nuclei structure by means the emulsion technique [1,2]. The paper shortly summarizes results of the work.

P. A. Rukoyatkin; L. N. Komolov; R. I. Kukushkina; V. N. Ramzhin; P. I. Zarubin

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

496

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 503 (2003) 276278 Neutrino studies in nuclei and intense neutrino sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 503 (2003) 276­278 Neutrino studies in nuclei interactions. Nuclear responses for neutrinos are crucial for neutrino studies in nuclei. The responses, which are mainly nuclear spin isospin responses, are studied indirectly by charge exchange hadronic reactions

Washington at Seattle, University of

497

Charged Pion Photoproduction on the p-Shell Nuclei at Low Energy and Rescattering Effect of a Pion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the p-Shell Nuclei at Low Energy and Rescattering Effect of a...photoproduction reaction at low energy, We investigate two types of...C26. 2554[APS] . 19) Audit G. , et al. Phys. Rev...the p-Shell Nuclei at Low Energy and Rescattering Effect of a......

Naoto Odagawa; Toru Sato; Hisao Ohtsubo

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Effect of neutron orbitals on the nuclear shape in neutron-deficient and neutron-rich zirconium nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The neutron-deficient and neutron-rich zirconium nuclei are studied using statistical theory. The deformation dependence of occupation numbers of the neutron orbitals in these nuclei near the Fermi level is investigated. The preference of the neutrons to occupy or vacate a particular orbital is found to contribute a particular shape to the nucleus.

N. Arunachalam; S. Veeraraghavan; A. Mohamed Akbar

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Subsurface imaging with reverse vertical seismic profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents imaging results from a 3D reverse vertical seismic profile (RVSP) dataset measured at a hydrocarbon bearing pinnacle reef in northern Michigan. The study presented many challenges in seismic data ...

Krasovec, Mary L. (Mary Lee), 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

load profile | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

data load data load profile OpenEI residential load TMY3 United States Load data Image source: NREL Files: applicationzip icon System Advisor Model Tool for Downloading Load Data...