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1

Cloud Condensation Nuclei Profile Value-Added Product  

SciTech Connect

The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration at cloud base is the most relevant measure of the aerosol that influences droplet formation in clouds. Since the CCN concentration depends on supersaturation, a more general measure of the CCN concentration is the CCN spectrum (values at multiple supersaturations). The CCN spectrum is now measured at the surface at several fixed ARM sites and by the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF), but is not measured at the cloud base. Rather than rely on expensive aircraft measurements for all studies of aerosol effects on clouds, a way to project CCN measurements at the surface to cloud base is needed. Remote sensing of aerosol extinction provides information about the vertical profile of the aerosol, but cannot be directly related to the CCN concentration because the aerosol extinction is strongly influenced by humidification, particularly near cloud base. Ghan and Collins (2004) and Ghan et al. (2006) propose a method to remove the influence of humidification from the extinction profiles and tie the “dry extinction” retrieval to the surface CCN concentration, thus estimating the CCN profile. This methodology has been implemented as the CCN Profile (CCNPROF) value-added product (VAP).

McFarlane, S; Sivaraman, C; Ghan, S

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

2

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-103 Cloud Condensation Nuclei Profile Value-Added  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Cloud Condensation Nuclei Profile Value-Added Product S McFarlane C Sivaraman S Ghan October 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

3

Raman Lidar Profiles–Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) Value-Added Product  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to describe the Raman Lidar Profiles–Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) value-added product (VAP) and the procedures used to derive atmospheric temperature profiles from the raw RL measurements. Sections 2 and 4 describe the input and output variables, respectively. Section 3 discusses the theory behind the measurement and the details of the algorithm, including calibration and overlap correction.

Newsom, RK; Sivaraman, C; McFarlane, SA

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Recent Developments on the Broadband Heating Rate Profile Value-Added Product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Developments on the Recent Developments on the Broadband Heating Rate Profile Value-Added Product E. J. Mlawer, J. S. Delamere, and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts M. A. Miller and K. L. Johnson Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York T. R. Shippert and C. N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington R. G. Ellingson Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida M. H. Zhang State University of New York - Stony Brook Albany, New York R. A. Ferrare National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia R. T. Cederwall and S. C. Xie Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico J. A. Ogren National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

5

Raman Lidar Profiles Best Estimate Value-Added Product Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ARM Raman lidars are semi-autonomous ground-based systems that transmit at a wavelength of 355 nm with 300 mJ, {approx}5 ns pulses, and a pulse repetition frequency of 30Hz. Signals from the various detection channels are processed to produce time- and height-resolved estimates of several geophysical quantities, such as water vapor mixing ratio, relative humidity, aerosol scattering ratio, backscatter, optical depth, extinction, and depolarization ratio. Data processing is currently handled by a suite of six value-added product (VAP) processes. Collectively, these processes are known as the Raman Lidar Profiles VAP (RLPROF). The top-level best-estimate (BE) VAP process was introduced in order to bring together the most relevant information from the intermediate-level VAPs. As such, the BE process represents the final stage in data processing for the Raman lidar. Its principal function is to extract the primary variables from each of the intermediate-level VAPs, perform additional quality control, and combine all of this information into a single output file for the end-user. The focus of this document is to describe the processing performed by the BE VAP process.

Newson, R

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

6

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-100 Raman Lidar Profiles Best Estimate Value-Added Product Technical Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Raman Lidar Profiles Best Estimate Value-Added Product Technical Report R Newsom January 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and

7

Merged Sounding Value-Added Product  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Merged Sounding value-added product (VAP) uses a combination of observations from radiosonde soundings, the microwave radiometer (MWR), surface meteorological instruments, and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model output with a sophisticated scaling/interpolation/smoothing scheme in order to define profiles of the atmospheric thermodynamic state at one-minute temporal intervals and a total of 266 altitude levels.

Troyan, D

2010-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

8

Aerosol Best Estimate Value-Added Product  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) value-added product (VAP) is to provide vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo, asymmetry parameter, and Angstroem exponents for the atmospheric column above the Central Facility at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. We expect that AEROSOLBE will provide nearly continuous estimates of aerosol optical properties under a range of conditions (clear, broken clouds, overcast clouds, etc.). The primary requirement of this VAP was to provide an aerosol data set as continuous as possible in both time and height for the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP in order to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Even though BBHRP has been completed, AEROSOLBE results are very valuable for environmental, atmospheric, and climate research.

Flynn, C; Turner, D; Koontz, A; Chand, D; Sivaraman, C

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

9

ARM - Value-Added Product Status Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status Reports Status Reports Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Value-Added Product Status Reports ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report July 1-September 30, 2013 (PDF, 1MB) ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report April 1-June 30, 2013 (PDF, 1MB) ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report January 1-March 31, 2013 (PDF, 268KB) ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report October 1-December 31, 2012 (PDF, 271KB) ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report

10

Electricity Restructuring and Value-Added Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-46069 Electricity Restructuring and Value- Added Services: Beyond the Hype William Golove under Contract No. DE-AC03- 76SF00098. #12;Electricity Restructuring and Value-Added Services: Beyond with non- residential electricity service customers who have chosen to take service from a retail electric

11

ARM KAZR-ARSCL Value Added Product  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Ka-band ARM Zenith Radars (KAZRs) have replaced the long-serving Millimeter Cloud Radars, or MMCRs. Accordingly, the primary MMCR Value Added Product (VAP), the Active Remote Sensing of CLouds (ARSCL) product, is being replaced by a KAZR-based version, the KAZR-ARSCL VAP. KAZR-ARSCL provides cloud boundaries and best-estimate time-height fields of radar moments.

Michael Jensen

12

ARM KAZR-ARSCL Value Added Product  

SciTech Connect

The Ka-band ARM Zenith Radars (KAZRs) have replaced the long-serving Millimeter Cloud Radars, or MMCRs. Accordingly, the primary MMCR Value Added Product (VAP), the Active Remote Sensing of CLouds (ARSCL) product, is being replaced by a KAZR-based version, the KAZR-ARSCL VAP. KAZR-ARSCL provides cloud boundaries and best-estimate time-height fields of radar moments.

Michael Jensen

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

13

Missouri Value-Added Loan Guarantee Program (Missouri) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Missouri Value-Added Loan Guarantee Program (Missouri) Missouri...

14

Sonde Adjust Value-Added Product Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sonde Adjust (SONDEADJUST) value-added product (VAP) creates a file that includes all fields from original Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ARM Facility) radiosonde files and contains several value-added fields that provide adjustments related to well-known humidity issues. SONDEADJUST produces data that correct documented biases in radiosonde humidity measurements. Previous efforts towards applying some of these corrections are available via the discontinued PI product sgpsondecorr1miloC1. Unique fields contained within this datastream include smoothed original relative humidity, dry bias corrected relative humidity, and final corrected relative humidity. The smoothed RH field refines the relative humidity from integers-the resolution of the instrument-to fractions of a percent. This profile is then used to calculate the dry bias corrected field. The final correction fixes the time-lag problem and uses the dry-bias field as input into the algorithm. In addition to dry bias, solar heating is another correction that is encompassed in the final corrected RH field. Output from SONDEADJUST differs from the previous RH-corrected datastreams in important ways. First, all three types of ARM radiosondes-Vaisala RS-80, RS-90, and RS-92-are corrected using dedicated procedures and/or parameters. Second, the output variables include all of those found in the original radiosonde file: dry bulb temperature, dewpoint temperature, wind speed, wind direction, eastward wind component, northward wind component, wind status (a Vaisala-produced field used in conjunction with the Loran system), ascent rate, and original relative humidity. Additional humidity fields are smoothed relative humidity, dry biased corrected relative humidity, final ambient relative humidity, and scaled adjusted relative humidity. Third, quality control (QC) flags of the fields from the original radiosonde datastream are brought into the SONDEADJUST output file. Additional QC variables are created for the new fields.

Troyan, D

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

15

Value-Added Stock Loan Participation Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Value-Added Stock Loan Participation Program Value-Added Stock Loan Participation Program Value-Added Stock Loan Participation Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Bioenergy Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Maximum Rebate RFA provides up to 45% of the loan up to $40,000 of loan principal Program Info Start Date 1994 State Minnesota Program Type State Loan Program Provider Minnesota Department of Agriculture The Value-Added Stock Loan Participation Program was created in 1994 and is designed to help farmers finance the purchase of stock in certain types of cooperative, limited liability company, or limited liability partnership that will produce a "value-added agricultural product." This may include wind energy and anaerobic-digestion cooperatives if they meet the

16

Missouri Value-Added Grant Program (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Value-Added Grant Program (Missouri) Value-Added Grant Program (Missouri) Missouri Value-Added Grant Program (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Program Info State Missouri Program Type Grant Program Provider Missouri Department of Agriculture The Missouri Value-Added Grant Program provides grants for projects that add value to Missouri agricultural products and aid the economy of a rural community. Grant applications will be considered for value-added agricultural business concepts that: (a) Lead to and result in development, processing and marketing of new or expanded uses or technologies for agricultural products; and (b) Foster agricultural economic development in Missouri's rural communities. Applications will be considered for

17

ARM Value-Added Cloud Products: Description and Status  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Value-Added Cloud Products: Value-Added Cloud Products: Description and Status M. A. Miller, K. L. Johnson, and D. T. Troyan Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York E. E. Clothiaux Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania E. J. Mlawer Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program operates a variety of state-of-the-art active and passive remote sensors at its sites. These sensors provide information about the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere and the structure of the clouds that are present above the site. Families of value- added products (VAPs) that contain geophysically relevant data are produced from the electronic

18

NETL: Utilization Projects - Value Added Products from FGD Sulfite rich  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Value Added Products from FGD Sulfite rich Scrubber Material Value Added Products from FGD Sulfite rich Scrubber Material In pursuit of developing value added products from sulfite-rich scrubber material, e.g., low-density panels, carpet underlayment, siding, pre-cast building material, lumber panels, particle and wafer type boards, the following four experimental tasks are proposed: A comprehensive characterization of sulfite-rich scrubber materials produced by power plant generation. Specifically, the mercury, selenium, arsenic, boron, and organic content will be monitored The sulfite-rich scrubber material will be combined with cheap but renewable agricultural byproducts like micronized core fibers and/or micronized wheat straw, and the composites will be formulated by exploiting the natural polymers of the byproducts. The conditions under which structural composites can be formulated using injection molding and compressive molding will be evaluated.

19

ARM - Evaluation Product - Droplet Number Concentration Value-Added Product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsDroplet Number Concentration Value-Added ProductsDroplet Number Concentration Value-Added Product Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Droplet Number Concentration Value-Added Product 2005.01.01 - 2010.12.30 Site(s) SGP General Description Cloud droplet number concentration is an important factor in understanding aerosol-cloud interactions. As aerosol concentration increases, it is expected that droplet number concentration, Nd, will increase and droplet size decrease, for a given liquid water path (Twomey 1977), which will greatly affect cloud albedo as smaller droplets reflect more shortwave radiation. However, the magnitude and variability of these processes under different environmental conditions is still uncertain. McComiskey et al.

20

Training Needs in Louisiana's Value-Added Forest Products Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Incentives Industry #12;What is Value-Added? The increased value at each stage of a manufacturingThe increased value at each stage of a manufacturing assembly processassembly process Those activities or steps and necessary Addition of net economic valueAddition of net economic value Value can be added through

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Organic Aerosol Component (OACOMP) Value-Added Product Report  

SciTech Connect

Significantly improved returns in their aerosol chemistry data can be achieved via the development of a value-added product (VAP) of deriving OA components, called Organic Aerosol Components (OACOMP). OACOMP is primarily based on multivariate analysis of the measured organic mass spectral matrix. The key outputs of OACOMP are the concentration time series and the mass spectra of OA factors that are associated with distinct sources, formation and evolution processes, and physicochemical properties.

Fast, J; Zhang, Q; Tilp, A; Shippert, T; Parworth, C; Mei, F

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

22

Value Added Energy Information Systems VAEIS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Value Added Energy Information Systems VAEIS Value Added Energy Information Systems VAEIS Jump to: navigation, search Name Value Added Energy Information Systems (VAEIS) Place Arlington, New Hampshire Zip 2474 Sector Solar, Wind energy Product Provides turn-key monitoring systems for the performance of solar, wind, fuel cell and other distributed generation installations. Coordinates 43.337585°, -89.379449° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.337585,"lon":-89.379449,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

23

76SF00098. Electricity Restructuring and Value-Added Services:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a series of interviews that were conducted with nonresidential electricity service customers who have chosen to take service from a retail electric service provider (RESP). The interviews explored customer attitudes towards and experiences with the process of purchasing electricity and, in some cases, value-added services in the competitive market. Key findings include: (1) our sample of large commercial/industrial customers believe that they are benefiting significantly more from commodity savings arising from direct access than from the value-added services that they are receiving; (2) there is high customer interest in billing, energy information, and energy efficiency services, as well as some (lesser) interest in “newer ” services, such as facility management and outsourcing (although customers remain uncertain of the value of these services); (3) there is no established preference among the majority of customers with respect to choice of suppliers (RESP, utility or other) for value-added services, although there are limited preferences for the RESP to provide billing, energy information and green power, and for a third party provider to deliver energy efficiency.

William Golove; Rodrigo Prudencio; Ryan Wiser; Charles Goldman; Beyond The Hype; William Golove

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Micropulse Lidar Cloud Mask Value-Added Product Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lidar backscattered signal is a useful tool for identifying vertical cloud structure in the atmosphere in optically thin clouds. Cloud boundaries derived from lidar signals are a necessary input for popular ARM data products, such as the Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL) product. An operational cloud boundary algorithm (Wang and Sassen 2001) has been implemented for use with the ARM Micropulse Lidar (MPL) systems. In addition to retrieving cloud boundaries above 500 m, the value-added product (VAP) named Micropulse Lidar Cloud Mask (MPLCMASK) applies lidar-specific corrections (i.e., range-square, background, deadtime, and overlap) as described in Campbell et al. (2002) to the measured backscattered lidar. Depolarization ratio is computed using the methodology developed by Flynn et al. (2007) for polarization-capable MPL systems. The cloud boundaries output from MPLCMASK will be the primary lidar cloud mask for input to the ARSCL product and will be applied to all MPL systems, including historical data sets.

Sivaraman, C; Comstock, J

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

25

Techniques and Methods Used to Determine the Aerosol Best Estimate Value-Added Product at SGP Central Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determine the Aerosol Best Estimate Value-Added Product at SGP Central Facility C. Sivaraman, D. D. Turner, and C. J. Flynn Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Objective Profiles of aerosol optical properties are needed for radiative closure exercises such as the broadband heating rate profile (BBHRP) project (Mlawer et al. 2002) and the Shortwave Quality Measurement Experiment (QME). Retrieving cloud microphysical properties using radiation measurements in the shortwave, such as the spectral retrieval technique described in Daniel et al. (2002), also require the optical properties of the aerosols so that they can be accounted for in the retrieval process. The objective of the aerosol best estimate (ABE) value-added procedure (VAP) is to provide profiles of

26

The Microbase Value-Added Product: A Baseline Retrieval of Cloud Microphysical Properties  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility baseline cloud microphysical properties (MICROBASE) value-added product (VAP). MICROBASE uses a combination of millimeter-wavelength cloud radar, microwave radiometer, and radiosonde observations to estimate the vertical profiles of the primary microphysical parameters of clouds including the liquid/ice water content and liquid/ice cloud particle effective radius. MICROBASE is a baseline algorithm designed to apply to most conditions and locations using a single set of parameterizations and a simple determination of water phase based on temperature. This document provides the user of this product with guidelines to assist in determining the accuracy of the product under certain conditions. Quality control flags are designed to identify outliers and indicate instances where the retrieval assumptions may not be met. The overall methodology is described in this report through a detailed description of the input variables, algorithms, and output products.

Dunn, M; Johnson, K; Jensen, M

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

USDA Webinar: Value-Added Producer Grants for Tribal Entities | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

USDA Webinar: Value-Added Producer Grants for Tribal Entities USDA Webinar: Value-Added Producer Grants for Tribal Entities USDA Webinar: Value-Added Producer Grants for Tribal Entities January 14, 2014 11:00AM to 12:30PM MST Webinar Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development, this tribal-specific training will provide an overview of the FY14 Funding Opportunity and the Value-Added Producer Grants (VAPG) program and provide information about tribal entity eligibility and documentation requirements. Prospective tribal applicants, technical assistance providers, and interested USDA field staff will find the information helpful. Conference Call Information: Toll-free number: +1 800-981-3173 Toll number for DC area: +1 202-720-7039 Participant code: 4248 Join the LiveMeeting Webinar here. For more information, contact Tedd Buelow at 720-544-2911.

28

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-124 Interpolated Sounding Value-Added Product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Interpolated Sounding Value-Added Product D Troyan February 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United...

29

Microbial chemical factories: recent advances in pathway engineering for synthesis of value added chemicals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dwindling nature of petroleum and other fossil reserves has provided impetus towards microbial synthesis of fuels and value added chemicals from biomass-derived sugars as a renewable resource. Microbes have naturally ...

Dhamankar, Himanshu Hemant

30

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-098 Micropulse Lidar Cloud Mask Value-Added Product...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Micropulse Lidar Cloud Mask Value-Added Product Technical Report C Sivaraman J Comstock July 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S....

31

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Errors for Table 6.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of...

32

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Errors for Table 6.4;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of...

33

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-120 Raman Lidar Profiles–Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) Value-Added Product  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect

Rk Newsom; C Sivaraman; Sa Mcfarlane; C Sivaraman; Sa Mcfarlane

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

USDA Webinar: Value-Added Producer Grants for Tribal Entities | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

USDA Webinar: Value-Added Producer Grants for Tribal Entities USDA Webinar: Value-Added Producer Grants for Tribal Entities USDA Webinar: Value-Added Producer Grants for Tribal Entities January 14, 2014 1:00PM EST FY2014 Training Schedule Tuesday, January 14 9:00 - 10:30 AM Alaska Standard Time 10:00 - 11:30 AM Pacific Standard Time 11:00 AM-12:30 PM Mountain Standard Time 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM Central Standard Time 1:00 PM-2:30 PM Eastern Standard Time Topics: FY 14 Funding Opportunity, overview of VAPG program, tribal entity eligibility and documentation requirements. Who should attend: Prospective Tribal applicants, technical assistance providers, interested USDA field staff. Conference Call Information: Toll-free number: +1 800-981-3173 Toll number for DC area: +1 202-720-7039 Participant code: 4248 Join the LiveMeeting Webinar here:

35

Value-Added Attributes of the QA Requirements | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Value-Added Attributes of the QA Requirements Value-Added Attributes of the QA Requirements Value-Added Attributes of the QA Requirements Senior Management Ownership Senior management must take full ownership of the quality assurance program. These managers should establish policies and objectives focused on achieving the organization's mission while improving the quality of the organization's products and services. They must create an environment that promotes quality and the improvement of quality throughout the entire organization. Line Organization Responsibility People who perform the work have the greatest affect on item and process quality. They should be empowered. They determine the extent to which management's objectives are met. Individual employees should seek ways to improve the quality of their work by suggesting product and process

36

Best Estimate Radiation Flux Value-Added Procedure: Algorithm Operational Details and Explanations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Best Estimate Radiation Flux Value-Added Procedure: Algorithm Operational Details and Explanations October 2002 Y. Shi and C. N. Long DOE, ARM, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Research, Office of Health and Environmental Research Contents 1. Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 1 2. Input Data ............................................................................................................................................... 1 3. Configuration Files.................................................................................................................................

37

Ceramic membranes for partial oxygenation of hydrocarbon fuels to high-value-added products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report describes the design of a membrane reactor for converting methane into value added products. The design includes an outer tube of perovskite which contacts air, an inner tube of zirconium oxide which contacts methane, and a bonding layer of a mixture of zirconium oxide and perovskite.

Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Kobylinski, T.P.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) Value-Added Product  

SciTech Connect

The G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) value-added product (VAP) computes precipitable water vapor using neural network techniques from data measured by the GVR. The GVR reports time-series measurements of brightness temperatures for four channels located at 183.3 ± 1, 3, 7, and 14 GHz.

Koontz, A; Cadeddu, M

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

39

Microsoft Word - ARM Value-Added Product_tech_rpt_v2.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

77 77 An Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Value-Added Product to Retrieve Optically Thin Cloud Visible Optical Depth using Micropulse Lidar October 2006 Chaomei Lo Jennifer M. Comstock Connor Flynn Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Research, Office of Biological and Environmental Research C Lo, JM Comstock, C Flynn, October 2006, ARM TR-077 iii Contents 1 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 1 2 Input Data.............................................................................................................................................

40

Method for conversion of carbohydrate polymers to value-added chemical products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are described for conversion of carbohydrate polymers in ionic liquids, including cellulose, that yield value-added chemicals including, e.g., glucose and 5-hydroxylmethylfurfural (HMF) at temperatures below 120.degree. C. Catalyst compositions that include various mixed metal halides are described that are selective for specified products with yields, e.g., of up to about 56% in a single step process.

Zhang, Zongchao C. (Norwood, NJ); Brown, Heather M. (Kennewick, WA); Su, Yu (Richland, WA)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Functionally gradient material for membrane reactors to convert methane gas into value-added products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A functionally gradient material for a membrane reactor for converting methane gas into value-added-products includes an outer tube of perovskite, which contacts air; an inner tube which contacts methane gas, of zirconium oxide, and a bonding layer between the perovskite and zirconium oxide layers. The bonding layer has one or more layers of a mixture of perovskite and zirconium oxide, with the layers transitioning from an excess of perovskite to an excess of zirconium oxide. The transition layers match thermal expansion coefficients and other physical properties between the two different materials. 7 figs.

Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Kobylinski, T.P.

1996-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

42

Functionally gradient material for membrane reactors to convert methane gas into value-added products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A functionally gradient material for a membrane reactor for converting methane gas into value-added-products includes an outer tube of perovskite, which contacts air; an inner tube which contacts methane gas, of zirconium oxide, and a bonding layer between the perovskite and zirconium oxide layers. The bonding layer has one or more layers of a mixture of perovskite and zirconium oxide, with the layers transitioning from an excess of perovskite to an excess of zirconium oxide. The transition layers match thermal expansion coefficients and other physical properties between the two different materials.

Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Dusek, Joseph T. (Lombard, IL); Kleefisch, Mark S. (Napersville, IL); Kobylinski, Thadeus P. (Lisle, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Value Added Products from Hemicellulose Utilization in Dry Mill Ethanol Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Iowa Corn Promotion Board is the principal contracting entity for this grant funded by the US Department of Agriculture and managed by the US Department of Energy. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board subcontracted with New Jersey Institute of Technology, KiwiChem, Pacific Northwest National Lab and Idaho National Lab to conduct research for this project. KiwiChem conducted the economic engineering assessment of a dry-mill ethanol plant. New Jersey Institute of Technology conducted work on incorporating the organic acids into polymers. Pacific Northwest National Lab conducted work in hydrolysis of hemicellulose, fermentation and chemical catalysis of sugars to value-added chemicals. Idaho National Lab engineered an organism to ferment a specific organic acid. Dyadic, an enzme company, was a collaborator which provided in-kind support for the project. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board collaborated with the Ohio Corn Marketing Board and the Minnesota Corn Merchandising Council in providing cost share for the project. The purpose of this diverse collaboration was to integrate the hydrolysis, the conversion and the polymer applications into one project and increase the likelihood of success. This project had two primary goals: (1) to hydrolyze the hemicellulose fraction of the distillers grain (DG) coproduct coming from the dry-mill ethanol plants and (2) convert the sugars derived from the hemicellulose into value-added co-products via fermentation and chemical catalysis.

Rodney Williamson, ICPB; John Magnuson, PNNL; David Reed, INL; Marco Baez, Dyadic; Marion Bradford, ICPB

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

44

Value-Added Products from FGD Sulfite-Rich Scrubber Materials  

SciTech Connect

According to the American Coal Ash Association, about 29.25 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts were produced in the USA in 2003. Out of 29.25 million tons, 17.35 million tons were sulfite-rich scrubber materials. At present, unlike its cousin FGD gypsum, the prospect for effective utilization of sulfite-rich scrubber materials is not bright. In fact, almost 16.9 million tons are leftover every year. In our pursuit to mitigate the liability of sulfite-rich FGD scrubber materials' disposal, we are attempting to develop value-added products that can commercially compete. More specifically, for this Innovative Concept Phase I project, we have the following objectives: to characterize the sulfite-rich scrubber material for toxic metals; to optimize the co-blending and processing of scrubber material and natural byproducts; to formulate and develop structural composites from sulfite-rich scrubber material; and to evaluate the composites' mechanical properties and compare them with current products on the market. After successfully demonstrating the viability of our research, a more comprehensive approach will be proposed to take these value-added materials to fruition.

Vivak Malhotra

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-087 Merged Sounding Value-Added Product D Troyan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Merged Sounding Value-Added Product D Troyan March 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and

46

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-128 Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio Value-Added  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio Value-Added Product April 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and

47

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-115 Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) Value-Added Product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) Value-Added Product C Flynn D Turner A Koontz D Chand C Sivaraman July 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

48

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 3d. Value Added by Selected Industries, 1998,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

d d Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3d. Value Added1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Brillion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 173 205 233 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 62 67 79 313 Textile Mills 24 19 17 314 Textile Product Mills 13 13 15 315 Apparel Manufacturing 32 21 16 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 5 3 3 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 34 35 44 322 Paper Manufacturing 73 76 80 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 60 59 60 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 32 37 126 325 Chemical Manufacturing 230 254 340 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 86 92 99 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Product Manufacturing 53 55 72 331 Primary Metal Manufacturing 69 57 84 332 Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing

49

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 4d. Value Added by Selected Industries, 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

d d Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4d. Value Added1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Billion 2000 Dollars 2) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food Manufacturing 193 182 214 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Manufacturing 70 59 73 313 Textile Mills 23 18 17 314 Textile Product Mills 13 13 15 315 Apparel Manufacturing 32 22 17 316 Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing 5 3 3 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 35 35 37 322 Paper Manufacturing 84 77 85 323 Printing and Related Support Activities 62 56 59 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing 38 46 53 325 Chemical Manufacturing 225 248 291 326 Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 84 88 99 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Product Manufacturing 55 54 66

50

Process for Converting Waste Glass Fiber into Value Added Products, Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nature of the Event: Technology demonstration. The project successfully met all of its technical objectives. Albacem has signed an exclusive licensing agreement with Vitro Minerals Inc., a specialty minerals company, to commercialize the Albacem technology (website: www.vitrominerals.com). Location: The basic research for the project was conducted in Peoria, Illinois, and Atlanta, Georgia, with third-party laboratory verification carried out in Ontario, Canada. Pilot-scale trials (multi-ton) were conducted at a facility in South Carolina. Full-scale manufacturing facilities have been designed and are scheduled for construction by Vitro Minerals during 2006 at a location in the Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina tri-state area. The Technology: This technology consists of a process to eliminate solid wastes generated at glass fiber manufacturing facilities by converting them to value-added materials (VCAS Pozzolans) suitable for use in cement and concrete applications. This technology will help divert up to 250,000 tpy of discarded glass fiber manufacturing wastes into beneficial use applications in the concrete construction industry. This technology can also be used for processing glass fiber waste materials reclaimed from monofills at manufacturing facilities. The addition of take-back materials and reclamation from landfills can help supply over 500,000 tpy of glass fiber waste for processing into value added products. In the Albacem process, waste glass fiber is ground to a fine powder that effectively functions as a reactive pozzolanic admixture for use in portland ce¬ment-based building materials and products, such as concrete, mortars, terrazzo, tile, and grouts. Because the waste fiber from the glass manufacturing industry is vitreous, clean, and low in iron and alkalis, the resulting pozzolan is white in color and highly consistent in chemical composition. This white pozzolan, termed VCAS Pozzolan (for Vitreous Calcium-Alumino-Silicate). is especially suited for white concrete applications where it imparts desirable benefits such as increased long-term strength and improved long-term durability of concrete products. Two U.S. patents entitled have been issued to Albacem covering the technology. Third-party validation testing has confirmed that the pozzolanic product is an excellent, high performance material that conforms to a ASTM standards and improves the strength and durability of concrete. Currently, there are no known significant competing technologies to process glass fiber manufacturing by-products and con¬vert them into value-added products. Most glass fiber-forming and fabrication wastes continue to be disposed in landfills at significant costs and with associated negative environmental impact. It is estimated that in a typical glass fiber manufactur¬ing facility, 10-20% by weight of the processed glass material is sent for dis¬posal to a landfill. Today, supplementary ce¬menting materials or mineral admixtures are key to achieving strong and durable concrete. Recovered materials such as coal fly ash, ground granulated blast furnace slag and silica fume are widely accepted and used in concrete all over the world, espe¬cially in the construction of “high performance” structures such as massive dams, bridges, subway tunnels, etc. These min¬eral admixtures are not suitable for white concrete and light-colored architectural concrete applications. Converting waste glass fibers into a high performance white pozzolan would allow white concrete producers to gain from the same durability benefits currently realized by gray concrete producers. Description of the Benefit: Albacem’s technology will enable the glass fiber industry to eliminate nearly 100% of its glass fiber produc¬tion waste streams by converting them into viable value-added products. With this technology, the glass industry can prevent the landfilling of about 250,000 tons of waste glass fiber annually. Glass manufacturers will realize improved production efficiency by reducing process costs through the elimination of solid was

Hemmings, Raymond T.

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Value-Added Products From FGD Sulfite-Rich Scrubber Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Massive quantities of sulfite-rich flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber materials are produced every year in the USA. In fact, at present, the production of wet sulfite-rich scrubber cake outstrips the production of wet sulfate-rich scrubber cake by about 6 million tons per year. However, most of the utilization focus has centered on FGD gypsum. Therefore, we have recently initiated research on developing new strategies for the economical, but environmentally-sound, utilization of sulfite-rich scrubber material. In this exploratory project (Phase I), we attempted to ascertain whether it is feasible to develop reconstituted wood replacement products from sulfite-rich scrubber material. In pursuit of this goal, we characterized two different wet sulfite-rich scrubber materials, obtained from two power plants burning Midwestern coal, for their suitability for the development of value-added products. The overall strategy adopted was to fabricate composites where the largest ingredient was scrubber material with additional crop materials as additives. Our results suggested that it may be feasible to develop composites with flexural strength as high as 40 MPa (5800 psi) without the addition of external polymers. We also attempted to develop load-bearing composites from scrubber material, natural fibers, and phenolic polymer. The polymer-to-solid ratio was limited to {le} 0.4. The formulated composites showed flexural strengths as high as 73 MPa (10,585 psi). We plan to harness the research outcomes from Phase I to develop parameters required to upscale our value-added products in Phase II.

Vivak M. Malhotra

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 9 Value-Added Products from Extruding-Expelling of Soybeans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 9 Value-Added Products from Extruding-Expelling of Soybeans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

53

Best Estimate Radiation Flux Value-Added Procedure: Algorithm Operational Details and Explanations  

SciTech Connect

This document describes some specifics of the algorithm for best estimate evaluation of radiation fluxes at Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF). It uses the data available from the three co-located surface radiometer platforms at the SGP CF to automatically determine the best estimate of the irradiance measurements available. The Best Estimate Flux (BEFlux) value-added procedure (VAP) was previously named Best Estimate ShortWave (BESW) VAP, which included all of the broadband and spectral shortwave (SW) measurements for the SGP CF. In BESW, multiple measurements of the same quantities were handled simply by designating one as the primary measurement and using all others to merely fill in any gaps. Thus, this “BESW” is better termed “most continuous,” since no additional quality assessment was applied. We modified the algorithm in BESW to use the average of the closest two measurements as the best estimate when possible, if these measurements pass all quality assessment criteria. Furthermore, we included longwave (LW) fields in the best estimate evaluation to include all major components of the surface radiative energy budget, and renamed the VAP to Best Estimate Flux (BEFLUX1LONG).

Shi, Y; Long, CN

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

DOE/SC-ARM-TR-102 Sonde Adjust Value-Added Product Technical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... 14 Figures 1 The original and corrected relative humidity profile for Vaisala RS-92 radiosondes launched at the SGP Central Facility on May 12,...

55

ON THE DIVERSITY AND COMPLEXITY OF ABSORPTION LINE PROFILES PRODUCED BY OUTFLOWS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the origin of active galactic nucleus (AGN) absorption line profiles and their diversity could help to explain the physical structure of the accretion flow, and also to assess the impact of accretion on the evolution of the AGN host galaxies. Here, we present our first attempt to systematically address the issue of the origin of the complexities observed in absorption profiles. Using a simple method, we compute absorption line profiles against a continuum point source for several simulations of accretion disk winds. We investigate the geometrical, ionization, and dynamical effects on the absorption line shapes. We find that significant complexity and diversity of the absorption line profile shapes can be produced by the non-monotonic distribution of the wind velocity, density, and ionization state. Non-monotonic distributions of such quantities are present even in steady-state, smooth disk winds, and naturally lead to the formation of multiple and detached absorption troughs. These results demonstrate that the part of a wind where an absorption line is formed is not representative of the entire wind. Thus, the information contained in the absorption line is incomplete if not even insufficient to well estimate gross properties of the wind such as the total mass and energy fluxes. In addition, the highly dynamical nature of certain portions of disk winds can have important effects on the estimates of the wind properties. For example, the mass outflow rates can be off by up to two orders of magnitude with respect to estimates based on a spherically symmetric, homogeneous, constant velocity wind.

Giustini, Margherita [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica cosmica di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Proga, Daniel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV 891541-4002 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

56

ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report Fourth Quarter: July 1–September 30, 2012  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to a VAP, and (5) top requested VAPs from the archive.

Sivaraman, C

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

57

ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report First Quarter: October 01-December 31, 2011  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to a VAP, and (5) top requested VAPs from the archive.

Sivaraman, C

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

58

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.1;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",3.8,4.3,4.1 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",8.2,5.8,5.6 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0 31131," Sugar Manufacturing",0,0,0 3114," Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods ",7.3,6.7,6.2

59

ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report Fourth Quarter: July 01–September 30, 2011  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to a VAP, and (5) top requested VAPs from the archive. New information is highlighted in blue text. New information about processed data by the developer is highlighted in red text.

Sivaraman, C

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

60

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-095 The Microbase Value-Added Product: A Baseline Retrieval of Cloud  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 The Microbase Value-Added Product: A Baseline Retrieval of Cloud Microphysical Properties M Dunn K Johnson M Jensen May 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-005.1 ARM Value-Added Product (VAP) Monthly Status Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 ARM Value-Added Product (VAP) Monthly Status Report ARM Translator Team J. Comstock C. Flynn M. Jensen C. Long D. Turner S. Xie March 13, 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

62

An Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Value-Added Product to Retrieve Optically Thin Cloud Visible Optical Depth using Micropulse Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Micropulse Lidar (MPL) Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) Value-Added Product (VAP) is to retrieve the visible (short-wave) cloud optical depth for optically thin clouds using MPL. The advantage of using the MPL to derive optical depth is that lidar is able to detect optically thin cloud layers that may not be detected by millimeter cloud radar or radiometric techniques. The disadvantage of using lidar to derive optical depth is that the lidar signal becomes attenuation limited when ? approaches 3 (this value can vary depending on instrument specifications). As a result, the lidar will not detect optically thin clouds if an optically thick cloud obstructs the lidar beam.

Lo, C; Comstock, JM; Flynn, C

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Impact Study of Value-Added Functionality on Inverters in ESS - Eric Green & Vivek Ramachandran, NC State  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Results (Model Validation) Results (Model Validation) Figure 6: Real and Reactive Power Reference vs. Output Figure 7: IGBT and Diode Loss from Manufacturer (Fuji) Figure 8: IGBT and Diode Loss from Simulation Impact Study of Value-Added Functionality on Inverters in Energy Storage Systems Motivation Power conversion systems (PCS) developers are incorporating value-added functions; little is known about the on overall PCS reliability. Objective Develop electrical models to gain an understanding of the degradation of a PCS and its internal components due to value- added functionality; primarily VAR generation. Investigation and modeling of frequency support applications may be considered as a secondary objective.

64

MWRRET Value-Added Product: The Retrieval of Liquid Water Path and Precipitable Water Vapor from Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Data Sets (Revision 2)  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a short description of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility microwave radiometer (MWR) Retrieval (MWRRET) value-added product (VAP) algorithm. This algorithm utilizes a complementary physical retrieval method and applies brightness temperature offsets to reduce spurious liquid water path (LWP) bias in clear skies resulting in significantly improved precipitable water vapor (PWV) and LWP retrievals. We present a general overview of the technique, input parameters, output products, and describe data quality checks. A more complete discussion of the theory and results is given in Turner et al. (2007b).

Gaustad, KL; Turner, DD; McFarlane, SA

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

65

Testing a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Remote Sensing Method  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Cloud Condensation Nuclei a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Remote Sensing Method S. J. Ghan Climate Physics Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington D. R. Collin Department of Atmospheric Sciences Texas A&M University College Station, Texas Introduction Under certain conditions vertical profiles of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra can be retrieved from ground-based measurements (Ghan and Collins 2003). Surface measurements of the CCN spectrum are scaled by the ratio of the 180 backscatter (or extinction) profile to the surface backscatter (or extinction). The backscatter (or extinction) profile is measured by Raman lidar (RL), and is corrected to dry conditions using the vertical profile of relative humidity (calculated from the absolute

66

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",3,3,3 " 20-49",5,5,4 " 50-99",6,5,4 " 100-249",5,5,4 " 250-499",7,9,7 " 500 and Over",3,2,2 "Total",2,2,2

67

ARM - Value-Added Products (VAP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

banner Cart Icon Cart | Home | People | Site Index Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility US Department of Energy About Science Campaigns Sites Instruments...

68

ARM - Value-Added Product (VAP) Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

banner Cart Icon Cart | Home | People | Site Index Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility US Department of Energy About Science Campaigns Sites Instruments...

69

Bacterial Carbon Storage to Value Added Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PhaR from Paracoccus denitrificans functions as a repressor or autoregulator of the expression of genes encoding phasin protein (PhaP) and PhaR itself, both of which are components of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules ...

Brigham, Christopher J.

70

Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect

A Koontz; G Hodges; J Barnard; C Flynn; J Michalsky; A Koontz; G Hodges; J Barnard; C Flynn; J Michalsky

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",2.5,2.5,2.4 " 20-49",5,5,4.3 " 50-99",5.8,5.8,5.3 " 100-249",6.2,6.2,5.3 " 250-499",8.2,8,7.1 " 500 and Over",4.3,3,2.7

72

ARM - Measurement - Ice nuclei  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Ice nuclei Small particles around which ice particles form. Categories Cloud Properties...

73

Cloud Condensation Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The state of knowledge of the particles upon which liquid droplets condense to form atmospheric water clouds is presented. The realization of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) as a distinct aerosol subset originated with the cloud microphysical ...

James G. Hudson

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Testing a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Remote Sensing Method  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Cloud Condensation Nuclei a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Remote Sensing Method S. J. Ghan Climate Dynamics Group Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Under certain conditions vertical profiles of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra can be retrieved from ground-based measurements. Surface measurements of the CCN spectrum are scaled by the ratio of the backscatter (or extinction) profile to the surface backscatter (or extinction). The backscatter (or extinction) profile is measured by Raman lidar, and is corrected to dry conditions using the vertical profile of relative humidity (also measured by Raman Lidar) and surface measurements of the dependence of backscatter (or extinction) on relative humidity. This method should be accurate up to

75

The decay of hot nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of hot compound nuclei in intermediate-energy heavy ion reactions is discussed. The statistical decay of such compound nuclei is responsible for the abundant emission of complex fragments and high energy gamma rays. 43 refs., 23 figs.

Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Dynamic Chirality in Nuclei  

SciTech Connect

The possible chiral interpretation of twin bands in odd-odd nuclei was investigated in the Interacting Boson Fermion-Fermion Model. The analysis of the wave functions has shown that the possibility for angular momenta of the valence proton, neutron and core to find themselves in the favorable, almost orthogonal geometry is present, but not dominant. Such behaviour is found to be similar in nuclei where both the level energies and the electromagnetic decay properties display the chiral pattern, as well as in those where only the energies of the corresponding levels in the twin bands are close together. The difference in the structure of the two types of chiral candidates nuclei can be attributed to different beta and gamma fluctuations, induced by the exchange boson-fermion interaction of the Interacting Boson Fermion-Fermion Model. In both cases the chirality is weak and dynamic. The existence of doublets of bands in {sup 134}Pr can be attributed to dynamic chirality dominated by shape fluctuations.

Tonev, D. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, BAS, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Angelis, G. de [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Brant, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Petkov, P. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, BAS, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Ventura, A. [ENEA, 40129 Bologna and INFN, Sezione di Bologna (Italy)

2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

77

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Value of Shipments and Receipts" ,"(million dollars)" ," Under 20",3,3,3

78

Clusters in Light Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A great deal of research work has been undertaken in the alpha-clustering study since the pioneering discovery, half a century ago, of 12C+12C molecular resonances. Our knowledge of the field of the physics of nuclear molecules has increased considerably and nuclear clustering remains one of the most fruitful domains of nuclear physics, facing some of the greatest challenges and opportunities in the years ahead. In this work, the occurence of "exotic" shapes in light N=Z alpha-like nuclei is investigated. Various approaches of superdeformed and hyperdeformed bands associated with quasimolecular resonant structures are presented. Results on clustering aspects are also discussed for light neutron-rich Oxygen isotopes.

C. Beck; P. Papka; A. Sanchez i Zafra; S. Thummerer; F. Azaiez; P. Bednarczyk; S. Courtin; D. Curien; O. Dorvaux; A. Goasduff; D. Lebhertz; A. Nourreddine; M. Rousseau; M. -D. Salsac; W. von Oertzen; B. Gebauer; C. Wheldon; Tz. Kokalova; G. Efimov; V. Zherebchevsky; Ch. Schulz; H. G. Bohlen; D. Kamanin; G. de Angelis; A. Gadea; S. Lenzi; D. R. Napoli; S. Szilner; M. Milin; W. N. Catford; D. G. Jenkins; G. Royer

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Shape coexistence in atomic nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shape coexistence in nuclei appears to be unique in the realm of finite many-body quantum systems. It differs from the various geometrical arrangements that sometimes occur in a molecule in that in a molecule the various arrangements are of the widely separated atomic nuclei. In nuclei the various ''arrangements'' of nucleons involve (sets of) energy eigenstates with different electric quadrupole properties such as moments and transition rates, and different distributions of proton pairs and neutron pairs with respect to their Fermi energies. Sometimes two such structures will ''invert'' as a function of the nucleon number, resulting in a sudden and dramatic change in ground-state properties in neighboring isotopes and isotones. In the first part of this review the theoretical status of coexistence in nuclei is summarized. Two approaches, namely, microscopic shell-model descriptions and mean-field descriptions, are emphasized. The second part of this review presents systematic data, for both even- and odd-mass nuclei, selected to illustrate the various ways in which coexistence is observed in nuclei. The last part of this review looks to future developments and the issue of the universality of coexistence in nuclei. Surprises continue to be discovered. With the major advances in reaching to extremes of proton-neutron number, and the anticipated new ''rare isotope beam'' facilities, guidelines for search and discovery are discussed.

Heyde, Kris; Wood, John L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0430 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

ARM - Measurement - Cloud condensation nuclei  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

condensation nuclei condensation nuclei ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud condensation nuclei Small particles (typically 0.0002 mm, or 1/100 th the size of a cloud droplet) about which cloud droplets coalesce. Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CCN : Cloud Condensation Nuclei Particle Counter Field Campaign Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Employment Size" ," Under 50",3,4,4 ," 50-99",5,5,5 ," 100-249",4,4,3

82

Active galactic nuclei and massive galaxy cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Context) Central active galactic nuclei (AGN) are supposed to play a key role in the evolution of their host galaxies. In particular, the dynamical and physical properties of the gas core must be affected by the injected energy. (Aims) Our aim is to study the effects of an AGN on the dark matter profile and on the central stellar light distribution in massive early type galaxies. (Methods) By performing self-consistent N-body simulations, we assume in our analysis that periodic bipolar outbursts from a central AGN can induce harmonic oscillatory motions on both sides of the gas core. (Results) Using realistic AGN properties, we find that the motions of the gas core, driven by such feedback processes, can flatten the dark matter and/or stellar profiles after 4-5 Gyr. These results are consistent with recent observational studies that suggest that most giant elliptical galaxies have cores or are "missing light" in their inner part. Since stars behave as a "collisionless" fluid similar to dark matter, the density profile both of stars and dark matter should be affected in a similar way, leading to an effective reduction in the central brightness.

Sebastien Peirani; Scott Kay; Joe Silk

2006-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

83

Alternative Stabilization Methods and Value-Added Derivatives ...  

fusion in carbonized fibers. The proposed route involves least expensive chemicals. A proof-of-concept has been demonstrated (in the laboratory) ...

84

Quality Assurance: Value-Added Attributes of the QA Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

qualified and performance-oriented. Quality Results A measure or the success of an organization is the quality of the services and products it provides. Product and service...

85

Wood Products Marketing And Value-Added Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Point, NC, 27261, USA Tel.: (336) 841 8535 Fax.: (336) 841 5435 151 Randall St. Oakville, ON Canada, L6J SituationThe Situation As global populations continue to grow, the demand for wood products will increase in: Cultures Technology Infrastructure #12;Demand: Overall ClimateDemand: Overal

86

Commercial Demonstration of Wood Recovery, Recycling, and Value Adding Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This commercial demonstration project demonstrated the technical feasibility of converting low-value, underutilized and waste stream solid wood fiber material into higher valued products. With a growing need to increase product/production yield and reduce waste in most sawmills, few recovery operations and practically no data existed to support the viability of recovery operations. Prior to our efforts, most all in the forest products industry believed that recovery was difficult, extremely labor intensive, not cost effective, and that recovered products had low value and were difficult to sell. This project provided an opportunity for many within the industry to see through demonstration that converting waste stream material into higher valued products does in fact offer a solution. Our work, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, throughout the project aimed to demonstrate a reasonable approach to reducing the millions of recoverable solid wood fiber tons that are annually treated as and converted into low value chips, mulch and fuel. Consequently sawmills continue to suffer from reduced availability of forest resources, higher raw material costs, growing waste disposal problems, increased global competition, and more pressure to operate in an Environmentally Friendly manner. It is our belief (based upon the experience of this project) that the successful mainstreaming of the recovery concept would assist in alleviating this burden as well as provide for a realistically achievable economic benefit to those who would seriously pursue the concept and tap into the rapidly growing ''GREEN'' building marketplace. Ultimately, with participation and aggressive pursuit of the recovery concept, the public would benefit in that: (1) Landfill/disposal waste volume could be reduced adding greater life to existing municipal landfill sites thereby minimizing the need to prematurely license and open added facilities. Also, there would be a cost avoidance benefit associated to what would have been the added municipal (community) management costs involved with maintaining closed landfills. (2) With greater quantities of recovered material being returned to and integrated into manufacturing and the marketplace, reduced demand upon virgin wood sources could help lead the way to promoting improved relations and environmental balance between producers and consumers further expanding the value of our natural resource without adding environmental burden.

Auburn Machinery, Inc.

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Task 4.9 -- Value-added products from syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work on advanced fuel forms in 1996 focused on the synthesis of higher alcohols from mixtures of hydrogen and carbon dioxide (syngas) from coal gasification. The conversion of coal gasification products to commercially valuable alcohols will provide an important new market for current and future gasification plants. Initial work in this project utilized a novel molybdenum sulfide catalyst previously shown to be active for hydrodesulfurization reactions of coal liquids. The support for the active metal sulfide is a layered mixed oxide (hydrotalcite) capable of interaction with the metal sites for catalysis of carbon monoxide reductions. These catalysts have a high surface area, are highly porous, and have basic and acidic functionality. A pressurized fixed-bed flow-through reactor was constructed, and the MoS{sub 2} catalysts were tested with syngas under a variety of conditions. Unfortunately, the catalysts, even with higher molybdenum loading and addition of promoters, failed to give alcohol products. A batch reactor test of the catalyst was also conducted, but did not produce alcohol products. Group 8 metals have been used previously in catalysts for syngas reactions. Ruthenium and rhodium catalysts were prepared by impregnation of a hydrotalcite support. Tests with these catalysts in flow-through reactors also did not produce the desired alcohol products. The formation of higher alcohols from smaller ones, such as methanol and ethanol, could be commercially important if high selectivity could be achieved. The methanol and ethanol would be derived from syngas and fermentation, respectively. Based on previous work in other laboratories, it was hypothesized that the hydrotalcite supported MoS{sub 2} or Ru or Rh catalysts could catalyze the formation of butyl alcohols. Although the desired 1-butanol was obtained in batch reactions with the promoted Ru catalyst, the reaction was not as selective as desired. Product suitable for a lower-vapor-pressure gasoline oxygenate additive was obtained, but it may not be economical to market such products in competition with methyl tertiary-butyl-ether. Flow-through catalytic bed reactions were not successful.

Olson, E.S.; Sharma, R.K.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Wood Products Marketing And Value-Added Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Vlosky 2002 #12;s The first MDF plant started up four years ago and now there are 3 or 4, so furniture for exotic wood veneer layup. Pressing veneer on MDF will give the most defect-free, flat and smooth surface

89

Wood Products Marketing And Value-Added Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Opportunities -MDF- Market Opportunities -MDF- The first MDF plant started up four years ago and now there are 3 the substrate of choice for exotic wood veneer layup. Pressing veneer on MDF will give the most defect

90

Understanding transit travel behavior : value added by smart cards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Travel behavior represents a particularly complex area of research in transportation given the interaction between transport supply characteristics and the user perceptions which guide his/her decisions. Thanks to the ...

Gupta, Saumya, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo and asymmetry parameter at Barrow. Sivaraman, Chitra Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Flynn, Connor Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Category: Aerosols Efforts are currently underway to run and evaluate the Broadband Heating Rate Profile project at the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site for the time period March 2004 - February 2005. The Aerosol Best-Estimate (ABE) Value-Added Procedure (VAP) is to provide continuous estimates of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single-scatter albedo, and asymmetry parameter above the Northern Slopes of Alaska (NSA) facility. In the interest of temporal continuity, we have developed an algorithm that

92

Proton Distribution in Heavy Nuclei  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

It is reasoned that, from considerations connected with beta-decay stability and Coulomb repulsion forces, a neutron excess is developed on the surface of heavy nuclei. Several consequences of this qualitative analysis in nucleon interactions are briefly noted. (K.S.)

Johnson, M. H; Teller, E.

1953-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

93

Urban Cloud Condensation Nuclei Spectral Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectral flux and the condensation nuclei (CN) flux from an urban area are determined from in situ aircraft measurements at Denver, Colorado. The concentration differences between upwind and downwind cross ...

Paul R. Frisbie; James G. Hudson

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Some Basic Characteristics of Bacterial Freezing Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Freezing spectra of INA bacteria from different parts of the world were compared. A slight increase in efficiency of freezing nuclei produced by strains from warmer climates was observed. Whole cells of the most efficient strain produced nuclei ...

S. A. Yankofsky; Z. Levin; T. Bertold; N. Sandlerman

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Nuclei embedded in an electron gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The properties of nuclei embedded in an electron gas are studied within the relativistic mean-field approach. These studies are relevant for nuclear properties in astrophysical environments such as neutron-star crusts and supernova explosions. The electron gas is treated as a constant background in the Wigner-Seitz cell approximation. We investigate the stability of nuclei with respect to alpha and beta decay. Furthermore, the influence of the electronic background on spontaneous fission of heavy and superheavy nuclei is analyzed. We find that the presence of the electrons leads to stabilizing effects for both $\\alpha$ decay and spontaneous fission for high electron densities. Furthermore, the screening effect shifts the proton dripline to more proton-rich nuclei, and the stability line with respect to beta decay is shifted to more neutron-rich nuclei. Implications for the creation and survival of very heavy nuclear systems are discussed.

Thomas J. Buervenich; Igor N. Mishustin; Walter Greiner

2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

96

Spectroscopy of Neutron-rich Pu Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectroscopic studies of nuclei in the A{approx}250, Z{approx}100 region provide critical input to theoretical models that attempt to describe the structure and stability of the heaviest elements. We report here on new spectroscopic studies in the N = 150,151 nuclei {sup 244,245}Pu. (Z = 94). Excitations in these nuclei on the neutron-rich side of the valley of stability, accessed via inelastic and transfer reactions, complement fusion-evaporation studies of Z{>=}100 nuclei. States in {sup 244,245}Pu were populated using {sup 47}Ti and {sup 208}Pb beams incident on a {sup 244}Pu target, with delayed and prompt gamma rays detected by the Gammasphere array. The new results are discussed in the context of emerging systematics of one- and two-quasiparticle excitations in N{>=}150 nuclei.

Chowdhury, P.; Hota, S.; Lakshmi, S.; Tandel, S. K.; Harrington, T.; Jackson, E.; Moran, K.; Shirwadkar, U. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell MA 01854 (United States); Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M. P.; Greene, J.; Hoffman, C. R.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; McCutchan, E. A.; Seweryniak, D.; Stefanescu, I. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

97

Quasifree Kaon Photoproduction on Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigations of the quasifree reaction A$(\\gamma, K Y)$B are presented in the distorted wave impulse approximation (DWIA). For this purpose, we present a revised tree-level model of elementary kaon photoproduction that incorporates hadronic form factors consistent with gauge invariance, uses SU(3) values for the Born couplings and uses resonances consistent with multi-channel analyses. The potential of exclusive quasifree kaon photoproduction on nuclei to reveal details of the hyperon-nucleus interaction is examined. Detailed predictions for the coincidence cross section, the photon asymmetry, and the hyperon polarization and their sensitivities to the ingredients of the model are obtained for all six production channels. Under selected kinematics these observables are found to be sensitive to the hyperon-nucleus final state interaction. Some polarization observables are found to be insensitive to distortion effects, making them ideal tools to search for possible medium modifications of the elementary amplitude.

F. X. Lee; T. Mart; C. Bennhold; H. Haberzettl; L. E. Wright

1999-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

98

NUCLEI: Nuclear Computational Low-Energy Initiative | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NUCLEI: Nuclear Computational Low-Energy Initiative NUCLEI: Nuclear Computational Low-Energy Initiative This project seeks to advance large-scale nuclear physics compoutations in...

99

Coupled-cluster computations of atomic nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past decade, coupled-cluster theory has seen a renaissance in nuclear physics, with computations of neutron-rich and medium-mass nuclei. The method is efficient for nuclei with product-state references, and it describes many aspects of weakly bound and unbound nuclei. This report reviews the technical and conceptual developments of this method in nuclear physics, and the results of coupled-cluster calculations for nucleonic matter, and for exotic isotopes of helium, oxygen, calcium, and some of their neighbors.

G. Hagen; T. Papenbrock; M. Hjorth-Jensen; D. J. Dean

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

100

Quasifree Eta Photoproduction from Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quasifree $\\eta$ photoproduction from nuclei is studied in the Distorted Wave Impulse Approximation (DWIA). The elementary eta production operator contains Born terms, vector meson and nucleon resonance contributions and provides an excellent description of the recent low energy Mainz measurements on the nucleon. The resonance sector includes the $S_{11}(1535)$, $P_{11}(1440)$ and $D_{13}(1520)$ states whose couplings are fixed by independent electromagnetic and hadronic data. Different models for the $\\eta N$ t-matrix are used to construct a simple $\\eta A$ optical potential based on a $t \\rho$-approximation. We find that the exclusive $A(\\gamma,\\eta N)B$ process can be used to study medium modifications of the $N^*$ resonances, particularly if the photon asymmetry can be measured. The inclusive $A(\\gamma, \\eta)X$ reaction is compared to new data obtained on $^{12}C$, $^{40}Ca$, and is found to provide a clear distinction between different models for the $\\eta N$ t-matrix.

F. X Lee; L. E. Wright; C. Bennhold; L. Tiator

1996-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Fission Barriers of Compound Superheavy Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dependence of fission barriers on the excitation energy of the compound nucleus impacts the survival probability of superheavy nuclei synthesized in heavy-ion fusion reactions. In this work, we investigate the isentropic ...

Sheikh, J. A.

102

Understanding Nuclei in the upper sd - shell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclei in the upper-$sd$ shell usually exhibit characteristics of spherical single particle excitations. In the recent years, employment of sophisticated techniques of gamma spectroscopy has led to observation of high spin states of several nuclei near A$\\simeq$ 40. In a few of them multiparticle, multihole rotational states coexist with states of single particle nature. We have studied a few nuclei in this mass region experimentally, using various campaigns of the Indian National Gamma Array setup. We have compared and combined our empirical observations with the large-scale shell model results to interpret the structure of these nuclei. Indication of population of states of large deformation has been found in our data. This gives us an opportunity to investigate the interplay of single particle and collective degrees of freedom in this mass region.

M. Saha Sarkar; Abhijit Bisoi; Sudatta Ray; Ritesh Kshetri; S. Sarkar

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Superheavy Nuclei: Relativistic Mean Field Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of quasiparticle spectra in heaviest $A\\sim 250$ nuclei with spectroscopic data provides an additional constraint for the choice of effective interaction for the description of superheavy nuclei. It strongly suggest that only the parametrizations of the relativistic mean field Lagrangian which predict Z=120 and N=172 as shell closures are reliable for superheavy nuclei. The influence of the central depression in the density distribution of spherical superheavy nuclei on the shell structure is studied. Large central depression produces large shell gaps at Z=120 and N=172. The shell gaps at Z=126 and N=184 are favored by a flat density distribution in the central part of nucleus. It is shown that approximate particle number projection (PNP) by means of the Lipkin-Nogami method removes pairing collapse seen at these gaps in the calculations without PNP.

A. V. Afanasjev

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

104

Weighing exotic nuclei for nuclear astrophysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We briefly discuss recent mass measurements of exotic nuclei performed with Penning trap and storage ring mass spectrometry. A special attention is given to results relevant for nuclear astrophysics.

Litvinov, Yuri A.; Blaum, Klaus [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany) and Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Max Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany) and Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

105

Heat capacity and pairing transition in nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple model based on the canonical-ensemble theory is outlined for hot nuclei. The properties of the model are discussed with respect to the Fermi gas model and the breaking of Cooper pairs. The model describes well the experimental level density of deformed nuclei in various mass regions. The origin of the so-called S-shape of the heat capacity curve Cv(T) is discussed.

M. Guttormsen; M. Hjorth-Jensen; E. Melby; J. Rekstad; A. Schiller; S. Siem

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

Reaction theories for exotic nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This contribution discusses two important dynamical effects in the scattering of exotic beams. The first part deals proton breakup. The Coulomb interactions between the core and the target and the proton and the target are treated to all orders, including also the full multipole expansion of the Coulomb potential. The dynamics of proton Coulomb breakup is compared to that of an equivalent neutron of larger binding energy in order to elucidate the differences with the well understood neutron breakup mechanism. With respect to nuclear breakup it is found that a proton behaves exactly as a neutron of larger binding energy. The extra 'effective energy' is due to the combined core-target Coulomb barrier. In Coulomb breakup we distinguish the effect of the core-target Coulomb potential (called recoil effect), with respect to which the proton behaves again as a more bound neutron, from the direct proton-target Coulomb potential. The latter gives cross sections about an order of magnitude larger than the recoil term. The two effects give rise to complicated interferences in the parallel momentum distributions. They are instead easily separable in the proton angular distributions which are therefore suggested as a very useful observable for future experimental studies. The second part has to do with the dynamics of one-neutron and one-proton removal from unstable nuclei with large asymmetry {Delta}S S{sub n}-S{sub p} in the separation energies and incident energies below 80 MeV/nucleon. Strong non-sudden effects are observed in the case of deeply-bound-nucleon removal. The corresponding parallel momentum distributions exhibit an abrupt cutoff at high momentum that corresponds to an energy threshold occurring when the incident energy per particle is of comparable magnitude as the nucleon separation energy.

Bonaccorso, Angela [INFN, Sez. di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

107

Stability and Production of Superheavy Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beyond uranium heavy elements rapidly become increasingly unstable with respect to spontaneous fission as the proton number Z increases, because of the disruptive effect of the long-range Coulomb force. However, in the region just beyond Z = 100 magic proton and neutron numbers and the associated shell structure enhances nuclear stability sufficiently to allow observation of additional nuclei. Some thirty years ago it was speculated that an island of spherical, relatively stable superheavy nuclei would exist near the next doubly magic proton-neutron combination beyond 208:Pb, that is, at proton number Z = 114 and neutron number N = 184. Theory and experiment now show that there also exists a rock of stability in the vicinity of Z = 110 and N = 162 between the actinide region, which previously was the end of the peninsula of known elements, and the predicted island of spherical superheavy nuclei slightly southwest of the magic numbers Z = 114 and N = 184. We review here the stability properties of the heavy region of nuclei. Just as the decay properties of nuclei in the heavy region depend strongly on shell structure, this structure also dramatically affects the fusion entrance channel. The six most recently discovered new elements were all formed in cold-fusion reactions. We discuss here the effect of the doubly magic structure of the target in cold-fusion reactions on the fusion barrier and on dissipation.

Peter Moller; J. Rayford Nix

1997-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

108

Mentor Profile  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mentor Profile Mentor Profile The information you provide on this form will assist us in providing you with a list of prospective mentee from which to choose the most appropriate match. Once you've completed the form, please email it to doementoringprogram@hq.doe.gov . Thank you for your interest in the DOE Mentoring Program. Name (last/first): Phone Number: Job Title/Series/Grade: Organization (indicate HQ or field - complete address): Email Address: Are you a Veteran? If yes, do want a veteran mentee? If yes, which branch of the service? Do you want a student or intern mentee? Do you have a preference on mentee? For example, male, female, particular career field or other? If so, what or state name of pre selected mentee? Do you want a mentee in your career field? What are your hobbies?

109

Mentee Profile  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mentee Profile Mentee Profile The information you provide on this form will assist us in providing you with a list of prospective mentor from which to choose the most appropriate match. Once you've completed the form, please email it to doementoringprogram@hq.doe.gov . Thank you for your interest in the DOE Mentoring Program. Name (last/first): Phone Number: Job Title/Series/Grade: Organization (indicate HQ or field - complete address): Email Address: Are you a Veteran? If yes, do want a veteran mentee? If yes, which branch of the service? Are you student or intern? Do you have a preference on mentor? For example, male, female, particular career field, specific person or other? If so, what or who? Do you want a mentor in your career field? What are your career goals?

110

Fission Barriers of Compound Superheavy Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dependence of fission barriers on the excitation energy of the compound nucleus impacts the survival probability of superheavy nuclei synthesized in heavy-ion fusion reactions. In this work, we investigate the isentropic fission barriers by means of the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory. The relationship between isothermal and isentropic descriptions is demonstrated. Calculations have been carried out for $^{264}$Fm, $^{272}$Ds, $^{278}$112, $^{292}$114, and $^{312}$124. For nuclei around $^{278}$112 produced in "cold fusion" reactions, we predict a more rapid decrease of fission barriers with excitation energy as compared to the nuclei around $^{292}$114 synthesized in "hot fusion" experiments. This is explained in terms of the difference between the ground-state and saddle-point temperatures. The effect of the particle gas is found to be negligible in the range of temperatures studied.

J. C. Pei; W. Nazarewicz; J. A. Sheikh; A. K. Kerman

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

111

Thermodynamics of nuclei in thermal contact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The behaviour of a di-nuclear system in the regime of strong pairing correlations is studied with the methods of statistical mechanics. It is shown that the thermal averaging is strong enough to assure the application of thermodynamical methods to the energy exchange between the two nuclei in contact. In particular, thermal averaging justifies the definition of a nuclear temperature.

Karl-Heinz Schmidt; Beatriz Jurado

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

112

Probing the Structure of Halo Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our understanding of halo nuclei has so far relied on high-energy scattering and reactions, but a number of uncertainties remain. I discuss in general terms the new range of observables which will be measured by experiments around the Coulomb barrier, and how some details of the reaction mechanisms still need to be clarified.

I. J. Thompson

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Coherent Dissociation of Relativistic $^{12}$N Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dissociation of relativistic $^{12}$N nuclei having a momentum of 2 GeV/c per nucleon and undergoing the most peripheral interactions in a track emulsion is studied. The picture of charged topology of product ensembles of relativistic fragments and special features of their angular distributions are presented.

R. R. Kattabekov; K. Z. Mamatkulov; S. S. Alikulov; D. A. Artemenkov; R. N. Bekmirzaev; V. Bradnova; P. I. Zarubin; I. G. Zarubina; N. V. Kondratieva; N. K. Kornegrutsa; D. O. Krivenkov; A. I. Malakhov; K. Olimov; N. G. Peresadko; N. G. Polukhina; P. A. Rukoyatkin; V. V. Rusakova; R. Stanoeva; S. P. Kharlamov

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

114

Atmospheric Concentrations of Submicron Contact-freezing Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric concentrations of contact-freezing nuclei were measured using a technique primarily sensitive to submicron aerosol particles. Diffusion and phoretic forces were relied on for the capture of nuclei by supercooled drops of distilled ...

Terry Deshler; Gabor Vali

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Relationship Between Fog Condensation Nuclei and Fog Microstructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of fog drop size distribution, cloud condensation nuclei and fog condensation nuclei were made at several locations along the U.S. Pacific Coast. Wide variations in fog microstructure were associated with and appeared to be mostly ...

James G. Hudson

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Nuclear Shell Structure and Beta Decay I. Odd A Nuclei II. Even A Nuclei  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

In Part I a systematics is given of all transitions for odd A nuclei for which sufficiently reliable data are available. The allowed or forbidden characters of the transitions are correlated with the positions of the initial and final odd nucleon groups in the nuclear shell scheme. The nuclear shells show definite characteristics with respect to parity of the ground states. The latter is the same as the one obtained from known spins and magnetic moments in a one-particle interpretation. In Part II a systematics of the beta transitions of even-A nuclei is given. An interpretation of the character of the transitions in terms of nuclear shell structure is achieved on the hypothesis that the odd nucleon groups have the same structure as in odd-A nuclei, together with a simple coupling rule between the neutron and proton groups in odd-odd nuclei.

Mayer, M.G.; Moszkowski, S.A.; Nordheim, L.W.

1951-05-00T23:59:59.000Z

117

Non-Newtonian gravity in finite nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk, we report our recent study of constraining the non-Newtonian gravity at femtometer scale. We incorporate the Yukawa-type non-Newtonian gravitational potential consistently to the Skyrme functional form using the exact treatment for the direct contribution and density-matrix expansion method for the exchange contribution. The effects from the non-Newtonian potential on finite nuclei properties are then studied together with a well-tested Skyrme force. Assuming that the framework without non-Newtonian gravity can explain the binding energies and charge radii of medium to heavy nuclei within 2% error, we set an upper limit for the strength of the non-Newtonian gravitational potential at femtometer scale.

Xu, Jun; Chen, Lie-Wen; Zheng, Hao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Light nuclei production in heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light nuclei production as a result of nuclear coalescence effect can give some signals on final state of Quark Gluon Plasma formation. We are studying the behavior of nuclear modification factor as a function of different variables using the simulated data coming from the FASTMC generator. This data is necessary to extract information on coalescence mechanism from experimental data on high energy nuclear-nuclear interactions.

K. H. Khan; M. K. Suleymanov; Z. Wazir; E. U. Khan; Mahnaz Q. Haseeb; M. Ajaz

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

119

Interaction of eta mesons with nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Back in the mid eighties, a new branch of investigation which was related to the interaction of eta mesons with nuclei came into existence. It started with the theoretical prediction of possible exotic states of eta mesons and nuclei bound by the strong interaction and later developed into an extensive experimental program to search for such unstable states as well as understand the underlying interaction via eta meson producing reactions. The vast literature of experimental as well as theoretical works which studied various aspects of eta producing reactions such as the $\\pi ^+$ $n$ $\\to \\eta p$, $p d \\to ^3$He $\\eta$, $p \\,^6$Li $\\to ^7$Be $\\eta$ and $\\gamma ^3$He $\\to \\eta$ X, to name a few, had but one objective in mind: to understand the eta - nucleon ($\\eta N$) and hence the $\\eta$-nucleus interaction which could explain the production data and confirm the existence of some $\\eta$-mesic nuclei. In spite of these efforts, there remain uncertainties in the knowledge of the $\\eta N$ and hence the $\\eta$-nucleus interaction. The present review is hence an attempt to bind together the findings in these works and draw some global and specific conclusions which can be useful for future explorations.

N. G. Kelkar; K. P. Khemchandani; N. J. Upadhyay; B. K. Jain

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

120

Short-Distance Structure of Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of Jefferson Lab's original missions was to further our understanding of the short-distance structure of nuclei. In particular, to understand what happens when two or more nucleons within a nucleus have strongly overlapping wave-functions; a phenomena commonly referred to as short-range correlations. Herein, we review the results of the (e,e'), (e,e'p) and (e,e'pN) reactions that have been used at Jefferson Lab to probe this short-distance structure as well as provide an outlook for future experiments.

Douglas Higinbotham, Eliazer Piasetzky, Stephen Wood

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Compressed Baryonic Matter: from Nuclei to Pulsars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our world is wonderful because of the negligible baryonic part although unknown dark matter and dark energy dominate the Universe. Those nuclei in the daily life are forbidden to fuse by compression due to the Coulomb repulse, nevertheless, it is usually unexpected in extraterrestrial extreme-environments: the gravity in a core of massive evolved star is so strong that all the other forces (including the Coulomb one) could be neglected. Compressed baryonic matter is then produced after supernova, manifesting itself as pulsar-like stars observed. The study of this compressed baryonic matter can not only be meaningful in fundamental physics (e.g., the elementary color interaction at low-energy scale, testing gravity theories, detecting nano-Hertz background gravitational waves), but has also profound implications in engineering applications (including time standard and navigation), and additionally, is focused by Chinese advanced telescopes, either terrestrial or in space. Historically, in 1930s, L. Landau speculated that dense matter at supra-nuclear density in stellar cores could be considered as gigantic nuclei (the prototype of standard model of neutron star), however, we address that the residual compact object of supernova could be of condensed matter of quark clusters. The idea that pulsars are quark-cluster stars was not ruled out during the last decade, and we are expecting to test further by future powerful facilities. (in Chinese)

Renxin Xu

2013-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

122

Resonant Tidal Disruption in Galactic Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has recently been shown that the rate of angular momentum relaxation in nearly-Keplerian star clusters is greatly increased by a process termed resonant relaxation (Rauch & Tremaine 1996), who also argued that tidal disruption of stars in galactic nuclei containing massive black holes could be noticeably enhanced by this process. We describe here the results of numerical simulations of resonant tidal disruption which quantitatively test the predictions made by Rauch & Tremaine. The simulation method is based on an N-body routine incorporating cloning of stars near the loss cone and a semi-relativistic symplectic integration scheme. We also briefly describe the discovery of chaos in the Wisdom-Holman symplectic integrator applied to highly eccentric orbits and propose a modified integration scheme that remains robust under these conditions. We find that resonant disruption rates exceed their non-resonant counterparts by an amount consistent with the predictions; in particular, we estimate the net tidal disruption rate for a fully resonant cluster to be about twice that of its non-resonant counterpart. No significant enhancement in rates is observed outside the critical radius. Relativistic quenching of the effect is found to occur for hole masses M>8*10^7 solar masses. The numerical results combined with the observed properties of galactic nuclei indicate that for most galaxies the resonant enhancement to tidal disruption rates will be very small.

Kevin P. Rauch; Brian Ingalls

1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

123

Spin Modes in Nuclei and Nuclear Forces  

SciTech Connect

Spin modes in stable and unstable exotic nuclei are studied and important roles of tensor and three-body forces on nuclear structure are discussed. New shell model Hamiltonians, which have proper tensor components, are shown to explain shell evolutions toward drip-lines and spin properties of both stable and exotic nuclei, for example, Gamow-Teller transitions in {sup 12}C and {sup 14}C and an anomalous M1 transition in {sup 17}C. The importance and the necessity of the repulsive monopole corrections in isospin T = 1 channel to the microscopic two-body interactions are pointed out. The corrections are shown to lead to the proper shell evolutions in neutron-rich isotopes. The three-body force, in particular the Fujita-Miyazawa force induced by {Delta} excitations, is pointed out to be responsible for the repulsive corrections among the valence neutrons. The important roles of the three-body force on the energies and transitions in exotic oxygen and calcium isotopes are demonstrated.

Suzuki, Toshio [Department of Physics and Graduate School of Integrated Basic Sciences, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan) and Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Otsuka, Takaharu [Department of Physics and Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

124

The Stellar Populations of Seyfert 2 Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a preliminary analysis of the stellar populations in the central parsecs of a sample of 22 Seyfert 2 galaxies, based on a careful separation of nebular emission and stellar light in high-spatial resolution HST-STIS spectra. 10% of the surveyed nuclei display stellar populations of intermediate age, 1-2 Gyr old, whereas the remaining targets appear to be evenly split between objects showing only very old stellar populations and nuclei requiring also an additional blue featureless component, which we characterise by means of very young, few-Myr-old stars. The small fraction of stellar population of intermediate age seems to argue against the presence of such a young component, however, since the short lifetime of O-stars would imply recurrent star-formation episodes and the build-up over the last 1-2 Gyr of a detectable intermediate-age population. Additionally, a correlation between the luminosity of such a blue component and the emission from highly-ionised species, together with the general absence of Wolf-Rayet features, further suggests that the featureless continuum arises from the central engine rather than from star-forming regions. We discuss our results in the framework of the unification paradigm and of models for star formation close to supermassive black holes.

Marc Sarzi; Joe Shields; Rick Pogge; Paul Martini

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Esplorazione Della Terra Incognita Della Fisica Nucleare: Nuclei Con Alone, Nuclei "A Grappoli", Nuclei Borromeani e Altre Stranezze Esotiche!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

English: If the current status of theoretical and experimental knowledge in Nuclear Physics could be reduced to a geographical chart or a planisphere, then our epoch would be in some respect comparable to the end of the Medieval age and in other to the beginning of the Reinassance: epochs in which, together with the consolidated knowledge of the Old World, there have been great and revolutionary expeditions as the discovery of America or the periplus of Cape of Good Hope, explorations aimed at reaching the limits that, along the centuries, have lead to more and more engaging scientific discoveries in more and more far away lands, ending only in the twentieth century with the complete mapping of all the continents. Nuclear Physics is living an analogous adventure on the plane of contrast... - Italian: Se lo stato attuale delle conoscenze teoriche e sperimentali della Fisica Nucleare si potesse ridurre a una carta geografica o un mappamondo, allora la nostra epoca si potrebbe paragonare per certi versi alla fine del Medioevo e per altri al Rinascimento: epoche in cui, accanto alla conoscenza consolidata del Vecchio mondo, ci furono grandi e rivoluzionarie spedizioni come la scoperta dell'America o il periplo del Capo di Buona Speranza, esplorazioni geografiche volte al raggiungimento dei limiti che, nel corso dei secoli, hanno portato a scoperte scientifiche sempre pi\\`u avvincenti in terre sempre pi\\`u lontane, culminate solo nel ventesimo secolo con la completa mappatura di tutte le terre emerse. La Fisica Nucleare sta vivendo un'avventura analoga sul piano della contrapposizione tra la conoscenza acquisita sui nuclei stabili e la scoperta delle sorprendenti propriet\\`a esotiche dei nuclei instabili, pi\\`u difficili da produrre, da studiare e da comprendere.

Lorenzo Fortunato

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

126

User_TalentProfile  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of accessing their talent profiles, adding information to their profiles, and editing existing talent profile information. Task A. Access Talent Profile Enter the web address (URL) of the user application into your browser Address field and press the Enter key. Enter your user ID in the User ID textbox. Enter your password in the Password textbox. Click Sign In. Access Talent Profile 4 Steps Task A Add Information to Talent Profile Sections 5 Steps Task B Edit Talent Profile Sections

127

Oriented collisions for cold synthesis of superheavy nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conditions of optimum orientations (lowest barrier and largest interaction radius) for deformed colliding nuclei are introduced in "cold" fusion of superheavy nuclei. Also, the role of (octupole and) hexadecupole deformations is studied. We have used the proximity potential and applied our method to Ca-induced reactions.

Raj K. Gupta; M. Balasubramaniam; Rajesh Kumar; Narinder Singh

2003-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

128

On single nucleon wave functions in nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The strong and singular interaction between nucleons, makes the nuclear many body theory very complicated. Still, nuclei exhibit simple and regular features which are simply described by the shell model. Wave functions of individual nucleons may be considered just as model wave functions which bear little resemblance to the real ones. There is, however, experimental evidence for the reality of single nucleon wave functions. There is a simple method of constructing such wave functions for valence nucleons. It is shown that this method can be improved by considering the polarization of the core by the valence nucleon. This gives rise to some rearrangement energy which affects the single valence nucleon energy within the nucleus.

Talmi, Igal [Weizamnn Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

129

Subthreshold Photofission of Even-Even Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within quantum-mechanical fission theory, the angular distributions of fragments originating from the subthreshold photofission of the even-even nuclei {sup 232}Th, {sup 234}U, {sup 236}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, and {sup 242}Pu are analyzed for photon energies below 7 MeV. Special features of various fission channels are assessed under the assumption that the fission barrier has a two-humped shape. It is shown that the maximum value of the relative orbital angular momentum L{sub m} of fission fragments can be found upon taking into account deviations from the predictions of A. Bohr's formula for the angular distributions of fission fragments. The result is L{sub m} {approx_equal} 30. The existence of an 'isomeric shelf' for the angular distributions of fragments from {sup 236}U and {sup 238}U photofission in the low-energy region is confirmed.

Kadmensky, S.G.; Rodionova, L.V. [Voronezh State University, Universitetskaya pl. 1, Voronezh, 394693 (Russian Federation)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Cluster magnetic fields from active galactic nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active galactic nuclei (AGN) found at the centers of clusters of galaxies are a possible source for weak cluster-wide magnetic fields. To evaluate this scenario, we present 3D adaptive mesh refinement MHD simulations of a cool-core cluster that include injection of kinetic, thermal, and magnetic energy via an AGN-powered jet. Using the MHD solver in FLASH 2, we compare several sub-resolution approaches that link the estimated accretion rate as measured on the simulation mesh to the accretion rate onto the central black hole and the resulting feedback. We examine the effects of magnetized outflows on the accretion history of the black hole and discuss the ability of these models to magnetize the cluster medium.

Sutter, P M; Yang, H -Y

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Neutron-Antineutron Oscillations in Nuclei Revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An upper limit on $n-\\bar n$ oscillations can be obtained from the stability of matter. This relation has been worked out theoretically and together with data yields $\\tau_{n\\bar n} > (1 - 2)\\times 10^8 sec$. A recent publication claims a different relation and finds a nuclear suppression of the $n\\to\\bar n$ oscillations which is two orders of magnitude weaker than the previous evaluations. Using the same approach we find, nevertheless, that the earlier estimates are correct and conclude that future experiments with free neutrons from reactors are capable to put a stronger limit on the $n - \\bar n$ oscillation time than experiments with large amount of neutrons bound in nuclei.

Joerg Huefner; Boris Kopeliovich

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-120 Raman Lidar Profiles-Temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Raman Lidar Profiles-Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) Value-Added Product RK Newsom C Sivaraman SA McFarlane October 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

133

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer...

134

Accelerator beam profile analyzer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A beam profile analyzer employing sector or quadrant plates each servo controlled to outline the edge of a beam.

Godel, Julius B. (Bayport, NY); Guillaume, Marcel (Grivegnee, BE); Lambrecht, Richard M. (East Quogue, NY); Withnell, Ronald (East Setauket, NY)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Trade and Reliability; All Reports ‹ See all Electricity Reports State Electricity Profiles. ... Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010:

136

Assessment of Value Added for Surface Marine Wind Speed Obtained from Two Regional Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hindcasts with reanalysis-driven regional climate models (RCMs) are a common tool to assess weather statistics (i.e., climate) and recent changes and trends. The capability of different state-of-the-art RCMs (with and without spectral nudging ...

Jörg Winterfeldt; Ralf Weisse

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Dynamics and Trends in U.S. Value-Added Wood Product Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rouge, Louisiana, USA #12;Presentation Outline Demographics/Demand DriversDemographics/Demand Drivers, Flooring The BalkansThe Balkans RecommendationsRecommendations #12;Demographics/ Demand Drivers #12

138

Assessing the Economic Viability of Bio-based Products for Missouri Value-added Crop Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While research and development on biobased products has continued strong over the years, parallel attention on the economics and management of such product innovation has been lacking. With the financial support of the Department of Energy, the Economics and Management of Agrobiotechnology Center at the University of Missouri-Columbia has launched a pilot graduate education program that seeks to fill the gap. Within this context, a multi-disciplinary research and teaching program has been structured with an emphasis on new product and innovation economics and management. More specifically, this pilot graduate education program has the following major objectives: (1) To provide students with a strong background in innovation economics, management, and strategy. (2) To diversify the students academic background with coursework in science and technology. (3) To familiarize the student with biobased policy initiatives through interaction with state and national level organizations and policymakers. (4) To facilitate active collaboration with industry involved in the development and production of biobased products. The pilot education program seeks to develop human capital and research output. Although the research is, initially, focused on issues related to the State of Missouri, the results are expected to have national implications for the economy, producers, consumers and environment.

Nicholas Kalaitzandonakes

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

Western cattle prices vary across video markets and value-adding programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

results show average price differences between the regionthe highest average prices. † These values are statisticallyfactors affecting cow auction price differentials. Southern

Blank, Steven C.; Boriss, Hayley; Forero, Larry C.; Nader, Glenn A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The Integrated Biorefinery: Conversion of Corn Fiber to Value-added Chemicals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides a summary of Michigan Biotechnology Institute's efforts to employ the corn fiber fraction of a dry grind ethanol plant as a feedstock to produce succinic acid which has potential as a building block intermediate for a wide range of commodity chemicals.

Susanne Kleff

2007-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Advanced Metering, Value-Added Services, and Communications-Based Applications for National Account Customers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric utility industry progresses toward deregulation, many different approaches will be used by customers and energy brokers to leverage their buying power through bulk electricity purchases. This report documents interviews with national account customers to determine the advanced information, communications, and metering systems needed to deliver, monitor, and bill such purchases.

1997-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

142

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-129 Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Product A Koontz C Flynn G Hodges J Michalsky J Barnard March 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the...

143

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-133 Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research B Ermold, September 2013, DOESC-ARM-133 Contents 1.0 Introduction ......

144

Identifying Employment Structure and Training Needs In the Louisiana Value-Added Wood Products Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a layup on Saturday at EnergySolutions Arena in Salt Lake City. "Our coaches had a great gameplan for us or not the microbes might be harmful to humans. The purpose of the assign- ment, according to plant and wildlife hiding be- hind a brand and start reping a brand that reflects you. The time has come to plant your print

145

The application of the value-added activity model for the Mark-6 LE integration project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Powerful information and workflow management tools can minimize risks and maximize productivity for a project. However, a conventional task-based project management approach does not provide the kind of details necessary ...

Liang, Joanna (Joanna Jung-Yen)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Heat Treatment of Black Dross for the Production of a Value Added ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical composition of the BD after heat treatment was investigated by ... of the Chemical Changes and Surface Properties of Carbonated Waste Cement ... Flux for Basic Oxygen Steel Making Using Waste Oxides of Steel Plant ... Leaching Studies for Metals Recovery from Waste Printed Wiring Boards (PWBs).

147

The intergalactic propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray nuclei  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the propagation of ultra-high energy cosmic ray nuclei (A = 1-56) from cosmologically distant sources through the cosmic radiation backgrounds. Various models for the injected composition and spectrum and of the cosmic infrared background are studied using updated photodisintegration cross-sections. The observational data on the spectrum and the composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays are jointly consistent with a model where all of the injected primary cosmic rays are iron nuclei (or a mixture of heavy and light nuclei).

Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab; Sarkar, Subir; /Oxford U., Theor. Phys.; Taylor, Andrew M.; /Oxford U.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Decay modes of $^{10}$C nuclei unbound state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unbound states of $^{10}$C nuclei produced as quasi-projectiles in $^{12}$C+$^{24}$Mg collisions at E/A = 53 and 95 MeV are studied with the Indra detector array. Multi-particle correlation function analyses provide experimental evidence of sequential de-excitation mechanisms through the production of intermediate $^{9}$B, $^{6}$Be and $^{8}$Be unbound nuclei. The relative contributions of different decay sequences to the total decay width of the explored states is estimated semi-quantitatively. The obtained results show that heavy-ion collisions can be used as a tool to access spectroscopic information about exotic nuclei.

F. Grenier; A. Chbihi; R. Roy; G. Verde; D. Thériault; J. D. Frankland; J. P. Wieleczko; B. Borderie; R. Bougault; R. Dayras; E. Galichet; D. Guinet; P. Lautesse; N. Le Neindre; O. Lopez; J. Moisan; L. Nalpas; M. Pârlog; M. F. Rivet; E. Rosato; B. Tamain; E. Vient; M. Vigilante

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

149

Fission Properties for R-Process Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a systematics of fission barriers and fission lifetimes for the whole landscape of superheavy elements (SHE), i.e., nuclei with Z 100. The fission lifetimes are also compared with the -decay half-lives. The survey is based on a self-consistent description in terms of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (SHF) approach. Results for various different SHF parametrizations are compared to explore the robustness of the predictions. The fission path is computed by quadrupole constrained SHF. The computation of fission lifetimes takes care of the crucial ingredients of the large-amplitude collective dynamics along the fission path, as self-consistent collective mass and proper quantum corrections. We discuss the different topologies of fission landscapes which occur in the realm of SHE (symmetric versus asymmetric fission, regions of triaxial fission, bimodal fission, and the impact of asymmetric ground states). The explored region is extended deep into the regime of very neutron-rich isotopes as they are expected to be produced in the astrophysical r process.

Erler, J. [Inst. fur Theoretische Physik II, Univ. Erlangen-Numberg, Germany/UTK/ORNL; Langanke, K. [GSI-Darmstadt/Tech. Univ. Darmstadt, Inst. Phys./Frankfurt Inst. Advanced Studies, Germany; Loens, H. P. [GSI-Darmstadt/Tech. Univ. Darmstadt, Inst. Phys.; Martinez-Pinedo, G. [GSI-Darmstadt/Tech. Univ. Darmstadt, Inst. Phys.; Reinhard, P.-G. [Inst. fur Theoretische Physik II, Univ. Erlangen-Numberg, Germany

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Fission properties for r-process nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a systematics of fission barriers and fission lifetimes for the whole landscape of super-heavy elements (SHE), i.e. nuclei with Z>100. The fission lifetimes are also compared with the alpha-decay half-lives. The survey is based on a self-consistent description in terms of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (SHF) approach. Results for various different SHF parameterizations are compared to explore the robustness of the predictions. The fission path is computed by quadrupole constrained SHF. The computation of fission lifetimes takes care of the crucial ingredients of the large-amplitude collective dynamics along the fission path, as self-consistent collective mass and proper quantum corrections. We discuss the different topologies of fission landscapes which occur in the realm of SHE (symmetric versus asymmetric fission, regions of triaxial fission, bi-modal fission, and the impact of asymmetric ground states). The explored region is extended deep into the regime of very neutron-rich isotopes as they are expected to be produced in the astrophysical r process.

J. Erler; K. Langanke; H. P. Loens; G. Martínez-Pinedo; P. -G. Reinhard

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

151

Properties of heavy and superheavy nuclei in supernova environments  

SciTech Connect

The properties of nuclei embedded in an electron gas are studied within the relativistic mean-field approach. These studies are relevant for nuclear properties in astrophysical environments such as neutron-star crusts and supernova explosions. The electron gas is treated as a constant background in the Wigner-Seitz cell approximation. We investigate the stability of nuclei with respect to {alpha} and {beta} decay. We find that the presence of the electrons leads to stabilizing effects for {alpha} decay at high electron densities. Furthermore, the screening effect shifts the proton dripline to more proton-rich nuclei, and the stability line with respect to {beta}-decay is shifted to more neutron-rich nuclei. Implications for the creation and survival of very heavy nuclear systems are discussed.

Buervenich, T. J.; Mishustin, I. N.; Greiner, W. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

152

Anomaly of the moment of inertia of shape transitional nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The change in the structure of the collective levels with spin angular momentum in atomic nuclei is often expressed in terms of the classical concepts of the kinematic and the dynamic moments of inertia varying with spin. For the well deformed even-even nuclei the kinematic moment of inertia increases with spin up to 10%-20%, at say I{sup {pi}} = 12{sup +}. However, for the shape transitional nuclei, or almost spherical nuclei, it increases with spin much faster. The pitfalls of using the rotor model form of kinematic moment of inertia in such cases are pointed out here. Alternative methods of extracting the nuclear structure information are explored. The important role of the ground state deformation is illustrated. The use of the power index formula for evaluating the effective moment of inertia, free from the assumption of the rotor model, is described.

Gupta, J. B. [Ramjas College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110 007 (India); Hamilton, J. H. [Physics Department, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Influence of Cloud Condensation Nuclei on Orographic Snowfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pollution aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) have the potential to alter warm rain clouds via the aerosol first and second indirect effects in which they modify the cloud droplet population, cloud lifetime and size, rainfall ...

Stephen M. Saleeby; William R. Cotton; Douglas Lowenthal; Randolph D. Borys; Melanie A. Wetzel

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Electric Dipole Moments of Neutron-Odd Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric dipole moments (EDMs) of neutron-odd nuclei with even protons are systematically evaluated. We first derive the relation between the EDM and the magnetic moment operators by making use of the core polarization scheme. This relation enables us to calculate the EDM of neutron-odd nuclei without any free parameters. From this calculation, one may find the best atomic system suitable for future EDM experiments.

Takehisa Fujita; Sachiko Oshima

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Introduction to the study of collisions between heavy nuclei  

SciTech Connect

Current investigations concerning the collisions of nuclei governed by small de Broglie wavelengths are reviewed. The wave packets localize nuclei in regions small compared to their diameters. Cross sections are examined for potential scattering, elastic scattering, quasi-molecular states, peripheral particle-transfer reactions, fusion, and deep inelastic collisions. Theories of fusion and deep inelastic collisions are summarized. This paper is in the nature of a review-tutorial. 45 references, 51 figures, 2 tables. (RWR)

Bayman, B.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Present Status of the Theory of Fission of hot Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent progress in the theory of fission of hot nuclei is reported. We discuss in particular the properties of the friction formfactor as function of the deformation (and possibly of the temperature) which are necessary to reproduce data concerning fission of hot nuclei and its accompanying light particle and $\\gamma$-ray emission. Recent theoretical work gives support to a phenomenological friction form factor (proposed some time ago), which is weak for compact shapes and increases on the way to scission.

P. Fröbrich

2004-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

157

Search for ?-Mesic Nuclei at J-PARC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The merits of searching for \\eta -mesic nuclei by use of the (\\pi, N) reaction at J-PARC is discussed, by comparison with an old experiment with the same reaction at BNL in 1980's. The importance of a pilot experiment using deuterium target is also stressed for a better understanding of the background which should exist even after the coincidence of the decay particles of \\eta -mesic nuclei.

H. Fujioka

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

158

EMC effect for light nuclei: new results from Jefferson Lab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High energy lepton scattering has been the primary tool for mapping out the quark distributions of nucleons and nuclei. Measurements of deep inelastic scattering in nuclei show that the quark distributions in heavy nuclei are not simply the sum of the quark distributions of the constituent proton and neutron, as one might expect for a weakly bound system. This modification of the quark distributions in nuclei is known as the EMC effect. I will discuss the results from Jefferson Lab (JLab) experiment E03-103, a precise measurement of the EMC effect in few-body nuclei with emphasis on the large x region. Data from the light nuclei suggests that the nuclear dependence of the high x quark distribution may depend on the nucleon's local environment, rather than being a purely bulk effect. In addition, I will also discuss about a future experiment at the upgraded 12 GeV Jefferson Lab facility which will further investigate the role of the local nuclear environment and the influence of detailed nuclear structure to the modification of quark distributions.

Daniel, A. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens OH 45701 (United States)

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

159

Texas Crop Profile: Onions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This profile of onion production in Texas gives an overview of basic commodity information; discusses insect, disease and weed pests; and covers cultural and chemical control methods.

Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.; Smith, Dudley

2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

160

A Moored Profiling Instrument*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The specifications and performance of a moored vertical profiling instrument, designed to acquire near-full-ocean-depth profile time series data at high vertical resolution, are described. The 0.8-m-diameter by 0.4-m-wide device utilizes a ...

K. W. Doherty; D. E. Frye; S. P. Liberatore; J. M. Toole

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Leading twist nuclear shadowing phenomena in hard processes with nuclei  

SciTech Connect

We present and discuss the theory and phenomenology of the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing which is based on the combination of the generalization of Gribov-Glauber theory, QCD factorization theorems, and HERA QCD analysis of diffraction in lepton-proton deep inelastic scattering (DIS). We apply this technique for the analysis of a wide range of hard processes with nuclei-inclusive DIS on deuterons, medium-range and heavy nuclei, coherent and incoherent diffractive DIS with nuclei, and hard diffraction in proton-nucleus scattering - and make predictions for the effect of nuclear shadowing in the corresponding sea quark and gluon parton distributions. We also analyze the role of the leading twist nuclear shadowing in generalized parton distributions in nuclei and certain characteristics of final states in nuclear DIS. We discuss the limits of applicability of the leading twist approximation for small x scattering off nuclei and the onset of the black disk regime and methods of detecting it. It will be possible to check many of our predictions in the near future in the studies of the ultraperipheral collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Further checks will be possible in pA collisions at the LHC and forward hadron production at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Detailed tests will be possible at an Electon-Ion Collider (EIC) in USA and at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider (LHeC) at CERN.

Leonid Frankfurt, Vadim Guzey, Mark Strikman

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Systematic Study of Fission Barriers of Excited Superheavy Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A systematic study of fission-barrier dependence on excitation energy has been performed using the self-consistent finite-temperature Hartree-Fock+BCS (FT-HF+BCS) formalism with the SkM* Skyrme energy density functional. The calculations have been carried out for even-even superheavy nuclei with Z ranging between 110 and 124. For an accurate description of fission pathways, the effects of triaxial and reflection-asymmetric degrees of freedom have been fully incorporated. Our survey demonstrates that the dependence of isentropic fission barriers on excitation energy changes rapidly with particle number, pointing to the importance of shell effects even at large excitation energies characteristic of compound nuclei. The fastest decrease of fission barriers with excitation energy is predicted for deformed nuclei around N=164 and spherical nuclei around N=184 that are strongly stabilized by ground-state shell effects. For nuclei 240Pu and 256Fm, which exhibit asymmetric spontaneous fission, our calculations predict a transition to symmetric fission at high excitation energies due to the thermal quenching of static reflection asymmetric deformations.

J. A. Sheikh; W. Nazarewicz; J. C. Pei

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

163

Topology of "white" stars in relativistic fragmentation of light nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present paper, experimental observations of the multifragmentation processes of light relativistic nuclei carried out by means of emulsions are reviewed. Events of the type of "white" stars in which the dissociation of relativistic nuclei is not accompanied by the production of mesons and the target-nucleus fragments are considered. A distinctive feature of the charge topology in the dissociation of the Ne, Mg, Si, and S nuclei is an almost total suppression of the binary splitting of nuclei to fragments with charges higher than 2. The growth of the nuclear fragmentation degree is revealed in an increase in the multiplicity of singly and doubly charged fragments with decreasing charge of the non-excited part of the fragmenting nucleus. The processes of dissociation of stable Li, Be, B, C, N, and O isotopes to charged fragments were used to study special features of the formation of systems consisting of the lightest $\\alpha$, d, and t nuclei. Clustering in form of the $^3$He nucleus can be detected in "white" stars via the dissociation of neutron-deficient Be, B, C, and N isotopes.

N. P. Andreeva; V. Bradnova; S. Vokal; A. Vokalova; A. Sh. Gaitinov; S. G. Gerasimov; L. A. Goncharova; V. A. Dronov; P. I. Zarubin; I. G. Zarubina; G. I. Orlova; A. D. Kovalenko; A. Kravchakova; V. G. Larionova; F. G. Lepekhin; O. V. Levitskaya; A. I. Malakhov; A. A. Moiseenko; G. I. Orlova; N. G. Peresadko; N. G. Polukhina; P. A. Rukoyatkin; V. V. Rusakova; N. A. Salmanova; V. R. Sarkisyan; B. B. Simonov; E. Stan; R. Stanoeva; M. M. Chernyavsky; M. Haiduc; S. P. Kharlamov; I. Tsakov; T. V. Shchedrina

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Description of Exotic Nuclei with the Interacting Boson Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Even--even nuclei in the A{approx}100 mass region are investigated within the framework of the interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1). The study includes energy spectra and electric quadrupole transition properties of zirconium, molybdenum, ruthenium and palladium isotopes with neutron number N{>=}54. A global parametrization of the IBM-1 hamiltonian is found leading to a description of 301 collective levels in 30 nuclei with a root-mean-square deviation from the observed level energies of 119 keV. The geometric character of the nuclei can be visualized by plotting the potential energy surface V({beta},{gamma}) obtained from the IBM-1 hamiltonian in the classical limit. The parametrization established on the basis of known elements is then used to predict properties of the unknown, neutron-rich isotopes {sup 106}Zr, {sup 112}Mo, {sup 116}Ru and {sup 120}Pd.

Boeyuekata, M. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds, B.P. 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Physics Department, Faculty of Science and Arts, University of Kirikkale, 71100 Kirikkale (Turkey); Van Isacker, P. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds, B.P. 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Uluer, I. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science and Arts, University of Kirikkale, 71100 Kirikkale (Turkey)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

165

Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118 and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

Feng, Zhao-Qing; Li, Jun-Qing; Scheid, Werner

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118 and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

Zhao-Qing Feng; Gen-Ming Jin; Jun-Qing Li; Werner Scheid

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

167

ARM - Field Campaign - MASRAD: Cloud Condensate Nuclei Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsMASRAD: Cloud Condensate Nuclei Chemistry Measurements govCampaignsMASRAD: Cloud Condensate Nuclei Chemistry Measurements Campaign Links AMF Point Reyes Website Related Campaigns MArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) IOP 2005.03.14, Miller, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : MASRAD: Cloud Condensate Nuclei Chemistry Measurements 2005.07.01 - 2005.07.30 Lead Scientist : Carl Berkowitz For data sets, see below. Description Principal Investigators: J. Ogren, C. Berkowitz, R. Halthore, A. Laskin, A. Strawa, J. Wang, A. Wexler As part of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment to Point Reyes, CA in the spring and summer of 2005, a suite of instrumentation was installed to measure the chemical, physical and optical properties of aerosol particles

168

Nuclear Superfluidity in Exotic Nuclei and Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear superfludity in exotic nuclei close to the drip lines and in the inner crust matter of neutron stars have common features which can be treated with the same theoretical tools. In the first part of my lecture I discuss how two such tools, namely the HFB approach and the linear response theory can be used to describe the pairing correlations in weakly bound nuclei, in which the unbound part of the energy spectrum becomes important. Then, using the same models, I shall discuss how the nuclear superfluidity can affect the thermal properties of the inner crust of neutron stars.

Nicolae Sandulescu

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

169

A BPS Skyrme model and phenomenology of nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We define a BPS Skyrme model, which is integrable, solvable and with solitons saturating a topological bound. When applied to nuclear physics, the model cures several serious problems appearing in the standard Skyrme model as well as in its typical generalizations. At the classical level, it qualitatively reproduces the main features of the liquid drop model of nuclei, providing proper relations between masses and radii of nuclei and the baryon number. In spite of its rather unusual form, the model also allows for the semiclassical quantization.

Adam, Christoph; Sanchez-Guillen, Joaquin [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Universidad de Santiago, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain and Instituto Galego de Fisica de Altas Enerxias (IGFAE), E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Wereszczynski, Andrzej [Physics Institute, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

170

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

171

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

172

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

173

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

174

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,392 15 Electric Utilities 20,115 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 6,277 16 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,750,957 12 Electric Utilities 91,232,664 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 20,518,293 17 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 33 33 Nitrogen Oxide 57 17 Carbon Dioxide 55,683 15 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 43 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 31 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,099 35 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 21 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 20

175

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

176

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

177

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

178

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

179

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

180

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

182

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

183

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

184

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

185

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

186

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

187

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

188

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

189

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

190

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

191

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

192

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (West Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 16,495 24 Electric Utilities 11,719 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,775 19 Net Generation (megawatthours) 80,788,947 20 Electric Utilities 56,719,755 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 24,069,192 13 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 105 20 Nitrogen Oxide 49 23 Carbon Dioxide 74,283 12 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 20 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 25 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,027 5 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 34 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 33

193

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,128 50 Electric Utilities 260 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 868 43 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,619,990 49 Electric Utilities 720,853 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,899,137 35 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide * 51 Nitrogen Oxide 1 50 Carbon Dioxide 8 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 51 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3 51 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 51 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 48 Direct Use (megawatthours) 19,806 47

194

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

195

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

196

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

197

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

198

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

199

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

200

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

202

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,739 18 Electric Utilities 20,360 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,378 39 Net Generation (megawatthours) 92,312,989 18 Electric Utilities 90,176,805 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,136,184 46 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 233 8 Nitrogen Oxide 56 18 Carbon Dioxide 78,815 10 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 6 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 26 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,882 7 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 17 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 15

203

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

204

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

205

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

206

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

207

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

208

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

209

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,623 45 Electric Utilities 2,994 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 629 48 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,049,636 46 Electric Utilities 8,682,448 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,367,188 47 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 43 Nitrogen Oxide 12 43 Carbon Dioxide 3,611 47 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 23 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 8 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 792 41 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 46 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 42

210

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

211

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,697 31 Electric Utilities 937 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,760 8 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,804,824 34 Electric Utilities 802,906 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 42,001,918 10 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 35 31 Nitrogen Oxide 17 38 Carbon Dioxide 20,291 36 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 34 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 39 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,045 38 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,123,422 26 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 31,822,942 34

212

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

213

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

214

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

215

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

216

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

217

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

218

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

219

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

220

profiles | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

profiles profiles Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

222

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

223

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

224

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 790 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 790 46 Net Generation (megawatthours) 199,858 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 199,858 51 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 1 49 Nitrogen Oxide * 51 Carbon Dioxide 191 50 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 8.8 2 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.0 3 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,104 1 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,876,995 43 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 3,388,490 50 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 8,488,505 12

225

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

226

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

227

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

228

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

229

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

230

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

231

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

232

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

233

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

234

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

235

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

236

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

237

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

238

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

239

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

240

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

242

Adaptive web usage profiling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web usage models and profiles capture significant interests and trends from past accesses. They are used to improve user experience, say through recommendation of pages, pre-fetching of pages, etc. While browsing behavior changes dynamically over time, ...

Bhushan Shankar Suryavanshi; Nematollaah Shiri; Sudhir P. Mudur

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Vertically Rising Microstructure Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertically rising microstructure profiler was designed to measure temperature gradient and conductivity gradient microstructure in lakes, reservoirs and coastal seas. The instrument is totally independent of surface craft while collecting ...

G. D. Carter; J. Imberger

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Performance profiles style sheet  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

investment throughout most of this period compared with the 1990s. Title: Performance profiles style sheet Author: Greg Filas Created Date: 12/23/2010 7:12:57 PM ...

245

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

246

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

247

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

248

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

249

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New York) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 39,357 6 Electric Utilities 11,032 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 28,325 5 Net Generation (megawatthours) 136,961,654 9 Electric Utilities 34,633,335 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 102,328,319 5 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 62 25 Nitrogen Oxide 44 28 Carbon Dioxide 41,584 22 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 40 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 44 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 669 42 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,623,573 7 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 79,119,769 18

250

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

251

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

252

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

253

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric Utilities 12,418,332 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 188,933,540 3 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 232 9 Nitrogen Oxide 83 8 Carbon Dioxide 103,128 6 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 25 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 38 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,129 34 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,760,674 6 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 77,890,532 19

254

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

255

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

256

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,638 13 Electric Utilities 23,008 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,630 23 Net Generation (megawatthours) 125,180,739 11 Electric Utilities 107,852,560 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,328,179 20 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 385 4 Nitrogen Oxide 120 4 Carbon Dioxide 116,283 5 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 6.8 4 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 12 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,048 4 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 11 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 8

257

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

258

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

259

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

260

Reaction mechanisms for weakly-bound, stable nuclei and unstable, halo nuclei on medium-mass targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental overview of reactions induced by the stable, but weakly-bound nuclei 6Li, 7Li and 9Be, and by the exotic, halo nuclei 6He, 8B, 11Be and 17F on medium-mass targets, such as 58Ni, 59Co or 64Zn, is presented. Existing data on elastic scattering, total reaction cross sections, fusion processes, breakup and transfer channels are discussed in the framework of a CDCC approach taking into account the breakup degree of freedom.

Beck, C; Papka, P; Courtin, S; Souza, F A; Carlin, N; Neto, R Liguori; De Moura, M M; del Santo, M G; Suaide, A A I; Munhoz, M G; Szanto, E M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Keeley, N; Díaz-Torres, A; Hagino, K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Fermilab | Women's History Month - Profiles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Profiles The profiles on this page present a cross section of women from the Fermilab community. Fermilab hopes that profiles of these women will inspire young women everywhere to...

262

Ground State Magnetic Moments of Mirror Nuclei Studied at NSCL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Progress in the measurement of the ground state magnetic moments of mirror nuclei at NSCL is presented. The systematic trend of the spin expectation value $$ and the linear behavior of $\\gamma_p$ versus $\\gamma_n$, both extracted from the magnetic moments of mirror partners, are updated to include all available data.

P. F. Mantica; K. Minamisono

2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

263

Pairing: from atomic nuclei to neutron-star crusts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear pairing is studied both in atomic nuclei and in neutron-star crusts in the unified framework of the energy-density functional theory using generalized Skyrme functionals complemented with a local pairing functional obtained from many-body calculations in homogeneous nuclear matter using realistic forces.

Chamel, N; Goriely, S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Band structure of doubly-odd nuclei around mass 130  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear structure of the doublet bands in the doubly-odd nuclei with mass A{approx}130 is studied in terms of a pair-truncated shell model. The model reproduces quite well the energy levels of the doublet bands and the electromagnetic transitions. The analysis of the electromagnetic transitions reveals new band structure of the doublet bands.

Higashiyama, Koji [Department of Physics, Chiba Institute of Technology, Narashino, Chiba 275-0023 (Japan); Yoshinaga, Naotaka [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama City 338-8570 (Japan)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

265

Electric dipole moments of light nuclei from {chi}EFT  

SciTech Connect

I present recent calculations of EDMs of light nuclei using chiral effective field theory techniques. At leading-order, we argue that they can be expressed in terms of six CP-violating low-energy constants. With our expressions, eventual non-zero measurements of EDMs of deuteron, helion, and triton can be combined to disentangle the different sources of CP-violation.

Higa, Renato [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05314-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

266

An Indirect Effect of Ice Nuclei on Atmospheric Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) with observed large-scale forcing is used to study how ice nuclei (IN) affect the net radiative flux at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). In all the numerical experiments carried out, the cloud ice ...

Xiping Zeng; Wei-Kuo Tao; Minghua Zhang; Arthur Y. Hou; Shaocheng Xie; Stephen Lang; Xiaowen Li; David O’C. Starr; Xiaofan Li; Joanne Simpson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Electroweak structure of light nuclei within chiral effective field theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the results of the most recent calculations for the electromagnetic structure of light nuclei, the weak muon capture on deuteron and 3He and the weak proton-proton capture reaction at energies of astrophysical interest, performed within the chiral effective field theory framework.

L. E. Marcucci

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

268

Cluster models for dripline halo nuclei: Achievements and puzzles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern Few-Body methods to investigate Borromean two-neutron halo nuclei discussed together with recent experiments. Progress in 6 He and 11 Li studies is analyzed. Some new problems created by large neutron excess and halo phenomenon are under consideration.

B. V. Danilin; I. J. Thompson; M. V. Zhukov; J. S. Vaagen; RNBT (Russian-Nordic-British Theory) Collaboration

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

2001 Exhibition: Event Profile - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2001 Exhibition: Event Profile ... Event Profile ... in transportation and other growing markets require the material to be designed for load bearing applications.

270

Energy Density Functional for Nuclei and Neutron Stars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background: Recent observational data on neutron star masses and radii provide stringent constraints on the equation of state of neutron rich matter [ Annu. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci. 62 485 (2012)]. Purpose: We aim to develop a nuclear energy density functional that can be simultaneously applied to finite nuclei and neutron stars. Methods: We use the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory (DFT) with Skyrme energy density functionals and covariance analysis to assess correlations between observables for finite nuclei and neutron stars. In a first step two energy functionals a high density energy functional giving reasonable neutron properties, and a low density functional fitted to nuclear properties are matched. In a second step, we optimize a new functional using exactly the same protocol as in earlier studies pertaining to nuclei but now including neutron star data. This allows direct comparisons of performance of the new functional relative to the standard one. Results: The new functional TOV-min yields results for nuclear bulk properties (energy, rms radius, diffraction radius, and surface thickness) that are of the same quality as those obtained with the established Skyrme functionals, including SV-min. When comparing SV-min and TOV-min, isoscalar nuclear matter indicators vary slightly while isovector properties are changed considerably. We discuss neutron skins, dipole polarizability, separation energies of the heaviest elements, and proton and neutron drip lines. We confirm a correlation between the neutron skin of 208Pb and the neutron star radius. Conclusions: We demonstrate that standard energy density functionals optimized to nuclear data do not carry information on the expected maximum neutron star mass, and that predictions can only be made within an extremely broad uncertainty band. For atomic nuclei, the new functional TOV-min performs at least as well as the standard nuclear functionals, but it also reproduces expected neutron star data within assumed error bands. This functional is expected to yield more reliable predictions in the region of very neutron rich heavy nuclei.

Erler, J. [UTK/ORNL/German Cancer Research Center-Heidelberg; Horowitz, C. J. [UTK/ORNL/Indiana University; Nazarewicz, Witold [UTK/ORNL/University of Warsaw; Rafalski, M. [UTK/ORNL; Reinhard, P.-G. [Universitat Erlangen, Germany

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Measurements of Cloud Nuclei in the Effluents from Launches of Liquid- and Solid-Fueled Rockets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne measurements of cloud nuclei [cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN)] were made in the stabilized ground clouds resulting from the launches of a liquid-fueled ATLAS/Centaur rocket and a solid-fueled TITAN III rocket. ...

Edward E. Hindman; Lawrence F. Radke; Mark W. Eltgroth

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

An evolutionary Michigan recurrent fuzzy system for nuclei classification in cytological images using nuclear chromatin distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: The objective of this research is to carry out the classification of cellular nuclei in cytological pleural fluid images. The article focuses on the feature extraction and classification processes. The extracted feature is a spatial measurement ... Keywords: Cytological images, Genetic algorithm, Nuclei chromatin distribution, Nuclei classification, Pattern recognition, ROC analysis, Recurrent fuzzy system

S. Alayón; J. I. Estévez; J. Sigut; J. L. Sánchez; P. Toledo

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Performance profiles style sheet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2009 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2009 vii Major Findings This edition of Performance Profiles reviews financial and operating data for the calendar year 2009 and discusses important trends and emerging issues relevant to U.S. energy company operations. Major U.S.-based oil and natural gas producers and petroleum refiners submit the data in this report annually on Form EIA-28, the Financial Reporting System (FRS). FRS companies' net income declined to the lowest level since 2002.  Net income fell 66 percent (in constant 2009 dollars) to $30 billion in 2009 from $88 billion in 2008. Substantial reductions in oil and natural gas prices in 2009 slowed revenue growth. FRS companies cut operating costs but by less than the decline in revenue, resulting in a 69-percent drop in operating income.

274

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Nuclear Profiles 2010 State Nuclear Profiles 2010 April 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Nuclear Profiles 2010 i Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity,

275

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

276

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

277

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 63,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

278

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 128,698 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

279

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

280

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409 1.2 Total 8,284 100.0 33,350 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,942 14.2 659 1.5 Natural Gas 6,063 44.3 25,582 59.8 Other 1 3 * 771 1.8 Other Renewable1 304 2.2 1,274 3.0 Petroleum 3,031 22.1 296 0.7 Total 13,697 100.0 42,805 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

282

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

283

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

284

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

285

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

286

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

287

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

288

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

289

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (nw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand nwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,142 8.0 18,639 18.1 Coal 3,417 12.8 23,924 23.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 192 0.7 1,109 1.1 Natural Gas 19,574 73.2 51,344 49.9 Other 1 213 0.8 2,120 2.1 Other Renewable1 325 1.2 2,468 2.4 Petroleum 881 3.3 3,281 3.2 Total 26,744 100.0 102,885 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

290

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110 0.1 Total 44,127 100.0 201,352 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

291

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

292

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 144 1.0 948 1.6 Natural Gas 2,299 15.8 1,312 2.3 Other Renewable1 3,584 24.6 9,360 16.3 Petroleum 1,007 6.9 154 .0.3 Total 14,592 100.0 57,509 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

293

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

294

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

295

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

296

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

297

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

298

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

299

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

300

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,134 6.5 15,805 11.0 Coal 21,360 64.6 117,828 82.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 101 0.3 429 0.3 Natural Gas 8,203 24.8 7,128 5.0 Other 1 123 0.4 266 0.2 Other Renewable1 130 0.4 700 0.5 Petroleum 1,019 3.1 1,442 1.0 Total 33,071 100.0 143,598 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

302

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

303

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

304

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

305

Towards user psychological profile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recents studies have demonstrated how useful and fundamental psychological aspects such as people Personality Traits and Emotions are during human decision-making process. Some research towards the identification and model of user's Emotions have been ... Keywords: personality traits, recommendation, reputation, user psychological profile

Maria Augusta S. N. Nunes; Stefano A. Cerri; Nathalie Blanc

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

307

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0 72 0.3 Total 4,180 100.0 22,196 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

308

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

309

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0 72 0.3 Total 4,180 100.0 22,196 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

310

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 128,698 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

311

Simple beam profile monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B. [ASD Inc. Garden Bay, BC (Canada); Best Theratronics Ltd Ottawa Ontario (Canada); PharmaSpect Ltd., Burnaby BC (Canada)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

312

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

313

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

314

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 63,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

315

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

316

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409 1.2 Total 8,284 100.0 33,350 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

317

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile New York total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 13,583 9.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 5,714 14.5 24,942 18.2 Natural Gas 17,407 44.2 48,916 35.7 Other 1 45 0.1 832 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,719 4.4 4,815 3.5 Petroleum 6,421 16.3 2,005 1.5 Total 39,357 100.0 136,962 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

318

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

319

Mixed-Spin Pairing Condensates in Heavy Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations for nuclear ground-state wave functions support solutions in which the condensate has a mixture of spin-singlet and spin-triplet pairing. We find that such mixed-spin condensates do not occur when there are equal numbers of neutrons and protons, but only when there is an isospin imbalance. Using a phenomenological Hamiltonian, we predict that such nuclei may occur in the physical region within the proton dripline. We also solve the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations with variable constraints on the spin-singlet and spin-triplet pairing amplitudes. For nuclei that exhibit this new pairing behavior, the resulting energy surface can be rather soft, suggesting that there may be low-lying excitations associated with the spin mixing.

Gezerlis, Alexandros; Luo, Y. L. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States); Bertsch, G. F. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States); Institute for Nuclear Theory, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States)

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

320

Interacting boson models for N{approx}Z nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This contribution discusses the use of boson models in the description of N{approx}Z nuclei. A brief review is given of earlier attempts, initiated by Elliott and co-workers, to extend the interacting boson model of Arima and Iachello by the inclusion of neutron-proton s and d bosons with T = 1 (IBM-3) as well as T = 0 (IBM-4). It is argued that for the N{approx}Z nuclei that are currently studied experimentally, a different approach is needed which invokes aligned neutron-proton pairs with angular momentum J = 2j and isospin T = 0. This claim is supported by an analysis of shell-model wave functions in terms of pair states. Results of this alternative version of the interacting boson model are compared with shell-model calculations in the 1g{sub 9/2} shell.

Van Isacker, P. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3 BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Exactly Solvable Model for the Decay of Superdeformed Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The history and importance of superdeformation in nuclei is briefly discussed. A simple two-level model is then employed to obtain an elegant expression for the branching ratio for the decay via the E1 process in the normal-deformed band of superdeformed nuclei. From this expression, the spreading width Gamma^downarrow for superdeformed decay is found to be determined completely by experimentally known quantities. The accuracy of the two-level approximation is verified by considering the effects of other normal-deformed states. Furthermore, by using a statistical model of the energy levels in the normal-deformed well, we can obtain a probabilistic expression for the tunneling matrix element V.

B. R. Barrett; D. M. Cardamone; C. A. Stafford

2005-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

322

Present Status of the Theory of Fission of hot Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent progress in the theory of fission of hot nuclei is reported. We discuss in particular the properties of the friction form factor as function of the deformation (and possibly of the temperature) which are necessary to reproduce data concerning fission of hot nuclei and its accompanying light particle and ?-ray emission. Recent theoretical work gives support to a phenomenological friction form factor (proposed some time ago 1)), which is weak for compact shapes and increases on the way to scission. Fission is one of the main decay channels after fusion of two heavy ions. The following discussion is restricted mainly to systems for which Bohr’s hypothesis is valid, which states that the formation and decay of the compound nucleus are independent processes, i. e. fission starts only after a completely equilibrated compound

Peter Fröbrich

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Rescattering effects in proton interaction with light neutron rich nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the framework of the Glauber diffraction theory, the differential cross sections of the elastic p6He, p8Li, and p9Li scattering were calculated at intermediate energies from 70 to 1000 MeV/nucleon. The use of realistic three-body wave functions alpha-n-n (6He), alpha-t-n (8Li) and alpha-t-2n (9Li), obtained in the framework of modern clear models, and the expansion of the Glauber operator into a series of multiple scatterings in a form that is well adapted to the three-body nuclei configuration, allows the calculation of the matrix elements, by taking into account the rescattering from all structure components of the designated nuclei.

E. T. Ibraeva; A. V. Dzhazairov-Kahramanov; O. Imambekov

2013-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

324

Do halos exist on the dripline of deformed nuclei?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the effect of deformation and pairing on the development of halo nuclei is presented. Exploratory three-body $core+n+n$ calculations show that both the NN interaction and the deformation/excitation of the core hinder the formation of the halo. Preliminary self-consistent mean-field calculations are used to search for regions in the nuclear chart where halos could potentially develop. These are also briefly discussed.

Nunes, F M; Duguet, T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Density dependence of symmetry free energy of hot nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The density and excitation energy dependence of symmetry energy and symmetry free energy for finite nuclei are calculated microscopically in a microcanonical framework taking into account thermal and expansion effects. A finite-range momentum and density dependent two-body effective interaction is employed for this purpose. The role of mass, isospin and equation of state (EoS) on these quantities is also investigated; our calculated results are in consonance with the available experimental data.

S. K. Samaddar; J. N. De; X. Vinas; M. Centelles

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Nuclear forces and ab initio calculations of atomic nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear forces and the nuclear many-body problem have been some of Gerry Brown's main topics in his so productive life as a theoretical physicist. In this talk, I outline how Gerry's work laid the foundations of the modern theory of nuclear forces and ab initio calculations of atomic nuclei. I also present some recent developments obtained in the framework of nuclear lattice simulations.

Meißner, Ulf-G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Chiral Sigma Model with Pion Mean Field in Finite Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The properties of infinite matter and finite nuclei are studied by using the chiral sigma model in the framework of the relativistic mean field theory. We reconstruct an extended chiral sigma model in which the omega meson mass is generated dynamically by the sigma condensation in the vacuum in the same way as the nucleon mass. All the parameters of chiral sigma model are essentially fixed from the hadron properties in the free space. In nuclear matter, the saturation property comes out right, but the incompressibility is too large and the scalar and vector potentials are about a half of the phenomenological ones, respectively. This fact is reflected to the properties of finite nuclei. We calculate N = Z even-even mass nuclei between N = 16 and N = 34. The extended chiral sigma model without the pion mean field leads to the result that the magic number appears at N = 18 instead of N = 20 and the magic number does not appear at N = 28 due to the above mentioned nuclear matter properties. The latter problem, however, could be removed by the introduction of the finite pion mean field with the appearance of the magic number at N = 28. We find that the energy differences between the spin-orbit partners are reproduced by the finite pion mean field which is completely a different mechanism from the standard spin-orbit interaction.

Y. Ogawa; H. Toki; S. Tamenaga; H. Shen; A. Hosaka; S. Sugimoto; K. Ikeda

2003-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

328

Temperature-Dependent Fission Barriers of Superheavy Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dependence of fission barriers on the excitation energy of the compound nucleus impacts the survival probability of superheavy nuclei synthesized in heavy-ion fusion reactions. We study the temperature-dependent fission barriers by means of the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory. The equivalence of isothermal and isentropic descriptions is demonstrated. The effect of the particle gas is found to be negligible in the range of temperatures studied. Calculations have been carried out for $^{264}$Fm, $^{272}$Ds, $^{278}$112, $^{292}$114, and $^{312}$124. For nuclei around $^{278}$112 produced in "cold fusion" reactions, we predict a more rapid decrease of fission barriers with temperature as compared to the nuclei around $^{292}$114 synthesized in "hot fusion" experiments. This is explained in terms of the difference between the ground-state and fission-barrier temperatures. Our calculations are consistent with the long survival probabilities of the superheavy elements produced in Dubna with th...

Pei, J C; Sheikh-Javid, A; Kerman, A K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Baldrige Award Recipients' Contacts and Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Pewaukee School District contacts, profile, award application summary ... application summary, Montgomery County Public Schools contacts, profile ...

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

330

Baldrige Award Recipients' Contacts and Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Small Business. Granite Rock Company contacts, profile. 1991. Small Business. Manufacturing. Marlow Industries, Inc. contacts, profile. ...

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

331

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

332

Performance profiles style sheet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

06) 06) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2006 December 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2006 is prepared by the Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division, Financial

333

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

334

Chemical profiles of switchgrass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

profiles profiles of switchgrass Zhoujian Hu a,b , Robert Sykes a,c , Mark F. Davis a,c , E. Charles Brummer a,d , Arthur J. Ragauskas a,b,e, * a BioEnergy Science Center, USA b School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA c National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, CO 80401, USA d Institute for Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Genomics, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA e Forest Products and Chemical Engineering Department, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 15 April 2009 Received in revised form 10 December 2009 Accepted 10 December 2009 Available online 13 January 2010 Keywords: Switchgrass Morphological components Chemical

335

Profile-Based Adaption . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

‘Cache decay ’ is a set of leakage-reduction mechanisms that put cache lines that have not been accessed for a specific duration into a low-leakage standby mode. This duration is called the decay interval, and its optimal value varies across applications. This paper provides an extended discussion of the results previously presented in our journal paper [13]. It describes an adaptation technique that analytically finds the optimal decay interval through profiling, and shows that the most important variables required for finding the optimal decay interval can be estimated with a reasonable degree of accuracy using profiling. This work explicitly trades off the leakage power saved in putting both the ‘live ’ and ‘dead ’ lines into standby mode, against its performance and energy costs. It achieves energy savings close to what can be obtained with an omniscient choice of per-benchmark optimal decay interval.

Karthik Sankaranarayanan; Kevin Skadron

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Temperature profile detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Temperature profiles at elevated temperature conditions are monitored by use of an elongated device having two conductors spaced by the minimum distance required to normally maintain an open circuit between them. The melting point of one conductor is selected at the elevated temperature being detected, while the melting point of the other is higher. As the preselected temperature is reached, liquid metal will flow between the conductors, creating short circuits which are detectable as to location.

Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Temperature-profile detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Temperature profiles at elevated temperature conditions are monitored by use of an elongated device having two conductors spaced by the minimum distance required to normally maintain an open circuit between them. The melting point of one conductor is selected at the elevated temperature being detected, while the melting point of the other is higher. As the preselected temperature is reached, liquid metal will flow between the conductors creating short circuits which are detectable as to location.

Not Available

1981-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

338

Surface profiling interferometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The design of a long-trace surface profiler for the non-contact measurement of surface profile, slope error and curvature on cylindrical synchrotron radiation (SR) mirrors. The optical system is based upon the concept of a pencil-beam interferometer with an inherent large depth-of-field. The key feature of the optical system is the zero-path-difference beam splitter, which separates the laser beam into two colinear, variable-separation probe beams. A linear array detector is used to record the interference fringe in the image, and analysis of the fringe location as a function of scan position allows one to reconstruct the surface profile. The optical head is mounted on an air bearing slide with the capability to measure long aspheric optics, typical of those encountered in SR applications. A novel feature of the optical system is the use of a transverse "outrigger" beam which provides information on the relative alignment of the scan axis to the cylinder optic symmetry axis.

Takacs, Peter Z. (P.O. Box 385, Upton, NY 11973); Qian, Shi-Nan (Hefei Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and, Hefei, Anhui, CN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Exposure of Nuclear Track Emulsion to a Mixed Beam of Relativistic $^{12}$N, $^{10}$C, and $^7$Be Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A nuclear track emulsion was exposed to a mixed beam of relativistic $^{12}$N, $^{10}$C, and $^7$Be nuclei having a momentum of 2 GeV/$c$ per nucleon. The beam was formed upon charge exchange processes involving $^{12}$C primary nuclei and their fragmentation. An analysis indicates that $^{10}$C nuclei are dominant in the beam and that $^{12}$N nuclei are present in it. The charge topology of relativistic fragments in the coherent dissociation of these nuclei is presented.

R. R. Kattabekov; K. Z. Mamatkulov; D. A. Artemenkov; V. Bradnova; D. M. Zhomurodov; M. Haiduc; S. P. Kharlamov; V. N. Kondratieva; D. O. Krivenkov; A. I. Malakhov; G. I. Orlova; N. G. Peresadko; Z. A. Igamkulov; N. G. Polukhina; P. A. Rukoyatkin; V. V. Rusakova; R. Stanoeva; S. Vokal; P. I. Zarubin; I. G. Zarubina

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

340

Dynamics of Line-Driven Disk Winds in Active Galactic Nuclei II: Effects of Disk Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore consequences of a radiation driven disk wind model for mass outflows from active galactic nuclei (AGN). We performed axisymmetric time-dependent hydrodynamic calculations using the same computational technique as Proga, Stone and Kallman (2000). We test the robustness of radiation launching and acceleration of the wind for relatively unfavorable conditions. In particular, we take into account the central engine radiation as a source of ionizing photons but neglect its contribution to the radiation force. Additionally, we account for the attenuation of the X-ray radiation by computing the X-ray optical depth in the radial direction assuming that only electron scattering contributes to the opacity. Our new simulations confirm the main result from our previous work: the disk atmosphere can 'shield' itself from external X-rays so that the local disk radiation can launch gas off the disk photosphere. We also find that the local disk force suffices to accelerate the disk wind to high velocities in the radial direction. This is true provided the wind does not change significantly the geometry of the disk radiation by continuum scattering and absorption processes; we discuss plausibility of this requirement. Synthetic profiles of a typical resonance ultraviolet line predicted by our models are consistent with observations of broad absorption line (BAL) QSOs.

D. Proga; T. R. Kallman

2004-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Load Scheduling with Profile Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the past five years, many manufactures have added hardware performance counters to their microprocessors to generate profile data cheaply.

Gotz Lindenmaier Kathryn; Kathryn S. M C Kinley; Olivier Temam

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Optimally profiling and tracing programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes algorithms for inserting monitoring code to profile and trace programs. These algorithms greatly reduce the cost of measuring programs with respect to the commonly used technique of placing code in each basic block. Program profiling ... Keywords: control-flow graph, instruction tracing, instrumentation, profiling

Thomas Ball; James R. Larus

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Negative heat capacities and first order phase transitions in nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anomalous negative heat capacities have been claimed as indicators of first order phase transitions in finite systems in general, and fornuclear systems in particular. A thermodynamic approach allowing for all Q value terms is used to evaluate heat capacities in finitevan der Waals fluids and finite lattice systems in the coexistence region. Fictitious large effects and negative heat capacities are observed in lattice systems when periodic boundary conditions are introduced. Small anomalous effects are predicted for small drops and for finite lattice systems. A straightforward application of the analysis to nuclei shows that negative heat capacities cannot be observed for A>60.

L. G. Moretto; J. B. Elliott; L. Phair; G. J. Wozniak

2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

344

Excitation energy dependence of symmetry energy of finite nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A finite range density and momentum dependent effective interaction is used to calculate the density and temperature dependence of the symmetry energy coefficient Csym(rho,T) of infinite nuclear matter. This symmetry energy is then used in the local density approximation to evaluate the excitation energy dependence of the symmetry energy coefficient of finite nuclei in a microcanonical formulation that accounts for thermal and expansion effects. The results are in good harmony with the recently reported experimental data from energetic nucleus-nucleus collisions.

S. K. Samaddar; J. N. De; X. Vinas; M. Centelles

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

345

Liquid-gas phase transition in finite nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a finite temperature Thomas-Fermi framework, we calculate density distributions of hot nuclei enclosed in a freeze-out volume of few times the normal nuclear volume and then construct the caloric curve, with and without inclusion of radial collective flow. In both cases, the calculated specific heats $C_v$ show a peaked structure signalling a liquid-gas phase transition. Without flow, the caloric curve indicates a continuous phase transition whereas with inclusion of flow, the transition is very sharp. In the latter case, the nucleus undergoes a shape change to a bubble from a diffuse sphere at the transition temperature.

J. N. De; S. K. Samaddar; S. Shlomo

1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

346

How to Measure the Spreading Width of Superdeformed Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new expression for the branching ratio for the decay via the E1 process in the normal-deformed band of superdeformed nuclei is given within a simple two-level model. Using this expression, the spreading or tunneling width {gamma}{down_arrow} for superdeformed decay can be expressed entirely in terms of experimentally known quantities. We show how to determine the tunneling matrix element V from the measured value of {gamma}{down_arrow} and a statistical model of the energy levels.

Cardamone, D.M.; Stafford, C.A.; Barrett, B.R. [Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2004-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

347

Semi-inclusive inelastic electron scattering from nuclei  

SciTech Connect

A survey is presented of the physics of the electroproduction of hadrons from nuclear targets, eA ..-->.. e'hX. Variables and structure functions are specified. The parton model description of electroproduction is summarized; fragmentation functions are defined and their properties are listed. Specific measurements are suggested. Predictions of the pion exchange model are presented for the nuclear dependence of eA ..-->.. e'hX, including a discussion of the special subprocess e..pi.. ..-->.. e'..pi.. in which scattering occurs from the pion constituents of nuclei.

Berger, E.L.

1987-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Thermalization in collisions of large nuclei at high energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrodynamical analysis of experimental data of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions seems to indicate that the hot QCD matter created in the collisions thermalizes very quickly. Theoretically, we have no idea why this should be true. In this proceeding, I will describe how the thermalization takes place in the most theoretically clean limit -- that of large nuclei at asymptotically high energy per nucleon, where the system is described by weak-coupling QCD. In this limit, plasma instabilities dominate the dynamics from immediately after the collision until well after the plasma becomes nearly in equilibrium at time t \\alpha^(-5/2)Q^(-1).

Kurkela, Aleksi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Suppressed fusion cross section for neutron halo nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion reactions of neutron-halo nuclei are investigated theoretically with a three-body model. The time-dependent wave-packet method is used to solve the three-body Schrodinger equation. The halo neutron behaves as a spectator during the Coulomb dissociation process of the projectile. The fusion cross sections of 11Be-209Bi and 6He-238U are calculated and are compared with measurements. Our calculation indicates that the fusion cross section is slightly hindered by the presence of weakly bound neutrons.

Makoto Ito; Kazuhiro Yabana; Takashi Nakatsukasa; Manabu Ueda

2005-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

350

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia profile Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

351

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas profile Texas profile Texas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6 1,262 0.3 Natural Gas 69,291 64.0 186,882 45.4 Other 1 477 0.4 3,630 0.9 Other Renewable1 10,295 9.5 27,705 6.7 Petroleum 204 0.2 708 0.2 Total 108,258 100.0 411,695 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

352

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont profile Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind.

353

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont profile Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind.

354

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee profile Tennessee profile Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,277 20.0 7,416 9.0 Natural Gas 4,655 21.7 2,302 2.8 Other 1 - - 16 * Other Renewable1 222 1.0 988 1.2 Petroleum 58 0.3 217 0.3 Total 21,417 100.0 82,349 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

355

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia profile Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

356

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

South Carolina profile South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982 100.0 104,153 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported.

357

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington profile Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

358

Deflagration Wave Profiles  

SciTech Connect

Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

359

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin profile Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

360

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington profile Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina profile South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982 100.0 104,153 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported.

362

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin profile Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

363

Delayed-fission properties of neutron-deficient americium nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristics of the delayed-fission decay mode in light americium nuclei have been investigated. Measurements on the unknown isotopes {sup 230}Am and {sup 236}Am were attempted, and upper limits on the delayed-fission branches of these nuclei were determined. Evidence of the existence of {sup 236}Am was observed in radiochemical separations. Total kinetic energy and mass-yield distributions of the electron-capture delayed-fission mode were measured for {sup 232}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 1.31 {plus minus} 0.04 min) and for {sup 234}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 2.32 {plus minus} 0.08 min), and delayed-fission probabilities of 6.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} and 6.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}, respectively, were determined. The total kinetic energy and the asymmetric mass-yield distributions are typical of fission of mid-range actinides. No discernible influence of the anomalous triple-peaked mass division characteristic of the thorium-radium region was detected. Measurements of the time correlation between the electron-capture x-rays and the subsequent fission conform that the observed fissions arise from the electron-capture delayed-fission mechanism. Delayed fission has provided a unique opportunity to extend the range of low-energy fission studies to previously inaccessible regions. 71 refs., 44 figs., 13 tabs.

Hall, H.L. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

1989-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

364

Proton-induced fission of heavy nuclei at intermediate energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The intermediate energy proton-induced fission of 241Am, 238$U and 237$Np is studied. The inelastic interactions of protons and heavy nuclei are described by a CRISP model, in which the reaction proceeds in two steps. The first one corresponds fast cascade, where a series of individual particle-particle collisions occurs within the nucleus. It leaves a highly excited cascade residual nucleus, assumed to be in thermal equilibrium. Subsequently, in the second step the excited nucleus releases its energy by evaporation of neutrons and light charged particles as well. Both the symmetric and asymmetric fission are regarded, and the fission probabilities are obtained from CRISP code calculations, by means of statistical weighting factors. The fission cross sections, the fissility of the fissioning nuclei, and the number of nucleons lost by the target - before and after fission - are calculated and compared to experiments for 660 MeV protons incident on 241Am, 238$U and 237$Np. Some of the model predictions are in full compliance to the experiments. We conclude that our two step model provides a reasonable description of the medium energy proton-induced fission.

A. Deppman; E. Andrade-II; V. Guimaraes; G. S. Karapetyan; A. R. Balabekyan; N. A. Demekhina

2013-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

365

Ice Nuclei in Marine Air: Biogenic Particles or Dust?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice nuclei impact clouds, but their sources and distribution in the atmosphere are still not well known. Particularly little attention has been paid to IN sources in marine environments, although evidence from field studies suggests that IN populations in remote marine regions may be dominated by primary biogenic particles associated with sea spray. In this exploratory model study, we aim to bring attention to this long-neglected topic and identify promising target regions for future field campaigns. We assess the likely global distribution of marine biogenic ice nuclei using a combination of historical observations, satellite data and model output. By comparing simulated marine biogenic immersion IN distributions and dust immersion IN distributions, we predict strong regional differences in the importance of marine biogenic IN relative to dust IN. Our analysis suggests that marine biogenic IN are most likely to play a dominant role in determining IN concentrations in near-surface-air over the Southern Ocean, so future field campaigns aimed at investigating marine biogenic IN should target that region. Climate related changes in the abundance and emission of biogenic marine IN could affect marine cloud properties, thereby introducing previously unconsidered feedbacks that influence the hydrological cycle and the Earth’s energy balance. Furthermore, marine biogenic IN may be an important aspect to consider in proposals for marine cloud brightening by artificial sea spray production.

Burrows, Susannah M.; Hoose, C.; Poschl, U.; Lawrence, M.

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

366

Deactivation of ice nuclei due to atmospherically relevant surface coatings  

SciTech Connect

The ice nucleation characteristics of Arizona Test Dust (ATD) and illite clay, surrogates for atmospheric ice nuclei, have been determined at the Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber located at the Research Center Karlsruhe in Germany. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of sulphuric acid and ammonium sulphate coatings on the ability of these mineral dust surrogates to nucleate ice in an environment where particles realistically compete for water vapor. Coated ATD particles required higher saturations at all investigated temperatures, from -20 to -45º C, than did identical uncoated particles. Freezing of coated particles often required saturations approaching those for the homogeneous freezing of aqueous solutions of the coating material alone. Less pronounced effects were found for illite although the presence of a coating consistently increased the saturation or decreased the temperature required for ice formation. Analysis of ice residue at the single particle level suggests that the first coated particles to freeze had thinner or incomplete coatings when compared to particles that froze later in the expansion. This observation highlights a need to verify coating properties since an assumption of homogeneity of a group of coated aerosol may be incorrect. The increase in saturation ratio for freezing suggests that gas-phase uptake of sulphates, a large fraction of which are due to anthropogenic emissions, will reduce the ice and mixed-phase cloud formation potential of atmospheric ice nuclei.

Cziczo, Daniel J.; Froyd, Karl D.; Gallavardin, S. J.; Moehler, Ottmar; Benz, Stefan; Saathoff, Harald; Murphy, Daniel M.

2009-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

367

The cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei effects on tropical anvil characteristics and water vapor of the tropical tropopause layer  

SciTech Connect

Cloud anvils from deep convective clouds are of great importance to the radiative energy budget and the aerosol impact on them is the least understood. Few studies examined the effects of both cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) on anvil properties and water vapor content (WVC) in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). Using a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model with size-resolved cloud microphysics, we focus on the CCN and IN effects on cloud anvil properties and WVC in the TTL. We find that cloud microphysical changes induced by CCN/IN play a very important role in determining cloud anvil area and WVC in the TTL, whether convection is enhanced or suppressed. Also, CCN effects on anvil microphysical properties, anvil size and lifetime are much more evident relative to IN. IN has little effect on convection, but can increase ice number and mass concentrations significantly under humid conditions. CCN in the PBL is found to have greater effects on convective strength and mid-tropospheric CCN has negligible effects on convection and cloud properties. Convective transport may only moisten the main convective outflow region but the cloud anvil size determines the WVC in the TTL domain. This study shows an important role of CCN in the lower-troposphere in modifying convection, the upper-level cloud properties. It also shows the effects of IN and the PBL CCN on the upper-level clouds depends on the humidity, resolving some contradictory results in past studies. 2

Fan, Jiwen; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

368

Top Value Added Chemicals from Biomass: Volume I -- Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report identifies twelve building block chemicals that can be produced from sugars via biological or chemical conversions. The twelve building blocks can be subsequently converted to a number of high-value bio-based chemicals or materials. Building block chemicals, as considered for this analysis, are molecules with multiple functional groups that possess the potential to be transformed into new families of useful molecules. The twelve sugar-based building blocks are 1,4-diacids (succinic, fumaric and malic), 2,5-furan dicarboxylic acid, 3-hydroxy propionic acid, aspartic acid, glucaric acid, glutamic acid, itaconic acid, levulinic acid, 3-hydroxybutyrolactone, glycerol, sorbitol, and xylitol/arabinitol.

Werpy, T.; Petersen, G.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Task 4.9 -- Value-added products from syngas. Semi-annual report, July 1--December 31, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work on advanced fuel forms in 1996 focused on the synthesis of higher alcohols from mixtures of hydrogen and carbon dioxide (syngas) from coal gasification. Initial work in this project utilized a novel molybdenum sulfide catalyst previously shown to be active for hydrodesulfurization reactions of coal liquids. A pressurized fixed-bed flow-through reactor was constructed, and the MoS{sub 2} catalysts were tested with syngas under a variety of conditions. Unfortunately, the catalysts, even with higher molybdenum loading and addition of promoters, failed to give alcohol products. A batch reactor test of the catalyst was also conducted, but did not produce alcohol products. Group VIII metals have been used previously in catalysts for syngas reactions. Ruthenium and rhodium catalysts were prepared by impregnation of a hydrotalcite support. Tests with these catalysts in flow-through reactors also did not produce the desired alcohol products. The formation of higher alcohols from smaller ones, such as methanol and ethanol, could be commercially important if high selectivity could be achieved. The methanol and ethanol would be derived from syngas and fermentation, respectively. Based on previous work in other laboratories, it was hypothesized that the hydrotalcite-supported MoS{sub 2} or Ru or Rh catalysts could catalyze the formation of butyl alcohols. Although the desired 1-butanol was obtained in batch reactions with the promoted ruthenium catalyst, the reaction was not as selective as desired. Product suitable for a lower-vapor-pressure gasoline oxygenate additive was obtained, but it may not be economical to market such products in competition with methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE). Flow-through catalytic bed reactions were not successful.

Olson, E.S.; Sharma, R.K.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Production of coal-based fuels and value-added products: coal to liquids using petroleum refinery streams  

SciTech Connect

We are studying several processes that utilize coal, coal-derived materials, or biomass in existing refining facilities. A major emphasis is the production of a coal-based replacement for JP-8 jet fuel. This fuel is very similar to Jet A and jet A-1 in commercial variation, so this work has significant carry-over into the private sector. We have been focusing on three processes that would be retrofitted into a refinery: (1) coal tar/refinery stream blending and hydro-treatment; (2) coal extraction using refinery streams followed by hydro-treatment; and (3) co-coking of coal blended with refinery streams. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Clifford, C.E.B.; Schobert, H.H. [Pennsylvania State University, PA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Membrane-Based Energy Efficient Dewatering of Microalgae in Biofuels Production and Recovery of Value Added Co-Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to describe the use of membranes for energy efficient biomass harvesting and dewatering. We have evaluated the dewatering of Nannochloropsis sp. with polymeric hollow fiber and tubular inorganic membranes to demonstrate the capabilities of a membrane-based system to achieve microalgal biomass of >150 g/L (dry wt.) and ~99% volume reduction through dewatering. The particle free filtrate containing the growth media is suitable for recycle and reuse. For cost-effective processing, hollow fiber membranes can be utilized to recover 90-95% media for recycle. Tubular membranes can provide additional media and water recovery to achieve target final concentrations. Based on the operating conditions used in this study and taking into scale-up considerations, it can be shown that an integrated hollow fiber-tubular membrane system can process microalgal biomass with at least 80% lower energy requirement compared to traditional processes. Backpulsing was found to be an effective flux maintenance strategy to minimize flux decline at high biomass concentration. An effective chemical cleaning protocol was developed for regeneration of fouled membranes.

Bhave, Ramesh R [ORNL; Kuritz, Tanya [ORNL; Powell, Lawrence E [ORNL; Adcock, Kenneth Dale [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Top Value Added Chemicals From Biomass: I. Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report identifies twelve building block chemicals that can be produced from sugars via biological or chemical conversions. The twelve building blocks can be subsequently converted to a number of high-value bio-based chemicals or materials. Building block chemicals, as considered for this analysis, are molecules with multiple functional groups that possess the potential to be transformed into new families of useful molecules. The twelve sugar-based building blocks are 1,4-diacids (succinic, fumaric and malic), 2,5-furan dicarboxylic acid, 3-hydroxy propionic acid, aspartic acid, glucaric acid, glutamic acid, itaconic acid, levulinic acid, 3-hydroxybutyrolactone, glycerol, sorbitol, and xylitol/arabinitol. In addition to building blocks, the report outlines the central technical barriers that are preventing the widespread use of biomass for products and chemicals.

Werpy, Todd A.; Holladay, John E.; White, James F.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Top Value-Added Chemicals from Biomass - Volume II—Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Biorefinery Lignin  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates lignin’s role as a renewable raw material resource. Opportunities that arise from utilizing lignin fit into one of three categories: 1)power, fuel and syngas (generally near-term opportunities) 2) macromolecules (generally medium-term opportunities) 3) aromatics and miscellaneous monomers (long-term opportunities). Biorefineries will receive and process massive amounts of lignin. For this reason, how lignin can be best used to support the economic health of the biorefinery must be defined. An approach that only considers process heat would be shortsighted. Higher value products present economic opportunities and the potential to significantly increase the amount of liquid transportation fuel available from biomass. In this analysis a list of potential uses of lignin was compiled and sorted into “product types” which are broad classifications (listed above as power—fuel—syngas; macromolecules; and aromatics). In the first “product type” (power—fuel—gasification) lignin is used purely as a carbon source and aggressive means are employed to break down its polymeric structure. In the second “product type” (macromolecules) the opposite extreme is considered and advantage of the macromolecular structure imparted by nature is retained in high-molecular weight applications. The third “product type” (aromatics) lies somewhere between the two extremes and employs technologies that would break up lignin’s macromolecular structure but maintain the aromatic nature of the building block molecules. The individual opportunities were evaluated based on their technical difficulty, market, market risk, building block utility, and whether a pure material or a mixture would be produced. Unlike the “Sugars Top 10” report it was difficult to identify the ten best opportunities, however, the potential opportunities fell nicely into near-, medium- and long-term opportunities. Furthermore, the near-, medium- and long-term opportunities roughly align with the three “product types.” From this analysis a list of technical barriers was developed which can be used to identify research needs. Lignin presents many challenges for use in the biorefinery. Chemically it differs from sugars having a complex aromatic substructure. Unlike cellulose, which has a relatively simple substructure of glucose subunits, lignin has a high degree of variability in its structure which differs both from biomass source and from the recovery process used. In addition to its variability lignin is also reactive and to some degree less stable thermally and oxidatively to other biomass streams. What this means is that integrating a lignin process stream within the biorefinery will require identifying the best method to separate lignin from biomass cost-effectively.

Holladay, John E.; White, James F.; Bozell, Joseph J.; Johnson, David

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Estimating the potential returns to research and development from sorghum value added products in El Salvador and Nicaragua.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench is a drought tolerant crop able to adapt to hot and dry weather. It has excellent chemical and physical properties, which… (more)

Jaen Celada, Jaeljattin R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Task 4.9 -- Value-added products from syngas. Semi-annual report, January 1--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The work on advanced fuel forms in 1996 is focused in part on the synthesis of higher alcohols from mixtures of hydrogen and carbon monoxide (syngas) from coal gasification. This art has been practiced for many years in Germany, South Africa, and the US. The conversion of coal gasification products to commercially valuable alcohols will provide an important new market for current and future gasification plants. Initial work in this project utilized a novel molybdenum catalyst previously shown to be active for hydrodesulfurization reactions of coal liquids. This support for the active metal is a mixed oxide capable of interaction with the metal sites for catalysis of carbon monoxide reductions. A pressurized fixed-bed flow-through reactor was constructed and one catalyst was tested under a variety of conditions. Unfortunately, this catalyst with low metal loading was inactive. Therefore, a catalyst with a high metal loading and additional metal sites (cobalt, potassium) is now being tested.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

PowerShape Market Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guidebook contains a series of market profiles for customer segments within the commercial and residential sectors. Each profile is a stand-alone document that provides information about a sector, segment region, or technology. PowerShape Market Profiles provide key insights into the market, demographic, business, and energy characteristics of segments within the commercial and residential sectors. It provides vital information for contacting customers equipped with an understanding of their busines...

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

377

State Renewable Electricity Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State Renewable Electricity Profiles 2010. March 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis . www.eia.gov . U.S. Department of Energy . Washington, DC 20585

378

DRAFT Microwave Radiometer Profiler Handbook  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microwave Radiometer Profiler Handbook Evaluation of a New Multi-Frequency Microwave Radiometer for Measuring the Vertical Distribution of Temperature, Water Vapor, and Cloud...

379

Role of BCS-type pairing in light deformed nuclei: A relativistic mean field approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the binding energy and deformation parameter for light nuclei with and without pairing using a deformed relativistic mean field model. The role of BCS-type pairing effect is analyzed for Ne and F isotopes. The calculated odd-even staggering and the deformation parameters argue strongly against the role of pairing in the light nuclei.

P. Arumugam; T. K. Jha; S. K. Patra

2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

380

Cluster aspects of p-shell and sd-shell nuclei  

SciTech Connect

We report some topics on cluster structures studied by using a theoretical method of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics(AMD). Cluster features of p-shell and sd-shell nuclei are discussed. In particular, three alpha cluster structures in the excited states of {sup 12}C and {sup 14}C are focused. Dineutron correlations in neutron-rich nuclei are also discussed.

Kanada-En'yo, Y.; Kobayashi, F.; Suhara, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kimura, M. [Creative Research Initiative ''Sousei'', Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 001-0021 (Japan); Taniguchi, Y. [RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

MOLECULAR GAS IN LUMINOUS GALACTIC NUCLEI N. Z. SCOVILLE AND A. J. BAKER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MOLECULAR GAS IN LUMINOUS GALACTIC NUCLEI N. Z. SCOVILLE AND A. J. BAKER California Institute­wave interferometry has clearly shown the existence of enormous masses (10 9 \\Gamma 10 10 M fi ) of molecular gas. In these systems, molecular gas is an obvious source of fuel for nuclear starbursts and active galactic nuclei (AGN

Baker, Andrew J.

382

Revisiting the symmetric reactions for synthesis of super heavy nuclei of $Z\\geq $120  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extensive efforts have been made experimentally to reach nuclei in the super heavy mass region of Z = 110 and above with suitable choices of projectile and target nuclei. The cross sections for production of these nuclei are seen to be in the range of a few picobarn or less, and pose great experimental challenges. Theoretically, there have been extensive calculations for highly asymmetric (hot-fusion) and moderately asymmetric (cold-fusion) collisions and only a few theoretical studies are available for near symmetric collisions to estimate the cross sections for production of super-heavy nuclei. In the present article, we revisit the symmetric heavy ion reactions with suitable combinations of projectile and target nuclei in the rare-earth region, that will lead to compound systems with very low excitation energy and with better neutron-to-proton ratio for higher stability.

R. K. Choudhury; Y. K. Gupta

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

383

Simple correlations between electric quadrupole moments of atomic nuclei  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of non-yrast electric quadrupole moments (i.e., diagonal E2 matrix elements) of atomic nuclei are becoming widely available from multiple-step Coulomb excitation. It is shown that, where quadrupole-moment data exist, $\\langle 2_1^+ ||E2|| 2_1^+ \\rangle+\\langle 2_2^+ ||E2|| 2_2^+ \\rangle\\approx 0$ is observed across a wide range of masses and deformations. In addition, $\\langle 4_1^+ ||E2|| 4_1^+ \\rangle+\\langle 4_2^+ ||E2|| 4_2^+ \\rangle+\\langle 4_3^+ ||E2|| 4_3^+ \\rangle\\approx 0$ is observed within two standard deviations for three of the four existing measurements. Rotor models appear to be sufficient in describing these trends.

Allmond, James M [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Are Globular Clusters the Remnant Nuclei of Progenitor Disk Galaxies?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The globular cluster system of a typical spheroidal galaxy makes up about 0.25% of the total galaxy mass (McLaughlin 1999). This is roughly the same mass fraction as contained in the nuclear star clus- ter (or stellar nucleus) present in most nearby low-mass galaxies. Motivated by this "coincidence", this Letter discusses a scenario in which globular clusters of present-day galaxies are the surviving nuclei of the dwarf galaxies that - according to the hierarchical merging paradigm of galaxy forma- tion - constitute the "building blocks" of present-day massive galaxies. This scenario, which was first suggested by Freeman (1993), has become more attractive recently in the light of studies that demonstrate a complex star formation history in a number of massive globular clusters.

Torsten Boeker

2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

385

Higher Nucleon Resonances in Exclusive $(?, ?N)$ Reactions on Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report calculations for exclusive pion photoproduction on nuclei beyond the first resonance region in the distorted wave impulse approximation. The elementary operator contains contributions from the resonances $P_{33}(1232)$, $P_{11}(1440)$, $D_{13}(1520)$, $D_{33}(1740)$, $S_{11}(1535)$, $S_{11}(1650)$, and $F_{15}(1680)$, in addition to the usual Born plus vector meson contributions. It gives a good description of single pion photoproduction data up to about 1.1 GeV. Final state interactions are incorporated via optical potentials and are found to be substantial in the coincidence cross sections, but insensitive to the photon asymmetry. Clear signatures of possible medium modifications of the $D_{13}$ and $F_{15}$ resonances are predicted.

Frank X. Lee; C. Bennhold; S. S. Kamalov; L. E. Wright

1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

386

Atomic nuclei decay modes by spontaneous emission of heavy ions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The great majority of the known nuclides with Z>40, including the so-called stable nuclides, are metastable with respect to several modes of spontaneous superasymmetric splitting. A model extended from the fission theory of alpha decay allows one to estimate the lifetimes and the branching ratios relative to the alpha decay for these natural radioactivities. From a huge amount of systematic calculations it is concluded that the process should proceed with maximum intensity in the trans-lead nuclei, where the minimum lifetime is obtained from parent-emitted heavy ion combinations leading to a magic (/sup 208/Pb) or almost magic daughter nucleus. More than 140 nuclides with atomic number smaller than 25 are possible candidates to be emitted from heavy nuclei, with half-lives in the range of 10/sup 10/--10/sup 30/ s: /sup 5/He, /sup 8en-dash10/Be, /sup 11,12/B, /sup 12en-dash16/C, /sup 13en-dash17/N, /sup 15en-dash22/O, /sup 18en-dash23/F, /sup 20en-dash26/Ne, /sup 23en-dash28/Na, /sup 23en-dash30/Mg, /sup 27en-dash32/Al, /sup 28en-dash36/Si, /sup 31en-dash39/P, /sup 32en-dash42/S, /sup 35en-dash45/Cl, /sup 37en-dash47/Ar, /sup 40en-dash49/ K, . .Ca, /sup 44en-dash53/ Sc, /sup 46en-dash53/Ti, /sup 48en-dash54/V, and /sup 49en-dash55/ Cr. The shell structure and the pairing effects are clearly manifested in these new decay modes.

Poenaru, D.N.; Ivascu, M.; Sndulescu, A.; Greiner, W.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

From super-charged nuclei to massive nuclear density cores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to e{sup +}e{sup -}-pair production in the field of supercritical (Z>>Z{sub cr}{approx_equal}170) nucleus an electron shell, created out of the vacuum, is formed. The distribution of the vacuum charge in this shell has been determined for super-charged nuclei Z{sub e}{sup 3} > or approx. 1 within the framework of the Thomas-Fermi equation generalized to the relativistic case. For Z{sub e}{sup 3}>>1 the electron shell penetrates inside the nucleus and almost completely screens its charge. Inside such nucleus the potential takes a constant value equal to V{sub 0} = -(3{pi}{sup 2}n{sub p}){sup 1/3}approx-2m{sub {pi}}c{sup 2}, and super-charged nucleus represents an electrically neutral plasma consisting of e, p and n. Near the edge of the nucleus a transition layer exists with a width {lambda}{approx_equal}{alpha}{sup -1/2}h-bar/m{sub {pi}}c{approx}15 fm, which is independent of Z(h-bar/m{sub {pi}}celectric field and surface charge are concentrated in this layer. These results, obtained earlier for hypothetical superheavy nuclei with Z{approx}A/2 or approx. 0.04(Z/A){sup 1/2}(m{sub Planck}/m{sub n}){sup 3} the Coulomb repulsion of protons, screened by relativistic electrons, can be balanced by gravitational forces. The overcritical electric fields E{approx}m{sup 2}{sub {pi}}c{sup 3}/eh-bar are present in the narrow transition layer near the core surface.

Popov, Vladimir [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

388

Detecting Ice Nuclei with a Continuous—Flow Diffusion Chamber-Some Exploratory Tests of Instrument Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A few basic experiments were performed with artificial cloud condensation nuclei and ice-nucleating aerosols in a continuous-flow thermal gradient diffusion chamber to investigate the instrument's response. Brief pulses of ice nuclei were input ...

David C. Rogers

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Downstream Heat Flux Profile vs. Midplane T Profile in Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

The relationship between the midplane scrape-off-layer electron temperature profile and the parallel heat flux profile at the divertor in tokamaks is investigated. A model is applied which takes into account anisotropic thermal diffusion, in a rectilinear geometry with constant density. Eigenmode analysis is applied to the simplified problem with constant thermal diffusivities. A self-similar nonlinear solution is found for the more realistic problem with anisotropically temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities. Numerical solutions are developed for both cases, with spatially dependent heat flux emerging from the plasma. For both constant and temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities it is found that, below about one-half of its peak, the heat flux profile shape at the divertor, compared with the midplane temperature profile shape, is robustly described by the simplest two-point model. However the physical processes are not those assumed in the simplest two-point model, nor is the numerical coefficient relating q||div to Tmp ?||mp/L|| as predicted. For realistic parameters the peak in the heat flux, moreover, can be reduced by a factor of two or more from the two-point model scaling which fits the remaining profile. For temperature profiles in the SOL region above the x-point set by marginal stability, the heat flux profile to the divertor can be largely decoupled from the prediction of the two-point model. These results suggest caveats for data interpretation, and possibly favorable outcomes for divertor configurations with extended field lines.

Robert J. Goldston

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

390

Future of superheavy element research: Which nuclei could be synthesized within the next few years?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low values of the fusion cross sections and very short half-lives of nuclei with Z$>$120 put obstacles in synthesis of new elements. Different nuclear reactions (fusion of stable and radioactive nuclei, multi-nucleon transfers and neutron capture), which could be used for the production of new isotopes of superheavy (SH) elements, are discussed in the paper. The gap of unknown SH nuclei, located between the isotopes which were produced earlier in the cold and hot fusion reactions, can be filled in fusion reactions of $^{48}$Ca with available lighter isotopes of Pu, Am, and Cm. Cross sections for the production of these nuclei are predicted to be rather large, and the corresponding experiments can be easily performed at existing facilities. For the first time, a narrow pathway is found to the middle of the island of stability owing to possible $\\beta^+$-decay of SH isotopes which can be formed in ordinary fusion reactions of stable nuclei. Multi-nucleon transfer processes at near barrier collisions of heavy (and very heavy, U-like) ions are shown to be quite realistic reaction mechanism allowing us to produce new neutron enriched heavy nuclei located in the unexplored upper part of the nuclear map. Neutron capture reactions can be also used for the production of the long-living neutron rich SH nuclei. Strong neutron fluxes might be provided by pulsed nuclear reactors and by nuclear explosions in laboratory conditions and by supernova explosions in nature. All these possibilities are discussed in the paper.

Valeriy Zagrebaev; Alexander Karpov; Walter Greiner

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

391

ENSEMBLE VARIABILITY OF NEAR-INFRARED-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the properties of the ensemble variability V for nearly 5000 near-infrared active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the catalog of Quasars and Active Galactic Nuclei (13th Edition) and the SDSS-DR7 quasar catalog. From three near-infrared point source catalogs, namely, Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), Deep Near Infrared Survey (DENIS), and UKIDSS/LAS catalogs, we extract 2MASS-DENIS and 2MASS-UKIDSS counterparts for cataloged AGNs by cross-identification between catalogs. We further select variable AGNs based on an optimal criterion for selecting the variable sources. The sample objects are divided into subsets according to whether near-infrared light originates by optical emission or by near-infrared emission in the rest frame; and we examine the correlations of the ensemble variability with the rest-frame wavelength, redshift, luminosity, and rest-frame time lag. In addition, we also examine the correlations of variability amplitude with optical variability, radio intensity, and radio-to-optical flux ratio. The rest-frame optical variability of our samples shows negative correlations with luminosity and positive correlations with rest-frame time lag (i.e., the structure function, SF), and this result is consistent with previous analyses. However, no well-known negative correlation exists between the rest-frame wavelength and optical variability. This inconsistency might be due to a biased sampling of high-redshift AGNs. Near-infrared variability in the rest frame is anticorrelated with the rest-frame wavelength, which is consistent with previous suggestions. However, correlations of near-infrared variability with luminosity and rest-frame time lag are the opposite of these correlations of the optical variability; that is, the near-infrared variability is positively correlated with luminosity but negatively correlated with the rest-frame time lag. Because these trends are qualitatively consistent with the properties of radio-loud quasars reported by some previous studies, most of our sample objects are probably radio-loud quasars. Finally, we also discuss the negative correlations seen in the near-infrared SFs.

Kouzuma, S. [School of International Liberal Studies, Chukyo University, Toyota 470-0393 (Japan); Yamaoka, H., E-mail: skouzuma@lets.chukyo-u.ac.jp, E-mail: yamaoka@phys.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Competition between alpha-decay and beta-decay for Heavy and Superheavy Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, the $\\beta$-stable region for Z $\\geq$ 90 is proposed. The calculated $\\beta$-stable nuclei in the $\\beta$-stable region are in good agreement with the ones obtained by M\\"{o}ller \\emph{et al}.. The half-lives of the nuclei close to the $\\beta$-stable region are calculated and the competition between $\\alpha$-decay and $\\beta$-decay is systematically investigated. The calculated half-lives and the suggested decay modes are well in line with the experimental results. The predictions for half-lives and decay modes of the nuclei with Z = 107$-$110 are presented.

Zongqiang Sheng; Liangping Shu; Ying Meng; Jigang Hu; Jianfa Qian

2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

393

Equation of state for finite nuclei and liquid-gas phase transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct the equation of state (EOS) of finite nuclei including surface and Coulomb effects in a Thomas-Fermi framework using a finite range, momentum and density dependent two-body interaction. We identify critical temperatures for nuclei below which the EOS so constructed shows clear signals for liquid-gas phase transition in these finite systems. Comparison with the EOS of infinite nuclear matter shows that the critical density and temperature of the phase transition in nuclei are influenced by the mentioned finite size effects.

J. N. De; B. K. Agrawal; S. K. Samaddar

1998-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

394

Why are the interband transitions among triaxially strongly deformed bands suppressed in even nuclei?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As top-on-top model has made a great success in explaining triaxially strongly deformed (TSD) bands in odd-A nuclei, we extend this model to even-A nuclei, i.e. two particles in different single-particle orbitals outside the triaxial rotor. In the lowest order approximation, the electromagnetic transitions between TSD bands in even-A case are reduced by a factor of 0.04 compared with odd-A case. It is one of the reasons why TSD bands are not yet explicitly observed in even-A nuclei.

Sugawara-Tanabe, Kazuko [Otsuma Women's University, Tama, Tokyo 206-8540 (Japan); Theoretical Nuclear Physics Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tanabe, Kosai [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Theoretical Nuclear Physics Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

395

Vibration of Tethered Microstructure Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although loosely tethered turbulence profilers have many advantages, they are prone to resonant vibrations at frequencies in the dissipation range when they are falling rapidly or when the tether is strummed. Using the Advanced Microstructure ...

Jack B. Miller; M. C. Gregg; Vernon W. Miller; Gordon L. Welsh

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Development of Wind Profiling Sodar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study group has developed a new wind profiling sodar with a phased array antenna. This system is superior to usual ones with parabolic reflectors in its portability. Preliminary experiments have shown the expected acoustic performance ...

Yoshiki Ito; Yasuhiro Kobori; Mitsuaki Horiguchi; Masato Takehisa; Yasushi Mitsuta

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Humidity Profiles over the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distribution of water vapor in the atmosphere affects climate change through radiative balance and surface evaporation. The variabilities of atmospheric humidity profile over oceans from daily to interannual time scales were examined using ...

W. Timothy Liu; Wenqing Tang; Pearn P. Niiler

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Iterated and irreducible pion-photon exchange in nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the contribution to the nuclear energy density functional which arises from iterated pion-photon exchange between nucleons. In heavy nuclei, this novel charge symmetry breaking interaction leads to an additional binding of each proton by about 0.2 MeV. Compared to that the analogous effect from irreducible pion-photon exchange is negligibly small. As a possible mechanism to resolve the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly we propose the iteration of one-photon exchange with an attractive short-range NN-interaction. The corresponding energy per proton reads: $\\bar E[\\rho_p]=(2\\alpha/15\\pi^2)(\\pi^2 -3+6 \\ln2) {\\cal A}_{pp} k_p^2$ with $\\rho_p =k_p^3/ 3\\pi^2$ the proton density and ${\\cal A}_{pp}\\approx 2 $fm an effective (in-medium) scattering length. Hints for such a value of ${\\cal A}_{pp}$ come from phenomenological Skyrme forces and from the neutron matter equation of state.

N. Kaiser

2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

399

Photon parton distributions in nuclei and the EMC effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photons as well as quarks and gluons are constituents of the infinite momentum frame (IMF) wave function of an energetic particle. They are mostly equivalent photons whose amplitude follows from the Lorentz transformation of the particle rest frame Coulomb field into the IMF and from the conservation of the electromagnetic current. We evaluate in a model independent way the dominant photon contribution \\propto \\alpha_{em}(Z^2/A^{4/3})\\ln(1/R_{A}m_{N}x) to the nuclear structure functions as well as the term \\propto \\alpha_{em}Z/A. In addition we show that the definition of x consistent with the exact kinematics of eA scattering (with exact sum rules) works in the same direction as the nucleus field of equivalent photons. Combined, these effects account for the bulk of the EMC effect for x\\le 0.5 where Fermi motion effects are small. In particular for these x the hadronic mechanism contribution to the EMC effect does not exceed \\sim 3% for all nuclei. Also the A-dependence of the hadronic mechanism of the EMC effect for x > 0.5 is significantly modified.

Leonid Frankfurt; Mark Strikman

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

400

ENERGY SPECTRA OF COSMIC-RAY NUCLEI AT HIGH ENERGIES  

SciTech Connect

We present new measurements of the energy spectra of cosmic-ray (CR) nuclei from the second flight of the balloon-borne experiment Cosmic-Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM). The instrument included different particle detectors to provide redundant charge identification and measure the energy of CRs up to several hundred TeV. The measured individual energy spectra of C, O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe are presented up to approx10{sup 14} eV. The spectral shape looks nearly the same for these primary elements and it can be fitted to an E {sup -2.66} {sup +}- {sup 0.04} power law in energy. Moreover, a new measurement of the absolute intensity of nitrogen in the 100-800 GeV/n energy range with smaller errors than previous observations, clearly indicates a hardening of the spectrum at high energy. The relative abundance of N/O at the top of the atmosphere is measured to be 0.080 +- 0.025 (stat.)+-0.025 (sys.) at approx800 GeV/n, in good agreement with a recent result from the first CREAM flight.

Ahn, H. S.; Ganel, O.; Han, J. H.; Kim, K. C.; Lee, M. H.; Malinine, A. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Allison, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Brandt, T. J. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bagliesi, M. G.; Bigongiari, G.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S. [Department of Physics, University of Siena and INFN, Via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy); Barbier, L. [Astroparticle Physics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Childers, J. T.; DuVernois, M. A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Conklin, N. B.; Coutu, S. [Department of Physics, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Jeon, J. A. [Department of Physics, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Minnick, S., E-mail: paolo.maestro@pi.infn.i [Department of Physics, Kent State University, Tuscarawas, New Philadelphia, OH 44663 (United States)

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Laser Probing of Neutron-Rich Nuclei in Light Atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The neutron-rich 6He and 8He isotopes exhibit an exotic nuclear structure that consists of a tightly bound 4He-like core with additional neutrons orbiting at a relatively large distance, forming a halo. Recent experimental efforts have succeeded in laser trapping and cooling these short-lived, rare helium atoms, and have measured the atomic isotope shifts along the 4He-6He-8He chain by performing laser spectroscopy on individual trapped atoms. Meanwhile, the few-electron atomic structure theory, including relativistic and QED corrections, has reached a comparable degree of accuracy in the calculation of the isotope shifts. In parallel efforts, also by measuring atomic isotope shifts, the nuclear charge radii of lithium and beryllium isotopes have been studied. The techniques employed were resonance ionization spectroscopy on neutral, thermal lithium atoms and collinear laser spectroscopy on beryllium ions. Combining advances in both atomic theory and laser spectroscopy, the charge radii of these light halo nuclei have now been determined for the first time independent of nuclear structure models. The results are compared with the values predicted by a number of nuclear structure calculations, and are used to guide our understanding of the nuclear forces in the extremely neutron-rich environment.

Z. -T. Lu; P. Mueller; G. W. F. Drake; W. Noertershaeuser; Steven C. Pieper; Z. -C. Yan

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

402

The Coincidence of Nuclear Star Clusters and Active Galactic Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study galaxies that host both nuclear star clusters and active galactic nuclei (AGN) implying the presence of a massive black hole. We select a sample of 176 galaxies with previously detected nuclear star clusters that range from ellipticals to late-type spirals. We search for AGN in this sample using optical spectroscopy and archival radio and X-ray data. We find galaxies of all Hubble types and with a wide range of masses (10^9-11 solar masses) hosting both AGN and nuclear star clusters. From the optical spectra, we classify 10% of the galaxies as AGN and an additional 15% as composite, indicating a mix of AGN and star-formation spectra. The fraction of nucleated galaxies with AGN increases strongly as a function of galaxy and nuclear star cluster mass. For galaxies with both a NC and a black hole, we find that the masses of these two objects are quite similar. However, non-detections of black holes in Local Group nuclear star clusters show that not all clusters host black holes of similar masses. We discuss the implications of our results for the formation of nuclear star clusters and massive black holes.

Anil Seth; Marcel Agueros; Duane Lee; Antara Basu-Zych

2008-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

403

Neutrino-induced pion production from nuclei at medium energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a fully relativistic formalism for describing neutrino-induced $\\Delta$-mediated single-pion production from nuclei. We assess the ambiguities stemming from the $\\Delta$ interactions. Variations in the cross sections of over 10% are observed, depending on whether or not magnetic-dipole dominance is assumed to extract the vector form factors. These uncertainties have a direct impact on the accuracy with which the axial-vector form factors can be extracted. Different predictions for $C_5^A(Q^2)$ induce up to 40-50% effects on the $\\Delta$-production cross sections. To describe the nucleus, we turn to a relativistic plane-wave impulse approximation (RPWIA) using realistic bound-state wave functions derived in the Hartree approximation to the $\\sigma$-$\\omega$ Walecka model. For neutrino energies larger than 1 GeV, we show that a relativistic Fermi-gas model with appropriate binding-energy correction produces comparable results as the RPWIA which naturally includes Fermi motion, nuclear-binding effects and the Pauli exclusion principle. Including $\\Delta$ medium modifications yields a 20 to 25% reduction of the RPWIA cross section. The model presented in this work can be naturally extended to include the effect of final-state interactions in a relativistic and quantum-mechanical way. Guided by recent neutrino-oscillation experiments, such as MiniBooNE and K2K, and future efforts like MINER$\

C. Praet; O. Lalakulich; N. Jachowicz; J. Ryckebusch

2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

404

Time-of-Flight Mass Measurements of Exotic Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic masses play an important role in nuclear physics and astrophysics. The need of experimental mass values for unstable nuclides has triggered the development of a wide range of mass measurement techniques, with devices installed at many laboratories around the world. We have implemented a time-of-flight magnetic-rigidity (TOF-B ) technique at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) that includes a position measurement for magnetic rigidity corrections and uses the A1900 separator and the S800 spectrograph. We performed a successful first experiment measuring masses of neutron-rich isotopes in the region of Z 20 30, important for calculations of processes occurring in the crust of accreting neutron stars. The masses of 16 nuclei were determined, for 61V, 63Cr, 66Mn, and 74Ni for the first time, with atomic mass excesses of 30.510(890) MeV, 35.280(650) MeV, 36.900(790) MeV, and 49.210(990) MeV, respectively. The mass resolution achieved was 1.8 10 4.

Matos, M. [Michigan State Univ./JINA/Louisiana State University; Estrade, A. [Michigan State Univ./JINA/LSU/Saint Mary's Univ./GSI Darmstadt, GE; Schatz, H. [Michigan State Univ./JINA; Bazin, D. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Famiano, M. [Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo; Gade, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; George, S. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing; Lynch, W. G. [NSCL, Michigan State Univ./JINA; Meisel, Z. [NSCL, Michigan State Univ./JINA; Portillo, M. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing; Rogers, A. [NSCL, Michigan State Univ./JINA; Shapira, Dan [ORNL; Stolz, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Wallace, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Yurkon, J. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

y-scaling in Quasielastic Electron Scattering from Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A relativistic single particle model is used to calculate the inclusive $(e,e')$ reaction from $A=$12, 40, 56, 197, and 208 nuclei in the quasielastic region. We have shown that this model provides a very good description of the available experimental cross sections when they are dominated by the quasielastic process. In this paper we use this model to investigate the dependence of $y$-scaling on electron kinematics, particularly the electron scattering angle, for a range of squared four momentum transfer $0.20-0.80$ (GeV/c)$^2$. In this kinematic domain, Coulomb distortion of the electron does not significantly affect scaling, but final state interactions of the knocked out nucleon do affect scaling particularly when the nucleons have lower energies. In general, we find that scaling works for this reaction, but at lower values of the four momentum transfer, the scaling function does have some dependence on the electron scattering angle. We also consider a modification of y-scaling to include small binding energy effects as a function of Z and A and show that there is some improvement in scaling.

K. S. Kim; L. E. Wright

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Quasifree Pion Electroproduction from Nuclei in the $?$ Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present calculations of the reaction $A(e,e^\\prime \\pi N)B$ in the distorted wave impulse approximation. The reaction allows for the study of the production process in the nuclear medium without being obscured by the details of nuclear transition densities. First, a pion electroproduction operator suitable for nuclear calculations is obtained by extending the Blomqvist-Laget photoproduction operator to the virtual photon case. The operator is gauge invariant, unitary, reference frame independent, and describes the existing data reasonably well. Then it is applied in nuclei to predict nuclear cross sections under a variety of kinematic arrangements. Issues such as the effects of gauge-fixing, the interference of the $\\Delta$ resonance with the background, sensitivities to the quadrupole component of the $\\Delta$ excitation and to the electromagnetic form factors, the role of final-state interactions, are studied in detail. Methods on how to experimentally separate the various pieces in the coincidence cross section are suggested. Finally, the model is compared to a recent SLAC experiment.

F. X. Lee; L. E. Wright; C. Bennhold

1995-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

407

Trends for Outer Disk Profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The surface-brightness profiles of galaxy disks fall into three main classes, based on whether they are simple exponentials (Type I), bend down at large radii (Type II, "truncations") or bend up at large radii (Type III, "antitruncations"). Here, we discuss how the frequency of these different profiles depends on Hubble type, environment, and the presence or absence of bars; these trends may herald important new tests for disk formation models.

Peter Erwin; Michael Pohlen; Leonel Gutierrez; John E. Beckman

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

408

Principal Component Analysis of Wind Profiler Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to wind profiler observations to study the vertical profile of the wind field and its temporal evolution. The rationale for decomposing time–height wind profiler data using PCA is twofold. The ...

Christopher R. Williams

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

An Acoustic Doppler and Electromagnetic Velocity Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A freely failing current meter called the Absolute Velocity Profiler (AVP) is described. This profiler is an expansion of a previously developed instrument, the Electro-Magnetic Velocity Profiler (EMVP), with the additional capability of acoustic ...

Thomas B. Sanford; Robert G. Driver; John H. Dunlap

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

JOBAID-ACCESSING AND MODIFYING TALENT PROFILE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of accessing their talent profiles, adding information to their profiles, and editing existing talent profile...

411

Densities and energies of nuclei in dilute matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the ground-state properties of nuclear clusters embedded in a gas of nucleons with the help of Skyrme-Hartree-Fock microscopic calculations. Two alternative representations of clusters are introduced, namely coordinate-space and energy-space clusters. We parameterize their density profiles in spherical symmetry in terms of basic properties of the energy density functionals used and propose an analytical, Woods-Saxon density profile whose parameters depend, not only on the composition of the cluster, but also of the nucleon gas. We study the clusters' energies with the help of the local-density approximation, validated through our microscopic results. We find that the volume energies of coordinate-space clusters are determined by the saturation properties of matter, while the surface energies are strongly affected by the presence of the gas. We conclude that both the density profiles and the cluster energies are strongly affected by the gas and discuss implications for the nuclear EoS and related perspectives. Our study provides a simple, but microscopically motivated modeling of the energetics of clusterized matter at subsaturation densities, for direct use in consequential applications of astrophysical interest.

P. Papakonstantinou; J. Margueron; F. Gulminelli; Ad. R. Raduta

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Structural Evolution in Atomic Nuclei: Residual Interactions, Quantum Phase Transitions and the Emergence of Collectivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A synoptic view of the evolution of structure with Z and N in nuclei is beginning to emerge from the confiuence of new experimental results on phase transitional behavior, newly proposed many-body symmetries for critical point nuclei, a new generation of solvable collective models, powerful approaches to viewing the systematics of nuclear properties based on simple models of residual interactions, and advances in microscopic calculations of medium mass and heavy nuclei. A recent compilation of nuclear masses has contributed by permitting empirical extractions of new p-n interaction strengths of the last protons with the last neutrons in many nuclei across the nuclear chart. A number of these developments will be discussed with an eye to the opportunities and challenges they provide for the future, especially in the era of next-generation exotic beam facihties throughout the world.

Casten, R. F. [A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

413

Ice Nuclei, Rainwater Chemical Composition, and Static Cloud Seeding Effects in Israel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzed the temporal and spatial variation of natural ice nuclei (IN), total suspended particles (TSP), and rainwater chemical composition (RCC) in Israel. This research is complementary to the statistical analyses of cloud seeding, ...

Yoav Levi; Daniel Rosenfeld

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Fission of actinides and superheavy nuclei: covariant density functional theory perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current status of the application of covariant density functional theory to the description of fission barriers in actinides and superheavy nuclei is reviewed. The achievements and open problems are discussed.

A. V. Afanasjev

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

415

Investigation of the Variability of Cloud Condensation Nuclei Concentrations at the Surface in Western North Dakota  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily observations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) were made for three summer months in 2005 at a site in rural western North Dakota. The goal was to define the natural background CCN population characteristics and to lay the groundwork for ...

Andrew Detwiler; Darin Langerud; Tracy Depue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Biogenic and Anthropogenic Sources of Ice-Forming Nuclei: A Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To develop theories and numerical models of the formation and microstructure of clouds and precipitation, it is necessary to identify the potential sources of ice nuclei in the atmosphere. However, the subject remains an area of debate. According ...

Wanda Szyrmer; Isztar Zawadzki

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Energy Profiler  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in several widely used formats. Energy Profiler helps users to better understand their energy usage and associated costs. Keywords load profiles, rate comparisons, data...

418

Synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions using radioative beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chances of synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions (one-neutron-out) reactions using radioactive beams are evaluated. Because intensities of radioactive beams are in most of the cases significantly lower than the ones of the stable beams, reactions with the highest radioactive beam intensities for the particular elements are considered. The results are compared with the recent ones obtained by Loveland who investigated the same nuclei.

Smolanczuk, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions using radioative beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chances of synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions (one-neutron-out) reactions using radioactive beams are evaluated. Because intensities of radioactive beams are in most of the cases significantly lower than the ones of the stable beams, reactions with the highest radioactive beam intensities for the particular elements are considered. The results are compared with the recent ones obtained by Loveland who investigated the same nuclei.

Robert Smolanczuk

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

420

Synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions using radioactive beams  

SciTech Connect

Chances of synthesis of transactinide nuclei in cold fusion reactions (one-neutron-out reactions) using radioactive beams are evaluated. Because in most of the cases intensities of radioactive beams are significantly less than those of the stable beams, reactions with the greatest radioactive-beam intensities for the particular elements are considered. The results are compared with the recent ones obtained by Loveland [Phys. Rev. C 76, 014612 (2007)], who investigated the same nuclei.

Smolanczuk, Robert [Theoretical Physics Department, Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warszawa (Poland)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Correlations between signals of the liquid-gas phase transition in nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finite systems such as atomic nuclei present at phase transition specific features different from those observed at the thermodynamic limit. Several characteristic signals were found in samples of events resulting from heavy ion collisions at and above the Fermi energy. The concomitant observation of different signatures of a liquid-gas phase transition in nuclei on a given sample strongly supports the occurrence of this transition.

Marie-France Rivet; N. Le Neindre; J. P. Wieleczko; B. Borderie; R. Bougault; A. Chbihi; J. D. Frankland; M. Parlog; M. Pichon; B. Tamain; the INDRA; ALADIN Collaboration

2004-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

422

Beyond the No Core Shell Model: Extending the NCSM to Heavier Nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The No Core Shell Model (NCSM) is an ab initio method for calculating the properties of light nuclei, up to about A = 20, in which all A nucleons are treated as being active. It is difficult to go to larger A values due to the rapid grow of the basis spaces required in order to obtain converged results. In this presentation we briefly discuss three new techniques for extending the NCSM to heavier mass nuclei.

Barrett, Bruce R. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 210081, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0081 (United States)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

423

Spontaneous fission half-lives of nuclei in a phenomenological model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple phenomenological model, based on the \\'Swi{\\c a}tecki idea for evaluation of the spontaneous fission half-lives is proposed. The model contains only one adjustable parameter fixed to the data for even-even nuclei and two additional hindrance factors to the life-times, which give the effect of odd particles. A good agreement with the experimental data for all fissioning nuclei is achieved.

A. Zdeb; M. Warda; K. Pomorski

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

424

Fusion cross sections for superheavy nuclei in the dinuclear system concept  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the dinuclear system concept we present calculations of production cross sections for the heaviest nuclei. The obtained results are in a good agreement with the experimental data. The experimentally observed rapid fall-off of the cross sections of the cold fusion with increasing charge number $Z$ of the compound nucleus is explained. Optimal experimental conditions for the synthesis of the superheavy nuclei are suggested.

G. G. Adamian; N. V. Antonenko; W. Scheid; V. V. Volkov

1997-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

425

HARD X-RAYEMITTING ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI SELECTED BY THE CHANDRA MULTIWAVELENGTH PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HARD X-RAY­EMITTING ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI SELECTED BY THE CHANDRA MULTIWAVELENGTH PROJECT J. D present X-ray and optical analysis of 188 active galactic nuclei (AGN) identified from 497 hard X-ray ( f2:0 8:0 keV > 2:7 ; 10�15 ergs cm�2 s�1 ) sources in 20 Chandra fields (1.5 deg2 ) forming part

Green, Paul

426

Industry Profile | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Profile Industry Profile Industry Profile November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis The largest energy consuming industrial sectors account for the largest share of CHP capacity; namely: Chemicals (30%), Petroleum Refining (17%), and Paper Products (14%). Other industrial sectors include: Commercial/Institutional (12%), Food (8%), Primary Metals (5%), Other Manufacturing (8%), and Other Industrial (6%). Combined heat and power (CHP)-sometimes referred to as cogeneration-involves the sequential process of producing and utilizing electricity and thermal energy from a single fuel. CHP is widely recognized to save energy and costs, while reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) and other pollutants. CHP is a realistic, near-term option for large energy efficiency improvements and significant CO2 reductions.

427

Phenotype MicroArray Profiling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MicroArray MicroArray Profiling of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 Barry Bochner & Vanessa Gomez & Michael Ziman & Shihui Yang & Steven D. Brown Received: 22 May 2009 / Accepted: 26 October 2009 # The Author(s) 2009. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Abstract In this study, we developed a Phenotype MicroArray(tm) (PM) protocol to profile cellular phenotypes in Zymomonas mobilis, which included a standard set of nearly 2,000 assays for carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur source utilization, nutrient stimulation, pH and osmotic stresses, and chemical sensitivities with 240 inhibitory chemicals. We observed two positive assays for C-source utilization (fructose and glucose) using the PM screen, which uses redox chemistry and cell respiration as a universal reporter to profile growth phenotypes in a high-throughput 96-well plate-based format.

428

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... solar, wind, geothermal, ... More Tables on New Jersey's Electricity Profile: Formats;

429

gprof Profiling Tools | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tuning MPI on BG/Q Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) HPCToolkit HPCTW mpiP gprof Profiling Tools Darshan PAPI BG/Q Performance Counters BGPM Openspeedshop Scalasca BG/Q DGEMM Performance Software & Libraries IBM References Intrepid/Challenger/Surveyor Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] gprof Profiling Tools Contents Introduction Profiling on the Blue Gene Enabling Profiling Collecting Profile Information Profiling Threaded Applications Using gprof Routine Level Flat Profile Line Level Flat Profile Call Graph Analysis Routine Execution Count List Annotated Source Listing Issues in Interpreting Profile Data Profiling Concepts Programs in Memory

430

THE SURVIVAL OF NUCLEI IN JETS ASSOCIATED WITH CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect

Heavy nuclei such as nickel-56 are synthesized in a wide range of core-collapse supernovae (CCSN), including energetic supernovae associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Recent studies suggest that jet-like outflows are a common feature of CCSN. These outflows may entrain synthesized nuclei at launch or during propagation, and provide interesting multi-messenger signals including heavy ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. Here, we investigate the destruction processes of nuclei during crossing from the stellar material into the jet material via a cocoon, and during propagation after being successfully loaded into the jet. We find that nuclei can survive for a range of jet parameters because collisional cooling is faster than spallation. While canonical high-luminosity GRB jets may contain nuclei, magnetic-dominated models or low-luminosity jets with small bulk Lorentz factors are more favorable for having a significant heavy nuclei component.

Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Murase, Kohta [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Ioka, Kunihito [KEK Theory Center and Graduate University for Advanced Studies (Sokendai), Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Meszaros, Peter [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics and Center for Particle Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Country Energy Profile, South Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This country energy profile provides energy and economic information about South Africa. Areas covered include: Economics, demographics, and environment; Energy situation; Energy structure; Energy investment opportunities; Department of Energy (DOE) programs in South Africa; and a listing of International aid to South Africa.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Applications of Line Profile Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2010 ... Neutron and X-Ray Studies of Advanced Materials III : Applications of Line Profile ... Science: Robert Von Dreele1; 1APS/Argonne National Laboratory .... using an X-ray synchrotron beam line of the Advanced Photon Source.

433

Profiles for the situated web  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The World Wide Web is evolving into a medium that will soon make it possible for conceiving and implementing situation-aware services. A situation-aware or situated web application is one that renders the user with an experience (content, interaction ... Keywords: CC/PP, XML, profiles, situated-aware applications, vocabulary, web architecture

Lalitha Suryanarayana; Johan Hjelm

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Shallow Angle Wave Profiling Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lidar scanning system is described that is primarily designed to measure sea wave shape. The device is capable of measuring real-time spatial profiles over distances of hundreds of meters, and as the lidar must inevitably operate from modest ...

M. R. Belmont; J. M. K. Horwood; R. W. F. Thurley; J. Baker

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Future of superheavy element research: Which nuclei could be synthesized within the next few years?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low values of the fusion cross sections and very short half-lives of nuclei with Z$>$120 put obstacles in synthesis of new elements. Different nuclear reactions (fusion of stable and radioactive nuclei, multi-nucleon transfers and neutron capture), which could be used for the production of new isotopes of superheavy (SH) elements, are discussed in the paper. The gap of unknown SH nuclei, located between the isotopes which were produced earlier in the cold and hot fusion reactions, can be filled in fusion reactions of $^{48}$Ca with available lighter isotopes of Pu, Am, and Cm. Cross sections for the production of these nuclei are predicted to be rather large, and the corresponding experiments can be easily performed at existing facilities. For the first time, a narrow pathway is found to the middle of the island of stability owing to possible $\\beta^+$-decay of SH isotopes which can be formed in ordinary fusion reactions of stable nuclei. Multi-nucleon transfer processes at near barrier collisions of heavy (a...

Zagrebaev, Valeriy; Greiner, Walter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Microscopic description of isoscalar giant resonance excitations in ??Ca and ¹¹?SN nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a microscopic description of isoscalar giant resonance excitations in ??Ca and ¹¹? Sn nuclei within the self-consistent Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Random-Phase-Approximation (HF-RPA) theory. Such characteristic features of the Isoscalar Giant Resonance as strength function, transition density and cross-sections for ??Ca and ¹¹?Sn nuclei are obtained. In this analysis, the SL1 Skyrme interaction associated with 230 MeV for the value of nuclear matter incompressibility coefficient K is chosen. The selection of nuclei is based on the availability of recent experimental results from Texas A&M University. The coordinate space formulation of the RPA in terms of Green's function is employed to obtain isoscalar monopole and dipole transition strength distributions for ??Ca and ¹¹?Sn nuclei. Calculations are performed with the discretized single-particle continuum. Theoretical transition strength distributions are used to find quantities of interest such as energy positions of resonance states, sum rules and average resonance energies. The cross-section of 240 MeV ?-particle scattering on the above nuclei are analysed within the Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA) using transition densities obtained from the HF-RPA calculations. From this analysis the cross-sections for ISGDR excitations are obtained and compared with the recent experimental data obtained at the Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University.

Karki, Bhishma

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Profiles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S2 S3 reaction by the chaperone mechanism, J. Chem. Phys 134, 154508 (2011). S. D. Herring, T. C. Germann, and N. Grnbech-Jensen, Effects of void size, density, and...

438

Profiles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the antibiotics from working. We hope that this understanding may help in developing new drugs that will restore the efficacy of existing antibiotics by blocking these pumps. Our...

439

Profiles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

diseases including smallpox, anthrax, malaria, HIV, and influenza on... Paul S. White Genomics - Development of tools for discovery and application of genetic variation. Technology...

440

Profiles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Y. pestis sample collection from nonporous surfaces by quantitative real-time PCR. Lett. Appl. Microbiol. 50: 431-7. Hong-Geller, E. and Micheva-Viteva, S. (2010)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Combining Microwave Radiometer and Wind Profiler Radar Measurements for High-Resolution Atmospheric Humidity Profiling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A self-consistent remote sensing physical method to retrieve atmospheric humidity high-resolution profiles by synergetic use of a microwave radiometer profiler (MWRP) and wind profiler radar (WPR) is illustrated. The proposed technique is based ...

Laura Bianco; Domenico Cimini; Frank S. Marzano; Randolph Ware

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The pi -> pi pi process in nuclei and the restoration of chiral symmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The results of an extensive campaign of measurements of the pi -> pi pi process in the nucleon and nuclei at intermediate energies are presented. The measurements were motivated by the study of strong pi pi correlations in nuclei. The analysis relies on the composite ratio C_{pi pi}^A, which accounts for the clear effect of the nuclear medium on the (pi pi) system. The comparison of the C_{pi pi}^A distributions for the (pi pi)_{I=J=0} and (pi pi)_{I=0,J=2} systems to the model predictions indicates that the C_{pi pi}^A behavior in proximity of the 2m_pi threshold is explainable through the partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclei.

N. Grion; M. Bregant; P. Camerini; E. Fragiacomo; S. Piano; R. Rui; E. F. Gibson; G. Hofman; E. L. Mathie; R. Meier; M. E. Sevior; G. R. Smith; R. Tacik; for the CHAOS Collaboration

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

443

Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclei in the relativistic Thomas-Fermi theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The equation of state (EOS) of finite nuclei is constructed in the relativistic Thomas-Fermi theory using the non-linear $\\sigma-\\omega -\\rho$ model. The caloric curves are calculated by confining the nuclei in the freeze-out volume taken to be a sphere of size about 4 to 8 times the normal nuclear volume. The results obtained from the relativistic theory are not significantly different from those obtained earlier in a non-relativistic framework. The nature of the EOS and the peaked structure of the specific heat $C_v$ obtained from the caloric curves show clear signals of a liquid-gas phase transition in finite nuclei. The temperature evolution of the Gibbs potential and the entropy at constant pressure indicate that the characteristics of the transition are not too different from the first-order one.

Tapas Sil; B. K. Agrawal; J. N. De; S. K. Samaddar

2000-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

444

ENAM'04 Fourth International Conference on Exotic Nuclei and Atomic Masses  

SciTech Connect

The conference can trace its origins to the 1950s and 1960s with the Atomic Mass and Fundamental Constants (AMCO) and the Nuclei Far From Stability (NFFS) series of conferences. Held jointly in 1992, the conferences officially merged in 1995 and the fourth conference was held at Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, GA and was organized by the Physics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conference covered a broad list of topics consisting of a series of invited and contributed presentation highlighting recent research in the following fields: Atomic masses, nuclear moments, and nuclear radii; Forms of radioactivity; Nuclear structure, nuclei at the drip lines, cluster phenomena; Reactions with radioactive ion beams; Nuclear astrophysics; Fundamental symmetries and interactions; Heaviest elements and fission; Radioactive ion beam production and experimental developments; Applications of exotic nuclei

Gross, C. J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Rykaczewski, K. P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Global Calculations of Ground-State Axial Shape Asymmetry of Nuclei  

SciTech Connect

Important insight into the symmetry properties of the nuclear ground-state (gs) shape is obtained from the characteristics of low-lying collective energy-level spectra. In the 1950s, experimental and theoretical studies showed that in the gs many nuclei are spheroidal in shape rather than spherical. Later, a hexadecapole component of the gs shape was identified. In the 1970-1995 time frame, a consensus that reflection symmetry of the gs shape was broken for some nuclei emerged. Here we present the first calculation across the nuclear chart of axial symmetry breaking in the nuclear gs. We show that we fulfill a necessary condition: Where we calculate axial symmetry breaking, characteristic gamma bands are observed experimentally. Moreover, we find that, for those nuclei where axial asymmetry is found, a systematic deviation between calculated and measured masses is removed.

Moeller, Peter [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Bengtsson, Ragnar; Carlsson, B. Gillis; Olivius, Peter [Department of Mathematical Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Ichikawa, Takatoshi [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan)

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

446

Alpha decay favoured isotopes of some superheavy nuclei: Spontaneous fission versus alpha decay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spontaneous fission and alpha decay are the main decay modes for superheavy nuclei. The superheavy nuclei which have small alpha decay half-life compared to spontaneous fission half-life will survive fission and can be detected in the laboratory through alpha decay. We have studied the alpha decay half-life and spontaneous half-life of some superheavy elements in the atomic range Z = 100-130. Spontaneous fission half-lives of superheavy nuclei have been calculated using the phenomenological formula and the alpha decay half-lives using Viola-Seaborg-Sobiczewski formula (Sobiczewski et al. 1989), semi empirical relation of Brown (1992) and formula based on generalized liquid drop model proposed by Dasgupta-Schubert and Reyes (2007). The results are reported here.

O. V. Kiren; S. B. Gudennavar; S. G. Bubbly

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

447

Shell model half-lives for r-process N=82 nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have performed shell-model calculations of the half-lives and neutron-branching probabilities of the r-process waiting point nuclei at the magic neutron number N=82. These new calculations use a larger model space than previous shell model studies and an improved residual interaction which is adjusted to recent spectroscopic data around A=130. Our shell-model results give a good account of all experimentally known half-lives and $Q_\\beta$-values for the N=82 r-process waiting point nuclei. Our half-life predictions for the N=82 nuclei with Z=42--46 agree well with recent estimates based in the energy-density functional method.

J. J. Cuenca-Garcia; G. Martinez-Pinedo; K. Langanke; F. Nowacki; I. N. Borzov

2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

448

Definition: Electrical Profiling Configurations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Profiling Configurations Profiling Configurations Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electrical Profiling Configurations Electrical profiling is a DC resistivity survey which aims to trace lateral variations in the apparent resistivity structure of the subsurface. Traditionally, electrical profiling provides qualitative information of relative apparent resistivity values in order to detect anomalous geological features.[1] Also Known As Electrical mapping References ↑ http://www.amazon.com/Principles-Electric-Borehole-Geophysics-Geochemistry/dp/0444529942 Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Electrical_Profiling_Configurations&oldid=596184" Category: Definitions

449

IPM Profiling Tool at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IPM IPM IPM Description and Overview IPM is a portable profiling infrastructure which provide a high level report on the execution of a parallel job. IPM reports hardware counters data, MPI function timings, and memory usage. It provides a low overhead means to generate scaling studies or performance data for ERCAP submissions. When you run a job using the IPM module you will get a performance summary (see below) to stdout as well as a web accessible summary of all your IPM jobs. The two main objectives of IPM are ease-of-use and scalability in performance analysis. Usage % module load ipm On HPC architectures that support shared libraries that's all you need to do. Once the module is loaded you can run as you normally and get a performance profile once the job has successfully completed. You do not

450

Enterprise Service Bus Implementation Profile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define an implementation profile for International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 61968 using technologies commonly found on an Enterprise Service Bus (ESB). More specifically, this document describes how message payloads defined by parts 3 through 9 of IEC 61968 are conveyed using Web Services and the Java Message Service (JMS). The goal is to provide details that are sufficient to enable implementations of IEC 61968 to be interoperable.

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

451

State coal profiles, January 1994  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of State Coal Profiles is to provide basic information about the deposits, production, and use of coal in each of the 27 States with coal production in 1992. Although considerable information on coal has been published on a national level, there is a lack of a uniform overview for the individual States. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. While focusing on coal output, State Coal Profiles shows that the coal-producing States are major users of coal, together accounting for about three-fourths of total US coal consumption in 1992. Each coal-producing State is profiled with a description of its coal deposits and a discussion of the development of its coal industry. Estimates of coal reserves in 1992 are categorized by mining method and sulfur content. Trends, patterns, and other information concerning production, number of mines, miners, productivity, mine price of coal, disposition, and consumption of coal are detailed in statistical tables for selected years from 1980 through 1992. In addition, coal`s contribution to the State`s estimated total energy consumption is given for 1991, the latest year for which data are available. A US summary of all data is provided for comparing individual States with the Nation as a whole. Sources of information are given at the end of the tables.

1994-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

452

Spontaneous fission half-lives of heavy and superheavy nuclei within a generalized liquid drop model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We systematically calculate the spontaneous fission half-lives for heavy and superheavy nuclei between U and Fl isotopes. The spontaneous fission process is studied within the semi-empirical WKB approximation. The potential barrier is obtained using a generalized liquid drop model, taking into account the nuclear proximity, the mass asymmetry, the phenomenological pairing correction, and the microscopic shell correction. Macroscopic inertial-mass function has been employed for the calculation of the fission half-life. The results reproduce rather well the experimental data. Relatively long half-lives are predicted for many unknown nuclei, sufficient to detect them if synthesized in a laboratory.

Xiaojun Bao; Hongfei Zhang; G. Royer; Junqing Li

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

453

First experiment on fission transients in highly fissile spherical nuclei produced by fragmentation of radioactive beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a novel experimental approach for studying the dissipative spreading of collective motion in a meta-stable nuclear system, using, for the first time, highly fissile nuclei with spherical shape. This was achieved by fragmentation of 45 radioactive heavy-ion beams at GSI, Darmstadt. The use of inverse kinematics and a dedicated experimental set-up allowed for the identification in atomic number of both fission fragments. From the width of their charge distributions, a transient time of (3.3 +/- 0.7) 10-21 s is deduced for initially spherical nuclei.

C. Schmitt; P. N. Nadtochy; A. Heinz; B. Jurado; A. Kelic; K. -H. Schmidt

2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

454

Kaon-nuclei interaction studies at low energies (the AMADEUS project)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The AMADEUS experiment aims to perform dedicated precision studies in the sector of low-energy kaon-nuclei interaction at the DA\\Phi NE collider at LNF-INFN. In particular the experiment plans to perform measurements of the debated deeply bound kaonic nuclear states (by stopping kaons in cryogenic gaseous targets 3He and 4He) to explore the nature of the \\Lambda(1405) in nuclear environment and to measure the cross section of K- on light nuclei, for K- momentum lower than 100 MeV/c. The AMADEUS dedicated setup will be installed in the central region of the KLOE detector.

K. Piscicchia; M. Bazzi; C. Berucci; D. Bosnar; A. M. Bragadireanu; M. Cargnelli; A. Clozza; C. Curceanu; A. D'Uffizi; F. Ghio; C. Guaraldo; P. Kienle; M. Iliescu; T. Ishiwatari; P. Levi Sandri; J. Marton; D. Pietreanu; M. Poli Lener; A. Rizzo; A. Romero Vidal; E. Sbardella; A. Scordo; D. L. Sirghi; F. Sirghi; H. Tatsuno; I. Tucakovic; O. Vazquez Doce; E. Widmann; J. Zmeskal

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

455

Neutrino-induced nucleosynthesis of A>64 nuclei: The nu p-process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new nucleosynthesis process, that we denote nu p-process, which occurs in supernovae (and possibly gamma-ray bursts) when strong neutrino fluxes create proton-rich ejecta. In this process, antineutrino absorptions in the proton-rich environment produce neutrons that are immediately captured by neutron-deficient nuclei. This allows for the nucleosynthesis of nuclei with mass numbers A >64. Making this process a possible candidate to explain the origin of the solar abundances of 92,94Mo and 96,98Ru. This process also offers a natural explanation for the large abundance of Sr seen in an hyper-metal-poor star.

C. Fröhlich; G. Martínez-Pinedo; M. Liebendörfer; F. -K. Thielemann; E. Bravo; W. R. Hix; K. Langanke; N. T. Zinner

2005-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

456

Phase transition in exotic nuclei along the $N=Z$ line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The abrupt structure change from the nuclei of $N=Z \\le 35$ to those of $N=Z \\ge 36$ is investigated by means of shell model calculations. The basic features of the even-even and odd-odd nuclei under consideration are nicely reproduced. A sudden jump of nucleons into the upper $g_{9/2}d_{5/2}$ shell at $N=Z=36$ is found to be the main reason that causes the qualitative structure difference. It is argued that the structure change can be viewed as a decisive change of the mean field, or a phase transition, along the $N=Z$ line.

M. Hasegawa; K. Kaneko; T. Mizusaki; Y. Sun

2006-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

457

Multi-particle correlation function to study short-lived nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unstable 10C nuclei are produced as quasi-projectiles in 12C+24Mg collisions at E/A = 53 and 95 MeV. The decay of their short-lived states is studied with the INDRA multidetector array via multi-particle correlation functions. The obtained results show that heavy-ion collisions can be used as a tool to access spectroscopic information of unbound states in exotic nuclei, such as their energies and the relative importance of different sequential decay widths.

Grenier, F; Roy, R; Verde, G; Thériault, D; Frankland, J D; Wieleczko, J P; Borderie, B; Bougault, R; Dayras, R; Galíchet, E; Guinet, D; Lautesse, P; Neindre, N Le; López, O; Moisan, J; Nalpas, L; Napolitani, P; Pârlog, M; Rivet, M F; Rosato, E; Tamain, B; Vient, E; Vigilante, M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Multi-particle correlation function to study short-lived nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unstable 10C nuclei are produced as quasi-projectiles in 12C+24Mg collisions at E/A = 53 and 95 MeV. The decay of their short-lived states is studied with the INDRA multidetector array via multi-particle correlation functions. The obtained results show that heavy-ion collisions can be used as a tool to access spectroscopic information of unbound states in exotic nuclei, such as their energies and the relative importance of different sequential decay widths.

F. Grenier; A. Chbihi; R. Roy; G. Verde; D. Thériault; J. D. Frankland; J. P. Wieleczko; B. Borderie; R. Bougault; R. Dayras; E. Galichet; D. Guinet; P. Lautesse; N. Le Neindre; O. Lopez; J. Moisan; L. Nalpas; P. Napolitani; M. Parlog; M. F. Rivet; E. Rosato; B. Tamain; E. Vient; M. Vigilante

2008-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

459

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. ... More Tables on Pennsylvania's Electricity Profile: Formats; Table 2.

460

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Maps. Maps by energy source and topic, ... Solar › Energy in Brief. ... More Tables on United States's Electricity Profile: Formats;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Regional Profiles: Pipeline Capacity and Service  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Regional Profiles: Pipeline Capacity ... large petrochemical and electric utility industries drawn there ... accounts for large electricity load ...

462

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. ... More Tables on New Hampshire's Electricity Profile: Formats;

463

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government ... Archived State Electricity Profiles. Choose a Year: ...

464

Secondary nuclear fragment beams for investigations of relativistic fragmentation of light radioactive nuclei using nuclear photoemulsion at Nuclotron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Slowly extracted relativistic beams of light nuclei and a beam transportation line net system constitute a good base for secondary nuclear beams forming at the LHE accelerator facility. A recent years activity in the field at the Laboratory is connected with a project on study light nuclei structure by means the emulsion technique [1,2]. The paper shortly summarizes results of the work.

Rukoyatkin, P A; Kukushkina, R I; Ramzhin, V N; Zarubin, P I

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Temperature profiles determine HRSG steam production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examine how temperature profiles affect steam production in heat recovery steam generators(HRSG). A typical gas/steam temperature profile for a HRSG is shown. Heat balance equations for the superheater, evaporator, and the complete HRSG are given along with examples for calculating the HRSG temperature profiles after assuming the pinch and approach point temperatures.

Ganapathy, V.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Analytic calculations of the spectra of ultra high energy cosmic ray nuclei. II. The general case of background radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the problem of ultra high energy nuclei propagation in extragalactic background radiations. The present paper is the continuation of the accompanying paper I where we have presented three new analytic methods to calculate the fluxes and spectra of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) nuclei, both primary and secondary, and secondary protons. The computation scheme in this paper is based on the analytic solution of coupled kinetic equations, which takes into account the continuous energy losses due to the expansion of the universe and pair-production, together with photo-disintegration of the nuclei. This method includes in the most natural way the production of secondary nuclei in the process of photo-disintegration of the primary nuclei during their propagation through extragalactic background radiations. In paper I, in order to present the suggested analytical schemes of calculations, we have considered only the case of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, in the present paper we gene...

Aloisio, R; Grigorieva, S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Benchmark calculation of no-core Monte Carlo shell model in light nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Monte Carlo shell model is firstly applied to the calculation of the no-core shell model in light nuclei. The results are compared with those of the full configuration interaction. The agreements between them are within a few % at most.

T. Abe; P. Maris; T. Otsuka; N. Shimizu; Y. Utsuno; J. P. Vary

2011-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

468

Simple model for decay of superdeformed nuclei C. A. Stafford and B. R. Barrett  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simple model for decay of superdeformed nuclei C. A. Stafford and B. R. Barrett Physics Department, and the dynamics are overdamped. As RAPID COMMUNICATIONS C. A. STAFFORD AND B. R. BARRETT PHYSICAL REVIEW C 60. Fisher, A. Garg, and W. Zwerger, Rev. Mod. Phys. 59, 1 1987 . 10 C. A. Stafford and N. S. Wingreen, Phys

Stafford, Charles

469

Classification of Potential Nuclei in Prostate Histology Images using Shape Manifold Learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Muhammad Arif1 , Nasir Rajpoot2 1 Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nilore, Islamabad, Pakistan 2 Department of Computer Science, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK Email and other diseases based on nuclear morphometry is the delineation of nuclei in the images of stained tissue

Rajpoot, Nasir

470

Liquid-gas phase transition in hot nuclei: correlation between dynamical and thermodynamical signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics and thermodynamics of phase transition in hot nuclei are studied through experimental results on multifragmentation of heavy systems (A$geq$200) formed in central heavy ion collisions. Different signals indicative of a phase transition studied in the INDRA collaboration are presented and their consistency is stressed.

M. F. Rivet; B. Borderie; R. Bougault; P. Désesquelles; E. Galichet; B. Guiot; N. Le Neindre; M. Parlog; G. Tabacaru; J. P. Wieleczko; the INDRA Collaboration

2005-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

471

Liquid-gas phase transition in hot nuclei studied with INDRA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thanks to the high detection quality of the INDRA array, signatures related to the dynamics (spinodal decomposition) and thermodynamics (negative microcanonical heat capacity) of a liquid-gas phase transition have been simultaneously studied in multifragmentation events in the Fermi energy domain. The correlation between both types of signals strongly supports the existence of a first order phase transition for hot nuclei.

B. Borderie; R. Bougault; P. Desesquelles; E. Galichet; B. Guiot; Ph. Lautesse; N. Le Neindre; J. Marie; M. Parlog; M. Pichon. M. F. Rivet; E. Rosato; G. Tabacaru; M. Vigilante; J. P. Wieleczko

2003-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

472

Benchmark calculation of no-core Monte Carlo shell model in light nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Monte Carlo shell model is firstly applied to the calculation of the no-core shell model in light nuclei. The results are compared with those of the full configuration interaction. The agreements between them are within a few % at most.

Abe, T; Otsuka, T; Shimizu, N; Utsuno, Y; Vary, J P; 10.1063/1.3584062

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Benchmark calculation of no-core Monte Carlo shell model in light nuclei  

SciTech Connect

The Monte Carlo shell model is firstly applied to the calculation of the no-core shell model in light nuclei. The results are compared with those of the full configuration interaction. The agreements between them are within a few % at most.

Abe, T.; Shimizu, N. [Department of Physics, the University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Maris, P.; Vary, J. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Otsuka, T. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); CNS, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Utsuno, Y. [ASRC, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

474

CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF GALAXY ZOO MERGERS: FREQUENCY OF BINARY ACTIVE NUCLEI IN MASSIVE MERGERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} that already have optical active galactic nucleus (AGN) signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N{sub H} {approx}< 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (<40 counts per nucleus; f{sub 2-10keV} {approx}< 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}) to reliably separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGNs in these mergers are rare (0%-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

Teng, Stacy H. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Bonning, Erin W. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Lintott, Chris J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Oh, Kyuseok [Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Cardamone, Carolin N. [Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning, Brown University, P.O. Box 1912, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Keel, William C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 206 Gallalee Hall, 514 University Boulevard, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-034 (United States); Simmons, Brooke D. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Treister, Ezequiel, E-mail: stacy.h.teng@nasa.gov [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

475

Slow proton production in semi-inclusive DIS off nuclei: the role of final state interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of the final state interaction on the production of slow protons in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic lepton scattering off nuclei is considered within the spectator mechanism and a realistic approach in which the rescattering in the medium of both the recoiling proton and the hadronizing nucleon debris are taken into account.

M. Alvioli; C. Ciofi degli Atti; V. Palli

2006-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

476

Non-Markovian approach to the damping of giant monopole resonances in nuclei  

SciTech Connect

The collisional relaxation rates of the giant monopole vibrations in nuclei are calculated using a semiclassical transport equation with a memory dependent collision term. Calculations show that depending on the mass the collisional damping accounts for about ten to twenty percent of the experimental damping widths.

Ayik, S.; Belkacem, M.; Bonasera, A. (Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee 38505 (United States) INFN-Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud, Viale Andrea Doria (ang. Via S. Sofia), 95123 Catania (Italy))

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

HEP/123-qed Fine structure of alpha decay in odd nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using an ? decay level scheme, the fine structure in odd nuclei is explained by taking into account the radial and rotational couplings between the unpaired valence nucleon and the core of the decaying system. It is shown that the experimental behavior of the ? decay fine structure phenomenon is governed by the dynamical characteristics of the system.

M. Mirea

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Cloud-Active Nuclei from Coal-Fired Electric Power Plants and Their Interactions with Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the plumes from coal-fired electric power plants are generally about 2 to 5 times greater than in the ambient air unaffected by the plumes. However, if the ambient air is very clean, the ...

Peter V. Hobbs; Jeffrey L. Stith; Lawrence F. Radke

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Fusion and Direct Reactions of Halo Nuclei at Energies around the Coulomb Barrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present understanding of reaction processes involving light unstable nuclei at energies around the Coulomb barrier is reviewed. The effect of coupling to direct reaction channels on elastic scattering and fusion is investigated, with the focus on halo nuclei. A list of definitions of processes is given, followed by a review of the experimental and theoretical tools and information presently available. The effect of couplings on elastic scattering and fusion is studied with a series of model calculations within the coupled-channels framework. The experimental data on fusion are compared to "bare" no-coupling one-dimensional barrier penetration model calculations. On the basis of these calculations and comparisons with experimental data, conclusions are drawn from the observation of recurring features. The total fusion cross sections for halo nuclei show a suppression with respect to the "bare" calculations at energies just above the barrier that is probably due to single neutron transfer reactions. The data for total fusion are also consistent with a possible sub-barrier enhancement; however, this observation is not conclusive and other couplings besides the single-neutron channels would be needed in order to explain any actual enhancement. We find that a characteristic feature of halo nuclei is the dominance of direct reactions over fusion at near and sub-barrier energies; the main part of the cross section is related to neutron transfers, while calculations indicate only a modest contribution from the breakup process.

N. Keeley; R. Raabe; N. Alamanos; J. L. Sida

2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

480

Search for a Possible Spontaneous Emission of Muons from Heavy Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for an exotic natural radioactivity of lead nuclei, using nuclear emulsion sheets as detector, is described. We discuss the experimental set-up of a test performed at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (Italy), the event simulation, data analysis and preliminary results.

M. Giorgini

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclei profile value-added" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.