National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for nuclear weapons nonproliferation

  1. EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel SUMMARY ...

  2. Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty | National Nuclear Security Administra...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy ... Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons off ...

  3. Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    or rogue nations will acquire nuclear weapons or other weapons of mass destruction (WMD). NNSA, through its Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN), works closely ...

  4. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  5. Some thoughts on the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krikorian N.H.; Hawkins, H.T.

    1996-05-01

    This paper discusses factors controlling the dissemination of nuclear technologies and especially fissile materials.

  6. Energy Secretary Abraham Announces Nuclear Nonproliferation Effort...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Energy Secretary Abraham Announces Nuclear Nonproliferation Effort with Kazakhstan for Former Soviet Nuclear Weapons Facility January 30, 2002 Energy Secretary Abraham Announces ...

  7. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristensen, Hans M.

    2014-05-09

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  8. Leveraging U.S. nuclear weapons policy to advance U.S. nonproliferation goals : implications of major theories of international relations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, Andrew

    2009-06-01

    National policymakers are currently considering a dilemma of critical importance to the continued security of the United States: how can U.S. nuclear weapons policies be leveraged to benefit U.S. nuclear nonproliferation goals in the near-term, without sacrificing U.S. national security? In its role supporting U.S. nuclear weapons policy, Sandia National Laboratories has a responsibility to provide objective technical advice to support policy deliberations on this question. However, to best fulfill this duty Sandia must have a broader understanding of the context of the problem. To help develop this understanding, this paper analyzes the two predominant analytical perspectives of international relations theory to explore their prescriptions for how nuclear weapons and nonproliferation policies interact. As lenses with which to view and make sense of the world, theories of international relations must play a crucial role in framing the trade-offs at the intersection of the nuclear weapons and nonproliferation policy domains. An analysis of what these theories suggest as courses of action to leverage nuclear weapons policies to benefit nonproliferation goals is then offered, with particular emphasis on where the policy prescriptions resulting from the respective theories align to offer near-term policy changes with broad theoretical support. These policy prescriptions are then compared to the 2001 Nuclear Posture Review to understand what the theories indicate policymakers may have gotten right in their dealing with the nuclear dilemma, and where they may have gone wrong. Finally, a brief international relations research agenda is proposed to help address the dilemma between nuclear deterrence and nuclear nonproliferation policies, with particular emphasis on how such an agenda can best support the needs of the policy community and a potential 'all things nuclear' policy deliberation and decision-support framework.

  9. EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This study analyzes the potential environmental impacts of adopting a policy to manage foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel containing uranium enriched in the United States. In particular, the study examines the comparative impacts of several alternative approaches to managing the spent fuel.

  10. Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Programs Nonproliferation One of the gravest threats the United States and the international community face is the possibility that terrorists or rogue nations will acquire nuclear weapons or other weapons of mass destruction (WMD). NNSA, through its Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN), works closely with a wide range of international partners, key U.S. federal agencies, the U.S. national laboratories, and the private sector to secure, safeguard, and/or dispose of dangerous nuclear

  11. Nuclear World Order and Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joeck, N

    2007-02-05

    The decision by India and Pakistan in May 1998 to conduct nuclear weapon tests and declare themselves as nuclear weapon states challenged South Asian regional stability calculations, US nonproliferation policy, and prevailing assumptions about international security. A decade later, the effects of those tests are still being felt and policies are still adjusting to the changed global conditions. This paper will consider non- and counter-proliferation policy options for the United States and Pakistan as they work as partners to prevent the transfer of nuclear technology and further nuclear proliferation.

  12. Nuclear Weapons Journal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Weapons Journal Nuclear Weapons Journal The Nuclear Weapons Journal ceased publication after Issue 2, 2009. Below are Nuclear Weapons Journal archived issues. Issue 2, 2009 ...

  13. Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Nuclear Nonproliferation Nuclear forensics, explained: NNSA analytic chemists help keep the world safe One of the gravest threats the world faces is the possibility that terrorists will acquire nuclear weapons or the necessary materials to construct a weapon. Part of the work of NNSA's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and the national laboratories is to support investigations into the... DOE/NNSA Successfully Establishes Uranium Lease and Takeback Program to Support

  14. Nuclear Nonproliferation, International Safeguards and Nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Nuclear Nonproliferation, International Safeguards and Nuclear Security in the Middle East Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Nonproliferation, ...

  15. Nuclear Nonproliferation, International Safeguards and Nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Nonproliferation, International Safeguards and Nuclear Security in the Middle East Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Nonproliferation, International ...

  16. Nuclear Deterrence in the Age of Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, J

    2009-01-21

    The fallacy of zero nuclear weapons, even as a virtual goal, is discussed. Because the complete abolition of nuclear weapons is not verifiable, nuclear weapons will always play a role in the calculus of assure, dissuade, deter and defeat (ADDD). However, the relative contribution of nuclear weapons to international security has diminished. To reconstitute the Cold War nuclear capability, with respect to both the nuclear weapons capability and their associated delivery systems, is fiscally daunting and not warranted due to competing budgetary pressures and their relative contribution to international security and nonproliferation. A proposed pathway to a sustainable nuclear weapons capability end-state is suggested which provides enough ADDD; a Dyad composed of fewer delivery and weapon systems, with trickle production at the National Laboratories and private sector to maintain capability and guard against technological surprise.

  17. Virtual nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, J.F.

    1997-08-01

    The term virtual nuclear weapons proliferation and arsenals, as opposed to actual weapons and arsenals, has entered in recent years the American lexicon of nuclear strategy, arms control, and nonproliferation. While the term seems to have an intuitive appeal, largely due to its cyberspace imagery, its current use is still vague and loose. The author believes, however, that if the term is clearly delineated, it might offer a promising approach to conceptualizing certain current problems of proliferation. The first use is in a reference to an old problem that has resurfaced recently: the problem of growing availability of weapon-usable nuclear materials in civilian nuclear programs along with materials made `excess` to defense needs by current arms reduction and dismantlement. It is argued that the availability of these vast materials, either by declared nuclear-weapon states or by technologically advanced nonweapon states, makes it possible for those states to rapidly assemble and deploy nuclear weapons. The second use has quite a different set of connotations. It is derived conceptually from the imagery of computer-generated reality. In this use, one thinks of virtual proliferation and arsenals not in terms of the physical hardware required to make the bomb but rather in terms of the knowledge/experience required to design, assemble, and deploy the arsenal. Virtual weapons are a physics reality and cannot be ignored in a world where knowledge, experience, materials, and other requirements to make nuclear weapons are widespread, and where dramatic army reductions and, in some cases, disarmament are realities. These concepts are useful in defining a continuum of virtual capabilities, ranging from those at the low end that derive from general technology diffusion and the existence of nuclear energy programs to those at the high end that involve conscious decisions to develop or maintain militarily significant nuclear-weapon capabilities.

  18. NNSA Labs host U.S. and Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Labs host U.S. and Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Non-Nuclear Weapon State Representatives | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS...

  19. Nonproliferation and Arms Control | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Nonproliferation Nonproliferation and Arms Control The mission of the Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control (NPAC) is to prevent proliferation, ensure peaceful nuclear uses, and enable verifiable nuclear reductions. NPAC provides a comprehensive approach to strengthen nonproliferation and arms control regimes, achieving its mission through four subprograms: International Nuclear Safeguards Nuclear Controls Nuclear Verification Nonproliferation Policy Learn More

  20. Presentation: DOE Nuclear Nonproliferation | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Presentation: DOE Nuclear Nonproliferation Presentation: DOE Nuclear Nonproliferation A briefing to the Secretary's Energy Advisory Board on DOE nuclear nonproliferation activities prepared by: Anne Harrington, US Department of Energy. DOE Nuclear Nonproliferation (2.49 MB) More Documents & Publications Global Threat Reduction Initiative 2008_Transition_Program_Details_Book_Three.pdf Report of the Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation

  1. Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability LANL has strengthened its capability in a key aspect of nuclear nonproliferation by combining two groups within its Global Security organization. June 27, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

  2. Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    community face is the possibility that terrorists or rogue nations will acquire nuclear weapons or other weapons of mass destruction (WMD). NNSA, through its Office of...

  3. Preliminary results of calculations for heavy-water nuclear-power-plant reactors employing {sup 235}U, {sup 233}U, and {sup 232}Th as a fuel and meeting requirements of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ioffe, B. L.; Kochurov, B. P.

    2012-02-15

    A physical design is developed for a gas-cooled heavy-water nuclear reactor intended for a project of a nuclear power plant. As a fuel, the reactor would employ thorium with a small admixture of enriched uranium that contains not more than 20% of {sup 235}U. It operates in the open-cycle mode involving {sup 233}U production from thorium and its subsequent burnup. The reactor meets the conditions of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons: the content of fissionable isotopes in uranium at all stages of the process, including the final one, is below the threshold for constructing an atomic bomb, the amount of product plutonium being extremely small.

  4. Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nonproliferation NNSA Announces Elimination of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) from Indonesia All of Southeast Asia Now HEU-Free (WASHINGTON, D.C.) - The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Indonesian Nuclear Industry, LLC (PT INUKI), the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), and the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) of the... NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation leaders gather in nation's capital Recently, the NNSA held the fourth meeting

  5. Sandia's Nuclear Weapons Mission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Weapons Mission Ensuring that the nation's stockpile is safe, secure and effective, and that it meets military requirements America's Nuclear Weapons Systems Engineering ...

  6. Nonproliferation Policy | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nonproliferation Policy Challenge: Address evolving threats/challenges to the nonproliferation and arms control regimes. Solution: Develop programs and strategies to address emerging nonproliferation and arms control challenges and opportunities. Learn More 10 CFR Part 810 Related Topics international security international security policy NIS nuclear controls safeguards safeguards and security verification Related News Nuclear Verification International Nuclear Safeguards Nonproliferation and

  7. nuclear weapons

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    09, 2015

    WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and United States Air Force completed eight successful...

  8. Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy ... and monitor nuclear weapons production, proliferation, and nuclear explosions worldwide. ...

  9. Systems resilience : a new analytical framework for nuclear nonproliferation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, Arian Leigh

    2011-12-01

    This paper introduces the concept of systems resilience as a new framework for thinking about the future of nonproliferation. Resilience refers to the ability of a system to maintain its vital functions in the face of continuous and unpredictable change. The nonproliferation regime can be viewed as a complex system, and key themes from the literature on systems resilience can be applied to the nonproliferation system. Most existing nonproliferation strategies are aimed at stability rather than resilience, and the current nonproliferation system may be over-constrained by the cumulative evolution of strategies, increasing its vulnerability to collapse. The resilience of the nonproliferation system can be enhanced by diversifying nonproliferation strategies to include general international capabilities to respond to proliferation and focusing more attention on reducing the motivation to acquire nuclear weapons in the first place. Ideas for future research, include understanding unintended consequences and feedbacks among nonproliferation strategies, developing methodologies for measuring the resilience of the nonproliferation system, and accounting for interactions of the nonproliferation system with other systems on larger and smaller scales.

  10. Fast reactors and nuclear nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avrorin, E.N.; Rachkov, V.I.; Chebeskov, A.N.

    2013-07-01

    Problems are discussed with regard to nuclear fuel cycle resistance in fast reactors to nuclear proliferation risk due to the potential for use in military programs of the knowledge, technologies and materials gained from peaceful nuclear power applications. Advantages are addressed for fast reactors in the creation of a more reliable mode of nonproliferation in the closed nuclear fuel cycle in comparison with the existing fully open and partially closed fuel cycles of thermal reactors. Advantages and shortcomings are also discussed from the point of view of nonproliferation from the start with fast reactors using plutonium of thermal reactor spent fuel and enriched uranium fuel to the gradual transition using their own plutonium as fuel. (authors)

  11. Abraham Announces Second Major Nuclear Nonproliferation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    technicians at a former nuclear weapons plant in Kazakhstan will turn their talents to ... The ULBA Metallurgical Plant, a former nuclear weapons facility in Kazahkstan, will expand ...

  12. non-proliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    non-proliferation

  13. Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    span>

    WASHINGTON D.C - The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) announced today the removal of 36 kilograms...

  14. Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation NNSA Announces Elimination of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) from Indonesia All of Southeast Asia Now HEU-Free (WASHINGTON, D.C.) - The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Indonesian Nuclear Industry, LLC (PT INUKI), the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), and the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) of the... NNSA program strengthens national security from afar The Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence

  15. Workshop on nuclear power growth and nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph F

    2010-01-01

    It is widely viewed that an expansion of nuclear power would have positive energy, economic and environmental benefits for the world. However, there are concerns about the economic competitiveness, safety and proliferation and terrorism risks of nuclear power. The prospects for a dramatic growth in nuclear power will depend on the ability of governments and industry to address these concerns, including the effectiveness of, and the resources devoted to, plans to develop and implement technologies and approaches that strengthen nonproliferation, nuclear materials accountability and nuclear security. In his Prague speech, President Obama stated: 'we should build a new framework for civil nuclear cooperation, including an international fuel bank, so that countries can access peaceful power without increasing the risks of proliferation. That must be the right of every nation that renounces nuclear weapons, especially developing countries embarking on peaceful programs. And no approach will succeed if it's based on the denial of rights to nations that play by the rules. We must harness the power of nuclear energy on behalf of our efforts to combat climate change, and to advance peace opportunity for all people.' How can the President's vision, which will rekindle a vigorous public debate over the future of nuclear power and its relation to proliferation, be realized? What critical issues will frame the reemerging debate? What policies must be put into place to address these issues? Will US policy be marked more by continuity or change? To address these and other questions, the Los Alamos National Laboratory in cooperation with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars will host a workshop on the future of nuclear power and nonproliferation.

  16. Principal Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Principal Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Ken Baker at the 32nd Annual International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors in ...

  17. Nuclear Arms Control, Nonproliferation, and Counterterrorism: Impacts on Public Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreicer, Mona; Pregenzer, Arian

    2014-04-01

    Reducing the risks of nuclear war, limiting the spread of nuclear weapons and reducing global nuclear weapons stockpiles are key national and international security goals. They are pursued through a variety of international arms control, nonproliferation and counter-terrorism treaties and agreements. These legally binding and political commitments, together with the institutional infrastructure that supports them, work to establish global norms of behavior and have limited the spread of weapons of mass destruction. Beyond the primary security objectives, reducing the likelihood of the use of nuclear weapons, preventing environmental releases of radioactive material, increasing the availability of safe and secure nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, and providing scientific data relevant to predicting and managing the consequences of natural or human-caused disasters world-wide provide significant benefits to global public health.

  18. NA 20 - Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) 20 - Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

  19. Identification of nuclear weapons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihalczo, J.T.; King, W.T.

    1987-04-10

    A method and apparatus for non-invasively indentifying different types of nuclear weapons is disclosed. A neutron generator is placed against the weapon to generate a stream of neutrons causing fissioning within the weapon. A first detects the generation of the neutrons and produces a signal indicative thereof. A second particle detector located on the opposite side of the weapon detects the fission particles and produces signals indicative thereof. The signals are converted into a detected pattern and a computer compares the detected pattern with known patterns of weapons and indicates which known weapon has a substantially similar pattern. Either a time distribution pattern or noise analysis pattern, or both, is used. Gamma-neutron discrimination and a third particle detector for fission particles adjacent the second particle detector are preferably used. The neutrons are generated by either a decay neutron source or a pulled neutron particle accelerator.

  20. Nuclear Arms Control, Nonproliferation, and Counterterrorism: Impacts on Public Health

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dreicer, Mona; Pregenzer, Arian

    2014-04-01

    Reducing the risks of nuclear war, limiting the spread of nuclear weapons and reducing global nuclear weapons stockpiles are key national and international security goals. They are pursued through a variety of international arms control, nonproliferation and counter-terrorism treaties and agreements. These legally binding and political commitments, together with the institutional infrastructure that supports them, work to establish global norms of behavior and have limited the spread of weapons of mass destruction. Beyond the primary security objectives, reducing the likelihood of the use of nuclear weapons, preventing environmental releases of radioactive material, increasing the availability of safe and secure nuclearmore » technology for peaceful purposes, and providing scientific data relevant to predicting and managing the consequences of natural or human-caused disasters world-wide provide significant benefits to global public health.« less

  1. DOE Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation DNN | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation DNN Jump to: navigation, search Name: DOE Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN) Place: Washington, Washington, DC Zip: 20585 Product: String...

  2. non-proliferation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    hosted representatives from 11StatesParties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and one representative from the United Nations Office for...

  3. Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Safety » Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation President Truman signed the Atomic Energy Act in 1946, creating the Atomic Energy Commission -- which later became a part of the Department of Energy. Read more about the Department of Energy's role in nuclear security in <a href="/node/1041771/">our interactive timeline.</a> | Energy Department Photo. President Truman signed the Atomic Energy Act in 1946, creating the Atomic Energy

  4. Advances in Nuclear Nonproliferation Technology & Policy Conference:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bridging the Gaps in Nuclear Nonproliferation Advances in Nuclear Nonproliferation Technology & Policy Conference Advances in Nuclear Nonproliferation Technology & Policy Conference: Bridging the Gaps in Nuclear Nonproliferation WHEN: Sep 25, 2016 8:00 AM - Sep 30, 2016 5:00 PM WHERE: La Fonda Hotel, Santa Fe, NM CONTACT: Bill Flor (505) 665-8768 CATEGORY: Community Science INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description This conference seeks to build upon previous ANS topical conferences

  5. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20).

  6. Nuclear Weapons Mission at Sandia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-03-12

    Take a rare “tour” of Sandia National Laboratories’ nuclear weapons work and see the strong, multidisciplinary relationship between all of Sandia’s missions and capabilities.

  7. Assessing the Institution of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toomey, Christopher

    2010-05-14

    The nuclear nonproliferation regime is facing a crisis of effectiveness. During the Cold War, the regime was relatively effective in stemming the proliferation of nuclear weapons and building an institutional structure that could, under certain conditions, ensure continued success. However, in the evolving global context, the traditional approaches are becoming less appropriate. Globalization has introduced new sets of stresses on the nonproliferation regime, such as the rise of non-state actors, broadening extensity and intensity of supply chains, and the multipolarization of power. This evolving global context demands an analytical and political flexibility in order to meet future threats. Current institutional capabilities established during the Cold War are now insufficient to meet the nonproliferation regime’s current and future needs. The research was based on information gathered through interviews and reviews of the relevant literature, and two dominant themes emerged. First, that human security should be integrated into the regime to account for the rise of non-state actors and networked violence. Second, confidence in the regime’s overall effectiveness has eroded at a time where verification-based confidence is becoming more essential. The research postulates that a critical analysis of the regime that fully utilizes institutional theory, with its focus on rules, normative structures, and procedures will be essential to adapting the regime to the current global context, building mechanisms for generating trust, creating better enforcement, and providing flexibility for the future.

  8. Report of a Workshop in Nuclear Forces and Nonproliferation held at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington, DC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph F

    2009-01-01

    The workshop addressed evolving nuclear forces and their impacts on nonproliferation in the context of the new strategic environment, the Obama Administration's Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) Review and the 2010 Conference (RevCon) of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The issues discussed are at the heart of the debate on nuclear policy issues such asfuture nuclear weapons requirements and nonproliferation, but also the stockpile stewardship program and infrastructure modernization. The workshop discussions reflected the importance of the NPRfor defining the role of US nuclear forces in dealing with 21s1 century threats and providing guidance that will shape NNSA and DoD programs. They also highlighted its importancefor NPT diplomacy. The discussion noted the report of the bipartisan Congressional Commission on the Strategic Posture of the United States, and the expectation that the NPR would likely reflect its consensus to a large degree (although the Administration was not bound by the report). There was widespread support for developing thefoundationsfor a sustainable nuclear-weapon program that addresses nuclear weapons, infrastructure and expertise in the broader nonproliferation, disarmament and international security contexts. The discussion also revealed a convergence of views, but no consensus, on a number of important issues, including the diminished role but continued importance of nuclear weapons; the need to take action to ensure the sustainability of the stockpile, and the recapitalization of the infrastructure and expertise; and the need to take action to promote nonproliferation, arms control and disarmament objectives.

  9. Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support NBL Program Office NBL PO Home About Programs Certified Reference Materials Program Measurement Evaluation Nuclear Safeguards and ...

  10. Non-Proliferation Treaty | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Non-Proliferation Treaty

  11. Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... best practices in Russia. Expand nuclear security best practices exchanges , e.g., Israel, France, and the U.K. Increase SLD mobile detection support for law enforcement ...

  12. Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    17, 2015

    Washington, D.C. -The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) will...

  13. Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    dispose of dangerous nuclear and radiological material, and detect and control the proliferation of related WMD technology and expertise. Vietnam Removal Working in close...

  14. Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and detect and control the proliferation of related WMD technology and expertise. ... both state- and non-state-based proliferation of nuclear and radiological materials ...

  15. NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation leaders gather in nation's

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    capital | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation leaders gather in nation's capital Wednesday, June 8, 2016 - 9:38am NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Science Council met at NNSA headquarters in Washington. Recently, the NNSA held the fourth meeting of the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Science Council in Washington, DC. The Science Council provides a way for senior-level leadership from NNSA headquarters and the labs,

  16. nuclear weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    weapons DOE, NNSA leaders open summit on the physical security of nuclear weapons Deputy Secretary of Energy Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, NNSA Principal Deputy Administrator Madelyn Creedon, and numerous speakers from throughout the Nuclear Security Enterprise spoke at the 2016 Nuclear Weapons Physical Security Collaboration Summit earlier this month at Joint Base Andrews in... Y-12 National Security Complex Completes W69 Dismantlement The man who trains everyone on the bombs Mark Meyer, training

  17. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, the relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Thomas Jr.

    2014-05-09

    The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) is the most important international security arrangement that we have that is protecting the world community and this has been true for many years. But it did not happen by accident, it is a strategic bargain in which 184 states gave up the right forever to acquire the most powerful weapon ever created in exchange for a commitment from the five states allowed to keep nuclear weapons under the NPT (U.S., U.K., Russia, France and China), to share peaceful nuclear technology and to engage in disarmament negotiations aimed at the ultimate elimination of their nuclear stockpiles. The most important part of this is the comprehensive nuclear test ban (CTBT); the thinking by the 184 NPT non-nuclear weapon states was and is that they understand that the elimination of nuclear weapon stockpiles is a long way off, but at least the NPT nuclear weapon states could stop testing the weapons. The CTBT has been ratified by 161 states but by its terms it can only come into force if 44 nuclear potential states ratify; 36 have of the 44 have ratified it, the remaining eight include the United States and seven others, most of whom are in effect waiting for the United States. No state has tested a nuclear weapon-except for complete outlier North Korea-in 15 years. There appears to be no chance that the U.S. Senate will approve the CTBT for ratification in the foreseeable future, but the NPT may not survive without it. Perhaps it is time to consider an interim measure, for the UN Security Council to declare that any future nuclear weapon test any time, anywhere is a 'threat to peace and security', in effect a violation of international law, which in today's world it clearly would be.

  18. Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... to detect nuclear explosions near and far NNSA Deputy Administrator Creedon Travels to China DNN Sentinel Newsletter Volume II, No. 1 (March 2016) Volume I, No. 3 (November 2015) ...

  19. NNSA Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation visits Oak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ridge | Y-12 National Security Complex NNSA Deputy Administrator ... NNSA Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation visits Oak Ridge Posted: January 25, 2016 - 1:12pm NNSA Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Anne Harrington addresses the East Tennessee Economic Council. Making the world a safer place. That is the message Anne Harrington delivered to the East Tennessee Economic Council about NNSA's role in nuclear nonproliferation. Harrington, Deputy

  20. The gas centrifuge and nuclear weapons proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Houston G.; Glaser, Alexander; Kemp, R. Scott

    2014-05-09

    Uranium enrichment by centrifugation is the basis for the quick and efficient production of nuclear fuel-or nuclear weapons.

  1. Nuclear Nonproliferation Ontology Assessment Team Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strasburg, Jana D.; Hohimer, Ryan E.

    2012-01-01

    Final Report for the NA22 Simulations, Algorithm and Modeling (SAM) Ontology Assessment Team's efforts from FY09-FY11. The Ontology Assessment Team began in May 2009 and concluded in September 2011. During this two-year time frame, the Ontology Assessment team had two objectives: (1) Assessing the utility of knowledge representation and semantic technologies for addressing nuclear nonproliferation challenges; and (2) Developing ontological support tools that would provide a framework for integrating across the Simulation, Algorithm and Modeling (SAM) program. The SAM Program was going through a large assessment and strategic planning effort during this time and as a result, the relative importance of these two objectives changed, altering the focus of the Ontology Assessment Team. In the end, the team conducted an assessment of the state of art, created an annotated bibliography, and developed a series of ontological support tools, demonstrations and presentations. A total of more than 35 individuals from 12 different research institutions participated in the Ontology Assessment Team. These included subject matter experts in several nuclear nonproliferation-related domains as well as experts in semantic technologies. Despite the diverse backgrounds and perspectives, the Ontology Assessment team functioned very well together and aspects could serve as a model for future inter-laboratory collaborations and working groups. While the team encountered several challenges and learned many lessons along the way, the Ontology Assessment effort was ultimately a success that led to several multi-lab research projects and opened up a new area of scientific exploration within the Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Verification.

  2. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    O 452.4C, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons by LtCol Karl Basham Functional areas: Nuclear Explosives, Nuclear Weapons, Security, Safety, Weapon...

  3. Uncrackable code for nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Mark

    2014-11-20

    Mark Hart, a scientist and engineer in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Defense Technologies Division, has developed a new approach for ensuring nuclear weapons and their components can't fall prey to unauthorized use. The beauty of his approach: Let the weapon protect itself. "Using the random process of nuclear radioactive decay is the gold standard of random number generators," said Mark Hart. "You’d have a better chance of winning both Mega Millions and Powerball on the same day than getting control of IUC-protected components."

  4. Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing Washington, DC President Clinton extends the nuclear weapons testing moratorium for at least 15 months

  5. Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing Eisenhower Halts Nuclear Weapons Testing Washington, DC President Eisenhower announces a moratorium on nuclear weapons testing to begin on October 31, 1958

  6. Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing | National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing Clinton Extends Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Testing Washington, DC President Clinton extends the nuclear weapons testing ...

  7. Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | (NNSA) Weapons Testing Resumes Nuclear Weapons Testing Resumes Washington, DC The Soviet Union breaks the nuclear test moratorium and the United States resumes testing

  8. weapon dismantlement | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    weapon dismantlement

  9. Control of Nuclear Weapon Data

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-21

    The directive establishes the policy, process and procedures for control of nuclear weapon data to ensure that dissemination of the information is restricted to individuals with appropriate clearances, approved authorization and valid need-to-know in keeping with the Atomic Energy Act (as amended) stipulation of ensuring common defense and security. Supersedes DOE O 5610.2.

  10. Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Northwest National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Placeholder image for Steve Mladineo. Steve Mladineo October 2009 Fellow of the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management Steve Mladineo joined Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 1993 and has managed the Nuclear Arms Control and Nonproliferation Product Line, has been the PNNL Account Manager for

  11. Preparation for the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Extension Conference in 1995. Workshop summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrzanowski, P.L.

    1993-05-07

    About 30 specialists in non-proliferation participated in a workshop to explore ideas for US Government preparatory steps leading to the 1995 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Extension Conference. To that end, workshop sessions were devoted to reviewing the lessons learned from previous Review Conferences, discussing the threats to the non-proliferation regime together with ways of preserving and strengthening it, and examining the management of international nuclear commerce. A fundamental premise shared by workshop participants was that extension of the NPT is immensely important to international security. The importance of stemming proliferation and, more specifically, extending the Treaty, is growing as a result of the significant changes in the world. If the conferees of the Extension Conference decide on no extension or extension for a short limited duration, some technically advanced states that have foregone development of nuclear weapons may begin to rethink their options. Also, other arms control measures, such as the Chemical Weapons Convention, could start to unravel. The US must provide strong international leadership to ensure that the Extension Conference is a success, resulting in Treaty extension, perhaps through successive terms, into the indefinite future. Workshop participants were struck by the urgent need for the US to take organizational steps so that it is highly effective in its advance preparations for the Extension Conference. Moreover, the Extension Conference provides both a challenge and an opportunity to mold a cohesive set of US policy actions to define the future role of nuclear weapons and combat their proliferation.

  12. Nuclear Weapons Complex reconfiguration study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Shortly after assuming duties as Secretary of Energy, I reviewed the Nuclear Weapons Complex Modernization Report'' submitted to the Congress in January 1989 as required by the National Defense Authorization Act of 1988 and 1989. My review showed that several of the report's assumptions needed to be re-evaluated. During this eighteen-month review, dramatic world changes forced further reassessments of the future Nuclear Weapons Complex. These changes are reflected in the new report. The new report presents a plan to achieve a reconfigured complex, called Complex-21. Complex-21 would be smaller, less diverse, and less expensive to operated than the Complex of today. Complex-21 would be able to safely and reliability support nuclear deterrent stockpile objectives set forth by the President and funded by the Congress. It would be consistent with realities of the emerging international security environment and flexible enough to accommodate the likely range of deterrent contingencies. In addition, Complex-21 would be constructed and operated to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and orders. Achieving Complex-21 will require significant resources. This report provides and organized approach toward selecting the most appropriate configuration for Complex-21, satisfying environmental requirements, and minimizing costs. The alternative -- to continue to use piecemeal fixes to run an antiquated complex -- will be more expensive and provide a less reliable Nuclear Weapons Complex. As a consequence, implementation of the Complex-21 plan is considered necessary to ensure continued viability of our nuclear deterrent.

  13. FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Reactor Programs before the House Appropriations Committee, Energy and Water Development Subcommittee | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactor Programs before the House Appropriations Committee, Energy and Water Development Subcommittee March 02, 2011 Chairman Frelinghuysen and Ranking Member Pastor, thank you for the opportunity to join you today to discuss the investments the President has requested for our nuclear nonproliferation

  14. U.S. - Kazakhstan Cooperation on Nuclear Security and Nonproliferation |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) - Kazakhstan Cooperation on Nuclear Security and Nonproliferation October 12, 2011 The United States of America and the Republic of Kazakhstan have cooperated on a broad range of nuclear security and nonproliferation topics for nearly two decades. The partnership was established under the umbrella of the Cooperative Threat Reduction Agreement signed in December 1993. Today, the Departments of Energy, Defense, and State work closely with the

  15. Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled Oak Ridge, TN Continuing its efforts to reduce the size of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile, the National Nuclear Security Administration announced that uranium components from two major nuclear weapons systems formerly deployed on U.S. Air Force missiles and aircraft have been dismantled at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, TN. Y-12 workers

  16. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-08-05

    The Order defines the Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, which was established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

  17. Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) and the U.K. Department of Energy and Climate Change concluded a workshop at Wilton Park, About This Site Budget IG Web Policy...

  18. weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    weapons NNSA Reaches Important Milestone with B61-12 Life Extension Program WASHINGTON - The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) announced that they recently formally authorized the production engineering phase of its B61-12 warhead life extension program (LEP). This important milestone comes after four years of work in... DOD/DOE NNSA Joint Munitions Program: 30 years of collaborative innovation As part of NNSA's commitment to protecting and preserving the

  19. NNSA Announces University Contracts | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... maintains the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile, promotes international nuclear non-proliferation and safety, reduces global danger from weapons of mass destruction, provides the ...

  20. National Nuclear Security Administration Announces University...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    maintains the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile, promotes international nuclear non-proliferation and safety, reduces global danger from weapons of mass destruction, provides the ...

  1. Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Nuclear weapons are developed, produced, and maintained in the stockpile, and then retired and dismantled. This sequence of events is known as the nuclear weapons life cycle. The Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and in partnership with Department of Defense (DoD) conducts activities in a joint nuclear weapons life cycle process. The major steps, or phases, of the life cycle are described below. Currently,

  2. Toward a nuclear weapons free world?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maaranen, S.A.

    1996-09-01

    Doubts about the wisdom of relying on nuclear weapons are as old as nuclear weapons themselves. But despite this questioning, nuclear weapons came to be seen as the indispensable element of American (indeed Western) security during the Cold War. By the 1970s and 1980s, however, discontent was growing about the intense US-Soviet nuclear arms competition, as it failed to provide any enduring improvement in security; rather, it was seen as creating ever greater risks and dangers. Arms control negotiations and limitations, adopted as a means to regulate the technical competition, may also have relieved some of the political pressures and dangers. But the balance of terror, and the fears of it, continued. The Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) under President Reagan was a very different approach to escaping from the precarious protection of nuclear weapons, in that it sought a way to continue to defend the US and the West, but without the catastrophic risks of mutual deterrence. As such, SDI connoted unhappiness with the precarious nuclear balance and, for many, with nuclear weapons in general. The disappearance of the Warsaw Pact, the disintegration of the Soviet Union, and the sudden end of the Cold War seemed to offer a unique opportunity to fashion a new, more peaceful world order that might allow for fading away of nuclear weapons. Scholars have foreseen two different paths to a nuclear free world. The first is a fundamental improvement in the relationships between states such that nuclear weapons are no longer needed. The second path is through technological development, e.g., missile defenses which could provide effective protection against nuclear attacks. The paper discusses nuclear weapon policy in the US, views of other nuclear states, the future of nuclear weapons, and issues in a less-nuclear world.

  3. National Nuclear Security Administration ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Under Article III of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), each ... pillars designed to limit weapons proliferation, encourage nuclear disarmament, and ...

  4. Statement on Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    before the House Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy & Water Development | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities before the House Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy & Water Development February 26, 2013 INTRODUCTION Chairman Frelinghuysen, Ranking Member Kaptur, and distinguished members of the Subcommittee, thank you for having me here today to discuss the National Nuclear

  5. Linking Legacies: Connecting the Cold War Nuclear Weapons Production...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Linking Legacies: Connecting the Cold War Nuclear Weapons Production Processes to Their Environmental Consequences Linking Legacies: Connecting the Cold War Nuclear Weapons ...

  6. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and several related enforcement issues. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues (111.05

  7. Laboratory's role in Cold War nuclear weapons testing program...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70th anniversary lecture Laboratory's role in Cold War nuclear weapons testing program focus of next 70th anniversary lecture Lab's role in the development of nuclear weapons ...

  8. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon programs and several related enforcement issues. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues (55.31

  9. Nuclear Weapons Dismantlement Rate Up 146 Percent | National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Weapons Dismantlement Rate Up 146 Percent October 01, 2007 WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The United States significantly increased its rate of dismantled nuclear weapons during ...

  10. Reducing the Nuclear Weapons Stockpile | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Reducing the Nuclear Weapons Stockpile January 01, 2009 The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is responsible for maintaining the safety, security and reliability of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile. In doing so, it ensures that the U.S. nuclear deterrent meets the needs of the 21st century. The current U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile is the lowest it has been since the Eisenhower Administration. Dismantlement of the W79 was

  11. Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Weapons The New START Treaty, which was signed in 2010, between the United States and Russian Federation will cap the strategic deployed nuclear arsenals of each country at 1,550 warheads, a nearly 75% reduction compared with the first START (Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty), which expired in 2009. New START follows a series of similar treaties between the United States and Russia all with the goal of reducing nuclear weapons in both countries and, ultimately, lowering the global nuclear

  12. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-01-26

    All nuclear explosives and nuclear explosive operations require special safety, security, and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program is established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Supersedes DOE O 452.1D.

  13. Nonproliferation Graduate Program | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    students with academic specializations in International Affairs, Political Science, Economics, Chemical Sciences, Physics, Nuclear Science, Nuclear Engineering and Engineering. ...

  14. Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Nonproliferation and Arms Control NNSA and IAEA Hold the 20th International Training Course on Nuclear Material Accounting and Control Washington, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are hosting 35 representatives from 30 countries at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from April 26 to May 8, 2015 for the 20th International Training Course

  15. NNSA and the European Commission advance global nuclear nonproliferation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    goals at 6th annual Joint Steering Committee Meeting | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) and the European Commission advance global nuclear nonproliferation goals at 6th annual Joint Steering Committee Meeting Friday, July 15, 2016 - 11:13am NNSA and the European Commission's Joint Research Centre participants at the 6th Annual Joint Steering Committee meeting. NNSA and the European Commission (E.C.) recently met in Ispra, Italy, to review the status of collaborative efforts

  16. AEC and control of nuclear weapons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    control of nuclear weapons The Atomic Energy Commission took control of the atomic energy project known originally as the Manhattan Project on January 1, 1947. This shift from the ...

  17. Nonproliferation and Arms Control | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy ... and Arms Control (NPAC) is to prevent proliferation, ensure peaceful nuclear uses, and ...

  18. Energy Secretary Abraham Announces Nuclear Nonproliferation Effort...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    its nuclear program and joined the Non- Proliferation Treaty as a non-nuclear state. ... DOENNSA has committed 1.2 million in Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (IPP) ...

  19. Stopping the emergence of nuclear weapon states in the Third World: An examination of the Iraq weapons inspection program. Study project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, D.A.

    1993-01-31

    The end of the Gulf War and the implementation of United Nation (UN) resolutions uncovered an Iraqi multi-billion dollar nuclear weapons program. Iraq's ability to pursue this clandestine program for more than a decade, despite periodic inspections, suggest that the myriad of treaties and agreements designed to curb proliferation may be inadequate. Clearly more must be done to deter and counter the spread of these deadly weapon. The UN weapons inspections in Iraq provide insight into possible solutions to the proliferation of nuclear weapons technology in the developing world. This study examines the policy and operational aspects associated with an intrusive United Nations inspection program. In its final analysis, this paper suggests that an effective challenge inspection program is a necessary element in countering the spread of weapons of mass destruction. Further, it suggests that the UN, as the only internationally accepted enforcement organization, be fully engaged in nonproliferation issues and support the challenge inspection program.

  20. Nonproliferation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    en Under U.S.-Russia Partnership, Final Shipment of Fuel Converted From 20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads Arrives in United States and Will Be Used for U.S. Electricity http:...

  1. Integration of facility modeling capabilities for nuclear nonproliferation analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, Humberto; Burr, Tom; Coles, Garill A; Edmunds, Thomas A.; Garrett, Alfred; Gorensek, Maximilian; Hamm, Luther; Krebs, John; Kress, Reid L; Lamberti, Vincent; Schoenwald, David; Tzanos, Constantine P; Ward, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  2. INTEGRATION OF FACILITY MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorensek, M.; Hamm, L.; Garcia, H.; Burr, T.; Coles, G.; Edmunds, T.; Garrett, A.; Krebs, J.; Kress, R.; Lamberti, V.; Schoenwald, D.; Tzanos, C.; Ward, R.

    2011-07-18

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  3. Advances in Nuclear Nonproliferation Technology & Policy Conference...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Verification and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC) Special Panel Sessions include: Iran Deal: 1 Year Later 2016 Nuclear Security Summit Lessons from the First 50 Years of ...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Missions: Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programs Nuclear Weapons Stockpile Stewardship Ensuring the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile is safe, secure, and reliable. About Nuclear Weapons Since 1949, Sandia's scientists and engineers have conducted breakthrough research in weaponization. About Safety & Security Safe and secure nuclear weapons are of paramount importance in a changing global threat environment. Safety and Security Science & Technology Sandia provides the science and engineering to help maintain and certify the

  5. Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a part of the Department of Energy. Read more about the Department of Energy's role in nuclear security in our interactive timeline. | Energy...

  6. Nuclear Weapon Surety Interface with the Department of Defense

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-05-14

    This Order establishes Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration requirements and responsibilities for addressing joint nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system surety activities in conjunction with the Department of Defense. Supersedes DOE O 452.6.

  7. Security and Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-12-17

    This directive establishes requirements and responsibilities to prevent the deliberate unauthorized use of U.S. nuclear explosives and U.S. nuclear weapons. Cancels DOE O 452.4.

  8. Audit Report National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Weapons

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Weapons Systems Configuration Management DOE/IG-0902 March 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 March 26, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Weapons Systems Configuration Management" BACKGROUND The National

  9. 2012 Annual Planning Summary for NNSA Defense Nuclear NonProliferation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within the NNSA Defense Nuclear NonProliferation.

  10. The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation comprises SEAB members and individuals with expertise and experience in the technologies, institutions, and...

  11. Management of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-06-08

    The Order defines and affirms the authorities and responsibilities of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) for the management of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex and emphasizes that the management of the United States nuclear weapons stockpile is the DOE's highest priority for the NNSA and the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. Supersedes DOE O 5600.1.

  12. The monitoring and verification of nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garwin, Richard L.

    2014-05-09

    This paper partially reviews and updates the potential for monitoring and verification of nuclear weapons, including verification of their destruction. Cooperative monitoring with templates of the gamma-ray spectrum are an important tool, dependent on the use of information barriers.

  13. Seventy Years of Computing in the Nuclear Weapons Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Seventy Years of Computing in the Nuclear Weapons Program Seventy Years of Computing in the Nuclear Weapons Program WHEN: Jan 13, 2015 7:30 PM - 8:00 PM WHERE: Fuller Lodge Central ...

  14. Report of a workshop on nuclear forces and nonproliferation Woodrow Wilson international center for scholars, Washington, DC October 28, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph F

    2010-12-08

    A workshop sponsored by the Los Alamos National Laboratory in cooperation with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars was held at the Wilson Center in Washington, DC, on October 28, 2010. The workshop addressed evolving nuclear forces and their impacts on nonproliferation in the context of the new strategic environment, the Obama Administration's Nuclear Posture Review and the 2010 NPT Review Conference. The discussions reflected the importance of the NPR for defining the role of US nuclear forces in dealing with 21st century threats and providing guidance for National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Department of Defense (DoD) programs and, for many but not all participants, highlighted its role in the successful outcome of the NPT RevCon. There was widespread support for the NPR and its role in developing the foundations for a sustainable nuclear-weapon program that addresses nuclear weapons, infrastructure and expertise in the broader nonproliferation, disarmament and international security contexts. However, some participants raised concerns about its implementation and its long-term effectiveness and sustainability.

  15. U.S. and Tunisia to Cooperate on Nuclear Safeguards, Nonproliferation and

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Peaceful Nuclear Energy Infrastructure | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) U.S. and Tunisia to Cooperate on Nuclear Safeguards, Nonproliferation and Peaceful Nuclear Energy Infrastructure September 22, 2010 VIENNA, AUSTRIA -The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) today announced that it has signed a Memorandum of Cooperation on nuclear safeguards and other nonproliferation topics with the Tunisia Ministry of Higher Education. NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino

  16. Savannah River Site hosts military interns | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    complex dedicated to environmental cleanup, nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship, and nuclear materials disposition in support of the U.S. nuclear non-proliferation efforts. ...

  17. A parameter study to optimizing scintillator characteristics for increased sensitivity in nuclear nonproliferation, safeguards, and security based applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shy, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    A parameter study to optimizing scintillator characteristics for increased sensitivity in nuclear nonproliferation, safeguards, and security based applications

  18. Nuclear weapons and NATO-Russia relations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornwell, G.C.

    1998-12-01

    Despite the development of positive institutional arrangements such as Russian participation in the NATO-led peacekeeping force in Bosnia and the NATO- Russia Permanent Joint Council, the strategic culture of Russia has not changed in any fundamental sense. Russian strategic culture has not evolved in ways that would make Russian policies compatible with those of NATO countries in the necessary economic, social, technological, and military spheres. On the domestic side, Russia has yet to establish a stable democracy and the necessary legal, judicial, and regulatory institutions for a free-market economy. Russia evidently lacks the necessary cultural traditions, including concepts of accountability and transparency, to make these adaptations in the short-term. Owing in part to its institutional shortcomings, severe socioeconomic setbacks have afflicted Russia. Russian conventional military strength has been weakened, and a concomitant reliance by the Russians on nuclear weapons as their ultimate line of defense has increased. The breakdown in the infrastructure that supports Russian early warning and surveillance systems and nuclear weapons stewardship defense, coupled with a tendency towards has exacerbated Russian anxiety and distrust toward NATO. Russia`s reliance on nuclear weapons as the ultimate line of defense, coupled with a tendency toward suspicion and distrust toward NATO, could lead to dangerous strategic miscalculation and nuclear catastrophe.

  19. Dismantlements of Nuclear Weapons Jump 50 Percent | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Dismantlements of Nuclear Weapons Jump 50 Percent June 07, 2007 WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Meeting President Bush's directive to reduce the country's nuclear arsenal, the Department of ...

  20. NNSA Administrator Gordon Assesses Security Of the Nuclear Weapons...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Gordon Assesses Security Of the Nuclear Weapons Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile ...

  1. Date Set for Closure of Russian Nuclear Weapons Plant - NNSA...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Date Set for Closure of Russian Nuclear Weapons Plant - NNSA Is Helping Make It Happen | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission ...

  2. Robert C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead Nuclear Weapons Program...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead Nuclear Weapons Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

  3. Record-Setting Year for Nuclear Weapon Dismantlement Achieved...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Record-Setting Year for Nuclear Weapon Dismantlement Achieved at the Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS...

  4. The IAEA: Neutralizing Iraq's nuclear weapons potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zifferero, M.

    1993-04-01

    With support from UNSCOM and staff members from several countries, the IAEA has succeeded in identifying and destroying most of Iraq's nuclear weapons potential. IAEA activities in Iraq have also established a sound basis for long-term monitoring of Iraq. This will involve several procedures and techniques, including the periodic monitoring of Iraq's main bodies of water and unannounced visits of resident inspectors to plants, factories, and research centers.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Missions: Nuclear Weapons:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Areas: Weapons Science Weapons Science & Technology National labs provide the science and technology to maintain and certify the nuclear stockpile in the absence of full-scale weapons testing. The facilities and expertise used to fulfill this mission over the last 60 years are even more critical as the stockpile ages, the total number of weapons decreases (greatly increasing the relative worth of each remaining weapon), and the security threat to the stockpile changes. Science

  6. The US nuclear weapon infrastructure and a stable global nuclear weapon regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Immele, John D; Wagner, Richard L

    2009-01-01

    US nuclear weapons capabilities -- extant force structure and nuclear weapons infrastructure as well as declared policy -- influence other nations' nuclear weapons postures, at least to some extent. This influence can be desirable or undesirable, and is, of course, a mixture of both. How strong the influence is, and its nature, are complicated, controversial, and -- in our view -- not well understood but often overstated. Divergent views about this influence and how it might shape the future global nuclear weapons regime seem to us to be the most serious impediment to reaching a national consensus on US weapons policy, force structure and supporting infrastructure. We believe that a paradigm shift to capability-based deterrence and dissuasion is not only consistent with the realities of the world and how it has changed, but also a desirable way for nuclear weapon postures and infrastructures to evolve. The US and other nuclear states could not get to zero nor even reduce nuclear arms and the nuclear profile much further without learning to manage latent capability. This paper has defined three principles for designing NW infrastructure both at the 'next plateau' and 'near zero.' The US can be a leader in reducing weapons and infrastructure and in creating an international regime in which capability gradually substitutes for weapons in being and is transparent. The current 'strategy' of not having policy or a Congressionally-approved plan for transforming the weapons complex is not leadership. If we can conform the US infrastructure to the next plateau and architect it in such a way that it is aligned with further arms reductions, it will have these benefits: The extant stockpile can be reduced in size, while the smaller stockpile still deters attack on the US and Allies. The capabilities of the infrastructure will dissuade emergence of new challenges/threats; if they emerge, nevertheless, the US will be able to deal with them in time. We will begin to transform the

  7. Office Of NONprOliferatiON

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Office Of NONprOliferatiON aNd iNterNatiONal Security July 2011 www.nnsa.doe.gov National Nuclear Security Administration ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Develop and implement DOE/NNSA nonproliferation and arms control policy to reduce the risk of weapons of mass destruction. control the spread of WMD-related material, equipment, technology and expertise. Safeguard and Secure nuclear material to prevent its diversion, theft and sabotage. Negotiate, monitor and verify compliance with international

  8. NNSA Timeline | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    agency within the U.S. Department of Energy, responsible for the management and security of the nation's nuclear weapons, nuclear nonproliferation, and naval reactor programs. ...

  9. Special Issue on University Nonproliferation Education and Training Introduction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leek, K. M.

    2006-07-31

    Nonproliferation, like many aspects of security, has not played out as many expected following the end of the cold war. The peace dividend has been elusive in many countries. The notion that the world would become a safer and more secure place as nuclear weapons stockpiles were reduced has been trumped by the rise in international terrorism. Hopes that nuclear weapons would lose their salience as markers of elite status among nations along with pressures to acquire them have been dashed. The drive by some countries and terrorist groups to acquire nuclear weapons has not diminished, and the threat of proliferation has increased. At the level of the nation state, the Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) itself is under pressure as more nations acquire nuclear weapons, de facto weapons states fail to join, and nations that want to acquire them leave or threaten to leave. At the sub-state level, the convergence of terrorism and weapons of mass destruction (WMD) has introduced an element of uncertainty into nonproliferation that is unprecedented. Another feature of the post-cold war era that has taken many by surprise is the continued, and growing need for trained specialists in nonproliferation and nuclear materials management. Contained within the notion of disarmament and reduced strategic importance of nuclear weapons was the expectation of a diminishing workforce of trained nonproliferation and nuclear materials specialists. Events have overtaken this assumption.

  10. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-01-22

    This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts/deliberate unauthorized use. Cancels DOE O 452.4A. Canceled by DOE O 452.4C.

  11. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-11-19

    The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts (DUAs), deliberate unauthorized use (DUU), and denial of authorized use (DAU).

  12. President Obama Calls for an End to Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Calls for an End to Nuclear Weapons President Obama Calls for an End to Nuclear Weapons Prague, Czech Republic President Obama in a landmark speech in Prague, Czech Republic called nuclear weapons the gravest threat to international security and advocates for the global abolition of nuclear weapons

  13. Nuclear Weapon Surety Interface with the Department of Defense

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-10-19

    The Order prescribes how the Department of Energy participates with the Department of Defense (DoD) to ensure the surety (safety, security and control) of military nuclear weapon systems deployed around the world. The Order establishes National Nuclear Security Administration requirements and responsibilities for addressing joint nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system surety activities in conjunction with the DoD. Cancels DOE O 5610.13. Canceled by DOE O 452.6A.

  14. Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report: Class of 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMakin, Andrea H.

    2012-08-20

    Annual report for the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP), which PNNL administers for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Features the Class of 2011. The NGFP is a NNSA program with a mission to cultivate future technical and policy leaders in nonproliferation and international security. Through the NGFP, outstanding graduate students with career interests in nonproliferation are appointed to program offices within the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN). During their one-year assignment, Fellows participate in programs designed to detect, prevent, and reverse the proliferation of nuclear weapons.

  15. Nuclear nonproliferation and safety: Challenges facing the International Atomic Energy Agency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Chairman of the Senate Committee on Govermental Affairs asked the United States General Accounting Office (GAO) to review the safeguards and nuclear power plant safety programs of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report examines (1) the effectiveness of IAEA`s safeguards program and the adequacy of program funding, (2) the management of U.S. technical assistance to the IAEA`s safeguards program, and (3) the effectiveness of IAEA`s program for advising United Nations (UN) member states about nuclear power plant safety and the adequacy of program funding. Under its statute and the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, IAEA is mandated to administer safeguards to detect diversions of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful uses. Because of limits on budget growth and unpaid contributions, IAEA has had difficulty funding the safeguards program. IAEA also conducts inspections of facilities or locations containing declared nuclear material, and manages a program for reviewing the operational safety of designated nuclear power plants. The U.S. technical assistance program for IAEA safeguards, overseen by an interagency coordinating committee, has enhanced the agency`s inspection capabilities, however, some weaknesses still exist. Despite financial limitations, IAEA is meeting its basic safety advisory responsibilities for advising UN member states on nuclear safety and providing requested safety services. However, IAEA`s program for reviewing the operational safety of nuclear power plants has not been fully effective because the program is voluntary and UN member states have not requested IAEA`s review of all nuclear reactors with serious problems. GAO believes that IAEA should have more discretion in selecting reactors for review.

  16. Nuclear energy in a nuclear weapon free world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The prospect of a nuclear renaissance has revived a decades old debate over the proliferation and terrorism risks of the use of nuclear power. This debate in the last few years has taken on an added dimension with renewed attention to disarmament. Increasingly, concerns that proliferation risks may reduce the prospects for realizing the vision of a nuclear-weapon-free world are being voiced.

  17. Evolution and resilience of the nuclear nonproliferation regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, Arian L.

    2014-05-09

    This paper introduces the concept of systems resilience as a new framework for thinking about the future of the nonproliferation regime. Resilience refers to the ability of a system to maintain its vital functions in the face of continuous and unpredictable change. First, I make the case that the nonproliferation regime can be viewed as a complex system. Next, I discuss key themes from the literature on systems resilience and apply them to the nonproliferation system: the difference between resilience and stability; the need for evolution to maintain function; the importance of functional diversity; and the concept of the adaptive cycle. I show that most existing nonproliferation strategies are aimed at stability rather than resilience and that the current nonproliferation system may be over-constrained by the cumulative evolution of strategies. According to the literature on systems resilience, this increases its vulnerability to collapse. I argue that the resilience of the nonproliferation system can be enhanced by increasing international participation in setting the nonproliferation agenda, developing general international response capabilities, focusing on non-coercive approaches to decreasing demand, and applying systems thinking more rigorously to nonproliferation.

  18. Linking Legacies: Connecting the Cold War Nuclear Weapons Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Processes to Their Environmental Consequences | Department of Energy Linking Legacies: Connecting the Cold War Nuclear Weapons Production Processes to Their Environmental Consequences Linking Legacies: Connecting the Cold War Nuclear Weapons Production Processes to Their Environmental Consequences This report described each step in the cycle of nuclear weapons production and defined for the first time a planned disposition path for all waste streams generated prior to 1992 as a result of

  19. Office of Weapons Material Protection | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Weapons Material Protection The Office of Weapons Material Protection (OWMP) enhances the security of Russia's nuclear material at 37 sites, including 11 Russian Navy fuel storage sites, 7 Rosatom weapons sites and 19 Rosatom civilian sites. These sites include weapons design laboratories, uranium enrichment facilities, and material processing/storage sites located in closed cities. In some cases, these industrial sites are the size of small cities and contain

  20. Integration of facility modeling capabilities for nuclear nonproliferation analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burr, Tom; Gorensek, M. B.; Krebs, John; Kress, Reid L; Lamberti, Vincent; Schoenwald, David; Ward, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclearnonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facilitymodeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facilitymodeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facilitymodelingcapabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferationanalysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facilitymodeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facilitymodelingcapabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  1. OSTIblog Articles in the nuclear weapons technology Topic | OSTI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    noted by Pete Domenici, senior fellow at the Bipartisan Policy... Related Topics: Bureau of Mines, communications, hydraulic fracturing, nasa, nuclear weapons technology, Oil Shale

  2. EGS 01-01: Nuclear Weapon Program Enforcement Issues

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    This enforcement guidance focuses on the applicability of 10 CFR Part 830 to nuclear weapon ... Although the requirements of Parts 830 and 835 apply to arrangements other than ...

  3. Gordon Assesses Security At Nuclear Weapons Complex News.....

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Anson Franklin, 202586-7371 September 21, 2001 NNSA Administrator Gordon Assesses Security Of the Nuclear Weapons Complex John Gordon, Administrator of the Department of Energy's ...

  4. Arms control and nonproliferation technologies. Fourth quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staehle, G.; Talaber, C.; Stull, S.

    1992-12-31

    This report includes information concerning: the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation; the nuclear inspections in Iraq, lessons for verification; detection technologies needed for each step of nuclear weapon development; nuclear proliferation problems; strengthening the nuclear reactor fuel cycle against proliferation; monitoring using unattended remote nondestructive assay; seismic monitoring in a proliferation environment; forensic science center, remote infrared spectrometry for nonproliferation applications; and acoustic instrument for identifying chemical munitions.

  5. Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Collaboration Following Russian Delegation Visit to the United States | Department of Energy Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation Collaboration Following Russian Delegation Visit to the United States Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation Collaboration Following Russian Delegation Visit to the United States December 10, 2013 - 2:30pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and

  6. The Effects of Nuclear Weapons (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    is a comprehensive summary of current knowledge on the effects of nuclear weapons. ... WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; MANUALS; NUCLEAR ENERGY; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; SCALING LAWS; US ...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Missions: Nuclear Weapons:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety & Security Safety & Security Linux computer simulation Sandia is responsible for a variety of safety and security features of nuclear weapons. We design safety components and subsystems based on fundamental science-based principles to prevent energy from unintentionally reaching the nuclear explosives components. Weapons security requires denying adversaries access to the weapon and its internal features so that unauthorized detonation cannot be achieved. Because of evolving

  8. US nuclear weapons stockpile (June 1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, R.S. ); Arkin, W.M.

    1993-06-01

    The US. nuclear stockpile is at its lowest level since late 1958 or early 1959. In the past year, many weapons were returned to central military storage depots in the United States and funneled to the Energy Department's Pantex facility for final disassembly and disposal. This article presents a table showing the author's current estimate of the composition of the current operational stockpile, which contains some 10,500 warheads. Also categorized are warheads in [open quotes]inactive reserve[close quotes] and warheads awaiting eventual disassembly. The warheads are generally grouped as bombs, submarine-launched ballistic missiles, intercontinental ballistic missiles, air-launched cruise missiles, and sea-launched cruise missiles. Initial production dates and yield are listed for the warheads.

  9. Major Milestone Achieved in Nuclear Weapons Stockpile Stewardship Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Y-12 | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Major Milestone Achieved in Nuclear Weapons Stockpile Stewardship Program at Y-12 April 18, 2006 PDF icon NR-04-06.pdf

  10. Sandia completes major overhaul of key nuclear weapons test facilities |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) completes major overhaul of key nuclear weapons test facilities Tuesday, May 13, 2014 - 2:46pm Sandia National Laboratories recently completed the renovation of five large-scale test facilities that are crucial to ensuring the safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons systems. The work supports Sandia's ongoing nuclear stockpile modernization work on the B61-12 and W88 Alt, assessments of current stockpile systems, and test and

  11. Seventy Years of Computing in the Nuclear Weapons Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Seventy Years of Computing in the Nuclear Weapons Program Seventy Years of Computing in the Nuclear Weapons Program WHEN: Jan 13, 2015 7:30 PM - 8:00 PM WHERE: Fuller Lodge Central Avenue, Los Alamos, NM, USA SPEAKER: Bill Archer of the Weapons Physics (ADX) Directorate CONTACT: Bill Archer 505 665 7235 CATEGORY: Science INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Rich history of computing in the Laboratory's weapons program. The talk is free and open to the public and is part of the 2014-15 Los

  12. NNSA Signs Memorandum with Kuwait to Increase Cooperation on Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2010-09-01

    On June 23, 2010, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation on nuclear safeguards and other nonproliferation topics with the Kuwait National Nuclear Energy Committee (KNNEC). NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino and KNNEC's Secretary General, Dr. Ahmad Bishara, signed the memorandum at a ceremony at U.S. Department of Energy headquarters in Washington.

  13. A Digest of Nonproliferation Literature.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duggan, Ruth A.

    2006-04-01

    In preparation for the 2005 US/Russian Weapons Laboratories Directors Meeting, the six laboratories participating in the meeting endeavored to develop a strategy for nonproliferation technology research and development. A literature review was conducted to identify possible areas of technical collaboration and technology opportunities associated with improving nonproliferation associated with the civilian nuclear fuel cycle. The issue of multinationalization of the nuclear fuel cycle was also researched. This digest is the compilation of one-page summaries used by management of the three US nuclear weapons laboratories in preparation for strategy development. Where possible, the Web site address of the complete paper is referenced.3 AcknowledgementsThe author wishes to thank Jessica Ruyle, Nancy Orlando-Gay, and Barbara Dry for their research assistance and contributions.4

  14. Five minutes past midnight: The clear and present danger of nuclear weapons grade fissile materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, G.B.

    1996-02-01

    Growing stockpiles of nuclear weapons grade fissile materials (plutonium and highly enriched uranium) are a `clear and present danger` to international security. Much of this material is uncontrolled and unsecured in the former Soviet Union (FSU). Access to these materials is the primary technical barrier to a nuclear weapons capability since the technology know-how for a bomb making is available in the world scientific community. Strategies to convince proliferators to give up their nuclear ambitions are problematic since those ambitions are a party of largest regional security. There is no national material control and accounting in Russia. No one knows exactly how much fissile materials they have, and if any is missing. A bankrupt atomic energy industry, unpaid employees and little or no security has created a climate in which more and more fissile materials will likely be sold in black markets or diverted to clandestine nuclear weapons programs or transnational terrorist groups. Control over these materials will ultimately rely on the continuous and simultaneous exercise of several measures. While there is little one can do now to stop a determined proliferator, over time international consensus and a strengthened non-proliferation regime will convince proliferators that the costs outweigh the gains.

  15. U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home About Us Our History NNSA Timeline U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons May...

  16. The Effects of Nuclear Weapons (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Effects of Nuclear Weapons Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Effects of Nuclear Weapons You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) ...

  17. The history of nuclear weapon safety devices (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The history of nuclear weapon safety devices Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The history of nuclear weapon safety devices You are accessing a document from the ...

  18. Ukraine: Independent nuclear weapons capability rising. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewing, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    This thesis argues that Ukraine will move from possession of CIS-controlled nuclear weapons to the development of an independent nuclear capability. It attempts to show how the factors driving Ukraine towards remaining a nuclear state outweigh the factors acting in restraint. This thesis describes the contents of the Ukrainian arsenal, reviews its current material condition and investigates the likelihood that Ukraine can directly control it. This thesis also shows why Ukraine's most likely course in developing and independent nuclear weapons capability will be to retain its 46 SS-24 ICBMs. United States, Ukraine, Russia, Strategic weapons, National strategy, Nuclear strategy, Arms control, Strategic stability, Nuclear weapons Strategic command and control, International relations.

  19. Sandia starts silicon wafer production for three nuclear weapon programs |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) starts silicon wafer production for three nuclear weapon programs Wednesday, March 25, 2015 - 3:24pm Sandia National Laboratories has begun making silicon wafers for three nuclear weapon modernization programs, the largest production series in the history of its Microsystems and Engineering Sciences Applications (MESA) complex. MESA's silicon fab in October began producing base wafers for Application-Specific Integrated Circuits for the

  20. SECURITY AND CONTROL OF NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVES AND NUCLEAR WEAPONS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    http://www.nnsa.energy.gov Office of Nuclear Weapon Surety and Quality SUPPLEMENTAL DIRECTIVE Approved: 7-7-11 IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLS TO PREVENT DELIBERATE UNAUTHORIZED USE NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Office of Defense Programs NA SD 452.4 NA SD 452.4 1 7-7-11 IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLS TO PREVENT DELIBERATE UNAUTHORIZED USE 1. PURPOSE. This NNSA Supplemental Directive (SD) supports the requirements of DOE O 452.4B, Security and Use Control of

  1. Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site, Volume I | Department of Energy Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963. Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site, Volume I Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963. Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site, Volume I Terrence R. Fehner and F.G. Gosling. Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963. Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site, Volume I (pdf). DOE/MA-0003. Washington,

  2. Initiating-event frequencies for nuclear weapons dismantlement hazard analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenhawer, S.W.; Bott, T.F.

    1996-08-01

    A quantitative data base for initiating events encountered during nuclear weapons handling is described. This data base was assembled from incident reports at the plant where the weapons are handled. The strengths and pitfalls of constructing such a data base are elaborated using examples encountered in the data. Insights gained into accident sequences, human error probabilities, and other areas of concern are discussed.

  3. Nonproliferation & Forensics | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nonproliferation & Nuclear Forensics Argonne strives to strengthen the nation's ability to detect, prevent, and interdict proliferation of nuclear, radiological, chemical, and biological weapons. Argonne is one of the world leaders in nuclear reactor design, fuel processing, radiation detection and radiological forensics. This enormous intellectual resource provides insight into the use and misuse of radiological and nuclear materials and equipment around the globe. Using our expertise, we

  4. Y-12 Deploys First Automated Security Weapons System in the DOE Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Weapons Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Deploys First Automated Security Weapons System in the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex September 02, 2005 PDF icon NR09-05.pdf

  5. Briefing, Classification of Nuclear Weapons-Related Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This brief will familiarize individuals from agencies outside of DOE who may come in contact with RD and FRD with the procedures for identifying, classifying, marking, handling, and declassifying documents containing Nuclear Weapons-Related Information.

  6. Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Cold War: The Nevada Test Site, Volume I Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963. Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site, Volume I Terrence ...

  7. NPT Enters Into Force | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NPT Enters Into Force New York, United States The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) goes into effect

  8. The role of nuclear weapons in the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This publication presents the proceedings for the workshop, The Role of Nuclear Weapons in the Year 2000, held on October 22--24, 1990. The workshop participants considered the changing nature of deterrence and of our strategic relationship with the Soviet Union, the impact of nuclear proliferation on regional conflicts, and ways that the nuclear forces might be restructured to reflect new political circumstances.

  9. Chinese tactical nuclear weapons. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, G.B.

    1996-06-01

    The United States, Russia and Great Britain have retired all nonstrategic nuclear weapons. Surprisingly, China has not, China seems to value highly tactical nuclear weapons (TNWs). Most studies of China`s nuclear arsenal focus on strategic nuclear weapons. This focus could mislead those trying to understand PRC TNW strategy. The purpose of this thesis is to explain China`s TNW development. China`s nuclear arsenal evolution can be described in three phases. In the first phase, China developed a limited strategic nuclear deterrent. China`s arsenal was driven by threat. Technology supplanted threat as the dominant driver during the next phase. While conducting research to miniaturize strategic warheads, were developed. During the third phase, a reduced threat caused political leaders to restrain the nuclear program. The nuclear program reverted to its primary objective - building strategic weapons, causing TNW production to level off. This study explains the last two phases of TNW development. The research goals are twofold: to compare threat and technology, the primary motivations driving TNW production; and to examine the relationship between doctrine and development, describing how one influences the other. The conclusion offers U.S. foreign policy recommendations.

  10. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VII. International perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this volume is to assess the proliferation vulnerabilities of the present deployment of civilian nuclear-power systems within the current nonproliferation regime and, in light of their prospective deployment, to consider technical and institutional measures and alternatives which may contribute to an improved regime in which nuclear power could play a significant part. An assessment of these measures must include consideration of their nonproliferation effectiveness as well as their bearing upon energy security, and their operational, economic, and political implications. The nature of these considerations can provide some measure of their likely acceptability to various nations.

  11. Public perspectives of nuclear weapons in the post-cold war environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins-Smith, H.C.; Herron, K.G.; Barke, R.P.

    1994-04-01

    This report summarizes the findings of a nationwide survey of public perceptions of nuclear weapons in the post-cold war environment. Participants included 1,301 members of the general public, 1,155 randomly selected members of the Union of Concerned Scientists, and 1,226 employees randomly selected from the technical staffs of four DOE national laboratories. A majority of respondents from all three samples perceived the post-cold war security environment to pose increased likelihood of nuclear war, nuclear proliferation, and nuclear terrorism. Public perceptions of nuclear weapons threats, risks, utilities, and benefits were found to systematically affect nuclear weapons policy preferences in predictable ways. Highly significant relationships were also found between public trust and nuclear weapons policy preferences. As public trust and official government information about nuclear weapons increased, perceptions of nuclear weapons management risks decreased and perceptions of nuclear weapons utilities and benefits increased. A majority of respondents favored decreasing funding for: (1) developing and testing new nuclear weapons; (2) maintaining existing nuclear weapons, and (3) maintaining the ability to develop and improve nuclear weapons. Substantial support was found among all three groups for increasing funding for: (1) enhancing nuclear weapons safety; (2) training nuclear weapons personnel; (3) preventing nuclear proliferation; and (4) preventing nuclear terrorism. Most respondents considered nuclear weapons to be a persistent feature of the post-cold war security environment.

  12. Of carrots and sticks or air power as a nonproliferation tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, F.R.

    1994-07-01

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons has become one of the principal threats to international peace and security. Postwar revelations from Iraq demonstrate how close a determined nation can come to covertly developing nuclear weapons without detection. In the past two years the issue of nonproliferation has increased in importance and the regime is becoming more intrusive. On the other hand, a number of nations hostile to the international order are attempting to develop or otherwise obtain nuclear weapons These states include North Korea, Iran, and Iraq. This paper argues that the use or threat of force must be incorporated into the nonproliferation regime. When properly integrated into nonproliferation strategy, force offers positive effects in terms of deterrence, compellence, and defense. Thus, the paper calls for the institutionalization of force options into the nonproliferation tool kit, ideally as part of chapter 7 enforcement actions under the authority of the UN Security Council.

  13. Managing nuclear weapons in a changing world: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The Center for Security and Technology Studies was established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to support long-range technical studies on issues of importance to US national security. An important goal of the Center is to bring together Laboratory staff and the broader outside community through a program of technical studies, visitors, symposia, seminars, workshops, and publications. With this in mind, the Center and LLNL`s Defense Systems Program sponsored a conference on Managing Nuclear Weapons in a Changing World held on November 17--18,1992. The first day of the meeting focused on nuclear weapons issues in the major geographical areas of the world. On the second day, the conference participants discussed what could be done to manage, control, and account for nuclear weapons in this changing world. Each of the talks and the concluding panel discussion are being indexed as separate documents.

  14. The use of neutron scattering in nuclear weapons research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juzaitis, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    We had a weapons science breakout session last week. Although it would have been better to hold it closer in time to this workshop, I think that it was very valuable. it may have been less of a {open_quotes}short-sleeve{close_quotes} workshop environment than we would have liked, but as the first time two communities-the weapons community and the neutron scattering community- got together, it was a wonderful opportunity to transfer information during the 24 presentations that were made. This report contains discussions on the fundamental analysis of documentation of the enduring stockpile; LANSCE`s contribution to weapons; spallation is critical to understanding; weapons safety assessments; applied nuclear physics requires cross section information; fission models need refinement; and establishing teams on collaborative projects.

  15. Siegfried S. Hecker, Plutonium, and Nonproliferation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Siegfried S. Hecker, Plutonium and Nuclear Nonproliferation Resources with Additional Information * Awards Siegfried S. Hecker Photo Credit: Courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory LeRoy Sanchez On September 17, 2009, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu named Siegfried S. Hecker as a winner of the Enrico Fermi Award 'in recognition for his contributions to plutonium metallurgy, his broad scientific leadership and for his energetic and continuing efforts to reduce the danger of nuclear weapons

  16. Meeting the Next Generation of Nuclear Nonproliferation Specialists...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... DNN R&D directs an integrated research and development portfolio in support of its mission to detect signs of nuclear proliferation and nuclear detonations. The DNN R&D-funded ...

  17. AN ANALYTICAL FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING RELIABLE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICE APPROACHES: ECONOMIC AND NON-PROLIFERATION MERITS OF NUCLEAR FUEL LEASING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreyling, Sean J.; Brothers, Alan J.; Short, Steven M.; Phillips, Jon R.; Weimar, Mark R.

    2010-08-11

    The goal of international nuclear policy since the dawn of nuclear power has been the peaceful expansion of nuclear energy while controlling the spread of enrichment and reprocessing technology. Numerous initiatives undertaken in the intervening decades to develop international agreements on providing nuclear fuel supply assurances, or reliable nuclear fuel services (RNFS) attempted to control the spread of sensitive nuclear materials and technology. In order to inform the international debate and the development of government policy, PNNL has been developing an analytical framework to holistically evaluate the economics and non-proliferation merits of alternative approaches to managing the nuclear fuel cycle (i.e., cradle-to-grave). This paper provides an overview of the analytical framework and discusses preliminary results of an economic assessment of one RNFS approach: full-service nuclear fuel leasing. The specific focus of this paper is the metrics under development to systematically evaluate the non-proliferation merits of fuel-cycle management alternatives. Also discussed is the utility of an integrated assessment of the economics and non-proliferation merits of nuclear fuel leasing.

  18. Nuclear Nonproliferation and Arms Control Primer Prepared for the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Laura S.

    2011-05-25

    To provide a brief overview of key arms control and nonproliferation arrangements for the layperson that may be relevant to the Commission's comprehensive review of policies for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Primer would be published by the Commission and made publicly available, probably as an appendix to a larger Commission report.

  19. Nonproliferation and arms control assessment of weapons-usable fissile material storage and excess plutonium disposition alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (DOE-NN) with support from the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). Its purpose is to analyze the nonproliferation and arms reduction implications of the alternatives for storage of plutonium and HEU, and disposition of excess plutonium, to aid policymakers and the public in making final decisions. While this assessment describes the benefits and risks associated with each option, it does not attempt to rank order the options or choose which ones are best. It does, however, identify steps which could maximize the benefits and mitigate any vulnerabilities of the various alternatives under consideration.

  20. Y-12, the Cold War, and nuclear weapons dismantlement „ Or:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Cold War, and nuclear weapons dismantlement - Or: The Cold War and nuclear weapons dismantlement (title used in The Oak Ridger) The Cold War heated up over the years with such ...

  1. Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer Los Alamos Physicist Eva Birnbaum shows how the laboratory ...

  2. The Effects of Nuclear Weapons (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    book is a revision of "The Effects of Nuclear Weapons" which was issued in 1957. It was ... Although the complex nature of nuclear weapons effects does not always allow exact ...

  3. The Los Alamos nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation technology development program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, H.A. Jr.; Menlove, H.O.; Reilly, T.D.; Bosler, G.E.; Hakkila, E.A.; Eccleston, G.W.

    1994-04-01

    For nearly three decades, Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed and implemented nuclear measurement technology and training in support of national and international nuclear safeguards. This paper outlines the major elements of those technologies and highlights some of the latest developments.

  4. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-08-06

    This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1A. Canceled by DOE O 452.1C.

  5. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-09-20

    This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1B. Canceled by DOE O 452.1D

  6. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14

    This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1C. Canceled by DOE O 452.1D Admin Chg 1.

  7. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-01-17

    This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1. Canceled by DOE O 452.1B.

  8. Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14

    This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.1D.

  9. Securing NNSA's Nuclear Weapons Complex in a Post-9/11 World | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Securing NNSA's Nuclear Weapons Complex in a Post-9/11 World January 02, 2009 The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has several missions that are critical to the country's national security. NNSA is responsible for securing thousands of nuclear weapons and components, and hundreds of tons of special nuclear material in all forms, shapes and sizes. The eight sites in NNSA's nuclear weapons complex are some of the most secure facilities in

  10. The role of the weapons laboratory in nuclear security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barry, W.R. )

    1989-07-01

    The role of the Nuclear Systems/Surety Division and its relationship to the Air Force Weapons Laboratory are described. The Function and goals of the security section within that division, under basic DOD guidance, are considered. Reference is made to work on ballistic protection shrouds for Minuteman II and III and Air Force nuclear weapon shipping containers. BNL-TSO contributions to AFWL study projects are explained. This involvement has existed since 1984 in regard to security improvements for SAC alert aircraft. The work involves ballistic screening and development of a taxiway-gap cable vehicle barrier. Future activities may deal with alert system upgrades, access denial systems, security seals, comprehensive security analysis, and criteria development.

  11. Nuclear weapons research holds benefits for tech industry | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) weapons research holds benefits for tech industry Tuesday, May 31, 2016 - 5:05pm Sandia National Laboratories' Alec Talin inspects a silicon chip coated with a thin oxide layer, an array of platinum electrodes and a MOF film. Optical absorption and interference in the MOF and silicon-dioxide layers give it the deep blue color. Research work performed at NNSA's national laboratories generates fervor among scientists worldwide because it produces new

  12. Y-12 employees receive awards recognizing excellence in nuclear weapons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    program | Y-12 National Security Complex receive ... Y-12 employees receive awards recognizing excellence in nuclear weapons program Posted: October 6, 2014 - 9:09am Defense Programs 2013 Award of Excellence recipient Penny Cunningham receives congratulations from Jim Haynes (far left), CNS president and CEO, Tim Driscoll, NNSA uranium program manager, and Mark Padilla, NPO's assistant manager for programs and projects. Thirteen Y-12 teams received DP Awards of Excellence for 2013 at a

  13. Management Principles for Nonproliferation Organizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Hund, Gretchen

    2012-03-06

    This paper identifies business models and six management principles that can be applied by a nonproliferation organization to maximize the value and effectiveness of its products. The organizations responsible for reducing the nuclear proliferation threat have experienced a substantial growth in responsibility and visibility since the September 11 attacks. Since then, the international community has witnessed revelations of clandestine nuclear facilities, nuclear black markets, periodic nuclear tests, and a resurgence of interest by countries worldwide in developing nuclear capabilities. The security environment will likely continue to evolve in unexpected ways since most of the proliferation threats with which the world will be forced to contend remain unforeseen. To better prepare for and respond to this evolving security environment, many nonproliferation organizations are interested in finding new or better ways to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of their operations. Of course, all organizations, whether they are market driven or non-profit, must operate effectively and efficiently if they are to succeed. Indeed, as this study demonstrates, many of the management principles that this study recommends can help all organizations succeed. However, this study pays particular attention to nonproliferation organizations because of the mission they are responsible for fulfilling. Nonproliferation organizations, including nonproliferation programs that operate within a larger national security organization, are responsible for reducing the threat of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons. These organizations have an enduring mandate from the public and the international community not to fail in the completion of their mission for failure could have detrimental impacts on international security, public health and the environment. Moreover, the public expects nonproliferation organizations and programs to fulfill their mission, even when resources are limited

  14. NNSA Eliminates 100 Metric Tons Of Weapons-Grade Nuclear Material |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Eliminates 100 Metric Tons Of Weapons-Grade Nuclear Material August 25, 2008 WASHINGTON, D.C. -Today the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) announced that it successfully eliminated 100 metric tons of U.S. highly enriched uranium (HEU), enough for thousands of nuclear weapons. For the last decade, the U.S. HEU disposition program has eliminated surplus HEU from the nuclear weapons program by downblending

  15. U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress July 24, 2007 - 2:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman joined the U.S. Secretaries of Defense and State in sending to Congress the Bush Administration's nuclear weapons strategy. This document not only describes the history of nuclear deterrence during the Cold War, but reinforces how deterrence applies to present and future security threats, and what a nuclear

  16. AIM-98-3464 RECEIVED THE HISTORY OF NUCLEAR WEAPON SAFETY DEVICES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... sea on April 7, after extensive search and recovery efforts. ... in the last weapon to enter the nuclear weapon stockpile. ... In electrical terms, nominal size-to-tolerance is equivalent ...

  17. Towards a tactical nuclear weapons treaty? Is There a Role of IAEA Tools of Safeguards?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saunders, Emily C.; Rowberry, Ariana N.; Fearey, Bryan L.

    2012-07-12

    In recent years, there is growing interest in formal negotiations on non-strategic or tactical nuclear weapons. With the negotiations of New START, there has been much speculation that a tactical nuclear weapons treaty should be included in the follow on to New START. This paper examines the current policy environment related to tactical weapons and some of the issues surrounding the definition of tactical nuclear weapons. We then map out the steps that would need to be taken in order to begin discussions on a tactical nuclear weapons treaty. These steps will review the potential role of the IAEA in verification of a tactical nuclear weapons treaty. Specifically, does IAEA involvement in various arms control treaties serve as a useful roadmap on how to overcome some of the issues pertaining to a tactical nuclear weapons treaty?

  18. Nuclear Nonproliferation,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signal Processing System Identification Controls Embedded systems Aerospace Systems Robotics Structural Health Monitoring Thinking Telescopes Machine Learning Los Alamos Dynamics...

  19. Picture of the Week: From nuclear weapons testing to stockpile stewardship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 From nuclear weapons testing to stockpile stewardship On Sept. 23, 1992, the last full-scale underground test of a nuclear weapon was conducted by Los Alamos National Lab at the Nevada Test Site. The test, code named "Divider," was the last of 1,030 nuclear tests carried out by the U.S. July 26, 2015 From nuclear weapons testing to stockpile stewardship x View larger version On Sept. 23, 1992, the last full-scale underground test of a nuclear weapon was conducted by Los Alamos

  20. New Y-12 Mill Supports Non-Proliferation | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Mill Supports Non-Proliferation November 09, 2010 Microsoft Office document icon NR-11-09

  1. Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer Los Alamos Physicist Eva Birnbaum shows how the laboratory is manufacturing a radioactive treatment that targets tumors, without killing the surrounding healthy tissue. December 20, 2015 Los Alamos physicist Eva Birnbaum Los Alamos physicist Eva Birnbaum Los Alamos turns its nuclear weapons power to war on cancer NBC News got exclusive access to Los Alamos National Laboratory

  2. NNSA Eliminates 100 Metric Tons Of Weapons-Grade Nuclear Material...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    secure and less expensive nuclear weapons complex. ... sale of LEU for safe use in power and research reactors around the world. ... NNSA maintains and enhances the safety, security, ...

  3. TOMORROW: Energy Secretary Moniz to Discuss Nuclear Non-Proliferation and the Iran Deal at Wilson Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz will participate in a Director’s Forum on the importance of nuclear non-proliferation and the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) at the Wilson Center in Washington, D.C.

  4. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) report provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest.

  5. National Nuclear Security Administration ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    to Article VI of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. iii Table of Contents Overview ... Article VI of the Treaty on the Non- Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), has proven ...

  6. forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    forensics Nuclear forensics, explained: NNSA analytic chemists help keep the world safe One of the gravest threats the world faces is the possibility that terrorists will acquire nuclear weapons or the necessary materials to construct a weapon. Part of the work of NNSA's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and the national laboratories is to support investigations into the

  7. National Nuclear Security Administration Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report in Brief: October 2007 - May 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkman, Clarissa O.; Fankhauser, Jana G.; Sandusky, Jessica A.

    2009-05-01

    This abbreviated Annual Report covers program activities of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP) from October 2007 through May 2008--the timeframe between the last Annual Report (which covered activities through September 2007) and the next report (which will begin with June 2008 activities). In that timeframe, the NGFP continued building a solid foundation as the program began reaping the benefits of recently implemented changes. This report is organized by Fellowship class and the pertinent program activities for each, including: October 2007 Recruiting events and final applications (Class of 2008) Winter 2007 Selection and hiring (Class of 2008) Spring 2008 Career development roundtables (Class of 2007) Orientation planning (Class of 2008) Recruitment planning and university outreach (Class of 2009) May 2008 Closing ceremony (Class of 2007)

  8. Plus c`est la meme chose: The future of nuclear weapons in Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maaranen, S.A.

    1996-07-01

    Since the end of the Cold War, the United States perhaps more than any other nuclear weapon state has deeply questioned the future role of nuclear weapons, both in a strategic sense and in Europe. It is probably the United States that has raised the most questions about the continuing need for and efficacy of nuclear weapons, and has expressed the greatest concerns about the negative consequences of continuing nuclear weapons deployment. In the US, this period of questioning has now come to a pause, if not a conclusion. In late 1994 the United States decided to continue to pursue reductions in numbers of nuclear weapons as well as other changes designed to reduce the dangers associated with the possession of nuclear weapons. But at the same time the US concluded that some number of nuclear forces would continue to be needed for national security for the foreseeable future. These necessary nuclear forces include a continuing but greatly reduced stockpile of nuclear bombs deployed in Europe under NATO`s New Strategic Concept. If further changes to the US position on nuclear weapons in Europe are to occur, it is likely to be after many years, and only in the context of dramatic additional improvements in the political and geo-political climate in and around Europe. The future role of nuclear weapons in Europe, as discussed in this report, depends in part on past and future decisions by the United States. but it must also be noted that other states that deploy nuclear weapons in Europe--Britain, France, and Russia, as well as the NATO alliance--have shown little inclination to discontinue their deployment of such weapons, whatever the United States might choose to do in the future.

  9. The Meteorological Monitoring program at a former nuclear weapons plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, D.R.; Bowen, B.M.

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of the Meteorological Monitoring program at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is to provide meteorological information for use in assessing the transport, and diffusion, and deposition of effluent actually or potentially released into the atmosphere by plant operations. Achievement of this objective aids in protecting health and safety of the public, employees, and environment, and directly supports Emergency Response programs at RFP. Meteorological information supports the design of environmental monitoring networks for impact assessments, environmental surveillance activities, remediation activities, and emergency responses. As the mission of the plant changes from production of nuclear weapons parts to environmental cleanup and economic development, smaller releases resulting from remediation activities become more likely. These possible releases could result from airborne fugitive dust, evaporation from collection ponds, or grass fires.

  10. Assurance and assessment techniques for nuclear weapon related software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackledge, M.A.

    1993-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has the qualification evaluation responsibility for the design of certain components intended for use in nuclear weapons. Specific techniques in assurance and assessment have been developed to provide the quality evidence that the software has been properly qualified for use. Qualification Evaluation is a process for assessing the suitability of either a process used to develop or manufacture the product, or the product itself. The qualification process uses a team approach to evaluating a product or process, chaired by a Quality Assurance professional, with other members representing the design organization, the systems organization, and the production agency. Suitable for use implies that adequate and appropriate definition and documentation has been produced and formally released, adequate verification and validation activities have taken place to ensure proper operation, and the software product meets all requirements, explicitly or otherwise.

  11. Assurance and assessment techniques for nuclear weapon related software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackledge, M.A.

    1993-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories has the qualification evaluation responsibility for the design of certain components intended for use in nuclear weapons. Specific techniques in assurance and assessment have been developed to provide the quality evidence that the software has been properly qualified for use. Qualification Evaluation is a process for assessing the suitability of either a process used to develop or manufacture the product, or the product itself The qualification process uses a team approach to evaluating a product or process, chaired by a Quality Assurance professional, with other members representing the design organization, the systems organization, and the production agency. Suitable for use implies that adequate and appropriate definition and documentation has been produced and formally released, adequate verification and validation activities have taken place to ensure proper operation, and the software product meets all requirements, explicitly or otherwise.

  12. Assurance and assessment techniques for nuclear weapon related software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackledge, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has the qualification evaluation responsibility for the design of certain components intended for use in nuclear weapons. Specific techniques in assurance and assessment have been developed to provide the quality evidence that the software has been properly qualified for use. Qualification Evaluation is a process for assessing the suitability of either a process used to develop or manufacture the product, or the product itself. The qualification process uses a team approach to evaluating a product or process, chaired by a Quality Assurance professional, with other members representing the design organization, the systems organization, and the production agency. Suitable for use implies that adequate and appropriate definition and documentation has been produced and formally released, adequate verification and validation activities have taken place to ensure proper operation, and the software product meets all requirements, explicitly or otherwise.

  13. Linking legacies: Connecting the Cold War nuclear weapons production processes to their environmental consequences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the US has begun addressing the environmental consequences of five decades of nuclear weapons production. In support of this effort, the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1995 directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the waste streams generated during each step in the production of nuclear weapons. Accordingly, this report responds to this mandate, and it is the Department`s first comprehensive analysis of the sources of waste and contamination generated by the production of nuclear weapons. The report also contains information on the missions and functions of nuclear weapons facilities, on the inventories of waste and materials remaining at these facilities, as well as on the extent and characteristics of contamination in and around these facilities. This analysis unites specific environmental impacts of nuclear weapons production with particular production processes. The Department used historical records to connect nuclear weapons production processes with emerging data on waste and contamination. In this way, two of the Department`s legacies--nuclear weapons manufacturing and environmental management--have become systematically linked. The goal of this report is to provide Congress, DOE program managers, non-governmental analysts, and the public with an explicit picture of the environmental results of each step in the nuclear weapons production and disposition cycle.

  14. Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Control Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements, implement regimes to reduce nuclear weapons, and detect and dismantle undeclared nuclear programs. Specific subprogram activities include: Implementing current and developing future

  15. Supporting Technology for Chain of Custody of Nuclear Weapons and Materials throughout the Dismantlement and Disposition Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunch, Kyle J.; Jones, Anthony M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Benz, Jacob M.; Denlinger, Laura Schmidt

    2014-05-04

    The ratification and ongoing implementation of the New START Treaty have been widely regarded as noteworthy global security achievements for both the Obama Administration and the Putin (formerly Medvedev) regime. But deeper cuts that move beyond the United States and Russia to engage the P-5 and other nuclear weapons possessor states are envisioned under future arms control regimes, and are indeed required for the P-5 in accordance with their Article VI disarmament obligations in the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. Future verification needs will include monitoring the cessation of production of new fissile material for weapons, monitoring storage of warhead components and fissile materials and verifying dismantlement of warheads, pits, secondary stages, and other materials. A fundamental challenge to implementing a nuclear disarmament regime is the ability to thwart unauthorized material diversion throughout the dismantlement and disposition process through strong chain of custody implementation. Verifying the declared presence, or absence, of nuclear materials and weapons components throughout the dismantlement and disposition lifecycle is a critical aspect of the disarmament process. From both the diplomatic and technical perspectives, verification under these future arms control regimes will require new solutions. Since any acceptable verification technology must protect sensitive design information and attributes to prevent the release of classified or other proliferation-sensitive information, non-nuclear non-sensitive modalities may provide significant new verification tools which do not require the use of additional information barriers. Alternative verification technologies based upon electromagnetic and acoustics could potentially play an important role in fulfilling the challenging requirements of future verification regimes. For example, researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have demonstrated that low frequency electromagnetic

  16. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-08-28

    The order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control elements of DOE O 452.1E to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts, deliberate unauthorized use, and denial of authorized use. Supersedes DOE O 452.4B, dated 1-22-10.

  17. Non-Proliferation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Non-Proliferation Non-Proliferation GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding the transfer, storage or disposition of nuclear materials recovered by DOE for public health, safety or nonproliferation purposes. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) operates several domestic and international programs aimed at securing vulnerable nuclear materials, such as orphan and disused sealed sources and foreign research reactor fuel, in support of nuclear nonproliferation and nuclear

  18. DOE, NNSA leaders open summit on the physical security of nuclear weapons |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) DOE, NNSA leaders open summit on the physical security of nuclear weapons Wednesday, August 17, 2016 - 3:52pm Deputy Secretary of Energy Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, NNSA Principal Deputy Administrator Madelyn Creedon, and numerous speakers from throughout the Nuclear Security Enterprise spoke at the 2016 Nuclear Weapons Physical Security Collaboration Summit earlier this month at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland. The event brought together

  19. COLLOQUIUM: Risks of Nuclear Weapons Use in an Era of Proliferation, Cyber

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Warfare and Terrorism | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab 5, 2014, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MGB Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Risks of Nuclear Weapons Use in an Era of Proliferation, Cyber Warfare and Terrorism Dr. Bruce G. Blair Princeton University The United States and eight other countries that possess nuclear weapons run myriad risks every day -- risks of accidental detonations, of unauthorized launches caused by false warning, of provoking escalation between nuclear forces, and of nuclear

  20. Preliminary Results from an Investigation into Nanostructured Nuclear Radiation Detectors for Non-Proliferation Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ,

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, the concept of embedding composite scintillators consisting of nanosized inorganic crystals in an organic matrix has been actively pursued. Nanocomposite detectors have the potential to meet many of the homeland security, non-proliferation, and border and cargo-screening needs of the nation and, by virtue of their superior nuclear identification capability over plastic, at roughly the same cost as plastic, have the potential to replace all plastic detectors. Nanocomposites clearly have the potential of being a gamma ray detection material that would be sensitive yet less expensive and easier to produce on a large scale than growing large, whole crystals of similar sensitivity. These detectors would have a broad energy range and a sufficient energy resolution to perform isotopic identification. The material can also be fabricated on an industrial scale, further reducing cost. This investigation focused on designing and fabricating prototype core/shell and quantum dot (QD) detectors. Fourteen core/shell and four QD detectors, all with the basic consistency of a mixture of nanoparticles in a polymer matrix with different densities of nanoparticles, were prepared. Nanoparticles with sizes <10 nm were fabricated, embedded in a polystyrene matrix, and the resultant scintillators radiation detector properties were characterized. This work also attempted to extend the gamma energy response on both low- and high-energy regimes by demonstrating the ability to detect low-energy and high-energy gamma rays. Preliminary results of this investigation are consistent with a significant response of these materials to nuclear radiation.

  1. Office of Weapons Material Protection | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    These sites include weapons design laboratories, uranium enrichment facilities, and material processingstorage sites located in closed cities. In some cases, these industrial ...

  2. Weapons Intern Program participants visit Pantex | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA Blog The current Sandia Weapons Intern Program (WIP) class recently visited NNSA's Pantex Plant as part of the six-month program curriculum. While at Pantex, participants ...

  3. Los Alamos Selected as Atomic Weapons Laboratory | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Los Alamos Selected as Atomic Weapons Laboratory Los Alamos, NM Groves selects Los Alamos, New Mexico, as site for separate scientific laboratory to design an atomic bomb

  4. DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex: Challenges to Safety, Security, and Taxpayer Stewardship

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oversight and Investigations Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives "DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex: Challenges to Safety, Security, and Taxpayer Stewardship" FOR RELEASE ON DELIVERY 10:00 AM September 12, 2012 1 Mr. Chairman and Members of the Subcommittee, I am pleased to be here at your request to testify on matters relating to the Department of Energy's oversight of the nuclear weapons complex. 1 The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) was

  5. Source terms for plutonium aerosolization from nuclear weapon accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, D.R.

    1995-07-01

    The source term literature was reviewed to estimate aerosolized and respirable release fractions for accidents involving plutonium in high-explosive (HE) detonation and in fuel fires. For HE detonation, all estimates are based on the total amount of Pu. For fuel fires, all estimates are based on the amount of Pu oxidized. I based my estimates for HE detonation primarily upon the results from the Roller Coaster experiment. For hydrocarbon fuel fire oxidation of plutonium, I based lower bound values on laboratory experiments which represent accident scenarios with very little turbulence and updraft of a fire. Expected values for aerosolization were obtained from the Vixen A field tests, which represent a realistic case for modest turbulence and updraft, and for respirable fractions from some laboratory experiments involving large samples of Pu. Upper bound estimates for credible accidents are based on experiments involving combustion of molten plutonium droplets. In May of 1991 the DOE Pilot Safety Study Program established a group of experts to estimate the fractions of plutonium which would be aerosolized and respirable for certain nuclear weapon accident scenarios.

  6. NEW - DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    All nuclear explosives and nuclear explosive operations require special safety, security, and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program is established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

  7. Terminating Safeguards on Excess Special Nuclear Material: Defense TRU Waste Clean-up and Nonproliferation - 12426

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, Timothy; Nelson, Roger

    2012-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) manages defense nuclear material that has been determined to be excess to programmatic needs and declared waste. When these wastes contain plutonium, they almost always meet the definition of defense transuranic (TRU) waste and are thus eligible for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The DOE operates the WIPP in a manner that physical protections for attractiveness level D or higher special nuclear material (SNM) are not the normal operating condition. Therefore, there is currently a requirement to terminate safeguards before disposal of these wastes at the WIPP. Presented are the processes used to terminate safeguards, lessons learned during the termination process, and how these approaches might be useful for future defense TRU waste needing safeguards termination prior to shipment and disposal at the WIPP. Also described is a new criticality control container, which will increase the amount of fissile material that can be loaded per container, and how it will save significant taxpayer dollars. Retrieval, compliant packaging and shipment of retrievably stored legacy TRU waste has dominated disposal operations at WIPP since it began operations 12 years ago. But because most of this legacy waste has successfully been emplaced in WIPP, the TRU waste clean-up focus is turning to newly-generated TRU materials. A major component will be transuranic SNM, currently managed in safeguards-protected vaults around the weapons complex. As DOE and NNSA continue to consolidate and shrink the weapons complex footprint, it is expected that significant quantities of transuranic SNM will be declared surplus to the nation's needs. Safeguards termination of SNM varies due to the wide range of attractiveness level of the potential material that may be directly discarded as waste. To enhance the efficiency of shipping waste with high TRU fissile content to WIPP, DOE designed an over

  8. Iraqi nuclear weapons development program. Final report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-30

    This is an abstract of the final report focusing on the collection, collation, analysis, and recording of information pertaining to Iraqi nuclear weapons development and on the long term monitoring of Iraq.

  9. Cold War Films Yield New Effects-Data for U.S. Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cold War Films Yield New Effects National Security Science Latest Issue:April 2016 past issues All Issues submit Cold War Films Yield New Effects-Data for U.S. Nuclear Weapons ...

  10. Quality at Y-12, part 3 -- Or: Quality goes beyond nuclear weapons...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quality at Y-12, part 3 Or: Quality goes beyond nuclear weapons (title as it appeared in The Oak Ridger) As we continue our look at the history of Quality at Y-12, Bud Leete, Y-12 ...

  11. Proceedings: 17th Asilomar conference on fire and blast effects of nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickman, R.G.; Meier, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of the 1983 conference was to provide for the technical exchange of ideas relating to the science and technology of the immediate effects of nuclear weapon explosions. Separate abstracts were prepared for 39 of the papers.

  12. EIS-0225: Continued Operation of the Pantex Plant and Associated Storage of Nuclear Weapon Components

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the potential environemental impact of a proposal to continue operation of the Pantex Plant and associated storage of nuclear weapon components. Alternatives considered include: ...

  13. COLLOQUIUM: Risks of Nuclear Weapons Use in an Era of Proliferation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COLLOQUIUM: Risks of Nuclear Weapons Use in an Era of Proliferation, Cyber Warfare and ... Carol Ann Austin 609-243-2484 Contact Information Coordinator(s): Miss Carol Ann Austin ...

  14. Nuclear Waste Partnership Contract Modifications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements, implement regimes to reduce nuclear weapons, and detect and dismantle undeclared nuclear programs. Specific subprogram activities include: Implementing current and developing future

  15. National Day of Remembrance HSS Honors Former Nuclear Weapons Program Workers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Friday, October 25th 2013, HSS honored over 150 nuclear weapons program workers at the National Atomic Testing Museum (NATM). Hosted by NATM Director Allan Palmer, the event was conducted in recognition of the US Senate Resolution which designates October 30th as a National Day of Remembrance to recognize the Department of Energy nuclear weapons workers for their contribution, service and sacrifice for the defense of the United States.

  16. Virtual enterprise model for the electronic components business in the Nuclear Weapons Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, T.J.; Long, K.S.; Sayre, J.A.; Hull, A.L.; Carey, D.A.; Sim, J.R.; Smith, M.G.

    1994-08-01

    The electronic components business within the Nuclear Weapons Complex spans organizational and Department of Energy contractor boundaries. An assessment of the current processes indicates a need for fundamentally changing the way electronic components are developed, procured, and manufactured. A model is provided based on a virtual enterprise that recognizes distinctive competencies within the Nuclear Weapons Complex and at the vendors. The model incorporates changes that reduce component delivery cycle time and improve cost effectiveness while delivering components of the appropriate quality.

  17. Laboratory's role in Cold War nuclear weapons testing program focus of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    next 70th anniversary lecture 70th anniversary lecture Laboratory's role in Cold War nuclear weapons testing program focus of next 70th anniversary lecture Lab's role in the development of nuclear weapons during the Cold War period will be discussed by Byron Ristvet of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. September 5, 2013 This photograph captures the expanding fireball of the world's first full-scale hydrogen bomb test, Ivy-Mike, which was conducted Oct. 31, 1952. This photograph captures

  18. Technical solutions to nonproliferation challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satkowiak, Lawrence

    2014-05-09

    The threat of nuclear terrorism is real and poses a significant challenge to both U.S. and global security. For terrorists, the challenge is not so much the actual design of an improvised nuclear device (IND) but more the acquisition of the special nuclear material (SNM), either highly enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium, to make the fission weapon. This paper provides two examples of technical solutions that were developed in support of the nonproliferation objective of reducing the opportunity for acquisition of HEU. The first example reviews technologies used to monitor centrifuge enrichment plants to determine if there is any diversion of uranium materials or misuse of facilities to produce undeclared product. The discussion begins with a brief overview of the basics of uranium processing and enrichment. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), its safeguard objectives and how the technology evolved to meet those objectives will be described. The second example focuses on technologies developed and deployed to monitor the blend down of 500 metric tons of HEU from Russia's dismantled nuclear weapons to reactor fuel or low enriched uranium (LEU) under the U.S.-Russia HEU Purchase Agreement. This reactor fuel was then purchased by U.S. fuel fabricators and provided about half the fuel for the domestic power reactors. The Department of Energy established the HEU Transparency Program to provide confidence that weapons usable HEU was being blended down and thus removed from any potential theft scenario. Two measurement technologies, an enrichment meter and a flow monitor, were combined into an automated blend down monitoring system (BDMS) and were deployed to four sites in Russia to provide 24/7 monitoring of the blend down. Data was downloaded and analyzed periodically by inspectors to provide the assurances required.

  19. Nuclear proliferation after the Cold War

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiss, M.; Litwak, R.S.

    1994-01-01

    Today, former Soviet republics threaten to gain control over nuclear weapons sited on their territories, and reports on North Korea, Pakistan, India, and Iraq reveal current or recent weapon development programs. This document offers a timely assessment of the prospects for nuclear nonproliferation.

  20. nuclear reactors | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    nuclear reactors NNSA Researchers Advance Technology for Remote Reactor Monitoring NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development Program drives the innovation of technical capabilities to detect, identify, and characterize foreign nuclear weapons development activities. To achieve this, NNSA leverages the unique capabilities of the national laboratories

  1. Chinese attitudes toward nuclear weapons: China and the United States during the Korean War

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Fundamental Chinese attitudes related to nuclear disarmament and proliferation, civil defense against nuclear attack, and the likely repercussions of nuclear war were set during the Korean War. Chinese viewpoints were heavily influenced by Western writings on nuclear matters from 1945-1950 and were characterized by an integrated military, political, and psychological realism. Previous studies, failing to make use of relevant Chinese-language materials, have neglected this crucial formative period. Both the Truman and Eisenhower administrations considered using nuclear weapons in Korea and China and attempted to shape the political settlement of the war through nuclear threats. The Chinese reaction was notable for its efforts to counteract the effects of fear among its population. They acknowledged the unprecedented destructiveness, not the military decisiveness, of the weapons, but they adamantly denied that nuclear threats would cow them. Chinese propaganda stressed the Soviet deterrent and skillfully appealed to worldwide opposition to nuclear weapons, often utilizing Western spokesmen and playing upon the theme of US misuse of science. The Chinese considered a nuclear attack relatively unlikely but were prepared to absorb an attack and fight a war of long duration. In Korea both the terrain and the extensive tunneling by Chinese troops afforded significant protection from nuclear weapons.

  2. Proliferation concerns in the Russian closed nuclear weapons complex cities : a study of regional migration behavior.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flores, Kristen Lee

    2004-07-01

    The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 left the legacy of the USSR weapons complex with an estimated 50 nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons cities containing facilities responsible for research, production, maintenance, and destruction of the weapons stockpile. The Russian Federation acquired ten such previously secret, closed nuclear weapons complex cities. Unfortunately, a lack of government funding to support these facilities resulted in non-payment of salaries to employees and even plant closures, which led to an international fear of weapons material and knowledge proliferation. This dissertation analyzes migration in 33 regions of the Russian Federation, six of which contain the ten closed nuclear weapons complex cities. This study finds that the presence of a closed nuclear city does not significantly influence migration. However, the factors that do influence migration are statistically different in regions containing closed nuclear cities compared to regions without closed nuclear cities. Further, these results show that the net rate of migration has changed across the years since the break up of the Soviet Union, and that the push and pull factors for migration have changed across time. Specifically, personal and residential factors had a significant impact on migration immediately following the collapse of the Soviet Union, but economic infrastructure and societal factors became significant in later years. Two significant policy conclusions are derived from this research. First, higher levels of income are found to increase outmigration from regions, implying that programs designed to prevent migration by increasing incomes for closed city residents may be counter-productive. Second, this study finds that programs designed to increase capital and build infrastructure in the new Russian Federation will be more effective for employing scientists and engineers from the weapons complex, and consequently reduce the potential for emigration of

  3. Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 452.4B, Security and Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons, dated 1-11-2010

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-09-18

    Recent events have revealed that there are organizations that are seeking to insert malicious software and/or components into the nuclear weapon supply chain that can alter the functionality of the weapon and possible cause DAU.

  4. Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman’s Remarks to the International Forum for a Nuclear Weapons-Free World

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Please find below Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman’s remarks, as prepared for delivery, to the International Forum for a Nuclear Weapons-Free World in Astana, Kazakhstan.

  5. Restructuring the DOE Laboratory Complex to Advance Clean Energy, Environmental Sustainability, and a Global Future without Nuclear Weapons

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Restructuring the DOE Laboratory Complex to Advance Clean Energy, Environmental Sustainability, and a Global Future without Nuclear Weapons - December Commission meeting

  6. DRAFT - DOE O 452.2C, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts (DUAs), deliberate unauthorized use (DUU), and denial of authorized use (DAU).

  7. DOE (Department of Energy) nuclear weapon R and T (research, development, and testing): Objectives, roles, and responsibilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otey, G.R.

    1989-07-01

    An overview of the DOE nuclear weapons research, development, and testing program is given along with a description of the program objectives and the roles and responsibilities of the various involved organizations. The relationship between the DoD and DOE is described and the division of responsibilities for weapon development as well as the coordinated planning and acquisition activities are reviewed. Execution of the RD T program at the nuclear weapons laboratories is outlined. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  8. NNSA Exceeds 2012 Goal for Nuclear Weapons Dismantlements | National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) ... Non-nuclear components are sent to the Savannah River Site and the Kansas City Plant for final disposition. ...

  9. The Need for a Strong Science and Technology Program in the Nuclear Weapons Complex for the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garaizar, X

    2010-01-06

    In this paper I argue for the need for a strong Science and Technology program in the Nuclear Weapons Complex as the basis for maintaining a credible deterrence capability. The current Nuclear Posture Review establishes a New Triad as the basis for the United States deterrence strategy in a changing security environment. A predictive science capability is at the core of a credible National Nuclear Weapons program in the 21st Century. In absence of nuclear testing, the certification of our current Nuclear Weapons relies on predictive simulations and quantification of the associated simulation uncertainties. In addition, a robust nuclear infrastructure needs an active research and development program that considers all the required nuclear scenarios, including new configurations for which there is no nuclear test data. This paper also considers alternative positions to the need for a Science and Technology program in the Nuclear Weapons complex.

  10. Robust Indicators of Nonproliferation Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, Mara R.; Kurzrok, Andrew J.

    2014-02-13

    Understanding how the nuclear industry may benefit from self-regulation is closely linked with understanding how to report compliance activities for nonproliferation and export control objectives, as well as how to distinguish high and low compliance performance. Drawing on the corporate sustainability reporting model, nuclear and dual-use commodities industries can frame socially responsible self-regulatory activities to distinguish themselves as good nonproliferators.