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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

National Nuclear Science Week live talks today | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Week live talks today | National Nuclear Security Science Week live talks today | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > National Nuclear Science Week live talks today National Nuclear Science Week live talks today Posted By Office of Public Affairs National Nuclear Science Week Students and teachers today will get the chance to talk live with nuclear

2

National Nuclear Science Week live talks today | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Science Week live talks today | National Nuclear Security Science Week live talks today | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > National Nuclear Science Week live talks today National Nuclear Science Week live talks today Posted By Office of Public Affairs National Nuclear Science Week Students and teachers today will get the chance to talk live with nuclear

3

Nuclear Science Day live webinar (National Nuclear Science Week) - Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science Day live webinar Nuclear Science Day live webinar Search Go Home Postdocs Students Student Outreach Resources for Schools U.S.-based International (English) International (Other) Events IGED 2013 Science Careers in Search of Women Girls, choose a career in Nuclear Science and Technology! Argonne Nuclear Engineers tell why they chose a Nuclear Career Resources Contact Us Recent Events Science Careers in Search of Women, Apr. 18, 2013 Junior Girl Scout Workshop 'Atomic Fission Fun with the American Nuclear Society', Jan. 26, 2013 Getting to know nuclear energy: the past, the present & the future - free public lecture (Nov. 15, 2012, Argonne National Laboratory) On January 26, 2013, Argonne staff members participated in the Junior Girl Scout Workshop 'Atomic Fission Fun with the American Nuclear Society'

4

Celebrating Innovation with National Nuclear Science Week | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Celebrating Innovation with National Nuclear Science Week Celebrating Innovation with National Nuclear Science Week Celebrating Innovation with National Nuclear Science Week January 25, 2012 - 2:54pm Addthis Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Dr. Peter Lyons meets with students from the California Institute of Technology to discuss how the Energy Department is working to ensure that the next generation is trained to lead innovation in the industry. | Photo courtesy of CalTech. Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Dr. Peter Lyons meets with students from the California Institute of Technology to discuss how the Energy Department is working to ensure that the next generation is trained to lead innovation in the industry. | Photo courtesy of CalTech. Kate Bannan Communications and Outreach Specialist How can I participate?

5

Fusion Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research...

6

Nuclear Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Editor and Founder John Gilligan Professor of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Version 5.13 Welcome to the 2013 Edition of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Education (NS&EE) Sourcebook. We have evolved and improved! The core mission of the Sourcebook has not changed, however. Our purpose is to facilitate interaction among faculty, students, industry, and government agencies to accomplish nuclear research, teaching and service activities. Since 1986 we have compiled critical information on nuclear

7

Nuclear Science at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerator Science Accelerator Science Astrophysics Biological Sciences Chemistry & Materials Science Climate & Earth Science Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Science Highlights NERSC Citations HPC Requirements Reviews Home » Science at NERSC » Nuclear Science Nuclear Science Experimental and theoretical nuclear research carried out at NERSC is driven by the quest for improving our understanding of the building blocks of matter. This includes discovering the origins of nuclei and identifying the forces that transform matter. Specific topics include: Nuclear astrophysics and the synthesis of nuclei in stars and elsewhere in the cosmos; Nuclear forces and quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the quantum field

8

Nuclear Science References Database  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr and the International Atomic Energy Agency http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr.

B. Pritychenko; E. B?tk; B. Singh; J. Totans

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

9

Nuclear Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Chemistry Advanced Materials Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Biology and Soft Matter Chemical and Engineering Materials Quantum Condensed Matter Computational Chemistry Nuclear Sciences More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Chemistry | Nuclear Sciences SHARE Nuclear Sciences In World War II's Manhattan Project, ORNL helped usher in the nuclear age. Today, laboratory scientists are leaders in using nuclear technologies and systems to improve human health; explore safer, more environmentally friendly power; and better understand the structure of matter. Thanks to its nuclear heritage, ORNL is a world leader in the production of isotopes for medical purposes and research. The lab's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC)

10

Security Science & Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Security Treaty Verification Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery |...

11

Nuclear Science & Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. /No/ Nuclear Science & Technology Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Databases Organizations Journals Key Resources International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA scientific and technical publications cover areas of nuclear power, radiation therapy, nuclear security, nuclear law, and emergency repose. Search under Publications/Books and Reports for scientific books, standards, technical guides and reports National Nuclear Data Center Nuclear physics data for basic nuclear research and for applied nuclear technologies, operated by Brookhaven.

12

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation | Nuclear Science...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation...

13

Reactor Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation...

14

The Nuclear Science References Database  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr and the International Atomic Energy Agency http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr.

Pritychenko, B; Singh, B; Totans, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Green Week 2011 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

16

Nuclear Science Series: Radiochemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiochemistry Nuclear Science Series: Radiochemistry These volumes are publicly accessible via the Library Catalog or the links below. Question? 667-5809 Email Scope This...

17

Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Educational Outreach Educational Outreach Publications and Reports News and Awards Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science Nuclear Science | Nuclear Science SHARE In World War II's Manhattan Project, ORNL helped usher in the nuclear age. Today, laboratory scientists are leaders in using nuclear technologies and systems to improve human health; explore safer, more environmentally friendly power; and better understand the structure of matter. Thanks to its nuclear heritage, ORNL is a world leader in the production of isotopes for medical purposes and research. The lab's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) together provide the western world's sole supply of californium-252, an isotope instrumental in a wide variety of uses including cancer therapy,

18

Nuclear Science Research Facilities Nuclear Science User Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LANSCE User Guide Nuclear Science Research Facilities #12;#12;Nuclear Science User Guide Table of Contents Introduction 3 Nuclear Science Research Facilities 3 The LANSCE Accelerator 4 Time structure techniques 8 Nuclear Science User Program 11 Proposal Process 13 Information for Prospective Users 14

19

Western Nuclear Science Alliance  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the INIE program is to strengthen nuclear science and engineering programs at the member institutions and to address the long term goal of the University Reactor Infrastructure and Education Assistance Program.

Steve Reese; George Miller; Stephen Frantz; Denis Beller; Denis Beller; Ed Morse; Melinda Krahenbuhl; Bob Flocchini; Jim Elliston

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

Nuclear Forensics | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science and Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Advanced Materials Clean Energy Materials Theory and Simulation Neutron Science Nuclear Forensics Nuclear Science Supercomputing Theory, Modeling and Simulation More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Materials Science and Engineering | Nuclear Forensics SHARE Nuclear Forensics image Tools, techniques, and expertise in nuclear fuel cycle research gained over seven decades help ORNL scientists control and track nuclear bomb-grade materials to be sure they don't fall into the wrong hands. Among the leading-edge technologies used by researchers are high-resolution techniques that allow analysis of radiation detector data in stunning detail. Researchers are also developing aerosol sampling systems to collect

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NNSA Celebrates Small Business Week | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Small Business Week | National Nuclear Security Small Business Week | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > NNSA Celebrates Small Business Week Press Release NNSA Celebrates Small Business Week Dec 13, 2010 More than $395 Million in Small Business Contract Obligations Distributed in FY2010

22

Nuclear Science | Publications and Reports | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSED Monthly Reports Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications News and Awards Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Publications and Reports SHARE...

23

Nuclear Systems Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Criticality Safety Irradiation Experiment Development and Execution Robotics & Remote Systems Engineering and Applications Thermal & Hydraulic Experiments & Analysis Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and Disposal Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research Areas | Nuclear Systems Technology SHARE Nuclear Systems Technology Nuclear Systems Technology Image 2 ORNL has had historic involvement in a broad set of nuclear research areas: irradiated materials and isotopes R&D, fission and fusion reactors development, neutron scattering, fuel enrichment, used fuel recycling and disposal, etc. The skills and knowledge required to succeed in these research areas often cultivated core areas of expertise in which ORNL is

24

Nuclear Data | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer Science Computer Science Theory, Modeling and Simulation Cyber Security Bioinformatics Climate & Environment Systems Biology Neutron Data Analysis and Visualization Nuclear Data Nuclear Systems Modeling and Simulation Supercomputing and Computation More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Computer Science | Nuclear Data SHARE Nuclear Data Nuclear Data ORNL is a recognized, international leader in nuclear data research and development (R&D) to support nuclear applications analyses. For more than 40 years, ORNL has provided neutron resonance region nuclear data evaluations to the US Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B) database, and many of the key ORNL resonance evaluations have also been adopted by international nuclear databases in Europe, Japan, China, and Russia. ORNL

25

NNSA Celebrates Earth Week: Pantex 'greens' firing range | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

'greens' firing range | National Nuclear 'greens' firing range | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA Celebrates Earth Week: Pantex 'greens' firing range NNSA Celebrates Earth Week: Pantex 'greens' firing range Posted By Greg Cunningham, Pantex The lead that flies at the Pantex Firing Range has to land somewhere, and

26

The ABC's of Nuclear Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basic Nuclear Science Basic Nuclear Science Cosmic Connection Presentations Experiments Antimatter Make a Nucleus Glossary Safety Credits Praise CPEP Speak With Us Boy Scout Merit Badge Translations Guide to the Nuclear Wall Chart About the Nuclear Wall Chart Privacy and Security Notice Other Interesting Sites Last updated: September 26, 2013 Contact Us The ABC's Of Nuclear Science The ABC's of Nuclear Science is a brief introduction to Nuclear Science. We look at Antimatter, Beta rays, Cosmic connection and much more. Visit here and learn about radioactivity - alpha, beta and gamma decay. Find out the difference between fission and fusion. Learn about the structure of the atomic nucleus. Learn how elements on the earth were produced. Do you know that you are being bombarded constantly by nuclear radiation from the

27

GARS | Nuclear Science and Technology Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science and Technology Department Exploring Nuclear Technologies for Our Energy Future Brookhaven National Laboratory's Department of Nuclear Science and Technology...

28

Educational Outreach | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science Research Areas Research Highlights Facilities and Capabilities Educational Outreach University Engagement STEM Outreach Publications and Reports News and Awards...

29

Promethean Boldness - Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy...

30

Fuel Cycle Science & Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Radiochemical Separation & Processing Recycle & Waste Management Uranium Enrichment Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and Disposal Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research Areas | Fuel Cycle Science & Technology SHARE Fuel Cycle Science and Technology The ORNL expertise and experience across the entire nuclear fuel cycle is underpinned by extensive facilities and a comprehensive modeling and simulation capability ORNL supports the understanding, development, evaluation and deployment of

31

Isotope Development & Production | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Radioisotope Radiochemical Separation & Processing Strategic Isotope Production Super Heavy Element Discovery Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems...

32

Index to Nuclear Science Wall Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Nucleus Chart of the Nuclides Radioactivity Expansion of the Universe Phases of Nuclear Matter Unstable Nuclei Nuclear Energy Applications of Nuclear Science Chapter 2 The...

33

Office of Nuclear Threat Science | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Threat Science | National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Threat Science | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Nuclear Threat Science Home > About Us > Our Programs > Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation > Office of Nuclear Threat Science Office of Nuclear Threat Science

34

Office of Nuclear Threat Science | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Threat Science | National Nuclear Security Administration Threat Science | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Nuclear Threat Science Home > About Us > Our Programs > Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation > Office of Nuclear Threat Science Office of Nuclear Threat Science

35

Basic Nuclear Science Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

element. Only through such radioactive decays or nuclear reactions can transmutation, the age-old dream of the alchemists, actually occur. The mass number, A, of an a particle is...

36

Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST)Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST) Challenges and Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST)Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST) Challenges these issues. 2 #12;FNST is the science, engineering, technology and materials Fusion Nuclear Science & Technology (FNST) FNST is the science, engineering, technology and materials for the fusion nuclear

Abdou, Mohamed

37

Nuclear Science-A Guide to the Nuclear Science Wall Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12 Tools of Nuclear Science Presently, the most commonly used tools of nuclear science are accelerators (see Chapter 11), reactors, detectors, and computers. The technological...

38

Nuclear Science and Engineering - Divisions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Home NSED Divisions The Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate (NSED) organization is composed of ORNL's only DOE Energy Innovation Hub, a program office, and the following five divisions. Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division (FCID) FCID focuses on advancing the applications of medical, industrial, and research isotopes (developing separation processes for the processing of radioisotopes and spent nuclear fuels) and designing robotic systems and unique facilities for the safe handling of nuclear materials. Fusion Energy Division (FE) FE is developing the understanding required for an attractive fusion energy source through integrated research, and is pursuing near term applications of plasma science and technology in support of national goals. Global Nuclear Security Technology Division (GNSTD)

39

Nuclear Science & Engineering Directorate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and allowable fuel burn-up Typical crud loading in a PWR fuel assembly ( NEI, 2012) CASL is advancing power plant with high-fidelity R&D capabilities · Provide analysis capability on a spatial scale never extremely large problems challenging the U.S. nuclear power industry · Software validation against measured

Pennycook, Steve

40

WEB RESOURCE: Glossary of Nuclear Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2007 ... Topic Summary: An animated glossary of nuclear science terms ... A number of animations have been created to illustrate nuclear decay and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Research Highlights | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News and Awards News and Awards Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research Highlights SHARE Research Highlights 1-3 of 3 Results Neutron scattering continues as a vital tool in superconductivity studies January 01, 2011 - In 2008, the totally unexpected discovery of a New class of superconductors, the iron pnictides, set off A Feverish international effort to understand them. Fabrication and Characterization of Uranium-based High Temperature Reactor Fuel June 01, 2013 - The Uranium Fuel Development Laboratory is a modern R&D scale lab for the fabrication and characterization of uranium-based high temperature reactor fuel. Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research June 01, 2013 - ORNL is the focus point for Light Water Reactor (LWR)

42

Green Week 2011 Day 2: NNSA Highlights Green Science Innovations...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

CO2 systems for power generation using all potential heat sources including solar, geothermal, fossil fuel, biofuel and nuclear. To learn more about NNSA's commitment...

43

Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia...

44

Multimedia Resources related to Argonne's Nuclear Science and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science and Technology Legacy > Multimedia Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and...

45

Nuclear Materials Science:Materials Science Technology:MST-16...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Materials Science (MST-16) Home About Us MST Related Links Research Highlights Focus on Facilities MST e-News Experimental Physical Sciences Vistas MaRIE: Matter-Radiation...

46

29 JANUARY 2010 VOL 327 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org514 NEWS OF THE WEEK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with CERN's setbacks in mind, those in charge of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), a huge laser published online this week by Science (www. sciencemag.org/cgi/content/ abstract/1185634), NIF researchers of RutherfordAppleton Laboratory near Oxford, U.K. NIF is the sledgehammer to crack a nut, writ huge (Science

47

Nuclear Science and Technology Division - Home page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

image image image - mural in bldg 5200 image image Fuels, Isotopes, and Nuclear Materials image Fuels, Isotopes, and Nuclear Materials Nuclear System Analysis, Design, and Safety image Nuclear System Analysis, Design, and Safety WELCOME Performing basic and applied R&D for the Department of Energy, the National Nuclear Security Administration, and other government agencies, as well as supporting and leveraging industrial partnerships Mission Statement The Nuclear Science and Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will provide leading-edge science, technology, and engineering research that support our Nation's nuclear science and technology enterprise across a broad spectrum of applications including but not limited to advanced nuclear power systems, nuclear medicine,and nuclear

48

Nuclear Data | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data SHARE Nuclear Data Nuclear Data ORNL is a recognized, international leader in nuclear data research and development (R&D) to support nuclear applications analyses. For more...

49

WEB RESOURCE: Nuclear Science and Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 19, 2007 ... This page offers lecture notes and presentations from a course on nuclear science and technology. Presentation slides and audio files are also...

50

Nuclear Science-A Guide to the Nuclear Science Wall Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science-A Guide to the Nuclear Science Wall Chart 2004 Contemporary Physics Education Project (CPEP) 9-1 Chapter 9 Phases of Nuclear Matter As we know, water (H 2 O) can exist as...

51

Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology ProgramFusion Nuclear Science and Technology Program Issues and Strategy for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Need for Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology ProgramFusion Nuclear Science and Technology Program ­Issues and Strategy for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) ­Key R&D Areas to begin NOW (modeling 12, 2010 #12;Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST) FNST is the science engineering technology

Abdou, Mohamed

52

Nuclear Science Division: 1993 Annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the 1993 calendar year. This was another significant year in the history of the Division with many interesting and important accomplishments. Activities for the following programs are covered here: (1) nuclear structure and reactions program; (2) the Institute for Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics; (3) relativistic nuclear collisions program; (4) nuclear theory program; (5) nuclear data evaluation program, isotope project; and (6) 88-inch cyclotron operations.

Myers, W.D. [ed.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

NUCLEAR SCIENCE REFERENCES CODING MANUAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual is intended as a guide for Nuclear Science References (NSR) compilers. The basic conventions followed at the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC), which are compatible with the maintenance and updating of and retrieval from the Nuclear Science References (NSR) file, are outlined. The NSR database originated at the Nuclear Data Project (NDP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory as part of a project for systematic evaluation of nuclear structure data.1 Each entry in this computer file corresponds to a bibliographic reference that is uniquely identified by a Keynumber and is describable by a Topic and Keywords. It has been used since 1969 to produce bibliographic citations for evaluations published in Nuclear Data Sheets. Periodic additions to the file were published as the ''Recent References'' issues of Nuclear Data Sheets prior to 2005. In October 1980, the maintenance and updating of the NSR file became the responsibility of the NNDC at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The basic structure and contents of the NSR file remained unchanged during the transfer. In Chapter 2, the elements of the NSR file such as the valid record identifiers, record contents, and text fields are enumerated. Relevant comments regarding a new entry into the NSR file and assignment of a keynumber are also given in Chapter 2. In Chapter 3, the format for keyword abstracts is given followed by specific examples; for each TOPIC, the criteria for inclusion of an article as an entry into the NSR file as well as coding procedures are described. Authors preparing Keyword abstracts either to be published in a Journal (e.g., Nucl. Phys. A) or to be sent directly to NNDC (e.g., Phys. Rev. C) should follow the illustrations in Chapter 3. The scope of 1See W.B.Ewbank, ORNL-5397 (1978). the literature covered at the NNDC, the categorization into Primary and Secondary sources, etc., is discussed in Chapter 4. Useful information regarding permitted character sets, recommended abbreviations, etc., is given in the Appendices. The NSR database has been in existence for decades, and responsibility for its upkeep has passed through many hands. Those familiar with the contents of NSR will note that not all of the formats and conventions discussed in this manual have always been adhered to. In recent years, however, these conventions have been followed fairly consistently, and it is expected that the preparation of new entries will follow these guidelines. The most up-to-date information about NSR contents and policies can be found at the NSR web site: http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr. This manual is an update to BNL-NCS-51800 (Rev. 08/96) by S. Ramavataram and C.L. Dunford. Discussions with Mark Kellett of the IAEA are gratefully acknowledged, as are comments and suggestions from the NNDC staff and members of the U.S. Nuclear Data Program. This manuscript has been authored by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH1-886 with the U.S.Department of Energy.

WINCHELL,D.F.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Photo of the Week: National Science Bowl Participants on the Fast Track to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Science Bowl Participants on the Fast National Science Bowl Participants on the Fast Track to a Future in STEM Photo of the Week: National Science Bowl Participants on the Fast Track to a Future in STEM May 2, 2013 - 10:48am Addthis After months of training and preparation, regional Science Bowl champions gathered in Washington, D.C. to compete for the national title at the 2013 National Science Bowl. Some of the nation's best and brightest high school and middle school students spent the past few days showing off their science, technology and engineering skills by completing a series of tasks, including the construction of a miniature electric car, using only household items and a lithium-ion battery. In this photo, Yaniel Ramirez from Colegio Catolico Notre Dame in Caguas, Puerto Rico launches his team's electric car down the test track. Learn more about the 2013 National Science Bowl. | Photo by Jack Dempsey, Department of Energy.

55

NUCLEAR SCIENCE ANNUAL REPORT 1975  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gove and A. H. Wapstra, Nuclear Data Tables 11, 127 (1972).P. Jackson, Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories Report (1975)national Conference on Nuclear Structure and Spec troscopy,

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Photo of the Week: National Science Bowl Participants on the Fast Track to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Photo of the Week: National Science Bowl Participants on the Fast Photo of the Week: National Science Bowl Participants on the Fast Track to a Future in STEM Photo of the Week: National Science Bowl Participants on the Fast Track to a Future in STEM May 2, 2013 - 10:48am Addthis After months of training and preparation, regional Science Bowl champions gathered in Washington, D.C. to compete for the national title at the 2013 National Science Bowl. Some of the nation's best and brightest high school and middle school students spent the past few days showing off their science, technology and engineering skills by completing a series of tasks, including the construction of a miniature electric car, using only household items and a lithium-ion battery. In this photo, Yaniel Ramirez from Colegio Catolico Notre Dame in Caguas, Puerto Rico launches his team's electric car down the test track. Learn more about the 2013 National Science Bowl. | Photo by Jack Dempsey, Department of Energy.

57

Stewardship Science Academic Alliances | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

| National Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > University Partnerships / Academic Alliances > Stewardship Science Academic Alliances

58

Los Alamos Neutron Science Center | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Neutron Science Center | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

59

2013 NNSA Science Council | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NNSA Science Council | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

60

Global Security, Medical Isotopes, and Nuclear Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past century basic nuclear science research has led to the use of radioactive isotopes into a wide variety of applications that touch our lives everyday. Some are obvious, such as isotopes for medical diagnostics and treatment. Others are less so, such as National/Global security issues. And some we take for granted, like the small amount of 241Am that is in every smoke detector. At the beginning of this century, we are in a position where the prevalence and importance of some applications of nuclear science are pushing the basic nuclear science community for improved models and nuclear data. Yet, at the same time, the push by the basic nuclear science community to study nuclei that are farther and farther away from stability also offer new opportunities for many applications. This talk will look at several global security applications of nuclear science, summarizing current R&D and need for improved nuclear data It will also look at how applications of nuclear science, such as to medicine, will benefit from the push for more and more powerful radioactive ion beam facilities.

Ahle, L E

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Preparing the Nuclear Security Science Minds of Tomorrow | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the Nuclear Security Science Minds of Tomorrow | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

62

Fusion Nuclear Science Pathways Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the strong commitment of the US to the success of the ITER burning plasma mission, and the project overall, it is prudent to consider how to take the most advantage of this investment. The production of energy from fusion has been a long sought goal, and the subject of several programmatic investigations and time line proposals [1]. The nuclear aspects of fusion research have largely been avoided experimentally for practical reasons, resulting in a strong emphasis on plasma science. Meanwhile, ITER has brought into focus how the interface between the plasma and engineering/technology, presents the most challenging problems for design. In fact, this situation is becoming the rule and no longer the exception. ITER will demonstrate the deposition of 0.5 GW of neutron heating to the blanket, deliver a heat load of 10-20 MW/m2 or more on the divertor, inject 50-100 MW of heating power to the plasma, all at the expected size scale of a power plant. However, in spite of this, and a number of other technologies relevant power plant, ITER will provide a low neutron exposure compared to the levels expected to a fusion power plant, and will purchase its tritium entirely from world reserves accumulated from decades of CANDU reactor operations. Such a decision for ITER is technically well founded, allowing the use of conventional materials and water coolant, avoiding the thick tritium breeding blankets required for tritium self-sufficiency, and allowing the concentration on burning plasma and plasma-engineering interface issues. The neutron fluence experienced in ITER over its entire lifetime will be ~ 0.3 MW-yr/m2, while a fusion power plant is expected to experience 120-180 MW-yr/m2 over its lifetime. ITER utilizes shielding blanket modules, with no tritium breeding, except in test blanket modules (TBM) located in 3 ports on the midplane [2], which will provide early tests of the fusion nuclear environment with very low tritium production (a few g per year).

C.E. Kessel, et. al.

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

63

Nuclear Science-A Guide to the Nuclear Science Wall Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fields, nuclear scientists generally work with a great interest and excitement for the science. Understanding the building blocks of nature and the physical laws that govern them...

64

Research Areas | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Research Highlights Facilities and Capabilities Educational Outreach Publications and Reports News and Awards...

65

Nuclear Science and Engineering Education Sourcebook | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science and Engineering Education Sourcebook Science and Engineering Education Sourcebook Nuclear Science and Engineering Education Sourcebook The Nuclear Science and Engineering Education Sourcebook is a repository of critial information on nuclear engineering programs at U.S. colleges and universities. It includes detailed information such as nuclear engineering enrollments, degrees, and faculty expertise. In this latest edition, science faculty and programs relevant to nuclear energy are also included. NuclearScienceEngineeringSourcebook2013.pdf More Documents & Publications University Research Reactor Task Force to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee The Future of University Nuclear Engineering Programs and University Research and Training Reactors Clark Atlanta Universities (CAU) Energy Related Research Capabilities

66

Nuclear Science Division Annual Report 1995-1996  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saladin5, and C.H. Yu6 Nuclear Science Division, LawrenceMoretto, G.J. Wozniak, Nuclear Science Division, LawrenceComment on Probing the Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Nuclear Medicine | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Medicine Nuclear Medicine SHARE Nuclear Medicine The Medical Isotope Program is focused on the development of: improved reactor production and processing methods to provide medical radioisotopes; new radionuclide generator systems; design and evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals for applications in nuclear medicine and oncology; and association with Medical Cooperative Programs throughout the world for the further pre-clinical testing and clinical evaluation of agents developed at ORNL. In the United States, only ORNL has the combined resources of a stable isotope inventory, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), hot cell processing capabilities, and a wide range of support functions required for such research. These collective resources provide unique capabilities for

68

Nuclear Science--A Guide to the Nuclear Science Wall Chart 2003 Contemporary Physics Education Project (CPEP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Science--A Guide to the Nuclear Science Wall Chart ©2003 Contemporary Physics Education Project (CPEP) 7-1 Chapter 7 Nuclear Reactions Nuclear reactions and nuclear scattering are used, protons, alphas, or "heavy ions"), creates these reactions when they strike a target nucleus. Nuclear

69

Media Mentions | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear security and safeguards at the Safeguards Laboratory at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from October 15-19, 2012. Faculty members Dr. Craig Marianno from NSSPI and Dr...

70

Nuclear Science References Coding Manual D.F. Winchell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Science References Coding Manual D.F. Winchell National Nuclear Data Center Brookhaven and coding procedures for specific topics . . 18 3.2.1 NUCLEAR REACTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 3.2.2 RADIOACTIVITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 3.2.3 NUCLEAR STRUCTURE

Homes, Christopher C.

71

Los Alamos Neutron Science Center | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

sponsors of LANSCE include the DOE, NNSA, Office of Science and Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. Users conduct research at state-of-the-art facilities...

72

Nuclear Science-A Guide to the Nuclear Science Wall Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

both to solve problems and to search for new understandings of the world around us. In nuclear science the concept of symmetry plays a key role in gaining an understanding of the...

73

Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

Dr. Wynn Volkert; Dr. Arvind Kumar; Dr. Bryan Becker; Dr. Victor Schwinke; Dr. Angel Gonzalez; Dr. DOuglas McGregor

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

74

Medical Radioisotope | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Medical Radioisotope SHARE Medical Radioisotope Staff members preparing Ac-225 in glove boxes for shipment to hospitals to support radiotherapy cancer clinical trials in multiple locations around the world. ORNL's Medical Radioisotope Program is focused on the development of improved reactor production and processing methods to provide medical radioisotopes, the development of new radionuclide generator systems, the design and evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals for applications in nuclear medicine and oncology, and association with Medical Cooperative Programs throughout the world for further preclinical testing and clinical evaluation of agents developed at ORNL. The collective resources of ORNL, including access to the enriched stable isotope inventory, a High Flux

75

Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The monograph is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. The structure and electrical properties, the technological aspects of production of high-strength synthetic graphites, the dynamics of the graphite destruction, traditionally used in the nuclear industry are discussed. It is focuses on the characteristics of graphitization and properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. The book is based, generally, on the original results, and concentrated on the actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern nuclear physics, in scientific and technical applications. For scientists and engineers specializing in nuclear physics and engineering, physics of nuclear reactors, condensed matter, for undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate students of universities physical specialties.

Zhmurikov, E I; Pokrovsky, A S; Harkov, D V; Dremov, V V; Samarin, S I

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The monograph is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. The structure and electrical properties, the technological aspects of production of high-strength synthetic graphites, the dynamics of the graphite destruction, traditionally used in the nuclear industry are discussed. It is focuses on the characteristics of graphitization and properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. The book is based, generally, on the original results, and concentrated on the actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern nuclear physics, in scientific and technical applications. For scientists and engineers specializing in nuclear physics and engineering, physics of nuclear reactors, condensed matter, for undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate students of universities physical specialties.

E. I. Zhmurikov; I. A. Bubnenkov; A. S. Pokrovsky; D. V. Harkov; V. V. Dremov; S. I. Samarin

2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

77

Nuclear Science References (NSR) from the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database is an indexed bibiliography of primary and secondary references in nuclear physics research. About 80 journals are regularly scanned for articles. Recent references are added on a weekly basis. Approximately 4300 entries are added to the database annually. In general, articles are included in NSR if they include measured, calculated, or deduced quantitative nuclear structure or reaction data. Papers that apply previously known data are generally not included. Examples of this include neutron activation analysis using known cross sections or radiological dating using known half-lives. The database can be searched like a normal bibliographic database but can also be searched by the data that distinguishes it, data such as the nuclide, target/parent/daughter, reaction, incident particles, and outgoing particles. (Specialized Interface) [Taken from the NSR Help pages at http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr/nsr_help.jsp

78

NUCLEAR SCIENCE DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979-1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1979). {Laboratory for Nuclear Studies, Osaka University,D. Loveland, and G. T. Seaborg, Nuclear Science Div. AnnualBohr and B. R. Hottel son. Nuclear Structure Vol. 1 (W. A.

Cerny, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Reactors: Modern-Day Alchemy - Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Legacy > Reactors: Modern-Day Alchemy About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

80

Education: The Effort Is Global - Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Argonne Reactors > Education: The Effort Is Global About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Program | National Nuclear Security Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program Home > Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program Stewardship Science Academic Alliances (SSAA) Program Overview Established in 2002, the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program

82

Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship Program | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Fellowship Program Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship Program The Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (CSGF) The Department of Energy Computational Science Graduate...

83

Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology| U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology (ANS&T) Exchange Meeting: August 22-23, 2011 Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Hotel & Executive Meeting Center

84

Middle School Energy and Nuclear Science Curriculum Now Available |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Middle School Energy and Nuclear Science Curriculum Now Available Middle School Energy and Nuclear Science Curriculum Now Available Middle School Energy and Nuclear Science Curriculum Now Available October 30, 2013 - 1:18pm Addthis Andrea Duskas Public Affairs Specialist for the Office of Nuclear Energy A new middle school science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) curriculum called The Harnessed Atom is now available on the Office of Nuclear Energy website. This new curriculum offers accurate, unbiased, and up-to-date information on the roles that energy and nuclear science play in our lives. The essential principles and fundamental concepts in The Harnessed Atom address the latest science standards for crosscutting concepts about energy and matter. The Harnessed Atom teacher's kit is an updated and expanded edition of the

85

National Museum of Nuclear Science & History Opens WIPP Exhibit |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Museum of Nuclear Science & History Opens WIPP Exhibit Museum of Nuclear Science & History Opens WIPP Exhibit National Museum of Nuclear Science & History Opens WIPP Exhibit November 22, 2011 - 3:17pm Addthis To celebrate the WIPP's 10,000th shipment of defense-related TRU waste, the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History added a new exhibit, which includes one the receptacles, pictured above, used by the Energy Department to ship transuranic (TRU) waste from sites located across the country to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. | Photo courtesy of the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History To celebrate the WIPP's 10,000th shipment of defense-related TRU waste, the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History added a new exhibit, which includes one the receptacles, pictured above, used by the Energy Department

86

The Italian Navigator Lands - Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Italian Navigator Lands The Italian Navigator Lands About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

87

Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program | National Nuclear Security Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and

88

Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing January 26-28, 2009 · Washington D.C. Major Issues in Nuclear Physics Aided by Massive Computation David B. Kaplan ~ Institute for Nuclear Theory #12;The challenge of nuclear theory · Many-body problem of interaction nucleons

Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

89

Department of Energy Issues Requests for Nuclear Science and Engineering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Science and Nuclear Science and Engineering Scholarships and Fellowships Applications Department of Energy Issues Requests for Nuclear Science and Engineering Scholarships and Fellowships Applications May 7, 2009 - 1:46pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced two new Requests for Application (RFA) as part of the Department's efforts to recruit and train the next generation of nuclear scientists and engineers - a critical need as the nation moves toward greater use of nuclear energy to meet our energy needs and address the global climate crisis. Under the Nuclear Energy University Program, DOE will provide approximately $2.9 million to fund scholarships and fellowships for students enrolled in two or four year nuclear science and engineering programs at accredited

90

Thomas Miller Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Miller Miller Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology U.S. Department of Energy September 30, 2002 Presentation at the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Nuclear Power 2010 Program Strategy to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants Nuclear Power 2010 Program Strategy to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology TMiller/Sept11_02 ESE Project.ppt ( 2) Nuclear Power 2010: Overview Nuclear Power 2010: Overview Goal 6 Achieve industry decision by 2005 to deploy at least one new advanced nuclear power plant by 2010 Cooperative Activities 6 Regulatory Demonstration Projects * Early Site Permit (ESP) * Combined Construction and Operating License (COL) 6 Reactor Technology Development Projects * NRC Design Certification (DC) * First-of-a-kind engineering for a standardized plant

91

MISSION AND NEED FOR A FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE FACILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MISSION AND NEED FOR A FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE FACILITY Mission Gerald Navratil Need Mohamed Abdou and Symposium 1-2 December 2010 #12;FUSION NUCLEAR SCIENCE FACILITY: COMMENTS ON MISSION Gerald A. Navratil Component Test Facility Theory & Simulation FESAC/Snowmass Report: ITER-Based Development Path #12;FUSION

92

NUCLEAR SCIENCE ANNUAL REPORT 1977-1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Relation Between Nuclear Dynamics and the RenormalizationMultiplicity Distributions in Nuclear Collision M. GyulassyHigh Energy Nuclear Collisions in the Resonance Dominated

Schroeder, L.S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Nuclear Science: a survey of funding, facilities, and manpower  

SciTech Connect

In 1973 the Committee on Nuclear Science of the National Research Council initiated a re-examination of aspects (funding, manpower, and facilities) of the organization and operation of nuclear science research in order to evaluate any changes in the preceding four years and implications of such changes. The reports of the three ad hoc panels established for this purpose (funding and level of effort, nuclear facilities, manpower and education) are presented. Although they identify current problems in nuclear science, these reports do not provide simple solutions; rather, they attempt to provide updated information for use as background for continuing decisions. (RWR)

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

2013 NNSA Defense Programs Science Council | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

3 NNSA Defense Programs Science Council | National Nuclear Security 3 NNSA Defense Programs Science Council | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > 2013 NNSA Defense Programs Science Council 2013 NNSA Defense Programs Science Council Posted By Office of Public Affairs 2013 NNSA Defense Programs Science Council Members of the 2013 NNSA Defense Programs Science Council include, from

95

Molecular forensic science of nuclear materials  

SciTech Connect

We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxides materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, process history, or transport of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science required to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensics science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

Wilkerson, Marianne Perry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Nuclear & Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Fuel Cycle * Overview * Fissile Material * Chemical Process Models * Chemistry at Interfaces * Improved Safeguards Nuclear & Environmental Processes Home Closing the...

97

Nuclear science. Annual report, July 1, 1980-June 30, 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report describes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division between July 1, 1980 and June 30, 1981. The principal activity of the division continues to be the experimental and theoretical investigation of the interaction of heavy ions with target nuclei. Complementary research programs in light-ion nuclear science, in nuclear data evaluations, and in the development of advanced instrumentation are also carried out.

Friedlander, E.M. (ed.)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

NUCLEAR SCIENCE PUBLICATIONS OF ROBERT B. WEISENMILLER, PH.D.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 NUCLEAR SCIENCE PUBLICATIONS OF ROBERT B. WEISENMILLER, PH.D. 1. Two-proton Pickup Studies, K. H. Wilcox, G. J. Wozniak, M. S. Zisman, and J. Cerny. Nuclear Physics A 280, 217. 1977. 3 Spectroscopic Measurement via Exotic Nuclear Rearrangement: The Reaction 26 Mg (7 Li, 8 B), 25 Ne. With K. H

99

Nuclear Science and Technology, November 2000. NEUTRON CROSS SECTION EVALUATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Science and Technology, November 2000. 1 NEUTRON CROSS SECTION EVALUATIONS FOR 238 U UP and Power Engineering, 249020 Obninsk, Russia A.Ventura ENEA, Nuclear Data Center and INFN, Bologna Section of the statistical description that includes direct, pre-equilibrium and equilibrium mechanisms of nuclear reactions

100

Nuclear Wallet Cards at BNL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Wallet Cards at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications SBIRSTTR Applications of Nuclear Science and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs >...

102

Future Science & Technology Programs | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Future Science & Technology Programs Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs...

103

Stewardship Science Academic Programs Annual | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Alliances Annual 2011 Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Annual Banner photo: The Texas Petawatt laser bay at the University of Texas, Center for High Intensity Laser Science...

104

NNSA conference showcases complex science, engineering | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

conference showcases complex science, engineering | National Nuclear conference showcases complex science, engineering | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA conference showcases complex science, engineering NNSA conference showcases complex science, engineering Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship (SSGF) annual fellows' conference

105

NNSA/CEA Cooperation in Computer Science | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NNSA/CEA Cooperation in Computer Science | National Nuclear Security NNSA/CEA Cooperation in Computer Science | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration NNSA/CEA Cooperation in Computer Science Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and

106

NNSA/CEA Cooperation in Computer Science | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA/CEA Cooperation in Computer Science | National Nuclear Security NNSA/CEA Cooperation in Computer Science | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration NNSA/CEA Cooperation in Computer Science Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and

107

Nuclear Science Division annual report for 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses research being conducted under the following programs: Low energy research program; bevalac research program; ultrarelativistic research program; nuclear theory program; nuclear theory program; nuclear data evaluation program; and 88-inch cyclotron operations.

Myers, W.D. (ed.)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Materials Science Challenges for Nuclear Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aladar A. Csontos, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Scope, Worldwide expansion of nuclear energy has been proposed to address rising global energy ...

109

Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Nuclear and Environmental Processes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

commercially viable electrochemical processes for the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. This work covers the full scope of the nuclear fuel cycle for metal, oxide,...

110

Drell receives National Medal of Science | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Drell receives National Medal of Science | National Nuclear Security Drell receives National Medal of Science | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Drell receives National Medal of Science Drell receives National Medal of Science Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Blog Sidney Drell, physicist, arms control expert and adviser, is one

111

Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

> Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing Institutional Research & Development > University...

112

Nuclear Science Division 1994 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the period of January 1, 1994, to December 31, 1994. This was a time of significant accomplishment for all of the programs in the Division. Assembly of the solar neutrino detector at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is well under way. All of the components fabricated by LBL were shipped to Sudbury early in the year and our efforts are now divided between assisting the assembly of the detector and preparing software for data analysis once the detector is operational in 1996. Much of the activity at the 88-Inch Cyclotron centered on Gammasphere. The {open_quotes}early implementation{close_quotes} phase of the detector ended in September. This phase was extremely successful, involving over 60 experiments with nearly 200 users from 37 institutions worldwide. The mechanical structure was installed and the final electronic system is expected to operate in March 1995. The Division concurrently hosted a conference on physics for large {gamma}-ray detector arrays at the Clark Kerr Campus at UC Berkeley in August. This was a very successful meeting, reflecting the enthusiasm for this field worldwide. Also at the Cyclotron, the progress toward weak interaction experiments using ultra-thin sources passed a major milestone with the trapping of radioactive {sup 21}Na atoms. We are now engaged in a major upgrade of the experimental area and the outlook is very promising for these novel experiments. Another highlight of research at the Cyclotron was the confirmation of element 106. This development allowed the original LLNL/LBL discovery team to move forward with their proposal to name this element seaborgium.

Myers, W.D. [ed.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Chemical Sciences and Engineering - Nuclear and Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation & Equipment Design * Members * Overview * Chemical Process Models * Chemistry at Interfaces Nuclear & Environmental Processes Home Process Simulation and Equipment...

114

Nuclear Test-Experimental Science: Annual report, fiscal year 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fiscal year 1988 has been a significant, rewarding, and exciting period for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's nuclear testing program. It was significant in that the Laboratory's new director chose to focus strongly on the program's activities and to commit to a revitalized emphasis on testing and the experimental science that underlies it. It was rewarding in that revolutionary new measurement techniques were fielded on recent important and highly complicated underground nuclear tests with truly incredible results. And it was exciting in that the sophisticated and fundamental problems of weapons science that are now being addressed experimentally are yielding new challenges and understanding in ways that stimulate and reward the brightest and best of scientists. During FY88 the program was reorganized to emphasize our commitment to experimental science. The name of the program was changed to reflect this commitment, becoming the Nuclear Test-Experimental Science (NTES) Program.

Struble, G.L.; Donohue, M.L.; Bucciarelli, G.; Hymer, J.D.; Kirvel, R.D.; Middleton, C.; Prono, J.; Reid, S.; Strack, B. (eds.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship Program | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

to students pursuing doctoral degrees in fields of study that use high performance computing to solve complex science and engineering problems. The program fosters a...

116

Future Science & Technology Programs | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

efforts and the long-term vitality of science and engineering at NNSA. NNSA is focused on developing and maintaining the critical scientific and technical capabilities that are...

117

Nuclear Criticality Safety | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Criticality Safety Criticality Safety SHARE Criticality Safety Nuclear Criticality Safety ORNL is the lead national laboratory responsible for supporting the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in managing the US Nuclear Criticality Safety Program. NCSP is chartered to maintain the technical infrastructure (integral experiments, computational tools, training, data, etc.) needed to support safe, efficient fissionable material operations. ORNL has extensive expertise in the area of nuclear criticality safety (NCS) based upon years of experience in the following areas: Operations Support: providing fissionable material operations support for enrichment, fabrication, production, and research; Critical Experiments: performing experiments at the Y-12 Critical Experiment Facility;

118

Materials Science of Nuclear Waste Management I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... Separation of the nuclear waste stream into actinides and fission products offers new opportunities for development of ceramic waste forms.

119

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - People - Nuclear and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear and Environmental Processes Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Vivian S. Sullivan, Physical and Analytical Chemist and Manager, Analytical Chemistry Laboratory phone: 630...

120

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - People - Nuclear and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spent nuclear fuel reprocessing Process monitoring for reprocessing safeguards Non-proliferation-based research: medical isotope production John F. Krebs, Chemist phone: 630...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - People - Nuclear and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Loyola University Design of liquid-liquid extraction systems for actinide and fission product separations Nuclear fuel and target dissolution Chemical processes for...

122

Materials Science of Nuclear Waste Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent is to provide a forum for researchers from national laboratories, universities, and nuclear industry to discuss current understanding of materials...

123

Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Nuclear & Environmental Processes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

processing of these fuels. In addition to evaluating degradation and radionuclide release from used nuclear fuels, group researchers are developing metal alloy waste...

124

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - People - Nuclear and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fax 630972-4456, e-mail: ebert@anl.gov Ph.D., Chemistry, Northwestern University Nuclear waste material formulation, testing, and modeling Test method development and...

125

Nuclear Systems Modeling & Simulation | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from single processors to the world's largest supercomputers. The DOE Nuclear Energy Hub (CASL, the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors) is a prominent...

126

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Nuclear & Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with other fuel processing steps and facilities, and are economically feasible. Two other key areas of interest are: Pyrochemical Process Research Closing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle...

127

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Nuclear & Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program. More Closing the nuclear fuel cycle Recycling long-lived fissile materials as fuel Developing chemical process models...

128

Nuclear Science-A Guide to the Nuclear Science Wall Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chapter 7 Nuclear Reactions Nuclear reactions and nuclear scattering are used to measure the properties of nuclei. Reactions that exchange energy or nucleons can be used to measure...

129

The Nuclear Education and Staffing Challenge: Rebuilding Critical Skills in Nuclear Science and Technology.  

SciTech Connect

The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory where 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of Nuclear Legacies, Global Security, Nonproliferation, Homeland Security and National Defense, Radiobiology and Nuclear Energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. This paper presents the current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs.

Wogman, Ned A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Waltar, Alan E.; Leber, R. E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The Nuclear Education and Staffing Challenge: Rebuilding Critical Skills in Nuclear Science and Technology  

SciTech Connect

The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory were 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of Nuclear Legacies, Global Security, Nonproliferation, Homeland Security and National Defense, Radiobiology and Nuclear Energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. This paper presents the current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs.

Wogman, Ned A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Waltar, Alan E.; Leber, R E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The Nuclear Education and Staffing Challenge: Rebuilding Critical Skills in Nuclear Science and Technology.  

SciTech Connect

The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory where 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of Nuclear Legacies, Global Security, Nonproliferation, Homeland Security and National Defense, Radiobiology and Nuclear Energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. This paper presents the current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs.

Wogman, Ned A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Waltar, Alan E.; Leber, R. E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

17, 2013 NNSA, Republic of Korea Ministry Agree to Minimize Use of HEU in Nuclear Reactors Sep 3, 2013 NNSA Conducts Two Emergency Response Training Courses in Armenia Aug 29, 2013...

133

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Nuclear & Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Nuclear & Environmental Processes Home Eliminating the Use of Highly-Enriched Uranium The mission of the U.S. non-proliferation policy is to minimize and, to the...

134

Research in the nuclear sciences: summaries of FY 1978  

SciTech Connect

Programs funded in fiscal year 1978 by the Division of Nuclear Sciences/Office of Basic Energy Sciences are summarized. Each summary is preceded by a heading that includes institution, title, principal investigators, budget reporting category, and operating funds provided in FY 1978. The summaries are presented in alphabetical order by institution. Indexes are appended to facilitate the location of a summary according to an investigator's name or a budget reporting category. (RWR)

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Studies in Low-Energy Nuclear Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of research projects in the area of low energy nuclear reactions and structure, carried out between March 1, 2006 and October 31, 2009 which were supported by U.S. DOE grant number DE-FG52-06NA26187.

Carl R. Brune; Steven M. Grimes

2010-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

136

From Federal Computer Week:  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Federal Computer Week: Energy agency launches performance-based pay system By Richard W. Walker Published on March 27, 2008 The Energy Department's National Nuclear Security...

137

Nuclear Science Division, 1995--1996 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division (NSD) for the two-year period, January 1, 1995 to January 1, 1997. This was a time of major accomplishments for all research programs in the Division-many of which are highlighted in the reports of this document.

Poskanzer, A.M. [ed.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

NNS computing facility manual P-17 Neutron and Nuclear Science  

SciTech Connect

This document describes basic policies and provides information and examples on using the computing resources provided by P-17, the Neutron and Nuclear Science (NNS) group. Information on user accounts, getting help, network access, electronic mail, disk drives, tape drives, printers, batch processing software, XSYS hints, PC networking hints, and Mac networking hints is given.

Hoeberling, M.; Nelson, R.O.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Standards in nuclear science and technology. A bibliography  

SciTech Connect

Abstracts of 1803 U. S. and non-U. S. publications concerning a broad range of standards used in nuclear science and technology are included. The publication dates span the period 1962 through 1972, inclusive. Abstracts are arranged chronologically within four categories entitled Reactors and Engineering, Instruments and Calibration, Radiation and Radiation Protection, and Miscellaneous. A subject index is also included. (auth)

1973-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

58 Federal Register 58 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 224 / Wednesday, November 20, 2013 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of these meetings be announced in the Federal Register. DATES: Thursday, December 19, 2013, 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. ADDRESSES: Gaithersburg Marriott Washingtonian Center, 9751 Washingtonian Boulevard, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20878, (301) 590-0044. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Brenda L. May, U.S. Department of Energy; SC-26/Germantown Building,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Nuclear science. Annual report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division (NSD) during the period between July 1, 1979 and June 30, 1980. The principal objective of the division continues to be the experimental and theoretical investigation of the interactions of heavy ions with target nuclei, complemented with programs in light ion nuclear science, in nuclear data compilations, and in advanced instrumentation development. The division continues to operate the 88 Inch Cyclotron as a major research facility that also supports a strong outside user program. Both the SuperHILAC and Bevalac accelerators, operated as national facilities by LBL's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, are also important to NSD experimentalists. (WHK)

Myers, W.D.; Friedlander, E.M.; Nitschke, J.M.; Stokstad, R.G. (eds.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Weekly Update  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

per MMBtu lower than a week earlier. Similar to last week, the price of West Texas crude oil declined early in the week then moved up, ending the week at 20.80 per barrel. Coal...

143

Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Emerging Technologies in Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Nuclear Science & Engineering ­ Development of novel techniques/tools using particle transport theory including reactors, nuclear security and safeguards systems and medical devices. His work is recognized methodologies with Alireza Haghighat, Nuclear Engineering Program, Mechanical Engineering Department Virginia

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

144

Nuclear Science-A Guide to the Nuclear Science Wall Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chapter 6 Nuclear Energy Levels The nucleus, like the atom, has discrete energy levels whose location and properties are governed by the rules of quantum mechanics. The locations...

145

Basic science research to support the nuclear material focus area  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

Boak, J. M. (Jeremy M.); Eller, P. Gary; Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Basic Science Research to Support the Nuclear Materials Focus Area  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.; Boak, J. M.; Eller, P. G.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

147

Nuclear Science-A Guide to the Nuclear Science Wall Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The proton distribution can be characterized by an average radius. It is found that nuclear radii range from 1-10 10 -15 m. This radius is much smaller than that of the atom,...

148

Nuclear Science-A Guide to the Nuclear Science Wall Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and about 250 kg of 239 Pu. Some 40% of the energy produced in the course of a nuclear fuel cycle comes from 239 Pu. Since about 20% of the electricity generated in the United...

149

Putting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the Soviets. Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) enters into force (1970). Prevent the spread of nuclear and eliminate nuclear weapons (1953). Vetoed by the Soviets. Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) entersPutting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation Jerry Gilfoyle

Gilfoyle, Jerry

150

Nuclear reactor and materials science research: Technical report, May 1, 1985-September 30, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Throughout the 17-month period of its grant, May 1, 1985-September 30, 1986, the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) was operated in support of research and academic programs in the physical and life sciences and in related engineering fields. The reactor was operated 4115 hours during FY 1986 and for 6080 hours during the entire 17-month period, an average of 82 hours per week. Utilization of the reactor during that period may be classified as follows: neutron beam tube research; nuclear materials research and development; radiochemistry and trace analysis; nuclear medicine; radiation health physics; computer control of reactors; dose reduction in nuclear power reactors; reactor irradiations and services for groups outside MIT; MIT Research Reactor. Data on the above utilization for FY 1986 show that the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) engaged in joint activities with nine academic departments and interdepartmental laboratories at MIT, the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory in Cambridge, and 22 other universities and nonprofit research institutions, such as teaching hospitals.

Not Available

1987-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

151

Scientific Opportunities to Reduce Risk in Nuclear Process Science  

SciTech Connect

Cleaning up the nations nuclear weapons complex remains as one of the most technologically challenging and financially costly problems facing the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Safety, cost, and technological challenges have often delayed progress in retrieval, processing, and final disposition of high-level waste, spent nuclear fuel, and challenging materials. Some of the issues result from the difficulty and complexity of the technological issues; others have programmatic bases, such as contracting strategies that may provide undue focus on near-term, specific clean-up goals or difficulty in developing and maintaining stakeholder confidence in the proposed solutions. We propose that independent basic fundamental science research focused on the full cleanup life-cycle offers an opportunity to help address these challenges by providing 1) scientific insight into the fundamental mechanisms involved in currently selected processing and disposal options, 2) a rational path to the development of alternative technologies should the primary options fail, 3) confidence that models that predict long-term performance of different disposal options are based upon the best available science, 4) fundamental science discovery that enables transformational solutions to revolutionize the current baseline processes.

Bredt, Paul R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Hobbs, David T.; Krahn, Steve; Machara, N.; Mcilwain, Michael; Moyer, Bruce A.; Poloski, Adam P.; Subramanian, K.; Vienna, John D.; Wilmarth, B.

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

152

Nuclear Physics Science Network Requirements Workshop, May 2008 - Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedProgram Office, DOE Office of Science Energy SciencesDepartment of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced Scientific

Tierney, Ed., Brian L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Nuclear Physics Science Network Requirements Workshop, May 2008 - Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States of America. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In May 2008, ESnet and the Nuclear Physics (NP) Program Office of the DOE Office of Science organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the science programs funded by the NP Program Office. Most of the key DOE sites for NP related work will require significant increases in network bandwidth in the 5 year time frame. This includes roughly 40 Gbps for BNL, and 20 Gbps for NERSC. Total transatlantic requirements are on the order of 40 Gbps, and transpacific requirements are on the order of 30 Gbps. Other key sites are Vanderbilt University and MIT, which will need on the order of 20 Gbps bandwidth to support data transfers for the CMS Heavy Ion program. In addition to bandwidth requirements, the workshop emphasized several points in regard to science process and collaboration. One key point is the heavy reliance on Grid tools and infrastructure (both PKI and tools such as GridFTP) by the NP community. The reliance on Grid software is expected to increase in the future. Therefore, continued development and support of Grid software is very important to the NP science community. Another key finding is that scientific productivity is greatly enhanced by easy researcher-local access to instrument data. This is driving the creation of distributed repositories for instrument data at collaborating institutions, along with a corresponding increase in demand for network-based data transfers and the tools to manage those transfers effectively. Network reliability is also becoming more important as there is often a narrow window between data collection and data archiving when transfer and analysis can be done. The instruments do not stop producing data, so extended network outages can result in data loss due to analysis pipeline stalls. Finally, as the scope of collaboration continues to increase, collaboration tools such as audio and video conferencing are becoming ever more critical to the productivity of scientific collaborations.

Tierney, Ed., Brian L; Dart, Ed., Eli; Carlson, Rich; Dattoria, Vince; Ernest, Michael; Hitchcock, Daniel; Johnston, William; Kowalski, Andy; Lauret, Jerome; Maguire, Charles; Olson, Douglas; Purschke, Martin; Rai, Gulshan; Watson, Chip; Vale, Carla

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

154

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - People - Nuclear and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Processes Processes Areas Heavy Element Separations Science Interfacial Processes Process Safeguards Environmental Science Radiochemistry Process Simulation and Equipment Design Pyroprocess Development Management and Support Mark A. Williamson, Chemist and Department Manager phone: 630/252-9627, fax: 630/252-5246, e-mail: williamson@anl.gov Ph.D., Physical Chemistry, University of Kansas Advanced nuclear fuel cycles Pyrochemical process research and development Actinide thermodynamics and inorganic chemistry High-temperature chemistry Monica C. Regalbuto, Senior Chemical Engineer phone:630/252-4616, e-mail: regalbuto@anl.gov George F. Vandegrift, Argonne Distinguished Fellow phone: 630/252-4513, fax: 630/972-4513, e-mail: vandegrift@anl.gov Ph.D., Inorganic Chemistry, Iowa State University

155

Glenn T. Seaborg and heavy ion nuclear science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiochemistry has played a limited but important role in the study of nucleus-nucleus collisions. Many of the important radiochemical studies have taken place in Seaborg's laboratory or in the laboratories of others who have spent time in Berkeley working with Glenn T. Seaborg. I will discuss studies of low energy deep inelastic reactions with special emphasis on charge equilibration, studies of the properties of heavy residues in intermediate energy nuclear collisions and studies of target fragmentation in relativistic and ultrarelativistic reactions. The emphasis will be on the unique information afforded by radiochemistry and the physical insight derived from radiochemical studies. Future roles of radiochemistry in heavy ion nuclear science also will be discussed.

Loveland, W. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Chemistry Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Glenn T. Seaborg and heavy ion nuclear science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiochemistry has played a limited but important role in the study of nucleus-nucleus collisions. Many of the important radiochemical studies have taken place in Seaborg`s laboratory or in the laboratories of others who have spent time in Berkeley working with Glenn T. Seaborg. I will discuss studies of low energy deep inelastic reactions with special emphasis on charge equilibration, studies of the properties of heavy residues in intermediate energy nuclear collisions and studies of target fragmentation in relativistic and ultrarelativistic reactions. The emphasis will be on the unique information afforded by radiochemistry and the physical insight derived from radiochemical studies. Future roles of radiochemistry in heavy ion nuclear science also will be discussed.

Loveland, W. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - People - Nuclear and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation and Equipment Design Simulation and Equipment Design Candido Pereira, Chemical Engineer and Group Leader phone: 630/252-9832, fax: 630/972-4448, e-mail: pereira@anl.gov Ph.D., Chemical Engineering, University of Pennsylvania Aqueous separations Solvent extraction and ion exchange Process modeling and design Spent nuclear fuel processing High-level waste treatment Jacqueline M. Copple, Computer Scientist phone: 630/252-4555, fax 630/972-4555, e-mail, copple@anl.gov MS, Computer Science, Illinois Institute of Technology Modeling and simulation (UREX+ process for recovering key radionuclides from commercial spent nuclear fuel) Laura E. Maggos, Scientific Associate phone: 630/252-4701, e-mail: maggos@anl.gov BS, Chemistry, University of Chicago Aqueous separations (UREX+) Solvent extraction modeling

158

Program Overview Shane Johnson Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Overview Program Overview Shane Johnson Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology April 15, 2002 Presentation to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Johnson/April15_02 NP 2010 to NERAC.ppt 2 Nuclear Power 2010 Overview Nuclear Power 2010 Overview Goals 6 Orders for one or more new nuclear plants by 2005 6 Operation of new nuclear power plants by 2010 6 New program initiative unveiled February 2002 6 Based on Near-Term Deployment Roadmap 6 Public/private partnership to: ! Develop advanced reactor technologies ! Explore sites that could host new nuclear power plants ! Demonstrate new Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory processes Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Johnson/April15_02 NP 2010 to NERAC.ppt 3

159

A Home for Heffalump and Pooh - Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Home for Heffalump and Pooh A Home for Heffalump and Pooh About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

160

288 Int. J. Nuclear Energy Science and Technology, Vol. 7, No. 4, 2013 Multi-physics modelling of nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

288 Int. J. Nuclear Energy Science and Technology, Vol. 7, No. 4, 2013 Multi-physics modelling of nuclear reactors: current practices in a nutshell Christophe Demazière Department of Applied Physics, Division of Nuclear Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden Email

Demazière, Christophe

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Nuclear Physics Science Network Requirements Workshop, May 2008 - Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Requirements Workshop Nuclear Physics Program Office, DOEDOE Nuclear Physics Programs .. 6 Nuclear Physics Network Requirementsbandwidth and services requirements. 3 DOE Nuclear Physics

Tierney, Ed., Brian L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Nuclear Wallet Cards at BNL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Wallet Cards at BNL Wallet Cards at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Nuclear Wallet Cards at BNL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Nuclear Wallet Cards Developed at: National Nuclear Data Center, BNL Developed in: 2000-current Result of NP research: DOE-NP nuclear data program Application currently being supported by:

163

Global Nuclear Energy Initiative at LBNL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Global Nuclear Energy Initiative at Global Nuclear Energy Initiative at LBNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Global Nuclear Energy Initiative at LBNL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Global nuclear energy initiative Developed at: 88-inch Cyclotron, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Developed in:

164

Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Medicine Technology NAME:________________________________ OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY UID___________________________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Medicine Technology NAME:________________________________ OLD________________________________ Entrance Writing Sample Placement Test:_________________ LOWER DIVISION GENERAL EDUCATION Credits/Grade A____________________ Students must complete the following courses (or equivalent) prior to entering the nuclear medicine

165

Development of Students Metacognitive Strategies In Science Learning Regarding Nuclear Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research aimed to develop 48 Grade 10 students learning process and metacognitive strategies in the Nuclear Energy topic through the Science

Warawun Siriuthen; Chokchai Yuenyong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

COURSE NOTES: Nuclear Science and Technology Part I/II - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 22, 2007 ... Citation: W. Udo Schrder, "Nuclear Science and Technology Part I/II Chm466/ 566/Phy446/546," University of Rochester, 2007. Access Course

167

Gas Week  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Gas WeekHouston, TexasSeptember 24, 2003

Information Center

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

168

Photo of the Week: 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Each week, we highlight some of our favorite energy and science photos from all over the U.S. Check out our favorites!

169

Nuclear Physics Related Brochures | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Nuclear Physics Related Brochures and Videos Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources NP Workforce Survey Results .pdf file (258KB) Links Databases Workshop Reports Nuclear Physics Related Brochures and Videos Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » News & Resources Nuclear Physics Related Brochures and Videos Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Brochures Accelerating Innovation NP Highlights Image Accelerating Innovation (2011) .pdf file (1.2MB): How nuclear physics benefits us all

170

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Nuclear & Environmental Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

f-Element Polyoxoanion Chemistry f-Element Polyoxoanion Chemistry PuPreyssler The trans-uranium chemistry of the Preyssler heteropolyanion was extended to include the synthesis of the Pu(III) complex, [PuP5W30O110]12-, whose electroanalytical characterization reveals dual redox activity involving the 1-electron Pu(III)/Pu(IV) couple of the guest ion at +0.96 V vs. Ag/AgCl and the 5 × 2-electron reductive electrochemistry of the P-W-O host framework at potentials between -0.6 and 0 V, and electrostatic ion solvation behavior. Details are presented in the article by Antonio and Chiang, Inorg. Chem. 2008, 47, 8285. Polyoxoanions of general composition [XaMbOc]d- (X º P, Si; M º W, Mo) have applications in various disciplines including medicine, catalysis, and separations science. In prospective applications relating to nuclear waste

171

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Nuclear & Environmental Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HESS HESS * Members * Publications * Overview * Recent Research Results Nuclear & Environmental Processes Home Heavy Element and Separations Science (HESS) Three dimensional reconstruction of the structure of a plutonium-containing protein in solution from small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the structure of a plutonium-containing protein in solution from small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data. Except for ultra-trace amounts of neptunium (Np) and plutonium (Pu) naturally generated by neutrons in uranium ores, all of the elements heavier than uranium (with atomic number 92) found in the geosphere are man made. The study of their chemistries began with the synthetic production of Np by Edwin McMillan and Philip H. Abelson in 1940. Since that time, much

172

New Horizons on the Nuclear Landscape | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Science Highlights » 2012 Science Highlights » 2012 » New Horizons on the Nuclear Landscape Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » June 2012 New Horizons on the Nuclear Landscape New calculations have quantified the boundaries and uncertainties of the 'chart of the nuclides'-the extended periodic table of all matter. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of University of Tennessee/ORNL

173

Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Homepage | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

NSAC Home NSAC Home Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) NSAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (629KB) NP Committees of Visitors NP Home The Frontiers of Nuclear Science .pdf file (11.7MB) Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's December 2007 Long Range Plan.Read More .pdf file (11.7MB) The Frontiers of Nuclear Science 1 of 2 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Additional Information Contact NSAC: Email: sc.np@science.doe.gov Phone: 301-903-3613 NSAC DFO: Dr. Timothy J. Hallman Committee Manager: Mrs. Brenda May Committee Chair: Dr. Donald Geesaman Associate Director - NP: Dr. Timothy J. Hallman NSAC is an advisory committee that provides official advice to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) External link

174

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence at MIT | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Resonance Fluorescence at MIT Resonance Fluorescence at MIT Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence at MIT Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Material Identification and Object Imaging Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Developed at: Massachusetts Institute of Technology

175

Conference on Advances in Materials Science | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

176

Electrical power generation: comparative risks and benefits. Final report, August 6, 1973--August 10, 1973. A one-week workshop for high school science teachers  

SciTech Connect

A live-in type workshop available for academic credit covering basic nuclear power generation and the tradeoffs and problems that exist between nuclear power and alternative means to generate electricity was held for 37 high- school teachers at the Madison campus for the University of Wisconsin. Significant improvements over last year's program included the distribution of a large amount of information and the distribution of two minicourse outlines on the subject of power and the environment entitled: The Environmental Impact of Electrical Power Generation: Nuclear and Fossil'' prepared by the Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, and Science II Matter-Energy Interactions in Natural Systems'' prepared by Carl Pfeiffer of Monona Grove High School, Monona, Wisconsin. (MCW)

Carbon, M.W.; Hartwig, K.T.

1973-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

177

The "Last Universal Scientist" Takes Charge - Argonne's Nuclear Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The "Last Universal Scientist" Takes Charge The "Last Universal Scientist" Takes Charge About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

178

Progress in Nuclear Energy 53 (2011) 618 625 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Progress in Nuclear Energy 53 (2011) 618 625 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Progress in Nuclear Energy journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/pnucene Comparison of thorium-based fuels. / Progress in Nuclear Energy 53 (2011) 618 625 3. Methodology 3.1. Determining the initial average fissile

Demazière, Christophe

179

Putting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Richmond, Virginia Outline: 1. Some Bits of History. 2. Nuclear Weapons 101. 3. The Comprehensive Test BanPutting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation Jerry Gilfoyle Physics Department, University of Richmond, Virginia Outline: 1. Some Bits of History. 2. Nuclear Weapons

Gilfoyle, Jerry

180

Putting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outline: 1. Some Bits of History. 2. Nuclear Weapons 101. 3. The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. 4. TestingPutting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation Jerry Gilfoyle Physics Department, University of Richmond, Virginia Outline: 1. Some Bits of History. 2. Nuclear Weapons

Gilfoyle, Jerry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Putting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Some Bits of History. 2. Nuclear Weapons 101. 3. The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. 4. Testing The TestPutting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation Jerry Gilfoyle Physics Department, University of Richmond, Virginia Outline: 1. Some Bits of History. 2. Nuclear Weapons

Gilfoyle, Jerry

182

Putting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

weapons (1953). Vetoed by the Soviets. Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) enters into force (1970Putting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation Jerry Gilfoyle of Nuclear Non-Proliferation Jerry Gilfoyle Physics Department, University of Richmond, Virginia Outline: 1

Gilfoyle, Jerry

183

ENDF/B-VII.0: Next Generation Evaluated Nuclear Data Library for Nuclear Science and Technology  

SciTech Connect

We describe the next generation general purpose Evaluated Nuclear Data File, ENDF/B-VII.0, of recommended nuclear data for advanced nuclear science and technology applications. The library, released by the U.S. Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in December 2006, contains data primarily for reactions with incident neutrons, protons, and photons on almost 400 isotopes. The new evaluations are based on both experimental data and nuclear reaction theory predictions. The principal advances over the previous ENDF/B-VI library are the following: (1) New cross sections for U, Pu, Th, Np and Am actinide isotopes, with improved performance in integral validation criticality and neutron transmission benchmark tests; (2) More precise standard cross sections for neutron reactions on H, {sup 6}Li, {sup 10}B, Au and for {sup 235,238}U fission, developed by a collaboration with the IAEA and the OECD/NEA Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC); (3) Improved thermal neutron scattering; (4) An extensive set of neutron cross sections on fission products developed through a WPEC collaboration; (5) A large suite of photonuclear reactions; (6) Extension of many neutron- and proton-induced reactions up to an energy of 150 MeV; (7) Many new light nucleus neutron and proton reactions; (8) Post-fission beta-delayed photon decay spectra; (9) New radioactive decay data; and (10) New methods developed to provide uncertainties and covariances, together with covariance evaluations for some sample cases. The paper provides an overview of this library, consisting of 14 sublibraries in the same, ENDF-6 format, as the earlier ENDF/B-VI library. We describe each of the 14 sublibraries, focusing on neutron reactions. Extensive validation, using radiation transport codes to simulate measured critical assemblies, show major improvements: (a) The long-standing underprediction of low enriched U thermal assemblies is removed; (b) The {sup 238}U, {sup 208}Pb, and {sup 9}Be reflector biases in fast systems are largely removed; (c) ENDF/B-VI.8 good agreement for simulations of highly enriched uranium assemblies is preserved; (d) The underprediction of fast criticality of {sup 233,235}U and {sup 239}Pu assemblies is removed; and (e) The intermediate spectrum critical assemblies are predicted more accurately. We anticipate that the new library will play an important role in nuclear technology applications, including transport simulations supporting national security, nonproliferation, advanced reactor and fuel cycle concepts, criticality safety, medicine, space applications, nuclear astrophysics, and nuclear physics facility design. The ENDF/B-VII.0 library is archived at the National Nuclear Data Center, BNL. The complete library, or any part of it, may be retrieved from www.nndc.bnl.gov.

Chadwick, M B; Oblozinsky, P; Herman, M; Greene, N M; McKnight, R D; Smith, D L; Young, P G; MacFarlane, R E; Hale, G M; Haight, R C; Frankle, S; Kahler, A C; Kawano, T; Little, R C; Madland, D G; Moller, P; Mosteller, R; Page, P; Talou, P; Trellue, H; White, M; Wilson, W B; Arcilla, R; Dunford, C L; Mughabghab, S F; Pritychenko, B; Rochman, D; Sonzogni, A A; Lubitz, C; Trumbull, T H; Weinman, J; Brown, D; Cullen, D E; Heinrichs, D; McNabb, D; Derrien, H; Dunn, M; Larson, N M; Leal, L C; Carlson, A D; Block, R C; Briggs, B; Cheng, E; Huria, H; Kozier, K; Courcelle, A; Pronyaev, V; der Marck, S

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

184

Conference on Advances in Materials Science | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

in Materials Science Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing Institutional Research...

185

Nuclear science abstracts (NSA) database 1948--1974 (on the Internet)  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) is a comprehensive abstract and index collection of the International Nuclear Science and Technology literature for the period 1948 through 1976. Included are scientific and technical reports of the US Atomic Energy Commission, US Energy Research and Development Administration and its contractors, other agencies, universities, and industrial and research organizations. Coverage of the literature since 1976 is provided by Energy Science and Technology Database. Approximately 25% of the records in the file contain abstracts. These are from the following volumes of the print Nuclear Science Abstracts: Volumes 12--18, Volume 29, and Volume 33. The database contains over 900,000 bibliographic records. All aspects of nuclear science and technology are covered, including: Biomedical Sciences; Metals, Ceramics, and Other Materials; Chemistry; Nuclear Materials and Waste Management; Environmental and Earth Sciences; Particle Accelerators; Engineering; Physics; Fusion Energy; Radiation Effects; Instrumentation; Reactor Technology; Isotope and Radiation Source Technology. The database includes all records contained in Volume 1 (1948) through Volume 33 (1976) of the printed version of Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA). This worldwide coverage includes books, conference proceedings, papers, patents, dissertations, engineering drawings, and journal literature. This database is now available for searching through the GOV. Research Center (GRC) service. GRC is a single online web-based search service to well known Government databases. Featuring powerful search and retrieval software, GRC is an important research tool. The GRC web site is at http://grc.ntis.gov.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Topics in nuclear and radiochemistry for college curricula and high school science programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concern with the current status and trends of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry education in academic institutions was addressed in a recent workshop. The 1988 workshop considered the important contributions that scientist with nuclear and radiochemistry backgrounds have made and are continuing to make to other sciences and to various applied fields. Among the areas discussed were environmental studies, life sciences, materials science, separation technology, hot atom chemistry, cosmochemistry, and the rapidly growing field of nuclear medicine. It is intent of the organizer and participants of this symposium entitled Topics in Nuclear and Radiochemistry for College Curricula and High School Science Program'' to provide lecture material on topics related to nuclear and radiochemistry to educators. It is our hope that teachers, who may or may not be familiar with the field, will find this collections of articles useful and incorporate some of them into their lectures.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Nuclear Science Division Annual Report 1995-1996  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Times in 3He Induced Nuclear Fission Th. Rubehn, K.X. Jing,of the discovery of nuclear fission. Many review papers andtimes in 3He induced nuclear fission* Th. Rubehn, K.X. Jing,

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Nuclear Science Division Annual Report 1984-85  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and J.R. Huizenga, Nuclear Fission (Academic, New York,and J.R. Huizenga, Nuclear Fission (Academic, N.Y. , 1973).is well known from nuclear fission where it can be related

Mahoney Editor, Jeannette

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Nuclear Science Division Annual Report 1984-85  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3. Nuclear Collisions at Relativistic Energies The theory6 Nuclear Theory 1. Hadronic and Quark Matter at High Energytheory group to calculate whether such energy densities could be generated in nuclear collisions at ultra-relativistic energies.

Mahoney Editor, Jeannette

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

NUCLEAR SCIENCE DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979-1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high energy nuclear collisions. Application of HFB theory totheory that accounts for the known bulk properties of nuclear matter, i t s saturation energyenergy options. Sane neutron star physics involving nuclear theory.

Cerny, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Nuclear Science Division Annual Report 1995-1996  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Theory Study of Medium-induced Parton Energy LossTransport theory With a view towards high-energy nuclearNuclear Theory Study of Medium-induced Parton Energy Loss

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Nuclear Science Division Annual Report 1984-85  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. Xcssi. and W. Wolf. Nuclear-Reaction-Time Studies of U +K Produced in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions Phys. Lett.Momentum Distributions of Nuclear Fragments in im Collisions

Mahoney Editor, Jeannette

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Nuclear Physics (NP) Homepage | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NP Home NP Home Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Accelerating Innovation .pdf file (1.2MB) Nuclear Physics supports the experimental and theoretical research needed to create a roadmap of matter that will help unlock the secrets of how the universe and everything in it is put together.Read More .pdf file (1.2MB) Accelerating Innovation What is Nuclear Physics? .pdf file (1.2MB) Nuclear physicists study the fundamental building blocks of matter, from

194

DOE Science Showcase - DOE Nuclear Physics R&D Info | OSTI, US Dept of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Nuclear Physics R&D Info DOE Nuclear Physics R&D Info While quarks and gluons are fairly well understood, how they fit together to create different types of matter is still a mystery. The DOE Nuclear Physics program's mission is to solve this mystery through theoretical and experimental research; the benefits to society range from fighting cancer to ensuring food safety to border protection. Find DOE research information on this topic from the OSTI databases and read about the Department's Nuclear Physics program. From the Databases Select a database to initiate a search. DOE Information Bridge DOE R&D Accomplishments Energy Citations Database ScienceCinema Science.gov WorldWideScience.org More information Accelerating Innovation: How nuclear physics benefits us all About DOE's Nuclear Physics Program

195

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

One the cover: One the cover: Albert Einstein (1879-1955) U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Washington, D.C. 20585 The History of Nuclear Energy Table of Contents Preface ................................................................... 1 Introduction .......................................................... 3 The Discovery of Fission ...................................... 4 The First Self-Sustaining Chain Reaction ............ 5 The Development of Nuclear Energy for Peaceful Applications ..................................... 7 Chronology of Nuclear Research and Development, 1942-1994 .................................... 13 Selected References ............................................. 23 Glossary ..............................................................

196

Girls, choose a career in Nuclear Science and Technology!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

'Atomic Fission Fun with the American Nuclear Society', Jan. 26, 2013 Getting to know nuclear energy: the past, the present & the future - free public lecture (Nov. 15, 2012,...

197

Einstein's Letter- Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people...

198

Economics of Nuclear and Renewable Electricity Energy Science Coalition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear energy arose as a spin-off from nuclear weapons. Its use grew rapidly during the 1960s, nurtured by huge subsidies and the belief that nuclear electricity would soon become too cheap to meter. According to the International Atomic Energy Agency, at the end of 2009 there were 438 operating nuclear power reactors in the world, total

Dr Mark Diesendorf

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Y-12 gives students a taste of science | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

gives students a taste of science | National Nuclear Security gives students a taste of science | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Y-12 gives students a taste of science Y-12 gives students a taste of science Posted By Office of Public Affairs During a recent visit to the Y-12 National Security Complex, eighth graders

200

Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Nuclear & Environmental Processes -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safeguards Safeguards * Members * Overview Nuclear & Environmental Processes Home Process Safeguards Process Safeguards is the application of chemical and engineering expertise to improve safeguards and nonproliferation of nuclear materials in complex facilities. Researchers in this group are developing novel approaches that integrate process modeling, process monitoring, and radiochemistry to understand, track and confirm the movement of nuclear materials through multistage chemical processes. Recent work includes Describing system response and observables of relevant process changes Developing detectors for nuclear materials Developing techniques for safeguarding nuclear materials More Closing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Improved Safeguards for Spent Fuel Treatment Systems

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Energy Frontier Research Center, Center for Materials Science of Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect

This is a document required by Basic Energy Sciences as part of a mid-term review, in the third year of the five-year award period and is intended to provide a critical assessment of the Center for Materials Science of Nuclear Fuels (strategic vision, scientific plans and progress, and technical accomplishments).

Todd R. Allen

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Impact of contributions of Glenn T. Seaborg on nuclear science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the negotiation of the Non-Proliferation Treaty and took thetalks were begun. The non- proliferation treaty (NPT) wasban treaty, nuclear non-proliferation and the use of nuclear

Hoffman, Darleane C.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A,B,C`s of nuclear science  

SciTech Connect

This introductory level presentation contains information on nuclear structure, radioactivity, alpha decay, beta decay, gamma decay, half-life, nuclear reactions, fusion, fission, cosmic rays, and radiation protection. Nine experiments with procedures and test questions are included.

Noto, V.A. [Mandeville High School, LA (United States); Norman, E.B.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Dairiki, J.; Matis, H.S.; McMahan, M.A.; Otto, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1995-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

204

Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-effective, advanced nuclear plant designs and develop gas-cooled reactor technologies in order to pave the way projects to usher forth next-generation nuclear reactors and fuel cycles based on the results that enable used nuclear fuels to be recycled back into the reactors as fresh fuel. The Advanced Fuel Cycle

205

NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DIVISION OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, engineering, construction. operation, transmission and distribution of nuclear electricity, decommissioning from $O.Ol/kWh ($1982) at l%/yr to $O.O165/kWh in year 50, decommissioning and nuclear waste reserved Copyright 0 1988 Pergamon Journals Ltd THE NET-ENERGY YIELD OF NUCLEAR POWER GENETYNER SR,~ ROBERT

McDonald, Kirk

206

Int. J. Nuclear Energy Science and Technology, Vol. 4, No. 4, 2009 287 Development of computational methods and their  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Int. J. Nuclear Energy Science and Technology, Vol. 4, No. 4, 2009 287 Development of computational plants', Int. J. Nuclear Energy Science and Technology, Vol. 4, No. 4, pp.287­298. Biographical notes, energy and temporal distribution of the neutron density throughout the nuclear core depends

Demazière, Christophe

207

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 54, NO. 4, AUGUST 2007 843 A Prototype Three-Dimensional Position Sensitive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for homeland security and nuclear non-proliferation applications. Mechanically cooled HPGe detectorsIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 54, NO. 4, AUGUST 2007 843 A Prototype Three of Nuclear Engineering and Radi- ological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA (e

He, Zhong

208

Nuclear Physics Science Network Requirements Workshop, May 2008 - Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Facilitiesof Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Facilities

Tierney, Ed., Brian L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

16 years of successful projects in16 years of successful projects in Nuclear Science & TechnologyNuclear Science & Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of operating NPP; · NPP decommissioning and waste treatment; · Novel reactor concepts and Nuclear Fuel Cycle

210

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Nuclear & Environmental Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Technology Nuclear Technology * Members * Contact * Publications * Overview * Pyrochemical Process Research * Closing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear & Environmental Processes Home Pyrochemical Process Research Our department is also interested in pyrochemical process research and its development and demonstration for the U.S. Department of Energy's Generation IV (GEN IV) and Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) programs. Through these initiatives, we are working to contribute to the development of next generation of advanced nuclear systems, to meet future needs for safe, economic, proliferation-resistant and environmentally responsible fuel cycles and energy production. Argonne research efforts in this area include: developing a novel electrochemical method for the conversion of spent oxide nuclear fuel to its metallic form for subsequent treatment by pyrochemical methods

211

Piglet and the Pumpkin Field - Argonne's Nuclear Science and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

scientists describe the historic events which brought them to understand nuclear fission Anniversary - 80 years ago, Leo Szilard envisioned neutron chain reaction blog...

212

Program Overview Shane Johnson Office of Nuclear Energy, Science...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(COL) 6 Design Completion Tasks * Material, component and system testing * Fuel irradiation and testing * First-of-a-kind engineering 6 Nuclear Plant Business Case Study...

213

Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Nuclear Science and Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

supercomputer research such as this simulation of a Westinghouse PWR900 pressurized water reactor core. Visualization by Tom Evans, ORNL Nuclear Energy Innovation Hub ORNL will...

214

Impact of contributions of Glenn T. Seaborg on nuclear science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the negotiation of the Non-Proliferation Treaty and took thebegun. The non- proliferation treaty (NPT) was negotiatedtest ban treaty, nuclear non-proliferation and the use of

Hoffman, Darleane C.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

PNNL's Community Science & Technology Seminar Series Nuclear Power in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Entropy and black holes Binney, Prof James ES21 Winter, Emma Balliol The importance of energy storage22 Colman, Jake St Peter's Accelerator driven Nuclear Reactors Jelley, Prof Nick CO38 Cullen, Emma Podsiadlowski, Prof Philipp ES0305 Ghelani, Shanil University The Challenges and Promise of Nuclear Fusion

216

884 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 52, NO. 4, AUGUST 2005 Distributed Computing Grid Experiences in CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

884 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 52, NO. 4, AUGUST 2005 Distributed Computing Grid is with National University of Science and Technology, Pakistan (e-mail: Ashiq.Anjum@cern.ch). T. Barrass, S

Low, Steven H.

217

A Clean Nuclear Energy Using Hydrogen and Condensed Matter Nuclear Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Other Concepts and Assessments / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

Xing Z. Li; Zhan M. Dong; Chang L. Liang; Han Yi; Yun P. Fu

218

Fusion Nuclear Science Facility - Advanced Tokamak Option (A26932)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of 19th Technology Of Fusion Energy, Las Vegas, Nevada, 2010; To Be Published In Fusion Science And Technology19th Topical Meeting on Technology Fusion Energy Las Vegas Nevada, US, 2010999618795

Wong, C.P.C.

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

219

Nuclear Theory and Science of the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) will be a world-leading laboratory for the study of nuclear structure, reactions and astrophysics. Experiments with intense beams of rare isotopes produced at FRIB will guide us toward a comprehensive description of nuclei, elucidate the origin of the elements in the cosmos, help provide an understanding of matter in neutron stars, and establish the scientific foundation for innovative applications of nuclear science to society. FRIB will be essential for gaining access to key regions of the nuclear chart, where the measured nuclear properties will challenge established concepts, and highlight shortcomings and needed modifications to current theory. Conversely, nuclear theory will play a critical role in providing the intellectual framework for the science at FRIB, and will provide invaluable guidance to FRIB's experimental programs. This article overviews the broad scope of the FRIB theory effort, which reaches beyond the traditional fields of nuclear structure and reactions, and nuclear astrophysics, to explore exciting interdisciplinary boundaries with other areas. \\keywords{Nuclear Structure and Reactions. Nuclear Astrophysics. Fundamental Interactions. High Performance Computing. Rare Isotopes. Radioactive Beams.

A. B Balantekin; J. Carlson; D. J. Dean; G. M. Fuller; R. J. Furnstahl; M. Hjorth-Jensen; R. V. F. Janssens; Bao-An Li; W. Nazarewicz; F. M. Nunes; W. E. Ormand; S. Reddy; B. M. Sherrill

2014-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

220

NNSA/CEA Cooperation in Computer Science | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

models for each stage of operation of a nuclear weapon and a high level of computing power and complex software to integrate these models along with experimental validation of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Need for a Strong Science and Technology Program in the Nuclear Weapons Complex for the 21st Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper I argue for the need for a strong Science and Technology program in the Nuclear Weapons Complex as the basis for maintaining a credible deterrence capability. The current Nuclear Posture Review establishes a New Triad as the basis for the United States deterrence strategy in a changing security environment. A predictive science capability is at the core of a credible National Nuclear Weapons program in the 21st Century. In absence of nuclear testing, the certification of our current Nuclear Weapons relies on predictive simulations and quantification of the associated simulation uncertainties. In addition, a robust nuclear infrastructure needs an active research and development program that considers all the required nuclear scenarios, including new configurations for which there is no nuclear test data. This paper also considers alternative positions to the need for a Science and Technology program in the Nuclear Weapons complex.

Garaizar, X

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

222

Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Nuclear and Environmental Processes -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiochemistry Radiochemistry * Members * Overview * Eliminating Uranium * Medical Isotopes Nuclear & Environmental Processes Home Radiochemistry radiochemistry The Radiochemistry Group studies the chemistry of radioactive materials involved in the nuclear fuel cycle and medical isotope production. Our research is aimed at developing a comprehensive understanding of radiochemical processes via experimental determination and modeling of the underlying kinetics, thermodynamics, and mechanisms of the relevant chemistries. A thorough understanding of these parameters enables the development of potentially transformational used fuel processing techniques, and the optimization and scale-up of known techniques. Current research goals: Design a single-step process, replacing TRUEX and TALSPEAK

223

Data Jam at New York Energy Week | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

--Bioenergy -Fossil --Oil --Natural Gas -Nuclear Energy Usage -Storage --Hydrogen & Fuel Cells -Transmission -Consumption -Smart Grid Science & Innovation -Science & Technology...

224

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - People - Nuclear and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interfacial Processes Interfacial Processes Paul Fenter, Physicist and Group Leader phone: 630/252-7053, fax: 630/252-9570, e-mail: fenter@anl.gov Ph.D., Physics, University of Pennsylvania Interfacial science Interfacial geochemistry (mineral / fluid interfaces) Phase-sensitive interfacial x-ray scattering Sang Soo Lee, Assistant Geochemist phone: 630/252-6679, fax: 630/252-9570, e-mail: sslee@anl.gov Ph.D., Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago Mineral-solution interfacial process Sorption of heavy metal and organic matter on minerals Ion-exchange and swelling of clay minerals X-ray reflectivity, resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity, resonant anomalous X-ray diffraction Tim Fister, Assistant Materials Scientist Fax: 630/252-9570, e-mail: fister@anl.gov

225

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Publications - Nuclear &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heavy Element and Separations Science Heavy Element and Separations Science 2009 Antonio, M. R., M. Nyman, and T. M. Anderson, Direct observation of contact ion-pair formation in aqueous solution, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 48(33), 6136-6140 (2009) Antonio, M. R., M.-H. Chiang, S. Seifert, D. M. Tiede, and P. Thiyagarajan, In situ measurement of the Preyssler polyoxometalate morphology upon electrochemical reduction: A redox system with Born electrostatic ion salvation. J. Electroanal. Chem. 626(1-2), 103-110 (2009) Meridiano, Y., L. Berthon, X. Crozes, C. Sorel, P. Dannus, M. R. Antonio, R. Chiarizia, and T. Zemb,Aggregation in organic solutions of malonamides: Consequences for water extraction, Solvent Extr. Ion Exch., in press (2009) Pan, Y. X., W. Wang, G. K. Liu, S. Skanthakumar, R. A. Rosenberg, X. Z. Guo, K. K. Li , Correlation between structure variation and luminescence red shift in YAG:Ce, J. Alloy Comp., in press (2009)

226

WIPP personnel plan activities for national engineers week  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

be on a mission next week - to encourage students to pursue careers in engineering, mathematics and science. The information blitz is in observance of National Engineers Week,...

227

Scientific Grand Challenges: Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing  

SciTech Connect

This report is an account of the deliberations and conclusions of the workshop on "Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing" held January 26-28, 2009, co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics (ONP) and the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing (ASCR). Representatives from the national and international nuclear physics communities, as well as from the high performance computing community, participated. The purpose of this workshop was to 1) identify forefront scientific challenges in nuclear physics and then determine which-if any-of these could be aided by high performance computing at the extreme scale; 2) establish how and why new high performance computing capabilities could address issues at the frontiers of nuclear science; 3) provide nuclear physicists the opportunity to influence the development of high performance computing; and 4) provide the nuclear physics community with plans for development of future high performance computing capability by DOE ASCR.

Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - People - Nuclear and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Technology Nuclear Technology Mark A. Williamson, Chemist and Department Head phone: 630/252-9627, fax: 630/252-5246, e-mail: williamson@anl.gov Pyroprocess Development James L. Willit, Physical Chemist and Group Leader Phone: 630/252-4384, fax 630/972-4416, e-mail: willit@anl.gov Ph.D., Physical Chemistry, North Carolina State University Molten salt electrochemistry High-temperature actinide chemistry Electrochemical separations chemistry Pyroprocess development Robert J. Blaskovitz, Engineering Specialist phone: 630/252-4441, fax: 630/972-4421, blaskovitz@anl.gov Javier Figueroa, Chemical Engineer phone: 630/252-4248, fax 630/52-9917, e-mail: figueroa@anl.gov M.S., Chemical Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology Pyroprocessing technology Plant modeling Terry R. Johnson, STA, Senior Chemical Engineer

229

Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - vision, approach, and overview  

SciTech Connect

Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Rcactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems is critical. In order to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the modeling and simulation approach in order to deliver predictive tools for advanced fuels development. The coordination between experimental nuclear fuel design, development technical experts, and computational fuel modeling and simulation technical experts is a critical aspect of the approach and naturally leads to an integrated, goal-oriented science-based R & D approach and strengthens both the experimental and computational efforts. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) and Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Fuels Integrated Performance and Safety Code (IPSC) are working together to determine experimental data and modeling needs. The primary objective of the NEAMS fuels IPSC project is to deliver a coupled, three-dimensional, predictive computational platform for modeling the fabrication and both normal and abnormal operation of nuclear fuel pins and assemblies, applicable to both existing and future reactor fuel designs. The science based program is pursuing the development of an integrated multi-scale and multi-physics modeling and simulation platform for nuclear fuels. This overview paper discusses the vision, goals and approaches how to develop and implement the new approach.

Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB; Carmack, Jon [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Energy Frontier Research Center, Center for Materials Science of Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, has funded the INL as one of the Energy Frontier Research Centers in the area of material science of nuclear fuels. This document is the required annual report to the Office of Science that outlines the accomplishments for the period of May 2010 through April 2011. The aim of the Center for Material Science of Nuclear Fuels (CMSNF) is to establish the foundation for predictive understanding of the effects of irradiation-induced defects on thermal transport in oxide nuclear fuels. The science driver of the centers investigation is to understand how complex defect and microstructures affect phonon mediated thermal transport in UO2, and achieve this understanding for the particular case of irradiation-induced defects and microstructures. The centers research thus includes modeling and measurement of thermal transport in oxide fuels with different levels of impurities, lattice disorder and irradiation-induced microstructure, as well as theoretical and experimental investigation of the evolution of disorder, stoichiometry and microstructure in nuclear fuel under irradiation. With the premise that thermal transport in irradiated UO2 is a phonon-mediated energy transport process in a crystalline material with defects and microstructure, a step-by-step approach will be utilized to understand the effects of types of defects and microstructures on the collective phonon dynamics in irradiated UO2. Our efforts under the thermal transport thrust involved both measurement of diffusive phonon transport (an approach that integrates over the entire phonon spectrum) and spectroscopic measurements of phonon attenuation/lifetime and phonon dispersion. Our distinct experimental efforts dovetail with our modeling effort involving atomistic simulation of phonon transport and prediction of lattice thermal conductivity using the Boltzmann transport framework.

Todd R. Allen, Director

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Nuclear Engineering and Design 257 (2013) 3144 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Engineering and Design 257 (2013) 31­44 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Nuclear Engineering and Design journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/nucengdes Validation of PARCS Bánáti, Mathias Stålek, Christophe Demazière Division of Nuclear Engineering, Department of Applied

Demazière, Christophe

232

Nuclear Science Division annual report, July 1, 1981-September 30, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division between July 1, 1981, and September 30, 1982. Heavy-ion investigations continue to dominate the experimental and theoretical research efforts. Complementary programs in light-ion nuclear science, in nuclear data evaluation, and in the development of advanced instrumentation are also carried out. Results from Bevalac experiments employing a wide variety of heavy ion beams, along with new or upgraded detector facilities (HISS, the Plastic Ball, and the streamer chamber) are contained in this report. These relativistic experiments have shed important light on the degree of equilibration for central collisions, the time evolution of a nuclear collision, the nuclear density and compressional energy of these collisions, and strange particle production. Reaction mechanism work dominates the heavy-ion research at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and the SuperHILAC. Recent experiments have contributed to our understanding of the nature of light-particle emission in deep-inelastic collisions, of peripheral reactions, incomplete fusion, fission, and evaporation. Nuclear structure investigations at these accelerators continue to be directed toward the understanding of the behavior of nuclei at high angular momentum. Research in the area of exotic nuclei has led to the observation at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the ..beta..-delayed proton decay of odd-odd T/sub z/ = -2 nuclides; ..beta..-delayed proton emitters in the rare earth region are being investigated at the SuperHILAC.

Mahoney, J. (ed.)

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Nuclear & Environmental Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing Medical Isotopes from Low-Enriched Uranium Developing Medical Isotopes from Low-Enriched Uranium Argonne researchers are contributing to the security and welfare of our nation by developing means to produce a reliable domestic supply of an important medical agent using low-enriched uranium. Technetium-99m is a vital isotope that is commonly used for cardiac and mammogram imaging. However, the U.S. currently has no domestic source of molybdenum-99, which is the parent nuclide for technetium-99m, so we are particularly susceptible to supply interruptions. Through the National Nuclear Security Administration's Global Threat Reduction Initiative, Argonne researchers are supporting three separate approaches for domestic molybdenum-99 production from low-enriched uranium. Argonne is currently working with University of Missouri Research Reactor, and has already demonstrated one approach by irradiating 5g of low-enriched uranium metal foil. Argonne is also working with Babcock and Wilcox to design a molybdenum-99 production system based on fission of uranium-235 in a liquid fuel reactor. Argonne and NorthStar Nuclear Medicine, LLC are exploring an accelerator-based method for the production of molybdenum-99 by irradiating molybdenum targets

234

from Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC NEWS Area High School Teams Compete during DOE's National Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High School Teams Compete during DOE's National Science High School Teams Compete during DOE's National Science Bowl® Regional Championship: Lakeside and Evans High School Finish Second and Third - Dorman Wins AIKEN, S.C. - Feb. 25, 2013 - Using a format similar to the television show "Jeopardy," America's next generation of scientists and engineers put their knowledge to the test at the University of South Carolina Aiken during the DOE National Science Bowl regional compe- tition this past weekend. High School teams from across South Carolina and the greater Augusta, Ga. area relied on their collective knowledge as they participated in one of the coun- try's largest science tournaments. This regional competition, managed by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (SRNS), hosted 120 high school students from 12 high schools. It is the only educational event

235

High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Flux Isotope Reactor High Flux Isotope Reactor May 30, 2013 The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) first achieved criticality on August 25, 1965, and achieved full power in August 1966. It is a versatile 85-MW isotope production, research, and test reactor with the capability and facilities for performing a wide variety of irradiation experiments and a world-class neutron scattering science program. HFIR is a beryllium-reflected, light water-cooled and moderated flux-trap type swimming pool reactor that uses highly enriched uranium-235 as fuel. HFIR typically operates seven 23-to-27 day cycles per year. Irradiation facility capabilities include Flux trap positions: Peak thermal flux of 2.5X1015 n/cm2/s with similar epithermal and fast fluxes (Highest thermal flux available in the

236

Photo of the Week: Students from Roosevelt Middle School win...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Students from Roosevelt Middle School win Argonne's 2013 Regional Science Bowl Photo of the Week: Students from Roosevelt Middle School win Argonne's 2013 Regional Science Bowl...

237

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

19, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 26) 19, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 26) Spot and futures prices surged upward as two tropical storms in close succession made their presence felt in gas markets over the past week. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price rose 47 cents week-to-week (Wednesday, September 11 to Wednesday, September 18) to $3.79 per MMBtu, which is at its highest level since May 1. In addition to some production shut-ins from Tropical Storm Hanna's arrival in the Gulf of Mexico on Friday (September 13), spot prices were also bolstered somewhat by warmer-than-normal temperatures in most regions since last Wednesday, as well as by outages of a number of nuclear-fired electric plants for routine maintenance. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the futures contract for October delivery rose in five consecutive trading sessions, reaching a 4-month high yesterday at $3.787 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage increased by 69 Bcf to 2,924 Bcf, 12 percent above the 5-year average. After falling 82 cents on Thursday (September 12) to dip below $29 per barrel, the spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rebounded strongly on Friday and remained above the $29 per barrel mark for the rest of the week, ending trading yesterday at $29.57 per barrel, or $5.10 per MMBtu. This is a decline of 20 cents per barrel from the WTI spot price of last Wednesday.

238

Technical Considerations for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission/ National Academy of Sciences Proposed Study: Cancer in Populations L iving Near Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), is updating the 1990 U.S. National Institutes of Health - National Cancer Institute (NCI) report, Cancer in Populations Living near Nuclear Facilities. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed a committee of scientists and professionals in the fields of epidemiology, radiation biology, nuclear plant effluents, and environmental risk assessment to provide study design considerations to the NAS committe...

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

239

Neutron Transfer Reactions: Surrogates for Neutron Capture for Basic and Applied Nuclear Science  

SciTech Connect

Neutron capture reactions on unstable nuclei are important for both basic and applied nuclear science. A program has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study single-neutron transfer (d,p) reactions with rare isotope beams to provide information on neutron-induced reactions on unstable nuclei. Results from (d,p) studies on {sup 130,132}Sn, {sup 134}Te and {sup 75}As are discussed.

Cizewski, J. A.; Peters, W. A.; Allen, J.; Hatarik, R.; Matthews, C.; O'Malley, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); Jones, K. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Kozub, R. L.; Howard, J.; Patterson, N.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Rogers, J.; Sissom, D. J. [Department of Physics, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN 38505 (United States); Pain, S. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Adekola, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45703 (United States); Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Liang, F.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Pittman, S. T. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] (and others)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

240

Los Alamos neutron science center nuclear weapons stewardship and unique national scientific capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation gives an overview of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) and its contributions to science and the nuclear weapons program. LANSCE is made of multiple experimental facilities (the Lujan Center, the Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR), the Ultra-Cold Neutron facility (UCN), the proton Radiography facility (pRad) and the Isotope Production Facility (IPF)) served by the its kilometer long linear accelerator. Several research areas are supported, including materials and bioscience, nuclear science, materials dynamics, irradiation response and medical isotope production. LANSCE is a national user facility that supports researchers worldwide. The LANSCE Risk Mitigation program is currently in progress to update critical accelerator equipment to help extend the lifetime of LANSCE as a key user facility. The Associate Directorate of Business Sciences (ADBS) plays an important role in the continued success of LANSCE. This includes key procurement support, human resource support, technical writing support, and training support. LANSCE is also the foundation of the future signature facility MARIE (Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes).

Schoenberg, Kurt F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Future of Nuclear Data for Nuclear Astrophysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear astrophysics is an exciting growth area in nuclear science. Because of the enormous nuclear data needs of this field

Michael S. Smith

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Safeguarding Nuclear Fuel Processing | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Safeguarding Nuclear Safeguarding Nuclear Fuel Processing Laboratory Policy and Evaluation (LPE) LPE Home Staff M&O Contracts SC Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Work for Others in the Office of Science Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) DOE's Philosophy on LDRD Frequently Asked Questions Success Stories Brochures Additional Information LDRD Program Contacts Technology Transfer DOE National Laboratories Contact Information Laboratory Policy and Evaluation U.S. Department of Energy SC-32/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5447 F: (202) 586-3119 Success Stories Safeguarding Nuclear Fuel Processing Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Idaho National Laboratory Develops International Nonproliferation

243

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Table 7. Imports of Crude Oil and Total Products by PAD District (Thousand Barrels per Day) Product Region Current Week Last Week Year Ago 2 Years Ago Four-Week Averages 126...

244

Weekly Blender Net Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production (Thousand Barrels per Day) Period: Weekly 4-Week Average Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes...

245

International Conference on Mathematics and Computational Methods Applied to Nuclear Science & Engineering (M&C 2013) Sun Valley, Idaho, USA, May 5-9, 2013, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL (2013)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors under U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725, National for Solving k-Eigenvalue Problems in Neutron Diffusion Theory," Nuclear Science and Engineering, 167, pp. 141International Conference on Mathematics and Computational Methods Applied to Nuclear Science

Kelley, C. T. "Tim"

246

Nuclear Physics User Facilities | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NP User Facilities NP User Facilities User Facilities ASCR User Facilities BES User Facilities BER User Facilities FES User Facilities HEP User Facilities NP User Facilities User Facilities Frequently Asked Questions User Facility Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 NP User Facilities Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Nuclear Physics program supports the operation of the following national scientific user facilities: Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC): External link RHIC at Brookhaven National Laboratory External link is a world-class scientific research facility that began operation in 2000, following 10 years of development and construction. Hundreds of physicists from around

247

Fusion Science at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rotating Plasma Finding is Key for ITER Heavy-Ion Fusion Science (HIFS) Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Science Highlights HPC Requirements Reviews NERSC HPC Achievement...

248

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

v v U.S. crude oil refinery inputs averaged 16.0 million barrels per day during the week ending December 13, 2013, 200 thousand barrels per day lower than the previous week's average. Refineries operated at 91.5% of their operable capacity last week. Gasoline production increased last week, averaging 9.3 million barrels per day. Distillate fuel production decreased last week, averaging 5.0 million barrels per day.

249

Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1984 to September 30, 1985. As in previous years, experimental research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, during this time, preparations began for a new generation of relativistic heavy-ion experiments at CERN. The Nuclear Science Division is involved in three major experiments at CERN and several smaller ones. The report is divided into 5 sections. Part I describes the research programs and operations, and Part II contains condensations of experimental papers arranged roughly according to program and in order of increasing energy, without any further subdivisions. Part III contains condensations of theoretical papers, again ordered according to program but in order of decreasing energy. Improvements and innovations in instrumentation and in experimental or analytical techniques are presented in Part IV. Part V consists of appendices, the first listing publications by author for this period, in which the LBL report number only is given for papers that have not yet appeared in journals; the second contains abstracts of PhD theses awarded during this period; and the third gives the titles and speakers of the NSD Monday seminars, the Bevatron Research Meetings and the theory seminars that were given during the report period. The last appendix is an author index for this report.

Mahoney, J. (ed.)

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

22 cents, or 4 percent, over the week, closing at 5.274 per MMBtu. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil ended the week at 73.64 per barrel, or 12.70 per MMBtu,...

251

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Weekly Petroleum Status Report/Energy Information Administration v U.S. crude oil refinery inputs averaged about 14.6 million barrels per day during the week ending ...

252

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

other Midwest market locations experienced temperatures in the 90s early this week. As heat arrived in the Northeast early in the week, the price at New York citygates off...

253

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0208(2013-14) Distribution Category UC-98 Data for Week Ended: April 5, 2013 Includes: Weekly Table A1 (See Page 31) Petroleum Supply Monthly

254

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

increased to 2,260 Bcf for the week, which is 19.5 percent above the 5-year average inventory at this time of the year, according to EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. The...

255

NSLS Weekly Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weekly Activities There are a variety of weekly meetings for NSLS staff and users. These are posted regularly on the TV monitors (User Information Channel 22), along with any time...

256

Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Systems. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, July 31-August 3, 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global utilization of nuclear energy has come a long way from its humble beginnings in the first sustained nuclear reaction at the University of Chicago in 1942. Today, there are over 440 nuclear reactors in 31 countries producing approximately 16% of the electrical energy used worldwide. In the United States, 104 nuclear reactors currently provide 19% of electrical energy used nationally. The International Atomic Energy Agency projects significant growth in the utilization of nuclear power over the next several decades due to increasing demand for energy and environmental concerns related to emissions from fossil plants. There are 28 new nuclear plants currently under construction including 10 in China, 8 in India, and 4 in Russia. In the United States, there have been notifications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission of intentions to apply for combined construction and operating licenses for 27 new units over the next decade. The projected growth in nuclear power has focused increasing attention on issues related to the permanent disposal of nuclear waste, the proliferation of nuclear weapons technologies and materials, and the sustainability of a once-through nuclear fuel cycle. In addition, the effective utilization of nuclear power will require continued improvements in nuclear technology, particularly related to safety and efficiency. In all of these areas, the performance of materials and chemical processes under extreme conditions is a limiting factor. The related basic research challenges represent some of the most demanding tests of our fundamental understanding of materials science and chemistry, and they provide significant opportunities for advancing basic science with broad impacts for nuclear reactor materials, fuels, waste forms, and separations techniques. Of particular importance is the role that new nanoscale characterization and computational tools can play in addressing these challenges. These tools, which include DOE synchrotron X-ray sources, neutron sources, nanoscale science research centers, and supercomputers, offer the opportunity to transform and accelerate the fundamental materials and chemical sciences that underpin technology development for advanced nuclear energy systems. The fundamental challenge is to understand and control chemical and physical phenomena in multi-component systems from femto-seconds to millennia, at temperatures to 1000?C, and for radiation doses to hundreds of displacements per atom (dpa). This is a scientific challenge of enormous proportions, with broad implications in the materials science and chemistry of complex systems. New understanding is required for microstructural evolution and phase stability under relevant chemical and physical conditions, chemistry and structural evolution at interfaces, chemical behavior of actinide and fission-product solutions, and nuclear and thermomechanical phenomena in fuels and waste forms. First-principles approaches are needed to describe f-electron systems, design molecules for separations, and explain materials failure mechanisms. Nanoscale synthesis and characterization methods are needed to understand and design materials and interfaces with radiation, temperature, and corrosion resistance. Dynamical measurements are required to understand fundamental physical and chemical phenomena. New multiscale approaches are needed to integrate this knowledge into accurate models of relevant phenomena and complex systems across multiple length and time scales.

Roberto, J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Gibala, R.; Zinkle, S.; Miller, J.R.; Pimblott, S.; Burns, C.; Raymond, K.; Grimes, R.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.; Clark, S.; Ewing, R.; Wagner, A.; Yip, S.; Buchanan, M.; Crabtree, G.; Hemminger, J.; Poate, J.; Miller, J.C.; Edelstein, N.; Fitzsimmons, T.; Gruzalski, G.; Michaels, G.; Morss, L.; Peters, M.; Talamini, K.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The Bulletin - BNL's Weekly Newspaper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thomas Wesley Burrows Thomas Wesley Burrows A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z In Memoriam Home | Bulletin Home Posted: July 16, 2008 Thomas Burrows of the Energy Sciences & Technology Department's National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC), died on July 1, 2008. He was 65. Burrows had joined the NNDC on September 9, 1974, as an assistant physicist. He was named physicist on October 1, 1979 ***** Full Text Thomas W. Burrows, a long-time scientist at the National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, passed away on July 1, 2008. He died of cancer which was not diagnosed until it was too late. Tom was born in Janesville, Wisconsin and received his B.S. (1965) and Ph.D. (1972) from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI. He was part of the prestigious physics group headed by Dr. H. Heinz Barschall who was also his thesis adviser. He was a Nuclear Information Research Associate at the University of Kentucky for two years (1972-1974) under a national program sponsored by the National Academy of Sciences and the National Science Foundation. He joined the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in September 1974 and worked there since then.

258

Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1986 to September 30, 1987. A highlight of the experimental program during this time was the completion of the first round of heavy-ion running at CERN with ultrarelativistic oxygen and sulfur beams. Very rapid progress is being made in the analysis of these important experiments and preliminary results are presented in this report. During this period, the Bevalac also continued to produce significant new physics results, while demand for beam time remained high. An important new community of users has arrived on the scene, eager to exploit the unique low-energy heavy-beam capabilities of the Bevalac. Another major highlight of the program has been the performance of the Dilepton Spectrometer which has entered into production running. Dileptons have been observed in the p + Be and Ca + Ca reactions at several bombarding energies. New data on pion production with heavy beams measured in the streamer chamber to shed light on the question of nuclear compressibility, while posing some new questions concerning the role of Coulomb forces on the observed pion spectra. In another quite different area, the pioneering research with radioactive beams is continuing and is proving to be one of the fastest growing programs at the Bevalac. Exotic secondary beams (e.g., 8He, 11Li, and 14Be) have been produced for fundamental nuclear physics studies. In order to further enhance the scientific research program and ensure the continued vitality of the facility, the Laboratory has proposed an upgrade of the existing Bevalac. Specifically, the Upgrade would replace the Bevatron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams to continue the forefront research program. Other papers on nuclear physics research are included in this report.

Mahoney, J. (ed.)

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 7, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 29, 2011) Nearly all pricing points were down slightly for the week on light weather load despite an end-week rally anticipating warmer weather for the approaching July 4th holiday weekend. The Henry Hub price decreased 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) over the week (0.5 percent) to close at $4.40 per MMBtu on June 29. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 2,432 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 24, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 78 Bcf, leaving storage volumes

260

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 23, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 15, 2011) The past week was characterized by passing of the earlier week’s heat wave. The Henry Hub price decreased 31 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) for the week (6.4 percent) to close at $4.52 per MMBtu on June 15. During the midst of the heat wave, working natural gas in storage last week rose to 2,256 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 10, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 69 Bcf, leaving storage volumes positioned 275 Bcf below year-ago levels.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center conversion from HEU to LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

The 2-MW Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC) open pool reactor was converted from 93% UAL-High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to 20% enrichment U3Si2-AL Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The conversion included redesign of the core to a more compact size and the addition of beryllium reflectors and a beryllium flux trap. A significant increase in thermal flux level was achieved due to greater neutron leakage in the new compact core configuration. Following the conversion, a second cooling loop and an emergency core cooling system were installed to permit operation at 5 MW. After re-licensing at 2 MW, a power upgrade request will be submitted to the NRC.

Tehan, Terry

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

262

Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

role in developing science and technology for nuclear power programs, nuclear propulsion, nuclear medicine, and the nation's nuclear weapon program among others. Many...

263

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview - May 21, 2001 Somewhat warmer temperatures early in the week, especially in the South, provided a lift to natural gas spot and futures prices. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) However, a report of another large stock build and a revised forecast for normal to below-normal temperatures over a larger area of the country turned the week's gains into losses. On a week-to-week basis, the spot price of natural gas at the Henry Hub dropped $0.10 to end Friday, May 18 at $4.15 per MMBtu, while the NYMEX price of natural gas for June delivery at the Henry Hub declined $0.013 to $4.291 per MMBtu. At 119 Bcf, net injections to storage for the week ended May 11, 2001, were the highest value for the 8-year period of weekly AGA data.

264

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tuesday, September 4, 2001 Tuesday, September 4, 2001 Prices in most major markets continued generally downward last week, spurred by relatively mild temperatures throughout much of the country and more than adequate supplies as indicated by reports of another strong storage refill rate for the prior week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) The spot market price at the Henry Hub in Louisiana ended the week down 62 cents at $2.15 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX futures market, the contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub expired on Wednesday at $2.295 per MMBtu, compared with almost $4.62 a year ago. The contract for delivery in October ended the week at $2.38. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil ended the week down at $27.25 per barrel ($4.70 per MMBtu), a decline of $1.05 per barrel from the prior week.

265

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 14, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 6, 2011) Nearly all pricing points were down overall for the week, some by more than 10 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub price decreased 6 cents per MMBtu over the week (1.4 percent) to close at $4.34 per MMBtu on July 6. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 2,527 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 1, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 95 Bcf, leaving storage volumes positioned 224 Bcf under year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the August 2011 natural

266

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 25, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 17, 2010) Natural gas prices continued their decline across much of the country for the week ended February 17. Even prices in the Northeast, which registered large increases during the previous week, fell as of yesterday. On the week, natural gas spot prices registered net decreases at almost all locations in the lower 48 States. The significant price increases for the week ended February 10 in the Northeast occurred in response to the two major snow storms that slammed the Mid-Atlantic and parts of the Northeast. However, with average temperatures this report week resembling historical normals, prices in the

267

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 10, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 2, 2011) The previous report week's increasing prices gave way to relatively consistent declines across a large part of the country over this report week. The Henry Hub spot price showed a slight increase over the weekend, but closed down 26 cents for the week to $3.39 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) on November 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the higher valued December 2011 natural gas contract moved into position as the near-month contract and declined by 2.6 cents per MMBtu to close the week at $3.749 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 3794 billion cubic

268

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 3, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 26, 2011) The weatherman’s promise for chillier temperatures later this week and mention of the word "snow" in some forecasts was the likely catalyst propelling prices upwards this week. In an environment of generally supportive market fundamentals, the Henry Hub price closed up 7 cents for the week to $3.65 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) on October 26. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the November 2011 natural gas contract rose just under half a cent per MMBtu for the week to close at $3.590 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 3,716 billion cubic

269

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 1, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 23, 2010) Natural gas spot and futures prices fell at all market locations in the lower 48 States since last Wednesday, June 16, completely reversing the previous week’s gains. However, spot prices remain significantly higher than they were 3 weeks ago. Prices at most market locations fell between 10 and 25 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) this week, with most locations ending the week below $5 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.804 per MMBtu, decreasing by 17 cents or about 4 percent during the report week. In

270

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2009 2, 2009 Next Release: February 19, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 11, 2009) Natural gas prices decreased this week as space-heating demand slackened with a break from the bitter cold of prior weeks. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.33 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.68. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased for the report week as the economic downturn is expected to be accompanied with a large-scale reduction in demand for all energy products, thus affecting prices for energy in forward markets. The futures contract for February 2009 delivery decreased by 6.5 cents per MMBtu on the week to

271

Biology | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioinformatics Nuclear Medicine Climate and Environment Systems Biology Computational Biology Chemistry Engineering Computer Science Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Materials...

272

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ruby Pipeline Set to Open this Week. Following approval to begin service from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on Wednesday, El Paso Corporations Ruby Pipeline has...

273

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

increased to 3,683 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, October 15, according to the Energy Information Administrations (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. The West...

274

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Report," and the Historical Weekly Storage Estimates Database. Other Market Trends: FERC Investigates Natural Gas Wash-Trading: The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC)...

275

ORNL User Week 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Week 2010 September 13 - 17, 2010, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN ORNL has an extensive history of collaborative research with colleagues in academia, other...

276

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Release: Thursday, August 26, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 18, 2010) Natural...

277

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Release: Thursday, November 4, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 27, 2010) As the...

278

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7, 2009 Next Release: May 14, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 6, 2009) Natural gas...

279

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next Release: Thursday, May 13, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 5, 2010) Since...

280

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2009 Next Release: January 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 14, 2009) In the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The development of a remote monitoring system for the Nuclear Science Center reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With funding provided by Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI), design of Secure, Transportable, Autonomous Reactors (STAR) to aid countries with insufficient energy supplies is underway. The development of a new monitoring system that allows remote access to data from the reactor site is an important part of this project. The two goals of this monitoring system are to control the use of nuclear materials and to monitor the performance of the facility from a remote location. I have designed a prototype system for this NERI project that utilizes LabVIEW software and global network technologies to monitor the Nuclear Science Center (NSC) reactor at Texas A&M University. LabVIEW and its applications have all the needed features to build a monitoring system for many types of facilities, including STAR reactors. This system takes data from reactor cooling systems, power monitoring channels, fuel temperature indicators, control rod drives, security alarm sensors and stores it on local and remote hard drives, sends it through an output port to remote clients, and graphically displays these data in the reactor control room. Data from NSC TRIGA reactor is fed to a computer program that analyzes and predicts reactor performance in real time. To provide a remote observation of the working area and fissile material, this system uses cameras, triggered by alarm sensors and LabVIEW vision applications. Operators at the local and remote control stations may view and store all the images from these cameras. The system has been in operation for many months at the NSC with outstanding results and further development is continuing.

Jiltchenkov, Dmitri Victorovich

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

International Conference on Mathematics and Computational Methods Applied to Nuclear Science & Engineering (M&C 2013) Sun Valley, Idaho, USA, May 5-9, 2013, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL (2013)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monte Carlo simulation to model nuclear reactor dynamics. These Monte Carlo methods can be extremely://www.energy.gov/hubs) for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors under U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 for Solving k-Eigenvalue Problems in Neutron Diffusion Theory," Nuclear Science and Engineering, 167, pp. 141

Kelley, C. T. "Tim"

283

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 18 (No issue Thanksgiving week; next release 2:00 p.m. on December 2) November 18 (No issue Thanksgiving week; next release 2:00 p.m. on December 2) Natural gas spot and futures prices fell for a third consecutive week (Wednesday to Wednesday, November 10-17), as temperatures for most of the nation continued to be moderate to seasonal. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined 6 cents on the week, for the smallest week-on-week decrease in the nation. Spot gas traded there yesterday (Wednesday, November 17) at $6.06 per MMBtu. Price declines at the majority of market locations ranged from around a dime to nearly 60 cents per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the price for the near-month natural gas futures contract (for December delivery) fell by almost 40 cents on the week, settling yesterday at $7.283 per MMBtu. EIA reported that working gas inventories in underground storage were 3,321 Bcf as of Friday, November 12, which is 9 percent greater than the previous 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined for a fourth consecutive week, dropping $1.85 per barrel ($0.32 per MMBtu), or nearly 4 percent, from last Wednesday's level, to trade yesterday at $46.85 per barrel ($8.08 per MMBtu).

284

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2002 1, 2002 Lingering low temperatures last week prompted spot prices at the Henry Hub to start the week up sharply gaining 19 cents to trade on Monday at $2.68 per MMBtu. Prices then declined sharply before rebounding on Thursday and Friday to end the week at $2.81 per MMBtu-32 cents higher than the previous Friday. Prices on the NYMEX futures market moved up most days to end the week up almost $0.45 per MMBtu at $2.800. Temperatures moderated in many parts of the country last week and rose to the 60s and 70s on Friday and Saturday in much of the Northeast. The latest National Weather Service (NWS) 6- to 10-day forecast calls for cool temperatures in the Midwest but for above normal temperatures to return to the Northeast. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) Net withdrawals from stocks increased to132 Bcf during the last week of February, which is more than double the level of a week earlier. Even though natural gas stocks continue to be 45 percent, or 577 Bcf, above the previous 5-year average, reports of the increase in storage withdrawals may have contributed to last week's spot and futures contract price rise. The price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose above $23 per barrel on Tuesday and ended trading on Friday at its highest level since September 21, 2001--$23.87 per barrel, or $4.15 per MMBtu.

285

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Due to the observance of Veterans Day on Monday, November 12, the next Natural Gas Weekly Update, will be published on Tuesday, November 13, 2001. Due to the observance of Veterans Day on Monday, November 12, the next Natural Gas Weekly Update, will be published on Tuesday, November 13, 2001. Overview: Monday, November 5, 2001 Spot prices at the Henry Hub began the week up then trended down to end the week 10 cents below the previous Friday at $2.96 per MMBtu. This represents a reversal from the pattern of a week earlier when the Henry Hub price gained more than $0.70 per MMBtu on a Friday-to-Friday basis. Warmer-than-normal temperatures in most parts of the country last week along with forecasts calling for the moderate weather to continue into the weekend contributed to the decline in prices. .(See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) Estimates of weekly net additions to storage again were below normal levels for this time of year but the total working gas in storage remained above average and well above volumes at this time last year. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down $1.95 per barrel for the week to end trading on Friday at $20.20 or $3.48 per MMBtu.

286

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 22, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 14, 2011) A touch of autumn in the air combined with hopes for the eventual return of winter was likely the catalyst enabling natural gas prices to recapture the $4 mark this week despite an environment of negative consumption fundamentals and continued strong production. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the October 2011 natural gas contract advanced 9.9 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) to close at $4.039 per MMBtu over the week. The Henry Hub price oscillated in a similar but narrow range before closing up 5 cents for the week at $4.01 per MMBtu on September 14. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 3,112 billion cubic

287

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: March 26, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 18, 2009) Warmer temperatures moved into major population centers this report week, signaling the imminent end of winter and the corresponding reduction in demand related to space heating. Spot prices continued to decline, with the biggest decreases west of the Mississippi River. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.17 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.75. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased as temperatures climbed higher this week. The futures contract for April delivery decreased by 11 cents per MMBtu on the week to $3.68, the lowest close for a near-month contract in about 6½ years.

288

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 11, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 3, 2011) Nearly all pricing points were down modestly for the week following passage of the heat wave that had earlier gripped most of the country. The Henry Hub price decreased 20 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) over the week (down 4.5 percent) to close at $4.26 per MMBtu on August 3. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the downward price response was somewhat more pronounced (down 5.3 percent) with the September 2011 natural gas contract losing ground over the week, closing at $4.090 per MMBtu on Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 2,758 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 29, according to the U.S. Energy Information

289

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20, 2008 20, 2008 Next Release: December 4, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, November 19, 2008) Wintry weather moved into major population centers in the Lower 48 States this report week, boosting demand related to space heating from the Midcontinent to the eastern half of the country. Prices increased throughout the country, with the biggest increases in the Midcontinent. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.11 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $6.76. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased for the report week as the second week of the heating season began. The futures contract for December delivery increased by 34 cents per

290

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 21, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 13, 2011) Nearly all pricing points were up somewhat for the week on a heat wave that affected nearly half the country’s population according to national news reports. Despite the record heat, the Henry Hub price increased a modest 9 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) over the week (2.0 percent) to close at $4.43 per MMBtu on July 13. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price response was more robust (up 4.4 percent) with the August 2011 natural gas contract price gaining ground over the week, closing at $4.403 per MMBtu on Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 2,611 billion cubic

291

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 13, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 5, 2011) Like autumn leaves floating down to earth, natural gas prices dropped decidedly from their $4 support branch this past week. In a whirlwind of generally unsupportive market fundamentals, the Henry Hub price closed down 25 cents for the week to $3.63 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) on October 5. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the November 2011 natural gas contract dropped nearly 23 cents per MMBtu to close at $3.570 per MMBtu over the week. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 3,409 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, September 30, according to the U.S. Energy

292

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 21, 2010) Natural gas prices rose across market locations in the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose 31 cents, or 7 percent, during the week, averaging $4.70 per million Btu (MMBtu) yesterday, July 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the August 2010 natural gas futures contract for delivery at the Henry Hub rose about 21 cents, or 5 percent, ending the report week at $4.513 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage increased to 2,891 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 16, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

293

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2008 3, 2008 Next Release: October 30, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, October 22) Natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States this report week increased as a result of cold weather in some major gas consuming areas of the country, several ongoing pipeline maintenance projects, and the continuing production shut-ins in the Gulf of Mexico region. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month contract (November 2008) increased on the week to $6.777 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) as of yesterday (October 22). The net weekly increase occurred during a week in which the price increased in three trading sessions. As of Friday, October 17, working gas in underground storage totaled

294

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25, 2001 25, 2001 The industry stock build that began in April has continued into June as the latest weekly estimate indicates that more than 100 Bcf was again added to working gas storage levels. At the same time that natural gas stocks have been increasing, prices have been generally trending down. Prices at many major spot markets moved down most days last week and ended the week between 20 and 30 cents per MMBtu below Tuesday's prices. On the NYMEX futures market, the near-month (July) contract also ended the week down 25 cents from Tuesday's high of $3.981. Much of the country continued to enjoy moderate temperatures during last week, which saw the first day of summer (June 21) prices (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map).

295

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 9, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 1, 2011) The past week was marked by two distinct trading markets — “before” and “after” the Memorial Day holiday. Cash markets were listless going into the holiday weekend but escalated Tuesday following an early heat wave that drifted into the East. The Henry Hub price advanced 27 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) for the week (6.2 percent) to close at $4.63 per MMBtu on June 1. Just prior to the heat wave, working natural gas in storage last week rose to 2,107 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, May 27, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas

296

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2008 7, 2008 Next Release: August 14, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, July 30, to Wednesday, August 6) Natural gas spot prices decreased this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, July 30-August 6), marking a fifth consecutive week of declines at many trading locations after the unprecedented run-up in prices earlier this year. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.31 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $8.70. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts were also lower relative to last week. After reaching a daily settlement high price for the week of $9.389 per MMBtu on Friday, August 1, the price of the near-month contract (September 2008) on Monday decreased

297

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2008 5, 2008 Next Release: May 22, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot prices increased in a majority of regions of the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, May 7-14).The Henry Hub spot price increased $0.43 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $11.51, the highest average price recorded at the Henry Hub in more than 2 years. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices also continued on an upward trend that has resulted in weekly price increases in 6 of the last 7 report weeks. The futures contract for June delivery increased 27.1 cents per MMBtu on the week to approximately $11.60. During the week ending Friday, May 9, estimated net injections of natural gas into underground storage totaled the largest volume to date

298

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2007 to Thursday, January 30, 2008) 23, 2007 to Thursday, January 30, 2008) Released: January 31, 2008 Next release: February 7, 2008 · Natural gas spot and futures prices increased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, January 23-30), as frigid temperatures in much of the country increased demand for space heating. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.33 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $8.17. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered increases. The futures contract for March delivery rose by about 46 cents per MMBtu on the week to $8.045. · As of Friday, January 25, working gas in storage was 2,262 Bcf, which is 3.9 percent above the 5-year (2003-2007) average. For the report week, EIA recorded the largest implied net withdrawal (274 Bcf) in its 14-year database of weekly storage statistics.

299

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2001 7, 2001 With the return of above-average storage refill estimates for the third week of August and relatively widespread normal temperatures, prices moved down at most major markets last week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) At the Henry Hub, the spot market price ended the week down 46 cents per MMBtu at $2.77. On the futures market, the near-month (September) NYMEX contract ended trading on Friday at $2.706 per MMBtu-off close to $0.60 from the previous Friday. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil remained at or above $27.20 per barrel each day last week and ended the week at $28.30 or $4.88 per MMBtu. Prices: Spot prices at most major market locations began the week down from the previous Friday, then trended up slightly at mid-week. However, following the release of the American Gas Association (AGA) weekly storage estimate on Wednesday for the previous week, prices moved down between 25 and 35 cents per MMBtu at key regional markets. Prices fell further in the Rockies, with most trading points there down a few cents either side of a half dollar. Spot gas at the Henry Hub traded at its lowest level since July 2 when it traded for $2.93 per MMBtu. Prices at other major markets all were below $3.00 at the end of the week. Some examples of these were: Katy in East Texas at $2.78 per MMBtu, Waha in West Texas at $2.71, and Midcontinent in Oklahoma at $2.65. The lowest prices reported were found in the Rockies where prices were mostly less than $2.20 per MMBtu.

300

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2001 30, 2001 Prices rose slightly mid-week with the return of summer weather and a reported slowing of net injections to storage for the prior week. Temperatures for the week reverted close to normal in the Northeast and as much as 3 degrees above normal in the Midwest. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) In a pattern typical for this summer, spot prices declined toward the end of the week as a cool front pervaded the eastern half of the country. However, the spot price at the Henry Hub was able to hold onto a 12-cent gain over the week to close at $3.07 per MMBtu on Friday. The August contract finished as the near-month contract on a slightly higher note on the last day of trade to close at $3.167 per MMBtu due to short-covering and a forecast for warmer weather in the upcoming week. The August contract ended less than 2 cents lower than the July contract for the lowest closure since May of last year. On the West Coast, the cancellation of high-linepack operational flow orders allowed prices to buoy upward by about $1 per MMBtu early in the week. As coastal areas remained cool though, price declines offset much of the gain. For only the third week in the last 2 months, the American Gas Association (AGA) estimated net injections to storage at less than 100 Bcf as they reported 84 Bcf for the week ended Friday, July 20. An OPEC agreement to reduce production quotas by 1 million barrels per day helped prop-up crude oil prices. As of Friday, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate was $27.05 per barrel, or $4.66 per MMBtu, $1.45 per barrel more than a week earlier.

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) before Upgrade to Component Test Facility (CTF)  

SciTech Connect

The compact (R0~1.2-1.3m) Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is aimed at providing a fully integrated, continuously driven fusion nuclear environment of copious fusion neutrons. This facility would be used to test, discover, understand, and innovate scientific and technical solutions for the challenges facing DEMO, by addressing the multi-scale synergistic interactions involving fusion plasma material interactions, tritium fuel cycle, power extraction, and the nuclear effects on materials. Such a facility properly designed would provide, initially at the JET-level plasma pressure (~30%T2) and conditions (e.g., Hot-Ion H-Mode), an outboard fusion neutron flux of 0.25 MW/m2 while requiring a fusion power of 19 MW. If and when this research operation is successful, its performance can be extended to 1 MW/m2 and 76 MW by reaching for twice the JET plasma pressure and Q. High-safety factor q and moderate- plasmas would minimize plasma-induced disruptions, helping to deliver reliably a neutron fluence of 1 MW-yr/m2 and a duty factor of 10% presently anticipated for the FNS research. Success of this research will depend on achieving time-efficient installation and replacement of all components using extensive remote handling (RH). This in turn requires modular designs for all internal components, including the single-turn toroidal field coil center-post with RH-compatible bi-directional sliding joints. Such device goals would further dictate placement of support structures and vacuum seal welds behind the internal and shielding components. If these further goals could be achieved, the FNSF would provide a ready upgrade path to the Component Test Facility (CTF), which would aim to test, at higher neutron fluence and duty cycle, the demanding fusion nuclear engineering and technologies for DEMO. This FNSF-CTF strategy would be complementary to the ITER and the Broader Approach programs, and thereby help mitigate the risks of an aggressive world fusion DEMO R&D Program. The key physics and technology research needed in the next decade to manage the potential risks of this FNSF are identified.

Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Civilian Nuclear Programs, SPO-CNP: LANL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Civilian Nuclear Programs, SPO-CNP Science Program Office Applied Energy Civilian Nuclear Office of Science Civilian Nuclear Programs Home Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs Yucca...

303

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 22) 15, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 22) An early spring chill in the Northeast kept natural gas spot prices firm this week until yesterday (April 14), when warmer temperatures resulted in sharp price declines at most trading locations for the day and moderately lower prices on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 7-14). The Henry Hub spot price declined 3 cents per MMBtu on the week to $5.73. After climbing above $6.00 per MMBtu earlier in the week, the NYMEX futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub dropped in the last two trading sessions to yesterday's closing price of $5.744, which represents a net decline of 13 cents per MMBtu on the week. There was a second consecutive week of injections into storage with stocks as of Friday, April 9, at 1,049 Bcf, which is 5.2 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose 34 cents per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $36.62 per barrel, or $6.31 per MMBtu.

304

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 20) 13, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 20) Moderate price increases on Monday and Wednesday of this week could not offset declines during the other three trading days of the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, June 5-12), leaving spot prices lower at most locations for the sixth consecutive week. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price decreased by 13 cents to $3.15 per MMBtu. Six weeks ago, on Wednesday, May 1, the Henry Hub spot price stood at $3.79 per MMBtu. Futures prices also trended lower for the sixth consecutive week. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub declined by $0.203 per MMBtu for the week, settling Wednesday, June 12 at $3.057 per MMBtu-a decrease of a little over 6 percent from the previous Wednesday. EIA's estimate of net injections into storage for the week ended June 7 is 81 Bcf, bringing total working gas inventories to 1,974 Bcf, or about 20 percent above the previous 5-year (1997-2001) average. On Thursday, June 6, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell below $25 per barrel for the first time since April 16, and ended trading on Wednesday, June 12 at $24.79 per barrel, or $4.27 per MMBtu.

305

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2001 6, 2001 After opening the week up at $3.353 per MMBtu, prices on the NYMEX futures market moved down 3 of the remaining 4 days of the week to settle at the end of the week at $2.971-more than 22 cents lower than the previous Friday. Despite unseasonably high temperatures in much of the Midwest and parts of the Southwest last week and the threat of a tropical storm in the Gulf of Mexico, (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) prices at the Henry Hub spot market moved down late in the week, falling to $3.06 per MMBtu on Friday. Net injections to storage declined for the second consecutive week but still averaged 11 Bcf per day, bringing the estimated stock level to 2,262 Bcf as of July 27 with more than 3 months remaining in the refill season. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil ended the week up $0.60 per barrel from the previous Friday at $27.65 or $4.77 per MMBtu.

306

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 18, 2006) 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 18, 2006) Springtime temperatures in most regions of the country this week and slightly lower prices for crude oil led to an easing of natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, May 3. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 3-10), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 6 cents per MMBtu, or less than 1.0 percent, to $6.50. In contrast to spot market activity, trading of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) this week resulted in gains. The NYMEX contract for June delivery increased 29.4 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $6.900 yesterday (May 10). Net injections reported in today's release of EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report brought natural gas storage supplies to 1,989 Bcf as of Friday, May 5, which is 56.0 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $0.11 per barrel on the week to $72.15 per barrel, or $12.44 per MMBtu.

307

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 29, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 5) August 29, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 5) Despite sizeable drops in both spot and futures contract prices in the past two days, week-on-week (Wednesday, August 21 to Wednesday August 28) increases were recorded in both cash and futures markets. Temperatures which had begun to moderate even before Thursday, August 22, particularly in the Northeast and West regions, seemed finally to begin exerting downward pressure on prices. For the week, the spot price at the Henry Hub gained $0.11 per MMBtu to average $3.33 yesterday (Wednesday, August 28). The NYMEX futures contract for September delivery expired yesterday at the closing price of $3.288 per MMBtu, up only $0.014 from the previous Wednesday's settlement. The Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report showed total stocks of 2,716 Bcf for the week ended Friday, August 23, which is 13 percent above the 5-year average. The run-up in the spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil that resulted in an increase of $2.18 per barrel over the previous week was almost completely offset this past week, as the WTI spot price fell $2.06 per barrel to end trading on Wednesday, August 28 at an average price of $28.31 per barrel, or $4.88 per MMBtu.

308

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview Overview Lower prices and a report of another considerable net injection to stocks were featured in last week's gas markets. As of Friday, May 11, 2001, the spot price of natural gas at the Henry Hub dropped $0.24 from the previous Friday to $4.25 per MMBtu. The NYMEX price of natural gas for June delivery at the Henry Hub declined $0.212 for the week to $4.278 per MMBtu. A record-setting 108 Bcf was added to natural gas stocks for the week ended May 4, 2001. The demand for cooling is still somewhat limited as mild temperatures prevailed around most of the country. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) Prices Mid-week prices were at the lowest level since early August. Even with an end-of-the-week influence from the futures market that caused a slight upturn, spot prices at the major supply hubs were $0.25 to $0.65 cents per MMBtu lower on a week-to-week basis with Katy, Texas ending at $4.23; the Henry Hub, Louisiana at $4.25; Midcon, Oklahoma at $4.11; and Opal, Wyoming at $3.30. Prices at the Chicago and New York citygates were lower as well, registering $4.35 and $4.65 at week's end, off a respective $0.27 and $0.20 per MMBtu for the week. SoCal provided the only exception to the generally lower trend as demand increased because of warmer temperatures. Natural gas prices receded before temperatures did, though. The effect of unscheduled maintenance on the PG&E Gas Transmission system was imperceptible to PG&E's large-volume purchasers. By Friday, the PG&E customers were paying $3.51 less at $4.18 while SoCal's citygate price was only $0.47 lower at $11.92.

309

Animal Science Weekly January 23, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, REFURBISHMENT & CAPITAL WORKS PROJECTS 1 HISTORY 1.1 As from 18 November 2003, the Tuftmaster Macquarie Special Solution 1 (K140) (10% nylon) and the Cavalier Bremworth Mardi Gras Rumba and Chimarrita (100% wool STANDARD UNDERLAY 3.1 The underlay is AIRSTEP from BRIDGESTONE (9mm thick) with a composition of 30% wool

Mukhtar, Saqib

310

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petrolem Reports Petrolem Reports Weekly Petroleum Status Report Data for week ending Dec. 13, 2013 | Release Date: Dec. 18, 2013 | Next Release Date: Dec. 27, 2013 | full report Previous Issues Week: December 18, 2013 December 11, 2013 December 4, 2013 November 27, 2013 November 20, 2013 November 14, 2013 November 6, 2013 October 30, 2013 October 23, 2013 October 21, 2013 October 9, 2013 October 2, 2013 prior issues Go The petroleum supply situation in the context of historical information and selected prices. Released after 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Highlights Weekly Petroleum Status Report Highlights PDF PDF Data Overview (Combined Table 1 and Table 9) PDF Tables 1 U.S. Petroleum Balance Sheet CSV XLS PDF 2 U.S. Inputs and Production by PAD District CSV XLS PDF

311

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2009 6, 2009 Next Release: July 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 15, 2009) Natural gas spot prices rose during the week in all trading locations. Price increases ranged between 6 cents and 48 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), with the biggest increases occurring in the Rocky Mountain region. During the report week, the spot price at the Henry Hub increased 15 cents or 5 percent to $3.37 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas near-month contract (August 2009) decreased 7 cents to $3.283 per MMBtu from $3.353 the previous week. During its tenure as the near-month contract, the August 2009 contract has lost 66 cents. As of Friday, July 10, 2009, working gas in storage rose to 2,886

312

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 20, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 12, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States, with price hikes ranging between 6 and 30 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week yesterday, May 12, at $4.18 per MMBtu, 18 cents higher than the preceding week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.284 per MMBtu, increasing by 29 cents or about 7 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,089 billion cubic feet (Bcf)

313

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: July 2, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 24, 2009) Natural gas spot prices generally declined this report week (June 17-24), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.19 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.80. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for natural gas decreased as prices for most energy products fell amid concerns over the economy. The natural gas futures contract for July delivery decreased by 49 cents per MMBtu on the week to $3.761. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday, June 19, is

314

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2009 1, 2009 Next Release: May 28, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 20, 2009) Natural gas prices at most trading locations fell on the week because of mild weather as well as continued weakness in the economy. Declines ranged between 37 cents at the Dracut trading area in the Northeast to 90 cents at the El Paso non-Bondad area in the Rocky Mountains. The Henry Hub spot price fell by 67 cents during the week to $3.75 per million Btu (MMBtu). Moving in the opposite direction of natural gas prices, the price of the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil contract rose on the week to $61.45 per barrel, or $10.59 per MMBtu. Oil prices are now at their highest level since November 10, 2008, having more than doubled since falling to a

315

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 16, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 8, 2011) Natural gas prices rose on the week across the board, with somewhat moderate increases in most areas and steep increases in the Northeast United States. The Henry Hub spot price rose 20 cents on the week from $4.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, June 1, to $4.83 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (July 2011) contract rose about 5 percent, from $4.692 last Wednesday to $4.847 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,187 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 3, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

316

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 19, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 11, 2010) Summer heat and increased demand this week were insufficient to sustain the natural gas price level, as prices at trading locations across the lower 48 States posted decreases. Overall, spot price at most locations in the lower 48 States fell between 30 and 45 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), although a number of locations posted price decreases of as much as 52 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week yesterday, August 11, 39 cents lower than the preceding week, at $4.38 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract

317

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 3, 2009 Next Release: January 29, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Thursday, January 22, 2009) Bitter cold in much of the eastern half of the country failed to boost prices this report week (Wednesday, January 14, to Thursday, January 22), as continued concerns over the economy and the perception of a healthy supply picture dominated price movements. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.75 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.72. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased for the report week as the economic downturn is expected to be accompanied with a large-scale reduction in demand for all energy products, thus affecting prices for energy in forward markets. The futures contract

318

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 26, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 18, 2011) The threat of shut-in production arising from lower Mississippi River flooding likely sent prices up temporarily at nearly all domestic pricing points over the week but the gains failed to stick. The Henry Hub price lost a modest 7 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (1.9 percent) to close at $4.15 per MMBtu on May 18. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,919 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, May 13, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 92 Bcf, leaving storage volumes

319

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 21, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 13, 2010) Significant price increases occurred through Friday, January 8, apparently as a result of extreme temperatures and continued wellhead freeze-offs in some parts of the country during the first half of the report week. However, with temperatures across much of the lower 48 States returning to normal, spot prices receded significantly between Monday, January 11, and Wednesday, January 13. On the week, natural gas spot prices registered significant net decreases at all locations in the lower 48 States since January 6. The largest weekly price drops occurred in Florida and the

320

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 22, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 14, 2010) While natural gas spot prices inched lower at a number of market locations, prices at the majority of points in the lower 48 States increased since last Wednesday, April 7. Overall, spot prices in the lower 48 States varied between a 3-percent increase and a 3-percent decrease on the week. The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week yesterday, April 14, 7 cents higher than the preceding week, at $4.15 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.199 per

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 23, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 15, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 8–15), likely supported by demand in the electric power sector from late-season heat and associated air-conditioning demand in much of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.25 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.06 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the October futures contract increased in 4 out of 5 trading days for a total gain during the report week of about $0.18 per MMBtu. The price of the

322

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 9, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 1, 2010) Following the Thanksgiving Day holiday weekend, prices moved up significantly this week as wintry weather moved into much of the country. The most severe weather to date this season is increasing space-heating demand from nearly coast to coast and as far south as Florida. During the report week (November 24-December 1), the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.39 to $4.21 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased during the report week in response to indications of warmer weather in the outlook and amid reports of growth in supply. The futures

323

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, to Wednesday, April 23) 16, to Wednesday, April 23) Released: April 24, 2008 Next release: May 1, 2008 · Spot prices at all market locations (outside the Rocky Mountain Region) are trading above $9 per million Btu (MMBtu), with a majority of the points registering prices in excess of $10 per MMBtu. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (April 24) at $10.781 MMBtu, continuing the trend of week-over-week increases for the fifth consecutive week. · Natural gas in storage was 1,285 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of April 18, which is 1.9 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007). · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $4.48 per barrel on the week to $119.28 per barrel or $20.57 per MMBtu.

324

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 20, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 12, 2011) Wholesale natural gas prices at most market locations east of the Mississippi River moved higher this week as a bitter cold moved into the eastern half of the country. West of the Mississippi River, a gradual warming trend resulted in lower prices. During the report week (January 5-12), the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.03 to $4.55 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased during the report week, likely in part due to forecasts of continuing cold weather and improving economic conditions. The futures

325

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 11, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 3, 2010) Warmer weather moved into major population centers this report week, limiting demand related to space heating for much of the country. Prices declined, with the biggest decreases occurring at markets in the Rocky Mountains and the Midcontinent. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.15 to $4.76 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased. The futures contract for April delivery decreased by $0.10 on the week to $4.76 per MMBtu. As of Friday, February 26, working gas in underground storage was

326

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 28, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 20, 2010) A reprieve from the extreme cold in much of the country during this report week limited space-heating demand, resulting in price declines. The biggest decreases occurred in the Northeast. During the report week (January 13-20), the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.07 to $5.54 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased. The futures contract for February delivery decreased by $0.24 on the week to $5.496 per MMBtu. As of Friday, January 15, working gas in underground storage was 2,607 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 0.2 percent below the 5-year

327

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 9, 2011) Natural gas spot prices remained soft at nearly all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price rose an insignificant 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (0.5 percent) for the week ending March 9, to $3.81 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,674 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, March 4, according to the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied draw for the week was 71 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned 32 Bcf above year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the April 2011 natural

328

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 1, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 24, 2011) Even an earthquake on Tuesday could not shake up most gas prices significantly for the week. However, the prospects of some near-term returning cooling load was likely the catalyst boosting overall cash market prices this week. The Henry Hub price increased 13 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) over the week (up 3.2 percent) to close at $4.10 per MMBtu on August 24. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), there was a 10.4 cent per MMBtu price spike on Tuesday following the East Coast earthquake but the September 2011 natural gas contract eventually gave most of the gain back and closed at $3.922 per MMBtu on Wednesday.

329

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 24, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 16, 2011) A reprieve from extreme cold in much of the country this week limited space-heating demand, contributing to price declines. The biggest price decreases occurred in the Northeast. During the report week (February 9-16), the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.29 to $3.93 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased. The futures contract for March delivery decreased by $0.12 on the week to $3.92 per MMBtu. As of Friday, February 11, working gas in underground storage was 1,911 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 6.3 percent below the 5-year

330

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 22, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 14, 2009) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (October 7-14) as a cold-air mass moved over major consuming areas of the country, including the populous Northeast. The Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.12 to $3.82 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased significantly after increasing for 5 consecutive weeks. The futures contract for November delivery decreased by $0.47 per MMBtu on the week to $4.436. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday (October 9) is estimated to have been 3,716 billion cubic feet (Bcf), a record high

331

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 5, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 27, 2011) Mild temperatures coupled with continued strong domestic production resulted in natural gas cash market prices dropping modestly at nearly all domestic pricing points over the week. The lone exception was the Henry Hub price which rose a token 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (0.5 percent) to $4.35 per MMBtu on April 27. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,685 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 22, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 31 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned

332

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 10, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 2, 2009) Natural gas spot prices soared this week, following significant, albeit smaller decreases in trading the prior week. Spot prices rose at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States by more than a dollar per million Btu (MMBtu). The only exception occurred at the Leidy location in the Northeast, which rose by 84 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week at $4.67 per MMBtu, $1.35 per MMBtu higher than last Wednesday. Trading at the Henry Hub ended yesterday’s session 14 cents higher than the January 2010 contract. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures

333

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 15, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 7, 2009) Since last Wednesday, September 30, natural gas prices rose across the board, with increases ranging between 37 cents and $1.32 per million Btu (MMBtu). Natural gas prices oscillated by large amounts at most market locations across the United States. The Henry Hub began the report week at $3.24 per MMBtu, fell to $2.32 on October 2, and ended trading yesterday at $3.70 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the near-month contract for November ended the week at $4.904 per MMBtu, a slight increase from the previous week’s value of $4.841 per MMBtu.

334

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 3, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 23, 2011) Natural gas spot prices were soft again at nearly all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price fell 10 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (2.5 percent) for the week ending February 23, to $3.83 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, February 18, according to the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied draw for the week was 81 Bcf, with storage volumes shifting to 48 Bcf below year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the March 2011 natural

335

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 15, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 7, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (Wednesday, June 30–Wednesday, July 7), as much of the East Coast experienced the hottest regional temperatures of the year. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.23 to $4.76 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub closed yesterday, July 7, at $4.565 per MMBtu, which is $0.05 lower than the previous Wednesday. Although the near-month contract increased $0.24 per MMBtu at the beginning of the report week, on Thursday, July 1, likely in response

336

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 20, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 27, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 19, 2011) Natural gas prices posted modest net gains at most market locations across the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price increased from $3.54 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, October 12, to $3.58 per MMBtu yesterday, October 19. Intra-week trading showed strong rallies followed by quick retreats. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (November 2011) gained about 10 cents on the week from $3.489 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.586 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,624 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, October 14, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas

337

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Appendix B Explanatory Notes and Detailed Methods Report 1. Overview .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 34 A. The Energy Information Administration's Quality Guidelines ............................................................................................................ 34 B. Concepts of Product Supply and Demand ........................................................................................................................................... 34 2. Weekly Petroleum Supply Surveys ............................................................................................................................................................

338

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, 2009 26, 2009 Next Release: April 2, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 25, 2009) Spot prices increased at all trading locations this week, with the biggest increases occurring in the Northeast. Many market locations ended the week with spot prices above $4 per million British thermal units (MMBtu). During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.38 to $4.13 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased, climbing by $0.65 to $4.329 for the April 2009 contract. Prices for the April 2009 contract reached their highest levels since February 13, 2009, on March 24. Natural gas in storage was 1,654 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

339

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

9 Table 1 * Current Week Data: Estimates for most series based on data collected on Forms EIA-800, -801, -802, -803, -804, -805, and -809. Other Oils Stocks, Other Supply Stock...

340

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

At the NYMEX futures market, the settlement price for November delivery of natural gas moved up most days before dropping by almost 0.19 per MMBtu on Friday to end the week...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

States, natural gas spot prices have increased since Wednesday, February 25, at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the...

342

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

in the Pacific Northwest is being exported to California and other States. Prices at market locations in the Rocky Mountains increased by up to 6 cents this week, and remained...

343

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Crude Oil Spot Price, and Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price Graph More Summary Data Prices A major weather front entered the Midwest and the East this week, leading to...

344

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Henry Hub increased a moderate 0.023 per MMBtu for the week to 3.877. Natural gas in storage decreased to 3,097 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by 2.4 percent. A general...

345

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas futures also reversed gains made in the previous week. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working natural gas in storage increased by 63 Bcf...

346

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Working gas in storage was 3,121 Bcf as of Friday, Oct 24, 2003, according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. This is 2.7...

347

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

at 2.35-20 cents higher than the previous Friday. This increase occurred as market fundamentals were generally unchanged last week with continued weakness in weather-related...

348

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

high levels over the past week (Wednesday to Wednesday, February 5-12), although regional trends were mixed. Northeast prices soared, prices in the Midwest and in California rose...

349

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

during the second week of February, but stocks remain over 90 percent higher than last year at this time. The spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) declined 0.55 to end...

350

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

which have supported higher energy prices in general this spring. The Henry Hub spot price increased in three of the four trading sessions this week (there was no trading on...

351

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

in the Gulf (see Other MarketIndustry Trends below). During the report week, the weather for the country as a whole was about 4 percent cooler than normal, as measured by...

352

Mentors - Intern's First Week  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with orientation, safety training, meetings with the program administrator, a lecture, tour and settling into the workplace. By the end of the week, you should be sure your intern...

353

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

to 10.011 at the close of trading on Wednesday, March 12. During the week, higher crude oil prices (including some intraday trading at more than 110 per barrel) likely provided...

354

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

on the week to 36.61 per barrel or 6.312 per MMBtu. Prices: Moderating temperatures led to price declines of at least 10 cents per MMBtu at most market locations in the Lower...

355

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

space cooling demand during the report week (Wednesday, May 30 - Wednesday, June 6) led to increases in spot prices in most market locations, with the exception of the Rocky...

356

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 12, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 4, 2011) Wholesale natural gas prices at market locations in the lower 48 States moved higher this week as cold weather persisted in some consuming regions. Prices also increased at the beginning of the report week as the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) released data (on April 28) showing the refill of storage inventories following last winter has proceeded slower than in recent years. During the report week (April 27-May 4), the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.24 to $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices

357

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, 2009 26, 2009 Next Release: March 5, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 25, 2009) Natural gas spot prices continued to decrease this week. The return of frigid temperatures for much of the report week in the Northeast, Southeast, and part of the Midwest did little to support any upward price movements in these regions. In fact, spot prices at all trading locations covered by this report either decreased or remained unchanged. Spot prices in the Northeast dipped below $5 per million Btu (MMBtu) for the first time in more than 2 years. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) the near-month futures contract barely remained above $4 per MMBtu this week. The futures contract

358

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 9. U.S. and PAD District Weekly Estimates (Thousand Barrels per Day Except Where Noted) Product/Region Current Week Last Week Year Ago 2 Years Ago Four-Week Averages 12/6/13 12/14/12 12/16/11 12/13/13 12/14/12 12/13/13 Crude Oil Production Domestic Production 1 ................................................................................ 8,058 8,075 6,863 5,862 8,041 6,838 Alaska ....................................................................................... 539 532 563 605 535 559 Lower 48 ................................................................................... 7,519 7,543 6,300 5,257 7,506 6,279 Refiner Inputs and Utilization Crude Oil Inputs .......................................................................................... 15,931 16,131 15,594 14,604

359

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 17, 2007) 10, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 17, 2007) Springtime temperatures in most regions of the country this week and lack of any significant cooling or heating load through much of the Lower 48 States led to an easing of natural gas spot prices since Wednesday, May 2. Furthermore, the formation of the first tropical storm of the 2007 Atlantic Hurricane Season 3 weeks prior to the beginning of the traditional hurricane season appeared to have no impact on the spot markets in the Lower 48 States. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 2-9), the Henry Hub spot price declined 18 cents per MMBtu, or 2.4 percent, to $7.46. In contrast to spot market activity, trading of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) this week resulted in gains for all contracts with the exception of the near-month contract, possibly reflecting an expected tightness in supply over the summer months. While the NYMEX contract for June delivery decreased 1 cent per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $7.720 yesterday (May 9), contracts through the end of the injection season all increased, albeit only by an average of 0.3 percent. Net injections reported in today's release of EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report brought natural gas storage supplies to 1,747 Bcf as of Friday, May 4, which is 20.5 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $2.24 per barrel on the week to $61.54 per barrel, or $10.61 per MMBtu.

360

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 30) 23 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 30) Spot price changes were mixed for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, October 15-22), with markets with declines outnumbering those with increases by about 2 to 1, while futures prices fell significantly. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined a nickel for the week, ending trading yesterday at $4.88 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for November delivery dropped $0.507 per MMBtu for the week, settling yesterday at $4.924. EIA reported that inventories were 3,028 Bcf as of Friday, October 17. This is 0.8 percent greater than the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average for the week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil ended a string of four consecutive weeks of price increases with a decline of $1.74 per barrel for the week to $30 per barrel, or $5.17 per MMBtu.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11, 2002 11, 2002 On Friday, spot gas traded at the Henry Hub for $2.20 per MMBtu, marking no change from the price on the previous Friday. Last week spot prices at the Henry Hub traded within a tight range of $2.14-$2.20 per MMBtu. Temperatures in much of the country returned to above normal in the second half of the week and the National Weather Service's (NWS) latest 6-to 10-day forecast called for this pattern to continue through the weekend and all of this week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) This dominant pattern of above normal temperatures has resulted in heating degree days thus far this winter that are 16 percent lower than normal. At the NYMEX, the settlement price for the March contract ended the week up almost 5 cents at $2.191 per MMBtu. Natural gas stocks remained well above last year's level as estimated net withdrawals were 82 Bcf during the last week of January. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down 15 cents last week and ended Friday trading at $20.25 per barrel or $3.49 per MMBtu.

362

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 18) 1, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 18) Spot price changes were mixed while futures prices edged up by a penny or two over the past week (Wednesday to Wednesday, March 3-10). Warmer-than-normal temperatures over nearly the entire nation early in the week gave way to considerably cooler temperatures in parts of the South and to colder-than-normal temperatures in the Midwest, the Middle Atlantic, and New England beginning over the weekend. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined a penny on the week, ending trading yesterday (Wednesday, March 10) at $5.33 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for April delivery settled yesterday at $5.397 per MMBtu, just 2.2 cents higher than its settlement price one week ago. EIA reported that inventories were 1,143 Bcf as of Friday, March 5, which is 8.3 percent below the 5-year average. Crude oil prices have generally been rising over the past 3 to 4 weeks as uncertainty over OPEC's production levels and continuing civil unrest in Venezuela apply upward pressure on oil prices and, to some extent, on gas prices. Nonetheless, the WTI price declined over the past 3 days, and ended the week with a net gain of 41 cents per barrel (7 cents per MMBtu), at $36.21, or $6.24 per MMBtu.

363

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 20, 2006) 13 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 20, 2006) Springtime temperatures in most regions of the country this week led to an easing of natural gas spot and futures prices in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, April 5. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 5-12), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 9 cents per MMBtu, or about 1.3 percent, to $6.79. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery fell 26.1 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $6.808 yesterday (April 12), the lowest closing price for a near-month contract in over a month (March 10). The first week of net injections this season brought natural gas storage supplies to 1,714 Bcf as of Friday, April 7, which is 63.4 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.77 per barrel on the week to $68.53 per barrel, or $11.82 per MMBtu.

364

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2001 7, 2001 Last week was a week like no other, as both financial and energy markets were disrupted Tuesday morning by the attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC) and the Pentagon. The New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), located within four blocks of the WTC, closed almost immediately after the first attack; spot markets throughout the country closed soon after news of the attacks reached them. Futures trading did not resume until Friday, and then only in an abbreviated session using the NYMEX ACCESS system. Regular, open-outcry trading resumed at around 11:30 AM today (Monday, September 17). Cash markets did re-open last Wednesday, and continued to operate, albeit at reduced activity levels, through the rest of the week. Temperatures in most parts of the country were seasonable early in the week, but by week's end were falling in the Northeast and the Midwest as a cold front moved down from the north. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) At the Henry Hub, spot prices gained 6 cents from the preceding week, ending trading on Friday at $2.41 per MMBtu. In its one day of open-outcry trading, the futures contract for October delivery fell $0.108 per MMBtu to settle at $2.392. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil slipped slightly on Monday to $27.65 per barrel, or $4.77 per MMBtu.

365

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 18) 11, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 18) Spot natural gas prices increased 5 to 15 cents in most regional markets for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 3-10). The Henry Hub spot price gained 10 cents on the week, ending trading yesterday (Wednesday, September 10) at $4.78 per MMBtu. Futures prices were up as well, with the gains owing almost entirely to yesterday's large price increases. The NYMEX futures contract for October delivery moved up nearly 24 cents in yesterday's trading, and for the week gained $0.278 per MMBtu with its settlement yesterday at $4.968. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that inventories were 2,486 Bcf as of Friday, September 5, which is 5.5 percent less than the 5-year (1998-2002) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell below $29 per barrel for the first time since late June, lingering in the high-$28s for the first 3 days of the week before regaining nearly all of its decreases on Tuesday and Wednesday. WTI crude oil ended the week at $29.41 per barrel ($5.07 per MMBtu), just 2 cents per barrel below the week-ago price.

366

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 16, 2007) 9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 16, 2007) The sweltering heat that engulfed most of the Lower 48 States for much of the report week led to natural gas spot price increases at most locations this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, August 1-8). The Henry Hub spot price increased 7 cents per MMBtu this week, or about 1 percent to $6.26. There were, however, some price decreases on the week, as well. For example, trading locations west of the Rocky Mountains decreased on the week between 7 and 14 cents per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery also decreased by 13 cents since last Wednesday (August 1) to settle yesterday at $6.220 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, August 3, was 2,882 Bcf, which is 16.4 percent above the 5-year average. After reaching the all-time high of $78.20 per barrel on July 31, the crude oil price decreased almost 8 percent. On the week, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil ended yesterday's trading session at $72.23 per barrel ($12.45 per MMBtu) after decreasing $4.26 per barrel (73 cents per MMBtu), or 5.6 percent.

367

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 30, 2007) 23, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 30, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices eased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, August 15-22), as Hurricane Dean failed to have a significant impact on U.S. production in the Gulf of Mexico and moderate temperatures limited demand. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price declined $1.46 per MMBtu, or 20 percent, to $5.84. Trading of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) also resulted in large price decreases. The NYMEX contract for September delivery decreased $1.286 per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $5.578 yesterday (August 22). Working gas inventories reported in today's release of EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report were 2,926 Bcf as of Friday, August 17, which is 12.8 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $4.06 per barrel on the week to $69.30 per barrel, or $11.95 per MMBtu.

368

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 28) 1, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 28) Despite rising temperatures in many regions of the country that helped push prices upward over the past 3 days, spot prices nonetheless ended trading yesterday (Wednesday, August 20) down for the most part from levels of the previous Wednesday (August 13). At the Henry Hub, the spot price fell by 14 cents per MMBtu on the week, ending trading yesterday at $5.03. Likewise on the NYMEX, the settlement price for the futures contract for September delivery ended the week down 6 cents per MMBtu from the previous week, when it finished trading yesterday at $5.119. The EIA reported that working gas in storage increased to 2,266 Bcf as of Friday, August 15, which is 7.4 percent below the 5-year (1998-2002) average for the week. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil on the spot market changed little during the week ending the week up 11 cents per barrel at $30.96, or $5.34 per MMBtu.

369

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview Net additions to storage during the fourth week of April were estimated to have been over 100 Bcf-a record high level for the first month of the refill season. Compared to last year when only 36 Bcf or 1.2 Bcf per day were added to stocks in April, this year the industry appears to be taking advantage of the reduction in demand that typically occurs in April, the first shoulder month of the year, and the recent price declines. After beginning the week down, spot prices at the Henry Hub trended down most days last week to end trading on Friday at $4.49 per MMBtu-the lowest price since early November. On the NYMEX futures market, the near-month (June) contract also moved down most days and ended last week at $4.490-down $0.377 from the previous Friday. Some-early summer high temperatures last week in the Northeast and winter-like weather in the Rockies (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) appear to have had little impact on the natural gas markets as prices declined most days at most major locations.

370

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview: Monday, June 04, 2001 Stock builds slowed from their recent pace, even though spot prices continued their downward trend to end the week at the Henry Hub at $3.71 per MMBtu, which is a Friday-to-Friday decline of $0.14 per MMBtu. The NYMEX contract price for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled Tuesday at $3.738, the lowest close-out of a near month contract since the May 2000 contract. The July contract price was $3.930 per MMBtu on Friday, $0.103 lower than a week earlier. Mild weather in the Northeast and Midwest continued to suppress prices on the Eastern Seaboard, while a short burst of warm temperatures in southern California early in the week had the opposite effect on prices in that region. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) Net injections to storage for the week ended Friday, May 25 were 99 Bcf, breaking a 4-week string of 100-plus net injections.

371

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 24) 7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 24) Spot and futures prices moved up for the second week in a row. Price increases for the week (Wednesday, April 9 to Wednesday, April 16) were generally around a half dollar in both the spot and futures markets-about twice the increase in spot prices (in most markets) the previous week, and three times the increase in the near-month (May delivery) futures contract price. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price rose 51 cents on the week, to $5.62 per MMBtu, an increase of nearly 10 percent. The settlement price for the May contract increased by just over 9 percent for the week, gaining a cumulative $0.482 to settle yesterday (Wednesday, April 16) at $5.677 per MMBtu. These price increases occurred despite a gradual warming trend since last Wednesday in every region of the country except in the West. Working gas in storage was 623 Bcf as of April 11, which was 49 percent below the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average, and a new record low level over the 9 years of EIA data. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil rose for the week by 23 cents per barrel, to $29.16 per barrel ($5.03 per MMBtu) in yesterday's trading.

372

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

19, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 26) 19, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 26) Spot and futures prices fell for the second straight week, as generally mild temperatures continued to prevail in most major market areas and storage injections exceeded 100 Bcf for a third straight week. At the Henry Hub, the spot price fell by 52 cents per MMBtu on the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, June 11-19), or almost 9 percent, to $5.54 per MMBtu. The settlement price for the NYMEX futures contract for July delivery declined by $0.632 on the week, closing yesterday (June 18) at $5.581 per MMBtu-a decline of 10 percent. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that working gas in storage was 1,438 Bcf as of Friday, June 13, which is about 22 percent below the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average for the week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell in 4 of 5 trading days, ending the week down by almost $2 per barrel, at $30.28, or $5.22 per MMBtu.

373

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, to Wednesday, April 2) 26, to Wednesday, April 2) Released: April 3, 2008 Next release: April 10, 2008 · Natural gas spot prices increased in all trading regions in the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 26-April 2). During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.34 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $9.59. Frigid temperatures continued for a portion of the week in the Northeast and for most of the week in the West, likely boosting space-heating demand. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered increases, albeit less than in spot markets. The futures contract for May delivery rose about 15 cents per MMBtu on the week to $9.832. · With the traditional heating season not quite over, natural gas withdrawals from underground storage continued through last week. As of Friday, March 28, working gas in storage was 1,248 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 0.5 percent above the 5-year (2003-2007) average.

374

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Thursday June 20, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 27) Thursday June 20, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 27) Natural gas spot prices registered gains of a dime or less at most major trading locations this week (Wednesday-Wednesday) as weather-driven demand combined with increasing oil prices to reverse a declining trend in prices. The upward price movement followed 6 weeks of declining prices until a low last Thursday, June 12, when prices at some trading locations along the Gulf Coast dipped just below $3.00 per MMBtu. Futures prices rose late last week after reaching similar lows. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery settled Wednesday, June 19, at $3.314 per MMBtu, an increase of 26 cents for the week. EIA's estimate of total working gas inventories for the week ended June 14 was 2,096 Bcf with implied net injections of 81 Bcf. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil recovered this week to trade at close to $26 per barrel on Monday, June 17. On Wednesday, the WTI crude oil price closed at $25.57 per barrel, or $4.41 per MMBtu.

375

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 20) 13 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 20) Spot and futures prices moved in opposite directions for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, November 5-12), as cash prices ended the week significantly higher in many locations, while futures prices moved lower. At the Henry Hub, the spot price increased 32 cents on the week, or about 7 percent, to end trading yesterday (Wednesday, November 12) at $4.77 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for December delivery ended the week down by nearly 16 cents, settling yesterday at $4.739 per MMBtu, a decrease of more than 3 percent. EIA reported that inventories were 3,187 Bcf as of Friday, November 7, which is 3.9 percent greater than the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average for the week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil increased on 4 out of 5 trading days, gaining more than $1 per barrel for the second week in a row and topping $31 per barrel for the first time in nearly a month, as it rose $1.08 to reach $31.37 per barrel, or $5.41 per MMBtu, in yesterday's trading.

376

PROBING DENSE NUCLEAR MATTER VIA NUCLEAR COLLISIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of California. LBL-12095 Probing Dense NuclearMatter Nuclear Collisions* v~a H. Stocker, M.Gyulassy and J. Boguta Nuclear Science Division Lawrence

Stocker, H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Bulletin - BNL's Weekly Newspaper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Victoria McLane Victoria McLane A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z In Memoriam Home | Bulletin Home Posted: October 21, 2011 Victoria McLane Victoria McLane, who joined the Department of Nuclear Energy as a physics associate IV on February 12, 1962, left in November 1963, returned in May, 1964, and retired as a senior physics associate on January 3, 2005, died at 71 on August 13, 2011. In addition to her scientific contributions, she was a founding member of Brookhaven Women in Science and contributed significantly to its organization and success. A remembrance of Vicki McLane by colleague and friend Harriet Martin, BNL retiree Vicki McLane spent almost all of her working years at BNL. She was hired by the late Sol Pearlstein to work at the National Nuclear Data Center, which started out known as the Sigma Center in 1952 and evolved into an international nuclear data bank as nuclear energy became widely used. In 2002, the group celebrated its "Golden Jubilee," and Vicki, by then was known to all those who worked in nuclear data centers throughout the world and at the IAEA - the International Atomic Energy Agency, which is an arm of the U.N. When Vicki retired, she continued to travel around the world consulting with the nuclear data centers on maintenance and retrieval of nuclear data for energy purposes, and to establish standards for data collection.

378

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 58, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2011 277 Anomaly Detection in Nuclear Power Plants via  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applications (e.g., nuclear power reactor plants, petroleum industry and micro-gravity flow systems and Seungjin Kim Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University sensing. The underlying algorithm is built upon the recently reported theory of a statistical pattern

Ray, Asok

379

Science Friday Pick  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Friday Videos are a "YouTube (tm)" for science news. Each week, the staff of Science Friday chooses the best video to be featured as the "Pick of the Week", which is then featured...

380

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tuesday, November 13. 2001 Tuesday, November 13. 2001 For the week ended Friday, November 9, 2001, both spot and futures prices continued the generally downward trend initiated in the preceding week. The declines accelerated on Monday (November 12), as prices dropped sharply to begin the week. The unusually mild temperatures in many parts of the nation coupled with relatively high storage levels were major factors in the downward trend in prices. Daily temperatures in a number of cities in the upper Midwest and Northern Plains States reached record highs and exceeded normal levels by double-digits. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) By Friday, spot prices at the Henry Hub had declined for 9 days straight, ending the week at $2.63 per MMBtu, a drop of 33 cents from the previous Friday. On Monday of this week (November 12), the spot price at the Henry Hub fell $0.17 per MMBtu to $2.46. After its major downward shift of over 32 cents per MMBtu on Monday, November 5, the settlement price of the NYMEX futures contract for December delivery fell on 3 of the 4 ensuing trading days and ended the week at $2.925 per MMBtu, down $0.323 from the previous Friday. This Monday (November 12), the December contract shifted down further, dropping $0.192 to settle at $2.733 per MMBtu. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil (WTI) edged below $20 per barrel for one day (Tuesday, November 6), then recovered to end the week at $22.25 per barrel, or $3.84 per MMBtu, up $2.05 per barrel from Friday, November 2. Yesterday, the WTI fell by a dollar to $21.25.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Nuclear Analytical Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nuclear Analytical Methods. Research activities in the Nuclear Analytical Methods Group are focused on the science that ...

382

Low Energy Nuclear Reactions: Exciting New Science and Potential Clean Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Other Concepts and Assessments / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

David J. Nagel; Kamron C. Fazel

383

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

24 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 31, 2006) 24 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 31, 2006) Since Wednesday, August 16, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations with the exception of a few locations in the Northeast. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 17 cents to $7.19 per MMBtu. Yesterday (August 23), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery settled at $6.875 per MMBtu, increasing about 11 cents or about 2 percent since Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,857 Bcf as of August 18, which is 13.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased 19 cents per barrel, or about 0.3 percent, on the week to $71.45 per barrel, or $12.32 per MMBtu. Prices: Despite the lower cooling load across much of the Lower 48 States and a diminished threat from Tropical Storm Debby, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations on the week. The increases, however, were moderate, as they were mostly limited to less than 15 cents per MMBtu. With the exception of the southern United States, power loads have been steadily diminishing in the past couple of weeks. Gas demand for electric power generation was much lower compared with the week ending August 5, when the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) reported record-high weekly electricity demand, leading to the 12 Bcf net withdrawal for the storage week ended August 4, 2006. On a regional basis, market locations in East Texas recorded the largest increases since Wednesday, August 16, averaging 18 cents per MMBtu, followed by Louisiana (16 cents per MMBtu). Most locations along the Gulf Coast recorded increases between 3 and 18 cents, while major consuming areas in the Midwest recorded an average increase of 14 cents per MMBtu. Despite the general increases this week, a few market locations in the Northeast recorded decreases since last Wednesday, the largest one of which was the 10-cent decrease at the Dracut, MA, trading point. Even with the overall increases in recent weeks, as of August 23, 2006, spot prices at market locations in the Lower 48 States are 17 to 30 percent lower than last year's levels.

384

The on-line charge breeding program at TRIUMF's Ion Trap For Atomic and Nuclear Science for precision mass measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN) constitutes the only high precision mass measurement setup coupled to a rare isotope facility capable of increasing the charge state of short-lived nuclides prior to the actual mass determination in a Penning trap. Recent developments around TITAN's charge breeder, the electron beam ion trap, form the basis for several successful experiments on radioactive isotopes with half-lives as low as 65 ms and in charge states as high as 22+.

Simon, M. C.; Eberhardt, B.; Jang, F.; Luichtl, M.; Robertson, D.; Chaudhuri, A.; Delheij, P.; Grossheim, A.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Mane, E.; Pearson, M. R.; Schultz, B. E. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Bale, J. C. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); Chowdhury, U. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Ettenauer, S.; Gallant, A. T.; Dilling, J. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Lennarz, A. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Ma, T.; Andreoiu, C. [Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); and others

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

October 2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 9) October 2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 9) A cold front moved through the Midwest and parts of the Northeast this week, but it failed to bring sustained higher prices. Seasonally mild temperatures in most other areas of the country and little in the way of tropical storm activity resulted in prices easing 20 cents per MMBtu or less since Wednesday, September 24. On the week (Wednesday, September 24-Wednesday, October 1), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 12 cents per MMBtu to $4.47. The NYMEX futures contract for October delivery expired on Friday, September 26, at $4.430, while the contract for November lost about 8 cents on the week to close at $4.677 yesterday (October 1). Natural gas in storage as of Friday, September 26, increased to 2,788 Bcf, which is 1.9 percent below the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $1.24 per barrel on the week to yesterday's (October 1) closing price of $29.43 per barrel, or $5.07 per MMBtu.

386

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2001 15, 2001 Natural gas prices generally rose last week despite mild temperatures throughout much of the country (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map). After beginning the week down on Monday, October 8, spot prices at the Henry Hub climbed through Thursday before dropping 10 cents on Friday, October 12, to end the week at $2.31 per million Btu, $0.19 or almost 9 percent above the previous Friday. At the NYMEX futures market, the settlement price for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $2.43 per million Btu, 32 cents above the previous Friday. Net additions to storage in the week ended October 5 were 1 billion cubic feet (Bcf) below the prior week, but, at 65 Bcf, remained above historical levels. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil closed at $22.55 per barrel ($3.89 per million Btu), up $0.15 or less than 1 percent over the previous Friday.

387

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 15) 8, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 15) Spot and futures prices seesawed throughout the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, April 30-May 7) with no clear underlying trend, however prices ended trading yesterday at uniformly higher levels than one week ago. The weather's influence on gas demand was muted, as temperatures in most areas of the country were generally comfortably spring-like, except for some parts of the Southeast and Southwest, where summer-like temperatures prompted some early air conditioning load. The Henry Hub average spot price increased 23 cents from the previous Wednesday (April 30) to $5.48 per MMBtu. The daily settlement price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery rose $0.275 on the week, ending at $5.660 per MMBtu in yesterday's trading. The EIA reported that 821 Bcf of gas was held in storage as of Friday, May 2, which is 39.9 percent less than the 5-year average. The average spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil traded in a narrow range of less than $1 per barrel during the week, and ended trading yesterday with a small increase of 15 cents on the week, at $26.24 per barrel, or $4.52 per MMBtu.

388

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 20) 13 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 20) Natural gas prices in both the cash and futures markets continued to move up for a third straight week. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 5-12), the Henry Hub spot price matched its 30-cent increase of the prior week, trading yesterday (May 12) at $6.39 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for June 2004 delivery increased by just under 10 cents on the week, settling yesterday at its record-high level of $6.405 per MMBtu. EIA reported that inventories were 1,303 Bcf as of Friday, May 7, which is 1.6 percent below the 5-year (1999-2003) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil also rose for a third straight week, moving up $0.61 per barrel ($0.11 per MMBtu) from last Wednesday's (May 5) price to yesterday's average of $40.30 per barrel ($6.95 per MMBtu).

389

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September 25, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 2) September 25, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 2) Spot prices fluctuated mildly during the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 17-24), with the majority of changes in either direction limited to a nickel or less. For the week, prices generally were lower than last Wednesday. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined 2 cents on the week, ending trading yesterday (September 24) at $4.59 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for October delivery ended the week down by $0.054 per MMBtu from the previous Wednesday (September 17), settling at $4.588 per MMBtu, as a significant one-day decline of 17 cents on Thursday (September 18) was not offset by four straight trading sessions with small increases. EIA reported that working gas inventories were 2,688 Bcf as of Friday, September 19, which is 3.3 percent below the 5-year (1998-2002) average. In oil markets, yesterday's announcement by the OPEC oil cartel of a production quota cut of 900,000 barrels per day sent crude oil and heating oil futures contract prices up sharply. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil accrued its entire increase for the week in yesterday's trading, as it gained $1.19 to $28.19 per barrel, or about $4.86 per MMBtu.

390

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 19) 2, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 19) Although seasonally cold weather continued to dominate the country this week, the absence of January's extreme temperatures resulted in prices easing 20 to 75 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, February 4. On the week (Wednesday, February 4-Wednesday, February 11), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 39 cents per MMBtu to $5.35. The NYMEX futures contract for March delivery also fell 39 cents on the week to close at $5.26 yesterday (February 11). Natural gas in storage as of Friday, February 6, decreased to 1,603 Bcf, which is 2.3 percent below the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $0.87 per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $33.93 per barrel, or $5.85 per MMBtu.

391

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2001 13, 2001 Spot prices for natural gas appeared to stabilize just above the $3.00 mark during the week ended August 10, 2001, as the price at the Henry Hub in Louisiana varied between $3.14 and $2.98 per million Btu. Net injections of natural gas into storage for the previous week again fell within the range of market expectations reported in the trade press and contributed to the stability of the price level. However, due to warmer-than-normal temperatures in the Northeast, Midwest, and parts of the Southwest and Southeast, prices at the Henry Hub increased early in the week before decreasing and finishing over 2 percent lower than the previous week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil finished the week at $28.10 per barrel or $4.84 per million Btu, an increase of almost 2 percent above the previous Friday.

392

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview: Tuesday, May 29, 2001 Overview: Tuesday, May 29, 2001 Spot prices at the Henry Hub declined to $3.84 per MMBtu on Friday, the lowest level since August 1, 2000. Prices at the Henry Hub, the Northeast, and the Midwest reflected the mild to cooler-than-normal temperatures in the eastern two-thirds of the nation coupled with anticipation of the Memorial Day holiday weekend-typically one of the lowest-demand weekends of the year. In California, early to mid-week prices rose to $10 per MMBtu and beyond in response to soaring temperatures, but then sagged somewhat with moderating temperatures later in the week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) The NYMEX futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub fell below the $4.00 per MMBtu level to end the week at $3.973. Net injections to storage for the week ended Friday, May 18 were 118 Bcf, marking the fourth week in a row of record-setting stock builds.

393

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monday, November 19, 2001 Monday, November 19, 2001 Last week, the NYMEX futures contract price for December delivery at the Henry Hub continued the generally downward trend that began in late October. The contract ended last week's trading at $2.637 per MMBtu-nearly 55 cents lower than the $3.183 recorded when it began as the near-month contract on October 30. Spot prices also experienced a similar pattern and reportedly declined well over $1.00 per MMBtu at most major market locations. The spot price at the Henry Hub on Friday hit its lowest level in more than two and a half years. The continued warmer-than-normal weather in most parts of the country appears to be a major contributing factor in the almost 3-week decline in natural gas prices. (Temperature Map) (Temperature Deviation Map) Another factor is the relatively high stocks that continued to increase in the second week of November. Working gas in storage now stands at its highest level since November 1998. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped by more than $2.00 per barrel on Thursday and ended the week at $18.05, or $3.11 per MMBtu-its lowest level in over 2 years.

394

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 1, 2007) 22, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 1, 2007) As the weather has made the transition from extreme cold to much more moderate conditions this week, natural gas spot prices have declined in much of the country. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, February 14-21), the Henry Hub spot price declined $1.40 per MMBtu to $7.51 as prices for next-day delivery responded to reduced demand for space-heating. However, the bitter and widespread cold of the first 2 weeks of February likely contributed to revised expectations of future storage levels, leading to increased futures prices this week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price for the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub increased 41 cents per MMBtu or about 5.6 percent. Generally, futures prices for delivery months through next summer increased by more than 4 percent. Working gas in storage as of Friday, February 16, was 1,865 Bcf, which is 10.8 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.40 per barrel on the week to $59.40, or $10.24 per MMBtu.

395

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 8) 1, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 8) Natural gas spot prices surged upward in the past three days, bringing price levels significantly above those of a week ago (Wednesday, March 24) in all regional markets. At the Henry Hub, the price for spot gas increased $0.28 per MMBtu on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 24-31), or about 5 percent, trading yesterday at $5.63. Taking over as the near-month futures contract on Tuesday, March 30, the NYMEX contract for May delivery moved up sharply, ending trading yesterday at its highest-ever settlement price of $5.933 per MMBtu. EIA reported that natural gas inventories were 1,014 Bcf as of Friday, March 26, which is 7.7 percent less than the preceding 5-year average for the week. Despite anticipation of yesterday's OPEC decision to curtail oil production by up to 1 million barrels per day, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil declined on four of the five trading days of the week, trading yesterday at $35.75 ($6.16 per MMBtu), down $1.31 per barrel ($0.23 per MMBtu) on the week.

396

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 22, 2007) 15, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 22, 2007) Spring-like temperatures in most regions of the country this week led to lower natural gas spot and futures prices in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, March 7. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 7-14), the Henry Hub spot price decreased 66 cents per MMBtu, or about 9 percent, to $6.86. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery fell 28 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $7.083 yesterday (March 14). Working gas in underground storage was 1,516 Bcf as of Friday, March 9, which is 12 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $3.70 per barrel on the week to $58.15 per barrel, or $10.03 per MMBtu.

397

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2001 8, 2001 Prices ended the week up slightly from where they started as a brief heat wave in the eastern half of the country caused a rise in prices (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) that was somewhat undone by the return of moderate temperatures and the report of another hefty stock build. On a Friday-to-Friday basis, the spot price at the Henry Hub increased by $0.25 to $3.88 per MMBtu compared with an increase of $0.23 to $0.33 at other major supply points in the eastern half of the country. In the same time period, the near-month (July delivery) futures contract was up less than 6 cents to $3.979 per MMBtu as of Friday, June 15, 2001. Prices in California rose substantially last Monday after coming off high inventory flow orders (OFOs) but ended the week close to or lower than the previous week due to another round of OFOs. For the past 7 weeks, weekly storage injections neared or exceeded 100 Bcf, bringing stocks to within less than a 1 percent difference from average levels. The string of record-breaking stock builds appears attributable to moderate spring temperatures and reduced cooling demand by natural-gas-fired electricity generation.

398

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February 19, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 26) February 19, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 26) Spot and futures prices moved in different directions over the past week (Wednesday to Wednesday, February 11-18), with spot prices at most market locations falling from a nickel to around 30 cents per MMBtu, while futures prices increased by a dime or less. At the Henry Hub, the spot price eased down 2 cents on the week, to $5.33 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for March delivery increased $0.096 per MMBtu for the week, ending trading yesterday (February 18) at $5.356. EIA reported that natural gas inventories declined to 1,431 Bcf as of Friday, February 13, which is 6.2 percent lower than the previous 5-year (1999-2003) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil rose each day of the holiday-shortened week, and ended trading yesterday with an increase for the week of $1.49 per barrel ($0.24 per MMBtu), or a little over 4 percent, to $35.42 ($6.11 per MMBtu).

399

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 5, 2006) 8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 5, 2006) Natural gas spot prices decreased sharply since Wednesday, September 20, at nearly all market locations. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the price at the Henry Hub decreased $0.52 per MMBtu, or about 10 percent, to $4.35 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub declined about 73 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $4.201 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, September 22, was 3,254 Bcf, which is 12.2 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.96 per barrel, or about 5 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $62.96 per barrel or $10.86 per MMBtu. This week's increase in the price of crude oil was the first week-on-week up-tick in the past 6 weeks.

400

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 30) 23, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 30) Natural gas spot and futures prices trended down for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 15-22). The cold front that moved into major gas-consuming areas of the Midwest and Northeast for the weekend and lingered into the first part of this week had minimal impact on prices. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price fell 24 cents for the week to $3.38 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the near-month contract (June delivery) declined for 5 straight trading sessions before recording a small increase of $0.064 per MMBtu in May 22 trading, to settle at $3.459. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil, which had held at or above $28 per barrel since last Thursday, fell nearly $1 on Tuesday, May 21, following the American Petroleum Institute's announcement of an unexpected build in crude oil stocks of 5.5 million barrels for the week ended Friday, May 17. For the week (May 15-22), the WTI price was down $0.99, at $27.01 per barrel, or $4.66 per MMBtu.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 23, 2006) 16 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 23, 2006) Winter-like conditions in much of the East this past weekend transitioned to above-normal temperatures, contributing to a further decline in natural gas spot prices this week (Wednesday, February 8 - Wednesday, February 15). On the week the Henry Hub spot price declined 57 cents per MMBtu to $7.31. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant declines. The futures contract for March delivery, which is the last contract for the current heating season, declined 66.9 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.066. Relatively high levels of natural gas in working storage and falling prices for competing fuels likely contributed to falling natural gas prices this week. Working gas in storage as of Friday, February 10, was 2,266 Bcf, which is 43.9 percent above the 5-year (2001-2005) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $4.90 per barrel on the week to $57.61, or $9.93 per MMBtu.

402

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, to Wednesday, April 30) 23, to Wednesday, April 30) Released: May 1, 2008 Next release: May 8, 2008 · Natural gas spot prices increased in all trading regions in the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 23-30). During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.48 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $10.81. During the month of April, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.95 per MMBtu, or 9.6 percent. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices declined for the report week, after a string of price increases during the previous five report periods. The futures contract for June delivery declined 10.3 cents per MMBtu on the week to $10.843. · During the week ending Friday, April 25, estimated net injections of natural gas into underground storage totaled the largest volume to date this year at 86 billion cubic feet (Bcf). Working gas in underground storage as of April 25 was 1,371 Bcf, which is 0.2 percent below the 5-year (2003-2007) average.

403

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 21) 14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 21) The emergence of more spring-like temperatures in most regions of the country, ample natural gas storage supplies, and lower oil prices resulted in natural gas spot prices easing 7 to 43 cents per MMBtu in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, April 6. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 6-13), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 39 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to $7.07. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery fell 58 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $6.978 yesterday (April 13), the first close below $7 for a near-month contract since March 28. A second week of net injections brought natural gas storage supplies to 1,293 Bcf as of Friday, April 8, which is 26.3 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $5.67 per barrel on the week to $50.21 per barrel, or $8.66 per MMBtu.

404

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 29, 2007) 15, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 29, 2007) Natural gas spot prices decreased this week, with the changes at most market locations somewhat more modest than the price changes observed over the past couple weeks. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, November 7-14), the price at the Henry Hub decreased 15 cents per MMBtu or about 2 percent. Relatively abundant supplies in the West and high stock levels in storage helped to drive spot prices lower this week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for December delivery moved up about 21 cents to $7.835 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage was 3,536 Bcf as of Friday, November 9, which is 8.4 percent higher than the 5-year average of 3,263 Bcf. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased on the week by $2.44 per barrel or about 3 percent to trade yesterday at $94.02 per barrel or $16.21 per MMBtu.

405

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 29) 2, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 29) Natural gas prices continued their upward trend for a second consecutive week with most market locations in the Lower 48 States registering gains of up to 25 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, August 14. Continued hot temperatures across the country and an increase in oil prices resulted in prices generally ranging between $3.15 and $3.25 per MMBtu along the Gulf Coast, representing new 8-week highs. At the NYMEX, the price for the futures contract for September delivery closed on Wednesday, August 21, at $3.274 per MMBtu, an increase of just over 36 cents, or about 12.5 percent, on the week. Working gas in storage for the week ended Friday, August 16 was 2,657 Bcf, which exceeds the average for the previous 5 years by 13.1 percent. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $2.18 to end trading yesterday at $30.37 per barrel, or $5.24 per MMBtu

406

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 5) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 5) Moderate temperatures across the country except in the Southwest and Gulf Coast contributed to natural gas spot prices easing 9 to 35 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, July 21. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 21-28), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 14 cents per MMBtu to $5.77. In contrast to the decrease in spot prices, natural gas futures prices increased this week owing at least in part to higher crude oil and petroleum product prices. The NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub expired at $6.048 per MMBtu on Wednesday, July 28, after increasing 11.7 cents in its last week of trading. The September contract takes over as the near-month contract at nearly a dime premium to the August contract, closing yesterday (July 28) at $6.142 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, July 23, increased to 2,297 Bcf, which is 3.1 percent above the 5-year average. Crude oil prices rose this week to recent historical highs, in part owing to concerns over supply from Russia. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $2.18 per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $42.81 per barrel, or $7.38 per MMBtu.

407

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 5, 2006) 22, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 5, 2006) Spot prices have decreased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States this week as moderating temperatures relative to the prior week reduced space-heating demand and prices for competing petroleum products eased. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, December 14-21), the Henry Hub price decreased $1.25 per MMBtu to $13.55. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for January delivery settled yesterday (December 21) at $14.271 per MMBtu, which was about 41 cents per MMBtu, or 2.8 percent, lower on the week. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that working gas in storage was 2,804 Bcf as of Friday, December 16, which reflects an implied net decrease of 162 Bcf. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $2.30 per barrel, or about 3.8 percent, on the week to settle yesterday at $58.56 per barrel, or $10.10 per MMBtu.

408

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 6) 7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 6) Natural gas spot prices across the country surged to record highs this week as yet another Arctic blast of cold arrived, this time reaching as far south as Texas. Prices in the Northeast were the highest in the country at more than $20 per MMBtu for much of the week, but prices also tripled since last Wednesday to $18 and more at production-area trading locations along the Gulf Coast and in Texas. On the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub had a net change of $4.26 per MMBtu to an average of $10.36 yesterday (Wednesday, February 26). The NYMEX contract for March delivery ended its run as the near-month futures contract on Wednesday, settling at just over $9.13 per MMBtu, or $3 higher on the week. As of February 21, natural gas in storage was 1,014 Bcf, or 33.4 percent below the 5-year average for this week. Crude oil prices climbed $1.90 per barrel yesterday to an average of $37.96, or $6.54 per MMBtu, which is near a 12-year high.

409

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 22) 15, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 22) Spot and futures prices reversed their downward trends from the previous week, as sweltering temperatures returned to many parts of the nation early this week. At the Henry Hub, average spot prices increased 4 days in a row from last Wednesday (August 7), gaining 30 cents per MMBtu to reach $3.03 per MMBtu on Tuesday (August 13), which was repeated yesterday. This pattern was mirrored by the price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub, which rose a cumulative 25 cents per MMBtu for the week to settle at $2.910 per MMBtu on Wednesday, August 14. Working gas in storage for the week ended Friday, August 9 was 2,620 Bcf, which exceeds the average for the previous 5 years by just under 15 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil posted a gain of $1.61 per barrel for the week, highlighted by a near-$1 increase on Monday, August 12. WTI ended trading yesterday at $28.19 per barrel, or $4.86 per MMBtu.

410

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 3, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 26, 2010) Current production during this report week remained relatively high, adding to a perception of a strong supply outlook. Natural gas prices drifted lower at markets across the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub spot price ended trading yesterday, May 26, at $4.19 per million Btu (MMBtu), a decrease of $0.09 compared with the previous Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub closed at $4.16 per MMBtu yesterday, which was its last day of trading as the near-month contract. This price

411

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2008 7, 2008 Next Release: July 24, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview The report week ended July 16 registered significant price declines at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with the largest decreases occurring in the Arizona/Nevada, California, and Louisiana trading regions. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased 94 cents per million British thermal units (MMBtu) to $11.15 as of yesterday. Similarly, at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for all futures contracts in the 12-month strip declined between 44.6 and 69.7 cents per MMBtu. The near-month contract on Monday settled below $12-per MMBtu for the first time in 6 weeks, dropping to $11.398 per MMBtu as of

412

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 19, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 11, 2009) With little impact on production in the Gulf of Mexico from Hurricane Ida and moderate temperatures in many parts of the country, natural gas spot prices decreased sharply this report week (November 4-11). The Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.90 to $3.59 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also moved lower as the threat of an interruption in supplies from the hurricane passed. The futures contract for December delivery decreased by $0.22 on the report week to $4.503 per MMBtu. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday (November 6) is

413

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2001 9, 2001 Prices headed up the middle of last week despite seasonal or cooler temperatures everywhere but California (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) and the July 4th holiday, regarded as one of the lowest natural gas consumption days. As expected, the resulting 10-cent-per-MMBtu gain at the Henry Hub on Thursday compared with the previous Friday was undone the following day. The futures price for August delivery was able to stay ahead of the previous week by 12.2 cents to settle at $3.218 on Friday. Spot natural gas prices for large packages in southern California increased as much as $2.71 per MMBtu as temperatures soared and gas-fired power plants endeavored to meet air conditioning demand. Prices started to recede as temperatures abated by the end of the week. Strong gas supplies across the country supported another hefty net addition to storage of 105 Bcf.

414

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 21, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 13, 2011) As the story of abundant natural gas supply continued to provide headlines for the market this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, April 6-13), spot prices at most market locations in the lower 48 States decreased. Moderate temperatures also likely contributed to the price declines by limiting end-use demand and allowing for replenishment of storage supplies. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by 3 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or less than 1 percent, to $4.14 per MMBtu. Other market prices also decreased by up to 10 cents per MMBtu, with a few exceptions in the U.S. Northeast.

415

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 20, 2011) Natural gas prices rose at most market locations during the week, as consumption increased. The Henry Hub spot price increased 19 cents from $4.14 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, April 13 to $4.33 per MMBtu on Wednesday, April 20. Futures prices behaved similar to spot prices; at the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (May 2011) rose from $4.141 per MMBtu to $4.310 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,654 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 15, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas

416

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 18, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 10, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board this week, likely in response to cooling temperatures as well as weak economic news. The Henry Hub spot price fell 17 cents from $4.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, August 3, to $4.09 per MMBtu yesterday, August 10. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month contract (September 2011) fell by $0.087 per MMBtu, from $4.090 last Wednesday to $4.003 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage was 2,783 Bcf as of Friday, August 5, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

417

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 3, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 26, 2011) Natural gas spot prices were soft at all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price fell 8 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (about 1.7 percent) for the week ending January 26, to $4.40 per MMBtu. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price settled at $86.15 per barrel ($14.85 per MMBtu), on Wednesday, January 26. This represents a decrease of $4.70 per barrel, or $0.81 per MMBtu, from the previous Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage fell to 2,542 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, January 21, according to the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The

418

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 to Wednesday, December 12) 5 to Wednesday, December 12) Released: December 13 Next release: December 20, 2007 · Natural gas spot and futures prices increased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, December 5-12), as cooler temperatures in much of the country increased demand for space heating. On the week the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.18 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $7.22. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant increases. The futures contract for January delivery rose about 22 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.408. · Working gas in storage is well above the 5-year average for this time year, indicating a healthy supply picture as the winter heating season progress. As of Friday, December 7, working gas in storage was 3,294 Bcf, which is 8.5 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average.

419

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 2, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 25, 2011) Warmer weather moved into major population centers this report week, increasing demand at electric power plants in order to meet air-conditioning needs. Prices moved higher at most trading locations in the lower 48 States, with the biggest increases occurring in the Southeast. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.21 to $4.36 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased as the weather outlook suggested higher weather-related consumption for the remaining days of May. The futures contract for June

420

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 13, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 20, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 12, 2011) Natural gas prices posted net losses at most market locations across the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price fell from $3.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, October 5, to $3.54 per MMBtu yesterday, October 12. Despite overall decreases, intraweek trading showed some rallies, particularly near the end of the report week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (November 2011) fell about 8 cents on the week from $3.570 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.489 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,521 billion cubic feet

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Friday, November 13, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 4, 2009) Natural gas spot prices fell over the week at most market locations, declining on average 16 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Decreases ranged between 2 cents and 77 cents per MMBtu. In the few trading locations where prices rose, increases were modest, ranging between 1 and 4 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell 10 cents on the week, closing at $4.49 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the December 2009 natural gas contract fell 34 cents per MMBtu, or 7 percent. The November contract expired on Wednesday, October 28, at $4.289 per MMBtu.

422

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 16, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 6, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 15, 2010) Extremely cold weather conditions moving across the country boosted demand for space heating this report week (December 8-15). Spot prices nonetheless decreased in most markets (with the exception of several in the Northeast), likely influenced by storage for winter usage remaining near historical highs and very strong current supplies. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.24 to $4.22 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also decreased with expectations of ample supply levels for this

423

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2008 30, 2008 Next Release: November 6, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, October 29) Natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States decreased from Wednesday to Wednesday, October 22-29, with relatively large declines of more than 10 percent occurring in markets west of the Mississippi River and more modest price movements in the eastern half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.36 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $6.58. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased for the report week. The futures contract for November delivery, for which the final day of trading was yesterday (October 29), decreased by

424

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2008 9, 2008 Next Release: June 5, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot price movements were mixed this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, May 21-28), with price decreases generally occurring in markets west of the Mississippi River and price increases dominant in trading locations in the eastern parts of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.20 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $11.60. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased for the report week, continuing a trend of rising prices that has occurred in futures markets for many commodities this spring, including futures prices for crude oil. The futures contract for June delivery, for

425

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 6, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 28, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (Wednesday, April 21 – Wednesday, April, 28), as a late-season chill temporarily increased demand. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.23 to $4.19 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month futures contract bounced above $4 per MMBtu in the final days of trading before its monthly expiration. The May contract expired yesterday at $4.271 per MMBtu, which is $0.429 more than the April contract’s expiration price of $3.842 per MMBtu. As a result, the May contract is the

426

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 16, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 8, 2010) Price changes during the week were mixed, but in most areas, these changes were moderate. The Henry Hub price rose slightly from $3.73 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, September 1, to $3.81 per MMBtu yesterday. The report week was shortened due to the Labor Day holiday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the October 2010 futures contract rose about 5 cents, from $3.762 per MMBtu on September 1 to $3.814 per MMBtu on September 8. Working natural gas in storage as of Friday, September 3, was 3,164 Bcf, following an implied net injection of 58 Bcf, according to EIA’s

427

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2008 8, 2008 Next Release: September 25, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, September 10, to Wednesday, September 17) Natural gas spot prices decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, September 10-17), even as disruptions in offshore Gulf of Mexico production continue in the aftermath of Hurricane Ike. However, price movements were not uniform, and prices increased at some trading locations directly supplied by offshore Gulf of Mexico production, which was almost entirely shut-in for most of the week. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.17 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $7.82. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the

428

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 17, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 9, 2009) Natural gas spot prices increased at all trading locations in the lower 48 States since last Wednesday, December 2. The Henry Hub price rose by 60 cents, or almost 13 percent, to $5.27 per million Btu (MMBtu) on the week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the January 2010 natural gas contract rose about 37 cents to $4.898 per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price was higher than price of the near-month contract during 3 days of the report week. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil contract fell by $5.95, or 8 percent, to $70.67 per barrel or $12.18 per MMBtu.

429

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. , 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 8, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 31, 2011) Coming only a few days after last week’s earthquake, Hurricane Irene (later downgraded to Tropical Storm Irene) brought with it cooler weather and reduced electric power demand. Irene put downward pressure on prices, but most prices rallied on the last day of the report week. The Henry Hub spot price registered a net decline of 13 cents, falling from $4.10 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday to $3.97 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the October 2011 contract moved into the near-month position, and rose from $3.889 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $4.054 yesterday.

430

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 4, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 24, 2010) Natural gas prices declined across the board, continuing a downward trend from the previous week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price closed at $4.91 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, February 24, a decline of about 10 percent from $5.47 per MMBtu on February 17. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for March 2010 delivery, which expired yesterday, fell 11 percent on the week, from $5.386 per MMBtu to $4.816 per MMBtu. With an implied net withdrawal of 172 billion cubic feet (Bcf), working gas in storage decreased to 1,853 Bcf as of Friday, February 19,

431

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2008 0, 2008 Next Release: July 17, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot prices declined sharply this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, July 2-9), with the largest decreases generally occurring in consuming regions in the Northeast and Midwest. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $1.22 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $12.09. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), a trend of rising prices for futures contracts was at least temporarily interrupted. After the August 2008 contract reached a daily settlement price of $13.578 per MMBtu (a record high for this contract) on July 3, the price decreased by $1.57 per MMBtu over the next three trading sessions and ended the week

432

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2008 9, 2008 Next Release: October 16, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, October 1 to Wednesday, October 8) Natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States this report week declined to their lowest levels this year even as disruptions in offshore Gulf of Mexico production continue in the aftermath of Hurricanes Ike and Gustav. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.83 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $6.58. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-term contract (November 2008) decreased to its lowest price since September 2007, closing at $6.742 per MMBtu yesterday (October 8). The net change during a week in which the price decreased each trading day was

433

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Wednesday, November 10, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 3, 2010) Price changes were mixed this week, with much regional variation across the country. At the Henry Hub in Erath, Louisiana, prices posted a net decline on the week of 2 cents, falling from $3.37 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, October 27, to $3.35 per MMBtu on Wednesday, November 3. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the December 2010 futures contract (which became the near-month contract on October 28) rose $0.073 from $3.763 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.836 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage increased to 3,821 billion cubic feet

434

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 31, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 23, 2011) Colder weather moved into major population centers this report week, increasing demand related to space heating for much of the country. Prices moved higher at all trading locations in the lower 48 States, with the biggest increases occurring in the Northeast. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.33 to $4.18 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased significantly as the weather outlook suggested higher consumption for the remaining days of March. The futures contract for April delivery

435

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2008 , 2008 Next Release: October 9, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, September 24 to Wednesday, October 1) Natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week, as seasonably moderate temperatures minimized natural gas demand in many areas of the country. The return of some Gulf of Mexico supplies during the week provided further downward pressure on spot prices. As of yesterday, October 1, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) reported that 3.5 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day of natural gas production remains shut-in, 16 percent lower than the 4.2 Bcf per day reported 1 week earlier. The Henry Hub spot price fell in the first three trading sessions of

436

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 at 2:00 P.M. 1 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 9, 2011) Continuing its recent trend of languishing below the $4 per million Btu (MMBtu) mark, the Henry Hub natural gas spot price oscillated this week, and posted an overall net increase of 16 cents, from $3.39 per MMBtu last Wednesday, November 2, to $3.55 per MMBtu yesterday, November 9. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (December 2011) natural gas futures contract fell from $3.749 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.652 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,831 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, November 4, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas

437

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 14, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 6, 2010) Since Wednesday, December 30, natural gas spot prices rose at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States, with increases of more than 10 percent on the week. Prices at the Henry Hub climbed $0.68 per MMBtu, or about 12 percent, to $6.47 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, January 6, at $6.01 per MMBtu. The price of the near-month contract increased by 30 cents or about 5 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 3,123 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

438

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 26, 2001 November 26, 2001 The spot price at the Henry Hub finished the abbreviated trading week on Wednesday, November 21 at $1.91 per MMBtu, roughly 22 cents or 13 percent over the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $2.813 per MMBtu, up roughly 18 cents over the previous Friday. Market prices were affected early in the week by the expectation of colder weather , and then on Wednesday-the end of trading for the week-by mild temperatures that prevailed throughout much of the country. (Temperature Map) (Temperature Deviation Map) The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased by nearly 2 percent, climbing to $18.38 per barrel or $3.17 per MMBtu.

439

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2009 30, 2009 Next Release: May 7, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 29, 2009) The direction of spot price movements was mixed this report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 22-29). However, changes were relatively small regardless of direction. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.05 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.43. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased as moderate temperatures in most of the country limited demand and a perception of strong supply continues. The futures contract for May delivery expired on Tuesday, April 28, at a price of $3.321 per MMBtu, which is the lowest monthly closing price for a NYMEX near-month contract

440

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 9, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 1, 2010) Since Wednesday, August 25, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the lower 48 States, although prices generally rose in the Northeast and Rocky Mountain areas. The Henry Hub spot price fell on the week from $3.99 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.73 per MMBtu, its lowest value since April 1, 2010. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the October 2010 natural gas futures contract fell about 3 percent from $3.896 per MMBtu to $3.762 per MMBtu. During the report week, the September 2010 natural gas futures contract expired at $3.651, having lost about $1.176 per MMBtu during its

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 10, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 2, 2011) Natural gas prices showed continued relative weakness during the report week. The spot price at the Henry Hub fell from $3.83 per million Btu (MMBtu) on February 23 to $3.79 per MMBtu on March 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the March 2011 futures contract expired at $3.793 per MMBtu, having declined about 12 percent during its tenure as the near-month contract. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,745 Bcf as of Friday, February 25, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. The spot price of the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil

442

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 to Thursday, January 9, 2008) 2, 2007 to Thursday, January 9, 2008) Released: January 10, 2008 Next release: January 17, 2008 · In the eastern half of the Lower 48 States, temperatures warmed significantly this report week, resulting in a respite from elevated prices at many trading locations. In the West, however, bitter cold persisted and prices continued to move upward as space-heating demand remained strong. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.05 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $7.88. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts after an initial decline increased through the past 4 trading days as the timing of another cold front became more certain. The futures contract for February delivery rose about 25 cents per MMBtu on the week to $8.099.

443

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 30, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 22, 2011) Natural gas prices fell slightly at most market locations from Wednesday, June 15 to Wednesday, June 22. The Henry Hub price fell 10 cents from $4.52 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday to $4.42 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the July 2011 near-month futures contract fell by 26 cents, or about 6 percent, from $4.58 last Wednesday to $4.32 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,354 this week, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

444

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2009 16, 2009 Next Release: April 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 15, 2009) Since Wednesday, April 8, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with some exceptions including those in the Northeast, Midwest, and Midcontinent. Despite this week’s upticks at most locations, natural gas spot prices remain at relatively low levels and have continued to trade within a limited range for the past 4 weeks. The Henry Hub spot market prices gained about 10 cents or 2.9 percent per million Btu (MMBtu), ending trading yesterday at $3.60 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (April 15) at $3.693

445

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2008 9, 2008 Next Release: June 26, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, June 11, natural gas spot prices increased at all markets in the Lower 48 States except one, despite the lack of weather-related demand in much of the country. The restoration of production at the Independence Hub to the level prevailing prior to the April 8 shut-in had limited effect on prices. For the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 44 cents to $12.93 per million British thermal units (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices also increased on the week, with the weekly increase of the near-month contract exceeding those observed at spot market locations in the eastern half of the country.

446

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 22, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 14, 2010) Natural gas prices moved significantly lower at market locations across the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub spot price averaged $4.39 per million Btu (MMBtu) in trading yesterday, July 14, decreasing $0.37 compared with the previous Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub decreased in 4 out the 5 trading sessions during the report week. The near-month contract settled yesterday at $4.31 per MMBtu, about $0.26 lower than the previous Wednesday. As of Friday, July 9, working gas in underground storage was 2,840

447

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: July 16, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 8, 2009) Natural gas prices posted across-the-board decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Price decreases at the spot market ranged between 1 and 44 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), although a few points in the lower 48 States posted small increases. During the report week, the price at the Henry Hub spot market fell to $3.22 per MMBtu, decreasing by 11 percent since last Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for August delivery lost 44.2 cents and ended the report week at $3.353 per MMBtu. The price for the August 2009 contract has posted a

448

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: February 12, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 4, 2009) Natural gas spot prices decreased in half of the trading regions in the Lower 48 States this report week. Generally, areas east of the Rockies and particularly those that experienced frigid temperatures posted weekly price increases. However, there were some exceptions, including the Midcontinent and East Texas. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures trading for the near-month contract was fairly volatile, with daily price changes ranging between a 16-cent loss and a 16-cent increase. The March 2009 contract ended trading yesterday 18 cents higher than on the previous Wednesday.

449

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 3, 2009 Next Release: July 30, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 22, 2009) Natural gas spot prices rose this report week, as prices for energy products generally increased and the economic outlook improved. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.12 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.49. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased significantly. The price of the futures contract for August delivery closed yesterday, July 22, at $3.793 per MMBtu, more than 50 cents higher than the closing price the previous Wednesday. Working gas in underground storage as of Friday, July 17, is estimated to have been 2,952 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 18.4

450

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 20, 2011) Responding to extremely hot weather this week, natural gas prices moved up at market locations across the lower 48 States. The spot price at the Henry Hub increased 21 cents from $4.43 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, July 13, to $4.64 per MMBtu yesterday, July 20. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (August 2011) increased from $4.403 per MMBtu to $4.500 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,671 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 15, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

451

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 7, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 16, 2009) Changes in natural gas spot prices this report week (December 9-16) reflected extremely cold weather conditions moving across the country. In response to varying levels of demand for space heating, spot prices increased east of the Mississippi River but declined in the West. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.30 to $5.57 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also rose with expectations of higher demand in response to this month’s trend of colder-than-normal temperatures. The futures contract for

452

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, to Wednesday, February 20) 13, to Wednesday, February 20) Released: February 21, 2008 Next release: February 28, 2008 Natural gas spot and futures prices increased this report week (February 13-20), as frigid temperatures returned to regions of the country that rely on the fuel for space heating. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.73 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $9.08. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant increases. The futures contract for March delivery rose about 58 cents per MMBtu on the week to $8.965. As of Friday, February 15, working gas in storage was 1,770 Bcf, which is 5.8 percent above the 5-year (2003-2007) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $7.58 per barrel, trading yesterday at $100.86 per barrel or $17.39 per MMBtu.

453

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2009 8, 2009 Next Release: June 4, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 27, 2009) Natural gas spot prices declined this report week (May 20-27), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.49. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased as moderate temperatures in most of the country limited demand. The futures contract for June delivery expired yesterday, May 27, at a price of $3.538 per MMBtu, which is the second-lowest monthly closing price for a NYMEX near-month contract in more than 6 years. Meanwhile, the price

454

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 0, 2009 Next Release: August 27, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 19, 2009) Natural gas spot prices declined this report week (August 12-19), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. The Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.34 to $3.02 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased as supplies continued to be viewed as more than adequate to address near-term demand, including heating-related demand increases this winter. The futures contract for September delivery decreased by $0.36 on the week to $3.12 per MMBtu. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday is estimated to

455

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2008 8, 2008 Next Release: September 4, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, August 20, to Wednesday, August 27) Natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, August 20-27), as tropical storm Gustav appeared to be heading into the Gulf of Mexico and industry initiated precautionary safety measures likely to result in the evacuation of offshore Gulf of Mexico platforms. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.53 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $8.55. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), a trend of declining prices for futures contracts was at least temporarily interrupted. Early in the report week, the price of the near-term contract (September 2008) had

456

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 24, 2007) 7, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 24, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices increased slightly this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 9-16), despite the usual lull in demand during this shoulder period between the winter heating and summer cooling seasons. The upward price trend likely resulted from a variety of factors, including rising prices for competing petroleum products (as evidenced by an increase in the underlying crude oil price). Additionally, concerns over current and future supplies do not appear to have eased. The official start of the hurricane season is imminent, and the first named tropical storm appeared this week. However, imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) have increased markedly in the past few months. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 16 cents per MMBtu, or 2 percent, to $7.62. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the contract for June delivery increased 17.0 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $7.890 yesterday (May 16). EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 1,842 Bcf as of Friday, May 11, reflecting an implied net injection of 95 Bcf. This level of working gas in underground storage is 20.6 percent above the 5-year average inventory for this time of year. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.03 per barrel on the week to $62.57 per barrel, or $10.79 per MMBtu.

457

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 13) May 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 13) Upward pressure on spot and futures natural gas prices continued for a second consecutive week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 28-May 5), owing to continuing concerns over gas supplies and higher crude oil prices. A 42-cent per MMBtu price increase at the Henry Hub on Tuesday (May 4) appeared to be related to the increase in futures prices the previous day, when the near-month contract moved past the $6-mark to a close of $6.231. The Henry Hub spot price increase on Tuesday and a 2-cent increase last Friday (April 30) were more than enough to offset declines in the other three trading sessions this week, resulting in a net gain on the week of 30 cents per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub was higher on the week by about 34 cents per MMBtu, closing yesterday (May 5) at $6.31. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, April 30, increased to 1,227 Bcf, which is 2.2 percent below the 5-year average. Owing to geopolitical concerns and perceived low gasoline supplies heading into the summer driving season, crude oil prices rose to almost $40 per barrel this week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.46 per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $39.69 per barrel, or $6.84 per MMBtu.

458

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Holiday Notice: Holiday Notice: Due to the federal holiday in observance of Martin Luther King Day on Monday, January 21, 2002, the next issue of the Natural Gas Weekly Update will be published on Tuesday, January 22, 2002. Overview: Monday, January 14, 2002 Natural gas prices were generally lower last week as the fundamentals of ample working gas in storage and very little temperature-driven swing demand dominated the market. With little in the way of market-changing developments, trading in both the spot and futures markets tended to occur in relatively small price ranges throughout the week. The warming trend begun late in the previous week continued nearly unabated through last week, with the heavy gas-consuming areas of the Midwest and Northeast recording many of the greatest deviations above daily normal temperatures. Philadelphia, New York City, and Buffalo, NY had at least 3 days of temperatures that were 10 or more degrees above normal; Chicago's temperature reached an unusually warm 26 degrees above normal on Wednesday. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) Spot prices at the Henry Hub moved down moderately from the previous week, ending trading on Friday at $2.31, down 5 cents from the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub declined by $0.071 from the previous Friday, settling on Friday, January 11 at $2.204 per MMBtu. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil also fell, dipping below $20 per barrel for the first time in the New Year, ending trading last Friday at $19.67 per barrel, or $3.39 per MMBtu, down $1.80 per barrel, or $0.31 per MMBtu, from Friday, January 4.

459

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The release day for the Natural Gas Weekly Market Update will shift from Monday to Thursday effective for the week of April 8-12. This is the last issue to be published on Monday. There will be no issue released on Monday, April 8. The next issue will be released on Thursday, April 11. The release day for the Natural Gas Weekly Market Update will shift from Monday to Thursday effective for the week of April 8-12. This is the last issue to be published on Monday. There will be no issue released on Monday, April 8. The next issue will be released on Thursday, April 11. Overview: Monday, April 1, 2002 Spot prices fell sharply after Tuesday, March 26, during last week's holiday-shortened trading, as unseasonably cold temperatures began to moderate around midweek in many high gas consumption areas. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) With the exception of the expiring near-month contract, futures contract prices also trended down, but the decreases were relatively modest. By Thursday's end of trading (both spot and futures markets were closed for Good Friday, March 29), the Henry Hub average spot price had declined by $0.35 per MMBtu since the previous Friday (March 22) to $3.19. The NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub expired on Tuesday on an upswing, gaining almost 15 cents in 2 days to close out trading at $3.472 per MMBtu. The new near-month contract (May delivery) ended trading on Thursday at $3.283 per MMBtu, down just over 9 cents in 2 days as the near-month contract. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil continued its steady rise, with modest gains early in the week punctuated by a 42-cent per barrel increase on Thursday. The WTI spot price at week's end was $26.21 per barrel ($4.52 per MMBtu), up $0.62 per barrel over the previous Friday. This is the highest price for WTI since the third week of September 2001.

460

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 14) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 14) Natural gas spot and futures prices generally moved in opposite directions for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 29-October 6), as spot prices fell at most market locations, while futures prices continued to climb higher. In yesterday's (Wednesday, October 6) trading at the Henry Hub, the spot price for natural gas averaged $6.00 per MMBtu, down 23 cents per MMBtu, or close to 4 percent, from the previous Wednesday. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery gained $0.134 per MMBtu on the week, or about 2 percent, as it settled yesterday at $7.045. Settlement prices for contracts for gas delivery in December 2004 through March 2005 rose much more sharply, with increases ranging from just over 40 cents to nearly 60 cents per MMBtu. EIA reported that inventories were 3,092 Bcf as of Friday, October 1, which is 6.9 percent greater than the previous 5-year average for the week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil rose $2.45 per barrel (42 cents per MMBtu) on the week, or about 5 percent, to yesterday's record-high price of $51.98 per barrel ($8.96 per MMBtu).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear science week" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 28) 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 28) Increased natural gas demand owing to falling temperatures this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 13-20) combined with higher petroleum prices to lift spot and futures gas prices dramatically. The result at the Henry Hub was a net gain on the week of $1.86 per MMBtu, or 35 percent, to $7.25. After gaining value in the past three trading days, the NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub ended the week at $7.623 per MMBtu, a net increase of 77.2 cents. Natural gas in storage continues to build at a rate that could result in the highest inventories in years by the start of the traditional heating season (November 1). As of Friday, October 15, inventories were 3,223 Bcf, which is 7.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $1.07 per barrel on the week to yesterday's (October 20) closing price of $54.93 per barrel, or $9.47 per MMBtu.

462

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2001 0, 2001 Prices in both spot and futures markets rose last week. For the week, spot prices at the Henry Hub increased by 25 cents from the previous Friday to $3.23 per MMBtu-an increase of 8 percent. The settlement price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery gained 37-plus cents on Wednesday in response to the AGA storage report, then declined to settle at $3.303 on Friday-still up $0.263 from the previous Friday's ending price. Pressure for sustained high prices was limited as temperatures across most of the nation moderated significantly from the heat wave conditions experienced for much of the preceding week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil oscillated in a fairly narrow range between $26.70 and $27.85 per barrel, and for the week was down $1.40 at $26.70 per barrel, or about $4.60 per MMBtu.

463

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monday, December 29 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 8) Monday, December 29 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 8) A trend of increasing natural gas spot prices since mid-November abruptly halted late in the week before Christmas, owing to mild temperatures across the country during the first week of the holiday season. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, December 17-24), the Henry Hub spot price decreased $1.06 per MMBtu to $5.50, while declines in Midwest and Northeast market centers were even greater at between $1.10-$1.40. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for January delivery fell slightly more than $0.61 per MMBtu to $6.379. As of December 19, natural gas in storage had decreased to 2,699 Bcf, which is 0.1 percent below the 5-year average. Although the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased slightly in trading before the holiday, the spot price fell $1.33 on the week to $32.03, or $5.52 per MMBtu.

464

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 20, 2006) 13 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 20, 2006) Natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this week despite significant drops in prices at many locations early in the report week. The spot price at the Henry Hub was one of the few to decrease for the week (Wednesday - Wednesday, July 5 to 12), declining 6 cents, or about 1 percent, to $5.65 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery settled at $5.782 per MMBtu yesterday (July 12), which is 2 cents, or less than 1 percent, above last Wednesday's level. As of Friday, July 7, 2006, natural gas in storage was 2,704 Bcf or 27.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil was $74.99 per barrel or $12.93 per MMBtu yesterday. This price is 21 cents per barrel less than the price last week, a decrease of less than 1 percent.

465

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 15, 2006) 8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 15, 2006) Continuing moderate temperatures across much of the Lower 48 States, particularly in the eastern half of the country, helped lower natural gas spot and futures prices during the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 31 - June 7). The spot price at the Henry Hub decreased by $0.15 per MMBtu, or about 2.5 percent, for the week, to $5.82 in yesterday's (Wednesday, June 7) trading. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for July delivery moved lower by 41 cents per MMBtu compared with its settlement price a week ago, ending yesterday at $5.974 per MMBtu. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that natural gas inventories in underground storage were an estimated 2,320 Bcf as of Friday, June 2, which is 41.3 percent greater than the previous 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased by $0.52 per barrel, or less than 1 percent on the week, bringing the WTI spot price in yesterday's trading to $70.90 per barrel, or $12.22 per MMBtu.

466

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monday, January 28, 2002 Monday, January 28, 2002 Natural gas prices generally declined last week as mild temperatures continued in most of the country and working gas storage stocks remain at very high levels. Spot prices at most major markets that serve the eastern two-thirds of the country ended the week down from the previous Friday with weather forecasts for the past weekend calling for daytime temperatures to be in the mid 50s to the low 60s in an area stretching from Chicago to Boston. At the Henry Hub prices moved down 9 cents on Friday to end at $2.04 per MMBtu--$0.25 below the previous Friday. The National Weather Service's (NWS) latest 6- to 10-day forecast is calling for above normal temperatures to continue through this week in most areas east of the Mississippi River. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) At the NYMEX futures market, the February contract continued to trend down as it ended the week trading at $2.037 per MMBtu-off almost $0.20 from previous Friday. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained almost $1.80 per barrel reaching $19.80 on Friday or about $3.40 per MMBtu.

467

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25, 2002 25, 2002 After moving down at mid-week, spot prices at most major market locations rebounded and climbed to levels not seen in over 6 months. At the Henry Hub prices gained $0.35 on Friday to end the week at $3.54 per MMBtu, the highest reported daily mid-point price since June 25, 2001. On the NYMEX the futures contract for April delivery ended trading on Friday at $3.326 per MMBtu. This is $0.90 per MMBtu higher or 37 percent above its settlement price when it began to trade as the near-month contract on February 27. Much of the country had cooler-than-normal temperatures last week, especially in the Northern Plains and the Northeast. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) The spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil continued to climb, exceeding $25 most days last week, and ended trading on Friday at $25.56 or $4.40 per MMBtu.

468

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10, 2001 10, 2001 Price surges on Monday and Friday of last week overshadowed 3 straight days of decreases midweek, as nearly every major market location showed Friday-to-Friday gains. At the Henry Hub, the spot price gained 36 cents from the previous Friday to end the week at $2.11 per million Btu (MMBtu). On the futures market, in its first full week of trading as the near-month contract, the price of the NYMEX contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub declined $0.133 per MMBtu to settle on Friday at $2.568. The unseasonably warm temperatures that have blanketed nearly the entire country east of the Rocky Mountains continued, with specific-day high-temperature records being set at numerous locations in the Northeast, Midwest, and Midcontinent (Temperature Map)(Temperature Deviation Map). On Thursday, the spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell nearly $1.00 per barrel, as the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) announced that it would delay an expected oil-production cut that it hopes will shore up sagging world crude oil prices. For the week (Friday-to-Friday), the WTI spot price fell $0.43 per barrel to $19.08, or $3.29 per MMBtu.

469

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

March 4, 2002 March 4, 2002 Spot prices wound up slightly higher for the week (Friday to Friday) after trading within relatively narrow ranges with only regional exceptions. On the NYMEX futures market, the March contract expired on Tuesday, February 26, 2002, at $2.388 per MMBtu, ending with a gain of $0.321 per MMBtu since becoming the near-month contract on January 29. Tuesday also saw the largest increase in spot prices, as a huge Arctic air mass expanded from the Central Plains States into the Midwest and Southwest, bringing some of the coldest temperatures thus far this winter. Daily average temperatures on Tuesday through Thursday in major cities in the Central and Southwest regions ranged from 6 to 18 degrees below normal and up to 8 degrees below normal in the Midwest. Equally sharp temperature drops were seen in the Southeast by Wednesday. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) At the Henry Hub, the spot price gained a nickel on Tuesday, but for the week was up by only 9 cents, to $2.49 per MMBtu. The new near-month contract, for April delivery at the Henry Hub, ended the week at $2.359 per MMBtu. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil moved above $22 per barrel for the first time since early November, gaining $1.45 for the week and ending trading on Friday at $22.37 per barrel, or $3.86 per MMBtu.

470

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

12 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 19) 12 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 19) Spot and futures natural gas prices this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 4-11) partly recovered from the prior week's sharp decline, owing to warmer temperatures moving into parts of the South and cool temperatures in the Rockies. The Henry Hub spot price increased 14 cents per MMBtu to $6.63. The New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub was higher on the week by about 5 cents per MMBtu, closing yesterday (May 11) at $6.683. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, May 6, increased to 1,509 Bcf, which is 22.3 percent above the 5-year average. Before declining sharply yesterday, crude oil spot prices appeared to be supporting higher natural gas prices, with the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) price increasing more than $1.50 per barrel since Wednesday (May 4) to over $52. The net change in the WTI price on the week was 17 cents per MMBtu, or less than 1 percent, as the price dropped $1.37 per barrel yesterday to $50.39 per barrel, or $8.69 per MMBtu.

471

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 3, 2001 December 3, 2001 Spot prices at the Henry Hub remain low for this time of year, as prices declined 16 cents from Friday-to-Friday. The spot price rose $0.50 per MMBtu from Monday to Wednesday, and then fell almost 60 cents by Friday to trade for $1.77 at the end of the week. Concern about the final resolution of the surprising decline of the Enron Corporation appears to be contributing to the price variability on the spot market. On the NYMEX futures market the December contract closed on Wednesday at $2.316 per MMBtu, more than $1.00 below what it began trading for as the near-month contract in late October. The unseasonably warm temperatures that have dominated the weather in much of the country continued last week in the eastern portion of the country. (Temperature Map) (Temperature Deviation Map) In addition, the National Weather Service's (NWS) latest 6 to 10 day forecast is calling for a warm weather pattern to continue into early December. Because of the combination of warmer-than-normal temperatures and favorable prices, this year's refill season has continued into the 2nd half of November with an estimated 12 Bcf added to working gas stocks during the third week of last month. The spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved up about $0.85 per barrel on Friday and ended the week at $19.50 or about $3.36 per MMBtu.

472

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 14, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 6, 2011) Continuing last week’s net decline, the Henry Hub price this week fell 8 cents from $4.25 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, March 30, to $4.17 per MMBtu on Wednesday, April 6. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (May 2011) contract fell from $4.355 per MMBtu to $4.146 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,579 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 1, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes Incorporated, rose by 11 to 891. A new study released by EIA estimated technically recoverable shale

473

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

12 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 19) 12 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 19) Spot prices generally moved higher for the week (Wednesday, December 4 to Wednesday, December 11) with exceptions at several Northeast locations, while futures prices experienced robust gains, particularly for contracts for delivery through the end of the heating season. Unusually cold temperatures accompanied the heating season's first significant and widespread snow storm late last week, and temperatures plunged again ahead of the ice storm of Tuesday and Wednesday. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price gained 41 cents for the week, ending trading yesterday (Wednesday, December 11) at $4.64 per MMBtu. Since last Wednesday, the NYMEX futures contract for delivery in January 2003 gained $0.411 per MMBtu, settling yesterday at $4.709. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, December 6, decreased to 2,794 Bcf, which is 2.9 percent below the 5-year average. The price of West Texas Intermediate crude oil gained 69 cents per barrel for the week, ending trading yesterday at $27.49 per barrel, or $4.74 per MMBtu.

474

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wednesday, January 02, 2002 Wednesday, January 02, 2002 Spot prices in the Midwest and the East moved up most days during the holiday period as cold weather blanketed much of the area. .(See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) (Temperature map) (Temperature Deviation Map). Prices in Chicago moved close to $3.00 per MMBtu last week, while prices in the New York City area approached $5.00 on the last day of the year. Daytime temperatures early this week in the Northeast remained in the 20s and 30s from Washington, DC to Boston. The National Weather Service is calling for the wintry temperatures to continue through the end of the week in most areas in the eastern two thirds of the country. On the NYMEX, the daily settlement price for the futures contract for February delivery has declined in recent trading as the higher-than-average storage levels continue to be the main contributor to the current strong natural gas supply situation. An estimated 2,992 Bcf remains in storage as of December 21, 2001. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down in last week's trading and ended the year at $19.96 per barrel or $3.44 per MMBtu on Monday.

475

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 20, 2007) 13, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 20, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices generally increased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 6-13), as tropical storms threatened to disrupt supplies and pipeline explosions in Mexico stirred concerns of supply security. Hurricane Humberto is still active near the Texas-Louisiana border at the time of this writing, and Tropical Depression 8 in the South Atlantic is apparently moving toward Puerto Rico and the general direction of the Gulf of Mexico (where these storms might cause energy-producing platforms to be evacuated and supplies to be shut in). However, companies have not yet announced significant shut-in production or damage from the weather. On the week the Henry Hub spot price increased 32 cents per MMBtu to $6.13. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant increases. The futures contract for October delivery rose 63.3 cents per MMBtu on the week to $6.438. Working gas in storage as of Friday, September 7, was 3,069 Bcf, which is 9.3 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil recorded yet another record high, increasing $4.11 per barrel on the week to $79.85, or $13.77 per MMBtu.

476

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 22) 15, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 22) A drop in temperatures across most of the Lower 48 States helped push natural gas spot and futures prices up on the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, December 7-14). The spot price at the Henry Hub increased by $0.85 per MMBtu, or about 6 percent, for the week, to $14.80 in yesterday's (Wednesday, December 14) trading. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for January delivery added 97.9 cents to its settlement price of 1 week ago, settling yesterday at $14.679 per MMBtu. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that natural gas inventories in underground storage were 2,964 Bcf as of Friday, December 9, which is 3.7 percent greater than the previous 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased by $1.65 per barrel, bringing the WTI spot price in yesterday's trading to $60.86 per barrel, or $10.49 per MMBtu, an almost 3 percent gain on the week.

477

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 16) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 16) Higher demand for natural gas from power generators meeting air-conditioning needs likely contributed to natural gas spot prices climbing $0.38 to $1.28 per MMBtu at most trading locations since Wednesday, June 1. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, June 1-8), the Henry Hub spot price rose 86 cents per MMBtu to $7.22. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery gained 21.1 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement price of $7.00 on Wednesday, June 8. Working gas in storage as of Friday, June 3, increased to 1,890 Bcf, which is 20.2 percent above the 5-year (2000-2004) average inventory for the week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.89 per barrel on the week to $52.51, or $9.05 per MMBtu.

478

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Due to the upcoming holidays, we will not produce another Natural Gas Weekly Update until January 2, 2002. Due to the upcoming holidays, we will not produce another Natural Gas Weekly Update until January 2, 2002. Overview: Monday, December 17, 2001 The spot price at the Henry Hub finished the trading week on December 14 at $2.41 per MMBtu, roughly 30 cents or 14 percent over the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $2.846 per MMBtu, up nearly 28 cents over the previous Friday. Market prices were affected early in the week by colder weather, and then by mil