Sample records for nuclear reactors light

  1. Discovery sheds light on nuclear reactor fuel behavior during...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Reports Summer Science Writing Internship Discovery sheds light on nuclear reactor fuel behavior during a severe event By Angela Hardin * November 20, 2014 Tweet...

  2. Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terrani, Kurt Amir

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamental aspects of nuclear reactor fuel elements.Unlike permanent nuclear reactor core components, nuclearof the first nuclear reactors, commercial nuclear fuel still

  3. Standard practice for evaluation of surveillance capsules from light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard practice for evaluation of surveillance capsules from light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels

  4. 309NUCLEAR ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, VOL.37 NO.4, AUGUST 2005 A NEW BOOK: "LIGHT-WATER REACTOR MATERIALS"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    309NUCLEAR ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, VOL.37 NO.4, AUGUST 2005 A NEW BOOK: "LIGHT-WATER REACTOR review; it is a book preview. Thirty years ago, "Fundamental Aspects of Nuclear Reactor Fuel Elements of nuclear fuels among other topics pertinent to the materials in the ensemble of the nuclear reactor

  5. Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terrani, Kurt Amir

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    target subassemblies in a fast reactor core for effectiveof minor actinides in fast reactors [79]. In order to

  6. A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Charges Relating to Nuclear Reactor Safety," 1976, availablestudies of light-water nuclear reactor safety, emphasizingstudies of overall nuclear reactor safety have been

  7. Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terrani, Kurt Amir

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    capacity and operating efficiency of nuclear plants [31,operating efficiency of nuclear plants in the past decades.cost of the fuel Nuclear Plant Capacity Factor Nuclear

  8. Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terrani, Kurt Amir

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electricity generation capacity and operating efficiency of nuclear plants [Nuclear Plant Capacity Factor Nuclear Electricity Generationelectricity generation capacity and operating efficiency of nu- clear plants [

  9. Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terrani, Kurt Amir

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.2.1 PWRs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.2Actinides Multi-Recycling in PWR Using Hydride Fuels. InRecycling in Hydride Fueled PWR Cores. Nuclear Engineering

  10. Standard Practice for Design of Surveillance Programs for Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Power Reactor Vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing a surveillance program for monitoring the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties of ferritic materials in light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels. This practice includes the minimum requirements for the design of a surveillance program, selection of vessel material to be included, and the initial schedule for evaluation of materials. 1.2 This practice was developed for all light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels for which the predicted maximum fast neutron fluence (E > 1 MeV) at the end of license (EOL) exceeds 1 × 1021 neutrons/m2 (1 × 1017 n/cm2) at the inside surface of the reactor vessel. 1.3 This practice applies only to the planning and design of surveillance programs for reactor vessels designed and built after the effective date of this practice. Previous versions of Practice E185 apply to earlier reactor vessels. 1.4 This practice does not provide specific procedures for monitoring the radiation induced cha...

  11. Nuclear reactor engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapters are presented concerning energy from nuclear fission; nuclear reactions and radiations; diffusion and slowing-down of neutrons; principles of reactor analysis; nuclear reactor kinetics and control; energy removal; non-fuel reactor materials; the reactor fuel system; radiation protection and environmental effects; nuclear reactor shielding; nuclear reactor safety; and power reactor systems.

  12. Standard Guide for In-Service Annealing of Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Reactor Vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This guide covers the general procedures to be considered for conducting an in-service thermal anneal of a light-water moderated nuclear reactor vessel and demonstrating the effectiveness of the procedure. The purpose of this in-service annealing (heat treatment) is to improve the mechanical properties, especially fracture toughness, of the reactor vessel materials previously degraded by neutron embrittlement. The improvement in mechanical properties generally is assessed using Charpy V-notch impact test results, or alternatively, fracture toughness test results or inferred toughness property changes from tensile, hardness, indentation, or other miniature specimen testing (1). 1.2 This guide is designed to accommodate the variable response of reactor-vessel materials in post-irradiation annealing at various temperatures and different time periods. Certain inherent limiting factors must be considered in developing an annealing procedure. These factors include system-design limitations; physical constrain...

  13. Advanced dry head-end reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Emory D.; Delcul, Guillermo D.; Hunt, Rodney D.; Johnson, Jared A.; Spencer, Barry B.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from a light water reactor includes the step of reacting spent nuclear fuel in a voloxidation vessel with an oxidizing gas having nitrogen dioxide and oxygen for a period sufficient to generate a solid oxidation product of the spent nuclear fuel. The reacting step includes the step of reacting, in a first zone of the voloxidation vessel, spent nuclear fuel with the oxidizing gas at a temperature ranging from 200-450.degree. C. to form an oxidized reaction product, and regenerating nitrogen dioxide, in a second zone of the voloxidation vessel, by reacting oxidizing gas comprising nitrogen monoxide and oxygen at a temperature ranging from 0-80.degree. C. The first zone and the second zone can be separate. A voloxidation system is also disclosed.

  14. Advanced dry head-end reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, Emory D; Delcul, Guillermo D; Hunt, Rodney D; Johnson, Jared A; Spencer, Barry B

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from a light water reactor includes the step of reacting spent nuclear fuel in a voloxidation vessel with an oxidizing gas having nitrogen dioxide and oxygen for a period sufficient to generate a solid oxidation product of the spent nuclear fuel. The reacting step includes the step of reacting, in a first zone of the voloxidation vessel, spent nuclear fuel with the oxidizing gas at a temperature ranging from 200-450.degree. C. to form an oxidized reaction product, and regenerating nitrogen dioxide, in a second zone of the voloxidation vessel, by reacting oxidizing gas comprising nitrogen monoxide and oxygen at a temperature ranging from 0-80.degree. C. The first zone and the second zone can be separate. A voloxidation system is also disclosed.

  15. Prospects for and problems of using light-water supercritical-pressure coolant in nuclear reactors in order to increase the efficiency of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alekseev, P. N.; Semchenkov, Yu. M.; Sedov, A. A., E-mail: sedov@dhtp.kial.ru; Subbotin, S. A.; Chibinyaev, A. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Trends in the development of the power sector of the Russian and world power industries both at present time and in the near future are analyzed. Trends in the rise of prices for reserves of fossil and nuclear fuels used for electricity production are compared. An analysis of the competitiveness of electricity production at nuclear power plants as compared to the competitiveness of electricity produced at coal-fired and natural-gas-fired thermal power plants is performed. The efficiency of the open nuclear fuel cycle and various versions of the closed nuclear fuel cycle is discussed. The requirements on light-water reactors under the scenario of dynamic development of the nuclear power industry in Russia are determined. Results of analyzing the efficiency of fuel utilization for various versions of vessel-type light-water reactors with supercritical coolant are given. Advantages and problems of reactors with supercritical-pressure water are listed.

  16. Nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomson, Wallace B. (Severna Park, MD)

    2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

  17. Nuclear reactor engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A book is reviewed which emphasizes topics directly related to the light water reactor power plant and the fast reactor power system. Current real-world problems are addressed throughout the text, and a chapter on safety includes much of the postThree Mile Island impact on operating systems. Topics covered include Doppler broadening, neutron resonances, multigroup diffusion theory, reactor kinetics, reactor control, energy removal, nonfuel materials, reactor fuel, radiation protection, environmental effects, and reactor safety.

  18. Reactor & Nuclear Systems Publications | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Publications and Reports | Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications SHARE Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications The...

  19. Nuclear reactor safety heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, O.C.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reviewed is a book which has 5 parts: Overview, Fundamental Concepts, Design Basis Accident-Light Water Reactors (LWRs), Design Basis Accident-Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs), and Special Topics. It combines a historical overview, textbook material, handbook information, and the editor's personal philosophy on safety of nuclear power plants. Topics include thermal-hydraulic considerations; transient response of LWRs and LMFBRs following initiating events; various accident scenarios; single- and two-phase flow; single- and two-phase heat transfer; nuclear systems safety modeling; startup and shutdown; transient response during normal and upset conditions; vapor explosions, natural convection cooling; blockages in LMFBR subassemblies; sodium boiling; and Three Mile Island.

  20. Reactor- Nuclear Science Center 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPARISON OF NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL ROOM DISPLAY PANELS A Thesis by FRANCES RENAE BOWERS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988... Major Subject: Industrial Engineering A COMPARISON OF NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL ROOM DISPLAY PANELS A Thesis by FRANCES RENAE BOWERS Approved as to style and content by: Rod er . oppa (Cha' of 'ttee) R. Quinn Brackett (Member) rome . Co gleton...

  1. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Non-Destructive...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Non-Destructive Evaluation R&D Roadmap for...

  2. TITAN : an advanced three dimensional coupled neutronicthermal-hydraulics code for light water nuclear reactor core analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griggs, D. P.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accurate analysis of nuclear reactor transients frequently requires that neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and feedback be included. A number of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics codes have been developed for this ...

  3. Nuclear reactor control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingham, R.V.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactor has power setback means for use in an emergency. On initiation of a trip-signal a control rod is injected into the core in two stages, firstly, by free fall to effect an immediate power-set back to a safe level and, secondly, by controlled insertion. Total shut-down of the reactor under all emergencies is avoided. 4 claims.

  4. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Ronald J. (Pensacola, FL); Land, John T. (Pensacola, FL); Misvel, Michael C. (Pensacola, FL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

  5. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.; Misvel, M.C.

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled. 12 figs.

  6. Nuclear reactor control column

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachovchin, D.M.

    1982-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest crosssectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

  7. Nuclear reactor control column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Plum Borough, PA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

  8. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Computer-based procedure for field activities: results from three evaluations at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Laboratory; Bly, Aaron [Idaho National Laboratory; LeBlanc, Katya [Idaho National Laboratory

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nearly all activities that involve human interaction with the systems of a nuclear power plant are guided by procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by industry have a demonstrated history of ensuring safety; however, improving procedure use could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety. One potential way to improve procedure-based activities is through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). Computer-based procedures provide the opportunity to incorporate context driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, just-in-time training, etc into CBP system. One obvious advantage of this capability is reducing the time spent tracking down the applicable documentation. Additionally, human performance tools can be integrated in the CBP system in such way that helps the worker focus on the task rather than the tools. Some tools can be completely incorporated into the CBP system, such as pre-job briefs, placekeeping, correct component verification, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduces the time and labor required, such as concurrent and independent verification. Another benefit of CBPs compared to PBPs is dynamic procedure presentation. PBPs are static documents which limits the degree to which the information presented can be tailored to the task and conditions when the procedure is executed. The CBP system could be configured to display only the relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. A dynamic presentation of the procedure (also known as context-sensitive procedures) will guide the user down the path of relevant steps based on the current conditions. This feature will reduce the user’s workload and inherently reduce the risk of incorrectly marking a step as not applicable and the risk of incorrectly performing a step that should be marked as not applicable. As part of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactors Sustainability Program, researchers at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) along with partners from the nuclear industry have been investigating the design requirements for computer-based work instructions (including operations procedures, work orders, maintenance procedures, etc.) to increase efficiency, safety, and cost competitiveness of existing light water reactors.

  9. Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  10. Light-Water Breeder Reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beaudoin, B. R.; Cohen, J. D.; Jones, D. H.; Marier, Jr, L. J.; Raab, H. F.

    1972-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Described is a light-water-moderated and -cooled nuclear breeder reactor of the seed-blanket type characterized by core modules comprising loosely packed blanket zones enriched with fissile fuel and axial zoning in the seed and blanket regions within each core module. Reactivity control over lifetime is achieved by axial displacement of movable seed zones without the use of poison rods in the embodiment illustrated. The seed is further characterized by a hydrogen-to-uranium-233 atom ratio in the range 10 to 200 and a uranium-233-to-thorium-232 atom ratio ranging from 0.012 to 0.200. The seed occupies from 10 to 35 percent of the core volume in the form of one or more individual islands or annuli. (NSA 26: 55130)

  11. Nuclear reactor safety device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, Ernest (Wilmette, IL)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A safety device is disclosed for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of an upward thermal excursion. Such safety device comprises a laminated helical ribbon configured as a tube-like helical coil having contiguous helical turns with slidably abutting edges. The helical coil is disclosed as a portion of a drive member connected axially to the control rod. The laminated ribbon is formed of outer and inner laminae. The material of the outer lamina has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material of the inner lamina. In the event of an upward thermal excursion, the laminated helical coil curls inwardly to a smaller diameter. Such inward curling causes the total length of the helical coil to increase by a substantial increment, so that the control rod is axially repositioned by a corresponding amount to reduce the power output of the reactor.

  12. Heat dissipating nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Lazarus, Jonathan D. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment adapted to retain and cool core debris in the unlikely event of a core meltdown and subsequent breach in the reactor vessel. The reactor vessel is seated in a cavity which has a thick metal sidewall that is integral with a thick metal basemat at the bottom of the cavity. The basemat extends beyond the perimeter of the cavity sidewall. Underneath the basemat is a porous bed with water pipes and steam pipes running into it. Water is introduced into the bed and converted into steam which is vented to the atmosphere. A plurality of metal pilings in the form of H-beams extends from the metal base plate downwardly and outwardly into the earth.

  13. Heat dissipating nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, A.; Lazarus, J.D.

    1985-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment adapted to retain and cool core debris in the unlikely event of a core meltdown and subsequent breach in the reactor vessel. The reactor vessel is seated in a cavity which has a thick metal sidewall that is integral with a thick metal basemat at the bottom of the cavity. The basemat extends beyond the perimeter of the cavity sidewall. Underneath the basemat is a porous bed with water pipes and steam pipes running into it. Water is introduced into the bed and converted into steam which is vented to the atmosphere. A plurality of metal pilings in the form of H-beams extend from the metal base plate downwardly and outwardly into the earth.

  14. A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Charges Relating to Nuclear Reactor Safety," 1976, availableissues impor tant to nuclear reactor safety. This report wasstudies of overall nuclear reactor safety have been

  15. Nuclear reactor sealing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEdwards, James A. (Calabasas, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor sealing system. The nuclear reactor includes a vessel sealed at its upper end by a closure head. The closure head comprises at least two components, one of which is rotatable; and the two components define an annulus therebetween. The sealing system includes at least a first and second inflatable seal disposed in series in an upper portion of the annulus. The system further includes a dip seal extending into a body of insulation located adjacent a bottom portion of the closure head. The dip seal comprises a trough formed by a lower portion of one of the components, and a seal blade pendently supported from the other component and extending downwardly into the trough. A body of liquid metal is contained in the trough which submerges a portion of the seal blade. The seal blade is provided with at least one aperture located above the body of liquid metal for providing fluid communication between the annulus intermediate the dip seal and the inflatable seals, and a body of cover gas located inside the vessel. There also is provided means for introducing a purge gas into the annulus intermediate the inflatable seals and the seal blade. The purge gas is introduced in an amount sufficient to substantially reduce diffusion of radioactive cover gas or sodium vapor up to the inflatable seals. The purge gas mixes with the cover gas in the reactor vessel where it can be withdrawn from the vessel for treatment and recycle to the vessel.

  16. Reduction of the Radiotoxicity of Spent Nuclear Fuel Using a Two-Tiered System Comprising Light Water Reactors and Accelerator-Driven Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H.R. Trellue

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two main issues regarding the disposal of spent nuclear fuel from nuclear reactors in the United States in the geological repository Yucca Mountain are: (1) Yucca Mountain is not designed to hold the amount of fuel that has been and is proposed to be generated in the next few decades, and (2) the radiotoxicity (i.e., biological hazard) of the waste (particularly the actinides) does not decrease below that of natural uranium ore for hundreds of thousands of years. One solution to these problems may be to use transmutation to convert the nuclides in spent nuclear fuel to ones with shorter half-lives. Both reactor and accelerator-based systems have been examined in the past for transmutation; there are advantages and disadvantages associated with each. By using existing Light Water Reactors (LWRs) to burn a majority of the plutonium in spent nuclear fuel and Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADSs) to transmute the remainder of the actinides, the benefits of each type of system can be realized. The transmutation process then becomes more efficient and less expensive. This research searched for the best combination of LWRs with multiple recycling of plutonium and ADSs to transmute spent nuclear fuel from past and projected nuclear activities (assuming little growth of nuclear energy). The neutronic design of each system is examined in detail although thermal hydraulic performance would have to be considered before a final system is designed. The results are obtained using the Monte Carlo burnup code Monteburns, which has been successfully benchmarked for MOX fuel irradiation and compared to other codes for ADS calculations. The best combination of systems found in this research includes 41 LWRs burning mixed oxide fuel with two recycles of plutonium ({approx}40 years operation each) and 53 ADSs to transmute the remainder of the actinides from spent nuclear fuel over the course of 60 years of operation.

  17. Nuclear reactor building

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gou, Perng-Fei (Saratoga, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (Campbell, CA); Barbanti, Giancarlo (Sirtori, IT)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor building for enclosing a nuclear reactor includes a containment vessel having a wetwell disposed therein. The wetwell includes inner and outer walls, a floor, and a roof defining a wetwell pool and a suppression chamber disposed thereabove. The wetwell and containment vessel define a drywell surrounding the reactor. A plurality of vents are disposed in the wetwell pool in flow communication with the drywell for channeling into the wetwell pool steam released in the drywell from the reactor during a LOCA for example, for condensing the steam. A shell is disposed inside the wetwell and extends into the wetwell pool to define a dry gap devoid of wetwell water and disposed in flow communication with the suppression chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the wetwell roof is in the form of a slab disposed on spaced apart support beams which define therebetween an auxiliary chamber. The dry gap, and additionally the auxiliary chamber, provide increased volume to the suppression chamber for improving pressure margin.

  18. Nuclear reactor building

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gou, P.F.; Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

    1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor building for enclosing a nuclear reactor includes a containment vessel having a wetwell disposed therein. The wetwell includes inner and outer walls, a floor, and a roof defining a wetwell pool and a suppression chamber disposed there above. The wetwell and containment vessel define a drywell surrounding the reactor. A plurality of vents are disposed in the wetwell pool in flow communication with the drywell for channeling into the wetwell pool steam released in the drywell from the reactor during a LOCA for example, for condensing the steam. A shell is disposed inside the wetwell and extends into the wetwell pool to define a dry gap devoid of wetwell water and disposed in flow communication with the suppression chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the wetwell roof is in the form of a slab disposed on spaced apart support beams which define there between an auxiliary chamber. The dry gap, and additionally the auxiliary chamber, provide increased volume to the suppression chamber for improving pressure margin. 4 figures.

  19. Nuclear Reactions and Reactor Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onuchic, José

    Nuclear Reactions and Reactor Safety DO NOT LICK We haven't entirely nailed down what element nuclear chain reaction, 1938 #12;Nuclear Chain Reactions Do nuclear chain reactions lead to runaway explosions? or ? -Controlled nuclear chain reactions possible: control energy release/sec -> More

  20. Nuclear reactor safety device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, E.

    1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A safety device is described for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of a thermal excursion. It comprises a laminated strip helically configured to form a tube, said tube being in operative relation to said control rod. The laminated strip is formed of at least two materials having different thermal coefficients of expansion, and is helically configured such that the material forming the outer lamina of the tube has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material forming the inner lamina of said tube. In the event of a thermal excursion the laminated strip will tend to curl inwardly so that said tube will increase in length, whereby as said tube increases in length it exerts a force on said control rod to axially reposition said control rod with respect to said core.

  1. Nuclear reactor control assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negron, S.B.

    1991-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an assembly for providing global power control in a nuclear reactor having the core split into two halves. It comprises a disk assembly formed from at least two disks each machined with an identical surface hole pattern such that rotation of one disk relative to the other causes the hole pattern to open or close, the disk assembly being positioned substantially at the longitudinal center of and coaxial with the core halves; and means for rotating at least one of the disks relative to the other.

  2. Nuclear reactor control apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sridhar, B.N.

    1981-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactor core safety rod release apparatus comprises a control rod having a detent notch in the form of an annular peripheral recess at its upper end, a control rod support tube for raising and lowering the control rod under normal conditions, latches pivotally mounted on the control support tube with free ends thereof normally disposed in the recess in the control rod, and cam means for pivoting the latches out of the recess in the control rod when a scram condition occurs. One embodiment of the invention comprises an additonal magnetically-operated latch for releasing the control rod under two different conditions, one involving seismic shock.

  3. Nuclear reactor control apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Bettadapur N. (Cupertino, CA)

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactor core safety rod release apparatus comprises a control rod having a detent notch in the form of an annular peripheral recess at its upper end, a control rod support tube for raising and lowering the control rod under normal conditions, latches pivotally mounted on the control support tube with free ends thereof normally disposed in the recess in the control rod, and cam means for pivoting the latches out of the recess in the control rod when a scram condition occurs. One embodiment of the invention comprises an additional magnetically-operated latch for releasing the control rod under two different conditions, one involving seismic shock.

  4. A domain-specific analysis system for examining nuclear reactor simulation data for light-water and sodium-cooled fast reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billings, Jay Jay; Hull, S Forest; Lingerfelt, Eric J; Wojtowicz, Anna

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building a new generation of fission reactors in the United States presents many technical and regulatory challenges. One important challenge is the need to share and present results from new high-fidelity, high-performance simulations in an easily usable way. Since modern multiscale, multi-physics simulations can generate petabytes of data, they will require the development of new techniques and methods to reduce the data to familiar quantities of interest (e.g., pin powers, temperatures) with a more reasonable resolution and size. Furthermore, some of the results from these simulations may be new quantities for which visualization and analysis techniques are not immediately available in the community and need to be developed. This paper describes a new system for managing high-performance simulation results in a domain-specific way that naturally exposes quantities of interest for light water and sodium-cooled fast reactors. It describes requirements to build such a system and the technical challenges faced...

  5. Nuclear reactor control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cawley, William E. (Phoenix, AZ); Warnick, Robert F. (Pasco, WA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1. In a nuclear reactor incorporating a plurality of columns of tubular fuel elements disposed in horizontal tubes in a mass of graphite wherein water flows through the tubes to cool the fuel elements, the improvement comprising at least one control column disposed in a horizontal tube including fewer fuel elements than in a normal column of fuel elements and tubular control elements disposed at both ends of said control column, and means for varying the horizontal displacement of the control column comprising a winch at the upstream end of the control column and a cable extending through the fuel and control elements and attached to the element at the downstream end of the column.

  6. Nuclear reactor control apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Bettadapur N. (Cupertino, CA)

    1983-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactor safety rod release apparatus comprises a ring which carries detents normally positioned in an annular recess in outer side of the rod, the ring being held against the lower end of a drive shaft by magnetic force exerted by a solenoid carried by the drive shaft. When the solenoid is de-energized, the detent-carrying ring drops until the detents contact a cam surface associated with the lower end of the drive shaft, at which point the detents are cammed out of the recess in the safety rod to release the rod from the drive shaft. In preferred embodiments of the invention, an additional latch is provided to release a lower portion of a safety rod under conditions that may interfere with movement of the entire rod.

  7. Nuclear reactor control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cawley, W.E.; Warnick, R.F.

    1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In a nuclear reactor incorporating a plurality of columns of tubular fuel elements disposed in horizontal tubes in a mass of graphite wherein water flows through the tubes to cool the fuel elements, the improvement comprising at least one control column disposed in a horizontal tube including fewer fuel elements than in a normal column of fuel elements and tubular control elements disposed at both ends of said control column, and means for varying the horizontal displacement of the control column comprising a winch at the upstream end of the control column and a cable extending through the fuel and control elements and attached to the element at the downstream end of the column.

  8. Fast reactors and nuclear nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avrorin, E.N. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center - Zababakhin Institute of Applied Physics, Snezhinsk (Russian Federation); Rachkov, V.I.; Chebeskov, A.N. [State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation - Institute for Physics and Power Engineering, Bondarenko Square, 1, Obninsk, Kaluga region, 249033 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Problems are discussed with regard to nuclear fuel cycle resistance in fast reactors to nuclear proliferation risk due to the potential for use in military programs of the knowledge, technologies and materials gained from peaceful nuclear power applications. Advantages are addressed for fast reactors in the creation of a more reliable mode of nonproliferation in the closed nuclear fuel cycle in comparison with the existing fully open and partially closed fuel cycles of thermal reactors. Advantages and shortcomings are also discussed from the point of view of nonproliferation from the start with fast reactors using plutonium of thermal reactor spent fuel and enriched uranium fuel to the gradual transition using their own plutonium as fuel. (authors)

  9. Teaching About Nature's Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herndon, J M

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Naturally occurring nuclear reactors existed in uranium deposits on Earth long before Enrico Fermi built the first man-made nuclear reactor beneath Staggs Field in 1942. In the story of their discovery, there are important lessons to be learned about scientific inquiry and scientific discovery. Now, there is evidence to suggest that the Earth's magnetic field and Jupiter's atmospheric turbulence are driven by planetary-scale nuclear reactors. The subject of planetocentric nuclear fission reactors can be a jumping off point for stimulating classroom discussions about the nature and implications of planetary energy sources and about the geomagnetic field. But more importantly, the subject can help to bring into focus the importance of discussing, debating, and challenging current thinking in a variety of areas.

  10. Nuclear Reactors and Technology; (USA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. (eds.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

  11. Nuclear reactor control rod

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cearley, J.E.; Izzo, K.R.

    1987-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a vertically oriented bottom entry control rod from a nuclear reactor: a frame including an elongated central spine of cruciform cross section connected between an upper support member and a lower support member both of cruciform shape having four laterally extending arms. The arms are in alignment with the arms of the lower support member and each aligned upper and lower support members has a sheath extending between; absorber plates of neutron absorber material, different from the material of the frame, one of the absorber plates is positioned within a sheath beneath each of the arms; attachment means suspends the absorber plates from the arms of the upper support member within a sheath; elongated absorber members positioned within a sheath between each of the suspended absorber plates and an arm of the lower support member; and joint means between the upper ends of the absorber members and the lower ends of the suspended absorber plates for minimizing gaps; the sheath means encloses the suspended absorber plates and the absorber members extending between aligned arms of the upper and lower support members and secured.

  12. Nuclear Reactor Safety Design Criteria

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes nuclear safety criteria applicable to the design, fabrication, construction, testing, and performance requirements of nuclear reactor facilities and safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) within these facilities. Cancels paragraphs 8a and 8b of DOE 5480.6. Cancels DOE O 5480.6 in part. Certified 11-18-10.

  13. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djurcic, Zelimir

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors Z. Djurcic 1 , ?emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined fromlarge commercial nuclear reactors are playing an important

  14. Nuclear reactor downcomer flow deflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Charles B. (Greensburg, PA); Altman, David A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Singleton, Norman R. (Murrysville, PA)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor having a coolant flow deflector secured to a reactor core barrel in line with a coolant inlet nozzle. The flow deflector redirects incoming coolant down an annulus between the core barrel and the reactor vessel. The deflector has a main body with a front side facing the fluid inlet nozzle and a rear side facing the core barrel. The rear side of the main body has at least one protrusion secured to the core barrel so that a gap exists between the rear side of the main body adjacent the protrusion and the core barrel. Preferably, the protrusion is a relief that circumscribes the rear side of the main body.

  15. Rethinking the light water reactor fuel cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shwageraus, Evgeni, 1973-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The once through nuclear fuel cycle adopted by the majority of countries with operating commercial power reactors imposes a number of concerns. The radioactive waste created in the once through nuclear fuel cycle has to ...

  16. Interdisciplinary Institute for Innovation Nuclear reactors' construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Interdisciplinary Institute for Innovation Nuclear reactors' construction costs: The role of lead@mines-paristech.fr hal-00956292,version1-6Mar2014 #12;hal-00956292,version1-6Mar2014 #12;Nuclear reactors' construction reactor construction costs in France and the United States. Studying the cost of nuclear power has often

  17. Nuclear reactor engineering: Reactor design basics. Fourth edition, Volume One

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This new edition of this classic reference combines broad yet in-depth coverage of nuclear engineering principles with practical descriptions of their application in design and operation of nuclear power plants. Extensively updated, the fourth edition includes new material on reactor safety and risk analysis, regulation, fuel management, waste management, and operational aspects of nuclear power. This volume contains the following: energy from nuclear fission; nuclear reactions and radiations; neutron transport; nuclear design basics; nuclear reactor kinetics and control; radiation protection and shielding; and reactor materials.

  18. Nuclear reactor engineering: Reactor systems engineering. Fourth edition, Volume Two

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This new edition of this classic reference combines broad yet in-depth coverage of nuclear engineering principles with practical descriptions of their application in the design and operation of nuclear power plants. Extensively updated, the fourth edition includes new materials on reactor safety and risk analysis, regulation, fuel management, waste management and operational aspects of nuclear power. This volume contains the following: the systems concept, design decisions, and information tools; energy transport; reactor fuel management and energy cost considerations; environmental effects of nuclear power and waste management; nuclear reactor safety and regulation; power reactor systems; plant operations; and advanced plants and the future.

  19. Zircaloy performance in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, R.B.; Cheng, B.C.; Kruger, R.M. [GE Nuclear Energy, Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Zircaloy has been successfully used as the primary light water reactor (LWR) core structural material since its introduction in the early days of the US naval nuclear program. Its unique combination of low neutron absorption cross section, fabricability, mechanical strength, and corrosion resistance in water and steam near 300{degrees}C has resulted in remarkable reliability of operation of pressurized and boiling water reactor (PWR, BWR) fuel through the years. At present time, BWRs use Zircaloy-2 and PWRs use Zircaloy-4 for fuel cladding. In BWRs, both Zircaloy-2 and -4 have been successfully used for spacer grids and channels, and in PWRs Zircaloy-4 is used for spacer grids and control rod guide tubes. Performance of fuel rods has been excellent thus far. The current trend for utilities worldwide is to expect both higher fuel reliability in the future. Fuel suppliers have already achieved extended exposures in lead use assemblies, and have demonstrated excellent performance in all areas; therefore unsuspected problems are not likely to arise. However, as exposure and expectations continue to increase, Zircaloy is being taken toward the limits of its known capabilities. This paper reviews Zircaloy performance capabilities in areas related to environmentally affected microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and dimensional stability. The effects of radiation and reactor environment on each property is illustrated with data, micrographs, and analysis.

  20. Propellant actuated nuclear reactor steam depressurization valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ehrke, Alan C. (San Jose, CA); Knepp, John B. (San Jose, CA); Skoda, George I. (Santa Clara, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear fission reactor combined with a propellant actuated depressurization and/or water injection valve is disclosed. The depressurization valve releases pressure from a water cooled, steam producing nuclear reactor when required to insure the safety of the reactor. Depressurization of the reactor pressure vessel enables gravity feeding of supplementary coolant water through the water injection valve to the reactor pressure vessel to prevent damage to the fuel core.

  1. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

  2. Development of Light Water Reactor Fuels with Enhanced Accident...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Development of Light Water Reactor Fuels with Enhanced Accident Tolerance - Report to Congress Development of Light Water Reactor Fuels with Enhanced Accident Tolerance - Report to...

  3. Review of light water reactor safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, H.S.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the present status of light water reactor (LWR) safety is presented. The review starts with a brief discussion of the outstanding accident scenarios concerning LWRs. Where possible the areas of present technological uncertainties are stressed. To provide a better perspective of reactor safety, it then reviews the probabilistic assessment of the outstanding LWR accidents considered in the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400) and discusses the potential impact of the present technological uncertainties on WASH-1400.

  4. Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bollinger, Lawrence R. (Schenectady, NY)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor comprises supports stacked above reactor core for holding control rods. Couplers associated with the supports and a vertically movable drive shaft have lugs at their lower ends for engagement with the supports.

  5. Shielding analysis for the 300 area light water reactor spent nuclear fuel within a modified multi-canister overpack canister in a modified multi-canister overpack cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gedeon, S.R.

    1997-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent light water reactor fuel is to be moved out of the 324 Building. It is anticipated that intact fuel assemblies will be loaded in a modified Multi-Canister Overpack Canister, which in turn will be placed in an Overpack Transportation Cask. An estimate of gamma ray dose rates from a transportation cask is desired.

  6. Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Initiative Science-Based R&D to Extend Nuclear Plant Operation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1, 1999InspectionsAnnual Financial Report |ProgramsfromLight

  7. Nuclear reactor multiphysics via bond graph formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sosnovsky, Eugeny

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work proposes a simple and effective approach to modeling nuclear reactor multiphysics problems using bond graphs. Conventional multiphysics simulation paradigms normally use operator splitting, which treats the ...

  8. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY11 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Johansen

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary report for Fiscal Year 2011 activities associated with the Constellation Pilot Project. The project is a joint effor between Constellation Nuclear Energy Group (CENG), EPRI, and the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The project utilizes two CENG reactor stations: R.E. Ginna and Nine Point Unit 1. Included in the report are activities associate with reactor internals and concrete containments.

  9. A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Power Reactors PROTECTION AGAINST SABOTAGE Protection Against Industrial Sabotage I1C-4 Decominarion and Decommissioning

  10. Simulated nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berta, Victor T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for electrically simulating a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It includes a heater assembly having a top end and a bottom end and a plurality of concentric heater tubes having electrical circuitry connected to a power source, and radially spaced from each other. An outer target tube and an inner target tube is concentric with the heater tubes and with each other, and the outer target tube surrounds and is radially spaced from the heater tubes. The inner target tube is surrounded by and radially spaced from the heater tubes and outer target tube. The top of the assembly is generally open to allow for the electrical power connection to the heater tubes, and the bottom of the assembly includes means for completing the electrical circuitry in the heater tubes to provide electrical resistance heating to simulate the power profile in a nuclear reactor. The embedded conductor elements in each heater tube is split into two halves for a substantial portion of its length and provided with electrical isolation such that each half of the conductor is joined at one end and is not joined at the other end.

  11. Simulated nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berta, V.T.

    1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for electrically simulating a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It includes a heater assembly having a top end and a bottom end and a plurality of concentric heater tubes having electrical circuitry connected to a power source, and radially spaced from each other. An outer target tube and an inner target tube is concentric with the heater tubes and with each other, and the outer target tube surrounds and is radially spaced from the heater tubes. The inner target tube is surrounded by and radially spaced from the heater tubes and outer target tube. The top of the assembly is generally open to allow for the electrical power connection to the heater tubes, and the bottom of the assembly includes means for completing the electrical circuitry in the heater tubes to provide electrical resistance heating to simulate the power profile in a nuclear reactor. The embedded conductor elements in each heater tube is split into two halves for a substantial portion of its length and provided with electrical isolation such that each half of the conductor is joined at one end and is not joined at the other end.

  12. APPLICATION OF DATA ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES TO NUCLEAR REACTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunz, Robert Francis

    1 APPLICATION OF DATA ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES TO NUCLEAR REACTOR SYSTEMS CODE ACCURACY ASSESSMENT) has been developed by the authors to provide quantitative comparisons between nuclear reactor systems. 1. INTRODUCTION In recent years, the commercial nuclear reactor industry has focused significant

  13. Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor - Rev. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Gail Lynn; Mc Cardell, Richard Keith; Illum, Douglas Brent

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was developed by Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to demonstrate the potential of a water-cooled, thorium oxide fuel cycle breeder reactor. The LWBR core operated from 1977-82 without major incident. The fuel and fuel components suffered minimal damage during operation, and the reactor testing was deemed successful. Extensive destructive and nondestructive postirradiation examinations confirmed that the fuel was in good condition with minimal amounts of cladding deformities and fuel pellet cracks. Fuel was placed in wet storage upon arrival at the Expended Core Facility, then dried and sent to the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center for underground dry storage. It is likely that the fuel remains in good condition at its current underground dry storage location at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Reports show no indication of damage to the core associated with shipping, loading, or storage.

  14. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, Kathryn A. [INL; Busby, Jeremy [ORNL; Hallbert, Bruce [INL; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon [INL; Smith, Curtis [INL; Barnard, Cathy [INL

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  15. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Griffith; Robert Youngblood; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Cathy Barnard; Kathryn McCarthy

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline - even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans.

  16. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn McCarthy; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Curtis Smith; Cathy Barnard

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  17. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  18. Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, L W; Moody, K J; Bradley, K S; Lorenzana, H E

    2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount, and we posit that the exploration, development, and implementation of intrinsic mechanisms such as discussed here are part of a balanced approach aimed at preventing the misuse of nuclear material for nuclear-energy applications.

  19. Physics-based multiscale coupling for full core nuclear reactor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    multiscale coupling for full core nuclear reactor simulation Numerical simulation of nuclear reactors is a key technology in the quest for improvements in efficiency, safety,...

  20. SciTech Connect: Fundamental aspects of nuclear reactor fuel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fundamental aspects of nuclear reactor fuel elements Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fundamental aspects of nuclear reactor fuel elements You are accessing a document...

  1. Digital computer operation of a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colley, Robert W. (Richland, WA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for the safe operation of a complex system such as a nuclear reactor using a digital computer. The computer is supplied with a data base containing a list of the safe state of the reactor and a list of operating instructions for achieving a safe state when the actual state of the reactor does not correspond to a listed safe state, the computer selects operating instructions to return the reactor to a safe state.

  2. Digital computer operation of a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colley, R.W.

    1982-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for the safe operation of a complex system such as a nuclear reactor using a digital computer. The computer is supplied with a data base containing a list of the safe state of the reactor and a list of operating instructions for achieving a safe state when the actual state of the reactor does not correspond to a listed safe state, the computer selects operating instructions to return the reactor to a safe state.

  3. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

  4. Spent nuclear fuel discharges from US reactors 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Nuclear Fuel Data Survey, Form RW-859. This form is used to collect data on fuel assemblies irradiated at commercial nuclear reactors operating in the United States, and the current inventories and storage capacities of those reactors. These data are important to the design and operation of the equipment and facilities that DOE will use for the future acceptance, transportation, and disposal of spent fuels. The data collected and presented identifies trends in burnup, enrichment, and spent nuclear fuel discharged form commercial light-water reactor as of December 31, 1993. The document covers not only spent nuclear fuel discharges; but also site capacities and inventories; canisters and nonfuel components; and assembly type characteristics.

  5. ME 361E Nuclear Reactor Engineering ABET EC2000 syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Yakar, Adela

    ME 361E ­ Nuclear Reactor Engineering Page 1 ABET EC2000 syllabus ME 361E ­ Nuclear Reactor students should be able to: · Compare and contrast numerous nuclear reactor designs · Calculate the effects of nuclear fuel burnup · Summarize the mechanism that affect the control of a nuclear reactor Topics Covered

  6. Nuclear reactor control apparatus. [FBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sridhar, B.N.

    1981-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactor safety rod release apparatus comprises a ring which carries detents normally positioned in an annular recess in outer side of the rod, the ring being held against the lower end of a drive shaft by magnetic force exerted by a solenoid carried by the drive shaft. When the solenoid is de-energized, the detent-carrying ring drops until the detents contact a cam surface associated with the lower end of the drive shaft, at which point the detents are cammed out of the recess in the safety rod to release the rod from the drive shaft. In preferred embodiments of the invention, an additional latch is provided to release a lower portion of a safety rod under conditions that may interfere with movement of the entire rod.

  7. Nuclear reactor internals alignment configuration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Charles B. (Greensburg, PA); Singleton, Norman R. (Murrysville, PA)

    2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An alignment system that employs jacking block assemblies and alignment posts around the periphery of the top plate of a nuclear reactor lower internals core shroud to align an upper core plate with the lower internals and the core shroud with the core barrel. The distal ends of the alignment posts are chamfered and are closely received within notches machined in the upper core plate at spaced locations around the outer circumference of the upper core plate. The jacking block assemblies are used to center the core shroud in the core barrel and the alignment posts assure the proper orientation of the upper core plate. The alignment posts may alternately be formed in the upper core plate and the notches may be formed in top plate.

  8. Nuclear reactor composite fuel assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burgess, Donn M. (Richland, WA); Marr, Duane R. (West Richland, WA); Cappiello, Michael W. (Richland, WA); Omberg, Ronald P. (Richland, WA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A core and composite fuel assembly for a liquid-cooled breeder nuclear reactor including a plurality of elongated coextending driver and breeder fuel elements arranged to form a generally polygonal bundle within a thin-walled duct. The breeder elements are larger in cross section than the driver elements, and each breeder element is laterally bounded by a number of the driver elements. Each driver element further includes structure for spacing the driver elements from adjacent fuel elements and, where adjacent, the thin-walled duct. A core made up of the fuel elements can advantageously include fissile fuel of only one enrichment, while varying the effective enrichment of any given assembly or core region, merely by varying the relative number and size of the driver and breeder elements.

  9. Raytheon explores thorium for next generation nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, M.

    1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Few new orders for nuclear power plants have been placed anywhere in the world in the last 20 years, but that is not discouraging Raytheon Engineers Constructors from making plans to explore new light water reactor technologies for commercial markets. The Lexington, Mass.-based company, which has extensive experience in nuclear power engineering and construction, has a vision for the light water reactor of the future - one that is based on the use of thorium-232, an element that decays over several steps to uranium-233. The use of thorium and a small amount of uranium that is 20 percent enriched is seen as providing operational, environmental, and safety advantages over reactors using the standard fuel mixture of uranium-238 and enriched uranium-235. According to Raytheon, the system could improve the economics of some reactors' operations by reducing fuel costs and lowering related waste volumes. At the same time, reactor safety could be improved by simpler control rod systems and the absence from reactor coolant of corrosive boric acid, which is used to slow neutrons in order to enhance reactions. Using thorium is also attractive because more of the fuel is burned up by the reactor, an estimated 12 percent as compared to about 4 percent for U-235. However, the technology's greatest attraction may well be its implications for nuclear proliferation. Growing plutonium inventories embedded in spent fuel rods from light water reactors have sparked concern worldwide. But according to Raytheon, using a thorium-based fuel core would alleviate this concern because it would produce only small quantities of plutonium. A thorium-based fuel system would produce 12 kilograms of plutonium over a decade versus 2,235 kilograms for an equivalent reactor operating with conventional uranium fuel.

  10. Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Illum, D.B.; Olson, G.L.; McCardell, R.K.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was a small water cooled, U-233/Th-232 cycle breeder reactor developed by the Pittsburgh Naval Reactors to improve utilization of the nation's nuclear fuel resources in light water reactors. The LWBR was operated at Shippingport Atomic Power Station (APS), which was a Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly Atomic Energy Commission)-owned reactor plant. Shippingport APS was the first large-scale, central-station nuclear power plant in the United States and the first plant of such size in the world operated solely to produce electric power. The Shippingport LWBR was operated successfully from 1977 to 1982 at the APS. During the five years of operation, the LWBR generated more than 29,000 effective full power hours (EFPH) of energy. After final shutdown, the 39 core modules of the LWBR were shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) at Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). At ECF, 12 of the 39 modules were dismantled and about 1000 of more than 17,000 rods were removed from the modules of proof-of-breeding and fuel performance testing. Some of the removed rods were kept at ECF, some were sent to Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in Idaho and some to ANL-East in Chicago for a variety of physical, chemical and radiological examinations. All rods and rod sections remaining after the experiments were shipped back to ECF, where modules and loose rods were repackaged in liners for dry storage. In a series of shipments, the liners were transported from ECF to Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The 47 liners containing the fully-rodded and partially-derodded core modules, the loose rods, and the rod scraps, are now stored in underground dry wells at CPP-749.

  11. Systems Issues in Nuclear Reactor Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Systems Issues in Nuclear Reactor Safety Commissioner George ApostolakisCommissioner George Apostolakis U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission CmrApostolakis@nrc.gov MIT SDM Conference on Systems Thinking, source, and special nuclear materials to ensure adequate protection of public health and safety, 3

  12. Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotlyar, Oleg M. (Idaho Falls, ID); West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast-acting nuclear reactor control device for moving and positioning a fety control rod to desired positions within the core of the reactor between a run position in which the safety control rod is outside the reactor core, and a shutdown position in which the rod is fully inserted in the reactor core. The device employs a hydraulic pump/motor, an electric gear motor, and solenoid valve to drive the safety control rod into the reactor core through the entire stroke of the safety control rod. An overrunning clutch allows the safety control rod to freely travel toward a safe position in the event of a partial drive system failure.

  13. Shutdown system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Groh, E.F.; Olson, A.P.; Wade, D.C.; Robinson, B.W.

    1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultimate shutdown system is provided for termination of neutronic activity in a nuclear reactor. The shutdown system includes bead chains comprising spherical containers suspended on a flexible cable. The containers are comprised of mating hemispherical shells which provide a ruggedized enclosure for reactor poison material. The bead chains, normally suspended above the reactor core on storage spools, are released for downward travel upon command from an external reactor monitor. The chains are capable of horizontal movement, so as to flow around obstructions in the reactor during their downward motion. 8 figs.

  14. Shutdown system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Groh, Edward F. (Naperville, IL); Olson, Arne P. (Western Springs, IL); Wade, David C. (Naperville, IL); Robinson, Bryan W. (Oak Lawn, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultimate shutdown system is provided for termination of neutronic activity in a nuclear reactor. The shutdown system includes bead chains comprising spherical containers suspended on a flexible cable. The containers are comprised of mating hemispherical shells which provide a ruggedized enclosure for reactor poison material. The bead chains, normally suspended above the reactor core on storage spools, are released for downward travel upon command from an external reactor monitor. The chains are capable of horizontal movement, so as to flow around obstructions in the reactor during their downward motion.

  15. Nuclear reactor safeguards and monitoring with antineutrino detectors A. Bernsteina)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gratta, Giorgio

    Nuclear reactor safeguards and monitoring with antineutrino detectors A. Bernsteina) Sandia of nuclear reactor types, including power reactors, research reactors, and plutonium production reactors-understood principles that govern the core's evolution in time, can be used to determine whether the reactor is being

  16. Gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peinado, Charles O. (La Jolla, CA); Koutz, Stanley L. (San Diego, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-cooled nuclear reactor includes a central core located in the lower portion of a prestressed concrete reactor vessel. Primary coolant gas flows upward through the core and into four overlying heat-exchangers wherein stream is generated. During normal operation, the return flow of coolant is between the core and the vessel sidewall to a pair of motor-driven circulators located at about the bottom of the concrete pressure vessel. The circulators repressurize the gas coolant and return it back to the core through passageways in the underlying core structure. If during emergency conditions the primary circulators are no longer functioning, the decay heat is effectively removed from the core by means of natural convection circulation. The hot gas rising through the core exits the top of the shroud of the heat-exchangers and flows radially outward to the sidewall of the concrete pressure vessel. A metal liner covers the entire inside concrete surfaces of the concrete pressure vessel, and cooling tubes are welded to the exterior or concrete side of the metal liner. The gas coolant is in direct contact with the interior surface of the metal liner and transfers its heat through the metal liner to the liquid coolant flowing through the cooling tubes. The cooler gas is more dense and creates a downward convection flow in the region between the core and the sidewall until it reaches the bottom of the concrete pressure vessel when it flows radially inward and up into the core for another pass. Water is forced to flow through the cooling tubes to absorb heat from the core at a sufficient rate to remove enough of the decay heat created in the core to prevent overheating of the core or the vessel.

  17. Today and Future Neutrino Experiments at Krasnoyarsk Nuclear Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. V. Kozlov; S. V. Khalturtsev; I. N. Machulin; A. V. Martemyanov; V. P. Martemyanov; A. A. Sabelnikov; V. G. Tarasenkov; E. V. Turbin; V. N. Vyrodov; L. A. Popeko; A. V. Cherny; G. A. Shishkina

    1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of undergoing experiments and new experiment propositions at Krasnoyarsk underground nuclear reactor are presented

  18. Nuclear facilities: criteria for the design and operation of ventilation systems for nuclear installations other than nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear facilities: criteria for the design and operation of ventilation systems for nuclear installations other than nuclear reactors

  19. Perspective unconventional means for nuclear reactor control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ionaitis, R.R.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of reliable shutdown of nuclear reactors demands application of engineering control means on the basis of principles, safety, safe failure, redundancy, independence, variety, defence in depth, and intrinsical safety. This report describes application of control methods.

  20. Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning Nuclear Reactors At Multiple-Reactor Stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittenbrock, N. G.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of large (1175-MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and large (1155-MWe) boiling water reactors {BWRs) at multiple-reactor stations. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). Safety and costs of decommissioning are estimated by determining the impact of probable features of multiple-reactor-station operation that are considered to be unavailable at a single-reactor station, and applying these estimated impacts to the decommissioning costs and radiation doses estimated in previous PWR and BWR decommissioning studies. The multiple-reactor-station features analyzed are: the use of interim onsite nuclear waste storage with later removal to an offsite nuclear waste disposal facility, the use of permanent onsite nuclear waste disposal, the dedication of the site to nuclear power generation, and the provision of centralized services. Five scenarios for decommissioning reactors at a multiple-reactor station are investigated. The number of reactors on a site is assumed to be either four or ten; nuclear waste disposal is varied between immediate offsite disposal, interim onsite storage, and immediate onsite disposal. It is assumed that the decommissioned reactors are not replaced in one scenario but are replaced in the other scenarios. Centralized service facilities are provided in two scenarios but are not provided in the other three. Decommissioning of a PWR or a BWR at a multiple-reactor station probably will be less costly and result in lower radiation doses than decommissioning an identical reactor at a single-reactor station. Regardless of whether the light water reactor being decommissioned is at a single- or multiple-reactor station: • the estimated occupational radiation dose for decommissioning an LWR is lowest for SAFSTOR and highest for DECON • the estimated cost of decommissioning a PWR is lowest for ENTOMB and highest for SAFSTOR • the estimated cost of decommissioning a BWR is lowest for OECON and highest for SAFSTOR. In all cases, SAFSTOR has the lowest occupational radiation dose and the highest cost.

  1. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djurcic, Zelimir

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reactors are determined from thermal power measure- ments and ?ssion rate calculations.of a reactor’s ther- mal power is given by a calculation ofCALCULATIONS During the power cycle of a nuclear reactor,

  2. Large Scale Weather Control Using Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh-Modgil, M

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is pointed out that controlled release of thermal energy from fission type nuclear reactors can be used to alter weather patterns over significantly large geographical regions. (1) Nuclear heat creates a low pressure region, which can be used to draw moist air from oceans, onto deserts. (2) Creation of low pressure zones over oceans using Nuclear heat can lead to Controlled Cyclone Creation (CCC).(3) Nuclear heat can also be used to melt glaciers and control water flow in rivers.

  3. Large Scale Weather Control Using Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moninder Singh Modgil

    2002-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    It is pointed out that controlled release of thermal energy from fission type nuclear reactors can be used to alter weather patterns over significantly large geographical regions. (1) Nuclear heat creates a low pressure region, which can be used to draw moist air from oceans, onto deserts. (2) Creation of low pressure zones over oceans using Nuclear heat can lead to Controlled Cyclone Creation (CCC).(3) Nuclear heat can also be used to melt glaciers and control water flow in rivers.

  4. Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

  5. Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotlyar, O.M.; West, P.B.

    1993-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast-acting nuclear reactor control device is described for controlling a safety control rod within the core of a nuclear reactor, the reactor controlled by a reactor control system, the device comprising: a safety control rod drive shaft and an electromagnetic clutch co-axial with the drive shaft operatively connected to the safety control rod for driving and positioning the safety control rod within or without the reactor core during reactor operation, the safety rod being oriented in a substantially vertical position to allow the rod to fall into the reactor core under the influence of gravity during shutdown of the reactor; the safety control rod drive shaft further operatively connected to a hydraulic pump such that operation of the drive shaft simultaneously drives and positions the safety control rod and operates the hydraulic pump such that a hydraulic fluid is forced into an accumulator, filling the accumulator with oil for the storage and supply of primary potential energy for safety control rod insertion such that the release of potential energy in the accumulator causes hydraulic fluid to flow through the hydraulic pump, converting the hydraulic pump to a hydraulic motor having speed and power capable of full length insertion and high speed driving of the safety control rod into the reactor core; a solenoid valve interposed between the hydraulic pump and the accumulator, said solenoid valve being a normally open valve, actuated to close when the safety control rod is out of the reactor during reactor operation; and further wherein said solenoid opens in response to a signal from the reactor control system calling for shutdown of the reactor and rapid insertion of the safety control rod into the reactor core, such that the opening of the solenoid releases the potential energy in the accumulator to place the safety control rod in a safe shutdown position.

  6. Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharbaugh, John E. (Bullskin Township, Fayette County, PA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat so as to insulate the reactor vessel bottom end wall from the containment structure base mat and allow the reactor vessel bottom end wall to freely expand as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof. Further, a deck is supported upon the side wall of the containment structure above the top open end of the reactor vessel, and a plurality of serially connected extendible and retractable annular bellows extend between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnect the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck. An annular guide ring is disposed on the containment structure and extends between its side wall and the top open end of the reactor vessel for providing lateral support of the reactor vessel top open end by limiting imposition of lateral loads on the annular bellows by the occurrence of a lateral seismic event.

  7. Light-water reactor safety analysis codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, J.F.; Ransom, V.H.; Ybarrondo, L.J.; Liles, D.R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of the evolution of light-water reactor safety analysis codes is presented. Included is a summary comparison of the technical capabilities of major system codes. Three recent codes are described in more detail to serve as examples of currently used techniques. Example comparisons between calculated results using these codes and experimental data are given. Finally, a brief evaluation of current code capability and future development trends is presented.

  8. Heat dissipating nuclear reactor with metal liner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluekler, E.L.; Hunsbedt, A.; Lazarus, J.D.

    1985-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor containment including a reactor vessel disposed within a cavity with capability for complete inherent decay heat removal in the earth and surrounded by a cast steel containment member which surrounds the vessel is described in this disclosure. The member has a thick basemat in contact with metal pilings. The basemat rests on a bed of porous particulate material, into which water is fed to produce steam which is vented to the atmosphere. There is a gap between the reactor vessel and the steel containment member. The containment member holds any sodium or core debris escaping from the reactor vessel if the core melts and breaches the vessel.

  9. Heat dissipating nuclear reactor with metal liner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluekler, Emil L. (San Jose, CA); Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Lazarus, Jonathan D. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment including a reactor vessel disposed within a cavity with capability for complete inherent decay heat removal in the earth and surrounded by a cast steel containment member which surrounds the vessel. The member has a thick basemat in contact with metal pilings. The basemat rests on a bed of porous particulate material, into which water is fed to produce steam which is vented to the atmosphere. There is a gap between the reactor vessel and the steel containment member. The containment member holds any sodium or core debris escaping from the reactor vessel if the core melts and breaches the vessel.

  10. Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor. [LMFBR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bollinger, L.R.

    1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention, which resulted from a contact with the United States Department of Energy, relates to a control mechanism for a nuclear reactor and, more particularly, to an assembly for selectively shifting different numbers of reactivity modifying rods into and out of the core of a nuclear reactor. It has been proposed heretofore to control the reactivity of a breeder reactor by varying the depth of insertion of control rods (e.g., rods containing a fertile material such as ThO/sub 2/) in the core of the reactor, thereby varying the amount of neutron-thermalizing coolant and the amount of neutron-capturing material in the core. This invention relates to a mechanism which can advantageously be used in this type of reactor control system.

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of Reprocessing Cooling Times on Light Water Reactor and Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. M. Ferrer; S. Bays; M. Pope

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the effects of variations of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and fast reactor reprocessing cooling time on a Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) assuming a single-tier fuel cycle scenario. The results from this study show the effects of different cooling times on the SFR’s transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR) and transuranic fuel enrichment. Also, the decay heat, gamma heat and neutron emission of the SFR’s fresh fuel charge were evaluated. A 1000 MWth commercial-scale SFR design was selected as the baseline in this study. Both metal and oxide CR=0.50 SFR designs are investigated.

  12. Multi-Applications Small Light Water Reactor - NERI Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Michale Modro; James E. Fisher; Kevan D. Weaver; Jose N. Reyes, Jr.; John T. Groome; Pierre Babka; Thomas M. Carlson

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) project was conducted under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary project objectives were to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate the technical feasibility by testing in an integral test facility. This report presents the results of the project. After an initial exploratory and evolutionary process, as documented in the October 2000 report, the project focused on developing a modular reactor design that consists of a self-contained assembly with a reactor vessel, steam generators, and containment. These modular units would be manufactured at a single centralized facility, transported by rail, road, and/or ship, and installed as a series of self-contained units. This approach also allows for staged construction of an NPP and ''pull and replace'' refueling and maintenance during each five-year refueling cycle.

  13. Materials Inventory Database for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazi Ahmed; Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific research involves the purchasing, processing, characterization, and fabrication of many sample materials. The history of such materials can become complicated over their lifetime – materials might be cut into pieces or moved to various storage locations, for example. A database with built-in functions to track these kinds of processes facilitates well-organized research. The Material Inventory Database Accounting System (MIDAS) is an easy-to-use tracking and reference system for such items. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS), which seeks to advance the long-term reliability and productivity of existing nuclear reactors in the United States through multiple research pathways, proposed MIDAS as an efficient way to organize and track all items used in its research. The database software ensures traceability of all items used in research using built-in functions which can emulate actions on tracked items – fabrication, processing, splitting, and more – by performing operations on the data. MIDAS can recover and display the complete history of any item as a simple report. To ensure the database functions suitably for the organization of research, it was developed alongside a specific experiment to test accident tolerant nuclear fuel cladding under the LWRS Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels Pathway. MIDAS kept track of materials used in this experiment from receipt at the laboratory through all processes, test conduct and, ultimately, post-test analysis. By the end of this process, the database proved to be right tool for this program. The database software will help LWRS more efficiently conduct research experiments, from simple characterization tests to in-reactor experiments. Furthermore, MIDAS is a universal tool that any other research team could use to organize their material inventory.

  14. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Paul Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  15. Optimally moderated nuclear fission reactor and fuel source therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ougouag, Abderrafi M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Terry, William K. (Shelley, ID); Gougar, Hans D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved nuclear fission reactor of the continuous fueling type involves determining an asymptotic equilibrium state for the nuclear fission reactor and providing the reactor with a moderator-to-fuel ratio that is optimally moderated for the asymptotic equilibrium state of the nuclear fission reactor; the fuel-to-moderator ratio allowing the nuclear fission reactor to be substantially continuously operated in an optimally moderated state.

  16. White paper report on using nuclear reactors to search for a value of theta13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PAPER REPORT on Using Nuclear Reactors to Search for a valuetimely new experiment at a nuclear reactor sensitive to theand judicious choice of a nuclear reactor. The dominant

  17. Design and Transient Analysis of Passive Safety Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galvez, Cristhian

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L. J. Hamilton Nuclear Reactor Analysis John Wiley and Sons,R. J. Neuhold, Introductury Nuclear Reactor Dynamics. ANSL. J. Hamilton Nuclear Reactor Analysis John Wiley and Sons,

  18. Nuclear Safeguards Considerations For The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip Casey Durst; David Beddingfield; Brian Boyer; Robert Bean; Michael Collins; Michael Ehinger; David Hanks; David L. Moses; Lee Refalo

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature reactors (HTRs) have been considered since the 1940s, and have been constructed and demonstrated in the United Kingdom (Dragon), United States (Peach Bottom and Fort Saint Vrain), Japan (HTTR), Germany (AVR and THTR-300), and have been the subject of conceptual studies in Russia (VGM). The attraction to these reactors is that they can use a variety of reactor fuels, including abundant thorium, which upon reprocessing of the spent fuel can produce fissile U-233. Hence, they could extend the stocks of available uranium, provided the fuel is reprocessed. Another attractive attribute is that HTRs typically operate at a much higher temperature than conventional light water reactors (LWRs), because of the use of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coated (TRISO) fuel particles embedded in ceramic graphite. Rather than simply discharge most of the unused heat from the working fluid in the power plant to the environment, engineers have been designing reactors for 40 years to recover this heat and make it available for district heating or chemical conversion plants. Demonstrating high-temperature nuclear energy conversion was the purpose behind Fort Saint Vrain in the United States, THTR-300 in Germany, HTTR in Japan, and HTR-10 and HTR-PM, being built in China. This resulted in nuclear reactors at least 30% or more thermodynamically efficient than conventional LWRs, especially if the waste heat can be effectively utilized in chemical processing plants. A modern variant of high temperature reactors is the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Originally developed in the United States and Germany, it is now being redesigned and marketed by the Republic of South Africa and China. The team examined historical high temperature and high temperature gas reactors (HTR and HTGR) and reviewed safeguards considerations for this reactor. The following is a preliminary report on this topic prepared under the ASA-100 Advanced Safeguards Project in support of the NNSA Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI).

  19. Synergistic Smart Fuel For In-pile Nuclear Reactor Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Randall A. Ali; Steven L . Garrett

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 2011, an earthquake of magnitude 9.0 on the Richter scale struck Japan with its epicenter on the northeast coast, near the Tohoku region. In addition to the immense physical destruction and casualties across the country, several nuclear power plants (NPP) were affected. It was the Fukushima Daiichi NPP that experienced the most severe and irreversible damage. The earthquake brought the reactors at Fukushima to an automatic shutdown and because the power transmission lines were damaged, emergency diesel generators (EDGs) were activated to ensure that there was continued cooling of the reactors and spent fuel pools. The situation was being successfully managed until the tsunami hit about forty-five minutes later with a maximum wave height of approximately 15 m. The influx of water submerged the EDGs, the electrical switchgear, and dc batteries, resulting in the total loss of power to the reactors.2 At this point, the situation became critical. There was a loss of the sensors and instrumentation within the reactor that could have provided valuable information to guide the operators to make informed decisions and avoid the unfortunate events that followed. In the light of these events, we have developed and tested a potential self-powered thermoacoustic system, which will have the ability to serve as a temperature sensor and can transmit data independently of electronic networks. Such a device is synergistic with the harsh environment of the nuclear reactor as it utilizes the heat from the nuclear fuel to provide the input power.

  20. Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotlyar, O.M.; West, P.B.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention consists of a fast-acting nuclear reactor control device for moving and positioning a safety control rod to desired elevations within the core of the reactor between a run position in which the safety control rod is outside the reactor core, and a shutdown position in which the rod is fully inserted in the reactor core. The device employs a hydraulic pump motor, an electric gear motor, and a solenoid valve to drive the safety control rod into the reactor core through the entire stroke of the safety control rod. An overrunning clutch, allows the safety control rod to freely travel toward a safe position in the event of a partial drive system failure.

  1. Nuclear reactor fissile isotopes antineutrino spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Sinev

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Positron spectrum from inverse beta decay reaction on proton was measured in 1988-1990 as a result of neutrino exploration experiment. The measured spectrum has the largest statistics and lowest energy threshold between other neutrino experiments made that time at nuclear reactors. On base of the positron spectrum the standard antineutrino spectrum for typical reactor fuel composition was restored. In presented analysis the partial spectra forming this standard spectrum were extracted using specific method. They could be used for neutrino experiments data analysis made at any fuel composition of reactor core.

  2. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production, Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Project 2001-001, Westinghouse Electric Co. Grant Number: DE-FG07-02SF22533, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip E. MacDonald

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the six reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation IV program. SCWRs are promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% versus about 33% efficiency for current Light Water Reactors [LWRs]) and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs are basically LWRs operating at higher pressure and temperatures with a direct once-through cycle. Operation above the critical pressure eliminates coolant boiling, so the coolant remains single-phase throughout the system. Thus, the need for a pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators, and dryers is eliminated. The main mission of the SCWR is generation of low-cost electricity. It is built upon two proven technologies: LWRs, which are the most commonly deployed power generating reactors in the world, and supercritical fossil-fired boilers, a large number of which are also in use around the world. The reference SCWR design for the U.S. program is a direct cycle system operating at 25.0 MPa, with core inlet and outlet temperatures of 280 and 500 C, respectively. The coolant density decreases from about 760 kg/m3 at the core inlet to about 90 kg/m3 at the core outlet. The inlet flow splits with about 10% of the inlet flow going down the space between the core barrel and the reactor pressure vessel (the downcomer) and about 90% of the inlet flow going to the plenum at the top of the rector pressure vessel, to then flow down through the core in special water rods to the inlet plenum. Here it mixes with the feedwater from the downcomer and flows upward to remove the heat in the fuel channels. This strategy is employed to provide good moderation at the top of the core. The coolant is heated to about 500 C and delivered to the turbine. The purpose of this NERI project was to assess the reference U.S. Generation IV SCWR design and explore alternatives to determine feasibility. The project was organized into three tasks: Task 1. Fuel-cycle Neutronic Analysis and Reactor Core Design Task 2. Fuel Cladding and Structural Material Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Task 3. Plant Engineering and Reactor Safety Analysis. moderator rods. materials.

  3. Theta 13 Determination with Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Dalnoki-Veress

    2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently there has been a lot of interest around the world in the use of nuclear reactors to measure theta 13, the last undetermined angle in the 3-neutrino mixing scenario. In this paper the motivations for theta 13 measurement using short baseline nuclear reactor experiments are discussed. The features of such an experiment are described in the context of Double Chooz, which is a new project planned to start data-taking in 2008, and to reach a sensitivity of sinsq(2 theta 13) < 0.03.

  4. 22.312 Engineering of Nuclear Reactors, Fall 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todreas, Neil E.

    Engineering principles of nuclear reactors, emphasizing power reactors. Power plant thermodynamics, reactor heat generation and removal (single-phase as well as two-phase coolant flow and heat transfer), and structural ...

  5. 22.312 Engineering of Nuclear Reactors, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buongiorno, Jacopo, 1971-

    Engineering principles of nuclear reactors, emphasizing power reactors. Power plant thermodynamics, reactor heat generation and removal (single-phase as well as two-phase coolant flow and heat transfer), and structural ...

  6. NUCLEAR POWER AND RESEARCH REACTORS 1939 1942 1943 1944

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    #12;#12;11 #12;2 NUCLEAR POWER AND RESEARCH REACTORS 1939 1942 1943 1944 Nuclear fission discovered Oak Ridge selected as site for World War II Manhattan Project First sustained and controlled nuclear 430 nuclear power reactors are operating in the world, and 103 nuclear power plants produce 20

  7. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Newsletter Rebecca Smith-Kevern

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rebecca Smith-Kevern Director, Office of Light Water Reactor Technologies. I am often asked why the Federal Government should fund a program that supports the continued operation...

  8. Breeding nuclear fuels with accelerators: replacement for breeder reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grand, P.; Takahashi, H.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One application of high energy particle accelerators has been, and still is, the production of nuclear fuel for the nuclear energy industry; tantalizing because it would create a whole new industry. This approach to producing fissile from fertile material was first considered in the early 1950's in the context of the nuclear weapons program. A considerable development effort was expended before discovery of uranium ore in New Mexico put an end to the project. Later, US commitment to the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR) killed any further interest in pursuing accelerator breeder technology. Interest in the application of accelerators to breed nuclear fuels, and possibly burn nuclear wastes, revived in the late 1970's, when the LMFBR came under attack during the Carter administration. This period gave the opportunity to revisit the concept in view of the present state of the technology. This evaluation and the extensive calculational modeling of target designs that have been carried out are promising. In fact, a nuclear fuel cycle of Light Water Reactors and Accelerator Breeders is competitive to that of the LMFBR. At this time, however, the relative abundance of uranium reserves vs electricity demand and projected growth rate render this study purely academic. It will be for the next generation of accelerator builders to demonstate the competitiveness of this technology versus that of other nuclear fuel cycles, such as LMFBR's or Fusion Hybrid systems. 22 references, 1 figure, 5 tables.

  9. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Handling of Beyond Design Basis Events for Nuclear Power Reactors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Bill Reckley, Chief, Policy and Support Branch, Japan Lessons-Learned Project Directorate, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  10. Technologies for Upgrading Light Water Reactor Outlet Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel S. Wendt; Piyush Sabharwall; Vivek Utgikar

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear energy could potentially be utilized in hybrid energy systems to produce synthetic fuels and feedstocks from indigenous carbon sources such as coal and biomass. First generation nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) technology will most likely be based on conventional light water reactors (LWRs). However, these LWRs provide thermal energy at temperatures of approximately 300°C, while the desired temperatures for many chemical processes are much higher. In order to realize the benefits of nuclear hybrid energy systems with the current LWR reactor fleets, selection and development of a complimentary temperature upgrading technology is necessary. This paper provides an initial assessment of technologies that may be well suited toward LWR outlet temperature upgrading for powering elevated temperature industrial and chemical processes during periods of off-peak power demand. Chemical heat transformers (CHTs) are a technology with the potential to meet LWR temperature upgrading requirements for NHESs. CHTs utilize chemical heat of reaction to change the temperature at which selected heat sources supply or consume thermal energy. CHTs could directly utilize LWR heat output without intermediate mechanical or electrical power conversion operations and the associated thermodynamic losses. CHT thermal characteristics are determined by selection of the chemical working pair and operating conditions. This paper discusses the chemical working pairs applicable to LWR outlet temperature upgrading and the CHT operating conditions required for providing process heat in NHES applications.

  11. Current Abstracts Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bales, J.D.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  12. Nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bilibin, Konstantin (North Hollywood, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature responsive, self-actuated nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly 10. The upper end 18 of a lower drive line 17 fits within the lower end of an upper drive line 12. The lower end (not shown) of the lower drive line 17 is connected to a neutron absorber. During normal temperature conditions the lower drive line 17 is supported by detent means 22,26. When an overtemperature condition occurs thermal actuation means 34 urges ring 26 upwardly sufficiently to allow balls 22 to move radially outwardly thereby allowing lower drive line 17 to move downwardly toward the core of the nuclear reactor resulting in automatic reduction of the reactor powder.

  13. Three Investment Scenarios for Future Nuclear Reactors in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Three Investment Scenarios for Future Nuclear Reactors in Europe Bianka SHOAI TEHRANI CEA nuclear reactors within a few decades (2040), several events and drivers could question this possibility or detrimental to future nuclear reactors compared with other technologies and according to four main investment

  14. ARTIGO INTERNET Professores visitam o maior reactor de Fuso Nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    ARTIGO INTERNET Professores visitam o maior reactor de Fusão Nuclear in http reactor de Fusão Nuclear Experiência aproxima investigação das futuras gerações Doze professores do ensino secundário visitaram o maior reactor de fusão nuclear da Terra (JET), no Reino Unido, na semana passada

  15. MA50177: Scientific Computing Nuclear Reactor Simulation Generalised Eigenvalue Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    MA50177: Scientific Computing Case Study Nuclear Reactor Simulation ­ Generalised Eigenvalue of a malfunction or of an accident experimentally, the numerical simulation of nuclear reactors is of utmost balance in a nuclear reactor are the two-group neutron diffusion equations -div (K1 u1) + (a,1 + s) u1 = 1

  16. THE ECONOMICS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS: RENAISSANCE OR RELAPSE?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    THE ECONOMICS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS: RENAISSANCE OR RELAPSE? MARK COOPER SENIOR FELLOW FOR ECONOMIC Findings Approach Hope and Hype vs. Reality in Nuclear Reactor Costs The Economic Cost of Low Carbon. INTRODUCTION 10 A. The Troubling History of Nuclear Reactor Costs B. Purpose and Outline II. THE STRUCTURE

  17. Nuclear reactor alignment plate configuration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Altman, David A; Forsyth, David R; Smith, Richard E; Singleton, Norman R

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An alignment plate that is attached to a core barrel of a pressurized water reactor and fits within slots within a top plate of a lower core shroud and upper core plate to maintain lateral alignment of the reactor internals. The alignment plate is connected to the core barrel through two vertically-spaced dowel pins that extend from the outside surface of the core barrel through a reinforcement pad and into corresponding holes in the alignment plate. Additionally, threaded fasteners are inserted around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad and into the alignment plate to further secure the alignment plate to the core barrel. A fillet weld also is deposited around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad. To accomodate thermal growth between the alignment plate and the core barrel, a gap is left above, below and at both sides of one of the dowel pins in the alignment plate holes through with the dowel pins pass.

  18. REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL ISSUES FOR THE LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Odette, George Robert [UCSB

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Plan is a collaborative program between the U.S. Department of Energy and the private sector directed at extending the life of the present generation of nuclear power plants to enable operation to at least 80 years. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is one of the primary components requiring significant research to enable such long-term operation. There are significant issues that need to be addressed to reduce the uncertainties in regulatory application, such as, 1) high neutron fluence/long irradiation times, and flux effects, 2) material variability, 3) high-nickel materials, 4)specimen size effects and the fracture toughness master curve, etc. The first issue is the highest priority to obtain the data and mechanistic understanding to enable accurate, reliable embrittlement predictions at high fluences. This paper discusses the major issues associated with long-time operation of existing RPVs and the LWRSP plans to address those issues.

  19. Cerenkov Light

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

  20. Cerenkov Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

  1. advanced light reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Light-to-surface distances overwhelm Gordon, Scott 11 Conceptual Design of a Large, Passive Pressure-Tube Light Water Reactor MIT - DSpace Summary: A design for a large,...

  2. CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronen, Y.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described. Volume II: Monte Carlo Calculations for Nuclear Reactors. In-Core Management of Four Reactor Types. In-Core Management in CANDU-PHW Reactors. Reactor Dynamics. The Theory of Neutron Leakage in Reactor Lattices. Index.

  3. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Shropshire

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  4. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E. [and others

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from April 1995 to December 1995. Topics that have been investigated include fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, EAC of Alloy 600 and 690, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic steels in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in simulated LWR environments. Effects of fluoride-ion contamination on susceptibility to intergranular cracking of high- and commercial- purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-tensile tests at 288 degrees Centigrade. Microchemical changes in the specimens were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials.

  5. Research in nondestructive evaluation techniques for nuclear reactor concrete structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Dwight; Smith, Cyrus [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting longterm environmental degradation behavior of material in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess the performance of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) essential to safe and sustained nuclear power plant operations. The understanding of aging-related phenomena and their impacts on SSCs is expected to be a significant issue for any nuclear power plant planning for long-term operations (i.e. service beyond the initial license renewal period). Management of those phenomena and their impacts during long-term operations can be better enable by improved methods and techniques for detection, monitoring, and prediction of SSC degradation. The MAaD Pathway R and D Roadmap for Concrete, 'Light Water Reactor Sustainability Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete Research and Development Roadmap', focused initial research efforts on understanding the recent concrete issues at nuclear power plants and identifying the availability of concrete samples for NDE techniques evaluation and testing. [1] An overview of the research performed by ORNL in these two areas is presented here.

  6. Nuclear reactor control room construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamuro, R.C.; Orr, R.

    1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A control room for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects labelled 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 in the drawing are no less than four inches from walls labelled 10.2. A ceiling contains cooling fins that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates. A concrete slab is poured over the plates. Studs are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete. 6 figures.

  7. Nuclear reactor control room construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamuro, Robert C. (Pittsburgh, PA); Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A control room 10 for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 are no less than four inches from walls 10.2. A ceiling 32 contains cooling fins 35 that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates 34. A concrete slab 33 is poured over the plates. Studs 36 are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete.

  8. DOE fundamentals handbook: Nuclear physics and reactor theory. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Physics and Reactor Theory Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of nuclear physics and reactor theory. The handbook includes information on atomic and nuclear physics; neutron characteristics; reactor theory and nuclear parameters; and the theory of reactor operation. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the scientific principles that are associated with various DOE nuclear facility operations and maintenance.

  9. DOE fundamentals handbook: Nuclear physics and reactor theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Physics and Reactor Theory Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of nuclear physics and reactor theory. The handbook includes information on atomic and nuclear physics; neutron characteristics; reactor theory and nuclear parameters; and the theory of reactor operation. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the scientific principles that are associated with various DOE nuclear facility operations and maintenance.

  10. DOE fundamentals handbook: Nuclear physics and reactor theory. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Physics and Reactor Theory Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of nuclear physics and reactor theory. The handbook includes information on atomic and nuclear physics; neutron characteristics; reactor theory and nuclear parameters; and the theory of reactor operation. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the scientific principles that are associated with various DOE nuclear facility operations and maintenance.

  11. Radioactive target needs for nuclear reactor physics and nuclear astrophysics , G. Barreau1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Radioactive target needs for nuclear reactor physics and nuclear astrophysics B.Jurado1* , G sections of short-lived nuclei are key inputs for new generation nuclear reactor simulations and for models and reactor physics where the demand of nuclear data on unstable nuclei is strong, we describe the general

  12. Method for automatically scramming a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Schultz, Richard R.; Terry, William K.

    2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An automatically scramming nuclear reactor system. One embodiment comprises a core having a coolant inlet end and a coolant outlet end. A cooling system operatively associated with the core provides coolant to the coolant inlet end and removes heated coolant from the coolant outlet end, thus maintaining a pressure differential therebetween during a normal operating condition of the nuclear reactor system. A guide tube is positioned within the core with a first end of the guide tube in fluid communication with the coolant inlet end of the core, and a second end of the guide tube in fluid communication with the coolant outlet end of the core. A control element is positioned within the guide tube and is movable therein between upper and lower positions, and automatically falls under the action of gravity to the lower position when the pressure differential drops below a safe pressure differential.

  13. CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronen, Y.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described. Volume III: Control Rods and Burnable Absorber Calculations. Perturbation Theory for Nuclear Reactor Analysis. Thermal Reactors Calculations. Fast Reactor Calculations. Seed-Blanket Reactors. Index.

  14. Oklo reactors and implications for nuclear science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. D. Davis; C. R. Gould; E. I. Sharapov

    2014-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the nuclear physics interests in the Oklo natural nuclear reactors, focusing particularly on developments over the past two decades. Modeling of the reactors has become increasingly sophisticated, employing Monte Carlo simulations with realistic geometries and materials that can generate both the thermal and epithermal fractions. The water content and the temperatures of the reactors have been uncertain parameters. We discuss recent work pointing to lower temperatures than earlier assumed. Nuclear cross sections are input to all Oklo modeling and we discuss a parameter, the $^{175}$Lu ground state cross section for thermal neutron capture leading to the isomer $^{176\\mathrm{m}}$ Lu, that warrants further investigation. Studies of the time dependence of dimensionless fundamental constants have been a driver for much of the recent work on Oklo. We critically review neutron resonance energy shifts and their dependence on the fine structure constant $\\alpha$ and the ratio $X_q=m_q/\\Lambda$ (where $m_q$ is the average of the $u$ and $d$ current quark masses and $\\Lambda$ is the mass scale of quantum chromodynamics). We suggest a formula for the combined sensitivity to $\\alpha$ and $X_q$ that exhibits the dependence on proton number $Z$ and mass number $A$, potentially allowing quantum electrodynamic and quantum chromodynamic effects to be disentangled if a broader range of isotopic abundance data becomes available.

  15. Thermoacoustic Thermometry for Nuclear Reactor Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Steven L. Garrett; Randall A. Ali

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On Friday, March 11, 2011, at 2:46pm (Japan Standard Trme), the Tohoku region on the east coast of northern Japan experi­enced what would become known as the largest earthquake in the country's history at magnitude 9.0 on the Richter scale. The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant suffered exten­sive and irreversible damage. Six operating units were at the site, each with a boiling water reactor. When the earthquake struck, three of the six reactors were operating and the others were in a periodic inspection outage phase. In one reactor, all of the fuel had been relocated to a spent fuel pool in the reactor building. The seismic acceleration caused by the earthquake brought the three operating units to an automatic shutdown. Since there was damage to the power transmission lines, the emergency diesel generators (EDG) were automat­ically started to ensure continued cooling of the reactors and spent fuel pools. The situation was under control until the tsunami hit about forty-five minutes later with a maximum wave height of approximately 15 meters, which was three times taller than the sea wall of 5m. The influx of water submerged the EDGs, the electrical switchgear, and dc batteries, resulting in the total loss of power to five of the six reactors. The flooding also resulted in the loss of instrumentation that would have other­ wise been used to monitor and control the emergency. The ugly aftermath included high radiation exposure to operators at the nuclear power plants and early contamina­tion of food supplies and water within several restricted areas in Japan, where high radiation levels have rendered them un­safe for human habitation. While the rest of the story will remain a tragic history, it is this part of the series of unfortunate events that has inspired our research. It has indubitably highlighted the need for a novel sensor and instrumentation system that can withstand similar or worse conditions to avoid future catastrophe and assume damage prevention as quickly as possible. This is the question which we are attempting to answer: Is it possible to implement a self-powered sensor that could transmit data independently of electronic networks while taking advantage of the harsh operating environment of the nuclear reactor?

  16. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Djurcic; J. A. Detwiler; A. Piepke; V. R. Foster Jr.; L. Miller; G. Gratta

    2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these quantities for commercial power plants and their impact on the calculated interaction rates in electron anti-neutrino detectors is examined. We discuss reactor-to-reactor correlations between the leading uncertainties and their relevance to reactor anti-neutrino experiments.

  17. LIMITED POWER BURSTS IN DISTRIBUTED MODELS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazhenov, Maxim

    LIMITED POWER BURSTS IN DISTRIBUTED MODELS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS M. V. Bazhenov and E. F. Sabaev UDC employed for analyzing reactor dynamics. Equations of this type are used for analyzing the stability of the reactor power, etc. Among these problems the question of the boundedness of reactor power bursts

  18. High Flux Isotope Reactor named Nuclear Historic Landmark | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Flux Isotope Reactor named Nuclear Historic Landmark The High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory resides in a pool of water illuminated by the blue...

  19. CRAD, Nuclear Reactor Facility Operations - December 4, 2014...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reactor Facility Operations - December 4, 2014 (EA CRAD 31-08, Rev. 0) CRAD, Nuclear Reactor Facility Operations - December 4, 2014 (EA CRAD 31-08, Rev. 0) December 4, 2014 CRAD,...

  20. Polynomial regression with derivative information in nuclear reactor uncertainty quantification*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anitescu, Mihai

    1 Polynomial regression with derivative information in nuclear reactor uncertainty quantification in the outputs. The usual difficulties in modeling the work of the nuclear reactor models include the large size, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, USA b Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory

  1. C Produced by Nuclear Power Reactors Generation and Characterization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    14 C Produced by Nuclear Power Reactors ­ Generation and Characterization of Gaseous, Liquid and process water from nuclear reactors ­ A method for quantitative determination of organic and inorganic and Solid Waste �sa Magnusson Division of Nuclear Physics Department of Physics 2007 Akademisk avhandling

  2. Nuclear Thermal Rockets: The Physics of the Fission Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Shane

    Nuclear Thermal Rockets: The Physics of the Fission Reactor Shane D. Ross Control and Dynamical combustion are those powered by nuclear fission. Comparison of Chemical and Nuclear Rockets. Most existent.g., hydrogen and oxygen). In a nuclear rocket, or more precisely, a nuclear thermal rocket, the propellant

  3. CONSTRUCTION OF WEB-ACCESSIBLE MATERIALS HANDBOOK FORGENERATION IV NUCLEAR REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a web-accessible materials handbook in support of the materials selection and structural design for the Generation IV nuclear reactors is being planned. Background of the reactor program is briefly introduced. Evolution of materials handbooks for nuclear reactors over years is reviewed in light of the trends brought forth by the rapid advancement in information technologies. The framework, major features, contents, and construction considerations of the web-accessible Gen IV Materials Handbook are discussed. Potential further developments and applications of the handbook are also elucidated.

  4. Fuel handling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saiveau, James G. (Hickory Hills, IL); Kann, William J. (Park Ridge, IL); Burelbach, James P. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pool type nuclear fission reactor has a core, with a plurality of core elements and a redan which confines coolant as a hot pool at a first end of the core separated from a cold pool at a second end of the core by the redan. A fuel handling system for use with such reactors comprises a core element storage basket located outside of the redan in the cold pool. An access passage is formed in the redan with a gate for opening and closing the passage to maintain the temperature differential between the hot pool and the cold pool. A mechanism is provided for opening and closing the gate. A lifting arm is also provided for manipulating the fuel core elements through the access passage between the storage basket and the core when the redan gate is open.

  5. Closure head for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wade, Elman E. (South Huntingdon, PA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A closure head for a nuclear reactor includes a stationary outer ring integral with the reactor vessel with a first rotatable plug disposed within the stationary outer ring and supported from the stationary outer ring by a bearing assembly. A sealing system is associated with the bearing assembly to seal the annulus defined between the first rotatable plug and the stationary outer ring. The sealing system comprises tubular seal elements disposed in the annulus with load springs contacting the tubular seal elements so as to force the tubular seal elements against the annulus in a manner to seal the annulus. The sealing system also comprises a sealing fluid which is pumped through the annulus and over the tubular seal elements causing the load springs to compress thereby reducing the friction between the tubular seal elements and the rotatable components while maintaining a gas-tight seal therebetween.

  6. Nuclear reactor flow control method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, John P. (1204 Woodbine Rd., Aiken, SC 29803)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for improving coolant flow in a nuclear reactor during accident as well as nominal conditions. The reactor has a plurality of fuel elements in sleeves and a plenum above the fuel and through which the sleeves penetrate. Holes are provided in the sleeve so that coolant from the plenum can enter the sleeve and cool the fuel. The number and size of the holes are varied from sleeve to sleeve with the number and size of holes being greater for sleeves toward the center of the core and less for sleeves toward the periphery of the core. Preferably the holes are all the same diameter and arranged in rows and columns, the rows starting from the bottom of every sleeve and fewer rows in peripheral sleeves and more rows in the central sleeves.

  7. Nuclear reactor flow control method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, J.P.

    1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for improving coolant flow in a nuclear reactor during accident as well as nominal conditions. The reactor has a plurality of fuel elements in sleeves and a plenum above the fuel and through which the sleeves penetrate. Holes are provided in the sleeve so that coolant from the plenum can enter the sleeve and cool the fuel. The number and size of the holes are varied from sleeve to sleeve with the number and size of holes being greater for sleeves toward the center of the core and less for sleeves toward the periphery of the core. Preferably the holes are all the same diameter and arranged in rows and columns, the rows starting from the bottom of every sleeve and fewer rows in peripheral sleeves and more rows in the central sleeves.

  8. Neutrino Oscillation Experiments at Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giorgio Gratta

    1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper I give an overview of the status of neutrino oscillation experiments performed using nuclear reactors as sources of neutrinos. I review the present generation of experiments (Chooz and Palo Verde) with baselines of about 1 km as well as the next generation that will search for oscillations with a baseline of about 100 km. While the present detectors provide essential input towards the understanding of the atmospheric neutrino anomaly, in the future, the KamLAND reactor experiment represents our best opportunity to study very small mass neutrino mixing in laboratory conditions. In addition KamLAND with its very large fiducial mass and low energy threshold, will also be sensitive to a broad range of different physics.

  9. Safety of light water reactor fuel with silicon carbide cladding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Youho

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural aspects of the performance of light water reactor (LWR) fuel rod with triplex silicon carbide (SiC) cladding - an emerging option to replace the zirconium alloy cladding - are assessed. Its behavior under accident ...

  10. Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2007

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating " Worksheet" "Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2007" "January through December 2007"...

  11. Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2004

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating " Worksheet" "Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2004" "January through December 2004"...

  12. Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating " Worksheet" "Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2005" "January through December 2005"...

  13. Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2003

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating " Worksheet" "Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2003" "January through December 2003"...

  14. Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating " Worksheet" "Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2008" "January through December 2008"...

  15. Commercial nuclear reactors and waste: the current status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, A.M.; Robinson, J.V.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last five years, the declared size of the commercial light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power industry in the US has steadily decreased. As of January 1980, the total number of power plants had dropped to 191 from the 226 in December 31, 1974. At least another nine were cancelled in the last few months. This report was developed as the first of a series to track implications to waste management due to such changes in the declared size of the industry. For the presently declared size, key conclusions are: the declared reactors will peak at a capacity of 162 GWe and consume about 10/sup 6/ MTU as enrichment feed. As few as two repositories of about 100,000 MTHM capacity each would hold the waste. Predisposal storage (reactor basins and AFRs) would peak at less than 100,000 MTHM (in the year 2020) with one repository opening in the year 1997 and the other in the year 2020. Most of the 100,000 MTHM would have to be in AFR storage unless current practice regarding reactor basin size was radically changed.

  16. Report of the Nuclear Reactor Technology Subcommittee

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptemberAssessments | Department ofSouthernof the Nuclear Reactor

  17. Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program – Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Brenchley, David L.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hashemian, Hash; Konnik, Robert; Ray, Sheila

    2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Cables is to support the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) R&D pathway. The focus of the workshop was to identify the technical gaps in detecting aging cables and predicting their remaining life expectancy. The workshop was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on July 30, 2012, at Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation (AMS) headquarters. The workshop was attended by 30 experts in materials, electrical engineering, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory), NDE instrumentation development, universities, commercial NDE services and cable manufacturers, and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The motivation for the R&D roadmap comes from the need to address the aging management of in-containment cables at nuclear power plants (NPPs).

  18. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Alper, Naum I. (Monroeville, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump.

  19. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, L.K.; Alper, N.I.

    1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump. 1 fig.

  20. Direct conversion nuclear reactor space power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britt, E.J.; Fitzpatrick, G.O.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a study of space nuclear reactor power systems using either thermoelectric or thermionic energy converters. An in-core reactor design and two heat pipe cooled out-of-core reactor designs were considered. One of the out-of-core cases utilized, long heat pipes (LHP) directly coupled to the energy converter. The second utilized a larger number of smaller heat pipes (mini-pipe) radiatively coupled to the energy converter. In all cases the entire system, including power conditioning, was constrained to be launched in a single shuttle flight. Assuming presently available performance, both the LHP thermoelectric system and minipipe thermionic system, designed to produce 100 kWe for seven years, would have a specific mass near 22kg/kWe. The specific mass of the thermionic minipipe system designed for a one year mission is 165 kg/kWe due to less fuel swelling. Shuttle imposed growth limits are near 300 kWe and 1.2 MWe for the thermoelectric and thermionic systems, respectively. Converter performance improvements could double this potential, and over 10 MWe may be possible for very short missions.

  1. Electrochemistry of Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macdonald, Dgiby; Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna; Pitt, Jonathan

    2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project developed a comprehensive mathematical and simulation model for calculating thermal hydraulic, electrochemical, and corrosion parameters, viz. temperature, fluid flow velocity, pH, corrosion potential, hydrogen injection, oxygen contamination, stress corrosion cracking, crack growth rate, and other important quantities in the coolant circuits of water-cooled nuclear power plants, including both Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The model is being used to assess the three major operational problems in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), which include mass transport, activity transport, and the axial offset anomaly, and provide a powerful tool for predicting the accumulation of SCC damage in BWR primary coolant circuits as a function of operating history. Another achievement of the project is the development of a simulation tool to serve both as a training tool for plant operators and as an engineering test-bed to evaluate new equipment and operating strategies (normal operation, cold shut down and others). The development and implementation of the model allows us to estimate the activity transport or "radiation fields" around the primary loop and the vessel, as a function of the operating parameters and the water chemistry.

  2. Neutron transport analysis for nuclear reactor design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vujic, Jasmina L. (Lisle, IL)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Replacing regular mesh-dependent ray tracing modules in a collision/transfer probability (CTP) code with a ray tracing module based upon combinatorial geometry of a modified geometrical module (GMC) provides a general geometry transfer theory code in two dimensions (2D) for analyzing nuclear reactor design and control. The primary modification of the GMC module involves generation of a fixed inner frame and a rotating outer frame, where the inner frame contains all reactor regions of interest, e.g., part of a reactor assembly, an assembly, or several assemblies, and the outer frame, with a set of parallel equidistant rays (lines) attached to it, rotates around the inner frame. The modified GMC module allows for determining for each parallel ray (line), the intersections with zone boundaries, the path length between the intersections, the total number of zones on a track, the zone and medium numbers, and the intersections with the outer surface, which parameters may be used in the CTP code to calculate collision/transfer probability and cross-section values.

  3. Neutron transport analysis for nuclear reactor design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vujic, J.L.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Replacing regular mesh-dependent ray tracing modules in a collision/transfer probability (CTP) code with a ray tracing module based upon combinatorial geometry of a modified geometrical module (GMC) provides a general geometry transfer theory code in two dimensions (2D) for analyzing nuclear reactor design and control. The primary modification of the GMC module involves generation of a fixed inner frame and a rotating outer frame, where the inner frame contains all reactor regions of interest, e.g., part of a reactor assembly, an assembly, or several assemblies, and the outer frame, with a set of parallel equidistant rays (lines) attached to it, rotates around the inner frame. The modified GMC module allows for determining for each parallel ray (line), the intersections with zone boundaries, the path length between the intersections, the total number of zones on a track, the zone and medium numbers, and the intersections with the outer surface, which parameters may be used in the CTP code to calculate collision/transfer probability and cross-section values. 28 figures.

  4. Minimizing or eliminating refueling of nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doncals, Richard A. (Washington, PA); Paik, Nam-Chin (Pittsburgh, PA); Andre, Sandra V. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA); Porter, Charles A. (Rostraver Township, Westmoreland County, PA); Rathbun, Roy W. (Greensburg, PA); Schwallie, Ambrose L. (Greensburg, PA); Petras, Diane S. (Penn Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand for refueling of a liquid metal fast nuclear reactor having a life of 30 years is eliminated or reduced to intervals of at least 10 years by operating the reactor at a low linear-power density, typically 2.5 kw/ft of fuel rod, rather than 7.5 or 15 kw/ft, which is the prior art practice. So that power of the same magnitude as for prior art reactors is produced, the volume of the core is increased. In addition, the height of the core and it diameter are dimensioned so that the ratio of the height to the diameter approximates 1 to the extent practicable considering the requirement of control and that the pressure drop in the coolant shall not be excessive. The surface area of a cylinder of given volume is a minimum if the ratio of the height to the diameter is 1. By minimizing the surface area, the leakage of neutrons is reduced. By reducing the linear-power density, increasing core volume, reducing fissile enrichment and optimizing core geometry, internal-core breeding of fissionable fuel is substantially enhanced. As a result, core operational life, limited by control worth requirements and fuel burnup capability, is extended up to 30 years of continuous power operation.

  5. Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program – Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, K.L.; Ramuhali, P.; Brenchley, D.L.; Coble, J.B.; Hashemian, H.M.; Konnick, R.; Ray, S.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary [partial] The purpose of the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Cables is to support the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) R&D pathway. A workshop was held to gather subject matter experts to develop the NDE R&D Roadmap for Cables. The focus of the workshop was to identify the technical gaps in detecting aging cables and predicting their remaining life expectancy. The workshop was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on July 30, 2012, at Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation (AMS) headquarters. The workshop was attended by 30 experts in materials, electrical engineering, and NDE instrumentation development from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory), universities, commercial NDE service vendors and cable manufacturers, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI).

  6. Overview of the US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. A. McCarthy; D. L. Williams; R. Reister

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is focused on the long-term operation of US commercial power plants. It encompasses two facets of long-term operation: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the nuclear industry that support implementation of performance improvement technologies. An important aspect of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is partnering with industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to support and conduct the long-term research needed to inform major component refurbishment and replacement strategies, performance enhancements, plant license extensions, and age-related regulatory oversight decisions. The Department of Energy research, development, and demonstration role focuses on aging phenomena and issues that require long-term research and/or unique Department of Energy laboratory expertise and facilities and are applicable to all operating reactors. This paper gives an overview of the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, including vision, goals, and major deliverables.

  7. Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Matlack, Katie [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Light, Glenn [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort which works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operations of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods which support these objectives. DOE funded Research and Development (R&D) on emerging NDE techniques to support commercial nuclear reactor sustainability is expected to begin next year. This summer, the MAaD Pathway invited subject matter experts to participate in a series of workshops which developed the basis for the research plan of these DOE R&D NDE activities. This document presents the results of one of these workshops which are the DOE LWRS NDE R&D Roadmap for Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV). These workshops made a substantial effort to coordinate the DOE NDE R&D with that already underway or planned by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) through their representation at these workshops.

  8. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1993. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: civilian, production, military, export, and critical assembly.

  9. Spent nuclear fuel discharges from U.S. reactors 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent Nuclear Fuel Discharges from US Reactors 1994 provides current statistical data on fuel assemblies irradiated at commercial nuclear reactors operating in the US. This year`s report provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities at these reactors. Detailed statistics on the data are presented in four chapters that highlight 1994 spent fuel discharges, storage capacities and inventories, canister and nonfuel component data, and assembly characteristics. Five appendices, a glossary, and bibliography are also included. 10 figs., 34 tabs.

  10. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djurcic, Zelimir; Detwiler, Jason A.; Piepke, Andreas; Foster Jr., Vince R.; Miller, Lester; Gratta, Giorgio

    2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these quantities for commercial power plants and their impact on the calculated interaction rates in {bar {nu}}{sub e} detectors is examined. We discuss reactor-to-reactor correlations between the leading uncertainties, and their relevance to reactor {bar {nu}}{sub e} experiments.

  11. Weld monitor and failure detector for nuclear reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sutton, Jr., Harry G. (Mt. Lebanon, PA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical but inaccessible welds in a nuclear reactor system are monitored throughout the life of the reactor by providing small aperture means projecting completely through the reactor vessel wall and also through the weld or welds to be monitored. The aperture means is normally sealed from the atmosphere within the reactor. Any incipient failure or cracking of the weld will cause the environment contained within the reactor to pass into the aperture means and thence to the outer surface of the reactor vessel where its presence is readily detected.

  12. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Status of Silicon Carbide Joining Technology Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced, accident tolerant nuclear fuel systems are currently being investigated for potential application in currently operating light water reactors (LWR) or in reactors that have attained design certification. Evaluation of potential options for accident tolerant nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) relative to Zr-based alloys, including increased corrosion resistance, reduced oxidation and heat of oxidation, and reduced hydrogen generation under steam attack (off-normal conditions). If demonstrated to be applicable in the intended LWR environment, SiC could be used in nuclear fuel cladding or other in-core structural components. Achieving a SiC-SiC joint that resists corrosion with hot, flowing water, is stable under irradiation and retains hermeticity is a significant challenge. This report summarizes the current status of SiC-SiC joint development work supported by the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Significant progress has been made toward SiC-SiC joint development for nuclear service, but additional development and testing work (including irradiation testing) is still required to present a candidate joint for use in nuclear fuel cladding.

  13. Nuclear reactor cooling system decontamination reagent regeneration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anstine, Larry D. (San Jose, CA); James, Dean B. (Saratoga, CA); Melaika, Edward A. (Berkeley, CA); Peterson, Jr., John P. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water-cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution.

  14. Design of a nuclear reactor system for lunar base applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, Richard Odell

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DESIGN OF A NUCLEAR REACTOR SYSTEM FOR LUNAR BASE APPLICATIONS A Thesis by RICMARD ODELL GRIFFITH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1986 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineer ing DESIGN OF A NUCLEAR REACTOR SYSTEM FOR LUNAR BASE APPLICATIONS A Thesis by RICHARD ODELL GRIFFITH Appr oved as to style and content by: Carl A. Endman (Chain of Committee) Cer aid A. Schlapper...

  15. MOOSE simulating nuclear reactor CRUD buildup

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This simulation uses multiple physical models to show how the buildup of boron deposits on reactor fuel can affect performance and the reactor's power profile.

  16. MOOSE simulating nuclear reactor CRUD buildup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This simulation uses multiple physical models to show how the buildup of boron deposits on reactor fuel can affect performance and the reactor's power profile.

  17. A brief history of design studies on innovative nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi, E-mail: hsekimot@gmail.com [Emeritus Professor, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In a short period after the success of CP1, many types of nuclear reactors were proposed and investigated. However, soon only a small number of reactors were selected for practical use. Around 1970, only LWRs with small number of CANDUs were operated in the western world, and FBRs were under development. It was about the time when Apollo moon landing was accomplished. However, at the same time, the future of human being was widely considered pessimistic and Limits to Growth was published. In the end of 1970’s the TMI accident occurred and many nuclear reactor contracts were cancelled in USA and any more contracts had not been concluded until recent years. From the reflection of this accident, many Inherent Safe Reactors (ISRs) were proposed, though none of them were constructed. A common idea of ISRs is smallness of their size. Tokyo Institute of Technology (TokyoTech) held a symposium on small reactors, SR/TIT, in 1991, where many types of small ISRs were presented. Recently small reactors attract interest again. The most ideas employed in these reactors were the same discussed in SR/TIT. In 1980’s the radioactive wastes from fuel cycle became a severe problem around the world. In TokyoTech, this issue was discussed mainly from the viewpoint of nuclear transmutations. The neutron economy became inevitable for these innovative nuclear reactors especially small long-life reactors and transmutation reactors.

  18. PHYSICS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS Nuclear reactions and cross sections 1-10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    PHYSICS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS Nuclear reactions and cross sections 1-10 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Figure 5 ­ neutron capture, fission and elastic scattering in 235 U. For spaced resonances the center neutron wavelength, D is given by: cE mM Mm 2 + = h D , (1.22) 1 Bell and Glasstone, Nuclear Reactor

  19. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, B.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1991. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables; Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned; and Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. Sections 2 and 3 contain the following classification of reactors: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is an American company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4, in each section). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

  20. Physics methods for calculating light water reactor increased performances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandenberg, C.; Charlier, A.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intensive use of light water reactors (LWRs) has induced modification of their characteristics and performances in order to improve fissile material utilization and to increase their availability and flexibility under operation. From the conceptual point of view, adequate methods must be used to calculate core characteristics, taking into account present design requirements, e.g., use of burnable poison, plutonium recycling, etc. From the operational point of view, nuclear plants that have been producing a large percentage of electricity in some countries must adapt their planning to the need of the electrical network and operate on a load-follow basis. Consequently, plant behavior must be predicted and accurately followed in order to improve the plant's capability within safety limits. The Belgonucleaire code system has been developed and extensively validated. It is an accurate, flexible, easily usable, fast-running tool for solving the problems related to LWR technology development. The methods and validation of the two computer codes LWR-WIMS and MICROLUX, which are the main components of the physics calculation system, are explained.

  1. Fuel assembly for the production of tritium in light water reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cawley, William E. (Richland, WA); Trapp, Turner J. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear fuel assembly is described for producing tritium in a light water moderated reactor. The assembly consists of two intermeshing arrays of subassemblies. The first subassemblies comprise concentric annular elements of an outer containment tube, an annular target element, an annular fuel element, and an inner neutron spectrums shifting rod. The second subassemblies comprise an outer containment tube and an inner rod of either fuel, target, or neutron spectrum shifting neutral.

  2. Establishment of a Hub for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Online Monitoring Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy J. Lybeck; Magdy S. Tawfik; Binh T. Pham

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Implementation of online monitoring and prognostics in existing U.S. nuclear power plants will involve coordinating the efforts of national laboratories, utilities, universities, and private companies. Internet-based collaborative work environments provide necessary communication tools to facilitate interaction between geographically diverse participants. Available technologies were considered, and a collaborative workspace was established at INL as a hub for the light water reactor sustainability online monitoring community.

  3. Fuel assembly for the production of tritium in light water reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cawley, W.E.; Trapp, T.J.

    1983-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear fuel assembly is described for producing tritium in a light water moderated reactor. The assembly consists of two intermeshing arrays of subassemblies. The first subassemblies comprise concentric annular elements of an outer containment tube, an annular target element, an annular fuel element, and an inner neutron spectrums shifting rod. The second subassemblies comprise an outer containment tube and an inner rod of either fuel, target, or neutron spectrum shifting neutral.

  4. Reactor Physics and Criticality Benchmark Evaluations for Advanced Nuclear Fuel - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Anderson; James Tulenko; Bradley Rearden; Gary Harms

    2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear industry interest in advanced fuel and reactor design often drives towards fuel with uranium enrichments greater than 5 wt% 235U. Unfortunately, little data exists, in the form of reactor physics and criticality benchmarks, for uranium enrichments ranging between 5 and 10 wt% 235U. The primary purpose of this project is to provide benchmarks for fuel similar to what may be required for advanced light water reactors (LWRs). These experiments will ultimately provide additional information for application to the criticality-safety bases for commercial fuel facilities handling greater than 5 wt% 235U fuel.

  5. Reactor and shielding design implications of clustering nuclear thermal rockets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buksa, J.J.; Houts, M.G. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines design considerations in the context of engine-out accidents in clustered nuclear-thermal rocket stages, and an accident-management protocol is devised. Safety and performance issues are considered in the light of designs for the reactor and shielding elements of ROVER/NERVA-type engines. The engine-out management process involves: phase one, in which sufficient propulsive power is guaranteed for mission completion; and phase two, in which engine failure is isolated and not allowed to propagate to other engines or to the spacecraft. Phase-one designs can employ spare engines, throttled engines, and/or long-burning engines. Phase-two safety concepts can include techniques for cooling or jettisoning the failed engines. Engine-out management philosophies are shown to be shaped by a combination of safety and mission-trajectory requirements. 6 refs.

  6. Plutonium Discharge Rates and Spent Nuclear Fuel Inventory Estimates for Nuclear Reactors Worldwide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian K. Castle; Shauna A. Hoiland; Richard A. Rankin; James W. Sterbentz

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a preliminary survey and analysis of the five primary types of commercial nuclear power reactors currently in use around the world. Plutonium mass discharge rates from the reactors’ spent fuel at reload are estimated based on a simple methodology that is able to use limited reactor burnup and operational characteristics collected from a variety of public domain sources. Selected commercial reactor operating and nuclear core characteristics are also given for each reactor type. In addition to the worldwide commercial reactors survey, a materials test reactor survey was conducted to identify reactors of this type with a significant core power rating. Over 100 material or research reactors with a core power rating >1 MW fall into this category. Fuel characteristics and spent fuel inventories for these material test reactors are also provided herein.

  7. Light-front nuclear shell-model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.B.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I examine the effects of nuclear structure on high-energy, high-momentum transfer processes, specifically the EMC effect. For pedagogical reasons, a fictitious but simple two-body system consisting of two equal-mass particles interacting in a harmonic oscillator potential has been chosen. For this toy nucleus, I utilize a widely-used link between instant-form and light-front dynamics, formulating nuclear structure and deep-inelastic scattering consistently in the laboratory system. Binding effects are compared within conventional instant-form and light-front dynamical frameworks, with appreciable differences being found in the two cases. 20 refs.

  8. Role of nuclear reactors in future military satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future military capabilities will be profoundly influenced by emerging Shuttle Era space technology. Regardless of the specific direction or content of tomorrow's military space program, it is clear that advanced space transportation systems, orbital support facilities, and large-capacity power subsystems will be needed to create the generally larger, more sophisticated military space systems of the future. This paper explores the critical role that space nuclear reactors should play in America's future space program and reviews the current state of nuclear reactor power plant technology. Space nuclear reactor technologies have the potential of satisfying power requirements ranging from 10 kW/sub (e)/ to 100 MW/sub (e)/.

  9. The behavior of fission products during nuclear rocket reactor tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bokor, P.C.; Kirk, W.L.; Bohl, R.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experience base regarding fission product behavior developed during the Rover program, the nuclear rocket development program of 1955--1972, will be useful in planning a renewed nuclear rocket program. During the Rover program, 20 reactors were tested at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station in Nevada. Nineteen of these discharged effluent directly into the atmosphere; the last reactor tested, a non-flight-prototypic, fuel-element-testing reactor called the Nuclear Furnace (NF-1) was connected to an effluent cleanup system that removed fission products before the hydrogen coolant (propellant) was discharged to the atmosphere. In general, we are able to increase both test duration and fuel temperature during the test series. Therefore fission product data from the later part of the program are more interesting and more applicable to future reactors. We have collected fission product retention (and release) data reported in both formal and informal publications for six of the later reactor tests; five of these were Los Alamos reactors that were firsts of a kind in configuration or operating conditions. We have also, with the cooperation of Westinghouse, included fission product data from the NRX-A6 reactor, the final member of series of developmental reactors with the same basic geometry, but with significant design and fabrication improvements as the series continued. Table 1 lists the six selected reactors and the test parameters for each.

  10. Indirect passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

  11. Passive cooling safety system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA); Hui, Marvin M. (Sunnyvale, CA); Berglund, Robert C. (Saratoga, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

  12. Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60,???

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactors present a very harsh environment for components service. Components within a reactor core must tolerate high temperature water, stress, vibration, and an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. A recent EPRI-led study interviewed 47 US nuclear utility executives to gauge perspectives on long-term operation of nuclear reactors. Nearly 90% indicated that extensions of reactor lifetimes to beyond 60 years were likely. When polled on the most challenging issues facing further life extension, two-thirds cited plant reliability as the key issue with materials aging and cable/piping as the top concerns for plant reliability. Materials degradation within a nuclear power plant is very complex. There are many different types of materials within the reactor itself: over 25 different metal alloys can be found with can be found within the primary and secondary systems, not to mention the concrete containment vessel, instrumentation and control, and other support facilities. When this diverse set of materials is placed in the complex and harsh environment coupled with load, degradation over an extended life is indeed quite complicated. To address this issue, the USNRC has developed a Progressive Materials Degradation Approach (NUREG/CR-6923). This approach is intended to develop a foundation for appropriate actions to keep materials degradation from adversely impacting component integrity and safety and identify materials and locations where degradation can reasonably be expected in the future. Clearly, materials degradation will impact reactor reliability, availability, and potentially, safe operation. Routine surveillance and component replacement can mitigate these factors, although failures still occur. With reactor life extensions to 60 years or beyond or power uprates, many components must tolerate the reactor environment for even longer times. This may increase susceptibility for most components and may introduce new degradation modes. While all components (except perhaps the reactor vessel) can be replaced, it may not be economically favorable. Therefore, understanding, controlling, and mitigating materials degradation processes are key priorities for reactor operation, power uprate considerations, and life extensions. This document is written to give an overview of some of the materials degradation issues that may be key for extend reactor service life. A detailed description of all the possible forms of degradation is beyond the scope of this short paper and has already been described in other documents (for example, the NUREG/CR-6923). The intent of this document is to present an overview of current materials issues in the existing reactor fleet and a brief analysis of the potential impact of extending life beyond 60 years. Discussion is presented in six distinct areas: (1) Reactor pressure vessel; (2) Reactor core and primary systems; (3) Reactor secondary systems; (4) Weldments; (5) Concrete; and (6) Modeling and simulations. Following each of these areas, some research thrust directions to help identify and mitigate lifetime extension issues are proposed. Note that while piping and cabling are important for extended service, these components are discussed in more depth in a separate paper. Further, the materials degradation issues associated with fuel cladding and fuel assemblies are not discussed in this section as these components are replaced periodically and will not influence the overall lifetime of the reactor.

  13. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication contains unclassified information about facilities, built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1996. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters, and field offices of DOE; from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the U. S. reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from U.S. and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled.

  14. Conceptual Design of a Large, Passive Pressure-Tube Light Water Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hejzlar, P.

    A design for a large, passive, light water reactor has been developed. The proposed concept is a pressure tube reactor of similar design to CANDU reactors, but differing in three key aspects. First, a solid SiC-coated ...

  15. Nuclear Graphite -Fission Reactor Brief Outline of Experience and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Nuclear Graphite - Fission Reactor Brief Outline of Experience and Understanding Professor Barry J · Physical Changes ­ to Polycrystalline Graphite due to Fast Neutron Damage and Radiolytic Oxidation ­ Provided channels for control rods and coolant gas · Neutron Shield ­ Boronated graphite · Thermal columns

  16. ASSESSMENT OF SMALL AND MODULAR REACTOR NUCLEAR FUEL COST 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pannier, Christopher 1992-

    2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear energy industry is experiencing a renaissance of new reactor design and construction in Asia, North America, and Europe. The new Generation III designs are some of the largest ever built, featuring improved efficiency, construction...

  17. PEBBLE-BED NUCLEAR REACTOR SYSTEM PHYSICS AND FUEL UTILIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Ryan 1989-

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Generation IV Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PMBR) design may be used for electricity production, co-generation applications (industrial heat, hydrogen production, desalination, etc.), and could potentially eliminate some high level nuclear wastes...

  18. Observer-based fault detection for nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Qing, 1972-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a study of fault detection for nuclear reactor systems. Basic concepts are derived from fundamental theories on system observers. Different types of fault- actuator fault, sensor fault, and system dynamics fault ...

  19. Fuel assembly transfer basket for pool type nuclear reactor vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Ramsour, Nicholas L. (San Jose, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel assembly transfer basket for a pool type, liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a side access loading and unloading port for receiving and relinquishing fuel assemblies during transfer.

  20. Solid0Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP).

  1. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

  2. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1994. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is a US company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

  3. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned: 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the US for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1995. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is a US company--working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

  4. CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronen, Y.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described.

  5. Neutron spectrometer for fast nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osipenko, M; Ricco, G; Caiffi, B; Pompili, F; Pillon, M; Angelone, M; Verona-Rinati, G; Cardarelli, R; Mila, G; Argiro, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we describe the development and first tests of a neutron spectrometer designed for high flux environments, such as the ones found in fast nuclear reactors. The spectrometer is based on the conversion of neutrons impinging on $^6$Li into $\\alpha$ and $t$ whose total energy comprises the initial neutron energy and the reaction $Q$-value. The $^6$LiF layer is sandwiched between two CVD diamond detectors, which measure the two reaction products in coincidence. The spectrometer was calibrated at two neutron energies in well known thermal and 3 MeV neutron fluxes. The measured neutron detection efficiency varies from 4.2$\\times 10^{-4}$ to 3.5$\\times 10^{-8}$ for thermal and 3 MeV neutrons, respectively. These values are in agreement with Geant4 simulations and close to simple estimates based on the knowledge of the $^6$Li(n,$\\alpha$)$t$ cross section. The energy resolution of the spectrometer was found to be better than 100 keV when using 5 m cables between the detector and the preamplifiers.

  6. Neutron spectrometer for fast nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Osipenko; M. Ripani; G. Ricco; B. Caiffi; F. Pompili; M. Pillon; M. Angelone; G. Verona-Rinati; R. Cardarelli; G. Mila; S. Argiro

    2015-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we describe the development and first tests of a neutron spectrometer designed for high flux environments, such as the ones found in fast nuclear reactors. The spectrometer is based on the conversion of neutrons impinging on $^6$Li into $\\alpha$ and $t$ whose total energy comprises the initial neutron energy and the reaction $Q$-value. The $^6$LiF layer is sandwiched between two CVD diamond detectors, which measure the two reaction products in coincidence. The spectrometer was calibrated at two neutron energies in well known thermal and 3 MeV neutron fluxes. The measured neutron detection efficiency varies from 4.2$\\times 10^{-4}$ to 3.5$\\times 10^{-8}$ for thermal and 3 MeV neutrons, respectively. These values are in agreement with Geant4 simulations and close to simple estimates based on the knowledge of the $^6$Li(n,$\\alpha$)$t$ cross section. The energy resolution of the spectrometer was found to be better than 100 keV when using 5 m cables between the detector and the preamplifiers.

  7. Assessment of innovative fuel designs for high performance light water reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, David Michael

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To increase the power density and maximum allowable fuel burnup in light water reactors, new fuel rod designs are investigated. Such fuel is desirable for improving the economic performance light water reactors loaded with ...

  8. Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science...

  9. Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modro, S.M.; Fisher, J.E.; Weaver, K.D.; Reyes, J.N.; Groome, J.T.; Babka, P.; Carlson, T.M.

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) project was conducted under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary project objectives were to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate the technical feasibility by testing in an integral test facility. This report presents the results of the project. After an initial exploratory and evolutionary process, as documented in the October 2000 report, the project focused on developing a modular reactor design that consists of a self-contained assembly with a reactor vessel, steam generators, and containment. These modular units would be manufactured at a single centralized facility, transported by rail, road, and/or ship, and installed as a series of self-contained units. This approach also allows for staged construction of an NPP and ''pull and replace'' refueling and maintenance during each five-year refueling cycle. Development of the baseline design concept has been sufficiently completed to determine that it complies with the safety requirements and criteria, and satisfies the major goals already noted. The more significant features of the baseline single-unit design concept include: (1) Thermal Power--150 MWt; (2) Net Electrical Output--35 MWe; (3) Steam Generator Type--Vertical, helical tubes; (4) Fuel UO{sub 2}, 8% enriched; (5) Refueling Intervals--5 years; (6) Life-Cycle--60 years. The economic performance was assessed by designing a power plant with an electric generation capacity in the range of current and advanced evolutionary systems. This approach allows for direct comparison of economic performance and forms a basis for further evaluation, economic and technical, of the proposed design and for the design evolution towards a more cost competitive concept. Applications such as cogeneration, water desalination or district heating were not addressed directly in the economic analyses since these depend more on local conditions, demand and economy and can not be easily generalized. Current economic performance experience and available cost data were used. The preliminary cost estimate, based on a concept that could be deployed in less than a decade, is: (1) Net Electrical Output--1050 MWe; (2) Net Station Efficiency--23%; (3) Number of Power Units--30; (4) Nominal Plant Capacity Factor--95%; (5) Total capital cost--$1241/kWe; and (6) Total busbar cost--3.4 cents/kWh. The project includes a testing program that has been conducted at Oregon State University (OSU). The test facility is a 1/3-height and 1/254.7 volume scaled design that will operate at full system pressure and temperature, and will be capable of operation at 600 kW. The design and construction of the facility have been completed. Testing is scheduled to begin in October 2002. The MASLWR conceptual design is simple, safe, and economical. It operates at NSSS parameters much lower than for a typical PWR plant, and has a much simplified power generation system. The individual reactor modules can be operated as on/off units, thereby limiting operational transients to startup and shutdown. In addition, a plant can be built in increments that match demand increases. The ''pull and replace'' concept offers automation of refueling and maintenance activities. Performing refueling in a single location improves proliferation resistance and eliminates the threat of diversion. Design certification based on testing is simplified because of the relatively low cost of a full-scale prototype facility. The overall conclusion is that while the efficiency of the power generation unit is much lower (23% versus 30%), the reduction in capital cost due to simplification of design more than makes up for the increased cost of nuclear fuel. The design concept complies with the safety requirements and criteria. It also satisfies the goals for modularity, standard plant design, certification before construction, c

  10. Temperature dependent scattering cross section effects on nuclear reactor control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggs, Charles Leon

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactor e e o e o a a e e ~ a o e ~ a e o o 43 Ato. . . Dsnsitiec of 'Materials in the Conceived Fast Nuclear Reactor ~ ~ o e o e e a o a o e e o ~ ~ ~ ~ 6, IDPut SPecifications oi' the AIYi-6 Criticality arch e o o e a a ~ a e e o ~ ~ ~ e e e ~ o e... both reactors depended upon axially expanding fuel elements for inherent control, other methods should be considered, Due to ths magnitude and sign of the reactivity cosfi'ioients, inherent control is especially of. interest in large fast nuclear...

  11. Sandia Energy - Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Advanced Nuclear Energy Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water...

  12. Evaluating Russian space nuclear reactor technology for United States applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polansky, G.F. [Phillips Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schmidt, G.L. [New Mexico Engineering Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Voss, S.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Reynolds, E.L. [Applied Physics Lab., Laurel, MD (United States)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Space nuclear power and nuclear electric propulsion are considered important technologies for planetary exploration, as well as selected earth orbit applications. The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) was intended to provide an early flight demonstration of these technologies at relatively low cost through extensive use of existing Russian technology. The key element of Russian technology employed in the program was the Topaz II reactor. Refocusing of the activities of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO), combined with budgetary pressures, forced the cancellation of the NEPSTP at the end of the 1993 fiscal year. The NEPSTP was faced with many unique flight qualification issues. In general, the launch of a spacecraft employing a nuclear reactor power system complicates many spacecraft qualification activities. However, the NEPSTP activities were further complicated because the reactor power system was a Russian design. Therefore, this program considered not only the unique flight qualification issues associated with space nuclear power, but also with differences between Russian and United States flight qualification procedures. This paper presents an overview of the NEPSTP. The program goals, the proposed mission, the spacecraft, and the Topaz II space nuclear power system are described. The subject of flight qualification is examined and the inherent difficulties of qualifying a space reactor are described. The differences between United States and Russian flight qualification procedures are explored. A plan is then described that was developed to determine an appropriate flight qualification program for the Topaz II reactor to support a possible NEPSTP launch.

  13. Spent nuclear fuel discharges from US reactors 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides current statistical data on every fuel assembly irradiated in commercial nuclear reactors operating in the United States. It also provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities of those reactors to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the nuclear and electric industries and the general public. It uses data from the mandatory, ``Nuclear Fuel Data`` survey, Form RW-859 for 1992 and historical data collected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on previous Form RW-859 surveys. The report was prepared by the EIA under a Memorandum of Understanding with the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management.

  14. http://arXiv.org/physics/0507088 Teaching About Nature's Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    http://arXiv.org/physics/0507088 Teaching About Nature's Nuclear Reactors J. Marvin Herndon reactors existed in uranium deposits on Earth long before Enrico Fermi built the first man-made nuclear reactors. The subject of planetocentric nuclear fission reactors can be a jumping off point for stimulating

  15. Nuclear Reactor Safeguards and Monitoring with Antineutrino Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam Bernstein; Yifang Wang; Giorgio Gratta; Todd West

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cubic-meter-sized antineutrino detectors can be used to non-intrusively, robustly and automatically monitor and safeguard a wide variety of nuclear reactor types, including power reactors, research reactors, and plutonium production reactors. Since the antineutrino spectra and relative yields of fissioning isotopes depend on the isotopic composition of the core, changes in composition can be observed without ever directly accessing the core itself. Information from a modest-sized antineutrino detector, coupled with the well-understood principles that govern the core's evolution in time, can be used to determine whether the reactor is being operated in an illegitimate way. A group at Sandia is currently constructing a one cubic meter antineutrino detector at the San Onofre reactor site in California to demonstrate these principles.

  16. REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR TECHNICAL NUCLEAR FORENSICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, T.; Beals, D.; Sternat, M.

    2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical nuclear forensics (TNF) refers to the collection, analysis and evaluation of pre- and post-detonation radiological or nuclear materials, devices, and/or debris. TNF is an integral component, complementing traditional forensics and investigative work, to help enable the attribution of discovered radiological or nuclear material. Research is needed to improve the capabilities of TNF. One research area of interest is determining the isotopic signatures of research reactors. Research reactors are a potential source of both radiological and nuclear material. Research reactors are often the least safeguarded type of reactor; they vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power, and burn-up. Many research reactors are fueled with highly-enriched uranium (HEU), up to {approx}93% {sup 235}U, which could potentially be used as weapons material. All of them have significant amounts of radiological material with which a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) could be built. Therefore, the ability to attribute if material originated from or was produced in a specific research reactor is an important tool in providing for the security of the United States. Currently there are approximately 237 operating research reactors worldwide, another 12 are in temporary shutdown and 224 research reactors are reported as shut down. Little is currently known about the isotopic signatures of spent research reactor fuel. An effort is underway at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to analyze spent research reactor fuel to determine these signatures. Computer models, using reactor physics codes, are being compared to the measured analytes in the spent fuel. This allows for improving the reactor physics codes in modeling research reactors for the purpose of nuclear forensics. Currently the Oak Ridge Research reactor (ORR) is being modeled and fuel samples are being analyzed for comparison. Samples of an ORR spent fuel assembly were taken by SRNL for analytical and radiochemical analysis. The fuel assembly was modeled using MONTEBURNS(MCNP5/ ORIGEN2.2) and MCNPX/CINDER90. The results from the models have been compared to each other and to the measured data.

  17. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program summary, Project No. 669

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 1 of a safety evaluation report (SER), NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Program Summary,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER provides a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  18. Distributed expert systems for nuclear reactor control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otaduy, P.J.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A network of distributed expert systems is the heart of a prototype supervisory control architecture developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for an advanced multimodular reactor. Eight expert systems encode knowledge on signal acquisition, diagnostics, safeguards, and control strategies in a hybrid rule-based, multiprocessing and object-oriented distributed computing environment. An interactive simulation of a power block consisting of three reactors and one turbine provides a realistic, testbed for performance analysis of the integrated control system in real-time. Implementation details and representative reactor transients are discussed.

  19. Distributed expert systems for nuclear reactor control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otaduy, P.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A network of distributed expert systems is the heart of a prototype supervisory control architecture developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for an advanced multimodular reactor. Eight expert systems encode knowledge on signal acquisition, diagnostics, safeguards, and control strategies in a hybrid rule-based, multiprocessing and object-oriented distributed computing environment. An interactive simulation of a power block consisting of three reactors and one turbine provides a realistic, testbed for performance analysis of the integrated control system in real-time. Implementation details and representative reactor transients are discussed.

  20. PHYSICS AND ENGINEERING OF NUCLEAR REACTORS AT THE ECOLE NATIONALE SUPRIEURE DE PHYSIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PHYSICS AND ENGINEERING OF NUCLEAR REACTORS AT THE ECOLE NATIONALE SUPÃ?RIEURE DE PHYSIQUE DE. In this context, it is necessary to design and evaluate new generations of nuclear reactors as defined by the Gen. Introduction Nuclear reactors currently generate nearly one fourth of the electricity in the world, and nuclear

  1. Decision-support tool for assessing future nuclear reactor generation portfolios.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oosterlee, Cornelis W. "Kees"

    Decision-support tool for assessing future nuclear reactor generation portfolios. Shashi Jain, where especially capital costs are known to be highly uncertain. Differ- ent nuclear reactor types uncertainties in the cost elements of a nuclear power plant, to provide an optimal portfolio of nuclear reactors

  2. U.N. report concludes that Syrian site destroyed in 2007 was a nuclear reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.N. report concludes that Syrian site destroyed in 2007 was a nuclear reactor Joby Warrick, 24 May that Syria "very likely" was building a secret nuclear reactor in 2007 when the partially completed project, 2007, was a nuclear reactor intended for making fuel for nuclear bombs, a claim that Syria has

  3. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, 3rd Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed.

  4. Dual annular rotating "windowed" nuclear reflector reactor control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacox, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Drexler, Robert L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hunt, Robert N. M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lake, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core.

  5. 288 Int. J. Nuclear Energy Science and Technology, Vol. 7, No. 4, 2013 Multi-physics modelling of nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    of nuclear reactors: current practices in a nutshell Christophe Demazière Department of Applied Physics of nuclear reactors are based on the use of different solvers for resolving the different physical fields and the corresponding approximations. Keywords: nuclear reactors; multi-physics; multi-scale; modelling; deterministic

  6. Advanced Fuels Campaign Light Water Reactor Accident Tolerant Fuel Performance Metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad Merrill; Melissa Teague; Robert Youngblood; Larry Ott; Kevin Robb; Michael Todosow; Chris Stanek; Mitchell Farmer; Michael Billone; Robert Montgomery; Nicholas Brown; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safe, reliable and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the United States’ nuclear industry. As a result, continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels, remains central to industry’s success. Decades of research combined with continual operation have produced steady advancements in technology and yielded an extensive base of data, experience, and knowledge on light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance under both normal and accident conditions. In 2011, following the Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. As a result of direction from the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) initiated an Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) Development program. The complex multiphysics behavior of LWR nuclear fuel makes defining specific material or design improvements difficult; as such, establishing qualitative attributes is critical to guide the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. This report summarizes a common set of technical evaluation metrics to aid in the optimization and down selection of candidate designs. As used herein, “metrics” describe a set of technical bases by which multiple concepts can be fairly evaluated against a common baseline and against one another. Furthermore, this report describes a proposed technical evaluation methodology that can be applied to assess the ability of each concept to meet performance and safety goals relative to the current UO2 – zirconium alloy system and relative to one another. The resultant ranked evaluation can then inform concept down-selection, such that the most promising accident tolerant fuel design option(s) can continue to be developed for lead test rod or lead test assembly insertion into a commercial reactor within the desired timeframe (by 2022).

  7. Spectral Structure of Electron Antineutrinos from Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Dwyer; T. J. Langford

    2014-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent measurements of the positron energy spectrum obtained from inverse beta decay interactions of reactor electron antineutrinos show an excess in the 4 to 6 MeV region relative to current predictions. First-principle calculations of fission and beta decay processes within a typical pressurized water reactor core identify prominent fission daughter isotopes as a possible origin for this excess. These calculations also predict percent-level substructure in the antineutrino spectrum due to Coulomb effects in beta decay. Precise measurement of this substructure can constrain nuclear reactor physics. The substructure can be a systematic uncertainty for measurements utilizing the detailed spectral shape.

  8. Spectral Structure of Electron Antineutrinos from Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dwyer, D A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent measurements of the positron energy spectrum obtained from inverse beta decay interactions of reactor electron antineutrinos show an excess in the 4 to 6 MeV region relative to current predictions. First-principle calculations of fission and beta decay processes within a typical pressurized water reactor core identify prominent fission daughter isotopes as a possible origin for this excess. These calculations also predict percent-level substructure in the antineutrino spectrum due to Coulomb effects in beta decay. Precise measurement of this substructure can constrain nuclear reactor physics. The substructure can be a systematic uncertainty for measurements utilizing the detailed spectral shape.

  9. Report from the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on On-Line Monitoring Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Baldwin; Magdy Tawfik; Leonard Bond

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of expanding the use of nuclear power, interest is growing in methods of determining the feasibility of longer term operation for the U.S. fleet of nuclear power plants, particularly operation beyond 60 years. To help establish the scientific and technical basis for such longer term operation, the DOE-NE has established a research and development (R&D) objective. This objective seeks to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which addresses the needs of this objective, is being developed in collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of nuclear power plants. The LWRS Program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy and environmental security. In moving to identify priorities and plan activities, the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on On-Line Monitoring (OLM) Technologies was held June 10–12, 2010, in Seattle, Washington. The workshop was run to enable industry stakeholders and researchers to identify the nuclear industry needs in the areas of future OLM technologies and corresponding technology gaps and research capabilities. It also sought to identify approaches for collaboration that would be able to bridge or fill the technology gaps. This report is the meeting proceedings, documenting the presentations and discussions of the workshop and is intended to serve as a basis for a plan which is under development that will enable the I&C research pathway to achieve its goals. Benefits to the nuclear industry accruing from On Line Monitoring Technology cannot be ignored. Information gathered thus far has contributed significantly to the Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. DOE has shown great interest in supplying necessary support to help this industry to move forward as indicated by the recent workshop conducted in support of this interest. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on On-Line Monitoring Technologies provided an opportunity for industry stakeholders and researchers to gather in order to collectively identify the nuclear industry’s needs in the areas of OLM technologies including diagnostics, prognostics, and RUL. Additionally, the workshop provided the opportunity for attendees to pinpoint technology gaps and research capabilities along with the fostering of future collaboration in order to bridge the gaps identified. Attendees concluded that a research and development program is critical to future nuclear operations. Program activities would result in enhancing and modernizing the critical capabilities of instrumentation, information, and control technologies for long-term nuclear asset operation and management. Adopting a comprehensive On Line Monitoring research program intends to: • Develop national capabilities at the university and laboratory level • Create or renew infrastructure needed for long-term research, education, and testing • Support development and testing of needed I&C technologies • Improve understanding of, confidence in, and decisions to employ these new technologies in the nuclear power sector and achieve successful licensing and deployment.

  10. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Meyer

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this meeting were to capture the observations, insights, issues, concerns, and ideas of those involved in the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center (TAMU NSC) TRIGA Reactor Conversion so that future efforts can be conducted with greater effectiveness, efficiency, and with fewer challenges. This workshop was held in conjunction with a similar workshop for the University of Florida Reactor Conversion. Some of the generic lessons from that workshop are included in this report for completeness.

  11. Low exchange element for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brogli, Rudolf H. (Aarau, CH); Shamasunder, Bangalore I. (Encinitas, CA); Seth, Shivaji S. (Encinitas, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow exchange element is presented which lowers temperature gradients in fuel elements and reduces maximum local temperature within high temperature gas-cooled reactors. The flow exchange element is inserted within a column of fuel elements where it serves to redirect coolant flow. Coolant which has been flowing in a hotter region of the column is redirected to a cooler region, and coolant which has been flowing in the cooler region of the column is redirected to the hotter region. The safety, efficiency, and longevity of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor is thereby enhanced.

  12. Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schenter, R.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted.

  13. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketing | Department ofEnergy Nuclear Reactor

  14. Shippingport operations with the Light Water Breeder Reactor core. (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budd, W.A. (ed.)

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the operation of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station during the LWBR (Light Water Breeder Reactor) Core lifetime. It also summarizes the plant-oriented operations during the period preceding LWBR startup, which include the defueling of The Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 (PWR-2) and the installation of the LWBR Core, and the operations associated with the defueling of LWBR. The intent of this report is to examine LWBR experience in retrospect and present pertinent and significant aspects of LWBR operations that relate primarily to the nuclear portion of the Station. The nonnuclear portion of the Station is discussed only as it relates to overall plant operation or to unusual problems which result from the use of conventional equipment in radioactive environments. 30 refs., 69 figs., 27 tabs.

  15. Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Undine Shoop, Chief, Health Physics and Human Performance Branch, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  16. The impact of passive safety systems on desirability of advanced light water reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eul, Ryan C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work investigates whether the advanced light water reactor designs with passive safety systems are more desirable than advanced reactor designs with active safety systems from the point of view of uncertainty in the ...

  17. Foundational development of an advanced nuclear reactor integrated safety code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarno, Kevin (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Lorber, Alfred Abraham; Pryor, Richard J.; Spotz, William F.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Belcourt, Kenneth (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Hooper, Russell Warren; Humphries, Larry LaRon

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the activities and results of a Sandia LDRD project whose objective was to develop and demonstrate foundational aspects of a next-generation nuclear reactor safety code that leverages advanced computational technology. The project scope was directed towards the systems-level modeling and simulation of an advanced, sodium cooled fast reactor, but the approach developed has a more general applicability. The major accomplishments of the LDRD are centered around the following two activities. (1) The development and testing of LIME, a Lightweight Integrating Multi-physics Environment for coupling codes that is designed to enable both 'legacy' and 'new' physics codes to be combined and strongly coupled using advanced nonlinear solution methods. (2) The development and initial demonstration of BRISC, a prototype next-generation nuclear reactor integrated safety code. BRISC leverages LIME to tightly couple the physics models in several different codes (written in a variety of languages) into one integrated package for simulating accident scenarios in a liquid sodium cooled 'burner' nuclear reactor. Other activities and accomplishments of the LDRD include (a) further development, application and demonstration of the 'non-linear elimination' strategy to enable physics codes that do not provide residuals to be incorporated into LIME, (b) significant extensions of the RIO CFD code capabilities, (c) complex 3D solid modeling and meshing of major fast reactor components and regions, and (d) an approach for multi-physics coupling across non-conformal mesh interfaces.

  18. A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for sabotage of nuclear plants or the potential forAccidents in Large Nuclear Plants" (AEC Report, WASH-/40),YEAR FROM POTENTIAL NUCLEAR PLANT ACCIDENTS(a) Consequence

  19. Automatic coolant flow control device for a nuclear reactor assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, E.

    1984-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A device which controls coolant flow through a nuclear reactor assembly comprises a baffle means at the exit end of said assembly having a plurality of orifices, and a bimetallic member in operative relation to the baffle means such that at increased temperatures said bimetallic member deforms to unblock some of said orifices and allow increased coolant flow therethrough.

  20. advanced-gas-cooled-nuclear-reactor materials evaluation: Topics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advanced-gas-cooled-nuclear-reactor materials evaluation First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index...

  1. Passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gou, Perng-Fei (Saratoga, CA); Wade, Gentry E. (Saratoga, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  2. Method of controlling crystallite size in nuclear-reactor fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lloyd, Milton H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Collins, Jack L. (Knoxville, TN); Shell, Sam E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved spherules for making enhanced forms of nuclear-reactor fuels are prepared by internal gelation procedures within a sol-gel operation and are accomplished by first boiling the concentrated HMTA-urea feed solution before engaging in the spherule-forming operation thereby effectively controlling crystallite size in the product spherules.

  3. Automatic coolant flow control device for a nuclear reactor assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, Ernest (Wilmette, IL)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device which controls coolant flow through a nuclear reactor assembly comprises a baffle means at the exit end of said assembly having a plurality of orifices, and a bimetallic member in operative relation to the baffle means such that at increased temperatures said bimetallic member deforms to unblock some of said orifices and allow increased coolant flow therethrough.

  4. Natural circulating passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gou, Perng-Fei (Saratoga, CA); Wade, Gentry E. (Saratoga, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  5. Safety program considerations for space nuclear reactor systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cropp, L.O.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the necessity for in-depth safety program planning for space nuclear reactor systems. The objectives of the safety program and a proposed task structure is presented for meeting those objectives. A proposed working relationship between the design and independent safety groups is suggested. Examples of safety-related design philosophies are given.

  6. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Research and Development Program Plan -- Fiscal Year 2009–2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power has reliably and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. By the year 2030, domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to grow to levels of 16 to 36% higher than 2007 levels. At the same time, most currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their 60-year operating licenses. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary this year. U.S. regulators have begun considering extended operations of nuclear power plants and the research needed to support long-term operations. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Research and Development (R&D) Program, developed and sponsored by the Department of Energy, is performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs. The purpose of the LWRS R&D Program is to provide technical foundations for licensing and managing long-term, safe and economical operation of the current operating nuclear power plants. The LWRS R&D Program vision is captured in the following statements: Existing operating nuclear power plants will continue to safely provide clean and economic electricity well beyond their first license- extension period, significantly contributing to reduction of United States and global carbon emissions, enhancement of national energy security, and protection of the environment. There is a comprehensive technical basis for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, economical operation of nuclear power plants. Sustaining the existing operating U.S. fleet also will improve its international engagement and leadership on nuclear safety and security issues.

  7. Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anitescu, Mihai

    Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants ANL-AFCI-168 of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants ANL-AFCI-168 by G. Palmiotti, J. Cahalan, P. Pfeiffer, T;2 ANL-AFCI-168 Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants G

  8. Piccolo Micromegas: first in-core measurements in a nuclear reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Piccolo Micromegas: first in-core measurements in a nuclear reactor J. Pancina , S. Andriamonjea in the coupling of an accelerator with a nuclear reactor. Such systems will need neutron detectors working domains. For the first time, Piccolo Micromegas has been placed in the core of a nuclear reactor

  9. FRP Retrofit of the Ring-Beam of a Nuclear Reactor Containment Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SP·215-18 FRP Retrofit of the Ring-Beam of a Nuclear Reactor Containment Structure by M. Demers. A for the storage of the moderately contaminated nuclear reactor. The enforcement of more rigorous environmental. 1. HISTORY 1.1 Decommissioning of the Reactor The Gentilly-I nuclear power plant, located

  10. Status of Potential New Commercial Nuclear Reactors in the United Release Date: December 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    1 Status of Potential New Commercial Nuclear Reactors in the United States Release Date: December for building new nuclear power reactors in the United States. Evidence of this includes press releases and conditionally operate new commercial nuclear reactors. Actual applications will also be included on future

  11. Identification and localization of absorbers of variable strength in nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    Identification and localization of absorbers of variable strength in nuclear reactors C. Demazie evenly distrib- uted throughout the core of a commercial nuclear reactor. The novelty and ergodic in time, can be used for many diagnostic purposes in nuclear reactors. Many examples can be found

  12. Walking and Climbing Service Robots for Safety Inspection of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng

    Walking and Climbing Service Robots for Safety Inspection of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessels B of Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK Abstract: Nuclear reactor and the usefulness of these robots for improving safety inspection of nuclear reactors in general are discussed

  13. Analysis of granular flow in a pebble-bed nuclear reactor Chris H. Rycroft,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazant, Martin Z.

    Analysis of granular flow in a pebble-bed nuclear reactor Chris H. Rycroft,1 Gary S. Grest,2 James February 2006; published 24 August 2006 Pebble-bed nuclear reactor technology, which is currently being States, the Modular Pebble Bed Reactor MPBR 4,8 is a candidate for the next generation nuclear plant

  14. Japanese set to direct `sun-power' nuclear reactor in France September 16, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Japanese set to direct `sun-power' nuclear reactor in France September 16, 2005 Japan has been develop three generations of nuclear reactors and includes six low-capacity experimental reactors and a 17 asked to nominate the chief of an international project to build a multi- billion-dollar nuclear fusion

  15. A NOVEL MICROMEGAS DETECTOR FOR IN-CORE NUCLEAR REACTOR NEUTRON FLUX MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 A NOVEL MICROMEGAS DETECTOR FOR IN-CORE NUCLEAR REACTOR NEUTRON FLUX MEASUREMENTS S. ANDRIAMONJE Talence Cedex, France Future fast nuclear reactors designed for energy production and transmutation to neutron detection inside nuclear reactor is given. The advantage of this detector over conventional

  16. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electrical Power Production, 5th Quarterly Report, October - December 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip MacDonald; Jacopo Buongiorno; Cliff Davis; J. Stephen Herring; Kevan Weaver; Ron Latanision; Bryce Mitton; Gary Was; Luca Oriani; Mario Carelli; Dmitry Paramonov; Lawrence Conway

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is to evaluate the feasibility of supercritical light water cooled reactors for electric power production. The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies for the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If no additional moderator is added to the fuel rod lattice, it is possible to attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions in a supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain a hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity. One can also add moderation and design a thermal spectrum SCWR that can also burn actinides. The project is organized into three tasks:

  17. Operating strategy generators for nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solovyev, D. A., E-mail: and@est.mephi.ru; Semenov, A. A.; Shchukin, N. V. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Operating strategy generators, i.e., the software intended for increasing the efficiency of work of nuclear power plant operators, are discussed. The possibilities provided by the domestic and foreign operating-strategy generators are analyzed.

  18. Nuclear Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627 Federal Register /76 LosExperimentalSecurityReactor

  19. Assessment of the use of extended burnup fuel in light water power reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, D.A.; Bailey, W.J.; Beyer, C.E.; Bold, F.C.; Tawil, J.J.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study has been conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the environmental and economic impacts associated with the use of extended burnup nuclear fuel in light water power reactors. It has been proposed that current batch average burnup levels of 33 GWd/t uranium be increased to above 50 GWd/t. The environmental effects of extending fuel burnup during normal operations and during accident events and the economic effects of cost changes on the fuel cycle are discussed in this report. The physical effects of extended burnup on the fuel and the fuel assembly are also presented as a basis for the environmental and economic assessments. Environmentally, this burnup increase would have no significant impact over that of normal burnup. Economically, the increased burnup would have favorable effects, consisting primarily of a reduction: (1) total fuel requirements; (2) reactor downtime for fuel replacement; (3) the number of fuel shipments to and from reactor sites; and (4) repository storage requirements. 61 refs., 4 figs., 27 tabs.

  20. Development of Advanced Accident Tolerant Fuels for Commercial Light Water Reactors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safe, reliable and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the United States’ nuclear industry. Continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels remains central to industry’s success. Decades of research combined with continual operation have produced steady advancements in technology and yielded an extensive base of data, experience, and knowledge on light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance under both normal and accident conditions. Thanks to efforts by both the U.S. government and private companies, nuclear technologies have advanced over time to optimize economic operations in nuclear utilitiesmore »while ensuring safety. One of the missions of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) is to develop nuclear fuels and claddings with enhanced accident tolerance. In 2011, following the Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. As a result of direction from the U.S. Congress, DOE-NE initiated Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) development as a primary component of the Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC). Prior to the unfortunate events at Fukushima, the emphasis for advanced LWR fuel development was on improving nuclear fuel performance in terms of increased burnup for waste minimization, increased power density for power upgrades, and increased fuel reliability. Fukushima highlighted some undesirable performance characteristics of the standard fuel system during severe accidents, including accelerated hydrogen production under certain circumstances. Thus, fuel system behavior under design basis accident and severe accident conditions became the primary focus for advanced fuels while still striving for improved performance under normal operating conditions to ensure that proposed new fuels will be economically viable. The goal of the ATF development effort is to demonstrate performance with a lead test assembly or lead test rod (LTR) or lead test assembly (LTA) irradiation in a commercial power reactor by 2022. Research and development activities are being conducted at multiple DOE national laboratories, universities and within industry with support from the DOE program. A brief program overview and status are provided.« less

  1. Development of Advanced Accident Tolerant Fuels for Commercial Light Water Reactors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safe, reliable and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the United States’ nuclear industry. Continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels remains central to industry’s success. Decades of research combined with continual operation have produced steady advancements in technology and yielded an extensive base of data, experience, and knowledge on light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance under both normal and accident conditions. Thanks to efforts by both the U.S. government and private companies, nuclear technologies have advanced over time to optimize economic operations in nuclear utilities while ensuring safety. One of the missions of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) is to develop nuclear fuels and claddings with enhanced accident tolerance. In 2011, following the Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. As a result of direction from the U.S. Congress, DOE-NE initiated Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) development as a primary component of the Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC). Prior to the unfortunate events at Fukushima, the emphasis for advanced LWR fuel development was on improving nuclear fuel performance in terms of increased burnup for waste minimization, increased power density for power upgrades, and increased fuel reliability. Fukushima highlighted some undesirable performance characteristics of the standard fuel system during severe accidents, including accelerated hydrogen production under certain circumstances. Thus, fuel system behavior under design basis accident and severe accident conditions became the primary focus for advanced fuels while still striving for improved performance under normal operating conditions to ensure that proposed new fuels will be economically viable. The goal of the ATF development effort is to demonstrate performance with a lead test assembly or lead test rod (LTR) or lead test assembly (LTA) irradiation in a commercial power reactor by 2022. Research and development activities are being conducted at multiple DOE national laboratories, universities and within industry with support from the DOE program. A brief program overview and status are provided.

  2. Accident Performance of Light Water Reactor Cladding Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Andrew T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    During a loss of coolant accident as experienced at Fukushima, inadequate cooling of the reactor core forces component temperatures ever higher where they must withstand aggressive chemical environments. Conventional zirconium cladding alloys will readily oxidize in the presence of water vapor at elevated temperatures, rapidly degrading and likely failing. A cladding breach removes the critical barrier between actinides and fission products and the coolant, greatly increasing the probability of the release of radioactivity in the event of a containment failure. These factors have driven renewed international interest in both study and improvement of the materials used in commercial light water reactors. Characterization of a candidate cladding alloy or oxidation mitigation technique requires understanding of both the oxidation kinetics and hydrogen production as a function of temperature and atmosphere conditions. Researchers in the MST division supported by the DOE-NE Fuel Cycle Research and Development program are working to evaluate and quantify these parameters across a wide range of proposed cladding materials. The primary instrument employed is a simultaneous thermal analyzer (STA) equipped with a specialized water vapor furnace capable of maintaining temperatures above 1200 C in a range of atmospheres and water vapor contents. The STA utilizes thermogravimetric analysis and a coupled mass spectrometer to measure in situ oxidation and hydrogen production of candidate materials. This capability is unprecedented in study of materials under consideration for reactor cladding use, and is currently being expanded to investigate proposed coating techniques as well as the effect of coating defects on corrosion resistance.

  3. The use of reduced-moderation light water reactors for transuranic isotope burning in thorium fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindley, Benjamin A.

    2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    THE USE OF REDUCED-MODERATION LIGHT WATER REACTORS FOR TRANSURANIC ISOTOPE BURNING IN THORIUM FUEL Benjamin Andrew Lindley St Catharine?s College Department of Engineering University of Cambridge A thesis... of Engineering as stated in the Memorandum to Graduate Students. Benjamin Andrew Lindley The Use of Reduced-moderation Light Water Reactors for Transuranic Isotope Burning in Thorium Fuel B. A. Lindley Light water reactors (LWRs) are the world...

  4. Modeling of the performance of weapons MOX fuel in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvis, J.; Bellanger, P.; Medvedev, P.G.; Peddicord, K.L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Gellene, G.I. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both the Russian Federation and the US are pursing mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel in light water reactors (LWRs) for the disposition of excess plutonium from disassembled nuclear warheads. Fuel performance models are used which describe the behavior of MOX fuel during irradiation under typical power reactor conditions. The objective of this project is to perform the analysis of the thermal, mechanical, and chemical behavior of weapons MOX fuel pins under LWR conditions. If fuel performance analysis indicates potential questions, it then becomes imperative to assess the fuel pin design and the proposed operating strategies to reduce the probability of clad failure and the associated release of radioactive fission products into the primary coolant system. Applying the updated code to anticipated fuel and reactor designs, which would be used for weapons MOX fuel in the US, and analyzing the performance of the WWER-100 fuel for Russian weapons plutonium disposition are addressed in this report. The COMETHE code was found to do an excellent job in predicting fuel central temperatures. Also, despite minor predicted differences in thermo-mechanical behavior of MOX and UO{sub 2} fuels, the preliminary estimate indicated that, during normal reactor operations, these deviations remained within limits foreseen by fuel pin design.

  5. Light-water breeder reactors: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning prebreeder and breeder reactors based on light-water-breeder (LWBR) Type 1 modules; light-water backfit prebreeder supplying advanced breeder; light-water backfit prebreeder/seed-blanket breeder system; and light-water backfit low-gain converter using medium-enrichment uranium, supplying a light-water backfit high-gain converter.

  6. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY12 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Johansen

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary report for Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) activities related to the R. E. Ginna and Nine Mile Point Unit 1 for FY12.

  7. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY13 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Johansen

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary report for Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) activities related to the R. E. Ginna and Nine Mile Point Unit 1 for FY13.

  8. Light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, July to September 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors; transient fuel response and fission-product release; and clad properties for code verification.

  9. Small Modular Nuclear Reactors | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou are here Home » SmallEnergyReactor

  10. Nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate direct containment heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tutu, Narinder K. (Manorville, NY); Ginsberg, Theodore (East Setauket, NY); Klages, John R. (Mattituck, NY)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A light water nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate the extent of direct containment heating of the reactor containment building. The structure includes a retention chamber for retaining molten core material away from the upper regions of the reactor containment building when a severe accident causes the bottom of the pressure vessel of the reactor to fail and discharge such molten material under high pressure through the reactor cavity into the retention chamber. In combination with the melt-retention chamber there is provided a passageway that includes molten core droplet deflector vanes and has gas vent means in its upper surface, which means are operable to deflect molten core droplets into the retention chamber while allowing high pressure steam and gases to be vented into the upper regions of the containment building. A plurality of platforms are mounted within the passageway and the melt-retention structure to direct the flow of molten core material and help retain it within the melt-retention chamber. In addition, ribs are mounted at spaced positions on the floor of the melt-retention chamber, and grid means are positioned at the entrance side of the retention chamber. The grid means develop gas back pressure that helps separate the molten core droplets from discharged high pressure steam and gases, thereby forcing the steam and gases to vent into the upper regions of the reactor containment building.

  11. Progress in evaluation and improvement in nondestructive examination reliability for inservice inspection of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) and characterize fabrication flaws in reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doctor, S.R.; Bowey, R.E.; Good, M.S.; Friley, J.R.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Taylor, T.T.; Heasler, P.G.; Andersen, E.S.; Diaz, A.A.; Greenwood, M.S.; Hockey, R.L.; Schuster, G.J.; Spanner, J.C.; Vo, T.V.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a review of the work conducted under two programs. One (NDE Reliability Program) is a multi-year program addressing the reliability of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for the inservice inspection (ISI) of light water reactor components. This program examines the reliability of current NDE, the effectiveness of evolving technologies, and provides assessments and recommendations to ensure that the NDE is applied at the right time, in the right place with sufficient effectiveness that defects of importance to structural integrity will be reliably detected and accurately characterized. The second program (Characterizing Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessels) is assembling a data base to quantify the distribution of fabrication flaws that exist in US nuclear reactor pressure vessels with respect to density, size, type, and location. These programs will be discussed as two separate sections in this report. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Investigation of cracking and leaking of nuclear reactor pools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, William Bernard

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    *ion of the pool was lined with a 0. 2y in, aluminum I'xxer which hss since corroded. snd. pitted. allowing the dent nex slimed watel' used xxx the pool to come into dix'ec't contact with the concx etc pool wall. Pigure Hc, LacBtx one oi l&BkBg?e A mare detai3... good, Job i'or several years without, renovation, [0] This type of reactor has, however, developed. some maJor problems that have?or will, require r'enovation ~ Figure l. Nuclear Science Center Reactor Facie. ity at, Texas A& University...

  13. LIGHT WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM ADVANCED INSTRUMENTATION, INFORMATION, AND CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGIES TECHNICAL PROGRAM PLAN FOR 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallbert, Bruce; Thomas, Ken

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  14. Light Vector Mesons in the Nuclear Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. H. Wood; R. Nasseripour; D. P. Weygand; C. Djalali; C. Tur; U. Mosel; P. Muehlich; CLAS Collaboration

    2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The light vector mesons ($\\rho$, $\\omega$, and $\\phi$) were produced in deuterium, carbon, titanium, and iron targets in a search for possible in-medium modifications to the properties of the $\\rho$ meson at normal nuclear densities and zero temperature. The vector mesons were detected with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) via their decays to $e^{+}e^{-}$. The rare leptonic decay was chosen to reduce final-state interactions. A combinatorial background was subtracted from the invariant mass spectra using a well-established event-mixing technique. The $\\rho$ meson mass spectrum was extracted after the $\\omega$ and $\\phi$ signals were removed in a nearly model-independent way. Comparisons were made between the $\\rho$ mass spectra from the heavy targets ($A > 2$) with the mass spectrum extracted from the deuterium target. With respect to the $\\rho$-meson mass, we obtain a small shift compatible with zero. Also, we measure widths consistent with standard nuclear many-body effects such as collisional broadening and Fermi motion.

  15. Heat barrier for use in a nuclear reactor facility

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keegan, Charles P. (South Huntingdon Twp., Westmoreland County, PA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal barrier for use in a nuclear reactor facility is disclosed herein. Generally, the thermal barrier comprises a flexible, heat-resistant web mounted over the annular space between the reactor vessel and the guard vessel in order to prevent convection currents generated in the nitrogen atmosphere in this space from entering the relatively cooler atmosphere of the reactor cavity which surrounds these vessels. Preferably, the flexible web includes a blanket of heat-insulating material formed from fibers of a refractory material, such as alumina and silica, sandwiched between a heat-resistant, metallic cloth made from stainless steel wire. In use, the web is mounted between the upper edges of the guard vessel and the flange of a sealing ring which surrounds the reactor vessel with a sufficient enough slack to avoid being pulled taut as a result of thermal differential expansion between the two vessels. The flexible web replaces the rigid and relatively complicated structures employed in the prior art for insulating the reactor cavity from the convection currents generated between the reactor vessel and the guard vessel.

  16. Synergistic smart fuel for in-pile nuclear reactor measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.A.; Kotter, D.K. [Idaho National Laboratories, Idaho Falls (United States); Ali, R.A.; Garrett, S.L. [Penn State University, University Park, State College, PA 16801 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermo-acoustic fuel rod sensor developed in this research has demonstrated a novel technique for monitoring the temperature within the core of a nuclear reactor or the temperature of the surrounding heat-transfer fluid. It uses the heat from the nuclear fuel to generate sustained acoustic oscillations whose frequency will be indicative of the temperature. Converting a nuclear fuel rod into this type of thermo-acoustic sensor simply requires the insertion of a porous material (stack). This sensor has demonstrated a synergy with the elevated temperatures that exist within the nuclear reactor using materials that have only minimal susceptibility to high-energy particle fluxes. When the sensor is in operation, the sound waves radiated from the fuel rod resonator will propagate through the surrounding cooling fluid. The frequency of these oscillations is directly correlated with an effective temperature within the fuel rod resonator. This device is self-powered and is operational even in case of total loss of power of the reactor.

  17. SNIF: A Futuristic Neutrino Probe for Undeclared Nuclear Fission Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thierry Lasserre; Maximilien Fechner; Guillaume Mention; Romain Reboulleau; Michel Cribier; Alain Letourneau; David Lhuillier

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Today reactor neutrino experiments are at the cutting edge of fundamental research in particle physics. Understanding the neutrino is far from complete, but thanks to the impressive progress in this field over the last 15 years, a few research groups are seriously considering that neutrinos could be useful for society. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) works with its Member States to promote safe, secure and peaceful nuclear technologies. In a context of international tension and nuclear renaissance, neutrino detectors could help IAEA to enforce the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). In this article we discuss a futuristic neutrino application to detect and localize an undeclared nuclear reactor from across borders. The SNIF (Secret Neutrino Interactions Finder) concept proposes to use a few hundred thousand tons neutrino detectors to unveil clandestine fission reactors. Beyond previous studies we provide estimates of all known background sources as a function of the detector's longitude, latitude and depth, and we discuss how they impact the detectability.

  18. Nuclear reactor spacer grid and ductless core component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Karnesky, Richard A. (Richland, WA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a nuclear reactor spacer grid member for use in a liquid cooled nuclear reactor and to a ductless core component employing a plurality of these spacer grid members. The spacer grid member is of the egg-shell type and is constructed so that the walls of the cell members of the grid member are formed of a single thickness of metal to avoid tolerance problems. Within each cell member is a hydraulic spring which laterally constrains the nuclear material bearing rod which passes through each cell member against a hardstop in response to coolant flow through the cell member. This hydraulic spring is also suitable for use in a water cooled nuclear reactor. A core component constructed of, among other components, a plurality of these spacer grid members, avoids the use of a full length duct by providing spacer sleeves about the sodium tubes passing through the spacer grid members at locations between the grid members, thereby maintaining a predetermined space between adjacent grid members.

  19. Requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemicalseparation plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmiotti, G.; Cahalan, J.; Pfeiffer, P.; Sofu, T.; Taiwo, T.; Wei,T.; Yacout, A.; Yang, W.; Siegel, A.; Insepov, Z.; Anitescu, M.; Hovland,P.; Pereira, C.; Regalbuto, M.; Copple, J.; Willamson, M.

    2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants that are of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. Justification for advanced simulation and some examples of grand challenges that will benefit from it are provided. An integrated software tool that has its main components, whenever possible based on first principles, is proposed as possible future approach for dealing with the complex problems linked to the simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants. The main benefits that are associated with a better integrated simulation have been identified as: a reduction of design margins, a decrease of the number of experiments in support of the design process, a shortening of the developmental design cycle, and a better understanding of the physical phenomena and the related underlying fundamental processes. For each component of the proposed integrated software tool, background information, functional requirements, current tools and approach, and proposed future approaches have been provided. Whenever possible, current uncertainties have been quoted and existing limitations have been presented. Desired target accuracies with associated benefits to the different aspects of the nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants were also given. In many cases the possible gains associated with a better simulation have been identified, quantified, and translated into economical benefits.

  20. Sustained Recycle in Light Water and Sodium-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Michael A. Pope; Gilles J. Youinou

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain recycle of used fuel in either thermal or fast reactors. This paper examines multi-recycle potential performance by considering three recycling approaches and calculating several fuel cycle parameters, including heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; radiotoxicity of waste; and uranium utilization. The first recycle approach is homogeneous mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in a light water reactor (LWR). The transuranic portion of the MOX was varied among Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. (All-TRU means all isotopes through Cf-252.) The Pu case was allowed to go to 10% Pu in fresh fuel, but when the minor actinides were included, the transuranic enrichment was kept below 8% to satisfy the expected void reactivity constraint. The uranium portion of the MOX was enriched uranium. That enrichment was increased (to as much as 6.5%) to keep the fuel critical for a typical LWR irradiation. The second approach uses heterogeneous inert matrix fuel (IMF) assemblies in an LWR - a mix of IMF and traditional UOX pins. The uranium-free IMF fuel pins were Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. The UOX pins were limited to 4.95% U-235 enrichment. The number of IMF pins was set so that the amount of TRU in discharged fuel from recycle N (from both IMF and UOX pins) was made into the new IMF pins for recycle N+1. Up to 60 of the 264 pins in a fuel assembly were IMF. The assembly-average TRU content was 1-6%. The third approach uses fast reactor oxide fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor with transuranic conversion ratio of 0.50 and 1.00. The transuranic conversion ratio is the production of transuranics divided by destruction of transuranics. The FR at CR=0.50 is similar to the CR for the MOX case. The fast reactor cases had a transuranic content of 33-38%, higher than IMF or MOX.

  1. Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility Geotechnical Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, M.R.

    2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A geotechnical investigation program has been completed for the Circulating Light Water Reactor - Tritium Extraction Facility (CLWR-TEF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The program consisted of reviewing previous geotechnical and geologic data and reports, performing subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing and geologic and engineering analyses. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the subsurface conditions for the CLWR-TEF in terms of subsurface stratigraphy and engineering properties for design and to perform selected engineering analyses. The objectives of the evaluation were to establish site-specific geologic conditions, obtain representative engineering properties of the subsurface and potential fill materials, evaluate the lateral and vertical extent of any soft zones encountered, and perform engineering analyses for slope stability, bearing capacity and settlement, and liquefaction potential. In addition, provide general recommendations for construction and earthwork.

  2. Passive heat-transfer means for nuclear reactors. [LMFBR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burelbach, J.P.

    1982-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved passive cooling arrangement is disclosed for maintaining adjacent or related components of a nuclear reactor within specified temperature differences. Specifically, heat pipes are operatively interposed between the components, with the vaporizing section of the heat pipe proximate the hot component operable to cool it and the primary condensing section of the heat pipe proximate the other and cooler component operable to heat it. Each heat pipe further has a secondary condensing section that is located outwardly beyond the reactor confinement and in a secondary heat sink, such as air ambient the containment, that is cooler than the other reactor component. By having many such heat pipes, an emergency passive cooling system is defined that is operative without electrical power.

  3. COMSOL-based Nuclear Reactor Kinetics Studies at the HFIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, David [ORNL] [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL] [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL] [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The computational ability to accurately predict the dynamic behavior of a nuclear reactor core in response to reactivity-induced perturbations is an important subject in reactor physics. Space-time and point kinetics methodologies were developed for the purpose of studying the transient-induced behavior of the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) compact core. The space-time simulations employed the three-energy-group neutron diffusion equations, and transients initiated by control cylinder and hydraulic tube rabbit ejections were studied. The work presented here is the first step towards creating a comprehensive multiphysics methodology for studying the dynamic behavior of the HFIR core during reactivity perturbations. The results of these studies show that point kinetics is adequate for small perturbations in which the power distribution is assumed to be time-independent, but space-time methods must be utilized to determine localized effects.

  4. Support arrangements for core modules of nuclear reactors. [PWR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bollinger, L.R.

    1983-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A support arrangement is provided for the core modules of a nuclear reactor which provides support access through the control drive mechanisms of the reactor. This arrangement provides axial support of individual reactor core modules from the pressure vessel head in a manner which permits attachment and detachment of the modules from the head to be accomplished through the control drive mechanisms after their leadscrews have been removed. The arrangement includes a module support nut which is suspended from the pressure vessel head and screw threaded to the shroud housing for the module. A spline lock prevents loosening of the screw connection. An installation tool assembly, including a cell lifting and preloading tool and a torquing tool, fits through the control drive mechanism and provides lifting of the shroud housing while disconnecting the spline lock, as well as application of torque to the module support nut.

  5. Collecting and recirculating condensate in a nuclear reactor containment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An arrangement passively cools a nuclear reactor in the event of an emergency, condensing and recycling vaporized cooling water. The reactor is surrounded by a containment structure and has a storage tank for cooling liquid, such as water, vented to the containment structure by a port. The storage tank preferably is located inside the containment structure and is thermally coupleable to the reactor, e.g. by a heat exchanger, such that water in the storage tank is boiled off to carry away heat energy. The water is released as a vapor (steam) and condenses on the cooler interior surfaces of the containment structure. The condensed water flows downwardly due to gravity and is collected and routed back to the storage tank. One or more gutters are disposed along the interior wall of the containment structure for collecting the condensate from the wall. Piping is provided for communicating the condensate from the gutters to the storage tank.

  6. Collecting and recirculating condensate in a nuclear reactor containment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, T.L.

    1993-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An arrangement passively cools a nuclear reactor in the event of an emergency, condensing and recycling vaporized cooling water. The reactor is surrounded by a containment structure and has a storage tank for cooling liquid, such as water, vented to the containment structure by a port. The storage tank preferably is located inside the containment structure and is thermally coupleable to the reactor, e.g. by a heat exchanger, such that water in the storage tank is boiled off to carry away heat energy. The water is released as a vapor (steam) and condenses on the cooler interior surfaces of the containment structure. The condensed water flows downwardly due to gravity and is collected and routed back to the storage tank. One or more gutters are disposed along the interior wall of the containment structure for collecting the condensate from the wall. Piping is provided for communicating the condensate from the gutters to the storage tank. 3 figures.

  7. Removable check valve for use in a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Charlton (Calabasas, CA); Gutzmann, Edward A. (Simi Valley, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A removable check valve for interconnecting the discharge duct of a pump and an inlet coolant duct of a reactor core in a pool-type nuclear reactor. A manifold assembly is provided having an outer periphery affixed to and in fluid communication with the discharge duct of the pump and has an inner periphery having at least one opening therethrough. A housing containing a check valve is located within the inner periphery of the manifold. The upper end of the housing has an opening in alignment with the opening in the manifold assembly, and seals are provided above and below the openings. The lower end of the housing is adapted for fluid communication with the inlet duct of the reactor core.

  8. Software reliability and safety in nuclear reactor protection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, J.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning the development, use and regulation of computer systems in nuclear reactor protection systems in such a way as to enhance reliability and safety is a complex issue. This report is one of a series of reports from the Computer Safety and Reliability Group, Lawrence Livermore that investigates different aspects of computer software in reactor National Laboratory, that investigates different aspects of computer software in reactor protection systems. There are two central themes in the report, First, software considerations cannot be fully understood in isolation from computer hardware and application considerations. Second, the process of engineering reliability and safety into a computer system requires activities to be carried out throughout the software life cycle. The report discusses the many activities that can be carried out during the software life cycle to improve the safety and reliability of the resulting product. The viewpoint is primarily that of the assessor, or auditor.

  9. Advanced Nuclear Reactors | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14 PowerAdvanced Modeling &Advanced Nuclear

  10. A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPACTS OF FOSSIL-FUEL NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA Energy and Environment

  11. Systems and methods for dismantling a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heim, Robert R; Adams, Scott Ryan; Cole, Matthew Denver; Kirby, William E; Linnebur, Paul Damon

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for dismantling a nuclear reactor are described. In one aspect the system includes a remotely controlled heavy manipulator ("manipulator") operatively coupled to a support structure, and a control station in a non-contaminated portion of a workspace. The support structure provides the manipulator with top down access into a bioshield of a nuclear reactor. At least one computing device in the control station provides remote control to perform operations including: (a) dismantling, using the manipulator, a graphite moderator, concrete walls, and a ceiling of the bioshield, the manipulator being provided with automated access to all internal portions of the bioshield; (b) loading, using the manipulator, contaminated graphite blocks from the graphite core and other components from the bioshield into one or more waste containers; and (c) dispersing, using the manipulator, dust suppression and contamination fixing spray to contaminated matter.

  12. Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor nuclear steam supply system design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Memmott, M. J.; Harkness, A. W.; Van Wyk, J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 600 Cranberry Woods Drive, Cranberry Twp. PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR), in which all of the components typically associated with the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) of a nuclear power plant are incorporated within a single reactor pressure vessel. This paper is the first in a series of four papers which describe the design and functionality of the Westinghouse SMR. Also described in this series are the key drivers influencing the design of the Westinghouse SMR and the unique passive safety features of the Westinghouse SMR. Several critical motivators contributed to the development and integration of the Westinghouse SMR design. These design driving motivators dictated the final configuration of the Westinghouse SMR to varying degrees, depending on the specific features under consideration. These design drivers include safety, economics, AP1000{sup R} reactor expertise and experience, research and development requirements, functionality of systems and components, size of the systems and vessels, simplicity of design, and licensing requirements. The Westinghouse SMR NSSS consists of an integral reactor vessel within a compact containment vessel. The core is located in the bottom of the reactor vessel and is composed of 89 modified Westinghouse 17x17 Robust Fuel Assemblies (RFA). These modified fuel assemblies have an active core length of only 2.4 m (8 ft) long, and the entirety of the core is encompassed by a radial reflector. The Westinghouse SMR core operates on a 24 month fuel cycle. The reactor vessel is approximately 24.4 m (80 ft) long and 3.7 m (12 ft) in diameter in order to facilitate standard rail shipping to the site. The reactor vessel houses hot and cold leg channels to facilitate coolant flow, control rod drive mechanisms (CRDM), instrumentation and cabling, an intermediate flange to separate flow and instrumentation and facilitate simpler refueling, a pressurizer, a straight tube, recirculating steam generator, and eight reactor coolant pumps (RCP). The containment vessel is 27.1 m (89 ft) long and 9.8 m (32 ft) in diameter, and is designed to withstand pressures up to 1.7 MPa (250 psi). It is completely submerged in a pool of water serving as a heat sink and radiation shield. Housed within the containment are four combined core makeup tanks (CMT)/passive residual heat removal (PRHR) heat exchangers, two in-containment pools (ICP), two ICP tanks and four valves which function as the automatic depressurization system (ADS). The PRHR heat exchangers are thermally connected to two different ultimate heat sink (UHS) tanks which provide transient cooling capabilities. (authors)

  13. A comparison of nuclear reactor control room display panels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, Frances Renae

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energized (and operating normally) and green indicates safe or deenergized (operation stopped) . This second coding system is the primary code in the control room of the TAMU Nuclear Engineering 10 Department's Research Reactor. It originated from... the red for danger standard mentioned at the beginning of this paragraph. In electrical systems, a closed circuit means that it is energized and therefore dangerous to touch. An open circuit means that current is not flowing and it is therefore safe...

  14. Search for Neutrino Oscillations at the Palo Verde Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Boehm; J. Busenitz; B. Cook; G. Gratta; H. Henrikson; J. Kornis; D. Lawrence; K. B. Lee; K. McKinny; L. Miller; V. Novikov; A. Piepke; B. Ritchie; D. Tracy; P. Vogel; Y-F. Wang; J. Wolf

    1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the initial results from a measurement of the anti-neutrino flux and spectrum at a distance of about 800 m from the three reactors of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station using a segmented gadolinium-loaded scintillation detector. We find that the anti-neutrino flux agrees with that predicted in the absence of oscillations to better than 5%, excluding at 90% CL $\\rm\\bar\

  15. Expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenny C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Singer, Ralph M. (Naperville, IL); Humenik, Keith E. (Columbia, MD)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps. This system provides a means for early detection of pump or sensor degradation. Degradation is determined through the use of a statistical analysis technique, sequential probability ratio test, applied to information from several sensors which are responsive to differing physical parameters. The results of sequential testing of the data provide the operator with an early warning of possible sensor or pump failure.

  16. Detachable connection for a nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.

    1983-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A locking connection for releasably attaching a handling socket to the duct tube of a fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor. The connection comprises a load pad housing mechanically attached to the duct tube and a handling socket threadably secured within the housing. A retaining ring is interposed between the housing and the handling socket and is formed with a projection and depression engagable within a cavity and groove of the housing and handling socket, respectively, to form a detachable interlocked connection assembly.

  17. A comparison of nuclear reactor control room display panels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, Frances Renae

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Evaluation Procedure 14 15 16 17 28 Analysis. 35 III RESULTS. 37 Discussion. 43 IV CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Recommendations REFERENCES 50 51 54 APPENDIX A: REACTOR OPERATOR INFORMATION PACKAGE. . . . . 57 APPENDIX B: AGN-201 STANDARD... related to human factors included poor training, inaccessibility or unavailability of pertinent information, copious amounts of unusable information and obscured displays. Since the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident, the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory...

  18. Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebak, Raul B. [General Electric] (ORCID:0000000280704475)

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the GE project is to demonstrate that advanced steels such as iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys could be used as accident tolerant fuel cladding material in commercial light water reactors. The GE project does not include fuel development. Current findings support the concept that a FeCrAl alloy could be used for the cladding of commercial nuclear fuel. The use of this alloy will benefit the public since it is going to make the power generating light water reactors safer. In the Phase 1A of this cost shared project, GE (GRC + GNF) teamed with the University of Michigan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the environmental and mechanical behavior of more than eight candidate cladding material both under normal operation conditions of commercial nuclear reactors and under accident conditions in superheated steam (loss of coolant condition). The main findings are as follows: (1) Under normal operation conditions the candidate alloys (e.g. APMT, Alloy 33) showed excellent resistance to general corrosion, shadow corrosion and to environmentally assisted cracking. APMT also showed resistance to proton irradiation up to 5 dpa. (2) Under accident conditions the selected candidate materials showed several orders of magnitude improvement in the reaction with superheated steam as compared with the current zirconium based alloys. (3) Tube fabrication feasibility studies of FeCrAl alloys are underway. The aim is to obtain a wall thickness that is below 400 µm. (4) A strategy is outlined for the regulatory path approval and for the insertion of a lead fuel assembly in a commercial reactor by 2022. (5) The GE team worked closely with INL to have four rodlets tested in the ATR. GE provided the raw stock for the alloys, the fuel for the rodlets and the cost for fabrication/welding of the rodlets. INL fabricated the rodlets and the caps and welded them to provide hermetic seal. The replacement of a zirconium alloy using a ferritic material containing chromium and aluminum appears to be the most near term implementation for accident tolerant nuclear fuels.

  19. INVESTIGATIONS ON NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPY AT THE REACTOR AND THEIR APPLICATIONS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titov, Anatoly

    1 INVESTIGATIONS ON NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPY AT THE REACTOR AND THEIR APPLICATIONS1 I.A. Kondurov , E. However the first work on nuclear spectroscopy was carried out before the reactor was launched; namely.M. Korotkikh, Yu.E. Loginov, V.V. Martynov Introduction Physical launch of the WWR-M reactor in the branch

  20. Granular flow in pebble-bed nuclear reactors: Scaling, Dust Generation, and Stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rycroft, Chris H.

    Granular flow in pebble-bed nuclear reactors: Scaling, Dust Generation, and Stress Chris H. Keywords: granular flow, dust generation, numerical methods 1. Introduction Pebble-bed nuclear reactors prototypes of pebble-bed reactors, significant quantities of graphite dust have been observed due to rubbing

  1. Method for passive cooling liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors, and system thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Busboom, Herbert J. (San Jose, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel.

  2. Nondestructive examination (NDE) reliability for inservice inspection of light waters reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doctor, S.R.; Deffenbaugh, J.D.; Good, M.S.; Green, E.R.; Heasler, P.G.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to ASME Code and Regulatory requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other inspected components. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from April 1988 through September 1988. 33 refs., 70 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. RIS-M-2575 REFERENCE NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHS OF NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISØ-M-2575 REFERENCE NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHS OF NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL J. C. Domanus Abstract. Reference neutron radiographs of nuclear reactor fuel were produced by the Euraton Neutron Radiography Working Group-conpacted nuclear fuel pins. Those parts of the pins are shown where changes of ap- pearance differ from those

  4. Nuclear reactor power for an electrically powered orbital transfer vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaffe, L.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Fujita, T.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To help determine the systems requirements for a 300-kWe space nuclear reactor power system, a mission and spacecraft have been examined which utilize electric propulsion and this nuclear reactor power for multiple transfers of cargo between low Earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). A propulsion system employing ion thrusters and xenon propellant was selected. Propellant and thrusters are replaced after each sortie to GEO. The mass of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), empty and dry, is 11,000 kg; nominal propellant load is 5000 kg. The OTV operates between a circular orbit at 925 km altitude, 28.5 deg inclination, and GEO. Cargo is brought to the OTV by Shuttle and an Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV); the OTV then takes it to GEO. The OTV can also bring cargo back from GEO, for transfer by OMV to the Shuttle. OTV propellant is resupplied and the ion thrusters are replaced by the OMV before each trip to GEO. At the end of mission life, the OTV's electric propulsion is used to place it in a heliocentric orbit so that the reactor will not return to Earth. The nominal cargo capability to GEO is 6000 kg with a transit time of 120 days; 1350 kg can be transferred in 90 days, and 14,300 kg in 240 days. These capabilities can be considerably increased by using separate Shuttle launches to bring up propellant and cargo, or by changing to mercury propellant.

  5. Sustainability Considerations in Spent Light-water Nuclear Fuel Retrievability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Thomas W.; Rothwell, Geoffrey

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines long-term cost differences between two competing Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels: Uranium Oxide (UOX) and Mixed Uranium Oxide-Plutonium Oxide (MOX). Since these costs are calculated on a life-cycle basis, expected savings from lower future MOX fuel prices can be used to value the option of substituting MOX for UOX, including the value of maintaining access to the used UOX fuel that could be reprocessed to make MOX. The two most influential cost drivers are the price of natural uranium and the cost of reprocessing. Significant and sustained reductions in reprocessing costs and/or sustained increases in uranium prices are required to give positive value to the retrievability of Spent Nuclear Fuel. While this option has positive economic value, it might not be exercised for 50 to 200 years. Therefore, there are many years for a program during which reprocessing technology can be researched, developed, demonstrated, and deployed. Further research is required to determine whether the cost of such a program would yield positive net present value and/or increases the sustainability of LWR energy systems.

  6. Reactor Vessel and Reactor Vessel Internals Segmentation at Zion Nuclear Power Station - 13230

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Conrad; Spann, Holger [Siempelkamp Nuclear Services: 5229 Sunset Blvd., (Suite M), West Columbia, SC, 29169 (United States)] [Siempelkamp Nuclear Services: 5229 Sunset Blvd., (Suite M), West Columbia, SC, 29169 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zion Nuclear Power Station (ZNPS) is a dual-unit Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant located on the Lake Michigan shoreline, in the city of Zion, Illinois approximately 64 km (40 miles) north of Chicago, Illinois and 67 km (42 miles) south of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Each PWR is of the Westinghouse design and had a generation capacity of 1040 MW. Exelon Corporation operated both reactors with the first unit starting production of power in 1973 and the second unit coming on line in 1974. The operation of both reactors ceased in 1996/1997. In 2010 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved the transfer of Exelon Corporation's license to ZionSolutions, the Long Term Stewardship subsidiary of EnergySolutions responsible for the decommissioning of ZNPS. In October 2010, ZionSolutions awarded Siempelkamp Nuclear Services, Inc. (SNS) the contract to plan, segment, remove, and package both reactor vessels and their respective internals. This presentation discusses the tools employed by SNS to remove and segment the Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) and Reactor Vessels (RV) and conveys the recent progress. SNS's mechanical segmentation tooling includes the C-HORCE (Circumferential Hydraulically Operated Cutting Equipment), BMT (Bolt Milling Tool), FaST (Former Attachment Severing Tool) and the VRS (Volume Reduction Station). Thermal segmentation of the reactor vessels will be accomplished using an Oxygen- Propane cutting system. The tools for internals segmentation were designed by SNS using their experience from other successful reactor and large component decommissioning and demolition (D and D) projects in the US. All of the designs allow for the mechanical segmentation of the internals remotely in the water-filled reactor cavities. The C-HORCE is designed to saw seven circumferential cuts through the Core Barrel and Thermal Shield walls with individual thicknesses up to 100 mm (4 inches). The BMT is designed to remove the bolts that fasten the Baffle Plates to the Baffle Former Plates. The FaST is designed to remove the Baffle Former Plates from the Core Barrel. The VRS further volume reduces segmented components using multiple configurations of the 38i and horizontal reciprocating saws. After the successful removal and volume reduction of the Internals, the RV will be segmented using a 'First in the US' thermal cutting process through a co-operative effort with Siempelkamp NIS Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH using their experience at the Stade NPP and Karlsruhe in Germany. SNS mobilized in the fall of 2011 to commence execution of the project in order to complete the RVI segmentation, removal and packaging activities for the first unit (Unit 2) by end of the 2012/beginning 2013 and then mobilize to the second unit, Unit 1. Parallel to the completion of the segmentation of the reactor vessel internals at Unit 1, SNS will segment the Unit 2 pressure vessel and at completion move to Unit 1. (authors)

  7. Cross section generation strategy for high conversion light water reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herman, Bryan R. (Bryan Robert)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High conversion water reactors (HCWR), such as the Resource-renewable Boiling Water Reactor (RBWR), are being designed with axial heterogeneity of alternating fissile and blanket zones to achieve a conversion ratio of ...

  8. Monitoring system for a liquid-cooled nuclear fission reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVolpi, Alexander (Bolingbrook, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring system for detecting changes in the liquid levels in various regions of a water-cooled nuclear power reactor, viz., in the downcomer, in the core, in the inlet and outlet plenums, at the head, and elsewhere; and also for detecting changes in the density of the liquid in these regions. A plurality of gamma radiation detectors are used, arranged vertically along the outside of the reactor vessel, and collimator means for each detector limits the gamma-radiation it receives as emitting from only isolated regions of the vessel. Excess neutrons produced by the fission reaction will be captured by the water coolant, by the steel reactor walls, or by the fuel or control structures in the vessel. Neutron capture by steel generates gamma radiation having an energy level of the order of 5-12 MeV, whereas neutron capture by water provides an energy level of approximately 2.2 MeV, and neutron capture by the fission fuel or its cladding provides an energy level of 1 MeV or less. The intensity of neutron capture thus changes significantly at any water-metal interface. Comparative analysis of adjacent gamma detectors senses changes from the normal condition with liquid coolant present to advise of changes in the presence and/or density of the coolant at these specific regions. The gamma detectors can also sense fission-product gas accumulation at the reactor head to advise of a failure of fuel-pin cladding.

  9. Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors. Semiannual report, October 1990--March 1991: Volume 13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doctor, S.R.; Good, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Hockey, R.L.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties.

  10. Pressurized water nuclear reactor system with hot leg vortex mitigator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, Louis K. S. (Monroeville, PA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor system includes a vortex mitigator in the form of a cylindrical conduit between the hot leg conduit and a first section of residual heat removal conduit, which conduit leads to a pump and a second section of residual heat removal conduit leading back to the reactor pressure vessel. The cylindrical conduit is of such a size that where the hot leg has an inner diameter D.sub.1, the first section has an inner diameter D.sub.2, and the cylindrical conduit or step nozzle has a length L and an inner diameter of D.sub.3 ; D.sub.3 /D.sub.1 is at least 0.55, D.sub.2 is at least 1.9, and L/D.sub.3 is at least 1.44, whereby cavitation of the pump by a vortex formed in the hot leg is prevented.

  11. Licensing for tritium production in a commercial light water reactor: A utility view

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chardos, J.S.; Sorensen, G.C.; Erickson, L.W.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a December 1995 Record of Decision for the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Tritium Supply and Recycling, the US Department of Energy (DOE) decided to pursue a dual-track approach to determine the preferred option for future production of tritium for the nuclear weapons stockpile. The two options to be pursued were (a) the Accelerator Production of Tritium and (b) the use of commercial light water reactors (CLWRs). DOE committed to select one of these two options as the primary means of tritium production by the end of 1998. The other option would continue to be pursued as a backup to the primary option. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) became involved in the tritium program in early 1996, in response to an inquiry from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for an expression of interest by utilities operating nuclear power plants (NPPs). In June 1996, TVA was one of two utilities to respond to a request for proposals to irradiate lead test assemblies (LTAs) containing tritium-producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs). TVA proposed that the LTAs be placed in Watts Bar NPP Unit 1 (WBN). TVA participated with DOE (the Defense Programs Office of CLWR Tritium Production), PNNL, and Westinghouse Electric Company (Westinghouse) in the design process to ensure that the TPBARs would be compatible with safe operation of WBN. Following US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issuance of a Safety Evaluation Report (SER) (NUREG-1607), TVA submitted a license amendment request to the NRC for approval to place four LTAs, containing eight TPBARs each, in WBN during the September 1997 refueling outage. In December 1998, DOE announced the selection of the CLWR program as the primary option for tritium production and identified the TVA WBN and Sequoyah NPP (SQN) Units 1 and 2 (SQN-1 and SQN-2, respectively) reactors as the preferred locations to perform tritium production. TVA will prepare license amendment requests for the three plants (WBN, SQN-1, and SQN-2). While the TPBARs replace discreet burnable absorbers in the reactor cores, there are differences in the reactions that occur in the absorber material (lithium aluminate versus boron). At end of life, the lithium aluminate provides considerably more reactivity holddown than the standard boron-containing burnable absorbers. Therefore, it will be necessary for the TVA plant engineering and fuels staffs, working with the fuel vendors, to define the appropriate core loading (number of fresh fuel assemblies, enrichment, etc.) to maintain safe operating limits under both operating and accident conditions. It is recognized that the irradiation of TPBARs in the TVA reactors will also require additional radiological and chemistry program upgrades.

  12. Aerosol behavior experiments on light water reactor primary systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahn, F.J.; Collen, J.; Wright, A.L.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of three experimental programs relevant to the behavior of aerosols in the primary systems of light water reactors (LWRs) are presented. These are the Large-Scale Aerosol Transport Test programs performed at the Marviken test facility in Sweden, parts of the LWR Aerosol Containment Experiments (LACE) performed at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, and the TRAP-MELT validation project performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Marviken experiments focused on the behavior of aerosols released from fuel and structural materials in a damaged core. Data on the transport of these aerosols and their physical characteristics were obtained in five experiments that simulated LWR primary systems. The LACE program data include results from the containment bypass accident tests, which focused on aerosol transport in pipes. The TRAP-MELT validation project data include results from two types of experiments: (a) aerosol transport tests to investigate aerosol wall plateout in a vertical pipe geometry and (b) aerosol resuspension tests to provide a data base from which analytical models can be developed. Typical results from these programs are presented and discussed.

  13. Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buden, D.

    1993-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts:were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressed from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987--88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power.

  14. Qualification Requirements of Guided Ultrasonic Waves for Inspection of Piping in Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) are being increasingly used for both NDT and monitoring of piping. GUW offers advantages over many conventional NDE technologies due to the ability to inspect large volumes of piping components without significant removal of thermal insulation or protective layers. In addition, regions rendered inaccessible to more conventional NDE technologies may be more accessible using GUW techniques. For these reasons, utilities are increasingly considering the use of GUWs for performing the inspection of piping components in nuclear power plants. GUW is a rapidly evolving technology and its usage for inspection of nuclear power plant components requires refinement and qualification to ensure it is able to achieve consistent and acceptable levels of performance. This paper will discuss potential requirements for qualification of GUW techniques for the inspection of piping components in light water reactors (LWRs). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has adopted ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code requirements in Sections V, III, and XI for nondestructive examination methods, fabrication inspections, and pre-service and in-service inspections. A Section V working group has been formed to place the methodology of GUW into the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code but no requirements for technique, equipment, or personnel exist in the Code at this time.

  15. Identifying and bounding uncertainties in nuclear reactor thermal power calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, J.; Hauser, E.; Estrada, H. [Cameron, 1000 McClaren Woods Drive, Coraopolis, PA 15108 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determination of the thermal power generated in the reactor core of a nuclear power plant is a critical element in the safe and economic operation of the plant. Direct measurement of the reactor core thermal power is made using neutron flux instrumentation; however, this instrumentation requires frequent calibration due to changes in the measured flux caused by fuel burn-up, flux pattern changes, and instrumentation drift. To calibrate the nuclear instruments, steam plant calorimetry, a process of performing a heat balance around the nuclear steam supply system, is used. There are four basic elements involved in the calculation of thermal power based on steam plant calorimetry: The mass flow of the feedwater from the power conversion system, the specific enthalpy of that feedwater, the specific enthalpy of the steam delivered to the power conversion system, and other cycle gains and losses. Of these elements, the accuracy of the feedwater mass flow and the feedwater enthalpy, as determined from its temperature and pressure, are typically the largest contributors to the calorimetric calculation uncertainty. Historically, plants have been required to include a margin of 2% in the calculation of the reactor thermal power for the licensed maximum plant output to account for instrumentation uncertainty. The margin is intended to ensure a cushion between operating power and the power for which safety analyses are performed. Use of approved chordal ultrasonic transit-time technology to make the feedwater flow and temperature measurements (in place of traditional differential-pressure- based instruments and resistance temperature detectors [RTDs]) allows for nuclear plant thermal power calculations accurate to 0.3%-0.4% of plant rated power. This improvement in measurement accuracy has allowed many plant operators in the U.S. and around the world to increase plant power output through Measurement Uncertainty Recapture (MUR) up-rates of up to 1.7% of rated power, while also decreasing the probability of significant over-power events. This paper will examine the basic elements involved in calculation of thermal power using ultrasonic transit-time technology and will discuss the criteria for bounding uncertainties associated with each element in order to achieve reactor thermal power calculations to within 0.3% to 0.4%. (authors)

  16. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, B.G.; Richards, R.E.; Reece, W.J.; Gertman, D.I.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Reference Guide contains instructions on how to install and use Version 3.5 of the NRC-sponsored Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR). The NUCLARR data management system is contained in compressed files on the floppy diskettes that accompany this Reference Guide. NUCLARR is comprised of hardware component failure data (HCFD) and human error probability (HEP) data, both of which are available via a user-friendly, menu driven retrieval system. The data may be saved to a file in a format compatible with IRRAS 3.0 and commercially available statistical packages, or used to formulate log-plots and reports of data retrieval and aggregation findings.

  17. A New Nuclear Reactor Neutrino Experiment to Measure theta 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Anderson

    2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An International Working Group has been meeting to discuss ideas for a new Nuclear Reactor Neutrino Experiment at meetings in May 2003 (Alabama), October 2003 (Munich) and plans for March 2004 (Niigata). This White Paper Report on the Motivation and Feasibility of such an experiment is the result of these meetings. After a discussion of the context and opportunity for such an experiment, there are sections on detector design, calibration, overburden and backgrounds, systematic errors, other physics, tunneling issues, safety and outreach. There are 7 appendices describing specific site opportunities.

  18. Iterative methods for solving nonlinear problems of nuclear reactor criticality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuz'min, A. M., E-mail: mephi.kam@mail.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents iterative methods for calculating the neutron flux distribution in nonlinear problems of nuclear reactor criticality. Algorithms for solving equations for variations in the neutron flux are considered. Convergence of the iterative processes is studied for two nonlinear problems in which macroscopic interaction cross sections are functionals of the spatial neutron distribution. In the first problem, the neutron flux distribution depends on the water coolant density, and in the second one, it depends on the fuel temperature. Simple relationships connecting the vapor content and the temperature with the neutron flux are used.

  19. Reactor Subsystem Simulation for Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton; J. Michael Doster; Alan Rominger

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary system models have been developed by Idaho National Laboratory researchers and are currently being enhanced to assess integrated system performance given multiple sources (e.g., nuclear + wind) and multiple applications (i.e., electricity + process heat). Initial efforts to integrate a Fortran-based simulation of a small modular reactor (SMR) with the balance of plant model have been completed in FY12. This initial effort takes advantage of an existing SMR model developed at North Carolina State University to provide initial integrated system simulation for a relatively low cost. The SMR subsystem simulation details are discussed in this report.

  20. Fast Transient And Spatially Non-Homogenous Accident Analysis Of Two-Dimensional Cylindrical Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yulianti, Yanti [Dept. of Physics, Universitas Lampung (UNILA), Jl. Sumantri Brojonegor No.1 Bandar Lampung (Indonesia); Dept. of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB), Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung (Indonesia); Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Khotimah, S. N. [Dept. of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB), Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung (Indonesia); Shafii, M. Ali [Dept. of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB), Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung (Indonesia); Dept. of Physics, Universitas Andalas (UNAND), Kampus Limau Manis, Padang, Sumatera Barat (Indonesia)

    2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The research about fast transient and spatially non-homogenous nuclear reactor accident analysis of two-dimensional nuclear reactor has been done. This research is about prediction of reactor behavior is during accident. In the present study, space-time diffusion equation is solved by using direct methods which consider spatial factor in detail during nuclear reactor accident simulation. Set of equations that obtained from full implicit finite-difference discretization method is solved by using iterative methods ADI (Alternating Direct Implicit). The indication of accident is decreasing macroscopic absorption cross-section that results large external reactivity. The power reactor has a peak value before reactor has new balance condition. Changing of temperature reactor produce a negative Doppler feedback reactivity. The reactivity will reduce excess positive reactivity. Temperature reactor during accident is still in below fuel melting point which is in secure condition.

  1. ANS Dedicates Reactor as Nuclear Historic Landmark on 50th Anniversary...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracy Marc 708.579.8224 ANS Dedicates Reactor as Nuclear Historic Landmark on 50th Anniversary Listen to the audio La Grange Park, IL, - The American Nuclear Society (ANS) honored...

  2. Development of dual phase magnesia-zirconia ceramics for light water reactor inert matrix fuel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medvedev, Pavel

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Dual phase magnesia-zirconia ceramics were developed, characterized, and evaluated as a potential matrix material for use in light water reactor inert matrix fuel intended for the disposition of plutonium and minor actinides. ...

  3. Assessment of light water reactor power plant cost and ultra-acceleration depreciation financing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Magboub, Sadek Abdulhafid.

    Although in many regions of the U.S. the least expensive electricity is generated from light-water reactor (LWR) plants, the fixed (capital plus operation and maintenance) cost has increased to the level where the cost ...

  4. Development of dual phase magnesia-zirconia ceramics for light water reactor inert matrix fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medvedev, Pavel

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Dual phase magnesia-zirconia ceramics were developed, characterized, and evaluated as a potential matrix material for use in light water reactor inert matrix fuel intended for the disposition of plutonium and minor actinides. Ceramics were...

  5. EIS-0288: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Environmental Impact Statement for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR EIS) evaluates the environmental impacts associated with producing tritium at one or more...

  6. Gas tagging and cover gas combination for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenny C. (Lemont, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention discloses the use of stable isotopes of neon and argon, that are grouped in preselected different ratios one to the other and are then sealed as tags in different cladded nuclear fuel elements to be used in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Failure of the cladding of any fuel element allows fission gases generated in the reaction and these tag isotopes to escape and to combine with the cover gas held in the reactor over the fuel elements. The isotopes specifically are Ne.sup.20, Ne.sup.21 and Ne.sup.22 of neon and Ar.sup.36, Ar.sup.38 and Ar.sup.40 of argon, and the cover gas is helium. Serially connected cryogenically operated charcoal beds are used to clean the cover gas and to separate out the tags. The first or cover gas cleanup bed is held between approximately 0.degree. and -25.degree. C. operable to remove the fission gases from the cover gas and tags and the second or tag recovery system bed is held between approximately -170.degree. and -185.degree. C. operable to isolate the tags from the cover gas. Spectrometric analysis further is used to identify the specific tags that are recovered, and thus the specific leaking fuel element. By cataloging the fuel element tags to the location of the fuel elements in the reactor, the location of the leaking fuel element can then be specifically determined.

  7. Monitoring nuclear reactor systems using neural networks and fuzzy logic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikonomopoulos, A.; Tsoukalas, L.H.; Uhrig, R.E. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Mullens, J.A. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach is presented that demonstrates the potential of trained artificial neural networks (ANNs) as generators of membership functions for the purpose of monitoring nuclear reactor systems. ANN`s provide a complex-to-simple mapping of reactor parameters in a process analogous to that of measurement. Through such ``virtual measurements`` the value of parameters with operational significance, e.g., control-valve-disk-position, valve-line-up or performance can be determined. In the methodology presented the output of a virtual measuring device is a set of membership functions which independently represent different states of the system. Utilizing a fuzzy logic representation offers the advantage of describing the state of the system in a condensed form, developed through linguistic descriptions and convenient for application in monitoring, diagnostics and generally control algorithms. The developed methodology is applied to the problem of measuring the disk position of the secondary flow control valve of an experimental reactor using data obtained during a start-up. The enhanced noise tolerance of the methodology is clearly demonstrated as well as a method for selecting the actual output. The results suggest that it is possible to construct virtual measuring devices through artificial neural networks mapping dynamic time series to a set of membership functions and thus enhance the capability of monitoring systems. 8 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Materials science division light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, October - December 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during October, November, and December 1981 on water-reactor-safety problems. The research and development areas covered are environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors, transient fuel response and fission-product release, and clad properties for code verification.

  9. Light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during April, May, and June 1981 on water-reactor-safety problems. The research and development areas covered are transient fuel response and fission-product release and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors.

  10. Extended-burnup LWR (light-water reactor) fuel: The amount, characteristics, and potential effects on interim storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a study on extended-burnup, light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel are described in this report. The study was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of the study was to collect and evaluate information on the status of in-reactor performance and integrity of extended-burnup LWR fuel and initiate the investigation of the effects of extending fuel burnup on the subsequent handling, interim storage, and other operations (e.g., rod consolidation and shipping) associated with the back end of the fuel cycle. The results of this study will aid DOE and the nuclear industry in assessing the effects on waste management of extending the useful in-reactor life of nuclear fuel. The experience base with extended-burnup fuel is now substantial and projections for future use of extended-burnup fuel in domestic LWRs are positive. The basic performance and integrity of the fuel in the reactor has not been compromised by extending the burnup, and the potential limitations for further extending the burnup are not severe. 104 refs., 15 tabs.

  11. Distribution of characteristics of LWR [light water reactor] spent fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reich, W.J.; Notz, K.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Moore, R.S. [Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to develop a collective description of the entire spent fuel inventory in terms of various fuel properties relevant to Approved Testing Materials (ATMs) using information available from the Characteristics Data Base (CBD), which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. A number of light-water reactor (LWR) characteristics were analyzed including assembly class representation, fuel burnup, enrichment, fuel fabrication data, defective fuel quantities, and, at PNL`s specific request, linear heat generation rate (LHGR) and the utilization of burnable poisons. A quantitative relationships was developed between burnup and enrichment for BWRs and PWRs. The relationship shows that the existing BWR ATM is near the center of the burnup-enrichment distribution, while the four PWR ATMs bracket the center of the burnup range but are on the low side of the enrichment range. Fuel fabrication data are based on vendor specifications for new fuel. Defective fuel distributions were analyzed in terms of assembly class and vendor design. LHGR values were calculated from utility data on burnup and effective full-power days; these calculations incorporate some unavoidable assumptions which may compromise the value of the results. Only a limited amount of data are available on burnable poisons at this time. Based on this distribution study, suggestions for additional ATMs are made. These are based on the class and design concepts and include BWR/2,3 barrier fuel, and the WE 17 {times} 17 class with integral burnable poison. Both should be at relatively high burnups. 16 refs., 5 figs., 15 tabs.

  12. Selecting a radiation tolerant piezoelectric material for nuclear reactor applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, D. A.; Reinhardt, B. T.; Tittmann, B. R. [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Penn State, University Park, PA 16803 (United States)

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Bringing systems for online monitoring of nuclear reactors to fruition has been delayed by the lack of suitable ultrasonic sensors. Recent work has demonstrated the capability of an AlN sensor to perform ultrasonic evaluation in an actual nuclear reactor. Although the AlN demonstrated sustainability, no loss in signal amplitude and d{sub 33} up to a fast and thermal neutron fluence of 1.85 Multiplication-Sign 1018 n/cm{sup 2} and 5.8 Multiplication-Sign 1018 n/cm{sup 2} respectively, no formal process to selecting a suitable sensor material was made. It would be ideal to use first principles approaches to somehow reduce each candidate piezoelectric material to a simple ranking showing directly which materials one should expect to be most radiation tolerant. However, the complexity of the problem makes such a ranking impractical and one must appeal to experimental observations. This should not be of any surprise to one whom is familiar with material science as most material properties are obtained in this manner. Therefore, this work adopts a similar approach, the mechanisms affecting radiation tolerance are discussed and a good engineering sense is used for material qualification of the candidate piezoelectric materials.

  13. Closed Brayton cycle power conversion systems for nuclear reactors :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Steven A.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Sanchez, Travis

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of a Sandia National Laboratories internally funded research program to study the coupling of nuclear reactors to gas dynamic Brayton power conversion systems. The research focused on developing integrated dynamic system models, fabricating a 10-30 kWe closed loop Brayton cycle, and validating these models by operating the Brayton test-loop. The work tasks were performed in three major areas. First, the system equations and dynamic models for reactors and Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems were developed and implemented in SIMULINKTM. Within this effort, both steady state and dynamic system models for all the components (turbines, compressors, reactors, ducting, alternators, heat exchangers, and space based radiators) were developed and assembled into complete systems for gas cooled reactors, liquid metal reactors, and electrically heated simulators. Various control modules that use proportional-integral-differential (PID) feedback loops for the reactor and the power-conversion shaft speed were also developed and implemented. The simulation code is called RPCSIM (Reactor Power and Control Simulator). In the second task an open cycle commercially available Capstone C30 micro-turbine power generator was modified to provide a small inexpensive closed Brayton cycle test loop called the Sandia Brayton test-Loop (SBL-30). The Capstone gas-turbine unit housing was modified to permit the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller to form a closed loop. The Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator were used without modification. The Capstone systems nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system also were reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled by adjusting the alternator load by using the electrical grid as the load bank. The SBL-30 test loop was operated at the manufacturers site (Barber-Nichols Inc.) and installed and operated at Sandia. A sufficiently detailed description of the loop is provided in this report along with the design characteristics of the turbo-alternator-compressor set to allow other researchers to compare their results with those measured in the Sandia test-loop. The third task consisted of a validation effort. In this task the test loop was operated and compared with the modeled results to develop a more complete understanding of this electrically heated closed power generation system and to validate the model. The measured and predicted system temperatures and pressures are in good agreement, indicating that the model is a reasonable representation of the test loop. Typical deviations between the model and the hardware results are less than 10%. Additional tests were performed to assess the capability of the Brayton engine to continue to remove decay heat after the reactor/heater is shutdown, to develop safe and effective control strategies, and to access the effectiveness of gas inventory control as an alternative means to provide load following. In one test the heater power was turned off to simulate a rapid reactor shutdown, and the turbomachinery was driven solely by the sensible heat stored in the heater for over 71 minutes without external power input. This is an important safety feature for CBC systems as it means that the closed Brayton loop will keep cooling the reactor without the need for auxiliary power (other than that needed to circulate the waste heat rejection coolant) provided the heat sink is available.

  14. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have concluded, however, that with adequate engineered cooling of the vessel, the A508/533 steels are also acceptable.

  15. June 28, 2005 France to Be Site of World's First Nuclear Fusion Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    June 28, 2005 France to Be Site of World's First Nuclear Fusion Reactor By CRAIG S. SMITH PARIS fusion reactor, an estimated $12 billion project that many scientists see as essential to solving chose the country as the site for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. Japan, which had

  16. Liquid level, void fraction, and superheated steam sensor for nuclear-reactor cores. [PWR; BWR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, R.D.

    1981-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This disclosure relates to an apparatus for monitoring the presence of coolant in liquid or mixed liquid and vapor, and superheated gaseous phases at one or more locations within an operating nuclear reactor core, such as pressurized water reactor or a boiling water reactor.

  17. Physics of Nuclear Reactors, March,21 2011 What do we know ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Dr. Danon Physics of Nuclear Reactors, March,21 2011 #12;What do we know ? All the information we have is from the media. More reliable; nuclear related information: www.nei.org www.iaea.org THE REST IS INTERPRETATION OF THIS DATA #12;BWR Reactor (Mark I containment) #12;BWR containment in more

  18. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program A Reference Plan for Control Room Modernization: Planning and Analysis Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques Hugo; Ronald Boring; Lew Hanes; Kenneth Thomas

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program is collaborating with a U.S. nuclear utility to bring about a systematic fleet-wide control room modernization. To facilitate this upgrade, a new distributed control system (DCS) is being introduced into the control rooms of these plants. The DCS will upgrade the legacy plant process computer and emergency response facility information system. In addition, the DCS will replace an existing analog turbine control system with a display-based system. With technology upgrades comes the opportunity to improve the overall human-system interaction between the operators and the control room. To optimize operator performance, the LWRS Control Room Modernization research team followed a human-centered approach published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-0711, Rev. 3, Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (O’Hara et al., 2012), prescribes four phases for human factors engineering. This report provides examples of the first phase, Planning and Analysis. The three elements of Planning and Analysis in NUREG-0711 that are most crucial to initiating control room upgrades are: • Operating Experience Review: Identifies opportunities for improvement in the existing system and provides lessons learned from implemented systems. • Function Analysis and Allocation: Identifies which functions at the plant may be optimally handled by the DCS vs. the operators. • Task Analysis: Identifies how tasks might be optimized for the operators. Each of these elements is covered in a separate chapter. Examples are drawn from workshops with reactor operators that were conducted at the LWRS Human System Simulation Laboratory HSSL and at the respective plants. The findings in this report represent generalized accounts of more detailed proprietary reports produced for the utility for each plant. The goal of this LWRS report is to disseminate the technique and provide examples sufficient to serve as a template for other utilities’ projects for control room modernization.

  19. A Spouted Bed Reactor Monitoring System for Particulate Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. S. Wendt; R. L. Bewley; W. E. Windes

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conversion and coating of particle nuclear fuel is performed in spouted (fluidized) bed reactors. The reactor must be capable of operating at temperatures up to 2000°C in inert, flammable, and coating gas environments. The spouted bed reactor geometry is defined by a graphite retort with a 2.5 inch inside diameter, conical section with a 60° included angle, and a 4 mm gas inlet orifice diameter through which particles are removed from the reactor at the completion of each run. The particles may range from 200 µm to 2 mm in diameter. Maintaining optimal gas flow rates slightly above the minimum spouting velocity throughout the duration of each run is complicated by the variation of particle size and density as conversion and/or coating reactions proceed in addition to gas composition and temperature variations. In order to achieve uniform particle coating, prevent agglomeration of the particle bed, and monitor the reaction progress, a spouted bed monitoring system was developed. The monitoring system includes a high-sensitivity, low-response time differential pressure transducer paired with a signal processing, data acquisition, and process control unit which allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor. The pressure transducer is mounted upstream of the spouted bed reactor gas inlet. The gas flow into the reactor induces motion of the particles in the bed and prevents the particles from draining from the reactor due to gravitational forces. Pressure fluctuations in the gas inlet stream are generated as the particles in the bed interact with the entering gas stream. The pressure fluctuations are produced by bulk movement of the bed, generation and movement of gas bubbles through the bed, and the individual motion of particles and particle subsets in the bed. The pressure fluctuations propagate upstream to the pressure transducer where they can be monitored. Pressure fluctuation, mean differential pressure, gas flow rate, reactor operating temperature data from the spouted bed monitoring system are used to determine the bed operating regime and monitor the particle characteristics. Tests have been conducted to determine the sensitivity of the monitoring system to the different operating regimes of the spouted particle bed. The pressure transducer signal response was monitored over a range of particle sizes and gas flow rates while holding bed height constant. During initial testing, the bed monitoring system successfully identified the spouting regime as well as when particles became interlocked and spouting ceased. The particle characterization capabilities of the bed monitoring system are currently being tested and refined. A feedback control module for the bed monitoring system is currently under development. The feedback control module will correlate changes in the bed response to changes in the particle characteristics and bed spouting regime resulting from the coating and/or conversion process. The feedback control module will then adjust the gas composition, gas flow rate, and run duration accordingly to maintain the bed in the desired spouting regime and produce optimally coated/converted particles.

  20. Porous nuclear fuel element for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youchison, Dennis L. (Albuquerque, NM); Williams, Brian E. (Pacoima, CA); Benander, Robert E. (Pacoima, CA)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  1. Methods for manufacturing porous nuclear fuel elements for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youchison, Dennis L. (Albuquerque, NM); Williams, Brian E. (Pocoima, CA); Benander, Robert E. (Pacoima, CA)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for manufacturing porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's). Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, a thin coating of nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made, for example, of reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  2. Porous nuclear fuel element with internal skeleton for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  3. Vital area identification for U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission nuclear power reactor licensees and new reactor applicants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, Donnie Wayne; Varnado, G. Bruce

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission nuclear power plant licensees and new reactor applicants are required to provide protection of their plants against radiological sabotage, including the placement of vital equipment in vital areas. This document describes a systematic process for the identification of the minimum set of areas that must be designated as vital areas in order to ensure that all radiological sabotage scenarios are prevented. Vital area identification involves the use of logic models to systematically identify all of the malicious acts or combinations of malicious acts that could lead to radiological sabotage. The models available in the plant probabilistic risk assessment and other safety analyses provide a great deal of the information and basic model structure needed for the sabotage logic model. Once the sabotage logic model is developed, the events (or malicious acts) in the model are replaced with the areas in which the events can be accomplished. This sabotage area logic model is then analyzed to identify the target sets (combinations of areas the adversary must visit to cause radiological sabotage) and the candidate vital area sets (combinations of areas that must be protected against adversary access to prevent radiological sabotage). Any one of the candidate vital area sets can be selected for protection. Appropriate selection criteria will allow the licensee or new reactor applicant to minimize the impacts of vital area protection measures on plant safety, cost, operations, or other factors of concern.

  4. Light-water-reactor safety materials engineering research programs. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1985. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes work performed by the Materials Science and Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory during January, February, and March 1985 on water reactor safety problems. The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light-Water Reactors and Long-Term Embrittlement of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels in Light-Water-Reactor Systems. 42 refs.

  5. Light-water-reactor safety materials engineering research programs. Volume 3. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes work performed by the Materials Science and Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory during October, November, and December 1984 on water reactor safety problems. The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light-Water Reactors and Long-Term Embrittlement of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels in Light-Water-Reactor Systems.

  6. Large-scale experiments on aerosol behavior in light water reactor containments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, W.; Bunz, H.; Adams, R.E.; Tobias, M.L.; Rahn, F.J.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, three large-scale experimental programs were carried out dealing with the behavior of aerosols during core-melt accidents in light water reactors (LWRs). In the Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant (NSPP) program, the principal behaviors of different insoluble aerosols and of mixed aerosols were measured in dry air atmospheres and in condensing steam-air atmospheres contained in a 38-m/sup 3/ steel vessel. The Demonstration of Nuclear Aerosol Behavior (DEMONA) program used a 640-m/sup 3/ concrete containment model to simulate typical accident sequence conditions, and measured the behavior of different insoluble aerosols and mixed aerosols in condensing and transient atmospheric conditions. Part of the LWR Aerosol Containment Experiments (LACE) program was also devoted to aerosol behavior in containment; and 852-m/sup 3/ steel vessel was used, and the aerosols were composed of mixtures of insoluble and soluble species. The results of these experiments provide a suitable data base for validation of aerosol behavior codes. Fundamental insight into details of aerosol behavior in condensing environments has been gained through the results of the NSPP tests. Code comparisons have been and are being performed in the DEMONA and LACE experiments.

  7. Measuring of fissile isotopes partial antineutrino spectra in direct experiment at nuclear reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Sinev

    2009-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct measuring method is considered to get nuclear reactor antineutrino spectrum. We suppose to isolate partial spectra of the fissile isotopes by using the method of antineutrino spectrum extraction from the inverse beta decay positron spectrum applied at Rovno experiment. This admits to increase the accuracy of partial antineutrino spectra forming the total nuclear reactor spectrum. It is important for the analysis of the reactor core fuel composition and could be applied for non-proliferation purposes.

  8. The harmony between nuclear reactions and nuclear reactor structures and systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popa-Simil, L. [LAVM LLC, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced nuclear energy is one extremely viable approach for achieving the required goals. With its extraordinarily high energy density (both, per unit mass and per unit volume), it produces over seven orders of magnitude less waste than fossil fuels per unit of energy generated. Applying nano-technologies to nuclear reactors could potentially produce the extraordinary performance required. The actual nuclear reactors lack of performances, the complexity and hazard of the fuel cycle are in part due to the lack of understanding of the nature's laws related to energy distribution applied to fission products, and in part to the current technologic capabilities that make the economical optimum. In order to produce the desired increase of performances a novel multi-scale multi-physics and engineering approach have been developed, starting from the nuclear reactions involved, analyzing in detail the key features and requirements of the 'key players' in the process (neutrons, compound nucleus, fission products, transmutation products, decay radiation), the consequences of their interaction with matter. That complex interaction generates new reactions and new key-players (knock-on electrons, photons, phonons) that further interact with the matter represented by the nuclear fuel, cladding, cooling agents, structural materials and control systems. The understanding of this complexity of problems from fm-ps scale up to macro-system and mitigating all the requirements drives to that desired harmony that provides a safe energy delivery. (authors)

  9. Closing nuclear fuel cycle with fast reactors: problems and prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shadrin, A.; Dvoeglazov, K.; Ivanov, V. [Bochvar Institute - VNIINM, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The closed nuclear fuel cycle (CNFC) with fast reactors (FR) is the most promising way of nuclear energetics development because it prevents spent nuclear fuel (SNF) accumulation and minimizes radwaste volume due to minor actinides (MA) transmutation. CNFC with FR requires the elaboration of safety, environmentally acceptable and economically effective methods of treatment of SNF with high burn-up and low cooling time. The up-to-date industrially implemented SNF reprocessing technologies based on hydrometallurgical methods are not suitable for the reprocessing of SNF with high burn-up and low cooling time. The alternative dry methods (such as electrorefining in molten salts or fluoride technologies) applicable for such SNF reprocessing have not found implementation at industrial scale. So the cost of SNF reprocessing by means of dry technologies can hardly be estimated. Another problem of dry technologies is the recovery of fissionable materials pure enough for dense fuel fabrication. A combination of technical solutions performed with hydrometallurgical and dry technologies (pyro-technology) is proposed and it appears to be a promising way for the elaboration of economically, ecologically and socially accepted technology of FR SNF management. This paper deals with discussion of main principle of dry and aqueous operations combination that probably would provide safety and economic efficiency of the FR SNF reprocessing. (authors)

  10. Method of nuclear reactor control using a variable temperature load dependent set point

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, J.J.; Rambo, G.E.

    1982-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for controlling a nuclear reactor in response to a variable average reactor coolant temperature set point is disclosed. The set point is dependent upon percent of full power load demand. A manually-actuated ''droop mode'' of control is provided whereby the reactor coolant temperature is allowed to drop below the set point temperature a predetermined amount wherein the control is switched from reactor control rods exclusively to feedwater flow.

  11. International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermalhydraulics, NURETH-15 NURETH15-xxx Pisa, Italy, May 12-15, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The 15th International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermalhydraulics, NURETH-15 NURETH15-xxx technologies in the context of generation IV nuclear power reactors. In order to improve electric efficiency during last years as a possible energy conversion cycle for Sodium nuclear Fast Reactors (SFRs) [1

  12. Record of Cycling Operation of the Natural Nuclear Reactor in the Oklo/Okelobondo Area in Gabon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Record of Cycling Operation of the Natural Nuclear Reactor in the Oklo/Okelobondo Area in Gabon A billion yr old Oklo natural nuclear reactor. In addition to elevated abundances of fission-produced Zr, Ce nuclear chain reaction was predicted by Kuroda [1] 20 years before the remnants of the natural reactor

  13. Nuclear reactor fuel element having improved heat transfer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garnier, J.E.; Begej, S.; Williford, R.E.; Christensen, J.A.

    1982-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor fuel element having improved heat transfer between fuel material and cladding is described. The element consists of an outer cladding tube divided into an upper fuel section containing a central core of fissionable or mixed fissionable and fertile fuel material, slightly smaller in diameter than the inner surface of the cladding tube and a small lower accumulator section, the cladding tube being which is filled with a low molecular weight gas to transfer heat from fuel material to cladding during irradiation. A plurality of essentially vertical grooves in the fuel section extend downward and communicate with the accumulator section. The radial depth of the grooves is sufficient to provide a thermal gradient between the hot fuel surface and the relatively cooler cladding surface to allow thermal segregation to take place between the low molecular weight heat transfer gas and high molecular weight fission product gases produced by the fuel material during irradiation.

  14. Nuclear reactor control rod with uniformly changeable axial worth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, T.R.

    1989-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A control rod is described for use in a nuclear reactor core to provide xenon compensation, comprising: (a) an elongated inner cylindrical member having a lower end; and (b) an elongated outer cylindrical member surrounding the inner member and having a lower end with concentrically-arranged inner and outer edge portions defined thereon; (c) each of the members being composed of alternating poison and nonpoison regions; (d) the inner member being axially movable relative to the outer member to adjust the degree to which the poison regions of the members overlap with the nonpoison regions thereof and thereby change the overall worth of the rod; and (e) the lower end of the inner member having defined thereon a radially outwardly projecting ledge for supporting in a rest relationship thereon the lower end of the outer member at only its inner edge portion for retaining the outer member about the inner member.

  15. Improved gas tagging and cover gas combination for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.

    1983-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention discloses the use of stable isotopes of neon and argon, sealed as tags in different cladding nuclear fuel elements to be used in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Cladding failure allows fission gases and these tag isotopes to escape and to combine with the cover gas. The isotopes are Ne/sup 20/, Ne/sup 21/ and Ne/sup 22/ and Ar/sup 36/, Ar/sup 38/ and Ar/sup 40/, and the cover gas is He. Serially connected cryogenically operated charcoal beds are used to clean the cover gas and to separate out the tags. The first or cover gas cleanup bed is held between 0 and -25/sup 0/C to remove the fission gases from the cover gas and tags, and the second or tag recovery system bed between -170 and -185/sup 0/C to isolate the tags from the cover gas. Spectrometric analysis is used to identify the specific tags that are recovered, and thus the specific leaking fuel element. By cataloging the fuel element tags to the location of the fuel elements in the reactor, the location of the leaking fuel element can then be determined.

  16. Modeling of thermophoretic deposition of aerosols in nuclear reactor containments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandes, A.; Loyalka, S.K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosol released in postulated or real nuclear reactor accidents can deposit on containment surfaces via motion induced by temperature gradients in addition to the motion due to diffusion and gravity. The deposition due to temperature gradients is known as thermophoretic deposition, and it is currently modeled in codes such as CONTAIN in direct analogy with heat transfer, but there have been questions about such analogies. This paper focuses on a numerical solution of the particle continuity equation in laminar flow condition characteristics of natural convection. First, the thermophoretic deposition rate is calculated as a function of the Prandtl and Schmidt numbers, the thermophoretic coefficient K, and the temperature difference between the atmosphere and the wall. Then, the cases of diffusion alone and a boundary-layer approximation (due to Batchelor and Shen) to the full continuity equation are considered. It is noted that an analogy with heat transfer does not hold, but for the circumstances considered in this paper, the deposition rates from the diffusion solution and the boundary-layer approximation can be added to provide reasonably good agreement (maximum deviation 30%) with the full solution of the particle continuity equation. Finally, correlations useful for implementation in the reactor source term codes are provided.

  17. Nuclear reactor cooling system decontamination reagent regeneration. [PWR; BWR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anstine, L.D.; James, D.B.; Melaika, E.A.; Peterson, J.P. Jr.

    1980-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water-cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution is described. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution.

  18. Self-actuating and locking control for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chung, Dong K. (Chatsworth, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-actuating, self-locking flow cutoff valve particularly suited for use in a nuclear reactor of the type which utilizes a plurality of fluid support neutron absorber elements to provide for the safe shutdown of the reactor. The valve comprises a substantially vertical elongated housing and an aperture plate located in the housing for the flow of fluid therethrough, a substantially vertical elongated nozzle member located in the housing and affixed to the housing with an opening in the bottom for receiving fluid and apertures adjacent a top end for discharging fluid. The nozzle further includes two sealing means, one located above and the other below the apertures. Also located in the housing and having walls surrounding the nozzle is a flow cutoff sleeve having a fluid opening adjacent an upper end of the sleeve, the sleeve being moveable between an upper open position wherein the nozzle apertures are substantially unobstructed and a closed position wherein the sleeve and nozzle sealing surfaces are mated such that the flow of fluid through the apertures is obstructed. It is a particular feature of the present invention that the valve further includes a means for utilizing any increase in fluid pressure to maintain the cutoff sleeve in a closed position. It is another feature of the invention that there is provided a means for automatically closing the valve whenever the flow of fluid drops below a predetermined level.

  19. Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2010, Prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, May 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Lewis D. A. Hagemeyer Y. U. McCormick

    2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2010 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no NRC-licensed low-level waste disposal facilities currently in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Annual reports for 2010 were received from a total of 190 NRC licensees. The summation of reports submitted by the 190 licensees indicated that 192,424 individuals were monitored, 81,961 of whom received a measurable dose. When adjusted for transient workers who worked at more than one licensee during the year, there were actually 142,471 monitored individuals and 62,782 who received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 10,617 person-rem, which represents a 12% decrease from the 2009 value. This decrease was primarily due to the decrease in collective dose at commercial nuclear power reactors, as well as a decrease in the collective dose for most of the other categories of NRC licensees. The number of individuals receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in an average measurable dose of 0.13 rem for 2010. The average measurable dose is defined as the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) divided by the number of individuals receiving a measurable dose. In calendar year 2010, the average annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor (LWR) licensees was 83 person-rem. This represents a 14% decrease from the value reported for 2009 (96 person-rem). The decrease in collective dose for commercial nuclear power reactors was due to an 11% decrease in total outage hours in 2010. During outages, activities involving increased radiation exposure such as refueling and maintenance are performed while the reactor is not in operation. The average annual collective dose per reactor for boiling water reactors (BWRs) was 137 personrem for 35 BWRs, and 55 person-rem for 69 pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Analyses of transient individual data indicate that 29,333 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient individuals by multiple licensees. The adjustment to account for transient individuals has been specifically noted in footnotes in the figures and tables for commercial nuclear power reactors. In 2010, the average measurable dose per individual for all licensees calculated from reported data was 0.13 rem. Although the average measurable dose per individual from data submitted by licensees was 0.13 rem, a corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose per individual of 0.17 rem.

  20. Thermal insulating barrier and neutron shield providing integrated protection for a nuclear reactor vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schreiber, R.B.; Fero, A.H.; Sejvar, J.

    1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel to form a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive valving also includes bistable vents at the upper end of the thermal insulating barrier for releasing steam. A removable, modular neutron shield extending around the upper end of the reactor cavity below the nozzles forms with the upwardly and outwardly tapered transition on the outer surface of the reactor vessel, a labyrinthine channel which reduces neutron streaming while providing a passage for the escape of steam during a severe accident, and for the cooling air which is circulated along the reactor cavity walls outside the thermal insulating barrier during normal operation of the reactor. 8 figs.

  1. Thermal insulating barrier and neutron shield providing integrated protection for a nuclear reactor vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schreiber, Roger B. (Penn Twp., PA); Fero, Arnold H. (New Kensington, PA); Sejvar, James (Murrysville, PA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel to form a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive valving also includes bistable vents at the upper end of the thermal insulating barrier for releasing steam. A removable, modular neutron shield extending around the upper end of the reactor cavity below the nozzles forms with the upwardly and outwardly tapered transition on the outer surface of the reactor vessel, a labyrinthine channel which reduces neutron streaming while providing a passage for the escape of steam during a severe accident, and for the cooling air which is circulated along the reactor cavity walls outside the thermal insulating barrier during normal operation of the reactor.

  2. Numerical analysis of turbulent heat transfer in a nuclear reactor coolant channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrard, Clarence William

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF TURBULENT HEAT TRANSFER IN A NUCLEAR REACTOR COOLANT CHANNEL A Thesis Clarence William Garrard, Jr. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of' the requirements for the degree... of' MASTER OF SC1ENCE May, 1965 Ma)or Subject Nuclear Engineering NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF TURBULENT HEAT TRANSFER 1N A NUCLEAR REACTOR COOLANT CHANNEL A Thesis By Clarence William Garrard, Jr. Approved as to style and content by; Head...

  3. SciTech Connect: Nuclear power reactor instrumentation systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: N79400* --Reactors--Reactor Control Systems; N46110 -- Instrumentation--Radiation Detection Instruments--General...

  4. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Grizzly Year-End Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin Spencer; Yongfeng Zhang; Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner; Marie Backman; Brian Wirth; Stephen Novascone; Jason Hales

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grizzly software application is being developed under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to address aging and material degradation issues that could potentially become an obstacle to life extension of nuclear power plants beyond 60 years of operation. Grizzly is based on INL’s MOOSE multiphysics simulation environment, and can simultaneously solve a variety of tightly coupled physics equations, and is thus a very powerful and flexible tool with a wide range of potential applications. Grizzly, the development of which was begun during fiscal year (FY) 2012, is intended to address degradation in a variety of critical structures. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) was chosen for an initial application of this software. Because it fulfills the critical roles of housing the reactor core and providing a barrier to the release of coolant, the RPV is clearly one of the most safety-critical components of a nuclear power plant. In addition, because of its cost, size and location in the plant, replacement of this component would be prohibitively expensive, so failure of the RPV to meet acceptance criteria would likely result in the shutting down of a nuclear power plant. The current practice used to perform engineering evaluations of the susceptibility of RPVs to fracture is to use the ASME Master Fracture Toughness Curve (ASME Code Case N-631 Section III). This is used in conjunction with empirically based models that describe the evolution of this curve due to embrittlement in terms of a transition temperature shift. These models are based on an extensive database of surveillance coupons that have been irradiated in operating nuclear power plants, but this data is limited to the lifetime of the current reactor fleet. This is an important limitation when considering life extension beyond 60 years. The currently available data cannot be extrapolated with confidence further out in time because there is a potential for additional damage mechanisms (i.e. late blooming phases) to become active later in life beyond the current operational experience. To develop a tool that can eventually serve a role in decision-making, it is clear that research and development must be perfomed at multiple scales. At the engineering scale, a multiphysics analysis code that can capture the thermomechanical response of the RPV under accident conditions, including detailed fracture mechanics evaluations of flaws with arbitrary geometry and orientation, is needed to assess whether the fracture toughness, as defined by the master curve, including the effects of embrittlement, is exceeded. At the atomistic scale, the fundamental mechanisms of degradation need to be understood, including the effects of that degradation on the relevant material properties. In addition, there is a need to better understand the mechanisms leading to the transition from ductile to brittle fracture through improved continuum mechanics modeling at the fracture coupon scale. Work is currently being conducted at all of these levels with the goal of creating a usable engineering tool informed by lower length-scale modeling. This report summarizes progress made in these efforts during FY 2013.

  5. Worldwide advanced nuclear power reactors with passive and inherent safety: What, why, how, and who

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Reich, W.J.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The political controversy over nuclear power, the accidents at Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl, international competition, concerns about the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect and technical breakthroughs have resulted in a segment of the nuclear industry examining power reactor concepts with PRIME safety characteristics. PRIME is an acronym for Passive safety, Resilience, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended time after initiation of an accident for external help. The basic ideal of PRIME is to develop power reactors in which operator error, internal sabotage, or external assault do not cause a significant release of radioactivity to the environment. Several PRIME reactor concepts are being considered. In each case, an existing, proven power reactor technology is combined with radical innovations in selected plant components and in the safety philosophy. The Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) reactor is a modified pressurized-water reactor, the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is a modified gas-cooled reactor, and the Advanced CANDU Project is a modified heavy-water reactor. In addition to the reactor concepts, there is parallel work on super containments. The objective is the development of a passive box'' that can contain radioactivity in the event of any type of accident. This report briefly examines: why a segment of the nuclear power community is taking this new direction, how it differs from earlier directions, and what technical options are being considered. A more detailed description of which countries and reactor vendors have undertaken activities follows. 41 refs.

  6. An economic analysis of a light and heavy water moderated reactor synergy: burning americium using recycled uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wojtaszek, D.; Edwards, G. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An economic analysis is presented for a proposed synergistic system between 2 nuclear utilities, one operating light water reactors (LWR) and another running a fleet of heavy water moderated reactors (HWR). Americium is partitioned from LWR spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to be transmuted in HWRs, with a consequent averted disposal cost to the LWR operator. In return, reprocessed uranium (RU) is supplied to the HWRs in sufficient quantities to support their operation both as power generators and americium burners. Two simplifying assumptions have been made. First, the economic value of RU is a linear function of the cost of fresh natural uranium (NU), and secondly, plutonium recycling for a third utility running a mixed oxide (MOX) fuelled reactor fleet has been already taking place, so that the extra cost of americium recycling is manageable. We conclude that, in order for this scenario to be economically attractive to the LWR operator, the averted disposal cost due to partitioning americium from LWR spent fuel must exceed 214 dollars per kg, comparable to estimates of the permanent disposal cost of the high level waste (HLW) from reprocessing spent LWR fuel. (authors)

  7. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    processes include neutron transport, thermal hydraulics, nuclear fuel performance, corrosion, and surface chemistry. VERA incorporates science-based models, state-of-the-art...

  8. A new type of Neutrino Detector for Sterile Neutrino Search at Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Nonproliferation Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Lane; S. M. Usman; J. Blackmon; C. Rasco; H. P. Mumm; D. Markoff; G. R. Jocher; R. Dorrill; M. Duvall; J. G. Learned; V. Li; J. Maricic; S. Matsuno; R. Milincic; S. Negrashov; M. Sakai; M. Rosen; G. Varner; P. Huber; M. L. Pitt; S. D. Rountree; R. B. Vogelaar; T. Wright; Z. Yokley

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new detector, called NuLat, to study electron anti-neutrinos a few meters from a nuclear reactor, and search for anomalous neutrino oscillations. Such oscillations could be caused by sterile neutrinos, and might explain the "Reactor Antineutrino Anomaly". NuLat, is made possible by a natural synergy between the miniTimeCube and mini-LENS programs described in this paper. It features a "Raghavan Optical Lattice" (ROL) consisting of 3375 boron or $^6$Li loaded plastic scintillator cubical cells 6.3\\,cm (2.500") on a side. Cell boundaries have a 0.127\\,mm (0.005") air gap, resulting in total internal reflection guiding most of the light down the 3 cardinal directions. The ROL detector technology for NuLat gives excellent spatial and energy resolution and allows for in-depth event topology studies. These features allow us to discern inverse beta decay (IBD) signals and the putative oscillation pattern, even in the presence of other backgrounds. We discuss here test venues, efficiency, sensitivity and project status.

  9. A new type of Neutrino Detector for Sterile Neutrino Search at Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Nonproliferation Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, C; Blackmon, J; Rasco, C; Mumm, H P; Markoff, D; Jocher, G R; Dorrill, R; Duvall, M; Learned, J G; Li, V; Maricic, J; Matsuno, S; Milincic, R; Negrashov, S; Sakai, M; Rosen, M; Varner, G; Huber, P; Pitt, M L; Rountree, S D; Vogelaar, R B; Wright, T; Yokley, Z

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new detector, called NuLat, to study electron anti-neutrinos a few meters from a nuclear reactor, and search for anomalous neutrino oscillations. Such oscillations could be caused by sterile neutrinos, and might explain the "Reactor Antineutrino Anomaly". NuLat, is made possible by a natural synergy between the miniTimeCube and mini-LENS programs described in this paper. It features a "Raghavan Optical Lattice" (ROL) consisting of 3375 boron or $^6$Li loaded plastic scintillator cubical cells 6.3\\,cm (2.500") on a side. Cell boundaries have a 0.127\\,mm (0.005") air gap, resulting in total internal reflection guiding most of the light down the 3 cardinal directions. The ROL detector technology for NuLat gives excellent spatial and energy resolution and allows for in-depth event topology studies. These features allow us to discern inverse beta decay (IBD) signals and the putative oscillation pattern, even in the presence of other backgrounds. We discuss here test venues, efficiency, sensitivity an...

  10. Underground collocation of nuclear power plant reactors and repository to facilitate the post-renaissance expansion of nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, Carl W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elkins, Ned Z [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Underground collocation of nuclear power reactors and the nuclear waste management facilities supporting those reactors, termed an underground nuclear park (UNP), appears to have several advantages compared to the conventional approach to siting reactors and waste management facilities. These advantages include the potential to lower reactor capital and operating cost, lower nuclear waste management cost, and increase margins of physical security and safety. Envirorunental impacts related to worker health, facility accidents, waste transportation, and sabotage and terrorism appear to be lower for UNPs compared to the current approach. In-place decommissioning ofUNP reactors appears to have cost, safety, envirorunental and waste disposal advantages. The UNP approach has the potential to lead to greater public acceptance for the deployment of new power reactors. Use of the UNP during the post-nuclear renaissance time frame has the potential to enable a greater expansion of U.S. nuclear power generation than might otherwise result. Technical and economic aspects of the UNP concept need more study to determine the viability of the concept.

  11. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip MacDonald; Jacopo Buongiorno; James Sterbentz; Cliff Davis; Robert Witt; Gary Was; J. McKinley; S. Teysseyre; Luca Oriani; Vefa Kucukboyaci; Lawrence Conway; N. Jonsson: Bin Liu

    2005-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) has been the object of interest throughout the nuclear Generation IV community because of its high potential: a simple, direct cycle, compact configuration; elimination of many traditional LWR components, operation at coolant temperatures much higher than traditional LWRs and thus high thermal efficiency. It could be said that the SWR was viewed as the water counterpart to the high temperature gas reactor.

  12. Materials Science Division light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shack, W.J.; Rest, J.; Kassner, T.F.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors; transient fuel response and fission product release; and clad properties for code verification.

  13. Radiogenic lead with dominant content of {sup 208}Pb: New coolant and neutron moderator for innovative nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shmelev, A. N.; Kulikov, G. G.; Kryuchkov, E. F.; Apse, V. A.; Kulikov, E. G. [National Research Nuclear Univ. MEPhI, Kashirskoe shosse, 31, 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advantages of radiogenic lead with dominant content of {sup 208}Pb as a reactor coolant with respect to natural lead are caused by unique nuclear properties of {sup 208}Pb which is a double-magic nucleus with closed proton and neutron shells. This results in significantly lower micro cross section and resonance integral of radiative neutron capture by {sup 208}Pb than those for numerous light neutron moderators. The extremely weak ability of {sup 208}Pb to absorb neutrons results in the following effects. Firstly, neutron moderating factor (ratio of scattering to capture cross sections) is larger than that for graphite and light water. Secondly, age and diffusion length of thermal neutrons are larger than those for graphite, light and heavy water. Thirdly, neutron lifetime in {sup 208}Pb is comparable with that for graphite, beryllium and heavy water what could be important for safe reactor operation. The paper presents some results obtained in neutronics and thermal-hydraulics evaluations of the benefits from the use of radiogenic lead with dominant content of {sup 208}Pb instead of natural lead as a coolant of fast breeder reactors. The paper demonstrates that substitution of radiogenic lead for natural lead can offer the following benefits for operation of fast breeder reactors. Firstly, improvement of the reactor safety thanks to the better values of coolant temperature reactivity coefficient and, secondly, improvement of some thermal-hydraulic reactor parameters. Radiogenic lead can be extracted from thorium sludge without isotope separation as {sup 208}Pb is a final isotope in the decay chain of {sup 232}Th. (authors)

  14. Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

  15. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1994. Twenty-seventh annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, M.L.; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corporation, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). Annual reports for 1994 were received from a total of 303 NRC licensees, of which 109 were operators of nuclear power reactors in commercial operation. Compilations of the reports submitted by the 303 licensees indicated that 152,028 individuals were monitored, 79,780 of whom received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 24,740 person-cSv (person-rem){sup 2} which represents a 15% decrease from the 1993 value. The number of workers receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in the average measurable dose of 0.31 cSv (rem) for 1994. The average measurable dose is defined to be the total collective dose (TEDE) divided by the number of workers receiving a measurable dose. These figures have been adjusted to account for transient reactor workers. In 1994, the annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor licensees (LWRs) was 198 person-cSv (person-rem). This represents a 18% decrease from the 1993 value of 242 person-cSv (person-rem). The annual collective dose per reactor for boiling water reactors (BWRs) was 327 person-cSv (person-rem) and, for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), it was 131 person-cSv (person-rem). Analyses of transient worker data indicate that 18,178 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient workers by multiple licensees. In 1994, the average measurable dose calculated from reported data was 0.28 cSv (rem). The corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose of 0.31 cSv (rem).

  16. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2003, 2nd Annual/8th Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip E. MacDonald

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the six reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation-IV program. SCWRs are promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% vs. about 33% efficiency for current Light Water Reactors, LWRs) and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs are basically LWRs operating at higher pressure and temperatures with a direct once-through cycle. Operation above the critical pressure eliminates coolant boiling, so the coolant remains single-phase throughout the system. Thus the need for recirculation and jet pumps, a pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators and dryers is eliminated. The main mission of the SCWR is generation of low-cost electricity. It is built upon two proven technologies, LWRs, which are the most commonly deployed power generating reactors in the world, and supercritical fossil-fired boilers, a large number of which is also in use around the world.

  17. A Generalized Adjoint Framework for Sensitivity and Global Error Estimation in Time-Dependent Nuclear Reactor Simulations 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anitescu, Mihai

    -Dependent Nuclear Reactor Simulations 1 H. F. Striplinga, , M. Anitescub , M. L. Adamsa aNuclear Engineering Bateman and transport equations, which govern the time-dependent neutronic behavior of a nuclear reactor framework for computing the adjoint variable to nuclear engineering problems gov- erned by a set

  18. Strategic Plan for Light Water Reactor Research and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this strategic plan is to establish a framework that will allow the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear power industry to jointly plan the nuclear energy research and development (R&D) agenda important to achieving the Nation's energy goals. This strategic plan has been developed to focus on only those R&D areas that will benefit from a coordinated government/industry effort. Specifically, this plan focuses on safely sustaining and expanding the electricity output from currently operating nuclear power plants and expanding nuclear capacity through the deployment of new plants. By focusing on R&D that addresses the needs of both current and future nuclear plants, DOE and industry will be able to take advantage of the synergism between these two technology areas, thus improving coordination, enhancing efficiency, and further leveraging public and private sector resources. By working together under the framework of this strategic plan, DOE and the nuclear industry reinforce their joint commitment to the future use of nuclear power and the National Energy Policy's goal of expanding its use in the United States. The undersigned believe that a public-private partnership approach is the most efficient and effective way to develop and transfer new technologies to the marketplace to achieve this goal. This Strategic Plan is intended to be a living document that will be updated annually.

  19. An underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hampel, V.E.

    1988-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working fluid in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast- acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor. 5 figs.

  20. Underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hampel, Viktor E. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working flud in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast-acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor.

  1. Nuclear reactor control rod having a reduced worth tip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doshi, P.K.; Wilson, J.F.

    1986-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor having a fuel assembly and a control rod moveable in and out for controlling the reactivity of the reactor, the control rod comprising: (a) an elongated tubular cladding; (b) means for closing the opposite ends of the cladding; (c) first pellets of a first type disposed within the cladding in an end-to-end relationship; and (d) second pellets of a second type disposed within the cladding in an end-to-end relationship; (e) one of the first and second types of pellets being formed of a material having a generally high neutron absorbing capacity; (f) the other of the first and second types of pellets being formed of an inert material having a generally low neutron absorbing capacity; (g) the pellets of the first and second types thereof being cylindrical with their respective diameters being generally equal; (h) the inert pellets being interspaced between the high neutron absorbing pellets at a lower end portion of the cladding with the remaining portion of the cladding above the lower end portion containing only the high neutron absorbing pellets; and (i) the axial heights of one of the first and second pluralities of pellets of the first and second types located at the lower end portion of the cladding progressively varying from pellet to pellet, the axial heights of the other of the first and second pellets of the first and second types located at the lower end portion of the cladding are generally equal from pellet to pellet, so as to produce an improved reduced worth tip at the lower end portion of the cladding.

  2. Safeguards and security requirements for weapons plutonium disposition in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, L.L.; Strait, R.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Fission Energy and Systems Safety Program

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores the issues surrounding the safeguarding of the plutonium disposition process in support of the United States nuclear weapons dismantlement program. It focuses on the disposition of the plutonium by burning mixed oxide fuel in light water reactors (LWR) and addresses physical protection, material control and accountability, personnel security and international safeguards. The S and S system needs to meet the requirements of the DOE Orders, NRC Regulations and international safeguards agreements. Experience has shown that incorporating S and S measures into early facility designs and integrating them into operations provides S and S that is more effective, more economical, and less intrusive. The plutonium disposition safeguards requirements with which the US has the least experience are the implementation of international safeguards on plutonium metal; the large scale commercialization of the mixed oxide fuel fabrication; and the transportation to and loading in the LWRs of fresh mixed oxide fuel. It is in these areas where the effort needs to be concentrated if the US is to develop safeguards and security systems that are effective and efficient.

  3. Advanced Fuels Campaign Light Water Reactor Accident Tolerant Fuel Performance Metrics Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research and development (R&D) activities on advanced, higher performance Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels have been ongoing for the last few years. Following the unfortunate March 2011 events at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, the R&D shifted toward enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs. Qualitative attributes for fuels with enhanced accident tolerance, such as improved reaction kinetics with steam resulting in slower hydrogen generation rate, provide guidance for the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. A common set of technical metrics should be established to aid in the optimization and down selection of candidate designs on a more quantitative basis. “Metrics” describe a set of technical bases by which multiple concepts can be fairly evaluated against a common baseline and against one another. This report describes a proposed technical evaluation methodology that can be applied to evaluate the ability of each concept to meet performance and safety goals relative to the current UO2 – zirconium alloy system and relative to one another. The resultant ranked evaluation can then inform concept down-selection, such that the most promising accident tolerant fuel design option(s) can continue to be developed toward qualification.

  4. Evolutionary/advanced light water reactor data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE Office of Fissile Material Disposition is examining options for placing fissile materials that were produced for fabrication of weapons, and now are deemed to be surplus, into a condition that is substantially irreversible and makes its use in weapons inherently more difficult. The principal fissile materials subject to this disposition activity are plutonium and uranium containing substantial fractions of plutonium-239 uranium-235. The data in this report, prepared as technical input to the fissile material disposition Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) deal only with the disposition of plutonium that contains well over 80% plutonium-239. In fact, the data were developed on the basis of weapon-grade plutonium which contains, typically, 93.6% plutonium-239 and 5.9% plutonium-240 as the principal isotopes. One of the options for disposition of weapon-grade plutonium being considered is the power reactor alternative. Plutonium would be fabricated into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and fissioned (``burned``) in a reactor to produce electric power. The MOX fuel will contain dioxides of uranium and plutonium with less than 7% weapon-grade plutonium and uranium that has about 0.2% uranium-235. The disposition mission could, for example, be carried out in existing power reactors, of which there are over 100 in the United States. Alternatively, new LWRs could be constructed especially for disposition of plutonium. These would be of the latest US design(s) incorporating numerous design simplifications and safety enhancements. These ``evolutionary`` or ``advanced`` designs would offer not only technological advances, but also flexibility in siting and the option of either government or private (e.g., utility) ownership. The new reactor designs can accommodate somewhat higher plutonium throughputs. This data report deals solely with the ``evolutionary`` LWR alternative.

  5. Role of fast reactor and its cycle to reduce nuclear waste burden

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arie, Kazuo; Oomori, Takashi; Okita, Takeshi [Toshiba Corporation, 8, Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan); Kawashima, Masatoshi [Toshiba Nuclear Engineering Services Corporation, 8, Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama, 235-8523 (Japan); Kotake, Shoji [The Japan Atomic Power Company, 1-1, Kanda-Mitoshiro-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0053 (Japan); Fuji-ie, Yoichi [Nuclear Salon Fuji-ie, 1-11-10, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0034 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of the metal fuel fast reactor with recycling of actinides and the five long-lived fission products based on the concept of the Self-Consistent Nuclear Energy System has been examined by evaluating the reduction of nuclear wastes during the transition period to this reactor system. The evaluation was done in comparison to an LWR once-through case and a conventional actinide recycling oxide fast reactor. As a result, it is quantitatively clarified that a metal fuel fast reactor with actinide and the five long-lived fission products (I{sup 129}, Tc{sup 99}, Zr{sup 93}, Cs{sup 135} and Sn{sup 126}) recycling could play a significant role in reducing the nuclear waste burden including the current LWR wastes. This can be achieved by using a fast neutron spectrum reactor enhanced with metal fuel that brings high capability as a 'waste burner'. (authors)

  6. 1 hour, 59 minutes ago President Jacques Chirac announced plans to build a prototype fourth-generation nuclear reactor by 2020 as well as symbolic targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -generation nuclear reactor by 2020 as well as symbolic targets for cutting France's reliance on oil in the coming and is conducting research into several new models of nuclear reactor. Business leaders in the French energy sector-generation nuclear reactor 1/5/06 3:19 PMPrint Story: France to develop fourth-generation nuclear reactor on Yahoo

  7. Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors and the Pyro-Process: Conversion of Nuclear Waste into a Fuel Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belanger, David P.

    1 Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors and the Pyro-Process: Conversion of Nuclear Waste into a Fuel Source renewed interest amongst the nuclear science community as the debate over nuclear waste has increased .................................................................................27 2.1.2 Waste Minimization

  8. Independent Confirmatory Survey Report for the University of Arizona Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Tucson, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick A. Altic

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Arizona (University) research reactor is a TRIGA swimming pool type reactor designed by General Atomics and constructed at the University in 1958. The reactor first went into operation in December of 1958 under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license R-52 until final shut down on May 18, 2010. Initial site characterization activities were conducted in February 2009 during ongoing reactor operations to assess the radiological status of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) excluding the reactor tank, associated components, and operating systems. Additional post-shutdown characterization activities were performed to complete characterization activities as well as verify assumptions made in the Decommissioning Plan (DP) that were based on a separate activation analysis (ESI 2009 and WMG 2009). Final status survey (FSS) activities began shortly after the issuance of the FSS plan in May 2011. The contractor completed measurement and sampling activities during the week of August 29, 2011.

  9. Power conversion system design for supercritical carbon dioxide cooled indirect cycle nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbs, Jonathan Paul

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO?) cycle is a promising advanced power conversion cycle which couples nicely to many Generation IV nuclear reactors. This work investigates the power conversion system design and ...

  10. Examination of offsite radiological emergency protective measures for nuclear reactor accidents involving core melt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldrich, David C.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evacuation, sheltering followed by population relocation, and iodine prophylaxis are evaluated as offsite public protective measures in response to nuclear reactor accidents involving core-melt. Evaluations were conducted ...

  11. The development of a remote monitoring system for the Nuclear Science Center reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiltchenkov, Dmitri Victorovich

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With funding provided by Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI), design of Secure, Transportable, Autonomous Reactors (STAR) to aid countries with insufficient energy supplies is underway. The development of a new monitoring system that allows...

  12. Space nuclear-power reactor design based on combined neutronic and thermal-fluid analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koenig, D.R.; Gido, R.G.; Brandon, D.I.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and performance analysis of a space nuclear-power system requires sophisticated analytical capabilities such as those developed during the nuclear rocket propulsion (Rover) program. In particular, optimizing the size of a space nuclear reactor for a given power level requires satisfying the conflicting requirements of nuclear criticality and heat removal. The optimization involves the determination of the coolant void (volume) fraction for which the reactor diameter is a minimum and temperature and structural limits are satisfied. A minimum exists because the critical diameter increases with increasing void fraction, whereas the reactor diameter needed to remove a specified power decreases with void fraction. The purpose of this presentation is to describe and demonstrate our analytical capability for the determination of minimum reactor size. The analysis is based on combining neutronic criticality calculations with OPTION-code thermal-fluid calculations.

  13. Print this article Close This Window EU OKs India joining ITER nuclear reactor project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Print this article Close This Window EU OKs India joining ITER nuclear reactor project Fri Dec 2 trademarks and trademarks of the Reuters group of companies around the world. Close This Window 12/2/05 4

  14. Passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with backup coolant flow path

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary system when rendered inoperable.

  15. A Computer Program Predicting Steady-State Performance of a Nuclear Research Reactor's Cooling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamel Sidi Ali [Nuclear Research Center of Birine (Algeria)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performances of a nuclear reactor are directly affected by its cooling system, especially when it uses wet towers to evacuate the heat generated in the nuclear reactor core. Failure of the cooling system can yield very serious damages to most of the components of the nuclear reactor core. In this work, a computer program simulating the thermal behavior of a nuclear research reactor's cooling system is presented. Starting from the proposed start-up data of the reactor, the program predicts the cooling capacity of the nuclear reactor while taking into account the current climate conditions and also monitors the behavior of the thermal equipment involved in this process and this for different levels of power. The proposed simulation is based on a set of heat transfer equations representing all the equipment making up the cooling system up to the nuclear reactor core. Owing to the proposed inter-connected set of equations used to predict the thermal behaviour of the system, this program allows the user to modify at will a specified parameter and study the induced resulting effects on the rest of the system. The computer program developed has been experimentally validated on an operational system generating 6.8 MW and the obtained results are in good agreement with experiment. The results produced by the program concern the capacity of the cooling system to evacuate all the heat generated in the nuclear reactor core while taking into account the current climate conditions, the determination of the optimal number of thermal equipment that need to be engaged, the monitoring of the reactor core's entry end exit temperatures as well as the temperatures of all the components of the cooling system. Moreover, the program gives all the characteristics of air at the exit of the cooling towers and the loss of water due to the cooling process. (authors)

  16. Modelling the Electron Beam Welding of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Modelling the Electron Beam Welding of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Christopher J. Duffy fabrication of thick-section steel for critical components such as reactor pressure vessels. Electron beam weld tests performed by Rolls-Royce and The Welding Institute of SA 508 Grade 3 and SA 508 Grade 4N

  17. Capillary-Pumped Passive Reactor Concept for Space Nuclear Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Thomas F. Lin; Dr. Thomas G. Hughes; Christopher G. Miller

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop the passively-cooled space reactor concept using the capillary-induced lithium flow, since molten lithium possesses a very favorable surface tension characteristic. In space where the gravitational field is minimal, the gravity-assisted natural convection cooling is not effective nor an option for reactor heat removal, the capillary induced cooling becomes an attractive means of providing reactor cooling.

  18. The design and construction of a 10-amplifier analog computer with provisions for nuclear reactor simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, James Robert

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF A 10-AMPLIFIER ANALOG COMPUTER WITH PROVISIONS FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR SIMULATION A Thesis by James Robert Cox Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1959 Major Subject: Ele ctr ical Engines r ing THE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF A 10-AMPLIFIER ANALOG COMPUTER WITH PROVISIONS FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR SIMULATION A The s is by Jame...

  19. Considerations for absorber analysis by reactivity measurements in a nuclear reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Jay Leslie

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONSIUERATIONS FOR ASSOESER ANALYSIS bY REACTIVITY NEASURENENTS IN A NUCLEAR REACTOR JAY LESLXE EAUFNAN Submitted to the Graduate School of tha Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of NASTER OF SCIENCE August 1959 Ma)or Sub)ect t Fhysics CONSIDERATIONS POR ABSORBER ANALYSIS BY REACTIVITY MEASUREHENTS IN A NUCLEAR REACTOR A Thssia By JA. Y LESLLE EAUPNAN Approved as to style and content by: (Chainsan of Coenittss...

  20. Hybrid nuclear reactor grey rod to obtain required reactivity worth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, John V. (Munhall, PA); Carlson, William R. (Scott Township, Allegheny County, PA); Yarbrough, Michael B. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid nuclear reactor grey rods are described, wherein geometric combinations of relatively weak neutron absorber materials such as stainless steel, zirconium or INCONEL, and relatively strong neutron absorber materials, such as hafnium, silver-indium cadmium and boron carbide, are used to obtain the reactivity worths required to reach zero boron change load follow. One embodiment includes a grey rod which has combinations of weak and strong neutron absorber pellets in a stainless steel cladding. The respective pellets can be of differing heights. A second embodiment includes a grey rod with a relatively thick stainless steel cladding receiving relatively strong neutron absorber pellets only. A third embodiment includes annular relatively weak netron absorber pellets with a smaller diameter pellet of relatively strong absorber material contained within the aperture of each relatively weak absorber pellet. The fourth embodiment includes pellets made of a homogeneous alloy of hafnium and a relatively weak absorber material, with the percentage of hafnium chosen to obtain the desired reactivity worth.

  1. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion: A Joint NASA/DOE/DOD Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, J.S.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Papers presented at the joint NASA/DOE/DOD workshop on nuclear thermal propulsion are compiled. The following subject areas are covered: nuclear thermal propulsion programs; Rover/NERVA and NERVA systems; Low Pressure Nuclear Thermal Rocket (LPNTR); particle bed reactor nuclear rocket; hybrid propulsion systems; wire core reactor; pellet bed reactor; foil reactor; Droplet Core Nuclear Rocket (DCNR); open cycle gas core nuclear rockets; vapor core propulsion reactors; nuclear light bulb; Nuclear rocket using Indigenous Martian Fuel (NIMF); mission analysis; propulsion and reactor technology; development plans; and safety issues.

  2. Large-eddy simulations of turbulent flow for grid-to-rod fretting in nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakosi, J; Lowrie, R B; Pritchett-Sheats, L A; Nourgaliev, R R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) problem in pressurized water reactors is a flow-induced vibration problem that results in wear and failure of the fuel rods in nuclear assemblies. In order to understand the fluid dynamics of GTRF and to build an archival database of turbulence statistics for various configurations, implicit large-eddy simulations of time-dependent single-phase turbulent flow have been performed in 3x3 and 5x5 rod bundles with a single grid spacer. To assess the computational mesh and resolution requirements, a method for quantitative assessment of unstructured meshes with no-slip walls is described. The calculations have been carried out using Hydra-TH, a thermal-hydraulics code developed at Los Alamos for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light water reactors, a United States Department of Energy Innovation Hub. Hydra-TH uses a second-order implicit incremental projection method to solve the single-phase incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The simulations explicitly resolve the la...

  3. Light water reactor mixed-oxide fuel irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, S.A.; Cowell, B.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chang, G.S.; Ryskamp, J.M. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition is sponsoring and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leading an irradiation experiment to test mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel made from weapons-grade (WG) plutonium. In this multiyear program, sealed capsules containing MOX fuel pellets fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The planned experiments will investigate the utilization of dry-processed plutonium, the effects of WG plutonium isotopics on MOX performance, and any material interactions of gallium with Zircaloy cladding.

  4. TREAT light water reactor source term experiments program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herceg, J.E.; Blomquist, C.A.; Chung, K.S.; Dunn, P.F.; Johnson, C.E.; Kraft, D.A.; Schlenger, B.J.; Shaftman, D.H.; Simms, R.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four experiments are being conducted in the TREAT facility to investigate the behavior of fission products released from typical LWR fuel overheated to the point of catastrophic cladding degradation. Heatup and steam flow transients are used that simulate the conditions expected in operating power reactors undergoing various types of hypothetical severe accidents. The experiments are integral in nature and are aimed at the physicochemical characterization, near the point of origin, of the biologically important volatile fission products released early in such accidents. Detailed program objectives are discussed, a test matrix is presented, and the test apparatus is described. Pretest analysis and preliminary results are reported for the first test.

  5. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercializationValidation and UncertaintyPWR Reactor Vessel

  6. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercializationValidation and UncertaintyPWR Reactor VesselRadiation

  7. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercializationValidation and UncertaintyPWR Reactor

  8. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercializationValidation and UncertaintyPWR ReactorIndustry Council and

  9. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercializationValidation and UncertaintyPWR ReactorIndustry Council

  10. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercializationValidation and UncertaintyPWR ReactorIndustry

  11. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercializationValidation and UncertaintyPWR ReactorIndustryMedia Center

  12. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercializationValidation and UncertaintyPWR ReactorIndustryMedia

  13. Advanced light water reactor plants system 80+{trademark} design certification program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80{sup +}{trademark} during the U.S. government`s 1994 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design covers an essentially complete plant. It is based on EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) improvements to the Standardized System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2 and 3. The NSSS is a traditional two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs, each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard design houses the NSSS in a spherical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual barrier to radioactivity release. Other major features include an all-digital, human-factors-engineered control room, an alternate electrical AC power source, an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), and plant arrangements providing complete separation of redundant trains in safety systems. Some design enhancements incorporated in the System 80+ design are included in the four units currently under construction in the Republic of Korea. These units and the System 80+ design form the basis of the Korean standardization program. The Nuclear Island portion of the System 80+ standard design has also been offered to the Republic of China, in response to their bid specification for an ALWR. The ABB-CE Standard Safety Analysis Report (CESSAR-DC) was docketed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in May 1991 and a Draft Safety Evaluation Report (DSER) was issued in October 1992.

  14. Eastern Europe Research Reactor Initiative nuclear education and training courses - Current activities and future challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snoj, L. [Josef Stefan Inst., Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sklenka, L.; Rataj, J. [Dept. of Nuclear Reactor, Czech Technical Univ. in Prague, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Boeck, H. [Vienna Univ. of Technology/Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eastern Europe Research Reactor Initiative was established in January 2008 to enhance cooperation between the Research Reactors in Eastern Europe. It covers three areas of research reactor utilisation: irradiation of materials and fuel, radioisotope production, neutron beam experiments, education and training. In the field of education and training an EERRI training course was developed. The training programme has been elaborated with the purpose to assist IAEA Member States, which consider building a research reactor (RR) as a first step to develop nuclear competence and infrastructure in the Country. The major strength of the reactor is utilisation of three different research reactors and a lot of practical exercises. Due to high level of adaptability, the course can be tailored to specific needs of institutions with limited or no access to research reactors. (authors)

  15. Apparatus and method for classifying fuel pellets for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilks, Robert S. (Plum Borough, PA); Sternheim, Eliezer (Pittsburgh, PA); Breakey, Gerald A. (Penn Township, Allegheny County, PA); Sturges, Jr., Robert H. (Plum Borough, PA); Taleff, Alexander (Churchill Borough, PA); Castner, Raymond P. (Monroeville, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control for the operation of a mechanical handling and gauging system for nuclear fuel pellets. The pellets are inspected for diameters, lengths, surface flaws and weights in successive stations. The control includes, a computer for commanding the operation of the system and its electronics and for storing and processing the complex data derived at the required high rate. In measuring the diameter, the computer enables the measurement of a calibration pellet, stores that calibration data and computes and stores diameter-correction factors and their addresses along a pellet. To each diameter measurement a correction factor is applied at the appropriate address. The computer commands verification that all critical parts of the system and control are set for inspection and that each pellet is positioned for inspection. During each cycle of inspection, the measurement operation proceeds normally irrespective of whether or not a pellet is present in each station. If a pellet is not positioned in a station, a measurement is recorded, but the recorded measurement indicates maloperation. In measuring diameter and length a light pattern including successive shadows of slices transverse for diameter or longitudinal for length are projected on a photodiode array. The light pattern is scanned electronically by a train of pulses. The pulses are counted during the scan of the lighted diodes. For evaluation of diameter the maximum diameter count and the number of slices for which the diameter exceeds a predetermined minimum is determined. For acceptance, the maximum must be less than a maximum level and the minimum must exceed a set number. For evaluation of length, the maximum length is determined. For acceptance, the length must be within maximum and minimum limits.

  16. Metal-fueled HWR (heavy water reactors) severe accident issues: Differences and similarities to commercial LWRs (light water reactors)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, P.G.; Hyder, M.L.; Monson, P.R. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA)); Coryell, E.W. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differences and similarities in severe accident progression and phenomena between commercial Light Water Reactors (LWR) and metal-fueled isotopic production Heavy Water Reactors (HWR) are described. It is very important to distinguish between accident progression in the two systems because each reactor type behaves in a unique manner to a fuel melting accident. Some of the lessons learned as a result of the extensive commercial severe accident research are not applicable to metal-fueled heavy water reactors. A direct application of severe accident phenomena developed from oxide-fueled LWRs to metal-fueled HWRs may lead to large errors or substantial uncertainties. In general, the application of severe accident LWR concepts to HWRs should be done with the intent to define the relevant issues, define differences, and determine areas of overlap. This paper describes the relevant differences between LWR and metal-fueled HWR severe accident phenomena. Also included in the paper is a description of the phenomena that govern the source term in HWRs, the areas where research is needed to resolve major uncertainties, and areas in which LWR technology can be directly applied with few modifications.

  17. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials with Particles and Components Testing (IMPACT) facility and the Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) Radiochemistry Processing Laboratory (RPL) and PIE facilities were added. The ATR NSUF annually hosts a weeklong event called User’s Week in which students and faculty from universities as well as other interested parties from regulatory agencies or industry convene in Idaho Falls, Idaho to see presentations from ATR NSUF staff as well as select researchers from the materials research field. User’s week provides an overview of current materials research topics of interest and an opportunity for young researchers to understand the process of performing work through ATR NSUF. Additionally, to increase the number of researchers engaged in LWR materials issues, a series of workshops are in progress to introduce research staff to stress corrosion cracking, zirconium alloy degradation, and uranium dioxide degradation during in-reactor use.

  18. The Arabidopsis blue light receptor cryptochrome 2 is a nuclear protein regulated by a blue light-dependent post-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Chentao

    The Arabidopsis blue light receptor cryptochrome 2 is a nuclear protein regulated by a blue light Charles E. Young Dr. South, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1606, USA Summary Cryptochrome 2 is a ¯avin-type blue light receptor mediating ¯oral induction in response to photoperiod and a blue light-induced hypocotyl

  19. Light Water Reactor Safety Research Program. Semiannual report, April-September 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents progress made in Light Water Reactor Safety research conducted by Division 6441 in the period from April 1982 to September 1982. The programs conducted under investigation include Core Concrete Interactions, Core Melt-Coolant Interactions, Containment Emergency Sump Performance, the Hydrogen Program, and Combustible Gas in Containment Program. 50 references.

  20. Light water reactor safety research program. Volume 12: quarterly report, Apr-Jun 79

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress of the Light Water Reactor Safety Research Program during the 2nd quarter of 1979. Specifically, the report summarizes progress in five major areas of research. They are: (1) the molten core/concrete interactions study; (2) steam explosion research phenomena; (3) statistical LOCA analysis; (4) UHI model development; (5) two-phase jet loads.

  1. Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terrani, Kurt Amir

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Zirconium Hydride and Deuteride. Journal of Alloysof ThZr 2 hydrides and deuterides using X-ray and neutronX-ray Diffraction Deuteride - X-ray Diffraction Deuteride -

  2. Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terrani, Kurt Amir

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of plutonium attainable with MOX fuel [24, 23]. In theof recycles feasible with MOX fuel is limited because the

  3. The Application of Structural Materials Data From the BN-350 Fast Reactor to Life Extension of Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanenko, O.G. [Nuclear Technology Safety Center, Liza Chaikina 4, Almaty 050020 (Kazakhstan); Kislitsin, S.B.; Maksimkin, O.P. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1 Ibragimova St., Almaty, 050032 (Kazakhstan); Shiganakov, Sh.B.; Chumakov, Ye.V. [Kazakhstan Atomic Energy Committee, Liza Chaikina 4, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Dumchev, I.V. [MAEC Kazatomprom, Aktau, 130000 (Kazakhstan)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the results of investigations of 08Cr16Ni11Mo3 (AISI 316 steel analogue) austenitic stainless steel irradiated in BN-350 breeder reactor at irradiation conditions close to that for Light Water Reactor (LWR) Internals. The pores were found in 08Cr16Ni11Mo3 steel irradiated at temperature 280 deg. C up to rather low damage 1.3 dpa and with dose rate 3.9 x 10{sup -9} dpa/s. There were obtained dose rate dependencies of yield strength, ultimate strength and ductility for 08Cr16Ni11Mo3 steel irradiated up to 7-13 dpa at 302-311 deg. C. These dependencies show a decrease in both yield strength and ultimate strength when dose rate decreases. There was observed an apparent decrease in total elongation when dose rate decreases, which was presumably connected with the pores formation in the steel at low dose rates. (authors)

  4. Application of an exact model matching technique to coupled-core nuclear reactor control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzafestas, S.G.; Chrysochoides, N.G.; Rokkos, K.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Note the control problem of linearized coupled-core multivariable nuclear reactors is treated by using a recent exact model matching technique in the frequency domain. The case of state feedback control is first considered and then the results are used where only the output variables of the reactor are available for feedback. A numerical example of a three coupled-core nuclear reactor model with one delayed neutron group for each core and short neutron travel time between cores is included.

  5. Role of small lead-cooled fast reactors for international deployment in worldwide sustainable nuclear energy supply.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, J. J.; Wade, D. C.; Moisseytsev, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most recently, the global nuclear energy partnership (GNEP) has identified, as one of its key objectives, the development and demonstration of concepts for small and medium-sized reactors (SMRs) that can be globally deployed while assuring a high level of proliferation resistance. Lead-cooled systems offer several key advantages in meeting these goals. The small lead-cooled fast reactor concept known as the small secure transportable autonomous reactor (SSTAR) has been under ongoing development as part of the US advanced nuclear energy systems programs. Meeting future worldwide projected energy demands during this century (e.g., 1000 to 2000 GWe by 2050) in a sustainable manner while maintaining CO2 emissions at or below today's level will require massive deployments of nuclear reactors in non-fuel cycle states as well as fuel cycle states. The projected energy demands of non-fuel cycle states will not be met solely through the deployment of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) in those states without using up the world's resources of fissile material (e.g., known plus speculative virgin uranium resources = 15 million tonnes). The present U.S. policy is focused upon domestic deployment of large-scale LWRs and sodium-cooled fast spectrum Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) working in a symbiotic relationship that burns existing fissile material while destroying the actinides which are generated. Other major nuclear nations are carrying out the development and deployment of SFR breeders as witness the planning for SFR breeder deployments in France, Japan, China, India, and Russia. Small (less that 300 MWe) and medium (300 to 700 MWe) size reactors are better suited to the growing economies and infrastructures of many non-fuel cycle states and developing nations. For those deployments, fast reactor converters which are fissile self-sufficient by creating as much fissile material as they consume are preferred to breeders that create more fissile material than they consume. Thus, there is a need for small and medium size fast reactors in non-fuel cycle states operating in a converter mode as well as large sodium-cooled fast breeders in fuel cycle states. Desired attributes for exportable small fast reactors include: proliferation resistance features such as restricted access to fuel; long core life further restricting access by reducing or eliminating the need for refueling; restricted potential to be misused in a breeding mode; fuel form that is unattractive in the safeguards sense; and a conversion ratio of unity to self-generate as much fissile material as is consumed. Desired attributes for exportable small reactor deployments in developing nations and remote sites also include: a small power level to match the smaller demand of towns or sites that are off-grid or on immature local grids; low enough cost to be economically competitive with alternative energy sources available to developing nation customers (e.g. diesel generators in remote locations); readily transported and assembled from transportable modules; simple to operate and highly reliable reducing plant operating staff requirements; as well as high reliability and passive safety reducing the number of accident initiators and need for safety systems as well as reducing the size of the exclusion and emergency planning zones. The Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) has the desired attributes. An example of a small exportable LFR concept is the 20 MWe (45 MWt) Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) incorporating proliferation resistance, fissile selfsufficiency, autonomous load following, a high degree of passive safety, and supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle energy conversion for high plant efficiency and improved economic competitiveness.

  6. An investigation of temperature measurement methods in nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acton, R.U.; Gill, W.; Sais, D.J.; Schulze, D.H.; Nakos, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to provide an assessment of several methods by which the temperature of a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel (RPV) could be measured during an annealing process. This project was a coordinated effort between DOE`s Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology; DOE`s Light Water Reactor Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories; and the Electric Power Research Institute`s Non- Destructive Evaluation Center. Ball- thermocouple probes similar to those described in NUREG/CR-5760, spring-loaded, metal- sheathed thermocouple probes, and 1778 air- suspended thermocouples were investigated in experiments that heated a section of an RPV wall to simulate a thermal annealing treatment. A parametric study of ball material, emissivity, thermal conductivity, and thermocouple function locations was conducted. Also investigated was a sheathed thermocouple failure mode known as shunting (electrical breakdown of insulation separating the thermocouple wires). Large errors were found between the temperature as measured by the probes and the true RPV wall temperature during heat-up and cool-down. At the annealing soak temperature, in this case 454{degrees}C [850`F], all sensors measured the same temperature within about {plus_minus}5% (23.6{degrees}C [42.5{degrees}F]). Because of these errors, actual RPV wall heating and cooling rates differed from those prescribed (by up to 29%). Shunting does not appear to be a problem under these conditions. The large temperature measurement errors led to the development of a thermal model that predicts the RPV wall temperature from the temperature of a ball- probe. Comparisons between the model and the experimental data for ball-probes indicate that the model could be a useful tool in predicting the actual RPV temperature based on the indicated ball- probe temperature. The model does not predict the temperature as well for the spring-loaded and air suspended probes.

  7. High-Temperature Nuclear Reactors for In-Situ Recovery of Oil from Oil Shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6165 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world is exhausting its supply of crude oil for the production of liquid fuels (gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel). However, the United States has sufficient oil shale deposits to meet our current oil demands for {approx}100 years. Shell Oil Corporation is developing a new potentially cost-effective in-situ process for oil recovery that involves drilling wells into oil shale, using electric heaters to raise the bulk temperature of the oil shale deposit to {approx}370 deg C to initiate chemical reactions that produce light crude oil, and then pumping the oil to the surface. The primary production cost is the cost of high-temperature electrical heating. Because of the low thermal conductivity of oil shale, high-temperature heat is required at the heater wells to obtain the required medium temperatures in the bulk oil shale within an economically practical two to three years. It is proposed to use high-temperature nuclear reactors to provide high-temperature heat to replace the electricity and avoid the factor-of-2 loss in converting high-temperature heat to electricity that is then used to heat oil shale. Nuclear heat is potentially viable because many oil shale deposits are thick (200 to 700 m) and can yield up to 2.5 million barrels of oil per acre, or about 125 million dollars/acre of oil at $50/barrel. The concentrated characteristics of oil-shale deposits make it practical to transfer high-temperature heat over limited distances from a reactor to the oil shale deposits. (author)

  8. SL-1 Accident Briefing Report - 1961 Nuclear Reactor Meltdown Educational Documentary

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (Idaho Operations Office) briefing about the SL-1 Nuclear Reactor Meltdown. The SL-1, or Stationary Low-Power Reactor Number One, was a United States Army experimental nuclear power reactor which underwent a steam explosion and meltdown on January 3, 1961, killing its three operators. The direct cause was the improper withdrawal of the central control rod, responsible for absorbing neutrons in the reactor core. The event is the only known fatal reactor accident in the United States. The accident released about 80 curies (3.0 TBq) of Iodine-131, which was not considered significant due to its location in a remote desert of Idaho. About 1,100 curies (41 TBq) of fission products were released into the atmosphere. The facility, located at the National Reactor Testing Station approximately 40 miles (64 km) west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, was part of the Army Nuclear Power Program and was known as the Argonne Low Power Reactor (ALPR) during its design and build phase. It was intended to provide electrical power and heat for small, remote military facilities, such as radar sites near the Arctic Circle, and those in the DEW Line. The design power was 3 MW (thermal). Operating power was 200 kW electrical and 400 kW thermal for space heating. In the accident, the core power level reached nearly 20 GW in just four milliseconds, precipitating the reactor accident and steam explosion.

  9. SL-1 Accident Briefing Report - 1961 Nuclear Reactor Meltdown Educational Documentary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (Idaho Operations Office) briefing about the SL-1 Nuclear Reactor Meltdown. The SL-1, or Stationary Low-Power Reactor Number One, was a United States Army experimental nuclear power reactor which underwent a steam explosion and meltdown on January 3, 1961, killing its three operators. The direct cause was the improper withdrawal of the central control rod, responsible for absorbing neutrons in the reactor core. The event is the only known fatal reactor accident in the United States. The accident released about 80 curies (3.0 TBq) of Iodine-131, which was not considered significant due to its location in a remote desert of Idaho. About 1,100 curies (41 TBq) of fission products were released into the atmosphere. The facility, located at the National Reactor Testing Station approximately 40 miles (64 km) west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, was part of the Army Nuclear Power Program and was known as the Argonne Low Power Reactor (ALPR) during its design and build phase. It was intended to provide electrical power and heat for small, remote military facilities, such as radar sites near the Arctic Circle, and those in the DEW Line. The design power was 3 MW (thermal). Operating power was 200 kW electrical and 400 kW thermal for space heating. In the accident, the core power level reached nearly 20 GW in just four milliseconds, precipitating the reactor accident and steam explosion.

  10. Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors. Semiannual report, April 1992--September 1992: Volume 16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doctor, S.R.; Diaz, A.A.; Friley, J.R.; Greenwood, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs);using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a programs report covering the programmatic work from April 1992 through September 1992.

  11. Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors. Volume 14, Semiannual report, April 1991--September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doctor, S.R.; Diaz, A.A.; Friley, J.R.; Good, M.S.; Greenwood, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Hockey, R.L.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWR`s); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from April 1991 through September 1991.

  12. Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors. Volume 15, Semiannual report: October 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doctor, S.R.; Diaz, A.A.; Friley, J.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to ASME Code and Regulatory requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from October 1991 through March 1992.

  13. Nuclear reactor having a polyhedral primary shield and removable vessel insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekeroth, D.E.; Orr, R.

    1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor is provided having a generally cylindrical reactor vessel disposed within an opening in a primary shield. The opening in the primary shield is defined by a plurality of generally planar side walls forming a generally polyhedral-shaped opening. The reactor vessel is supported within the opening in the primary shield by reactor vessel supports which are in communication and aligned with central portions of some of the side walls. The reactor vessel is connected to the central portions of the reactor vessel supports. A thermal insulation polyhedron formed from a plurality of slidably insertable and removable generally planar insulation panels substantially surrounds at least a portion of the reactor vessel and is disposed between the reactor vessel and the side walls of the primary shield. The shape of the insulation polyhedron generally corresponds to the shape of the opening in the primary shield. Reactor monitoring instrumentation may be mounted in the corners of the opening in the primary shield between the side walls and the reactor vessel such that insulation is not disposed between the instrumentation and the reactor vessel. 5 figures.

  14. Nuclear reactor having a polyhedral primary shield and removable vessel insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekeroth, Douglas E. (Delmont, PA); Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor is provided having a generally cylindrical reactor vessel disposed within an opening in a primary shield. The opening in the primary shield is defined by a plurality of generally planar side walls forming a generally polyhedral-shaped opening. The reactor vessel is supported within the opening in the primary shield by reactor vessel supports which are in communication and aligned with central portions of some of the side walls. The reactor vessel is connected to the central portions of the reactor vessel supports. A thermal insulation polyhedron formed from a plurality of slidably insertable and removable generally planar insulation panels substantially surrounds at least a portion of the reactor vessel and is disposed between the reactor vessel and the side walls of the primary shield. The shape of the insulation polyhedron generally corresponds to the shape of the opening in the primary shield. Reactor monitoring instrumentation may be mounted in the corners of the opening in the primary shield between the side walls and the reactor vessel such that insulation is not disposed between the instrumentation and the reactor vessel.

  15. A Preliminary Report on Static Analysis of C Code for Nuclear Reactor Protection System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    &C system in nuclear power plants consists of various safety and non-safety components. This paper triesA Preliminary Report on Static Analysis of C Code for Nuclear Reactor Protection System Jong-gu Republic of Korea (e-mail: {kirdess, atang34, jbyoo}@konkuk.ac.kr) **Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

  16. CRAD, Nuclear Safety- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Nuclear Safety Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  17. NA 30 - Deputy Administrator for Naval Reactors | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 30 - Deputy Administrator for Naval Reactors NA 30 - Deputy Administrator for...

  18. Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1986-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish reactor safety program requirements assure that the safety of each Department of Energy-owned (DOE-owned) reactor is properly analyzed, evaluated, documented, and approved by DOE; and reactors are sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that gives adequate protection for health and safety and will be in accordance with uniform standards, guides, and codes which are consistent with those applied to comparable licensed reactors. Cancels Chap. 6 of DOE O 5480.1A. Paragraphs 7b(3), 7e(3) & 8c canceled by DOE O 5480.23 & canceled by DOE N 251.4 of 9-29-95.

  19. Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732on ArmedManufacturingJune 17,DepartmentLibrary LibraryNuclear

  20. Status of Fuel Development and Manufacturing for Space Nuclear Reactors at BWX Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmack, W.J.; Husser, D.L.; Mohr, T.C.; Richardson, W.C. [BWX Technologies, PO Box 785, Lynchburg, VA 24505-0785 (United States)

    2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    New advanced nuclear space propulsion systems will soon seek a high temperature, stable fuel form. BWX Technologies Inc (BWXT) has a long history of fuel manufacturing. UO2, UCO, and UCx have been fabricated at BWXT for various US and international programs. Recent efforts at BWXT have focused on establishing the manufacturing techniques and analysis capabilities needed to provide a high quality, high power, compact nuclear reactor for use in space nuclear powered missions. To support the production of a space nuclear reactor, uranium nitride has recently been manufactured by BWXT. In addition, analytical chemistry and analysis techniques have been developed to provide verification and qualification of the uranium nitride production process. The fabrication of a space nuclear reactor will require the ability to place an unclad fuel form into a clad structure for assembly into a reactor core configuration. To this end, BWX Technologies has reestablished its capability for machining, GTA welding, and EB welding of refractory metals. Specifically, BWX Technologies has demonstrated GTA welding of niobium flat plate and EB welding of niobium and Nb-1Zr tubing. In performing these demonstration activities, BWX Technologies has established the necessary infrastructure to manufacture UO2, UCx, or UNx fuel, components, and complete reactor assemblies in support of space nuclear programs.

  1. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization andComputerConfirmed:Conservation isSimulation of Light

  2. Experimental Results from an Antineutrino Detector for Cooperative Monitoring of Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowden, N S; Bernstein, A; Allen, M; Brennan, J S; Cunningham, M; Estrada, J K; Greaves, C R; Hagmann, C; Lund, J; Mengesha, W; Weinbeck, T D; Winant, C D

    2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Our collaboration has designed, installed, and operated a compact antineutrino detector at a nuclear power station, for the purpose of monitoring the power and plutonium content of the reactor core. This paper focuses on the basic properties and performance of the detector. We describe the site, the reactor source, and the detector, and provide data that clearly show the expected antineutrino signal. Our data and experience demonstrate that it is possible to operate a simple, relatively small, antineutrino detector near a reactor, in a non-intrusive and unattended mode for months to years at a time, from outside the reactor containment, with no disruption of day-to-day operations at the reactor site. This unique real-time cooperative monitoring capability may be of interest for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reactor safeguards program and similar regimes.

  3. Safeguards Issues at Nuclear Reactors and Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Agency's safeguards technical objective is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection.

  4. Proposed and existing passive and inherent safety-related structures, systems, and components (building blocks) for advanced light-water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Moses, D.L.; Lewis, E.B.; Gibson, R.; Pearson, R.; Reich, W.J.; Murphy, G.A.; Staunton, R.H.; Kohn, W.E.

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear power plant is composed of many structures, systems, and components (SSCs). Examples include emergency core cooling systems, feedwater systems, and electrical systems. The design of a reactor consists of combining various SSCs (building blocks) into an integrated plant design. A new reactor design is the result of combining old SSCs in new ways or use of new SSCs. This report identifies, describes, and characterizes SSCs with passive and inherent features that can be used to assure safety in light-water reactors. Existing, proposed, and speculative technologies are described. The following approaches were used to identify the technologies: world technical literature searches, world patent searches, and discussions with universities, national laboratories and industrial vendors. 214 refs., 105 figs., 26 tabs.

  5. Hanging core support system for a nuclear reactor. [LMFBR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burelbach, J.P.; Kann, W.J.; Pan, Y.C.; Saiveau, J.G.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1984-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    For holding the reactor core in the confining reactor vessel, a support is disclosed that is structurally independent of the vessel, that is dimensionally accurate and stable, and that comprises tandem tension linkages that act redundantly of one another to maintain stabilized core support even in the unlikely event of the complete failure of one of the linkages. The core support has a mounting platform for the reactor core, and unitary structure including a flange overlying the top edge of the reactor vessels, and a skirt and box beams between the flange and platform for establishing one of the linkages. A plurality of tension rods connect between the deck closing the reactor vessel and the platform for establishing the redundant linkage. Loaded Belleville springs flexibly hold the tension rods at the deck and separable bayonet-type connections hold the tension rods at the platform.

  6. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) PathwayTechnical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Cristian Rabiti; Richard Martineau

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on “engineering judgment.”

  7. Supplying the nuclear arsenal: Production reactor technology, management, and policy, 1942--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, R.P.; Zenzen, J.M.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book focuses on the lineage of America`s production reactors, those three at Hanford and their descendants, the reactors behind America`s nuclear weapons. The work will take only occasional sideways glances at the collateral lines of descent, the reactor cousins designed for experimental purposes, ship propulsion, and electric power generation. Over the decades from 1942 through 1992, fourteen American production reactors made enough plutonium to fuel a formidable arsenal of more than twenty thousand weapons. In the last years of that period, planners, nuclear engineers, and managers struggled over designs for the next generation of production reactors. The story of fourteen individual machines and of the planning effort to replace them might appear relatively narrow. Yet these machines lay at the heart of the nation`s nuclear weapons complex. The story of these machines is the story of arming the winning weapon, supplying the nuclear arms race. This book is intended to capture the history of the first fourteen production reactors, and associated design work, in the face of the end of the Cold War.

  8. Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Fall, ID); Lambert, John D. B. (Wheaton, IL); Herzog, James P. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod.

  9. Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.; Lambert, J.B.; Herzog, J.P.

    1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system are disclosed for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod. 12 figs.

  10. Nuclear reactor with low-level core coolant intake

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Challberg, Roy C. (Livermore, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (Campbell, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A natural-circulation boiling-water reactor has skirts extending downward from control rod guide tubes to about 10 centimeters from the reactor vessel bottom. The skirts define annular channels about control rod drive housings that extend through the reactor vessel bottom. Recirculating water is forced in through the low-level entrances to these channels, sweeping bottom water into the channels in the process. The sweeping action prevents cooler water from accumulating at the bottom. This in turn minimizes thermal shock to bottom-dwelling components as would occur when accumulated cool water is swept away and suddenly replaced by warmer water.

  11. Zirconium-based alloys, nuclear fuel rods and nuclear reactors including such alloys, and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mariani, Robert Dominick

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Zirconium-based metal alloy compositions comprise zirconium, a first additive in which the permeability of hydrogen decreases with increasing temperatures at least over a temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C., and a second additive having a solubility in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. At least one of a solubility of the first additive in the second additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. and a solubility of the second additive in the first additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. is higher than the solubility of the second additive in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. Nuclear fuel rods include a cladding material comprising such metal alloy compositions, and nuclear reactors include such fuel rods. Methods are used to fabricate such zirconium-based metal alloy compositions.

  12. Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program on irradiation effects in light-water reactor pressure vessel materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Alexander, D.J.; Haggag, F.M.; Iskander, S.K.; McCabe, D.E.; Sokolov, M.A.; Stoller, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safety of commercial light-water nuclear plants is highly dependent on the structural integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the absence of radiation damage to the RPV, fracture of the vessel is difficult to postulate. Exposure to high energy neutrons can result in embrittlement of radiation-sensitive RPV materials. The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), is assessing the effects of neutron irradiation on RPV material behavior, especially fracture toughness. The results of these and other studies are used by the USNRC in the evaluation of RPV integrity and regulation of overall nuclear plant safety. In assessing the effects of irradiation, prototypic RPV materials are characterized in the unirradiated condition and exposed to radiation under varying conditions. Mechanical property tests are conducted to provide data which can be used in the development of guidelines for structural integrity evaluations, while metallurgical examinations and mechanistic modeling are performed to improve understanding of the mechanisms responsible for embrittlement. The results of these investigations, in conjunction with results from commercial reactor surveillance programs, are used to develop a methodology for the prediction of radiation effects on RPV materials. This irradiation-induced degradation of the materials can be mitigated by thermal annealing, i.e., heating the RPV to a temperature above that of normal operation. Thus, thermal annealing and evaluation of reirradiation behavior are major tasks of the HSSI Program. This paper describes the HSSI Program activities by summarizing some past and recent results, as well as current and planned studies. 30 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Containment building : architecture between the city and advanced nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauli, Lisa M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the inception of nuclear energy research, the element thorium (Th) has been considered the superior fuel for nuclear reactions because of its potency, safety, abundance and reduced waste. Cold War agendas broke from ...

  14. Development of Technical Nuclear Forensics for Spent Research Reactor Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sternat, Matthew Ryan 1982-

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    , an inverse analysis was developed to re-construct the burnup, initial uranium isotopic compositions, and cooling time of a research reactor spent fuel sample. A convergence acceleration technique was used that consisted of an analytical calculation to predict...

  15. The Neutrino Mass Hierarchy from Nuclear Reactor Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emilio Ciuffoli; Jarah Evslin; Xinmin Zhang

    2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    10 years from now reactor neutrino experiments will attempt to determine which neutrino mass eigenstate is the most massive. In this letter we present the results of more than seven million detailed simulations of such experiments, studying the dependence of the probability of successfully determining the mass hierarchy upon the analysis method, the neutrino mass matrix parameters, reactor flux models, geoneutrinos and, in particular, combinations of baselines. We show that a recently reported spurious dependence of the data analysis upon the high energy tail of the reactor spectrum can be removed by using a weighted Fourier transform. We determine the optimal baselines and corresponding detector locations. For most values of the CP-violating, leptonic Dirac phase delta, a degeneracy prevents NOvA and T2K from determining either delta or the hierarchy. We determine the confidence with which a reactor experiment can determine the hierarchy, breaking the degeneracy.

  16. Argonne partners with industry on nuclear reactor work | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the University of Pittsburgh to develop thermo-acoustic sensors for sodium-cooled fast reactors. The awards are part of the Obama administration's all-of-the-above energy...

  17. Dual annular rotating [open quotes]windowed[close quotes] nuclear reflector reactor control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacox, M.G.; Drexler, R.L.; Hunt, R.N.M.; Lake, J.A.

    1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core. 4 figures.

  18. Meeting Summary Advanced Light Water Reactor Fuels Industry Meeting Washington DC October 27 - 28, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Listed

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced LWR Fuel Working Group first met in November of 2010 with the objective of looking 20 years ahead to the role that advanced fuels could play in improving light water reactor technology, such as waste reduction and economics. When the group met again in March 2011, the Fukushima incident was still unfolding. After the March meeting, the focus of the program changed to determining what we could do in the near term to improve fuel accident tolerance. Any discussion of fuels with enhanced accident tolerance will likely need to consider an advanced light water reactor with enhanced accident tolerance, along with the fuel. The Advanced LWR Fuel Working Group met in Washington D.C. on October 72-18, 2011 to continue discussions on this important topic.

  19. Passive cooling system for top entry liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA); Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Hui, Marvin M. (Cupertino, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a top entry loop joined satellite assembly with a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This satellite type reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary cooling system when rendered inoperative.

  20. Blue Ribbon Commission, Yucca Mountain Closure, Court Actions - Future of Decommissioned Reactors, Operating Reactors and Nuclear Power - 13249

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devgun, Jas S. [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC1, Chicago, IL (United States)] [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC1, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues related to back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle continue to be difficult for the commercial nuclear power industry and for the decision makers at the national and international level. In the US, the 1982 NWPA required DOE to develop geological repositories for SNF and HLW but in spite of extensive site characterization efforts and over ten billion dollars spent, a repository opening is nowhere in sight. There has been constant litigation against the DOE by the nuclear utilities for breach of the 'standard contract' they signed with the DOE under the NWPA. The SNF inventory continues to rise both in the US and globally and the nuclear industry has turned to dry storage facilities at reactor locations. In US, the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future issued its report in January 2012 and among other items, it recommends a new, consent-based approach to siting of facilities, prompt efforts to develop one or more geologic disposal facilities, and prompt efforts to develop one or more consolidated storage facilities. In addition, the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi accident had a severe impact on the future growth of nuclear power. The nuclear industry is focusing on mitigation strategies for beyond design basis events and in the US, the industry is in the process of implementing the recommendations from NRC's Near Term Task Force. (authors)

  1. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  2. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  3. Detecting a Nuclear Fission Reactor at the Center of the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. S. Raghavan

    2002-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A natural nuclear fission reactor with a power output of 3- 10 terawatt at the center of the earth has been proposed as the energy source of the earth's magnetic field. The proposal can be directly tested by a massive liquid scintillation detector that can detect the signature spectrum of antineutrinos from the geo-reactor as well as the direction of the antineutrino source. Such detectors are now in operation or under construction in Japan/Europe. However, the clarity of both types of measurements may be limited by background from antineutrinos from surface power reactors. Future U. S. detectors, relatively more remote from power reactors, may be more suitable for achieving unambiguous spectral and directional evidence for a 3TW geo-reactor.

  4. Utilizing a Russian space nuclear reactor for a United States space mission: Systems integration issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, E.; Schaefer, E. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States). Applied Physics Lab.; Polansky, G.; Lacy, J. [Phillips Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bocharov, A. [GDBMB, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) has developed a cooperative relationship with several institutes of the former Soviet Union to evaluate Russian space hardware on a US spacecraft One component is the Topaz II Nuclear Power System; a built and flight qualified nuclear reactor that has yet to be tested in space. The access to the Topaz II reactor provides the NEPSTP with a rare opportunity; to conduct an early flight demonstration of nuclear electric propulsion at a relatively low cost. This opportunity, however, is not without challenges. Topaz II was designed to be compatible with Russian spacecraft and launch vehicles. It was manufactured and flight qualified by Russian techniques and standards and conforms to safety requirements of the former Soviet Union, not the United States. As it is desired to make minimal modifications to the Topaz II, integrating the reactor system with a United States spacecraft and launch vehicle presents an engineering challenge. This paper documents the lessons teamed regarding the integration of reactor based spacecraft and also some insight about integrating Russian hardware. It examines the planned integration flow along with specific reactor requirements that affect the spacecraft integration including American-Russian space system compatibility.

  5. A global approach of the representativity concept: Application on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, N. D.; Blaise, P.; Santamarina, A. [CEA, DEN/DER/SPRC Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of new types of reactor and the increase in the safety specifications and requirements induce an enhancement in both nuclear data knowledge and a better understanding of the neutronic properties of the new systems. This enhancement is made possible using ad hoc critical mock-up experiments. The main difficulty is to design these experiments in order to obtain the most valuable information. Its quantification is usually made by using representativity and transposition concepts. These theories enable to extract some information about a quantity of interest (an integral parameter) on a configuration, but generally a posteriori. This paper presents a more global approach of this theory, with the idea of optimizing the representativity of a new experiment, and its transposition a priori, based on a multiparametric approach. Using a quadratic sum, we show the possibility to define a global representativity which permits to take into account several quantities of interest at the same time. The maximization of this factor gives information about all quantities of interest. An optimization method of this value in relation to technological parameters (over-clad diameter, atom concentration) is illustrated on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case. This example tackles the problematic of plutonium experiment for the plutonium aging and a solution through the optimization of both the over-clad and the plutonium content. (authors)

  6. Materials Science and Technology Division, light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shack, W.J.; Rest, J.; Kassner, T.F.; Ayrault, G.; Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kupperman, D.S.; Maiya, P.S.; Nichols, F.A.; Park, J.Y.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors, Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release, Clad Properties for Code Verification, and Long-Term Embrittlement of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels in LWR Systems.

  7. Use of MCNP for characterization of reactor vessel internals waste from decommissioned nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, E.F.; Pauley, K.A.; Reid, B.D.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study describes the use of the Monte Carlo Neutron-Photon (MCNP) code for determining activation levels of irradiated reactor vessel internals hardware. The purpose of the analysis is to produce data for the Department of Energy`s Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Program. An MCNP model was developed to analyze the Yankee Rowe reactor facility. The model incorporates reactor geometry, material compositions, and operating history data acquired from Yankee Atomic Electric Company. In addition to the base activation analysis, parametric studies were performed to determine the sensitivity of activation to specific parameters. A component sampling plan was also developed to validate the model results, although the plan was not implemented. The calculations for the Yankee Rowe reactor predict that only the core baffle and the core support plates will be activated to levels above the Class C limits. The parametric calculations show, however, that the large uncertainties in the material compositions could cause errors in the estimates that could also increase the estimated activation level of the core barrel to above the Class C limits. Extrapolation of the results to other reactor facilities indicates that in addition to the baffle and support plates, core barrels may also be activated to above Class C limits; however the classification will depend on the specific operating conditions of the reactor and the specific material compositions of the metal, as well as the use of allowable concentration averaging practices in packaging and classifying the waste.

  8. EIS-0288-S1: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR) Tritium Readiness Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Supplemental EIS updates the environmental analyses in DOE’s 1999 EIS for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR EIS). The CLWR EIS addressed the production of tritium in Tennessee Valley Authority reactors in Tennessee using tritium-producing burnable absorber rods.

  9. Materials Science and Technology Division light-water-reactor safety research program: quarterly progress report, January-March 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during January, February and March 1983 on water reactor safety problems. The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors, Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release, Clad Properties for Code Verification, and Long-Term Embrittlement of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels in LWR Systems.

  10. Materials Science Division light-water-reactor safety-research program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1982. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shack, W.J.; Rest, J.; Kassner, T.F.; Chung, H.M.; Claytor, T.N.; Kupperman, D.S.; Maiya, P.S.; Nichols, F.A.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.E.; Yaggee, F.L.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during April, May, and June 1982 on water-reactor-safety problems. The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors, Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release, and Clad Properties for Code Verification.

  11. Materials Science Division light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shack, W.J.; Rest, J.; Kassner, T.F.; Neimark, L.A.; Chung, H.M.; Claytor, T.N.; Kupperman, D.S.; Maiya, P.S.; Nichols, F.A.; Park, J.Y.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during July, August, and September 1982 on water reactor safety problems. The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors, Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release, Clad Properties for Code Verification, Posttest Fuel Examination of the ORNL Fission Product Release Tests, and Examination of TMI-2 Fuel Specimens.

  12. MANAGEMENT OF RESEARCH AND TEST REACTOR ALUMINUM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL - A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinson, D.

    2010-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Program is responsible for the receipt and storage of aluminum research reactor spent nuclear fuel or used fuel until ultimate disposition. Aluminum research reactor used fuel is currently being stored or is anticipated to be returned to the U.S. and stored at DOE-EM storage facilities at the Savannah River Site and the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This paper assesses the technologies and the options for safe transportation/receipt and interim storage of aluminum research reactor spent fuel and reviews the comprehensive strategy for its management. The U.S. Department of Energy uses the Appendix A, Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Criteria, to identify the physical, chemical, and isotopic characteristics of spent nuclear fuel to be returned to the United States under the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program. The fuel is further evaluated for acceptance through assessments of the fuel at the foreign sites that include corrosion damage and handleability. Transport involves use of commercial shipping casks with defined leakage rates that can provide containment of the fuel, some of which are breached. Options for safe storage include wet storage and dry storage. Both options must fully address potential degradation of the aluminum during the storage period. This paper focuses on the various options for safe transport and storage with respect to technology maturity and application.

  13. Plan for Demonstration of Online Monitoring for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Online Monitoring Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magdy S. Tawfik; Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J. Lybeck

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Condition based online monitoring technologies and development of diagnostic and prognostic methodologies have drawn tremendous interest in the nuclear industry. It has become important to identify and resolve problems with structures, systems, and components (SSCs) to ensure plant safety, efficiency, and immunity to accidents in the aging fleet of reactors. The Machine Condition Monitoring (MCM) test bed at INL will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness to advancement in online monitoring, sensors, diagnostic and prognostic technologies on a pilot-scale plant that mimics the hydraulics of a nuclear plant. As part of this research project, INL will research available prognostics architectures and their suitability for deployment in a nuclear power plant. In addition, INL will provide recommendation to improve the existing diagnostic and prognostic architectures based on the experimental analysis performed on the MCM test bed.

  14. Composite Materials under Extreme Radiation and Temperature Environments of the Next Generation Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simos, N.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the nuclear energy renaissance, driven by fission reactor concepts utilizing very high temperatures and fast neutron spectra, materials with enhanced performance that exceeds are expected to play a central role. With the operating temperatures of the Generation III reactors bringing the classical reactor materials close to their performance limits there is an urgent need to develop and qualify new alloys and composites. Efforts have been focused on the intricate relations and the high demands placed on materials at the anticipated extreme states within the next generation fusion and fission reactors which combine high radiation fluxes, elevated temperatures and aggressive environments. While nuclear reactors have been in operation for several decades, the structural materials associated with the next generation options need to endure much higher temperatures (1200 C), higher neutron doses (tens of displacements per atom, dpa), and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience on materials accumulated to-date. The most important consideration is the performance and reliability of structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core functions. While there exists a great body of nuclear materials research and operating experience/performance from fission reactors where epithermal and thermal neutrons interact with materials and alter their physio-mechanical properties, a process that is well understood by now, there are no operating or even experimental facilities that will facilitate the extreme conditions of flux and temperature anticipated and thus provide insights into the behaviour of these well understood materials. Materials, however, still need to be developed and their interaction and damage potential or lifetime to be quantified for the next generation nuclear energy. Based on material development advances, composites, and in particular ceramic composites, seem to inherently possess properties suitable for key functions within the operating envelope of both fission and fusion reactors. In advanced fission reactors composite materials are being designed in an effort to extend the life and improve the reliability of fuel rod cladding as well as structural materials. Composites are being considered for use as core internals in the next generation of gas-cooled reactors. Further, next-generation plasma-fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will rely on the capabilities of advanced composites to safely withstand extremely high neutron fluxes while providing superior thermal shock resistance.

  15. DETERMINING THE EFFECTS OF RADIATION ON AGING CONCRETE STRUCTURES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrato, M.

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) is responsible for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities throughout the DOE Complex. Some of these facilities will be completely dismantled, while others will be partially dismantled and the remaining structure will be stabilized with cementitious fill materials. The latter is a process known as In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD). The ISD decision process requires a detailed understanding of the existing facility conditions, and operational history. System information and material properties are need for aged nuclear facilities. This literature review investigated the properties of aged concrete structures affected by radiation. In particular, this review addresses the Savannah River Site (SRS) isotope production nuclear reactors. The concrete in the reactors at SRS was not seriously damaged by the levels of radiation exposure. Loss of composite compressive strength was the most common effect of radiation induced damage documented at nuclear power plants.

  16. Nuclear breeder reactor fuel element with silicon carbide getter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Karnesky, Richard A. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved cesium getter 28 is provided in a breeder reactor fuel element or pin in the form of an extended surface area, low density element formed in one embodiment as a helically wound foil 30 located with silicon carbide, and located at the upper end of the fertile material upper blanket 20.

  17. Recent results on nuclear structure functions for light nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulagin, S. A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Petti, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia SC 29208 (United States)

    2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the nuclear EMC effect with particular emphasis on recent data for light nuclei including {sup 2}H, {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, {sup 9}Be, {sup 12}C and {sup 14}N. In order to verify the consistency of available data, we calculate the {chi}{sup 2} deviation between different data sets. We find a good agreement between the results from the NMC, SLAC E139, and HERMES experiments. However, our analysis indicates an overall normalization offset of about 2% in the data from the recent JLab E03-103 experiment with respect to previous data for nuclei heavier than {sup 3}He. We also discuss the extraction of the neutron/proton structure function ratio F{sub 2}{sup n}/F{sub 2}{sup p} from the nuclear ratios {sup 3}He/{sup 2}H and {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H. Our analysis shows that the E03-103 data on {sup 3}He/{sup 2}H require a renormalization of about 3% in order to be consistent with the F{sub 2}{sup n}/F{sub 2}{sup p} ratio obtained from the NMC experiment. After such a renormalization, the {sup 3}He data from the E03-103 data and HERMES experiments are in a good agreement. We also present a detailed comparison between data and model calculations, which include a description of the nuclear binding, Fermi motion and off-shell corrections to the structure functions of bound proton and neutron, as well as the nuclear pion and shadowing corrections.

  18. Transmutation Performance Analysis for Inert Matrix Fuels in Light Water Reactors and Computational Neutronics Methods Capabilities at INL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Pope; Samuel E. Bays; S. Piet; R. Ferrer; Mehdi Asgari; Benoit Forget

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The urgency for addressing repository impacts has grown in the past few years as a result of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) accumulation from commercial nuclear power plants. One path that has been explored by many is to eliminate the transuranic (TRU) inventory from the SNF, thus reducing the need for additional long term repository storage sites. One strategy for achieving this is to burn the separated TRU elements in the currently operating U.S. Light Water Reactor (LWR) fleet. Many studies have explored the viability of this strategy by loading a percentage of LWR cores with TRU in the form of either Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels or Inert Matrix Fuels (IMF). A task was undertaken at INL to establish specific technical capabilities to perform neutronics analyses in order to further assess several key issues related to the viability of thermal recycling. The initial computational study reported here is focused on direct thermal recycling of IMF fuels in a heterogeneous Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) bundle design containing Plutonium, Neptunium, Americium, and Curium (IMF-PuNpAmCm) in a multi-pass strategy using legacy 5 year cooled LWR SNF. In addition to this initial high-priority analysis, three other alternate analyses with different TRU vectors in IMF pins were performed. These analyses provide comparison of direct thermal recycling of PuNpAmCmCf, PuNpAm, PuNp, and Pu. The results of this infinite lattice assembly-wise study using SCALE 5.1 indicate that it may be feasible to recycle TRU in this manner using an otherwise typical PWR assembly without violating peaking factor limits.

  19. The concept of the use of recycled uranium for increasing the degree of security of export deliveries of fuel for light-water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alekseev, P. N.; Ivanov, E. A.; Nevinitsa, V. A.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N. N.; Rumyantsev, A. N.; Shmelev, V. M. [Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Borisevich, V. D.; Smirnov, A. Yu.; Sulaberidze, G. A. [National Nuclear Research University MEPhI (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper deals with investigation of the possibilities for reducing the risk of proliferation of fissionable materials by means of increasing the degree of protection of fresh fuel intended for light-water reactors against unsanctioned use in the case of withdrawal of a recipient country of deliveries from IAEA safeguards. It is shown that the use of recycled uranium for manufacturing export nuclear fuel makes transfer of nuclear material removed from the fuel assemblies for weapons purposes difficult because of the presence of isotope {sup 232}U, whose content increases when one attempts to enrich uranium extracted from fresh fuel. In combination with restricted access to technologies for isotope separation by means of establishing international centers for uranium enrichment, this technical measure can significantly reduce the risk of proliferation associated with export deliveries of fuel made of low-enriched uranium. The assessment of a maximum level of contamination of nuclear material being transferred by isotope {sup 232}U for the given isotope composition of the initial fuel is obtained. The concept of further investigations of the degree of security of export deliveries of fuel assemblies with recycled uranium intended for light-water reactors is suggested.

  20. Nuclear Reactor/Hydrogen Process Interface Including the HyPEP Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven R. Sherman

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Reactor/Hydrogen Plant interface is the intermediate heat transport loop that will connect a very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (VHTR) to a thermochemical, high-temperature electrolysis, or hybrid hydrogen production plant. A prototype plant called the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is planned for construction and operation at the Idaho National Laboratory in the 2018-2021 timeframe, and will involve a VHTR, a high-temperature interface, and a hydrogen production plant. The interface is responsible for transporting high-temperature thermal energy from the nuclear reactor to the hydrogen production plant while protecting the nuclear plant from operational disturbances at the hydrogen plant. Development of the interface is occurring under the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) and involves the study, design, and development of high-temperature heat exchangers, heat transport systems, materials, safety, and integrated system models. Research and development work on the system interface began in 2004 and is expected to continue at least until the start of construction of an engineering-scale demonstration plant.