National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for nuclear power station

  1. Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer cpacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,685,"5,918",98.7,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,685,"5,918",98.7

  2. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Clinton Power Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Clinton Power Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,065","8,612",92.3,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-

  3. Enhancement of NRC station blackout requirements for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, M. W.

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a Near-Term Task Force (NTTF) in response to Commission direction to conduct a systematic and methodical review of NRC processes and regulations to determine whether the agency should make additional improvements to its regulatory system and to make recommendations to the Commission for its policy direction, in light of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The NTTF's review resulted in a set of recommendations that took a balanced approach to defense-in-depth as applied to low-likelihood, high-consequence events such as prolonged station blackout (SBO) resulting from severe natural phenomena. Part 50, Section 63, of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), 'Loss of All Alternating Current Power,' currently requires that each nuclear power plant must be able to cool the reactor core and maintain containment integrity for a specified duration of an SBO. The SBO duration and mitigation strategy for each nuclear power plant is site specific and is based on the robustness of the local transmission system and the transmission system operator's capability to restore offsite power to the nuclear power plant. With regard to SBO, the NTTF recommended that the NRC strengthen SBO mitigation capability at all operating and new reactors for design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NTTF also recommended strengthening emergency preparedness for prolonged SBO and multi-unit events. These recommendations, taken together, are intended to clarify and strengthen US nuclear reactor safety regarding protection against and mitigation of the consequences of natural disasters and emergency preparedness during SBO. The focus of this paper is on the existing SBO requirements and NRC initiatives to strengthen SBO capability at all operating and new reactors to address prolonged SBO stemming from design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NRC initiatives are intended to

  4. Machinery monitoring system installed at nuclear power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piety, K.; Hamrick, L.; McCurdy, A.

    1981-10-01

    The Grand Gulf Nuclear Station under construction in Mississippi will have a computer-based system to monitor 300 process variables and 200 vibration signals in each of the two units. The system's functions include monitoring support, startup/shutdown, surveillance, and diagnostics. The tasks associated with machinery monitoring are broken down into the initial plant design, construction and startup testing, and power-operation phases. The value of this monitoring is discussed and summarized in a table showing the impact of component failure on plant availability. 4 figures, 3 tables. (DCK)

  5. Study of Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station Unit 4 Spent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Study of Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station Unit 4 Spent Fuel Pool Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Study of Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power...

  6. Statement from Deputy Secretary of Energy Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall after Visiting the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Deputy Secretary Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall's statement after visiting the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station in Japan

  7. The effects of solar-geomagnetically induced currents on electrical systems in nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subudhi, M.; Carroll, D.P.; Kasturi, S.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the potential effects of geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) caused by the solar disturbances on the in-plant electrical distribution system and equipment in nuclear power stations. The plant-specific electrical distribution system for a typical nuclear plant is modeled using the ElectroMagnetic Transient Program (EMTP). The computer model simulates online equipment and loads from the station transformer in the switchyard of the power station to the safety-buses at 120 volts to which all electronic devices are connected for plant monitoring. The analytical model of the plant`s electrical distribution system is studied to identify the transient effects caused by the half-cycle saturation of the station transformers due to GIC. This study provides results of the voltage harmonics levels that have been noted at various electrical buses inside the plant. The emergency circuits appear to be more susceptible to high harmonics due to the normally light load conditions. In addition to steady-state analysis, this model was further analyzed simulating various plant transient conditions (e.g., loss of load or large motor start-up) occurring during GIC events. Detail models of the plant`s protective relaying system employed in bus transfer application were included in this model to study the effects of the harmonic distortion of the voltage input. Potential harmonic effects on the uniterruptable power system (UPS) are qualitatively discussed as well.

  8. The AP1000{sup R} nuclear power plant innovative features for extended station blackout mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vereb, F.; Winters, J.; Schulz, T.; Cummins, E.; Oriani, L. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Station Blackout (SBO) is defined as 'a condition wherein a nuclear power plant sustains a loss of all offsite electric power system concurrent with turbine trip and unavailability of all onsite emergency alternating current (AC) power system. Station blackout does not include the loss of available AC power to buses fed by station batteries through inverters or by alternate AC sources as defined in this section, nor does it assume a concurrent single failure or design basis accident...' in accordance with Reference 1. In this paper, the innovative features of the AP1000 plant design are described with their operation in the scenario of an extended station blackout event. General operation of the passive safety systems are described as well as the unique features which allow the AP1000 plant to cope for at least 7 days during station blackout. Points of emphasis will include: - Passive safety system operation during SBO - 'Fail-safe' nature of key passive safety system valves; automatically places the valve in a conservatively safe alignment even in case of multiple failures in all power supply systems, including normal AC and battery backup - Passive Spent Fuel Pool cooling and makeup water supply during SBO - Robustness of AP1000 plant due to the location of key systems, structures and components required for Safe Shutdown - Diverse means of supplying makeup water to the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCS) and the Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) through use of an engineered, safety-related piping interface and portable equipment, as well as with permanently installed onsite ancillary equipment. (authors)

  9. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station: Comparison of two decommissioning cost estimates developed for the same commercial nuclear reactor power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I. )

    1990-12-01

    This study presents the results of a comparison of a previous decommissioning cost study by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and a recent decommissioning cost study of TLG Engineering, Inc., for the same commercial nuclear power reactor station. The purpose of this comparative analysis on the same plant is to determine the reasons why subsequent estimates for similar plants by others were significantly higher in cost and external occupational radiation exposure (ORE) than the PNL study. The primary purpose of the original study by PNL (NUREG/CR-0672) was to provide information on the available technology, the safety considerations, and the probable costs and ORE for the decommissioning of a large boiling water reactor (BWR) power station at the end of its operating life. This information was intended for use as background data and bases in the modification of existing regulations and in the development of new regulations pertaining to decommissioning activities. It was also intended for use by utilities in planning for the decommissioning of their nuclear power stations. The TLG study, initiated in 1987 and completed in 1989, was for the same plant, Washington Public Supply System's Unit 2 (WNP-2), that PNL used as its reference plant in its 1980 decommissioning study. Areas of agreement and disagreement are identified, and reasons for the areas of disagreement are discussed. 31 refs., 3 figs., 22 tabs.

  10. Lessons learned in digital upgrade projects digital control system implementation at US nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, S.; Bolian, T. W.

    2006-07-01

    AREVA NP has gained significant experience during the past five years in digital upgrades at operating nuclear power stations in the US. Plants are seeking modernization with digital technology to address obsolescence, spare parts availability, vendor support, increasing age-related failures and diminished reliability. New systems offer improved reliability and functionality, and decreased maintenance requirements. Significant lessons learned have been identified relating to the areas of licensing, equipment qualification, software quality assurance and other topics specific to digital controls. Digital control systems have been installed in non safety-related control applications at many utilities within the last 15 years. There have also been a few replacements of small safety-related systems with digital technology. Digital control systems are proving to be reliable, accurate, and easy to maintain. Digital technology is gaining acceptance and momentum with both utilities and regulatory agencies based upon the successes of these installations. Also, new plants are being designed with integrated digital control systems. To support plant life extension and address obsolescence of critical components, utilities are beginning to install digital technology for primary safety-system replacement. AREVA NP analyzed operating experience and lessons learned from its own digital upgrade projects as well as industry-wide experience to identify key issues that should be considered when implementing digital controls in nuclear power stations.

  11. Evaluation of station blackout accidents at nuclear power plants: Technical findings related to unresolved safety issue A-44: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    ''Station Blackout,'' which is the complete loss of alternating current (AC) electrical power in a nuclear power plant, has been designated as Unresolved Safety Issue A-44. Because many safety systems required for reactor core decay heat removal and containment heat removal depend on AC power, the consequences of a station blackout could be severe. This report documents the findings of technical studies performed as part of the program to resolve this issue. The important factors analyzed include: the fequency of loss of offsite power; the probability that emergency or onsite AC power supplies would be unavailable; the capability and reliability of decay heat removal systems independent of AC power; and the likelihood that offsite power would be restored before systems that cannot operate for extended periods without AC power fail, thus resulting in core damage. This report also addresses effects of different designs, locations, and operational features on the estimated frequency of core damage resulting from station blackout events.

  12. Topics in nuclear power (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NUCLEAR POWER STATION; GAIN; JAPAN; NATURAL DISASTERS; NUCLEAR INDUSTRY; NUCLEAR POWER; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; PROBABILISTIC ESTIMATION; REACTOR ACCIDENTS; REACTOR MAINTENANCE;...

  13. Reactor Vessel and Reactor Vessel Internals Segmentation at Zion Nuclear Power Station - 13230

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Conrad; Spann, Holger

    2013-07-01

    Zion Nuclear Power Station (ZNPS) is a dual-unit Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant located on the Lake Michigan shoreline, in the city of Zion, Illinois approximately 64 km (40 miles) north of Chicago, Illinois and 67 km (42 miles) south of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Each PWR is of the Westinghouse design and had a generation capacity of 1040 MW. Exelon Corporation operated both reactors with the first unit starting production of power in 1973 and the second unit coming on line in 1974. The operation of both reactors ceased in 1996/1997. In 2010 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved the transfer of Exelon Corporation's license to ZionSolutions, the Long Term Stewardship subsidiary of EnergySolutions responsible for the decommissioning of ZNPS. In October 2010, ZionSolutions awarded Siempelkamp Nuclear Services, Inc. (SNS) the contract to plan, segment, remove, and package both reactor vessels and their respective internals. This presentation discusses the tools employed by SNS to remove and segment the Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) and Reactor Vessels (RV) and conveys the recent progress. SNS's mechanical segmentation tooling includes the C-HORCE (Circumferential Hydraulically Operated Cutting Equipment), BMT (Bolt Milling Tool), FaST (Former Attachment Severing Tool) and the VRS (Volume Reduction Station). Thermal segmentation of the reactor vessels will be accomplished using an Oxygen- Propane cutting system. The tools for internals segmentation were designed by SNS using their experience from other successful reactor and large component decommissioning and demolition (D and D) projects in the US. All of the designs allow for the mechanical segmentation of the internals remotely in the water-filled reactor cavities. The C-HORCE is designed to saw seven circumferential cuts through the Core Barrel and Thermal Shield walls with individual thicknesses up to 100 mm (4 inches). The BMT is designed to remove the bolts that fasten the Baffle Plates to

  14. The network architecture and site test of DCIS in Lungmen nuclear power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C. K.

    2006-07-01

    The Lungmen Nuclear Power Station (LMNPS) is located in North-Eastern Seashore of Taiwan. LMNPP has two units. Each unit generates 1350 Megawatts. It is the first ABWR Plant in Taiwan and is under-construction now. Due to contractual arrangement, there are seven large I and C suppliers/designers, which are GE NUMAC, DRS, Invensys, GEIS, Hitachi, MHI, and Stone and Webster company. The Distributed Control and Information System (DCIS) in Lungmen are fully integrated with the state-of-the-art computer and network technology. General Electric is the leading designer for integration of DCIS. This paper presents Network Architecture and the Site Test of DCIS. The network architectures are follows. GE NUMAC System adopts the point to point architecture, DRS System adopts Ring type architecture with SCRAMNET protocol, Inevnsys system adopts IGiga Byte Backbone mesh network with Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol, GEIS adopts Ethernet network with EGD protocol, Hitachi adopts ring type network with proprietary protocol. MHI adopt Ethernet network with UDP. The data-links are used for connection between different suppliers. The DCIS architecture supports the plant automation, the alarm prioritization and alarm suppression, and uniform MMI screen for entire plant. The Test Program regarding the integration of different network architectures and Initial DCIS architecture Setup for 161KV Energization will be discussed. Test tool for improving site test schedule, and lessons learned from FAT will be discussed too. And conclusions are at the end of this paper. (authors)

  15. Direction on characterization of fuel debris for defueling process in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yano, Kimihiko; Kitagaki, Toru; Ikeuchi, Hirotomo; Wakui, Ryohei; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Kaji, Naoya; Koizumi, Kenji; Washiya, Tadahiro

    2013-07-01

    For the decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (1F), defueling of the fuel debris in the reactor core of Units 1-3 is planned to start within 10 years. Preferential items in the characterization of the fuel debris were identified for this work, in which the procedure and handling tools were assumed on the basis of information on 1F and experience after the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. The candidates for defueling tools for 1F were selected from among the TMI- 2 defueling tools. It was found that they could be categorized into six groups according to their operating principles. The important properties of the fuel debris for defueling were selected considering the effect of the target materials on the tool performance. The selected properties are shape, size, density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, melting point, hardness, elastic modulus, and fracture toughness. Of these properties, the mechanical properties (hardness, elastic modulus, fracture toughness) were identified as preferential items, because too few data on these characteristics of fuel debris are available in past severe accident studies. (authors)

  16. An underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hampel, V.E.

    1988-05-17

    A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working fluid in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast- acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor. 5 figs.

  17. Underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hampel, Viktor E.

    1989-01-01

    A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working flud in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast-acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor.

  18. Low-level radioactive waste from nuclear power generating stations: Characterization, classification and assessment of activated metals and waste streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, V.W.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.

    1993-02-01

    Since the enactment of 10 CFR Part 61, additional difficult-to-measure long-lived radionuclides, not specified in Tables 1 2 of Part 61, have been identified (e.g., {sup 108m}Ag, {sup 93}Mo, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 10}Be, {sup 113m}Cd, {sup 121m}Sn, {sup 126}Sn, {sup 93m}Nb) that may be of concern in certain types of waste. These nuclides are primarily associated with activated metal and perhaps other nuclear power low-level waste (LLW) being sent to disposal facilities. The concentration of a radionuclide in waste materials is normally determined by direct measurement or by indirect calculational methods, such as using a scaling factor to relate inferred concentration of a difficult-to-measure radionuclide to another that is easily measured. The total disposal site inventory of certain difficult-to-measure radionuclides (e.g., {sup 14}C, {sup 129}I, and {sup 99}Tc) often control the total quantities of radioactive waste permitted in LLW burial facilities. Overly conservative scaling factors based on lower limits of detection (LLD), often used in the nuclear power industry to estimate these controlling nuclides, could lead to premature closure of a disposal facility. Samples of LLW (Class B and C activated metals [AM] and other waste streams) are being collected from operating nuclear power stations and analyzed for radionuclides covered in 10 CFR Part 61 and the additional difficult-to-measure radionuclides. This analysis will enhance the NRC`s understanding of the distribution and projected quantities of radionuclides within AM and LLW streams from commercial nuclear power stations. This research will also provide radiological characterization of AM specimens for others to use in leach-rate and lysimeter experiments to determine nuclide releases and subsequent movement in natural soil environments.

  19. Low-level radioactive waste from nuclear power generating stations: Characterization, classification and assessment of activated metals and waste streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, V.W.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.

    1993-02-01

    Since the enactment of 10 CFR Part 61, additional difficult-to-measure long-lived radionuclides, not specified in Tables 1 2 of Part 61, have been identified (e.g., [sup 108m]Ag, [sup 93]Mo, [sup 36]Cl, [sup 10]Be, [sup 113m]Cd, [sup 121m]Sn, [sup 126]Sn, [sup 93m]Nb) that may be of concern in certain types of waste. These nuclides are primarily associated with activated metal and perhaps other nuclear power low-level waste (LLW) being sent to disposal facilities. The concentration of a radionuclide in waste materials is normally determined by direct measurement or by indirect calculational methods, such as using a scaling factor to relate inferred concentration of a difficult-to-measure radionuclide to another that is easily measured. The total disposal site inventory of certain difficult-to-measure radionuclides (e.g., [sup 14]C, [sup 129]I, and [sup 99]Tc) often control the total quantities of radioactive waste permitted in LLW burial facilities. Overly conservative scaling factors based on lower limits of detection (LLD), often used in the nuclear power industry to estimate these controlling nuclides, could lead to premature closure of a disposal facility. Samples of LLW (Class B and C activated metals [AM] and other waste streams) are being collected from operating nuclear power stations and analyzed for radionuclides covered in 10 CFR Part 61 and the additional difficult-to-measure radionuclides. This analysis will enhance the NRC's understanding of the distribution and projected quantities of radionuclides within AM and LLW streams from commercial nuclear power stations. This research will also provide radiological characterization of AM specimens for others to use in leach-rate and lysimeter experiments to determine nuclide releases and subsequent movement in natural soil environments.

  20. Hydrogen Mitigation Strategy of the APR1400 Nuclear Power Plant for a Hypothetical Station Blackout Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jongtae; Hong, Seong-Wan; Kim, Sang-Baik; Kim, Hee-Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    In order to analyze the hydrogen distribution during a hypothetical station blackout accident in the Korean next-generation Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR1400) containment, the three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code GASFLOW was used. The source of the hydrogen and steam for the GASFLOW analysis was obtained from a MAAP calculation. The discharged water, steam, and hydrogen from the pressurizer are released into the water of the in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST). Most of the discharged steam is condensed in the IRWST water because of its subcooling, and dry hydrogen is released into the free volume of the IRWST; finally, it goes out to the annular compartment above the IRWST through the vent holes. From the GASFLOW analysis, it was found that the gas mixture in the IRWST becomes quickly nonflammable by oxygen starvation but the hydrogen is accumulated in the annular compartment because of the narrow ventilation gap between the operating deck and containment wall when the igniters installed in the IRWST are not operated. When the igniters installed in the APR1400 were turned on, a short period of burning occurred in the IRWST, and then the flame was extinguished by the oxygen starvation in the IRWST. The unburned hydrogen was released into the annular compartment and went up to the dome because no igniters are installed around the annular compartment in the base design of the APR1400. From this result, it could be concluded that the control of the hydrogen concentration is difficult for the base design. In this study design modifications are proposed and evaluated with GASFLOW in view of the hydrogen mitigation strategy.

  1. Utilities respond to nuclear station blackout rule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, A.M.; Beasley, B.; Tenera, L.P

    1990-02-01

    The authors discuss how nuclear plants in the United States have taken actions to respond to the NRC Station Blackout Rule, 10CFR50.63. The rule requires that each light water cooled nuclear power plant licensed to operate must be able to withstand for a specified duration and recover from a station blackout. Station blackout is defined as the complete loss of a-c power to the essential and non-essential switch-gear buses in a nuclear power plant. A station blackout results from the loss of all off-site power as well as the on-site emergency a-c power system. There are two basic approaches to meeting the station blackout rule. One is to cope with a station blackout independent of a-c power. Coping, as it is called, means the ability of a plant to achieve and maintain a safe shutdown condition. The second approach is to provide an alternate a-c power source (AAC).

  2. Leach studies on cement-solidified ion exchange resins from decontamination processes at operating nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W.; Morcos, N.

    1992-08-01

    The effects of varying pH and leachant compositions on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents were determined for cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small scale waste-form specimens were collected during waste solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station. The collected specimens were leach tested, and their compressive strength was measured in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s ``Technical Position on Waste Form`` (Revision 1), from the Low-Level Waste Management Branch. Leachates from these studies were analyzed for radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to assess the leachability of these waste form constituents. Leachants used for the study were deionized water, simulated seawater, and groundwater compositions similar to those found at Barnwell, South Carolina and Hanford, Washington. Results of this study indicate that initial leachant pH does not affect leachate pH or releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms. However, differences in leachant composition and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. In addition, results from this study indicate that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents observed for forms that disintegrated were similar to those for forms that maintained their general physical integrity.

  3. Leach studies on cement-solidified ion exchange resins from decontamination processes at operating nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W.; Morcos, N.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of varying pH and leachant compositions on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents were determined for cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small scale waste-form specimens were collected during waste solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station. The collected specimens were leach tested, and their compressive strength was measured in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1), from the Low-Level Waste Management Branch. Leachates from these studies were analyzed for radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to assess the leachability of these waste form constituents. Leachants used for the study were deionized water, simulated seawater, and groundwater compositions similar to those found at Barnwell, South Carolina and Hanford, Washington. Results of this study indicate that initial leachant pH does not affect leachate pH or releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms. However, differences in leachant composition and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. In addition, results from this study indicate that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents observed for forms that disintegrated were similar to those for forms that maintained their general physical integrity.

  4. SEP operating history of the Dresden Nuclear Power Station Unit 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, G.T.; Harrington, K.H.

    1983-01-01

    206 forced shutdowns and power reductions were reviewed, along with 631 reportable events and other miscellaneous documentation concerning the operation of Dresden-2, in order to indicate those areas of plant operation that compromised plant safety. The most serious plant challenge to plant safety occurred on June 5, 1970; while undergoing power testing at 75% power, a spurious signal in the reactor pressure control system caused a turbine trip followed by a reactor scram. Subsequent erratic water level and pressure control in the reactor vessel, compounded by a stuck indicator pen on a water level monitor-recorder and inability of the isolation condenser to function, led to discharge of steam and water through safety valves into the reactor drywell. No significant contamination was discharged. There was no pressure damage or the reactor vessel of the drywell containment walls. Six areas of operation that should be of continued concern are diesel generator failures, control rod and rod drive malfunctions, radioactive waste management/health physics program problems, operator errors, turbine control valve and EHC problems, and HPCI failures. All six event types have continued to recur.

  5. Rancia Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Rancia Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area...

  6. Sesta Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Sesta Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Larderello...

  7. Farinello Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Farinello Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Larderello...

  8. Pianacce Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Pianacce Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area...

  9. Improved sampling and analytical techniques for characterization of very-low-level radwaste materials from commercial nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, D.E.; Robinson, P.J.

    1989-11-01

    This paper summarizes the unique sampling methods that were utilized in a recently completed project sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to perform accurate and precise radiological characterizations of several very-low-level radwaste materials from commercial nuclear power stations. The waste types characterized during this project included dry active waste (DAW), oil, secondary-side ion exchange resin, and soil. Special precautions were taken to insure representative sampling of the DAW. This involved the initial direct, quantitative gamma spectrometric analyses of bulk quantities (208-liter drums) of DAW utilizing a specially constructed barrel scanner employing a collimated intrinsic germanium detector assembly. Subsamples of the DAW for destructive radiochemical analyses of the difficult-to-measure 10CF61 radionuclides were then selected which had the same isotopic composition (to within {+-}25%) as that measured for the entire drum of DAW. The techniques for accomplishing this sampling are described. Oil samples were collected from the top, middle and bottom sections of 208-liter drums for radiochemical analyses. These samples were composited to represent the entire drum of oil. The accuracy of this type of sampling was evaluated by comparisons with direct, quantitative assays of a number of the drums using the barrel scanning gamma-ray spectrometer. The accuracy of sampling drums of spent secondary-side ion exchange resin was evaluated by comparing the radionuclide contents of grab samples taken from the tops of the drums with direct assays performed with the barrel scanner. The results of these sampling evaluations indicated that the sampling methods used were generally adequate for providing a reasonably representative subsample from bulk quantities of DAW, oil, and resin. The study also identified a number of potential pitfalls, in sampling of these materials.

  10. Fang Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Station General Information Name Fang Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Coordinates 19.961842432467, 99.107366035005 Loading map......

  11. Poihipi Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Poihipi Power Station General Information Name Poihipi Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Poihipi Road, Near Taupo, Waikato, New Zealand...

  12. Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Power Station Unit 1",685,"5,918",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Generation Co" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",685,"5,918",100.0 "Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent ...

  13. Nuclear Security for Floating Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skiba, James M.; Scherer, Carolynn P.

    2015-10-13

    Recently there has been a lot of interest in small modular reactors. A specific type of these small modular reactors (SMR,) are marine based power plants called floating nuclear power plants (FNPP). These FNPPs are typically built by countries with extensive knowledge of nuclear energy, such as Russia, France, China and the US. These FNPPs are built in one country and then sent to countries in need of power and/or seawater desalination. Fifteen countries have expressed interest in acquiring such power stations. Some designs for such power stations are briefly summarized. Several different avenues for cooperation in FNPP technology are proposed, including IAEA nuclear security (i.e. safeguards), multilateral or bilateral agreements, and working with Russian design that incorporates nuclear safeguards for IAEA inspections in non-nuclear weapons states

  14. Thermal Modeling of NUHOMS HSM-15 and HSM-1 Storage Modules at Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station ISFSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suffield, Sarah R.; Fort, James A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Cuta, Judith M.; Collins, Brian A.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2012-10-01

    As part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the Department of Energy (DOE), visual inspections and temperature measurements were performed on two storage modules in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station’s Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). Detailed thermal models models were developed to obtain realistic temperature predictions for actual storage systems, in contrast to conservative and bounding design basis calculations.

  15. Ohaaki Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Ohaaki Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location 20km NE of Taupo, Waikato, New Zealand Coordinates...

  16. Mokai Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Mokai Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Waikato, New Zealand Coordinates -38.530556,...

  17. Larderello Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Larderello Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Larderello, Pisa, Italy Coordinates 43.236, 10.8672...

  18. Krafla Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Krafla Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Krafla Volcanoe, Iceland Coordinates 65.703861,...

  19. Reykjanes Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Reykjanes Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Reykjanes, Iceland Coordinates 63.826389, -22.681944...

  20. Svartsengi Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Svartsengi Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland Coordinates 63.878611,...

  1. Kawerau Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Kawerau Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Bay of Plenty Region, New Zealand Coordinates...

  2. Screening evaluation of radionuclide groundwater concentrations for the end state basement fill model Zion Nuclear Power Station decommissioning project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan T.

    2014-06-09

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled with clean material. The final selection of fill material has not been made.

  3. Technical evaluation of the noise and isolation testing of the reactor protection system for the Davis Besse Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selan, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    This report documents the technical evaluation of the noise and isolation testing of the reactor protection system (RPS) for the Davis Besse Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1. The testing was performed in accordance to Section 4.6.11, Susceptibility, of MIL-N-19900B, and NRC approved plant test methods. Analysis of the test results shows that the reactor protection system did not degrade below acceptable levels when subjected to electromagnetic, electrostatic, isolation and noise level tests, nor was the system's ability to perform its Class 1E protective functions affected.

  4. Nesjavellir Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Information Name Nesjavellir Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Thingvellir, Iceland Coordinates 64.108164743246,...

  5. Archbald Power Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Archbald Power Station Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Archbald Power Station Biomass Facility Facility Archbald Power Station Sector Biomass Facility Type...

  6. PAVAN: an atmospheric-dispersion program for evaluating design-basis accidental releases of radioactive materials from nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bander, T.J.

    1982-11-01

    This report provides a user's guide for the NRC computer program, PAVAN, which is a program used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to estimate downwind ground-level air concentrations for potential accidental releases of radioactive material from nuclear facilities. Such an assessment is required by 10 CFR Part 100 and 10 CFR Part 50. The program implements the guidance provided in Regulatory Guide 1.145, Atmospheric Dispersion Models for Potential Accident Consequence Assessments at Nuclear Power Plants. Using joint frequency distributions of wind direction and wind speed by atmospheric stability, the program provides relative air concentration (X/Q) values as functions of direction for various time periods at the exclusion area boundary (EAB) and the outer boundary of the low population zone (LPZ). Calculations of X/Q values can be made for assumed ground-level releases (e.g., through building penetrations and vents) or elevated releases from free-standing stacks. Various options may be selected by the user. They can account for variation in the location of release points, additional plume dispersion due to building wakes, plume meander under low wind speed conditions, and adjustments to consider non-straight trajectories. It computes an effective plume height using the physical release height which can be reduced by inputted terrain features. It cannot handle multiple emission sources. A description of the main program and all subroutines is provided. Also included as appendices are a complete listing of the program and two test cases with the required data inputs and the resulting program outputs.

  7. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Braidwood Generation Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,330","19,200",20.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Byron Generating Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,300","19,856",20.6,"Exelon

  8. Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station Unit 1",685,"5,918",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Generation Co" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",685,"5,918",100.0 "Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to

  9. Hellisheidi Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Information Name Hellisheidi Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Hengill, Iceland Coordinates 64.037222, -21.400833...

  10. Effect of pH on the release of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resins collected from operating nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Data are presented on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small-scale waste--form specimens collected during solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station were leach-tested and subjected to compressive strength testing in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1). Samples of untreated resin waste collected from each solidification vessel before the solidification process were analyzed for concentrations of radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to determine the quantities of these chemicals in the waste-form specimens. The chelating agents included oxalic, citric, and picolinic acids. In order to determine the effect of leachant chemical composition and pH on the stability and leachability of the waste forms, waste-form specimens were leached in various leachants. Results of this study indicate that differences in pH do not affect releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms, but that differences in leachant chemistry and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. Also, this study indicates that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents are similar for waste- form specimens that decomposed and those that retained their general physical form. 36 refs., 60 figs., 28 tabs.

  11. Concentrating Solar Power Projects - Solana Generating Station |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Concentrating Solar Power | NREL Solana Generating Station Abengoa Solar has built a 280-megawatt parabolic trough solar plant about 70 miles southwest of Phoenix, Arizona. The plant generates enough power to supply 70,000 homes under a 30-year power supply contract with Arizona Public Service (APS). The thermal energy storage system provides up to 6 hours of generating capacity after sunset. Status Date: August 19, 2015 Project Overview Project Name: Solana Generating Station (Solana)

  12. Rancia 2 Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Rancia 2 Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area...

  13. Travale 4 Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Travale 4 Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area...

  14. Suggestion of typical phases of in-vessel fuel-debris by thermodynamic calculation for decommissioning technology of Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikeuchi, Hirotomo; Yano, Kimihiko; Kaji, Naoya; Washiya, Tadahiro; Kondo, Yoshikazu; Noguchi, Yoshikazu

    2013-07-01

    For the decommissioning of the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (1F), the characterization of fuel-debris in cores of Units 1-3 is necessary. In this study, typical phases of the in-vessel fuel-debris were estimated using a thermodynamic equilibrium (TDE) calculation. The FactSage program and NUCLEA database were applied to estimate the phase equilibria of debris. It was confirmed that the TDE calculation using the database can reproduce the phase separation behavior of debris observed in the Three Mile Island accident. In the TDE calculation of 1F, the oxygen potential [G(O{sub 2})] was assumed to be a variable. At low G(O{sub 2}) where metallic zirconium remains, (U,Zr)O{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}, and ZrO{sub 2} were found as oxides, and oxygen-dispersed Zr, Fe{sub 2}(Zr,U), and Fe{sub 3}UZr{sub 2} were found as metals. With an increase in zirconium oxidation, the mass of those metals, especially Fe{sub 3}UZr{sub 2}, decreased, but the other phases of metals hardly changed qualitatively. Consequently, (U,Zr)O{sub 2} is suggested as a typical phase of oxide, and Fe{sub 2}(Zr,U) is suggested as that of metal. However, a more detailed estimation is necessary to consider the distribution of Fe in the reactor pressure vessel through core-melt progression. (authors)

  15. Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Wolf Creek Generating Station Unit 1","1,160","9,556",100.0,"Wolf Creek Nuclear Optg Corp" "1 Plant 1 Reactor","1,160","9,556",100.0

  16. California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Diablo Canyon Unit 1, Unit 2","2,240","18,430",57.2,"Pacific Gas & Electric Co" "San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Unit 2, Unit

  17. Sangzhi Zhongyuan Hydroelectric Power Station | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zhongyuan Hydroelectric Power Station Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sangzhi Zhongyuan Hydroelectric Power Station Place: Zhangjiajie, Hunan Province, China Zip: 427100 Sector:...

  18. Genesee Power Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Genesee Power Station Biomass Facility Facility Genesee Power Station Sector Biomass Owner CMSFortistar Location Flint, Michigan...

  19. MHK Technologies/Jiangxia Tidal Power Station | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jiangxia Tidal Power Station < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Jiangxia Tidal Power Station.jpg Technology Profile Primary...

  20. Penrose Power Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name Penrose Power Station Biomass Facility Facility Penrose Power Station Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County,...

  1. Toyon Power Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name Toyon Power Station Biomass Facility Facility Toyon Power Station Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County,...

  2. EECBG Success Story: Police Station Triples Solar Power - and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Police Station Triples Solar Power - and Savings EECBG Success Story: Police Station Triples Solar Power - and Savings July 19, 2010 - 11:00am Addthis North Community Police ...

  3. Nuclear Power & Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power & Engineering - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  4. Nuclear Rocket Development Station at the Nevada Test Site |...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Rocket Development Station at the Nevada Test Site Nuclear Rocket Development Station at the Nevada Test Site During the 1950s, the United States launched a nuclear rocket program ...

  5. Design of a photovoltaic central power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    Photovoltaic central power station designs have been developed for both high-efficiency flat-panel arrays and two-axis tracking concentrator arrays. Both designs are based on a site adjacent to the Saguaro Power Station of Arizona Public Service. The plants are 100 MW each, made of 5 MW subfields. The site specific designs allow detailed cost estimate for site preparation, installation, and engineering. These designs are summarized and cost estimates analyzed. Provided also are recommendations for future work to reduce system cost for each plant design.

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Green Fueling Station Powers Fleets in

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Upstate New York Green Fueling Station Powers Fleets in Upstate New York to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Green Fueling Station Powers Fleets in Upstate New York on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Green Fueling Station Powers Fleets in Upstate New York on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Green Fueling Station Powers Fleets in Upstate New York on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Green Fueling Station Powers Fleets in

  7. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  8. Selva 1 Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Selva 1 Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Larderello...

  9. Le Prata Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Le Prata Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Larderello...

  10. La Leccia Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name La Leccia Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Larderello...

  11. Nuova Lago Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Nuova Lago Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Larderello...

  12. Carboli 2 Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Carboli 2 Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Larderello...

  13. Cornia 2 Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Cornia 2 Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Larderello...

  14. Valle Secolo Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Valle Secolo Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Geothermal Resource Area Larderello Geothermal Area Geothermal...

  15. Carboli 1 Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Carboli 1 Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Larderello...

  16. Bagnore 3 Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Station General Information Name Bagnore 3 Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Mount Amiata...

  17. BIOMASS COGASIFICATION AT POLK POWER STATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McDaniel

    2002-05-01

    Part of a closed loop biomass crop was recently harvested to produce electricity in Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station Unit No.1. No technical impediments to incorporating a small percentage of biomass into Polk Power Station's fuel mix were identified. Appropriate dedicated storage and handling equipment would be required for routine biomass use. Polk Unit No.1 is an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant. IGCC is a new approach to generating electricity cleanly from solid fuels such as coal, petroleum coke, The purpose of this experiment was to demonstrate the Polk Unit No.1 could process biomass as a fraction of its fuel without an adverse impact on availability and plant performance. The biomass chosen for the test was part of a crop of closed loop Eucalyptus trees.

  18. NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, J.C.; Armstrong, R.H.; Janicke, M.J.

    1963-05-14

    A nuclear power plant for use in an airless environment or other environment in which cooling is difficult is described. The power plant includes a boiling mercury reactor, a mercury--vapor turbine in direct cycle therewith, and a radiator for condensing mercury vapor. (AEC)

  19. Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Wolf Creek Generating Station Unit 1","1,160","9,556",100.0,"Wolf Creek Nuclear Optg Corp" "1 Plant 1 Reactor","1,160","9,556",100.0

  20. Operation of Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2, Dockets Nos. 50-416 and 50-417: Mississippi Power and Light Company, Middle South Energy, Inc. , South Mississippi Electric Power Association. Final environmental statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    The information in this Final Environmental Statement is the second assessment of the environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2, located on the Mississippi River in Claiborne County, Mississippi. The Draft Environmental Statement was issued in May 1981. The first assessment was the Final Environmental Statement related to construction, which was issued in August 1973 prior to issuance of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station construction permits. In September 1981 Grand Gulf Unit 1 was 92% complete and Unit 2 was 22% complete. Fuel loading for Unit 1 is scheduled for December 1981. The present assessment is the result of the NRC staff review of the activities associated with the proposed operation of the Station, and includes the staff responses to comments on the Draft Environmental Statement.

  1. Polk power station syngas cooling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, S.D.

    1995-01-01

    Tampa Electric Company (TEC) is in the site development and construction phase of the new Polk Power Station Unit No. 1. This will be the first unit at a new site and will use Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Technology. The unit will utilize Texaco`s oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasification, along with combined cycle power generation, to produce nominal 260MW. Integral to the gasification process is the syngas cooling system. The design, integration, fabrication, transportation, and erection of this equipment have provided and continue to provide major challenges for this project.

  2. Preliminary Thermal Modeling of Hi-Storm 100S-218 Version B Storage Modules at Hope Creek Nuclear Power Station ISFSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

    2013-08-30

    This report fulfills the M3 milestone M3FT-13PN0810022, Report on Inspection 1, under Work Package FT-13PN081002. Thermal analysis is being undertaken at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of inspections of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States, as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development. This report documents pre-inspection predictions of temperatures for four modules at the Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station ISFSI that have been identified as candidates for inspection in late summer or early fall/winter of 2013. These are HI-STORM 100S-218 Version B modules storing BWR 8x8 fuel in MPC-68 canisters. The temperature predictions reported in this document were obtained with detailed COBRA-SFS models of these four storage systems, with the following boundary conditions and assumptions.

  3. Nuova Molinetto Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Information Name Nuova Molinetto Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Larderello...

  4. Monteverdi 1 Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Information Name Monteverdi 1 Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Larderello...

  5. Nuova Radicondoli Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Information Name Nuova Radicondoli Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area...

  6. Nuova Castelnuovo Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Information Name Nuova Castelnuovo Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Larderello...

  7. Monteverdi 2 Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Information Name Monteverdi 2 Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Larderello...

  8. Nuova Gabbro Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Information Name Nuova Gabbro Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Larderello...

  9. Nuova Serrazzano Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Information Name Nuova Serrazzano Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Larderello...

  10. Nuova Monterotondo Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Information Name Nuova Monterotondo Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Larderello...

  11. Nuova Sasso Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Information Name Nuova Sasso Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Geothermal Resource Area Larderello Geothermal Area Geothermal...

  12. San Martino Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Information Name San Martino Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Larderello...

  13. New York Nuclear Profile - Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,630,"5,294",95.9,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  14. California Nuclear Profile - San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 2,"1,070","6,989",74.6,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  15. Labor and nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, R.; Nelkin, D.

    1980-03-01

    The AFL-CIO is officially pro-nuclear, but tensions within unions are taking issue over ideological differences. The Labor movement, having looked to nuclear power development as an economic necessity to avoid unemployment, has opposed efforts to delay construction or close plants. As many as 42% of union members or relatives of members, however, were found to oppose new power plants, some actively working against specific construction projects. The United Mine Workers and Teamsters actively challenged the nuclear industry while the auto workers have been ambivalent. The differences between union orientation reflects the history of unionism in the US and explains the emergence of social unionism with its emphasis on safety and working conditions as well as economic benefits. Business union orientation trends to prevail during periods of prosperity; social unions during recessions. The labor unions and the environmentalists are examined in this conext and found to be hopeful. 35 references. (DCK)

  16. Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net ...

  17. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net ...

  18. Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant ...

  19. Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net ...

  20. Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net ...

  1. Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net ...

  2. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear ...

  3. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net ...

  4. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear ...

  5. Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net ...

  6. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear ...

  7. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear ...

  8. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net ...

  9. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear ...

  10. Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear ...

  11. Solar Powered Radioactive Air Monitoring Stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J. Matthew; Bisping, Lynn E.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2013-10-30

    Environmental monitoring of ambient air for radioactive material is required as stipulated in the PNNL Site radioactive air license. Sampling ambient air at identified preferred locations could not be initially accomplished because utilities were not readily available. Therefore, solar powered environmental monitoring systems were considered as a possible option. PNNL purchased two 24-V DC solar powered environmental monitoring systems which consisted of solar panels, battery banks, and sampling units. During an approximate four month performance evaluation period, the solar stations operated satisfactorily at an on-site test location. They were subsequently relocated to their preferred locations in June 2012 where they continue to function adequately under the conditions found in Richland, Washington.

  12. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Oyster Creek Unit 1",615,"4,601",14.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station Unit 1","1,161","9,439",28.8,"PSEG Nuclear LLC" "PSEG Salem Generating

  13. Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal ... Electric & Power Co" "2 Plants 4 Reactors","3,501","26,572",100.0 "Note: ...

  14. Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Columbia Generating Station Unit 2","1,097","9,241",100.0,"Energy Northwest" "1 Plant 1 Reactor","1,097","9,241",100.0

  15. Overview paper on nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spiewak, I.; Cope, D.F.

    1980-09-01

    This paper was prepared as an input to ORNL's Strategic Planning Activity, ORNL National Energy Perspective (ONEP). It is intended to provide historical background on nuclear power, an analysis of the mission of nuclear power, a discussion of the issues, the technology choices, and the suggestion of a strategy for encouraging further growth of nuclear power.

  16. Lagoni Rossi 3 Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Information Name Lagoni Rossi 3 Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Larderello...

  17. Piancastagnaio 5 Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Information Name Piancastagnaio 5 Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Mount Amiata...

  18. Piancastagnaio 3 Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Information Name Piancastagnaio 3 Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Mount Amiata...

  19. Cerro Prieto Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Information Name Cerro Prieto Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Coordinates 32.4194445584, -115.30637090094 Loading map......

  20. Piancastagnaio 2 Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Information Name Piancastagnaio 2 Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Mount Amiata...

  1. Piancastagnaio 4 Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Information Name Piancastagnaio 4 Geothermal Power Station Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Tuscany, Italy Geothermal Resource Area Mount Amiata...

  2. WWTP Power Generation Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    WWTP Power Generation Station Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Alameda County, California Coordinates 37.6016892, -121.7195459 Show Map Loading map......

  3. Hellisheidi Geothermal Power Station - South Iceland | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - South Iceland Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hellisheidi Geothermal Power Station - South Iceland Published...

  4. Washington Nuclear Profile - Columbia Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Columbia Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration ...

  5. Kansas Nuclear Profile - Wolf Creek Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    April 2012" "Next Release Date: February 2013" "Wolf Creek Generating Station" ...0","9,556",94.0,"PWR","applicationvnd.ms-excel","applicationvnd.ms-excel" ...

  6. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, L.D.P.

    1959-09-01

    A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

  7. Conceptual design of a submerged power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herring, J.S. )

    1992-01-01

    Providing safe and sustainable energy to the world's increasing population will be one of the major challenges of the 21st century. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is developing the concept of a submerged power stations (SPS). The reactor is located in the forward part of the vessel, while the turbine and generator are in the midsection, and the control and crew quarters are located at the opposite end of the vessel. The current design of the SPS has a 22.5-m o.d., is 146 m long, and has a total mass, including seawater in the annular region between the hulls, of 47,000 t. The SPS would be operated in 20 to 100 m of water at a distance of 10 to 30 km from the shore and would generate 300 to 600 MW(electric) transmitted to shore by undersea cables. The SPS has the advantages of centralized fabrication and maintenance. The author believes that the SPS has significant safety and environmental advantages.

  8. NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 05 NUCLEAR FUELS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title list of documents made publicly available, January 1-31, 1998 NONE 21 NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; BIBLIOGRAPHIES; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS;...

  9. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear ...

  10. Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State ...

  11. California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State ...

  12. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State ...

  13. Radwaste assessment program for nuclear station modifications by design engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eble, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Radwaste burial for Duke Power Company's (DPC's) seven nuclear units has become a complicated and costly process. Burial costs are based on overall volume, surcharges for radioactivity content and weight of containers, truck and cask rental, driver fees, and state fees and taxes. Frequently, radwaste costs can be as high as $500 per drum. Additionally, DPC is limited on the total burial space allocated for each plant each year. The thrust of this program is to reduce radwaste volumes needing burial at either Barnwell, South Carolina, or Richland, Washington. A limited number of options are available at our sites: (a) minimization of radwaste volume production, (b) segregation of contamination and noncontaminated trash, (c) decontamination of small hardware, (d) volume reduction of compatible trash, (e) incineration of combustible trash (available at Oconee in near future), and (f) burial of below-regulatory-concern very low level waste on site. Frequently, costs can be reduced by contracting services outside the company, i.e., supercompaction, decontamination, etc. Information about radwaste volumes, activities, and weight, however, must be provided to the nuclear production department (NPD) radwaste group early in the nuclear station modification (NSM) process to determine the most cost-effective method of processing radwaste. In addition, NSM radwaste costs are needed for the NPD NSM project budget. Due to the advanced planning scope of this budget, NSM construction costs must be estimated during the design-phase proposal.

  14. Competitive economics of nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hellman, R.

    1981-03-02

    Some 12 components of a valid study of the competitive economics of a newly ordered nuclear power plant are identified and explicated. These are then used to adjust the original cost projections of four authoritative studies of nuclear and coal power economics.

  15. Ngawha Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Region Plant Information Facility Type Binary Cycle Power Plant Owner Top Energy Number of Units 3 1 Commercial Online Date 1998 Power Plant Data Type of Plant...

  16. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Braidwood Generation Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Braidwood Generation Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,178","9,197",89.1,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  17. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Byron Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Byron Generating Station" ,"Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,164","10,337",101.4,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  18. Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D "Even ...

  19. MHK Technologies/Ocean Powered Compressed Air Stations | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Description The Ocean Powered Compressed Air Station is a point absorber that uses an air pump to force air to a landbased generator The device only needs 4m water depth and...

  20. 1,"Elm Road Generating Station","Coal","Wisconsin Electric Power...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" ,"Plant","Primary energy source","Operating company","Net summer capacity (MW)" 1,"Elm Road Generating Station","Coal","Wisconsin Electric Power Co",1268 2,"Point Beach ...

  1. Kansas Nuclear Profile - Wolf Creek Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    April 2012" "Next Release Date: February 2013" "Wolf Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,160","9,556",94.0,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  2. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Dresden Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dresden Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 2,867,"7,727",101.7,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" 3,867,"6,866",90.4,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  3. Siemens Nuclear Power GmbH AREVA Nuclear Power | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nuclear Power GmbH AREVA Nuclear Power Jump to: navigation, search Name: Siemens Nuclear Power GmbH (AREVA Nuclear Power) Place: Erlangen, Germany Zip: 91058 Sector: Services...

  4. Birdsville Geothermal Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Artesian Basin Plant Information Facility Type Binary Cycle Power Plant, ORC Owner Ergon Energy Number of Units 1 Commercial Online Date 1992 Power Plant Data Type of Plant Number...

  5. Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1, Unit 2","1,705","13,994",100.0,"Calvert Cliffs Nuclear PP Inc" "1 Plant 2 Reactors","1,705","13,994",100.0 "Note: Totals

  6. Compression and immersion tests and leaching of radionuclides, stable metals, and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination waste collected from nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akers, D.W.; Kraft, N.C.; Mandler, J.W.

    1994-06-01

    A study was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to evaluate structural stability and leachability of radionuclides, stable metals, and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from seven commercial boiling water reactors and one pressurized water reactor. The decontamination methods used at the reactors were the Can-Decon, AP/Citrox, Dow NS-1, and LOMI processes. Samples of untreated resin waste and solidified waste forms were subjected to immersion and compressive strength testing. Some waste-form samples were leach-tested using simulated groundwaters and simulated seawater for comparison with the deionized water tests that are normally performed to assess waste-form leachability. This report presents the results of these tests and assesses the effects of the various decontamination methods, waste form formulations, leachant chemical compositions, and pH of the leachant on the structural stability and leachability of the waste forms. Results indicate that releases from intact and degraded waste forms are similar and that the behavior of some radionuclides such as {sup 55}Fe, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 99}Tc were similar. In addition, the leachability indexes are greater than 6.0, which meets the requirement in the NRC`s ``Technical Position on Waste Form,`` Revision 1.

  7. Independent technical support for the frozen soil barrier installation and operation at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (F1 Site)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, Brian B.; Jackson, Dennis G.; Truex, Michael J.; Johnson, Christian D.

    2015-02-23

    TEPCO is implementing a number of water countermeasures to limit the releases and impacts of contaminated water to the surrounding environment. The diverse countermeasures work together in an integrated manner to provide different types, and several levels, of protection. In general, the strategy represents a comprehensive example of a “defense in depth” concept that is used for nuclear facilities around the world. One of the key countermeasures is a frozen soil barrier encircling the damaged reactor facilities. The frozen barrier is intended to limit the flow of water into the area and provide TEPCO the ability to reduce the amount of contaminated water that requires treatment and storage. The National Laboratory team supports the selection of artificial ground freezing and the incorporation of the frozen soil barrier in the contaminated water countermeasures -- the technical characteristics of a frozen barrier are relatively well suited to the Fukushima-specific conditions and the need for inflow reduction. Further, our independent review generally supports the TEPCO/Kajima design, installation strategy and operation plan.

  8. Design of photovoltaic central power station concentrator array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    A design for a photovoltaic central power station using tracking concentrators has been developed. The 100 MW plant is assumed to be located adjacent to the Saguaro Power Station of Arizona Public Service. The design assumes an advanced Martin Marietta two-axis tracking fresnel lens concentrator. The concentrators are arrayed in 5 MW subfields, each with its own power conditioning unit. The photovoltaic plant output is connected to the existing 115 kV switchyard. The site specific design allows detailed cost estimates for engineering, site preparation, and installation. Collector and power conditioning costs have been treated parametrically.

  9. Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor Arco, ID The Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1 located at the National Reactor Testing ...

  10. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name..."8,291",62.4,"NextEra Energy Point Beach LLC" "2 Plants 3 Reactors","1,584","13,281",100.0

  11. Nuclear power reactor instrumentation systems handbook. Volume...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear power reactor instrumentation systems handbook. Volume 1 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear power reactor instrumentation systems handbook. Volume 1 You ...

  12. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station - a retrospective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usher, J.M. ); Yannitell, D.M. )

    1992-01-01

    The 72 MW Shippingport Atomic Power Station (SAPS) first achieved criticality in December 1957 and was operated thereafter for almost 25 years. During the period October 1984 to December 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) carried out the Shippingport Decommissioning Project, marking the world's first commercial sized nuclear power plant decommissioning. The experience gained from this project established the foundation for engineering, planning, and cost estimating for future decommissioning projects.

  13. Owners of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

    1996-11-01

    Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

  14. Owners of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, R.L.

    2000-01-12

    Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of November 1999. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

  15. Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Davis Besse Unit 1",894,"5,185",32.8,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "Perry Unit 1","1,240","10,620",67.2,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "2

  16. Topics in nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budnitz, Robert J.

    2015-03-30

    The 101 nuclear plants operating in the US today are far safer than they were 20-30 years ago. For example, there's been about a 100-fold reduction in the occurrence of 'significant events' since the late 1970s. Although the youngest of currently operating US plants was designed in the 1970s, all have been significantly modified over the years. Key contributors to the safety gains are a vigilant culture, much improved equipment reliability, greatly improved training of operators and maintenance workers, worldwide sharing of experience, and the effective use of probabilistic risk assessment. Several manufacturers have submitted high quality new designs for large reactors to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for design approval, and several companies are vigorously working on designs for smaller, modular reactors. Although the Fukushima reactor accident in March 2011 in Japan has been an almost unmitigated disaster for the local population due to their being displaced from their homes and workplaces and also due to the land contamination, its 'lessons learned' have been important for the broader nuclear industry, and will surely result in safer nuclear plants worldwide - indeed, have already done so, with more safety improvements to come.

  17. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Monticello Unit 1",554,"4,695",34.8,"Northern States Power Co - Minnesota" "Prairie Island Unit 1, Unit 2","1,040","8,783",65.2,"Northern States Power Co -

  18. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Cooper Unit 1",767,"6,793",61.4,"Nebraska Public Power District" "Fort Calhoun Unit 1",478,"4,261",38.6,"Omaha Public Power District" "2 Plants 2

  19. Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Edwin I Hatch Unit 1, Unit 2","1,759","13,902",41.5,"Georgia Power Co" "Vogtle Unit 1, Unit 2","2,302","19,610",58.5,"Georgia Power Co" "2 Plants 4

  20. (Nuclear power engineering in space)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, R.H. Jr.

    1990-06-18

    The principal purpose of this trip was to participate in the Anniversary Specialist Conference on Nuclear Power Engineering in Space hosted by the USSR Ministry of Atomic Power Engineering and Industry. The conference was held in Obninsk, USSR. A secondary purpose of the trip was to meet with the French Commissariat A L'Energie Atomique in Paris regarding the status of their space power program.

  1. Seismic risk assessment as applied to the Zion Nuclear Generating Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, J.

    1984-08-01

    To assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its licensing and evaluation role, the NRC funded the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) with the goal of developing tools and data bases to evaluate the risk of earthquake caused radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. This paper describes the SSMRP risk assessment methodology and the results generated by applying this methodology to the Zion Nuclear Generating Station. In addition to describing the failure probabilities and risk values, the effects of assumptions about plant configuration, plant operation, and dependence will be given.

  2. Dynamic Simulation Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-03-03

    DSNP (Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power-Plants) is a system of programs and data files by which a nuclear power plant, or part thereof, can be simulated. The acronym DSNP is used interchangeably for the DSNP language, the DSNP libraries, the DSNP precompiler, and the DSNP document generator. The DSNP language is a special-purpose, block-oriented, digital-simulation language developed to facilitate the preparation of dynamic simulations of a large variety of nuclear power plants. It is amore » user-oriented language that permits the user to prepare simulation programs directly from power plant block diagrams and flow charts by recognizing the symbolic DSNP statements for the appropriate physical components and listing these statements in a logical sequence according to the flow of physical properties in the simulated power plant. Physical components of nuclear power plants are represented by functional blocks, or modules. Many of the more complex components are represented by several modules. The nuclear reactor, for example, has a kinetic module, a power distribution module, a feedback module, a thermodynamic module, a hydraulic module, and a radioactive heat decay module. These modules are stored in DSNP libraries in the form of a DSNP subroutine or function, a block of statements, a macro, or a combination of the above. Basic functional blocks such as integrators, pipes, function generators, connectors, and many auxiliary functions representing properties of materials used in nuclear power plants are also available. The DSNP precompiler analyzes the DSNP simulation program, performs the appropriate translations, inserts the requested modules from the library, links these modules together, searches necessary data files, and produces a simulation program in FORTRAN.« less

  3. Recovery sequences for a station blackout accident at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, J.J. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Recovery sequences for a low-pressure, short term, station blackout severe accident at the Grand Gulf power plant have been investigated using the computer code MELCOR, version 1.8.3 PN. This paper investigates the effect of reflood timing and mass flow rate on accident recovery.

  4. Tampa Electric Company Polk Power Station IGCC Project -- Project status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, T.E.

    1998-12-31

    The Tampa Electric Company Polk Power Station is a nominal 25 MW (net) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant located southeast of Tampa in Polk County, Florida. This project is being partially funded under the Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology Program pursuant to a Round III award. The Polk Power Station uses oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasification technology licensed from Texaco Development Corporation in conjunction with a General Electric combined cycle with an advanced combustion turbine. This IGCC configuration demonstrates significant reductions of SO{sub 2} and NOx emissions when compared to existing and future conventional coal-fired power plants. The Polk Power Station achieved ``first fire`` of the gasification system on schedule in mid-July, 1996. It was placed into commercial operation on September 30, 1996. Since that time, significant advances have occurred in the operation of the entire IGCC train. The presentation features an up-to-the-minute update of actual performance parameters achieved by the Polk Power Station. These parameters include overall capacity, heat rate, and availability. Tests of four alternate feedstocks were conducted, and the resulting performance is compared to that achieved on their base coal. This paper also provides an update of the general operating experiences and shutdown causes of the gasification facility throughout 1997. Finally, the future plans for improving the reliability and efficiency of the Unit will be addressed, as well as plans for future additional alternate fuel test burns.

  5. License Amendment Request for Storing Exelon Sister Nuclear Stations Class B/C LLRW in the LaSalle Station Interim Radwaste Storage Facility - 13620

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azar, Miguel; Gardner, Donald A.; Taylor, Edward R.

    2013-07-01

    (LAR) to NRC on January 6, 2010; NRC approved the LAR on July 21, 2011. A similar decision was made by Exelon in early 2009 to forward Radwaste from Limerick Nuclear Station to its sister station, the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station; both in Pennsylvania. A LAR submittal to the NRC was also provided and NRC approval was received in 2011. (authors)

  6. EIS-0210: Tampa Electric Company-Polk Power Station (Adopted)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency prepared this statement to fulfill its National Environmental Policy Act requirements with respect to the potential issuance of a permit to the Tampa Electric Company under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System for the 1,150-MW Polk Power Station, a new pollutant source. The U.S. Department of Energy served as a cooperating agency in the development of this document due to its potential role to provide cost-shared financial assistance for a 260-MW Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle unit at the Power Station under its Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project, and adopted the document by August 1994.

  7. Tampa Electric Company, Polk Power Station IGCC Project: Project Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, T.E.; Shelnut, C.A.; McDaniel, J.E.

    1999-07-01

    Over the last ten years, Tampa Electric Company (TEC) has taken the Polk Power Station from a concept to a reality. The Tampa Electric Company Polk Power Station is a nominal 250 MW (net) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant located to the southeast of Tampa, Florida in Polk County, Florida. This project is being partially funded under the Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology Program pursuant to a Round III award. The Polk Power Station achieved first fire of the gasification system on schedule in mid-July, 1996. It was placed in commercial operation on September 30, 1996. Since start-up in July, 1996, significant advances have occurred in the design and operation of the entire IGCC train. This presentation will feature an up-to-the-minute update of actual performance parameters achieved by the Polk Power Station. These parameters include overall capacity, heat rate, and availability. Several different coal feedstocks have been tested and the resulting performance will be compared to that achieved on the base coal. This paper also provides an update of the general operating experiences and shutdown causes of the gasification facility. Finally, the future plans for improving the reliability and efficiency of the Unit will be addressed, as well as plans for future additional alternate fuel test burns.

  8. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Donald C Cook Unit 1, Unit 2","2,069","15,646",52.8,"Indiana Michigan Power Co" "Fermi Unit 2","1,085","7,738",26.1,"Detroit Edison Co" "Palisades Unit

  9. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Browns Ferry Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3","3,309","24,771",65.3,"Tennessee Valley Authority" "Joseph M Farley Unit 1, Unit 2","1,734","13,170",34.7,"Alabama Power

  10. Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Crystal River Unit 3",860,0,"--","Progress Energy Florida Inc" "St Lucie Unit 1, Unit 2","1,678","12,630",52.8,"Florida Power & Light Co" "Turkey Point

  11. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Beaver Valley Unit 1, Unit 2","1,777","14,994",19.3,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "Limerick Unit 1, Unit 2","2,264","18,926",24.3,"Exelon

  12. Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 1, Unit 2","1,835","15,023",100.0,"Entergy Arkansas Inc" "1 Plant 2 Reactors","1,835","15,023",100.0

  13. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Millstone Unit 2, Unit 3","2,103","16,750",100.0,"Dominion Nuclear Conn Inc" "1 Plant 2 Reactors","2,103","16,750",100.0

  14. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Sequoyah Unit 1, Unit 2","2,278","18,001",64.9,"Tennessee Valley Authority" "Watts Bar Nuclear Plant Unit 1","1,123","9,738",35.1,"Tennessee Valley

  15. Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Comanche Peak Unit 1, Unit 2","2,406","20,208",48.9,"Luminant Generation Company LLC" "South Texas Project Unit 1, Unit 2","2,560","21,127",51.1,"STP Nuclear

  16. Nevada Power: Clark Station; Las Vegas, Nevada (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    2006-03-27

    A partnership with the University of Nevada and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location. The solar measurement instrumentation is also accompanied by meteorological monitoring equipment to provide scientists with a complete picture of the solar power possibilities.

  17. Nevada Power: Clark Station; Las Vegas, Nevada (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    A partnership with the University of Nevada and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location. The solar measurement instrumentation is also accompanied by meteorological monitoring equipment to provide scientists with a complete picture of the solar power possibilities.

  18. 1,"Braidwood Generation Station","Nuclear","Exelon Nuclear",2330

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    LLC",1628 8,"Powerton","Coal","Midwest Generations EME LLC",1538 9,"Elwood Energy LLC","Natural gas","Elwood Energy LLC",1350 10,"Newton","Coal","Illinois Power Generating Co",119

  19. Nuclear Power Facilities (2008) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Power Facilities (2008) Nuclear Power Facilities (2008) Nuclear Power Facilities (2008) (408.42 KB) More Documents & Publications Front-end Nuclear Facilities (2008) Financial Institution Partnership Program - Commercial Technology Renewable Energy Generation Projects Issued: October 7, 2009 Transmission Infrastructure Investment Projects (2009)

  20. Seismic margin review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station: Fragility analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravindra, M. K.; Hardy, G. S.; Hashimoto, P. S.; Griffin, M. J.

    1987-03-01

    This Fragility Analysis is the third of three volumes for the Seismic Margin Review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station. Volume 1 is the Summary Report of the first trial seismic margin review. Volume 2, Systems Analysis, documents the results of the systems screening for the review. The three volumes are part of the Seismic Margins Program initiated in 1984 by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to quantify seismic margins at nuclear power plants. The overall objectives of the trial review are to assess the seismic margins of a particular pressurized water reactor, and to test the adequacy of this review approach, quantification techniques, and guidelines for performing the review. Results from the trial review will be used to revise the seismic margin methodology and guidelines so that the NRC and industry can readily apply them to assess the inherent quantitative seismic capacity of nuclear power plants.

  1. New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (nw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net ...

  2. Nuclear power high technology colloquium: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-10

    Reports presenting information on technology advancements in the nuclear industry and nuclear power plant functions have been abstracted and are available on the energy data base.

  3. North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear ...

  4. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net ...

  5. New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net ...

  6. Helping nuclear power help us

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schecker, Jay A

    2009-01-01

    After a prolonged absence, the word 'nuclear' has returned to the lexicon of sustainable domestic energy resources. Due in no small part to its demonstrated reliability, nuclear power is poised to playa greater role in the nation's energy future, producing clean, carbon-neutral electricity and contributing even more to our energy security. To nuclear scientists, the resurgence presents an opportunity to inject new technologies into the industry to maximize the benefits that nuclear energy can provide. 'By developing new options for waste management and exploiting new materials to make key technological advances, we can significantly impact the use of nuclear energy in our future energy mix,' says Chris Stanek, a materials scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Stanek approaches the big technology challenges by thinking way small, all the way down to the atoms. He and his colleagues are using cutting edge atomic-scale simulations to address a difficult aspect of nuclear waste -- predicting its behavior far into the future. Their research is part of a broader, coordinated effort on the part of the Laboratory to use its considerable experimental, theoretical, and computational capabilities to explore advanced materials central to not only waste issues, but to nuclear fuels as well.

  7. Global warming and nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, L., LLNL

    1998-07-10

    Nuclear fission power reactors represent a potential solution to many aspects of global change possibly induced by inputting of either particulate or carbon or sulfur oxides into the Earth`s atmosphere. Of proven technological feasibility, they presently produce high-grade heat for large-scale electricity generation, space heating and industrial process-energizing around the world, without emitting greenhouse gases or atmospheric particulates; importantly, electricity production costs from the best nuclear plants presently are closely comparable with those of the best fossil-fired plants. However, a substantial number of issues currently stand between nuclear power and widespread substitution for large stationary fossil fuel-fired systems. These include perceptual ones regarding both long-term and acute operational safety, plant decommissioning, fuel reprocessing, radwaste disposal, fissile materials diversion to military purposes and - perhaps most seriously- readily quantifiable concerns regarding long-term fuel supply and total unit electrical energy cost. We sketch a road-map for proceeding from the present situation toward a nuclear power-intensive world, addressing along the way each of the concerns which presently impede widespread nuclear substitution for fossil fuels, particularly for coal in the most populous and rapidly developing portions of the world, e.g., China and India. This `design to societal specifications` approach to large-scale nuclear fission power systems may lead to energy sources meeting essentially all stationary demands for high-temperature heat. Such advanced options offer a human population of ten billion the electricity supply levels currently enjoyed by Americans for 10,000 years. Nuclear power systems tailored to local needs-and-interests and having a common advanced technology base could reduce present-day world-wide C0{sub 2} emissions by two-fold, if universally employed. By application to small mobile demands, a second two

  8. Tampa Electric Company Polk Power Station IGCC project: Project status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDaniel, J.E.; Carlson, M.R.; Hurd, R.; Pless, D.E.; Grant, M.D.

    1997-12-31

    The Tampa Electric Company Polk Power Station is a nominal 250 MW (net) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant located to the southeast of Tampa, Florida in Polk County, Florida. This project is being partially funded under the Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology Program pursuant to a Round II award. The Polk Power Station uses oxygen-blown, entrained-flow IGCC technology licensed from Texaco Development Corporation to demonstrate significant reductions of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions when compared to existing and future conventional coal-fired power plants. In addition, this project demonstrates the technical feasibility of commercial scale IGCC and Hot Gas Clean Up (HGCU) technology. The Polk Power Station achieved ``first fire`` of the gasification system on schedule in mid-July, 1996. Since that time, significant advances have occurred in the operation of the entire IGCC train. This paper addresses the operating experiences which occurred in the start-up and shakedown phase of the plant. Also, with the plant being declared in commercial operation as of September 30, 1996, the paper discusses the challenges encountered in the early phases of commercial operation. Finally, the future plans for improving the reliability and efficiency of the Unit in the first quarter of 1997 and beyond, as well as plans for future alternate fuel test burns, are detailed. The presentation features an up-to-the-minute update on actual performance parameters achieved by the Polk Power Station. These parameters include overall Unit capacity, heat rate, and availability. In addition, the current status of the start-up activities for the HGCU portion of the plant is discussed.

  9. Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Duane Arnold Energy Center Unit 1",601,"4,451",100.0,"NextEra Energy Duane Arnold LLC" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",601,"4,451",100.0

  10. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant Name/Total Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (Pprcent)","Owner" "River Bend Unit 1",974,"8,363",44.9,"Entergy Gulf States - LA LLC" "Waterford 3 Unit 3","1,168","10,276",55.1,"Entergy Louisiana Inc" "2 Plants 2

  11. Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Grand Gulf Unit 1","1,251","9,643",100.0,"System Energy Resources, Inc" "1 Plant 1 Reactor","1,251","9,643",100.0

  12. Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Callaway Unit 1","1,190","8,996",100.0,"Union Electric Co" "1 Plant 1 Reactor","1,190","8,996",100.0 "Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to

  13. Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Palo Verde Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3","3,937","31,200",100.0,"Arizona Public Service Co" "1 Plant 3 Reactors","3,937","31,200",100.0 "Note: Totals may not equal sum of

  14. Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning Nuclear Reactors At Multiple-Reactor Stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittenbrock, N. G.

    1982-01-01

    Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of large (1175-MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and large (1155-MWe) boiling water reactors {BWRs) at multiple-reactor stations. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). Safety and costs of decommissioning are estimated by determining the impact of probable features of multiple-reactor-station operation that are considered to be unavailable at a single-reactor station, and applying these estimated impacts to the decommissioning costs and radiation doses estimated in previous PWR and BWR decommissioning studies. The multiple-reactor-station features analyzed are: the use of interim onsite nuclear waste storage with later removal to an offsite nuclear waste disposal facility, the use of permanent onsite nuclear waste disposal, the dedication of the site to nuclear power generation, and the provision of centralized services. Five scenarios for decommissioning reactors at a multiple-reactor station are investigated. The number of reactors on a site is assumed to be either four or ten; nuclear waste disposal is varied between immediate offsite disposal, interim onsite storage, and immediate onsite disposal. It is assumed that the decommissioned reactors are not replaced in one scenario but are replaced in the other scenarios. Centralized service facilities are provided in two scenarios but are not provided in the other three. Decommissioning of a PWR or a BWR at a multiple-reactor station probably will be less costly and result in lower radiation doses than decommissioning an identical reactor at a single-reactor station. Regardless of whether the light water reactor being decommissioned is at a single- or multiple-reactor station: • the estimated occupational radiation dose for decommissioning an LWR is lowest for SAFSTOR and highest for DECON • the estimated

  15. Nuclear Power: High Hopes, Unfulfilled Promise (Conference) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Power: High Hopes, Unfulfilled Promise Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Power: High Hopes, Unfulfilled Promise You are accessing a document from the Department ...

  16. EIS-0215: Pinon Pine Power Project, Tracy Station, NV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this statement to assess the environmental and human health issues associated with the Pinon Pine Power Project, a proposed demonstration project that would be cost-shared by DOE and the Sierra Pacific Power Company (SPPCo.) under DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program. The proposed Federal action is for DOE to provide cost-shared funding support for the construction and operation of the Pinon Pine Power Project, a coal-fired power generating facility, which would be a nominal, 800-ton-per-day (104 megawatt (MW) gross generation) air-blown, Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle plant proposed by SPPCo. at its Tracy Power Station near Reno, Nevada.

  17. Owners of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-11-01

    The list indicates percentage ownership of commercial nuclear power plants by utility companies as of September 1, 1982. The list includes all plants licensed to operate, under construction, docketed for NRC safety and environmental reviews, or under NRC antitrust review. Part I lists plants alphabetically with their associated applicants and percentage ownership. Part II lists applicants alphabetically with their associated plants and percentage ownership. Part I also indicates which plants have received operating licenses.

  18. Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purvis, James W.

    1999-07-21

    Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented.

  19. Role of nuclear power in the Philippine power development program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleta, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    The reintroduction of nuclear power in the Philippines is favored by several factors such as: the inclusion of nuclear energy in the energy sector of the science and technology agenda for national development (STAND); the Large gap between electricity demand and available local supply for the medium-term power development plan; the relatively lower health risks in nuclear power fuel cycle systems compared to the already acceptable power systems; the lower environmental impacts of nuclear power systems compared to fossil fuelled systems and the availability of a regulatory framework and trained personnel who could form a core for implementing a nuclear power program. The electricity supply gap of 9600 MW for the period 1993-2005 could be partly supplied by nuclear power. The findings of a recent study are described, as well as the issues that have to be addressed in the reintroduction of nuclear power.

  20. Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station IGCC project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, S.D.

    1995-12-31

    Tampa Electric Company (TEC) is in the construction phase of its new Polk Power Station Unit No. 1. This unique project incorporates the use of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology for electric power production. The project is being partially funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), as part of the Clean Coal Technology Program. This will help to demonstrate this state-of-the-art technology, providing utilities with the ability to use a wide range of coals in an efficient, environmentally superior manner. During the summer of 1994, TEC began site development at the new Polk Power Station. Since that time, most of the Site work has been completed, and erection and installation of the power plant equipment is well underway. This is the first time that IGCC technology will be installed at a new unit at a greenfield site. This is a major endeavor for TEC in that Polk Unit No. 1 is a major addition to the existing generating capacity and it involves the demonstration of technology new to utility power generation. As a part of the Cooperative Agreement with the DOE, TEC will also be demonstrating the use of a new Hot Gas Clean-Up System which has a potential for greater IGCC efficiency.

  1. Owners of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, R.S.

    1991-07-01

    This report indicates percentage ownership of commercial nuclear power plants by utility companies. The report includes all plants operating, under construction, docketed for NRC safety and environmental reviews, or under NRC antitrust review, but does not include those plants announced but not yet under review or those plants formally cancelled. Part 1 of the report lists plants alphabetically with their associated applicants or licensees and percentage ownership. Part 2 lists applicants or licensees alphabetically with their associated plants and percentage ownership. Part 1 also indicates which plants have received operating licenses (OLS).

  2. Effect of Hurricane Andrew on the Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Station from August 20--30, 1992. [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hebdon, F.J.

    1993-03-01

    On August 24, 1992, Hurricane Andrew, a Category 4 hurricane, struck the Turkey Point Electrical Generating Station with sustained winds of 145 mph (233 km/h). This is the report of the team that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) jointly sponsored (1) to review the damage that the hurricane caused the nuclear units and the utility`s actions to prepare for the storm and recover from it, and (2) to compile lessons that might benefit other nuclear reactor facilities.

  3. Powering the Nuclear Navy | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Programs Powering the Nuclear Navy The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program provides militarily effective nuclear propulsion plants and ensures their safe, reliable and long-lived operation. This mission requires the combination of fully trained U.S. Navy men and women with ships that excel in endurance, stealth, speed, and independence from supply chains. The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program provides militarily effective nuclear propulsion plants and ensures their safe, reliable and

  4. Anhui Wuhu Nuclear Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wuhu Nuclear Power Co Jump to: navigation, search Name: Anhui Wuhu Nuclear Power Co. Place: Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China Zip: 518031 Product: JV between Guangdong Nuclear...

  5. South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State ...

  6. SOARCA Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Long-Term Station Blackout Uncertainty Analysis: Knowledge Advancement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Mattie, Patrick D.; Bixler, Nathan E.; Ross, Kyle; Cardoni, Jeffrey N; Kalinich, Donald A.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Ghosh, S. Tina

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes the knowledge advancements from the uncertainty analysis for the State-of- the-Art Reactor Consequence Analyses (SOARCA) unmitigated long-term station blackout accident scenario at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station. This work assessed key MELCOR and MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2 (MACCS2) modeling uncertainties in an integrated fashion to quantify the relative importance of each uncertain input on potential accident progression, radiological releases, and off-site consequences. This quantitative uncertainty analysis provides measures of the effects on consequences, of each of the selected uncertain parameters both individually and in interaction with other parameters. The results measure the model response (e.g., variance in the output) to uncertainty in the selected input. Investigation into the important uncertain parameters in turn yields insights into important phenomena for accident progression and off-site consequences. This uncertainty analysis confirmed the known importance of some parameters, such as failure rate of the Safety Relief Valve in accident progression modeling and the dry deposition velocity in off-site consequence modeling. The analysis also revealed some new insights, such as dependent effect of cesium chemical form for different accident progressions. (auth)

  7. Nuclear power in the Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.

    1989-01-01

    The pros and cons of nuclear power are similar in many countries, but the following pro factors are specific to the Soviet Union: the major sources of conventional fuel are in one area of the country, but energy consumption is concentrated in another; and a large portion of energy is generated using oil and gas. The arguments against nuclear power are as follows: safety requirements and expectations have been increased; and public opinion is negative. A program of nuclear power generation has been developed. New techniques are being implemented to increase safety and enhance operations of different types of nuclear power plants. Its should be obvious in the future that a nuclear power plant has better economic and environmental parameters than existing methods of power generation.

  8. Socio-economic impacts of nuclear generating stations: Crystal River Unit 3 case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, P.A.

    1982-07-01

    This report documents a case study of the socio-economic impacts of the construction and operation of the Crystal River Unit 3 nuclear power station. It is part of a major post-licensing study of the socio-economic impacts at twelve nuclear power stations. The case study covers the period beginning with the announcement of plans to construct the reactor and ending in the period 1980 to 1981. The case study deals with changes in the economy, population, settlement patterns and housing, local government and public services, social structure, and public response in the study area during the construction/operation of the reactor. A regional modeling approach is used to trace the impact of construction/operation on the local economy, labor market, and housing market. Emphasis in the study is on the attribution of socio-economic impacts to the reactor or other causal factors. As part of the study of local public response to the construction/operation of the reactor, the effects of the Three Mile Island accident are examined.

  9. KiloPower Project - KRUSTY Experiment Nuclear Design (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    KiloPower Project - KRUSTY Experiment Nuclear Design Citation Details In-Document Search Title: KiloPower Project - KRUSTY Experiment Nuclear Design This PowerPoint presentation ...

  10. Powering the Nuclear Navy | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Powering the Nuclear Navy The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program provides militarily effective nuclear propulsion plants and ensures their safe, reliable and long-lived operation. NNSA's Naval Reactors Program provides the design, development and operational support required to provide militarily effective nuclear propulsion plants and ensure their safe, reliable and long-lived operation. Learn More USS George H.W. Bush conducts flight operations USS George H.W. Bush conducts flight

  11. U.S. Forward Operating Base Applications of Nuclear Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, George W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a high level overview of current nuclear power technology and the potential use of nuclear power at military bases. The size, power ranges, and applicability of nuclear power units for military base power are reviewed. Previous and current reactor projects are described to further define the potential for nuclear power for military power.

  12. Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Vermont Yankee Unit 1",620,"4,782",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",620,"4,782",100.0

  13. SOARCA Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Long-Term Station Blackout Uncertainty Analysis: Convergence of the Uncertainty Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, Nathan E.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Eckert-Gallup, Aubrey Celia; Mattie, Patrick D.; Ghosh, S. Tina

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes the convergence of MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2 (MACCS2) probabilistic results of offsite consequences for the uncertainty analysis of the State-of-the-Art Reactor Consequence Analyses (SOARCA) unmitigated long-term station blackout scenario at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station. The consequence metrics evaluated are individual latent-cancer fatality (LCF) risk and individual early fatality risk. Consequence results are presented as conditional risk (i.e., assuming the accident occurs, risk per event) to individuals of the public as a result of the accident. In order to verify convergence for this uncertainty analysis, as recommended by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, a ‘high’ source term from the original population of Monte Carlo runs has been selected to be used for: (1) a study of the distribution of consequence results stemming solely from epistemic uncertainty in the MACCS2 parameters (i.e., separating the effect from the source term uncertainty), and (2) a comparison between Simple Random Sampling (SRS) and Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) in order to validate the original results obtained with LHS. Three replicates (each using a different random seed) of size 1,000 each using LHS and another set of three replicates of size 1,000 using SRS are analyzed. The results show that the LCF risk results are well converged with either LHS or SRS sampling. The early fatality risk results are less well converged at radial distances beyond 2 miles, and this is expected due to the sparse data (predominance of “zero” results).

  14. Public opinion factors regarding nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is an effort to identify, as comprehensively as possible, public concerns about nuclear power, and to assess, where possible, the relative importance of these concerns as they relate to government regulation of and policy towards nuclear power. It is based on some two dozen in-depth interviews with key communicators representing the nuclear power industry, the environmental community, and government, as well as on the parallel efforts in our research project: (1) review of federal court case law, (2) a selective examination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) administrative process, and (3) the preceding George Mason University research project in this series. The paper synthesizes our findings about public attitudes towards nuclear power as expressed through federal court case law, NRC administrative law, public opinion surveys, and direct personal interviews. In so doing, we describe the public opinion environment in which the nuclear regulatory process must operate. Our premise is that public opinion ultimately underlies the approaches government agencies take towards regulating nuclear power, and that, to the degree that the nuclear power industry's practices are aligned with public opinion, a more favorable regulatory climate is possible.

  15. Public opinion factors regarding nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, B.

    1991-12-31

    This paper is an effort to identify, as comprehensively as possible, public concerns about nuclear power, and to assess, where possible, the relative importance of these concerns as they relate to government regulation of and policy towards nuclear power. It is based on some two dozen in-depth interviews with key communicators representing the nuclear power industry, the environmental community, and government, as well as on the parallel efforts in our research project: (1) review of federal court case law, (2) a selective examination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) administrative process, and (3) the preceding George Mason University research project in this series. The paper synthesizes our findings about public attitudes towards nuclear power as expressed through federal court case law, NRC administrative law, public opinion surveys, and direct personal interviews. In so doing, we describe the public opinion environment in which the nuclear regulatory process must operate. Our premise is that public opinion ultimately underlies the approaches government agencies take towards regulating nuclear power, and that, to the degree that the nuclear power industry`s practices are aligned with public opinion, a more favorable regulatory climate is possible.

  16. Workshop on nuclear power growth and nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph F

    2010-01-01

    It is widely viewed that an expansion of nuclear power would have positive energy, economic and environmental benefits for the world. However, there are concerns about the economic competitiveness, safety and proliferation and terrorism risks of nuclear power. The prospects for a dramatic growth in nuclear power will depend on the ability of governments and industry to address these concerns, including the effectiveness of, and the resources devoted to, plans to develop and implement technologies and approaches that strengthen nonproliferation, nuclear materials accountability and nuclear security. In his Prague speech, President Obama stated: 'we should build a new framework for civil nuclear cooperation, including an international fuel bank, so that countries can access peaceful power without increasing the risks of proliferation. That must be the right of every nation that renounces nuclear weapons, especially developing countries embarking on peaceful programs. And no approach will succeed if it's based on the denial of rights to nations that play by the rules. We must harness the power of nuclear energy on behalf of our efforts to combat climate change, and to advance peace opportunity for all people.' How can the President's vision, which will rekindle a vigorous public debate over the future of nuclear power and its relation to proliferation, be realized? What critical issues will frame the reemerging debate? What policies must be put into place to address these issues? Will US policy be marked more by continuity or change? To address these and other questions, the Los Alamos National Laboratory in cooperation with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars will host a workshop on the future of nuclear power and nonproliferation.

  17. ESBWR response to an extended station blackout/loss of all AC power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, A. J.; Marquino, W.

    2012-07-01

    U.S. federal regulations require light water cooled nuclear power plants to cope with Station Blackouts for a predetermined amount of time based on design factors for the plant. U.S. regulations define Station Blackout (SBO) as a loss of the offsite electric power system concurrent with turbine trip and unavailability of the onsite emergency AC power system. According to U.S. regulations, typically the coping period for an SBO is 4 hours and can be as long as 16 hours for currently operating BWR plants. Being able to cope with an SBO and loss of all AC power is required by international regulators as well. The U.S. licensing basis for the ESBWR is a coping period of 72 hours for an SBO based on U.S. NRC requirements for passive safety plants. In the event of an extended SBO (viz., greater than 72 hours), the ESBWR response shows that the design is able to cope with the event for at least 7 days without AC electrical power or operator action. ESBWR is a Generation III+ reactor design with an array of passive safety systems. The ESBWR primary success path for mitigation of an SBO event is the Isolation Condenser System (ICS). The ICS is a passive, closed loop, safety system that initiates automatically on a loss of power. Upon Station Blackout or loss of all AC power, the ICS begins removing decay heat from the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) by (i) condensing the steam into water in heat exchangers located in pools of water above the containment, and (ii) transferring the decay heat to the atmosphere. The condensed water is then returned by gravity to cool the reactor again. The ICS alone is capable of maintaining the ESBWR in a safe shutdown condition after an SBO for an extended period. The fuel remains covered throughout the SBO event. The ICS is able to remove decay heat from the RPV for at least 7 days and maintains the reactor in a safe shutdown condition. The water level in the RPV remains well above the top of active fuel for the duration of the SBO event

  18. Experiments ✚ Simulations = Better Nuclear Power Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiments + Simulations = Better Nuclear Power Research Experiments ✚ Simulations = Better Nuclear Power Research Atomic Level Simulations Enhance Characterization of Radiation Damage July 31, 2015 Contact: Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov Radiation Damage PNNL In a study featured on the cover of a Journal of Materials Research focus issue, an international research collaboration used molecular dynamics simulations run at NERSC to identify atomic-level details of early-stage

  19. Renewing America's Nuclear Power Partnership for Energy Security...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewing America's Nuclear Power Partnership for Energy Security and Economic Growth Renewing America's Nuclear Power Partnership for Energy Security and Economic Growth October 8, ...

  20. Understanding seismic design criteria for Japanese nuclear power...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Understanding seismic design criteria for Japanese nuclear power plants Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Understanding seismic design criteria for Japanese nuclear power ...

  1. Renewing America's Nuclear Power Partnership for Energy Security...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Renewing America's Nuclear Power Partnership for Energy Security and Economic Growth Renewing America's Nuclear Power Partnership for Energy Security and Economic Growth October 8,...

  2. China Guangdong Nuclear Power Holding Co Ltd CGNPC | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nuclear Power Holding Co Ltd CGNPC Jump to: navigation, search Name: China Guangdong Nuclear Power Holding Co Ltd (CGNPC) Place: Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China Zip: 518031...

  3. DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction October 2, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis ...

  4. Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Palo Verde Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3","3,937","31,200",100.0,"Arizona Public Service Co" "1 Plant 3 ...

  5. Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Grand Gulf Unit 1","1,251","9,643",100.0,"System Energy Resources, Inc" "1 Plant 1 Reactor","1,251","9,643",100.0

  6. Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Duane Arnold Energy Center Unit 1",601,"4,451",100.0,"NextEra Energy Duane Arnold LLC" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",601,"4,451",100.0

  7. Fresh nuclear fuel measurements at Ukrainian nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuzminski, Jozef; Ewing, Tom; Dickman, Debbie; Gavrilyuk, Victor; Drapey, Sergey; Kirischuk, Vladimir; Strilchuk, Nikolay

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the Provisions on Nuclear Material Measurement System was enacted in Ukraine as an important regulatory driver to support international obligations in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. It defines key provisions and requirements for material measurement and measurement control programs to ensure the quality and reliability of measurement data within the framework of the State MC&A System. Implementing the Provisions requires establishing a number of measurement techniques for both fresh and spent nuclear fuel for various types of Ukrainian reactors. Our first efforts focused on measurements of fresh nuclear fuel from a WWR-1000 power reactor.

  8. The American nuclear power industry. A handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearman, W.A.; Starr, P.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the history and current organization of the American nuclear power industry. Part I focuses on development of the industry, including the number, capacity, and type of plants in commercial operation as well as those under construction. Part II examines the safety, environmental, antitrust, and licensing issues involved in the use of nuclear power. Part III presents case studies of selected plants, such as Three Mile Island and Seabrook, to illustrate some of the issues discussed. The book also contains a listing of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission libraries and a subject index.

  9. Source terms released into the environment for a station blackout severe accident at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, J.J.

    1995-07-01

    This study calculates source terms released into the environment at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station after containment failure during a postulated low-pressure, short-term station blackout severe accident. The severe accident analysis code MELCOR, version 1.8.1, was used in these calculations. Source terms were calculated for three different containment failure modes. The largest environmental releases occur for early containment failure at the drywell liner in contact with the cavity by liner melt-through. This containment failure mode is very likely to occur when the cavity is dry during this postulated severe accident sequence.

  10. Police Station Triples Solar Power – and Savings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Henderson, Nevada, police department is going above and beyond the call of duty by tripling the size of its solar panel system on its LEED-certified station, saving the city thousands of dollars in energy costs.

  11. Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Goldston

    2010-03-03

    Integrated energy, environment and economics modeling suggests electrical energy use will increase from 2.4 TWe today to 12 TWe in 2100. It will be challenging to provide 40% of this electrical power from combustion with carbon sequestration, as it will be challenging to provide 30% from renewable energy sources. Thus nuclear power may be needed to provide ~30% by 2100. Calculations of the associated stocks and flows of uranium, plutonium and minor actinides indicate that the proliferation risks at mid-century, using current light-water reactor technology, are daunting. There are institutional arrangements that may be able to provide an acceptable level of risk mitigation, but they will be difficult to implement. If a transition is begun to fast-spectrum reactors at mid-century, without a dramatic change in the proliferation risks of such systems, at the end of the century proliferation risks are much greater, and more resistant to mitigation. The risks of nuclear power should be compared with the risks of the estimated 0.64oC long-term global surface-average temperature rise predicted if nuclear power were replaced with coal-fired power plants without carbon sequestration. Fusion energy, if developed, would provide a source of nuclear power with much lower proliferation risks than fission.

  12. The Fukushima Nuclear Event and its Implications for Nuclear Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golay, Michael

    2011-07-06

    The combined strong earthquake and super tsunami of 12 March 2011 at the Fukushima nuclear power plant imposed the most severe challenges ever experienced at such a facility. Information regarding the plant response and status remains uncertain, but it is clear that severe damage has been sustained, that the plant staff have responded creatively and that the offsite implications are unlikely to be seriously threatening to the health, if not the prosperity, of the surrounding population. Re-examination of the regulatory constraints of nuclear power will occur worldwide, and some changes are likely, particularly concerning reliance upon active systems for achieving critical safety functions and concerning treatments of used reactor fuel. Whether worldwide expansion of the nuclear power economy will be slowed in the long run is perhaps unlikely and worth discussion.

  13. Nuclear power and public acceptance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirschmann, H.

    1989-01-01

    Public acceptance is a decisive factor of growing importance, although economics has been and will remain the most decisive factor in ordering new nuclear capacity. Nuclear energy can make an important contribution toward preventing and reducing the greenhouse effect. Many politicians tend to base their decisions not on facts but rather on so called public opinion and consequently to overreact in particular on environmental issues. The entire debate hinges on public confidence rather than on a lack of information. There is no 100% guarantee that technical facilities will operate completely accident-free. Therefore, standards should be harmonized, plants should be operated safely and consequences of possible accidents should be limited. There needs to be some kind of early information system between countries concerning upcoming issues as a prerequisite for acting instead of reacting, because this is an essential tool in convincing the public that they can have more confidence. Technical information alone does not answer the real questions of the public. Political, technical, and economic matters as well as public opinion are interwoven and cannot be separated from each. Therefore, the exchange of experience gained in all these sectors on an international basis must be improved.

  14. Russian nuclear-powered submarine decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bukharin, O.; Handler, J.

    1995-11-01

    Russia is facing technical, economic and organizational difficulties in dismantling its oversized and unsafe fleet of nuclear powered submarines. The inability of Russia to deal effectively with the submarine decommissioning crisis increases the risk of environmental disaster and may hamper the implementation of the START I and START II treaties. This paper discusses the nuclear fleet support infrastructure, the problems of submarine decommissioning, and recommends international cooperation in addressing these problems.

  15. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Salem Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    PSEG Salem Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,174","8,777",85.3,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  16. Illinois Nuclear Profile - LaSalle Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    LaSalle Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,118","9,207",94.0,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  17. New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Indian Point Unit 2, Unit 3","2,063","16,321",39.0,"Entergy Nuclear Indian Point" "James A Fitzpatrick Unit 1",855,"6,361",15.2,"Entergy Nuc Fitzpatrick LLC" "Nine

  18. US Central Station Nuclear Electric Generating Units: significant milestones. (Status as of April 1, 1980)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Construction and operational milestones are tabulated for US nuclear power plants. Data are presented on nuclear steam supply system orders. A schedule of commercial operation through 1990 is given.

  19. QUARTERLY NUCLEAR POWER DEPLOYMENT SUMMARY APRIL 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Updates available at: www.energy.gov/ne NEXT UPDATE - July 2014 Page 1 News Updates  On February 20, Secretary Moniz announced the issuance of loan guarantees totalling approximately $6.5 billion to Georgia Power Company and Oglethorpe Power Company for the construction of two new nuclear reactors at the Alvin W. Vogtle Electric Generating Plant. The Department continues to work on the remaining conditional commitment for a $1.8 billion loan guarantee to Municipal Electric Authority of

  20. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,161","9,439",92.8,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,"1,161","9,439",92.8

  1. MODERATOR ELEMENTS FOR UNIFORM POWER NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balent, R.

    1963-03-12

    This patent describes a method of obtaining a flatter flux and more uniform power generation across the core of a nuclear reactor. The method comprises using moderator elements having differing moderating strength. The elements have an increasing amount of the better moderating material as a function of radial and/or axial distance from the reactor core center. (AEC)

  2. Method To Monitor Nuclear Power Plant Risk from Transmission Grid Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Gregg; K Canavan

    2004-10-30

    This report examines a method to monitor and trend the transmission grid in the local vicinity of a nuclear o other generating station. The method addresses the potential for a loss of off-site power following a plant trip or a loss-of-coolant accident.

  3. Design of a photovoltaic central power station: flat-plate array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    A design for a photovoltaic central power station using fixed flat-panel arrays has been developed. The 100 MW plant is assumed to be located adjacent to the Saguaro Power Station of Arizona Public Service. The design assumes high-efficiency photovoltaic modules using dendritic web cells. The modules are arranged in 5 MW subfields, each with its own power conditioning unit. The photovoltaic output is connected to the existing 115 kV utility switchyard. The site specific design allows detailed cost estimates for engineering, site preparation, and installation. Collector and power conditioning costs have been treated parametrically.

  4. Nuclear power-accomplishments and prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear energy is probably unique in being an international endeavor. The US was correct in 1973 in embracing nuclear energy, and is correct even today in continuing to champion and push this technology. Several major events justify this view. They include: the world's growing dependence on oil and America's increasing dependence on the unstable Middle East; steady high growth in electricity demand; culminated in this summer's record peak demands across the country, and while it was a hot summer, most of that increased demand was industrial activity-economic activity-not due to heat and renewed emphasis on the environment. The job of nuclear utilities and manufacturers is to work with continuity towards greater reliability, safety, and economy of our plants as they exist today. Nuclear power offers clear objective advantages if one is able to look beyond the illusions of the immediate situation. Taipower believes that nuclear power should be the major energy resource for Taiwan in the future. The first problem facing Taipower is the long lead time required for project approval. The second problem Taipower faces is the difficulty in obtaining a public consensus. Three main rational and irrational reasons are decisive for this future development of nuclear energy in Germany: energy structure, economics, and public acceptance. The use of nuclear energy is ethically not irresponsible, but it is ethically irresponsible not to use nuclear energy. A lot of modifications on the European plants have taken place to try to minimize the chance of having an accident and, in case it should happen, to limit the consequences. Another problem is waste deposits. As long as there is no answer to this question, the public will continue to debate on this issue.

  5. SP-100, the US Space Nuclear Reactor Power Program. Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: SP-100, the US Space Nuclear Reactor Power Program. Technical information report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SP-100, the US Space Nuclear Reactor ...

  6. Deputy Secretary Poneman Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    "For decades, we have worked in close partnership with Japan on nuclear issues, ranging from preventing the proliferation of nuclear weapons and confronting North Korea, to power ...

  7. Transactions of the fifth symposium on space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these paper include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

  8. Transactions of the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these papers include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, refractory alloys and high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

  9. North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Brunswick Unit 1, Unit 2","1,858","14,808",36.3,"Progress Energy Carolinas Inc" "Harris Unit 1",900,"7,081",17.4,"Progress Energy Carolinas Inc" "McGuire

  10. South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Catawba Unit 1, Unit 2","2,258","18,964",36.5,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "H B Robinson Unit 2",724,"3,594",6.9,"Progress Energy Carolinas Inc"