Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

King, L.D.P.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor December 20, 1951 Arco, ID Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor

3

MODERATOR ELEMENTS FOR UNIFORM POWER NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of obtaining a flatter flux and more uniform power generation across the core of a nuclear reactor. The method comprises using moderator elements having differing moderating strength. The elements have an increasing amount of the better moderating material as a function of radial and/or axial distance from the reactor core center. (AEC)

Balent, R.

1963-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

4

Multiple microprocessor based nuclear reactor power monitor  

SciTech Connect

The reactor power monitor is a portable multiple-microprocessor controlled data acquisition device being built for the International Atomic Energy Association. Its function is to measure and record the hourly integrated operating thermal power level of a nuclear reactor for the purpose of detecting unannounced plutonium production. The monitor consists of a /sup 3/He proportional neutron detector, a write-only cassette tape drive and control electronics based on two INTEL 8748 microprocessors. The reactor power monitor operates from house power supplied by the plant operator, but has eight hours of battery backup to cover power interruptions. Both the hourly power levels and any line power interruptions are recorded on tape and in memory. Intermediate dumps from the memory to a data terminal or strip chart recorder can be performed without interrupting data collection.

Lewis, P.S.; Ethridge, C.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decommissioning means permanently removing a nuclear facility from service and reducing radioactive material on the licensed site to levels that would permit termination of the NRC license. On June 27, 1988, the NRC issued general requirements on decommissioning that contained technical and financial criteria and dealt with planning needs, timing, funding mechanisms, and environmental review

unknown authors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

LIMITED POWER BURSTS IN DISTRIBUTED MODELS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a nuclear reactor with feedback," in: Applied Problems in the Theory of Oscillations [in RussianLIMITED POWER BURSTS IN DISTRIBUTED MODELS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS M. V. Bazhenov and E. F. Sabaev UDC of Nuclear Reactors [in Russian], l~nergoatomizdat, Moscow (1990). F. R. Gantmakher and V. A. Yakubovich

Bazhenov, Maxim

7

Technological Transfer from Research Nuclear Reactors to New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this paper is the analysis of the technological transfer role in the nuclear field, with particular emphasis on nuclear reactors domain. The presentation is sustained by historical arguments. In this frame, it is very important to start with the achievements of the first nuclear systems, for instant those with natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as moderator, following in time through the history until the New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors.Starting with 1940, the accelerated development of the industry has implied the increase of the global demand for energy. In this respect, the nuclear energy could play an important role, being essentially an unlimited source of energy. However, the nuclear option faces the challenges of increasingly demanding safety requirements, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. Worldwide, a significant amount of experience has been accumulated during development, licensing, construction, and operation of nuclear power reactors. The experience gained is a strong basis for further improvements. Actually, the nuclear programs of many countries are addressing the development of advanced reactors, which are intended to have better economics, higher reliability, improved safety, and proliferation-resistant characteristics in order to overcome the current concerns about nuclear power. Advanced reactors, now under development, may help to meet the demand for energy power of both developed and developing countries as well as for district heating, desalination and for process heat.The paper gives historical examples that illustrate the steps pursued from first research nuclear reactors to present advanced power reactors. Emphasis was laid upon the fact that the progress is due to the great discoveries of the nuclear scientists using the technological transfer.

Radulescu, Laura ['Horia Hulubei' National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering, PO BOX MG-6, Bucharest 077125 (Romania); Pavelescu, Margarit [Academy of Romanian Scientists, Bucharest (Romania)

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

8

Nuclear safety as applied to space power reactor systems  

SciTech Connect

Current space nuclear power reactor safety issues are discussed with respect to the unique characteristics of these reactors. An approach to achieving adequate safety and a perception of safety is outlined. This approach calls for a carefully conceived safety program which makes uses of lessons learned from previous terrestrial power reactor development programs. This approach includes use of risk analyses, passive safety design features, and analyses/experiments to understand and control off-design conditions. The point is made that some recent accidents concerning terrestrial power reactors do not imply that space power reactors cannot be operated safety.

Cummings, G.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Heat pipe nuclear reactor for space power  

SciTech Connect

A heat-pipe cooled nuclear reactor has been designed to provide 3.2 MW(t) to an out-of-core thermionic conversion system. The reactor is a fast reactor designed to operate at a nominal heat pipe temperature of 1675/sup 0/K. Each reactor fuel element consists of a hexagonal molybdenum block which is bonded along its axis to one end of a molybdenum, lithium vapor, heat pipe. The block is perforated with an array of longitudinal holes which are loaded with UO/sub 2/ pellets. The heat pipe transfers heat directly to a string of six thermionic converters which are bonded along the other end of the heat pipe. An assembly of 90 such fuel elements forms a hexagonal core. The core is surrounded by a thermal radiation shield, a thin thermal neutron absorber and a BeO reflector containing boron loaded control drums.

Koenig, D.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Regulatory Process for Decommissioning Nuclear Power Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NRC revised decommissioning rule 10 CFR 50.82 in 1996 to make significant changes in the regulatory process for nuclear power plant licensees. This report provides a summary of ongoing federal agency and industry activities. It also describes the regulatory requirements applicable, or no longer applicable, to nuclear power plants at the time of permanent shutdown through the early decommissioning stage. The report describes the major components of a typical decommissioning plan, and provides industry...

1998-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

11

Nuclear reactor power for an electrically powered orbital transfer vehicle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To help determine the systems requirements for a 300-kWe space nuclear reactor power system, a mission and spacecraft have been examined which utilize electric propulsion and this nuclear reactor power for multiple transfers of cargo between low Earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). A propulsion system employing ion thrusters and xenon propellant was selected. Propellant and thrusters are replaced after each sortie to GEO. The mass of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), empty and dry, is 11,000 kg; nominal propellant load is 5000 kg. The OTV operates between a circular orbit at 925 km altitude, 28.5 deg inclination, and GEO. Cargo is brought to the OTV by Shuttle and an Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV); the OTV then takes it to GEO. The OTV can also bring cargo back from GEO, for transfer by OMV to the Shuttle. OTV propellant is resupplied and the ion thrusters are replaced by the OMV before each trip to GEO. At the end of mission life, the OTV's electric propulsion is used to place it in a heliocentric orbit so that the reactor will not return to Earth. The nominal cargo capability to GEO is 6000 kg with a transit time of 120 days; 1350 kg can be transferred in 90 days, and 14,300 kg in 240 days. These capabilities can be considerably increased by using separate Shuttle launches to bring up propellant and cargo, or by changing to mercury propellant.

Jaffe, L.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Fujita, T.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

How Brazil spun the atom [nuclear power reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the Resende nuclear complex in Brazil which will house hundreds of uranium centrifuges to produce enriched uranium that will fuel its nuclear power reactors. By consistently fulfilling its obligations as a party to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation ...

E. Guizzo

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Radionuclides in United States commercial nuclear power reactors  

SciTech Connect

In the next ten to twenty years, many of the commercial nuclear power reactors in the United States will be reaching their projected lifetime of forty years. As these power plants are decommissioned, it seems prudent to consider the recycling of structural materials such as stainless steel. Some of these materials and components have become radioactive through either nuclear activation of the elements within the components or surface contamination with radioactivity form the operational activities. In order to understand the problems associated with recycling stainless steel from decommissioned nuclear power reactors, it is necessary to have information on the radionuclides expected on or in the contaminated materials. A study has been conducted of radionuclide contamination information that is available for commercial nuclear power reactors in the United States. There are two types of nuclear power reactors in commercial use in the United States, pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs). Before presenting radionuclide activities information, a brief discussion is given on the major components and operational differences for the PWRs and BWRs. Radionuclide contamination information is presented from 11 PWRs and over 8 BWRs. These data include both the radionuclides within the circulating reactor coolant water as well as radionuclide contamination on and within component parts.

Bechtold, T.E. [ed.] [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dyer, N.C. [Oregon Graduate Inst. of Science and Technology, Beaverton, OR (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Nuclear Archeology for CANDU Power Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this work is the development of so-called 'nuclear archeology' techniques to predict the irradiation history of both fuel-related and non-fuel-related materials irradiated in the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) family of nuclear reactors. In this application to CANDU-type reactors, two different scenarios for the collection of the appropriate data for use in these procedures will be assumed: the first scenario is the removal of the pressure tubes, calandria tubes, or fuel cladding and destructive analysis of the activation products contained in these structural materials; the second scenario is the nondestructive analysis (NDA) of the same hardware items via high-resolution gamma ray scans. There are obvious advantages and disadvantages for each approach; however, the NDA approach is the central focus of this work because of its simplicity and lack of invasiveness. The use of these techniques along with a previously developed inverse capability is expected to allow for the prediction of average flux levels and irradiation time, and the total fluence for samples where the values of selected isotopes can be measured.

Broadhead, Bryan L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Compact nuclear power systems based on particle bed reactors  

SciTech Connect

Compact, low cost nuclear power systems with an extremely low radioactive inventory are described. These systems use the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR), in which HTGR particle fuel is contained in packed beds that are changed daily. The small diameter particle fuel (500 ..mu..m) is directly cooled utilizing the large heat transfer area available (7.8 m/sup 2//liter), thus allowing high bed power densities (MW/liter).

Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.; Takahashi, H.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Digital control of power transients in a nuclear reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated, closed-loop, control system for on-line operations in nuclear power plants has been developed and demonstrated with an LSI-11/23 micro-processor on the 5 MWt fission reactor (MITR-II) that is operated by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This control system has inherent capabilities to perform on-line fault diagnosis, information display, sensor calibration, and measurement estimation. Recently, its scope has been extended to include the direct digital control of power changes ranging from 20-80% of the reactor's licensed limit. This controller differs from most of those discussed in theoretical and simulation studies by recognizing the non-linearity of reactor dynamics, calculating reactivity on-line, and controlling the rate of change of power by restricting both period and reactivity. The controller functions accurately using rods of non-linear worth in the presence of nonlinear feedback effects.

Bernard, J.A.; Lanning, D.D.; Ray, A.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

POWER PLANT USING A STEAM-COOLED NUCLEAR REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

A method of providing efficient and economic means for obtaining reheat from nuclear heat is described. A steamcooled steam-moderated reactor produces high-pressure, high-temperature steam. A multi-stage steam turbine partially expands the high-pressure steam, which is then withdrawn and reheated, and then further expanded for producing useful power. The saturated steam is superheated by leading it through tubular passages provided in the fuel assemblies of a nuclear reactor, leading the useful part of the superheated steam into a steam turbine in which it expands to a predetermined intermediate pressure, leading the steam at that reduced pressure from the turbine back into the reactor where it is reheated by flowing through other tubular passages in the fuel assemblies, and returning the reheated steam to the turbine for further expansion. (M.C.G.)

Nettel, F.; Nakanishi, T.

1963-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

18

Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983--1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts:were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressed from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987--88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power.

Buden, D.

1993-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

19

Light Water Reactor Materials for Commercial Nuclear Power ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Light Water Reactor Materials for Commercial Nuclear ... First- Principles Theory of Magnetism, Crystal Field and Phonon Spectrum of UO2.

20

Japanese set to direct `sun-power' nuclear reactor in France September 16, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Japanese set to direct `sun-power' nuclear reactor in France September 16, 2005 Japan has been develop three generations of nuclear reactors and includes six low-capacity experimental reactors and a 17 asked to nominate the chief of an international project to build a multi- billion-dollar nuclear fusion

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

System aspects of a Space Nuclear Reactor Power System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selected systems aspects of a 300 kW nuclear reactor power system for spacecraft have been studied. The approach included examination of two candidate missions and their associated spacecraft, and a number of special topics dealing with the power system design and operation. The missions considered were a reusable orbital transfer vehicle and a space-based radar. The special topics included: power system configuration and scaling, launch vehicle integration, operating altitude, orbital storage, start-up, thawing, control, load following, procedures in case of malfunction, restart, thermal and nuclear radiation to other portions of the spacecraft, thermal stresses between subsystems, boom and cable designs, vibration modes, altitude control, reliability, and survivability. Among the findings are that the stowed length of the power system is important to mission design and that orbital storage for months to years may be needed for missions involving orbital assembly. The power system design evolved during the study and has continued to evolve; the current design differs somewhat from that examined in this paper.

Jaffe, L.; Fujita, T.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Development of Improved Burnable Poisons for Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Burnable poisons are used in nuclear reactors to produce a more level distribution of power in the reactor core and to reduce to necessity for a large control system. An ideal burnable poison would burn at the same rate as the fuel. In this study, separation of neutron-absorbing isotopes was investigated in order to eliminate isotopes that remain as absorbers at the end of fuel life, thus reducing useful fuel life. The isotopes Gd-157, Dy-164, and Er-167 were found to have desirable properties. These isotopes were separated from naturally occurring elements by means of plasma separation to evaluate feasibility and cost. It was found that pure Gd-157 could save approximately $6 million at the end of four years. However, the cost of separation, using the existing facility, made separation cost- ineffective. Using a magnet with three times the field strength is expected to reduce the cost by a factor of ten, making isotopically separated burnable poisons a favorable method of increasing fuel life in commercial reactors, in particular Generation-IV reactors. The project also investigated various burnable poison configurations, and studied incorporation of metallic burnable poisons into fuel cladding.

M. L. Grossbeck J-P.A. Renier Tim Bigelow

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

Economic analysis of nuclear power reactor dissemination to less developed nations with implications for nuclear proliferation  

SciTech Connect

An economic model is applied to the transfer of nuclear-power reactors from industrialized nations to the less developed nations. The model includes demand and supply factors and predicts the success of US nonproliferation positions and policies. It is concluded that economic forces dominate the transfer of power reactors to less developed nations. Our study shows that attempts to either restrict or promote the spread of nuclear-power technology by ignoring natural economic incentives would have only limited effect. If US policy is too restrictive, less developed nations will seek other suppliers and thereby lower US Influence substantially. Allowing less developed nations to develop nuclear-power technology as dictated by economic forces will result in a modest rate of transfer that should comply with nuclear-proliferation objectives.

Gustavson, R.L.; Howard, J.S. II

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Nuclear safety as applied to space power reactor systems  

SciTech Connect

To develop a strategy for incorporating and demonstrating safety, it is necessary to enumerate the unique aspects of space power reactor systems from a safety standpoint. These features must be differentiated from terrestrial nuclear power plants so that our experience can be applied properly. Some ideas can then be developed on how safe designs can be achieved so that they are safe and perceived to be safe by the public. These ideas include operating only after achieving a stable orbit, developing an inherently safe design, ''designing'' in safety from the start and managing the system development (design) so that it is perceived safe. These and other ideas are explored further in this paper.

Cummings, G.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactors Nuclear reactors created not only large amounts of plutonium needed for the weapons programs, but a variety of other interesting and useful radioisotopes. They produced...

26

AN ADVANCED SODIUM-GRAPHITE REACTOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

An advanced sodium-cooled, graphite-moderated nuclear power plant is described which utilizes high-pressure, high-temperature steam to generate electricity at a high thermal efficiency. Steam is generated at 2400 psig, superheated to 1050 deg F and, after partial expansion in the turbine, reheated to 1000 deg F. Net thermal efficiency of the plant is 42.3%. In a plant sized to produce a net electrical output of 256 Mw, the estimated cost is 8232/kw. Estimated cost of power generation is 6.7 mills/kwh. In a similar plant with a net electrical output of 530 Mw, the estimated power generating cost is 5.4 mills/ kwh. Most of the components of the plant are within the capability of current technology. The major exception is the fuel material, uranium carbide. Preliminary results of the development work now in progress indicate that uranium carbide would be an excellent fuel for high-temperature reactors, but temperature and burnup limitation have yet to be firmly established. Additional development work is also required on the steam generators. These are the single-barrier type similar to those which will be used in the Enrico Fernri Fast Breeder Reactor plant but produce steam at higher pressure and temperature. Questions also remain regarding the use of nitrogen as a cover gas over sodium at 1200 deg F and compatibility of the materials used in the primary neutron shield. All of these questions are currently under investigation. (auth)

Churchill, J.R.; Renard, J.

1960-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

ENGINEERING STUDY ON UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

The advantages, disadvantages, and cost of constructing a auclear power reactor underground are outlinedData on underground construction of hydroelectric plants, other structures, and underground reactor projects in Norway and Sweden are reviewed. A hypothetical underground Experimental Boiling Water Reactor design and sketch are given with cost estimates(T.R.H.)

Beck, C.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent covers a power-producing nuclear reactor in which fuel rods of slightly enriched U are moderated by heavy water and cooled by liquid metal. The fuel rods arranged parallel to one another in a circle are contained in a large outer closed-end conduit that extends into a tank containing the heavy water. Liquid metal is introduced into the large conduit by a small inner conduit that extends within the circle of fuel rods to a point near the lower closed end of the outer conduit. (AEC) Production Reactors

Young, G.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Underground collocation of nuclear power plant reactors and repository to facilitate the post-renaissance expansion of nuclear power  

SciTech Connect

Underground collocation of nuclear power reactors and the nuclear waste management facilities supporting those reactors, termed an underground nuclear park (UNP), appears to have several advantages compared to the conventional approach to siting reactors and waste management facilities. These advantages include the potential to lower reactor capital and operating cost, lower nuclear waste management cost, and increase margins of physical security and safety. Envirorunental impacts related to worker health, facility accidents, waste transportation, and sabotage and terrorism appear to be lower for UNPs compared to the current approach. In-place decommissioning ofUNP reactors appears to have cost, safety, envirorunental and waste disposal advantages. The UNP approach has the potential to lead to greater public acceptance for the deployment of new power reactors. Use of the UNP during the post-nuclear renaissance time frame has the potential to enable a greater expansion of U.S. nuclear power generation than might otherwise result. Technical and economic aspects of the UNP concept need more study to determine the viability of the concept.

Myers, Carl W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elkins, Ned Z [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Guidebook to nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

A general introduction to reactor physics and theory is followed by descriptions of commercial nuclear reactor types. Future directions for nuclear power are also discussed. The technical level of the material is suitable for laymen.

Nero, A.V. Jr.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Power generation from nuclear reactors in aerospace applications  

SciTech Connect

Power generation in nuclear powerplants in space is addressed. In particular, the states of technology of the principal competitive concepts for power generation are assessed. The possible impact of power conditioning on power generation is also discussed. For aircraft nuclear propulsion, the suitability of various technologies is cursorily assessed for flight in the Earth's atmosphere. A program path is suggested to ease the conditions of first use of aircraft nuclear propulsion.

English, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Power generation from nuclear reactors in aerospace applications  

SciTech Connect

Power generation in nuclear powerplants in space is addressed. In particular, the states of technology of the principal competitive concepts for power generation are assessed. The possible impact of power conditioning on power generation is also discussed. For aircraft nuclear propulsion, the suitability of various technologies is cursorily assessed for flight in the Earth's atmosphere. A program path is suggested to ease the conditions of first use of aircraft nuclear propulsion.

English, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Design Concept and Application of Small Nuclear Power Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The outline of the recent design concepts and those features of the small nuclear power rector are described, including specifications, present design status, application and so on.

Minato, Akio [CRIEPI, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Sekimoto, Hiroshi [Center for Research into Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems (CRINES) Tokyo Institute of Technology 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8550 (Japan)

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Power conversion system design for supercritical carbon dioxide cooled indirect cycle nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO?) cycle is a promising advanced power conversion cycle which couples nicely to many Generation IV nuclear reactors. This work investigates the power conversion system design and ...

Gibbs, Jonathan Paul

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

POWER REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast nuclear reactor system ls described for producing power and radioactive isotopes. The reactor core is of the heterogeneous, fluid sealed type comprised of vertically arranged elongated tubular fuel elements having vertical coolant passages. The active portion is surrounded by a neutron reflector and a shield. The system includes pumps and heat exchangers for the primary and secondary coolant circuits. The core, primary coolant pump and primary heat exchanger are disposed within an irapenforate tank which is filled with the primary coolant, in this case a liquid metal such as Na or NaK, to completely submerge these elements. The tank is completely surrounded by a thick walled concrete shield. This reactor system utilizes enriched uranium or plutonium as the fissionable material, uranium or thorium as a diluent and thorium or uranium containing less than 0 7% of the U/sup 235/ isotope as a fertile material.

Zinn, W.H.

1958-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Nuclear Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Technologies Nuclear Reactor Technologies TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant | Photo courtesy of Tennessee Valley Authority TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant | Photo...

37

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling-water nuclear reactor is described wherein control is effected by varying the moderator-to-fuel ratio in the reactor core. This is accomplished by providing control tubes containing a liquid control moderator in the reactor core and providing means for varying the amount of control moderatcr within the control tubes.

Treshow, M.

1961-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Worldwide advanced nuclear power reactors with passive and inherent safety: What, why, how, and who  

SciTech Connect

The political controversy over nuclear power, the accidents at Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl, international competition, concerns about the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect and technical breakthroughs have resulted in a segment of the nuclear industry examining power reactor concepts with PRIME safety characteristics. PRIME is an acronym for Passive safety, Resilience, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended time after initiation of an accident for external help. The basic ideal of PRIME is to develop power reactors in which operator error, internal sabotage, or external assault do not cause a significant release of radioactivity to the environment. Several PRIME reactor concepts are being considered. In each case, an existing, proven power reactor technology is combined with radical innovations in selected plant components and in the safety philosophy. The Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) reactor is a modified pressurized-water reactor, the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is a modified gas-cooled reactor, and the Advanced CANDU Project is a modified heavy-water reactor. In addition to the reactor concepts, there is parallel work on super containments. The objective is the development of a passive box'' that can contain radioactivity in the event of any type of accident. This report briefly examines: why a segment of the nuclear power community is taking this new direction, how it differs from earlier directions, and what technical options are being considered. A more detailed description of which countries and reactor vendors have undertaken activities follows. 41 refs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Reich, W.J.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Worldwide advanced nuclear power reactors with passive and inherent safety: What, why, how, and who  

SciTech Connect

The political controversy over nuclear power, the accidents at Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl, international competition, concerns about the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect and technical breakthroughs have resulted in a segment of the nuclear industry examining power reactor concepts with PRIME safety characteristics. PRIME is an acronym for Passive safety, Resilience, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended time after initiation of an accident for external help. The basic ideal of PRIME is to develop power reactors in which operator error, internal sabotage, or external assault do not cause a significant release of radioactivity to the environment. Several PRIME reactor concepts are being considered. In each case, an existing, proven power reactor technology is combined with radical innovations in selected plant components and in the safety philosophy. The Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) reactor is a modified pressurized-water reactor, the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is a modified gas-cooled reactor, and the Advanced CANDU Project is a modified heavy-water reactor. In addition to the reactor concepts, there is parallel work on super containments. The objective is the development of a passive box'' that can contain radioactivity in the event of any type of accident. This report briefly examines: why a segment of the nuclear power community is taking this new direction, how it differs from earlier directions, and what technical options are being considered. A more detailed description of which countries and reactor vendors have undertaken activities follows. 41 refs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Reich, W.J.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working flud in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast-acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor.

Hampel, Viktor E. (Pleasanton, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

An underground nuclear power station using self-regulating heat-pipe controlled reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor for generating electricity is disposed underground at the bottom of a vertical hole that can be drilled using conventional drilling technology. The primary coolant of the reactor core is the working fluid in a plurality of thermodynamically coupled heat pipes emplaced in the hole between the heat source at the bottom of the hole and heat exchange means near the surface of the earth. Additionally, the primary coolant (consisting of the working fluid in the heat pipes in the reactor core) moderates neutrons and regulates their reactivity, thus keeping the power of the reactor substantially constant. At the end of its useful life, the reactor core may be abandoned in place. Isolation from the atmosphere in case of accident or for abandonment is provided by the operation of explosive closures and mechanical valves emplaced along the hole. This invention combines technology developed and tested for small, highly efficient, space-based nuclear electric power plants with the technology of fast- acting closure mechanisms developed and used for underground testing of nuclear weapons. This invention provides a nuclear power installation which is safe from the worst conceivable reactor accident, namely, the explosion of a nuclear weapon near the ground surface of a nuclear power reactor. 5 figs.

Hampel, V.E.

1988-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

42

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

1962-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

43

The Decline and Death of Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measures founder and a nuclear reactor does fail, theafter that, the first nuclear reactor, Chicago Pile-1, wentword “nuclear” can be. Nuclear reactors in power plants are

Melville, Jonathan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

The role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor in the future of nuclear power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary assessment is made of the potential role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) in the future of nuclear power. The development of a usable actinide burning strategy could be an important factor in the acceptance and implementation of a next generation of nuclear power. First, the need for nuclear generating capacity is established through the analysis of energy and electricity demand forecasting models which cover the spectrum of bias from anti-nuclear to pro-nuclear. The analyses take into account the issues of global warming and the potential for technological advances in energy efficiency. We conclude, as do many others, that there will almost certainly be a need for substantial nuclear power capacity in the 2000--2030 time frame. We point out also that any reprocessing scheme will open up proliferation-related questions which can only be assessed in very specific contexts. The focus of this report is on the fuel cycle impacts of actinide burning. Scenarios are developed for the deployment of future nuclear generating capacity which exploit the advantages of actinide partitioning and actinide burning. Three alternative reactor designs are utilized in these future scenarios: The Light Water Reactor (LWR); the Modular Gas-Cooled Reactor (MGR); and the Integral Fast Reactor (FR). Each of these alternative reactor designs is described in some detail, with specific emphasis on their spent fuel streams and the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Four separation and partitioning processes are utilized in building the future nuclear power scenarios: Thermal reactor spent fuel preprocessing to reduce the ceramic oxide spent fuel to metallic form, the conventional PUREX process, the TRUEX process, and pyrometallurgical reprocessing.

Hollaway, W.R.; Lidsky, L.M.; Miller, M.M.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Zero Power Reactor simulation | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zero Power Reactor simulation Share Description Ever wanted to see a nuclear reactor core in action? Here's a detailed simulation of the Zero Power Reactor experiment, run by...

46

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

Grebe, J.J.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

47

Vital area identification for U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission nuclear power reactor licensees and new reactor applicants.  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission nuclear power plant licensees and new reactor applicants are required to provide protection of their plants against radiological sabotage, including the placement of vital equipment in vital areas. This document describes a systematic process for the identification of the minimum set of areas that must be designated as vital areas in order to ensure that all radiological sabotage scenarios are prevented. Vital area identification involves the use of logic models to systematically identify all of the malicious acts or combinations of malicious acts that could lead to radiological sabotage. The models available in the plant probabilistic risk assessment and other safety analyses provide a great deal of the information and basic model structure needed for the sabotage logic model. Once the sabotage logic model is developed, the events (or malicious acts) in the model are replaced with the areas in which the events can be accomplished. This sabotage area logic model is then analyzed to identify the target sets (combinations of areas the adversary must visit to cause radiological sabotage) and the candidate vital area sets (combinations of areas that must be protected against adversary access to prevent radiological sabotage). Any one of the candidate vital area sets can be selected for protection. Appropriate selection criteria will allow the licensee or new reactor applicant to minimize the impacts of vital area protection measures on plant safety, cost, operations, or other factors of concern.

Whitehead, Donnie Wayne; Varnado, G. Bruce

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

100-MW NUCLEAR POWER PLANT UTILIZING A SODIUM COOLED, GRAPHITE MODERATED REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The conceptual design of a 100 Mw(e) nuclear power plant is described. The plant utilized a sodium-cooled graphite-moderated reactor with stainless- steel clad. slightiy enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel. The reactor is provided with three main coolant circuits, and the steam cycle has three stages of regenerative heating. The plant control system allows automatic operation over the range of 20 to 100% load, or manual operation at all loads. The site, reactor, sodium systems, reactor auxiliaries, fuel handling, instrumentation, turbine-generator, buildings. and safety measures are described. Engineering drawings are included. (W.D.M.)

1958-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

49

Capillary-Pumped Passive Reactor Concept for Space Nuclear Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To develop the passively-cooled space reactor concept using the capillary-induced lithium flow, since molten lithium possesses a very favorable surface tension characteristic. In space where the gravitational field is minimal, the gravity-assisted natural convection cooling is not effective nor an option for reactor heat removal, the capillary induced cooling becomes an attractive means of providing reactor cooling.

Dr. Thomas F. Lin; Dr. Thomas G. Hughes; Christopher G. Miller

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor is described that includes spaced vertical fuel elements centrally disposed in a pressure vessel, a mass of graphite particles in the pressure vessel, means for fluidizing the graphite particles, and coolant tubes in the pressure vessel laterally spaced from the fuel elements. (AEC)

Post, R.G.

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a combination useful in a nuclear reactor and is comprised of a casing, a mass of graphite irapregnated with U compounds in the casing, and at least one coolant tube extending through the casing. The coolant tube is spaced from the mass, and He is irtroduced irto the space between the mass and the coolant tube. (AEC)

Starr, C.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Estimates of power requirements for a manned Mars rover powered by a nuclear reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper assesses the power requirement for a Manned Mars Rover vehicle. Auxiliary power needs are fulfilled using a hybrid solar photovoltaic/regenerative fuel cell system while the primary power needs are met using an SP?100 type reactor. The primary electric power needs

Nicholas J. Morley; Mohamed S. El?Genk; Robert Cataldo; Harvey Bloomfield

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Nuclear Fusion Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Nuclear fusion reactors, if they can be made to work, promise virtually unlimited power for the indefinite future. This is because the fuel, isotopes of hydrogen, are...

54

NEUTRONIC REACTOR POWER PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a nuclear reactor power plant incorporating an air-cooled, beryllium oxide-moderated, pebble bed reactor. According to the invention means are provided for circulating a flow of air through tubes in the reactor to a turbine and for directing a sidestream of the circu1ating air through the pebble bed to remove fission products therefrom as well as assist in cooling the reactor. (AEC)

Metcalf, H.E.

1962-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

55

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

Christy, R.F.

1958-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Power beaming to space using a nuclear reactor-pumped laser  

SciTech Connect

The present political and environmental climate may slow the inevitable direct utilization of nuclear power in space. In the meantime, there is another approach for using nuclear energy for space power. That approach is to let nuclear energy generate a laser beam in a ground-based nuclear reactor-pumped laser (RPL), and then beam the optical energy into space. Potential space applications for a ground-based RPL include (1) illuminating geosynchronous communication satellites in the earth`s shadow to extend their lives, (2) beaming power to orbital transfer vehicles, (3) providing power (from earth) to a lunar base during the long lunar night, and (4) removing space debris. FALCON is a high-power, steady-state, nuclear reactor-pumped laser (RPL) concept that is being developed by the Department of Energy with Sandia National Laboratories as the lead laboratory. The FALCON program has experimentally demonstrated reactor-pumped lasing in various mixtures of xenon, argon, neon, and helium at wavelengths of 0.585, 0.703, 0.725, 1.271, 1.733, 1.792, 2.032, 2.63, 2.65, and 3.37 {mu}m with intrinsic efficiency as high as 2.5%. Frequency-doubling the 1.733{minus}{mu}m line would yield a good match for photovoltaic arrays at 0.867 {mu}m. Preliminary designs of an RPL suitable for power beaming have been completed. The MWclass laser is fairly simple in construction, self-powered, closed-cycle (no exhaust gases), and modular. This paper describes the FALCON program accomplishments and power-beaming applications.

Lipinski, R.J.; Monroe, D.K.; Pickard, P.S.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

OPERATING EXPERIENCE WITH THE SODIUM REACTOR EXPERIMENT AND ITS APPLICATION TO THE HALLAM NUCLEAR POWER FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) was constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of sodium-oooled graphitemoderated reactors for central station power. The operating experience of SRE has provided valuable data for the design of the Hallam Nuclear Power Facillty (HNPF) now under construction. Some of the difficulties found in the SRE, which HNPF will be designed to avoid, are the sodium-sodium intermediate heat exchanger (horizontal position in SRE gave trouble; a vertical position will be used in HNPF), sodium pumps, handling of broken fuel elements, and excessive thermal stresses due to inadequate coolant flow. Other features of HNPF include the addition of an activity monitoring system for the core cover gas, elimination of tetralin for auxiliary cooling of plant equipment, instrumentation of fuel elements, and addition of carbon traps in the primary sodium system. SRE operation has demonstrated unusual reactor stability and capability for rapid power changes. (D.L.C.)

Beeley, R.J.; Mahlmeister, J.E.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy dedicated the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), an advanced research facility that will accelerate the advancement of nuclear reactor technology.

59

Trojan Nuclear Power Plant Reactor Vessel and Internals Removal: Trojan Nuclear Plant Decommissioning Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One goal of the EPRI Decommissioning Technology Program is to capture the growing utility experience in nuclear plant decommissioning activities for the benefit of other utilities facing similar challenges in the future. This report provides historical information on the background, scope, organization, schedule, cost, contracts, and support activities associated with the Trojan Nuclear Plant Reactor Vessel and Internals Removal (RVAIR) Project. Also discussed are problems, successes, and lessons learned...

2000-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

60

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables (Information and data on nuclear power reactors Generation: by State and Reactor. Annual Energy Review, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Estimates of the financial consequences of nuclear-power-reactor accidents  

SciTech Connect

This report develops preliminary techniques for estimating the financial consequences of potential nuclear power reactor accidents. Offsite cost estimates are based on CRAC2 calculations. Costs are assigned to health effects as well as property damage. Onsite costs are estimated for worker health effects, replacement power, and cleanup costs. Several classes of costs are not included, such as indirect costs, socio-economic costs, and health care costs. Present value discounting is explained and then used to calculate the life cycle cost of the risks of potential reactor accidents. Results of the financial consequence estimates for 156 reactor-site combinations are summarized, and detailed estimates are provided in an appendix. The results indicate that, in general, onsite costs dominate the consequences of potential accidents.

Strip, D.R.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Tritium activities in Canada supporting CANDU{sup R} nuclear power reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview of the various Canadian tritium research and operational activities supporting the development, refurbishment and operation of CANDU{sup R} nuclear power reactors is presented. These activities encompass tritium health and safety, tritium in the environment, tritium interaction with materials, and tritium processing, and relate to both supporting R and D advances as well as operational best practices. The collective results of these activities contribute to our goals of improving worker and public safety, and operational efficiency. (authors)

Miller, J. M. [AECL, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

Pennell, William E. (Greensburg, PA); Rowan, William J. (Monroeville, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Evaluation of a Business Case for Safeguards by Design in Nuclear Power Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safeguards by Design (SbD) is a well-known paradigm for consideration and incorporation of safeguards approaches and associated design features early in the nuclear facility development process. This paradigm has been developed as part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), and has been accepted as beneficial in many discussions and papers on NGSI or specific technologies under development within NGSI. The Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security funded the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to examine the business case justification of SbD for nuclear power reactors. Ultimately, the implementation of SbD will rely on the designers of nuclear facilities. Therefore, it is important to assess the incentives which will lead designers to adopt SbD as a standard practice for nuclear facility design. This report details the extent to which designers will have compelling economic incentives to adopt SbD.

Wood, Thomas W.; Seward, Amy M.; Lewis, Valerie A.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Zentner, Michael D.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world of the twenty first century is an energy consuming society. Due to increasing population and living standards, each year the world requires more energy and new efficient systems for delivering it. Furthermore, the new systems must be inherently safe and environmentally benign. These realities of today's world are among the reasons that lead to serious interest in deploying nuclear power as a sustainable energy source. Today's nuclear reactors are safe and highly efficient energy systems that offer electricity and a multitude of co-generation energy products ranging from potable water to heat for industrial applications. The goal of the book is to show the current state-of-the-art in the covered technical areas as well as to demonstrate how general engineering principles and methods can be applied to nuclear power systems.

Tsvetkov, Pavel

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Power Reactor Decommissioning Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past two decades the NRC regulated nuclear industry has encountered and dealt with a diverse range of political, financial and technological challenges while decommissioning its nuclear facilities. During that time, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities has evolved into a mature industry in the United States with a number of large power reactors successfully decommissioned and their NRC licenses terminated. One of the challenges discussed in this report is site release standards, required ...

2011-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

67

Advanced Nuclear Reactors | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Sodium Reactor Subassemblies Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) Coolant Flow At the heart of a nuclear power plant is the reactor. The fuel assembly is placed inside a reactor...

68

FIRST SODIUM REACTOR EXPERIMENT (SRE) TEST OF HALLAM NUCLEAR POWER FACILITY (HNPF) CONTROL MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

An experiment was conducted in the SRE to measure temperatures and neutron flux levels in and near a boron-containing simulated control rod. The data are being used to check analytical methods developed for prediction of control rod heat generation rates and maximum temperatures in this type of control rod in the Hallam Nuclear Power Facility. The maximum observed temperatures with a reactor power level of 20 Mw were 1363 deg F for a boron-- nickel alloy ring having a 0.105-in. radial clearance with the thimble and 1100 deg F for a boron -nickel alloy ring having a 0.020-in. radial clearance. The maximum temperature difference between the coolant and the control rod was 473 deg F. It is concluded that the expected greater heat generation rates in the Hallam reactor would prohibit the use of boron-containing absorber materials in a combined a him-safety rod. (auth)

Arneson, S.O.

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Nuclear power plants: structure and function  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed include: steam electric plants; BWR type reactors; PWR type reactors; thermal efficiency of light water reactors; other types of nuclear power plants; the fission process and nuclear fuel; fission products and reactor afterheat; and reactor safety.

Hendrie, J.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Compact power reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector.

Wetch, Joseph R. (Woodland Hills, CA); Dieckamp, Herman M. (Canoga Park, CA); Wilson, Lewis A. (Canoga Park, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Safety/safeguards interactions during safety-related emergencies at Nuclear Power Reactor Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains an analysis of the safety/safeguards interactions that could occur during safety-related emergencies at licensed nuclear power reactors, and the extent to which these interactions are addressed in existing or proposed NRC guidance. The safety/safeguards interaction during a series of postulated emergencies was systematically examined to identify any potential performance deficiencies or conflicts between the Operations (safety) and Security (safeguards) organizations. This examination included the impacts of coordination with off-site emergency response personnel. Duties, responsibilities, optimal methods, and procedural actions inherent in these interactions were explored.

Moul, D.A.; Pilgrim, M.K.; Schweizer, R.L.; McEwen, J.E. Jr.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heterogeneous, natural uranium fueled, solid moderated, gas cooled reactor is described, in which the fuel elements are in the form of elongated rods and are dlsposed within vertical coolant channels ln the moderator symmetrically arranged as a regular lattice in groups. This reactor employs control rods which operate in vertical channels in the moderator so that each control rod is centered in one of the fuel element groups. The reactor is enclosed in a pressure vessel which ls provided with access holes at the top to facilitate loading and unloadlng of the fuel elements, control rods and control rod driving devices.

Moore, R.V.; Bowen, J.H.; Dent, K.H.

1958-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

74

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

75

Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

76

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

77

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

78

Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

79

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

80

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

82

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

83

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

84

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

85

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

86

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

87

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

88

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

89

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

90

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

91

Nuclear Reactor Accidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Accidents The accidents at the Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl nuclear reactors have triggered particularly intense concern about radiation hazards. The TMI accident,...

92

A STEAM POWER INSTALLATION FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT WITH GAS-COOLED REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

A steam power plant is designed for use with gas-cooled power reactors. In this plant, the turbine is divided into two sections, one high pressure and the other low pressure, the low-pressure turbine being the condensing turbine. The feed water from the condensing turbine is divided into two streams, one of which is brought to a higher pressure than the other. The high-pressure feed water is evaporated and superheated in the heat exchanger and then supplied to the high-pressure turbine, while the low-pressure feed water is evaporated and mixed with the exhaust steam of the highpressure turbine before superhenting and then passing to the low-pressure condensing turbine. Circulation of the reactor coolant is effected by a blower driven by a series turbine with no regulating devices and arranged in the steam plant circuit upstream of the low-pressure turbine; such a turbine works with constant efficiency over its whole load range. (D.L.C.)

1961-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Economic Analysis of a Nuclear Reactor Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating-current, AC, to direct-current, DC, conversion efficiency is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the lower heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A 48-month extended fuel cycle for the B and W mPower{sup TM} small modular nuclear reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The B and W mPower{sup TM} reactor is a small, rail-shippable pressurized water reactor (PWR) with an integral once-through steam generator and an electric power output of 150 MW, which is intended to replace aging fossil power plants of similar output. The core is composed of 69 reduced-height, but otherwise standard, PWR assemblies with the familiar 17 x 17 fuel rod array on a 21.5 cm inter-assembly pitch. The B and W mPower core design and cycle management plan, which were performed using the Studsvik core design code suite, follow the pattern of a typical nuclear reactor fuel cycle design and analysis performed by most nuclear fuel management organizations, such as fuel vendors and utilities. However, B and W is offering a core loading and cycle management plan for four years of continuous power operations without refueling and without the hurdles of chemical shim. (authors)

Erighin, M. A. [Babcock and Wilcox Company, 109 Ramsey Place, Lynchburg, VA 24502 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neuclear reactor is described of the heterogeneous type and employing replaceable tubular fuel elements and heavy water as a coolant and moderator. A pluraltty of fuel tubesa having their axes parallel, extend through a tank type pressure vessel which contatns the liquid moderator. The fuel elements are disposed within the fuel tubes in the reaetive portion of the pressure vessel during normal operation and the fuel tubes have removable plug members at each end to permit charging and discharging of the fuel elements. The fuel elements are cylindrical strands of jacketed fissionable material having helical exterior ribs. A bundle of fuel elements are held within each fuel tube with their longitudinal axes parallel, the ribs serving to space them apart along their lengths. Coolant liquid is circulated through the fuel tubes between the spaced fuel elements. Suitable control rod and monitoring means are provided for controlling the reactor.

Treshow, M.

1958-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

96

NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An active portion assembly for a fast neutron reactor is described wherein physical distortions resulting in adverse changes in the volume-to-mass ratio are minimized. A radially expandable locking device is disposed within a cylindrical tube within each fuel subassembly within the active portion assembly, and clamping devices expandable toward the center of the active portion assembly are disposed around the periphery thereof. (AEC)

Koch, L.J.; Rice, R.E. Jr.; Denst, A.A.; Rogers, A.J.; Novick, M.

1961-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

A high-speed data acquisition system to measure low-level current from self-powered flux detectors in CANDU nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high-speed data acquisition system to measure low-level current from self-powered flux detectors in CANDU nuclear reactors

Lawrence, C B

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis Overview Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments MAX NSTF SNAKE Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 We perform experiments simulating reactor core melt phenomena in which molten core debris ("corium") erodes the concrete floor of a containment building. This occurred during the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident though the extent of concrete damage is yet unknown. This video shows the top view of a churning molten pool of uranium oxide at 2000°C (3600°F) seen during an experiment at Argonne. Corium behaves much like lava.

99

Studies on Nuclear Reactors, Power Developed by Decay of Fissin Fragments  

SciTech Connect

A study is made of the power developed by the decay of fission fragments arising during the operation of a U235 reactor.

Greenfield, M.A.

1947-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The scalability of OTR (out-of-core thermionic reactor) space nuclear power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this document, masses of the STAR-C power system and an optimized out-of-core thermionic reactor (OTR) power system versus power level are investigated. The impacts of key system parameters on system performance are also addressed. The STAR-C is mass competitive below about 15 kWe, but at higher power levels the scalability is relatively poor. An optimized OR is the least massive space nuclear power system below 25 kWe, and scales well to 50 kWe. The system parameters that have a significant impact on the scalability of the STAR-C are core thermal flux, thermionic converter efficiency, and core length to diameter ratio. The emissivity of the core surface is shown to be a relatively unimportant parameter. For an optimized OR power system, the most significant system parameter is the maximum allowable fuel temperature. It is also shown that if advanced radiation-hardened electronics are used in the satellite payload, a very large mass savings is realized. 10 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

Gallup, D.R.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Nuclear Reactors and Technology  

SciTech Connect

This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

1959-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Plant Modernization with Digital Reactor Protection System Safety System Upgrades at US Nuclear Power Stations  

SciTech Connect

As the current fleet of nuclear power plants in the US reaches 25+ years of operation, obsolescence is driving many utilities to implement upgrades to both their safety and non-safety-related Instrumentation and Control (I and C) Systems. Digital technology is the predominant replacement technology for these upgrades. Within the last 15 years, digital control systems have been deployed in non-safety- related control applications at many utilities. In addition, a few utilities have replaced small safety-related systems utilizing digital technology. These systems have shown digital technology to be robust, reliable and simpler to maintain. Based upon this success, acceptance of digital technology has gained momentum with both utilities and regulatory agencies. Today, in an effort to extend the operating lives of their nuclear stations and resolve obsolescence of critical components, utilities are now pursuing digital technology for replacement of their primary safety systems. AREVA is leading this effort in the United States with the first significant digital upgrade of a major safety system. AREVA has previously completed upgrades to safety-related control systems emergency diesel engine controls and governor control systems for a hydro station which serves as the emergency power source for a nuclear station. Currently, AREVA is implementing the replacement of both the Reactor Protection System (RPS) and the Engineered Safety Features Actuation System (ESFAS) on all three units at a US PWR site. (authors)

Heckle, Wm. Lloyd; Bolian, Tricia W. [AREVA NP, an AREVA and Siemens Company, 1345 Ridgeland Parkway, Suite 130 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Boiling water reactors, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWRs) (NUREG-1123, Revision 1) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examiner Standards (NUREG-1021) and the Examiner`s Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Written Examinations (NUREG/BR-0122), will cover the topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55 (10 CFR 55). The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7,000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at BWRs. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Organization of the Catalog, Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Functions, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. Revision 1 to the BWR Catalog represents a modification in form and content of the original catalog. The K/As were linked to their applicable 10 CFR 55 item numbers. SRO level K/As were identified by 10 CFR 55.43 item numbers. The plant-wide generic and system generic K/As were combined in one section with approximately one hundred new K/As. Component Cooling Water and Instrument Air Systems were added to the Systems Section. Finally, High Containment Hydrogen Concentration and Plant Fire On Site evolutions added to the Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions section.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Search of Axions from a Nuclear Power Reactor with a High-Purity Germanium Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search of axions produced in nuclear transitions was performed at the Kuo-Sheng Nuclear Power Station with a high-purity germanium detector of mass 1.06 kg at a distance of 28 m from the 2.9 GW reactor core. The expected experimental signatures were mono-energetic lines produced by their Primakoff or Compton conversions at the detector. Based on 459.0/96.3 days of Reactor ON/OFF data, no evidence of axion emissions were observed and constraints on the couplings $\\gagg$ and $\\gaee$ versus axion mass $m_a$ within the framework of invisible axion models were placed. The KSVZ and DFSZ models can be excluded for 10^4 eV < m_a < 10^6 ~eV. Model-independent constraints on \\gagg \\gv1 < 7.7 X 10^{-9} GeV^{-2} for m_{a} < 10^5 eV and \\gaee \\gv1 < 1.3 X 10^{-10} for m_{a} < 10^6 eV at 90% confidence level were derived. This experimental approach provides a unique probe for axion mass at the keV--MeV range not accessible to the other techniques.

H. M. Chang; TEXONO Collaboration

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

FOREIGN RESEARCH AND POWER REACTOR PRELIMINARY LIST  

SciTech Connect

Foreign research and power reactors are tabulated. Nuclear power buildup goals are given for each nation on which information is available. (J.H.D.)

Ullmann, J.W.

1959-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

107

Monitoring the Thermal Power of Nuclear Reactors with a Prototype Cubic Meter Antineutrino Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we estimate how quickly and how precisely a reactor's operational status and thermal power can be monitored over hour to month time scales, using the antineutrino rate as measured by a cubic meter scale detector. Our results are obtained from a detector we have deployed and operated at 25 meter standoff from a reactor core. This prototype can detect a prompt reactor shutdown within five hours, and monitor relative thermal power to three percent within seven days. Monitoring of short-term power changes in this way may be useful in the context of International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Reactor Safeguards Regime, or other cooperative monitoring regimes.

A. Bernstein; N. S. Bowden; A. Misner; T. Palmer

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

108

Monitoring the Thermal Power of Nuclear Reactors with a Prototype Cubic Meter Antineutrino Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we estimate how quickly and how precisely a reactor's operational status and thermal power can be monitored over hour to month time scales, using the antineutrino rate as measured by a cubic meter scale detector. Our results are obtained from a detector we have deployed and operated at 25 meter standoff from a reactor core. This prototype can detect a prompt reactor shutdown within five hours, and monitor relative thermal power to three percent within seven days. Monitoring of short-term power changes in this way may be useful in the context of International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Reactor Safeguards Regime, or other cooperative monitoring regimes.

Bernstein, A; Misner, A; Palmer, T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Advanced Nuclear Reactors | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Nuclear Advanced Nuclear Reactors Advanced Nuclear Reactors Turbulent Flow of Coolant in an Advanced Nuclear Reactor Visualizing Coolant Flow in Sodium Reactor Subassemblies Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) Coolant Flow At the heart of a nuclear power plant is the reactor. The fuel assembly is placed inside a reactor vessel where all the nuclear reactions occur to produce the heat and steam used for power generation. Nonetheless, an entire power plant consists of many other support components and key structures like coolant pipes; pumps and tanks including their surrounding steel framing; and concrete containment and support structures. The Reactors Product Line within NEAMS is concerned with modeling the reactor vessel as well as those components of a complete power plant that

110

Technical evaluation report on the monitoring of electric power to the reactor-protection system for the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the technical evaluation of the monitoring of electric power to the reactor protection system (RPS) at the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station. The evaluation is to determine if the proposed design modification will protect the RPS from abnormal voltage and frequency conditions which could be supplied from the power supplies and will meet certain requirements set forth by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The proposed design modifications will protect the RPS from sustained abnormal voltage and frequency conditions from the supplying sources.

Selan, J.C.

1982-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

111

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station: Comparison of two decommissioning cost estimates developed for the same commercial nuclear reactor power station  

SciTech Connect

This study presents the results of a comparison of a previous decommissioning cost study by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and a recent decommissioning cost study of TLG Engineering, Inc., for the same commercial nuclear power reactor station. The purpose of this comparative analysis on the same plant is to determine the reasons why subsequent estimates for similar plants by others were significantly higher in cost and external occupational radiation exposure (ORE) than the PNL study. The primary purpose of the original study by PNL (NUREG/CR-0672) was to provide information on the available technology, the safety considerations, and the probable costs and ORE for the decommissioning of a large boiling water reactor (BWR) power station at the end of its operating life. This information was intended for use as background data and bases in the modification of existing regulations and in the development of new regulations pertaining to decommissioning activities. It was also intended for use by utilities in planning for the decommissioning of their nuclear power stations. The TLG study, initiated in 1987 and completed in 1989, was for the same plant, Washington Public Supply System's Unit 2 (WNP-2), that PNL used as its reference plant in its 1980 decommissioning study. Areas of agreement and disagreement are identified, and reasons for the areas of disagreement are discussed. 31 refs., 3 figs., 22 tabs.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Nuclear reactor safety device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A safety device is disclosed for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of an upward thermal excursion. Such safety device comprises a laminated helical ribbon configured as a tube-like helical coil having contiguous helical turns with slidably abutting edges. The helical coil is disclosed as a portion of a drive member connected axially to the control rod. The laminated ribbon is formed of outer and inner laminae. The material of the outer lamina has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material of the inner lamina. In the event of an upward thermal excursion, the laminated helical coil curls inwardly to a smaller diameter. Such inward curling causes the total length of the helical coil to increase by a substantial increment, so that the control rod is axially repositioned by a corresponding amount to reduce the power output of the reactor.

Hutter, Ernest (Wilmette, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Independent Safety Assessment of the TOPAZ-II space nuclear reactor power system (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

The Independent Safety Assessment described in this study report was performed to assess the safety of the design and launch plans anticipated by the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) in 1993 for a Russian-built, U.S.-modified, TOPAZ-II space nuclear reactor power system. Its conclusions, and the bases for them, were intended to provide guidance for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) management in the event that the DOD requested authorization under section 91b. of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, for possession and use (including ground testing and launch) of a nuclear-fueled, modified TOPAZ-II. The scientists and engineers who were engaged to perform this assessment are nationally-known nuclear safety experts in various disciplines. They met with participants in the TOPAZ-II program during the spring and summer of 1993 and produced a report based on their analysis of the proposed TOPAZ-II mission. Their conclusions were confined to the potential impact on public safety and did not include budgetary, reliability, or risk-benefit analyses.

NONE

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Lunar Nuclear Power Plant With Solid Core Reactor, Heatpipes and Thermoelectric Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a lunar nuclear power plant with the advantages of minimum mass, with no moving parts, no pumped liquid coolant, a solid metal rugged core, with no single point of failure. The electrical output is 100 kilowatts with a 500 kilowatt thermal reactor. The thermoelectric converters surround the potassium heatpipes from the core and water heatpipes surround the converter and connect to the radiator. The solid core reactor is made from HT9 alloy. The fuel is uranium oxide with 90% enrichment. The thermoelectric converter is bonded to the outside of the 1.10 inch ID heat pipe and is 30 inches long. The thermoelectric couple is Si/SiGe-Si/SiC Quantum Well with over 20% efficiency with an 890 K hot side and a 490 K cold side and produces 625 Watts. 176 converters produce 110 kWe. With less than 10% loss in controls this yields 100 kWe for use. The cylindrical thermoelectric converter is designed and fabricated by HIPing to keep brittle materials in compression and to ensure conductivity. The solid core is fabricated by machining the heatpipe tubes with 6 grooves that are diffusion bonded together by HIPing to form the fuel tubes. The maximum temperature of the heat pipes is 940 K and the return flow temperature is 890 K. The reactor core is hexagonal shaped, 61 cm. wide and 76.2 cm high with 12 rotating control drums surrounding it. There is shielding to protect components and human habitation. The radiator is daisy shaped at 45 degrees with each petal 5.5 meters long. The design life is ten years.

Sayre, Edwin D. [Engineering Consultant, 218 Brooke Acres Drive, Los Gatos, CA 95032 (United States); Ring, Peter J. [Advanced Methods and Materials, 1190 Mountain View-Alviso Rd. Suite P, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (United States); Brown, Neil [Engineering Consultant, 5134 Cordoy Lane, San Jose, CA 95124 (United States); Elsner, Norbert B.; Bass, John C. [Hi-Z Technology, Inc., 7606 Miramar Rd. Suite 7400, San Diego, CA 92126 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

115

Analysis and numerical optimization of gas turbine space power systems with nuclear fission reactor heat sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new three objective optimization technique is developed and applied to find the operating conditions for fission reactor heated Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) space power systems at which maximum efficiency, minimum radiator area, and minimum total ...

Albert J. Juhasz / Jerzy Sawicki

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Impact of the use of low or medium enriched uranium on the masses of space nuclear reactor power systems  

SciTech Connect

The design process for determining the mass increase for the substitution of low-enriched uranium (LEU) for high-enriched uranium (HEU) in space nuclear reactor systems is an optimization process which must simultaneously consider several variables. This process becomes more complex whenever the reactor core operates on an in-core thermionic power conversion, in which the fissioning of the nuclear fuel is used to directly heat thermionic emitters, with the subsequent elimination of external power conversion equipment. The increased complexity of the optimization process for this type of system is reflected in the work reported herein, where considerably more information has been developed for the moderated in-core thermionic reactors.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Light Water Reactors Technology Development - Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactors Light Water Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

118

Long Term Storage with Surveillance of Canadian Prototype Nuclear Power Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) was originally formed by the government of Canada in 1952 to perform research in radiation and nuclear areas. In the mid 1950's Canada decided to limit itself to peaceful uses of nuclear energy and AECL embarked on several research and development programs, one of them being the development of nuclear power plants. This led to the development of the CANDU{sup TM} design of heavy water power reactors, of which there are now 29 operating around the world. This presentation discusses the present state of the first two CANDU{sup TM} prototype reactors and a prototype boiling light water reactor and lessons learnt after being in a long-term storage with surveillance state for more than 20 years. AECL facilities undergo decommissioning by either a prompt or a deferred removal approach. Both approaches are initiated after an operating facility has been declared redundant and gone through final operational shutdown. For the deferred approach, initial decommissioning activities are performed to put the facility into a sustainable, safe, shutdown state to minimize the hazards and costs of the ensuing extended storage with surveillance (SWS) or Safestor phase. At the appropriate time, the facility is dismantled and removed, or put into a suitable condition for re-use. AECL has a number of facilities that were built during its history, and some of these are now redundant or will become redundant in the near future. The deferred removal approach is part of AECL's decommissioning strategy for several reasons: 1. Reduction in radiation doses to workers during the final dismantling, 2. No facilities are available yet in Canada for the management of quantity of wastes arising from decommissioning, 3. Financial constraints presented by the number of facilities that will undergo decommissioning, compared to the availability of funds to carry out the work. This has led to the development of a comprehensive decommissioning plan that includes all of AECL's redundant and presently operating facilities. Several significant issues have arisen over the decades these reactors have been in the SWS phase. With the long time frames encompassed by this approach to decommissioning, the storage and maintenance of facility information for future decommissioning, and the knowledge and training of successive generations of staff to perform facility inspections and maintenance are major issues. Complacency of both staff and management is a potential issue. The problem arises primarily because these facilities have been put into a comparatively low hazard state, are remotely located, and not much changes over time and changes are slow. During the period that these facilities have been in this state, regulatory scrutiny and expectations have increased. This along with continuing changes in regulatory staff requires a continuous education and communication activity with the regulator. Because of the long time frames involved, the building structures continue to deteriorate slowly, and repairs and maintenance are required upon occasion. The costs can be significant, for example, to replace a roof. When these occasions arise, the balance of cost and benefit is always questioned, i.e., 'Wouldn't it be better to spend the money on dismantling rather than fixing?'. One positive note is that ancillary buildings that either have very low radiation hazards or were decontaminated during the initial decommissioning activities have been used for several alternate uses. This has helped to defray costs, and also keeps an interest in maintaining the building structures and systems in good condition during the SWS phase. Over the past few years, the lessons learnt from these and other facilities in SWS, have been addressed in a holistic manner by moving from a short-term, project-oriented approach to a comprehensive, long term stewardship approach. Key to this approach was the development of an integrated plan to decommission all of AECL's facilities. One of the prime results of the implementation of this plan was the development of an organiza

Janzen, Rick [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Thermal Design of an Ultrahigh Temperature Vapor Core Reactor Combined Cycle Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

Current work modeling high temperature compact heat exchangers may demonstrate the design feasibility of a Vapor Core Reactor (VCR) driven combined cycle power plant. For solid nuclear fuel designs, the cycle efficiency is typically limited by a metallurgical temperature limit which is dictated by fuel and structural melting points. In a vapor core, the gas/vapor phase nuclear fuel is uniformly mixed with the topping cycle working fluid. Heat is generated homogeneously throughout the working fluid thus extending the metallurgical temperature limit. Because of the high temperature, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation is employed for topping cycle power extraction. MHD rejected heat is transported via compact heat exchanger to a conventional Brayton gas turbine bottoming cycle. High bottoming cycle mass flow rates are required to remove the waste heat because of low heat capacities for the bottoming cycle gas. High mass flow is also necessary to balance the high Uranium Tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}) mass flow rate in the topping cycle. Heat exchanger design is critical due to the high temperatures and corrosive influence of fluoride compounds and fission products existing in VCR/MHD exhaust. Working fluid compositions for the topping cycle include variations of Uranium Tetrafluoride, Helium and various electrical conductivity seeds for the MHD. Bottoming cycle working fluid compositions include variations of Helium and Xenon. Some thought has been given to include liquid metal vapor in the bottoming cycle for a Cheng or evaporative cooled design enhancement. The NASA Glenn Lewis Research Center code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA) is utilized for evaluating chemical species existing in the gas stream. Work being conducted demonstrates the compact heat exchanger design, utilization of the CEA code, and assessment of different topping and bottoming working fluid compositions. (authors)

Bays, Samuel E.; Anghaie, Samim; Smith, Blair; Knight, Travis [Innovative Space Power and Propulsion Institute, University of Florida, 202 Nuclear Science Building, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

122

California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

123

Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

124

Nuclear Reactors and Technology; (USA)  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. (eds.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

COSTS OF NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

The discussion on the costs of nuclear power from stationary plants, designed primarily for the generation of electricity. deals with those plants in operation, being built, or being designed for construction at an early date. An attempt is made to consider the power costs on the basis of consistent definitions and assumptions for the various nuclear plants and for comparable fossil-fuel plants. Information on several new power reactor projects is included. (auth)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Economic analysis of nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

The report presents several methods for estimating the power costs of nuclear reactors. When based on a consistent set of economic assumptions, total power costs may be useful in comparing reactor alternatives. The principal items contributing to the total power costs of a nuclear power plant are: (1) capital costs, (2) fuel cycle costs, (3) operation and maintenance costs, and (4) income taxes and fixed charges. There is a large variation in capital costs and fuel expenses among different reactor types. For example, the standard once-through LWR has relatively low capital costs; however, the fuel costs may be very high if U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ is expensive. In contrast, the FBR has relatively high capital costs but low fuel expenses. Thus, the distribution of expenses varies significantly between these two reactors. In order to compare power costs, expenses and revenues associated with each reactor may be spread over the lifetime of the plant. A single annual cost, often called a levelized cost, may be obtained by the methods described. Levelized power costs may then be used as a basis for economic comparisons. The paper discusses each of the power cost components. An exact expression for total levelized power costs is derived. Approximate techniques of estimating power costs will be presented.

Owen, P.S.; Parker, M.B.; Omberg, R.P.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division (RNSD)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RNSD Home RNSD Home Research Groups Advanced Reactor Systems & Safety Nuclear Data & Criticality Safety Nuclear Security Modeling Radiation Safety Information Computational Center Radiation Transport Reactor Physics Thermal Hydraulics & Irradiation Engineering Used Fuel Systems Staff Details (CV/Bios) Publications Org Chart Contact Us ORNL Staff Only Research Groups Advanced Reactor Systems & Safety Nuclear Data & Criticality Safety Nuclear Security Modeling Radiation Safety Information Computational Center Radiation Transport Reactor Physics Thermal Hydraulics & Irradiation Engineering Used Fuel Systems Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division News Highlights U.S. Rep. Fleischmann touts ORNL as national energy treasure Martin Peng wins Fusion Power Associates Leadership Award

128

Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2010, Prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, May 2012  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2010 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no NRC-licensed low-level waste disposal facilities currently in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Annual reports for 2010 were received from a total of 190 NRC licensees. The summation of reports submitted by the 190 licensees indicated that 192,424 individuals were monitored, 81,961 of whom received a measurable dose. When adjusted for transient workers who worked at more than one licensee during the year, there were actually 142,471 monitored individuals and 62,782 who received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 10,617 person-rem, which represents a 12% decrease from the 2009 value. This decrease was primarily due to the decrease in collective dose at commercial nuclear power reactors, as well as a decrease in the collective dose for most of the other categories of NRC licensees. The number of individuals receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in an average measurable dose of 0.13 rem for 2010. The average measurable dose is defined as the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) divided by the number of individuals receiving a measurable dose. In calendar year 2010, the average annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor (LWR) licensees was 83 person-rem. This represents a 14% decrease from the value reported for 2009 (96 person-rem). The decrease in collective dose for commercial nuclear power reactors was due to an 11% decrease in total outage hours in 2010. During outages, activities involving increased radiation exposure such as refueling and maintenance are performed while the reactor is not in operation. The average annual collective dose per reactor for boiling water reactors (BWRs) was 137 personrem for 35 BWRs, and 55 person-rem for 69 pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Analyses of transient individual data indicate that 29,333 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient individuals by multiple licensees. The adjustment to account for transient individuals has been specifically noted in footnotes in the figures and tables for commercial nuclear power reactors. In 2010, the average measurable dose per individual for all licensees calculated from reported data was 0.13 rem. Although the average measurable dose per individual from data submitted by licensees was 0.13 rem, a corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose per individual of 0.17 rem.

D. E. Lewis D. A. Hagemeyer Y. U. McCormick

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

129

NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear power plant for use in an airless environment or other environment in which cooling is difficult is described. The power plant includes a boiling mercury reactor, a mercury--vapor turbine in direct cycle therewith, and a radiator for condensing mercury vapor. (AEC)

Carter, J.C.; Armstrong, R.H.; Janicke, M.J.

1963-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

130

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

131

Nuclear reactor overflow line  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The overflow line for the reactor vessel of a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor includes means for establishing and maintaining a continuous bleed flow of coolant amounting to 5 to 10% of the total coolant flow through the overflow line to prevent thermal shock to the overflow line when the reactor is restarted following a trip. Preferably a tube is disposed concentrically just inside the overflow line extending from a point just inside the reactor vessel to an overflow tank and a suction line is provided opening into the body of liquid metal in the reactor vessel and into the annulus between the overflow line and the inner tube.

Severson, Wayne J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Small Modular Nuclear Reactors | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Technologies » Small Modular Reactor Technologies » Small Modular Nuclear Reactors Small Modular Nuclear Reactors Cutaway of 2-Unit Generation mPower SMR Installation. | © 2012 Generation mPower LLC. All Rights Reserved. Reprinted with permission. Cutaway of 2-Unit Generation mPower SMR Installation. | © 2012 Generation mPower LLC. All Rights Reserved. Reprinted with permission. The development of clean, affordable nuclear power options is a key element of the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. As a part of this strategy, a high priority of the Department has been to help accelerate the timelines for the commercialization and deployment of small modular reactor (SMR) technologies through the SMR Licensing Technical Support program. Begun

133

22.312 Engineering of Nuclear Reactors, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering principles of nuclear reactors, emphasizing power reactors. Power plant thermodynamics, reactor heat generation and removal (single-phase as well as two-phase coolant flow and heat transfer), and structural ...

Buongiorno, Jacopo, 1971-

134

22.312 Engineering of Nuclear Reactors, Fall 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering principles of nuclear reactors, emphasizing power reactors. Power plant thermodynamics, reactor heat generation and removal (single-phase as well as two-phase coolant flow and heat transfer), and structural ...

Todreas, Neil E.

135

Nuclear reactor apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lifting, rotating and sealing apparatus for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor core. This apparatus permits rotation of the plugs to provide under the plug refueling of a nuclear core. It also provides a means by which positive top core holddown can be utilized. Both of these operations are accomplished by means of the apparatus lifting the top core holddown structure off the nuclear core while stationary, and maintaining this structure in its elevated position during plug rotation. During both of these operations, the interface between the rotating member and its supporting member is sealingly maintained.

Wade, Elman E. (Ruffs Dale, PA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

NUCLEAR REACTORS AND EARTHQUAKES  

SciTech Connect

A book is presented which supplies pertinent seismological information to engineers in the nuclear reactor field. Data are presented on the occurrence, intensity, and wave shapes. Techniques are described for evaluating the response of structures to such events. Certain reactor types and their modes of operation are described briefly. Various protection systems are considered. Earthquake experience in industrial and reactor plants is described. (D.L.C.)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Induced Radioactivity and Waste Classification of Reactor Zone Components of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 After Final Shutdown  

SciTech Connect

The dismantlement of the reactor core materials and surrounding structural components is a major technical concern for those planning closure and decontamination and decommissioning of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Specific issues include when and how dismantlement should be accomplished and what the radwaste classification of the dismantled system would be at the time it is disassembled. Whereas radiation levels and residual radiological characteristics of the majority of the plant systems are directly measured using standard radiation survey and radiochemical analysis techniques, actual measurements of reactor zone materials are not practical due to high radiation levels and inaccessibility. For these reasons, neutron transport analysis was used to estimate induced radioactivity and radiation levels in the Chernobyl NPP Unit 1 reactor core materials and structures.Analysis results suggest that the optimum period of safe storage is 90 to 100 yr for the Unit 1 reactor. For all of the reactor components except the fuel channel pipes (or pressure tubes), this will provide sufficient decay time to allow unlimited worker access during dismantlement, minimize the need for expensive remote dismantlement, and allow for the dismantled reactor components to be classified as low- or medium-level radioactive waste. The fuel channel pipes will remain classified as high-activity waste requiring remote dismantlement for hundreds of years due to the high concentration of induced {sup 63}Ni in the Zircaloy pipes.

Bylkin, Boris K. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Davydova, Galina B. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Zverkov, Yuri A. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Krayushkin, Alexander V. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Neretin, Yuri A. [Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (Ukraine); Nosovsky, Anatoly V. [Slavutych Division of the International Chernobyl Center (Ukraine); Seyda, Valery A. [Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (Ukraine); Short, Steven M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (United States)

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Nuclear Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Technologies Reactor Technologies Nuclear Reactor Technologies TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant | Photo courtesy of Tennessee Valley Authority TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant | Photo courtesy of Tennessee Valley Authority Nuclear power has reliably and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Small Modular Reactor Technologies Small modular reactors can also be made in factories and transported to sites where they would be ready to "plug and play" upon arrival, reducing both capital costs and construction times. The smaller size also makes these reactors ideal for small electric grids and for locations that

139

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

140

New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (nw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

142

Report on emergency electrical power supply systems for nuclear fuel cycle and reactor facilities security systems  

SciTech Connect

The report includes information that will be useful to those responsible for the planning, design and implementation of emergency electric power systems for physical security and special nuclear materials accountability systems. Basic considerations for establishing the system requirements for emergency electric power for security and accountability operations are presented. Methods of supplying emergency power that are available at present and methods predicted to be available in the future are discussed. The characteristics of capacity, cost, safety, reliability and environmental and physical facility considerations of emergency electric power techniques are presented. The report includes basic considerations for the development of a system concept and the preparation of a detailed system design.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center - REPORT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007... Nuclear Power Background, Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear ... Science: Application to Fusion and Generation IV Fission Reactors

144

ARMY GAS-COOLED REACTOR SYSTEMS PROGRAM. INITIAL FULL POWER AND LIMITED ENDURANCE TESTS OF THE ML-1 NUCLEAR POWER PLANT. Final Test Report  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation of the data generated during the full power and limited endurance tests of the ML-1 mobile nuclear power plant indicates that the reactor performs in accordance with the design specifications. During the 101 hr test period, the reactor attained a maximum power of 3.44 Mw( and 247 kw(e) was measured at the output shaft of the turbine-compressor set. No operating limits were exceeded during these tests and all systems performed satisfactorily Except for the known performance deficiency of the turbinecompressor set, which prevented the attainment of design output power, no operational, stability, or control problems were encountered. All test objectives were achieved and the tests were considered completely successful. (auth)

Kattchee, N.

1963-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Power Burst Facility (PBF) Reactor Reactor Decommissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Decommissioning Click here to view Click here to view Reactor Decommissioning Click on an image to enlarge A crane removes the reactor vessel from the Power Burst Facility...

146

Domestic U.S. Reactor Conversions: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Reactor Conversions: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

147

Reactors for nuclear electric propulsion  

SciTech Connect

Propulsion is the key to space exploitation and power is the key to propulsion. This paper examines the role of nuclear fission reactors as the primary power source for high specific impulse electric propulsion systems for space missions of the 1980s and 1990s. Particular mission applications include transfer to and a reusable orbital transfer vehicle from low-Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit, outer planet exploration and reconnaissance missions, and as a versatile space tug supporting lunar resource development. Nuclear electric propulsion is examined as an indispensable component in space activities of the next two decades.

Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Source-term reevaluation for US commercial nuclear power reactors: a status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Only results that had been discussed publicly, had been published in the open literature, or were available in preliminary reports as of September 30, 1984, are included here. More than 20 organizations are participating in source-term programs, which have been undertaken to examine severe accident phenomena in light-water power reactors (including the chemical and physical behavior of fission products under accident conditions), update and reevaluate source terms, and resolve differences between predictions and observations of radiation releases and related phenomena. Results from these source-term activities have been documented in over 100 publications to date.

Herzenberg, C.L.; Ball, J.R.; Ramaswami, D.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Nuclear reactor reflector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

Hopkins, Ronald J. (Pensacola, FL); Land, John T. (Pensacola, FL); Misvel, Michael C. (Pensacola, FL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Nuclear reactor reflector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled. 12 figs.

Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.; Misvel, M.C.

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

151

Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1992; Twenty-fifth annual report, Volume 14  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC`s Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1992. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10CFR20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10CFR20.408. The 1992 annual reports submitted by about 364 licensees indicated that approximately 204,365 individuals were monitored, 183,927 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.16 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of about 0.30 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 74,566 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 364 covered licensees during 1992. Some 71,846 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 9,724 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.50 rem (cSv).

Raddatz, C.T. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Division of Regulatory Applications; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Nuclear reactor control column  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Plum Borough, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Braidwood Generation Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,330","19,200",20.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Byron Generating Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,300","19,856",20.6,"Exelon Nuclear" "Clinton Power Station Unit 1","1,065","8,612",9.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Dresden Generating Station Unit 2, Unit 3","1,734","14,593",15.2,"Exelon Nuclear" "LaSalle Generating Station

154

Reactor & Nuclear Systems Publications | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications and Reports NSED Monthly Reports Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications 2013 Publications 2012 Publications 2011 Publications 2010 and Older Publications Nuclear...

155

Executive Director for Operations USE OF INSURANCE AS A METHOD TO PROVIDE FINANCIAL ASSURANCE FOR DECOMMISSIONING NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this memorandum is to inform the Commission of the staff’s proposed Standard Review Plan (SRP) criteria for evaluating the insurance method of providing financial assurance for decommissioning nuclear power reactors and provide the status of the staff’s ongoing reviews of two insurance proposals. In a memorandum dated May 20, 2004, from then Executive Director for Operations, Dr. William Travers, the Commission was informed of the staff’s receipt of two first-of-a-kind proposals submitted by Marsh USA (Marsh) and Nuclear Electric Insurance Limited (NEIL) to use insurance to provide financial assurance for decommissioning nuclear power reactors pursuant to 10 CFR 50.75(e)(1)(iii). In that memorandum, the staff stated that it would develop SRP criteria to evaluate the use of insurance, commence reviews of the two proposals, and inform the Commission of its progress by October 2004. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations at 10 CFR 50.75(e) specify that insurance is an acceptable method for a licensee to demonstrate reasonable assurance that sufficient funds will be available for the plant decommissioning process. Specifically, 10 CFR 50.75(e)(1)(iii) requires that certain terms and conditions must be present in the decommissioning insurance policy. These conditions include: automatic renewal, 90-days advance notice by the insurer of intent not to renew the policy, and payment of the full face amount into a trust if the licensee fails to provide an acceptable replacement after receiving notice of the insurer’s intent to cancel the policy. CONTACT: Ronald B. Uleck, NRR/DRIP 301-415-3741 The Commissioners-2-However, 10 CFR 50.75 contains only limited requirements for use of the insurance method. Similarly, existing guidance provided by NUREG-1577, Rev. 1, “Standard Review Plan on

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Nuclear Reactors and Technology; (USA)  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. (eds.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element particularly adapted for use in nuclear reactors of high power density is offered. It has fissionable fuel pellet segments mounted in a tubular housing and defining a central passage in the fuel element. A burnable poison element extends through the central passage, which is designed to contain more poison material at the median portion than at the end portions thereby providing a more uniform hurnup and longer reactivity life.

Bassett, C.H.

1961-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

158

SMALL POWER REACTOR PROJECTS OF THE UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION  

SciTech Connect

Information on small power reactor projects of the USAEC is summarized. General information concerning the projects as a whole is given. Specific projects discussed include: the Elk River Power Reactor, the Piqua Nuclear Power Facility, the BONUS Power Reactor, the Pathfinder Power Reactor, the small-size pressurized water power reactor, and the experimental low-power process heat reactor. (M.C.G.)

1961-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

159

Worldwide assessment of steam-generator problems in pressurized-water-reactor nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective is to assess the reliability of steam generators of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants in the United States and abroad. The assessment is based on operation experience of both domestic and foreign PWR plants. The approach taken is to collect and review papers and reports available from the literature as well as information obtained by contacting research institutes both here and abroad. This report presents the results of the assessment. It contains a general background of PWR plant operations, plant types, and materials used in PWR plants. A review of the worldwide distribution of PWR plants is also given. The report describes in detail the degradation problems discovered in PWR steam generators: their causes, their impacts on the performance of steam generators, and the actions to mitigate and avoid them. One chapter is devoted to operating experience of PWR steam generators in foreign countries. Another discusses the improvements in future steam generator design.

Woo, H.H.; Lu, S.C.

1981-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

THERMAL NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear reactors of the graphite moderated air cooled type in which canned slugs or rods of fissile material are employed are discussed. Such a reactor may be provided with a means for detecting dust particles in the exhausted air. The means employed are lengths of dust absorbent cord suspended in vertical holes in the shielding structure above each vertical coolant flow channel to hang in the path of the cooling air issuing from the channels, and associated spindles and drive motors for hauling the cords past detectors, such as Geiger counters, for inspecting the cords periodically. This design also enables detecting the individual channel in which a fault condition may have occurred.

Fenning, F.W.; Jackson, R.F.

1957-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Nuclear power and nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect

The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described.

Vaughen, V.C.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Heat dissipating nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment adapted to retain and cool core debris in the unlikely event of a core meltdown and subsequent breach in the reactor vessel. The reactor vessel is seated in a cavity which has a thick metal sidewall that is integral with a thick metal basemat at the bottom of the cavity. The basemat extends beyond the perimeter of the cavity sidewall. Underneath the basemat is a porous bed with water pipes and steam pipes running into it. Water is introduced into the bed and converted into steam which is vented to the atmosphere. A plurality of metal pilings in the form of H-beams extends from the metal base plate downwardly and outwardly into the earth.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Lazarus, Jonathan D. (Sunnyvale, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Heat dissipating nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment adapted to retain and cool core debris in the unlikely event of a core meltdown and subsequent breach in the reactor vessel. The reactor vessel is seated in a cavity which has a thick metal sidewall that is integral with a thick metal basemat at the bottom of the cavity. The basemat extends beyond the perimeter of the cavity sidewall. Underneath the basemat is a porous bed with water pipes and steam pipes running into it. Water is introduced into the bed and converted into steam which is vented to the atmosphere. A plurality of metal pilings in the form of H-beams extend from the metal base plate downwardly and outwardly into the earth.

Hunsbedt, A.; Lazarus, J.D.

1985-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

164

Advanced Reactor Development and Technology - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Overview Advanced Fast Reactor...

165

Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors, establishes reactor safety requirements to assure that reactors are sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that adequately protects health and safety and is in accordance with uniform standards, guides, and codes which are consistent with those applied to comparable licensed reactors. This document identifies nuclear safety criteria applied to NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) licensed reactors. The titles of the chapters and sections of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.70, Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Rev. 3, are used as the format for compiling the NRC criteria applied to the various areas of nuclear safety addressed in a safety analysis report for a nuclear reactor. In each section the criteria are compiled in four groups: (1) Code of Federal Regulations, (2) US NRC Regulatory Guides, SRP Branch Technical Positions and Appendices, (3) Codes and Standards, and (4) Supplemental Information. The degree of application of these criteria to a DOE-owned reactor, consistent with their application to comparable licensed reactors, must be determined by the DOE and DOE contractor.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOTE TO EDITORS: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has received two reports from its independent Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. The attached reports, in the form of letters, comment on a proposed amendment to the NRC's rule on license renewal for nuclear power plants and a proposed revision to the decommissioning rule for nuclear power reactors. Attachments:

T. S. Kress

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

ASSESSMENT OF THE RADIONUCLIDE COMPOSITION OF "HOT PARTICLES" SAMPLED IN THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT FOURTH REACTOR UNIT  

SciTech Connect

Fuel-containing materials sampled from within the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) 4th Reactor Unit Confinement Shelter were spectroscopically studied for gamma and alpha content. Isotopic ratios for cesium, europium, plutonium, americium, and curium were identified and the fuel burnup in these samples was determined. A systematic deviation in the burnup values based on the cesium isotopes, in comparison with other radionuclides, was observed. The conducted studies were the first ever performed to demonstrate the presence of significant quantities of {sup 242}Cm and {sup 243}Cm. It was determined that there was a systematic underestimation of activities of transuranic radionuclides in fuel samples from inside of the ChNPP Confinement Shelter, starting from {sup 241}Am (and going higher), in comparison with the theoretical calculations.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.; Marra, J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

THE ECONOMICS OF NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

Economic aspects of nuclear power development in the U. S. are tabulated and graphed. Included are figures on presently operating reactors as well as those contemplated or scheduled. Also a brief description of the objectives of short- and long-range programs is given as well as tables listing some of the characteristics of each reactor. (J.R.D.)

Lane, J.A.

1959-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

169

Optimum Discharge Burnup for Nuclear Fuel: A Comprehensive Study of Duke Power's Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic analysis of two pressurized water reactors (PWRs) shows that increasing the discharge burnup of light water reactor (LWR) fuel above current values can result in significant cost benefits. Optimum discharge burnup levels, however, may not be achievable without exceeding the current limit on enrichment.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount, and we posit that the exploration, development, and implementation of intrinsic mechanisms such as discussed here are part of a balanced approach aimed at preventing the misuse of nuclear material for nuclear-energy applications.

Gray, L W; Moody, K J; Bradley, K S; Lorenzana, H E

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

171

Nuclear reactor building  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor building for enclosing a nuclear reactor includes a containment vessel having a wetwell disposed therein. The wetwell includes inner and outer walls, a floor, and a roof defining a wetwell pool and a suppression chamber disposed there above. The wetwell and containment vessel define a drywell surrounding the reactor. A plurality of vents are disposed in the wetwell pool in flow communication with the drywell for channeling into the wetwell pool steam released in the drywell from the reactor during a LOCA for example, for condensing the steam. A shell is disposed inside the wetwell and extends into the wetwell pool to define a dry gap devoid of wetwell water and disposed in flow communication with the suppression chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the wetwell roof is in the form of a slab disposed on spaced apart support beams which define there between an auxiliary chamber. The dry gap, and additionally the auxiliary chamber, provide increased volume to the suppression chamber for improving pressure margin. 4 figures.

Gou, P.F.; Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

172

Nuclear reactor building  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor building for enclosing a nuclear reactor includes a containment vessel having a wetwell disposed therein. The wetwell includes inner and outer walls, a floor, and a roof defining a wetwell pool and a suppression chamber disposed thereabove. The wetwell and containment vessel define a drywell surrounding the reactor. A plurality of vents are disposed in the wetwell pool in flow communication with the drywell for channeling into the wetwell pool steam released in the drywell from the reactor during a LOCA for example, for condensing the steam. A shell is disposed inside the wetwell and extends into the wetwell pool to define a dry gap devoid of wetwell water and disposed in flow communication with the suppression chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the wetwell roof is in the form of a slab disposed on spaced apart support beams which define therebetween an auxiliary chamber. The dry gap, and additionally the auxiliary chamber, provide increased volume to the suppression chamber for improving pressure margin.

Gou, Perng-Fei (Saratoga, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (Campbell, CA); Barbanti, Giancarlo (Sirtori, IT)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these quantities for commercial power plants and their impact on the calculated interaction rates in electron anti-neutrino detectors is examined. We discuss reactor-to-reactor correlations between the leading uncertainties and their relevance to reactor anti-neutrino experiments.

Z. Djurcic; J. A. Detwiler; A. Piepke; V. R. Foster Jr.; L. Miller; G. Gratta

2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

174

Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these quantities for commercial power plants and their impact on the calculated interaction rates in electron anti-neutrino detectors is examined. We discuss reactor-to-reactor correlations between the leading uncertainties and their relevance to reactor anti-neutrino experiments.

Djurcic, Z; Piepke, A; Foster, V R; Miller, L; Gratta, G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Nuclear reactor safety device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A safety device is described for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of a thermal excursion. It comprises a laminated strip helically configured to form a tube, said tube being in operative relation to said control rod. The laminated strip is formed of at least two materials having different thermal coefficients of expansion, and is helically configured such that the material forming the outer lamina of the tube has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material forming the inner lamina of said tube. In the event of a thermal excursion the laminated strip will tend to curl inwardly so that said tube will increase in length, whereby as said tube increases in length it exerts a force on said control rod to axially reposition said control rod with respect to said core.

Hutter, E.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear reactors of the homogeneous liquid fuel type are discussed. The reactor is comprised of an elongated closed vessel, vertically oriented, having a critical region at the bottom, a lower chimney structure extending from the critical region vertically upwardly and surrounded by heat exchanger coils, to a baffle region above which is located an upper chimney structure containing a catalyst functioning to recombine radiolyticallydissociated moderator gages. In operation the liquid fuel circulates solely by convection from the critical region upwardly through the lower chimney and then downwardly through the heat exchanger to return to the critical region. The gases formed by radiolytic- dissociation of the moderator are carried upwardly with the circulating liquid fuel and past the baffle into the region of the upper chimney where they are recombined by the catalyst and condensed, thence returning through the heat exchanger to the critical region.

Hammond, R.P.; Busey, H.M.

1959-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

177

Nuclear reactor control apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor core safety rod release apparatus comprises a control rod having a detent notch in the form of an annular peripheral recess at its upper end, a control rod support tube for raising and lowering the control rod under normal conditions, latches pivotally mounted on the control support tube with free ends thereof normally disposed in the recess in the control rod, and cam means for pivoting the latches out of the recess in the control rod when a scram condition occurs. One embodiment of the invention comprises an additional magnetically-operated latch for releasing the control rod under two different conditions, one involving seismic shock.

Sridhar, Bettadapur N. (Cupertino, CA)

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

How clean is coal : coal power plant ash pond regulations compared to nuclear reactor decommissioning standards.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal power is the prominent source of energy in the United States (U.S.) and around the world. The byproducts of coal power contain many of… (more)

[No author

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Microsoft Word - power_reactors_briggs.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Most common - Boiling Water and Pressurized Most common - Boiling Water and Pressurized Water Reactors About 80% of the world's nuclear reactors used for generating electricity are either boiling water reactors or pressurized water reactors. Of these, about 30% are boiling water reactors and 70% are pressurized water reactors. All power reactors currently in use in the United States are of these two types. Both types of reactors have been very successfully used for reliable, on-demand, emissions-free electricity generation for decades. How does a boiling water reactor work? Water flows from the bottom of the fuel to the top of the fuel, and as it moves past the fuel, it carries away the heat produced by the

180

Small Power Cells Based on Low Energy Nuclear Reactor (LENR) - A New Type of "Green" Nuclear Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Other Concepts and Assessments / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

George H. Miley; Xiaoling Yang; Heinrich Hora

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1996: Twenty-ninth annual report. Volume 18  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 1996 annual reports submitted by six of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Since there are no geologic repositories for high level waste currently licensed, only six categories will be considered in this report. Annual reports for 1996 were received from a total of 300 NRC licensees, of which 109 were operators of nuclear power reactors in commercial operation. Compilations of the reports submitted by the 300 licensees indicated that 138,310 individuals were monitored, 75,139 of whom received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 21,755 person-cSv (person-rem){sup 2} which represents a 13% decrease from the 1995 value. The number of workers receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in the average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem) for 1996. The average measurable dose is defined to be the total collective dose (TEDE) divided by the number of workers receiving a measurable dose. These figures have been adjusted to account for transient reactor workers. Analyses of transient worker data indicate that 22,348 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient workers by multiple licensees. In 1996, the average measurable dose calculated from reported was 0.24 cSv (rem). The corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem).

Thomas, M.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Simulated nuclear reactor fuel assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for electrically simulating a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It includes a heater assembly having a top end and a bottom end and a plurality of concentric heater tubes having electrical circuitry connected to a power source, and radially spaced from each other. An outer target tube and an inner target tube is concentric with the heater tubes and with each other, and the outer target tube surrounds and is radially spaced from the heater tubes. The inner target tube is surrounded by and radially spaced from the heater tubes and outer target tube. The top of the assembly is generally open to allow for the electrical power connection to the heater tubes, and the bottom of the assembly includes means for completing the electrical circuitry in the heater tubes to provide electrical resistance heating to simulate the power profile in a nuclear reactor. The embedded conductor elements in each heater tube is split into two halves for a substantial portion of its length and provided with electrical isolation such that each half of the conductor is joined at one end and is not joined at the other end.

Berta, Victor T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Accelerator Laboratory AGN-201M Nuclear Reactor Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory Nuclear Power Institute (NPI) Nuclear Science Center (1MW Triga Reactor) (NSC) Nuclear SecurityAccelerator Laboratory AGN-201M Nuclear Reactor Laboratory Center for Large-scale Scientific Simulations (CLASS) Fuel Cycle and Materials Laboratory (FCML) Institute for National Security, Education

184

COST FUNCTION STUDIES FOR POWER REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

A function to evaluate the cost of electricity produced by a nuclear power reactor was developed. The basic equation, revenue = capital charges + profit + operating expenses, was expanded in terms of various cost parameters to enable analysis of multiregion nuclear reactors with uranium and/or plutonium for fuel. A corresponding IBM 704 computer program, which will compute either the price of electricity or the value of plutonium, is presented in detail. (auth)

Heestand, J.; Wos, L.T.

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

SIGNAL GROUPING FOR CONDITION MONITORING OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SIGNAL GROUPING FOR CONDITION MONITORING OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS Piero Baraldi between those used to monitor the reactor coolant pump of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is considered Monitoring, Empirical Modeling, Power Plants, Safety Critical Nuclear Instrumentation, Autoassociative models

186

Programme A. Nuclear Power Subprogramme A.4 Technology Development for Advanced Reactor Lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the economic merits of centralized versus distributed production units. #12;Page 2 Programme B. Nuclear Fuel natural polymers. New marketable advanced materials (using, for example, the concept of nanomaterials

De Cindio, Fiorella

187

Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recapping the Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power ... The conference hosted utility engineers, reactor vendor engineers, plant architect ...

188

Overview of Reactor and Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Safety Gary Mays Nuclear Data and Criticality Safety Mike Dunn Nuclear Security Modeling Tim Valentine - Office of Environmental Management - Office of Intelligence · National Nuclear Security AdministrationOverview of Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division Cecil Parks RNS Division Director parkscv

189

EMERGENCY SHUTDOWN FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An emergency shutdown or scram apparatus for use in a nuclear reactor that includes a neutron absorber suspended from a temperature responsive substance that is selected to fail at a preselected temperature in excess of the normal reactor operating temperature, whereby the neutron absorber is released and allowed to fall under gravity to a preselected position within the reactor core is presented. (AEC)

Paget, J.A.; Koutz, S.L.; Stone, R.S.; Stewart, H.B.

1963-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

190

Physical protection of power reactors  

SciTech Connect

Sandia Laboratories has applied a systematic approach to designing physical protection systems for nuclear facilities to commercial light-water reactor power plants. A number of candidate physical protection systems were developed and evaluated. Focus is placed on the design of access control subsystems at each of three plant layers: the protected area perimeter, building surfaces, and vital areas. Access control refers to barriers, detectors, and entry control devices and procedures used to keep unauthorized personnel and contraband out of the plant, and to control authorized entry into vital areas within the plant.

Darby, J.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Reactor thermal-hydraulic FY 1986 status report for the multimegawatt Space Nuclear Power Program  

SciTech Connect

PNL's 1986 activities can be divided into three basic areas: code assessment, correlation assessment and experimental activities. The ultimate goal of all these activities is developing computer codes and verifying their use to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis and design of the reactor core and plenum of the various proposed concepts. To perform this task as assessment is made of existing computer codes, models, correlations, and microgravity experimental data.

Krotiuk, W.J.; Antoniak, Z.I.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

THE HGCR-1, A DESIGN STUDY OF A NUCLEAR POWER STATION EMPLOYING A HIGH- TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR WITH GRAPHITE-UO$sub 2$ FUEL ELEMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The preliminary design of a 3095-Mw(thermal), helium-cooled, graphite- moderated reactor employing sign conditions, 1500 deg F reactor outlet gas would be circulated to eight steam generators to produce 1050 deg F, 1450-psi steam which would be converted to electrical power in eight 157-Mw(electrical) turbine- generators. The over-all efficiency of this nuclear power station is 36.5%. The significant activities released from the unclad graphite-UO/sub 2/ fuel appear to be less than 0.2% of those produced and would be equivalent to 0.002 curie/ cm/ sup 3/ in the primary helium circuit. The maintenance problems associated with this contamination level are discussed. A cost analysis indicates that the capital cost of this nuclear station per electrical kilowatt would be around 0, and that the production cost of electrical power would be 7.8 mills/kwhr. (auth)

Cottrell, W.B.; Copenhaver, C.M.; Culver, H.N.; Fontana, M.H.; Kelleghan, V.J.; Samuels, G.

1959-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

193

Executive Summary: Research in Nuclear Power—Workshop on the Needs of the Next Generation of Nuclear Power Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / NSF Workshop on the Research Needs of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Technology / Fission Reactor

A. David Rossin; Kunmo Chung; K. L. Peddicord

194

Nuclear reactor control apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor safety rod release apparatus comprises a ring which carries detents normally positioned in an annular recess in outer side of the rod, the ring being held against the lower end of a drive shaft by magnetic force exerted by a solenoid carried by the drive shaft. When the solenoid is de-energized, the detent-carrying ring drops until the detents contact a cam surface associated with the lower end of the drive shaft, at which point the detents are cammed out of the recess in the safety rod to release the rod from the drive shaft. In preferred embodiments of the invention, an additional latch is provided to release a lower portion of a safety rod under conditions that may interfere with movement of the entire rod.

Sridhar, Bettadapur N. (Cupertino, CA)

1983-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

195

GAS COOLED NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-cooled nuclear reactor consisting of a graphite reacting core and reflector structure supported in a containing vessel is described. A gas sealing means is included for sealing between the walls of the graphite structure and containing vessel to prevent the gas coolant by-passing the reacting core. The reacting core is a multi-sided right prismatic structure having a pair of parallel slots around its periphery. The containing vessel is cylindrical and has a rib on its internal surface which supports two continuous ring shaped flexible web members with their radially innermost ends in sealing engagement within the radially outermost portion of the slots. The core structure is supported on ball bearings. This design permits thermal expansion of the core stracture and vessel while maintainirg a peripheral seal between the tvo elements.

Long, E.; Rodwell, W.

1958-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

196

Nuclear reactor control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

1. In a nuclear reactor incorporating a plurality of columns of tubular fuel elements disposed in horizontal tubes in a mass of graphite wherein water flows through the tubes to cool the fuel elements, the improvement comprising at least one control column disposed in a horizontal tube including fewer fuel elements than in a normal column of fuel elements and tubular control elements disposed at both ends of said control column, and means for varying the horizontal displacement of the control column comprising a winch at the upstream end of the control column and a cable extending through the fuel and control elements and attached to the element at the downstream end of the column.

Cawley, William E. (Phoenix, AZ); Warnick, Robert F. (Pasco, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (kWh). There were 65 nuclear power plants with 104 operating nuclear reactors that generated a total of 790 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh), ...

198

Review of reactor pressure vessel evaluation report for Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station (YAEC No. 1735)  

SciTech Connect

The Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed an Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS)-type evaluation of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel in accordance with the PTS Rule (10 CFR 50. 61) and a US Regulatory Guide 1.154. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the YAEC document and performed an independent probabilistic fracture-mechnics analysis. The review included a comparison of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics codes (VISA-II and OCA-P, respectively). The review identified minor errors and one significant difference in philosophy. Also, the two codes have a few dissimilar peripheral features. Aside from these differences, VISA-II and OCA-P are very similar and with errors corrected and when adjusted for the difference in the treatment of fracture toughness distribution through the wall, yield essentially the same value of the conditional probability of failure. The ORNL independent evaluation indicated RT{sub NDT} values considerably greater than those corresponding to the PTS-Rule screening criteria and a frequency of failure substantially greater than that corresponding to the ``primary acceptance criterion`` in US Regulatory Guide 1.154. Time constraints, however, prevented as rigorous a treatment as the situation deserves. Thus, these results are very preliminary.

Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Review of reactor pressure vessel evaluation report for Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station (YAEC No. 1735)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed an Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS)-type evaluation of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel in accordance with the PTS Rule (10 CFR 50. 61) and a US Regulatory Guide 1.154. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the YAEC document and performed an independent probabilistic fracture-mechnics analysis. The review included a comparison of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics codes (VISA-II and OCA-P, respectively). The review identified minor errors and one significant difference in philosophy. Also, the two codes have a few dissimilar peripheral features. Aside from these differences, VISA-II and OCA-P are very similar and with errors corrected and when adjusted for the difference in the treatment of fracture toughness distribution through the wall, yield essentially the same value of the conditional probability of failure. The ORNL independent evaluation indicated RT{sub NDT} values considerably greater than those corresponding to the PTS-Rule screening criteria and a frequency of failure substantially greater than that corresponding to the primary acceptance criterion'' in US Regulatory Guide 1.154. Time constraints, however, prevented as rigorous a treatment as the situation deserves. Thus, these results are very preliminary.

Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Environmental Assessment for Authorizing the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow Public Access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) Reactor Building, Rincon, Puerto Rico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to consent to a proposal by the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow public access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) reactor building located near Rincon, Puerto Rico for use as a museum. PREPA, the owner of the BONUS facility, has determined that the historical significance of this facility, as one of only two reactors of this design ever constructed in the world, warrants preservation in a museum, and that this museum would provide economic benefits to the local community through increased tourism. Therefore, PREPA is proposing development of the BONUS facility as a museum.

N /A

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fast Reactor Curriculum Workshop - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fast Reactor Curriculum Workshop Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear...

202

Heat pipe reactors for space power applications  

SciTech Connect

A family of heat pipe reactors design concepts has been developed to provide heat to a variety of electrical conversion systems. Three power plants are described that span the power range 1-500 kW(e) and operate in the temperature range 1200 to 1700/sup 0/K. The reactors are fast, compact, heat-pipe cooled, high-temperature nuclear reactors fueled with fully enriched refractory fuels, UC-ZrC or UO/sub 2/. Each fuel element is cooled by an axially located molybdenum heat pipe containing either sodium or lithium vapor.

Koenig, D.R.; Ranken, W.A.; Salmi, E.W.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. Nuclear Power Plants: Construction and Technology Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Korean nuclear power industry has grown rapidly since Kori Unit 1, the first Korean nuclear power plant (NPP), which began operation in April 1978. Following the technology developments of the nuclear power industry in 1980s, the first standard Korean nuclear plants (Ulchin Units 3 and 4) were constructed in the 1990s. At present, 20 NPP units operate in Korea16 pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants and four pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) plants; eight PWR units are under construction. This ...

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

204

Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2008 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories1 of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no low-level waste disposal facilities in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Using risk-based regulations for licensing nuclear power plants : case study of gas-cooled fast reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The strategy adopted for national energy supply is one of the most important policy choice for the US. Although it has been dismissed in the past decades, nuclear power today has key assets when facing concerns on energy ...

Jourdan, Grégoire

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Evaluation of the applicability of existing nuclear power plant regulatory requirements in the U.S. to advanced small modular reactors.  

SciTech Connect

The current wave of small modular reactor (SMR) designs all have the goal of reducing the cost of management and operations. By optimizing the system, the goal is to make these power plants safer, cheaper to operate and maintain, and more secure. In particular, the reduction in plant staffing can result in significant cost savings. The introduction of advanced reactor designs and increased use of advanced automation technologies in existing nuclear power plants will likely change the roles, responsibilities, composition, and size of the crews required to control plant operations. Similarly, certain security staffing requirements for traditional operational nuclear power plants may not be appropriate or necessary for SMRs due to the simpler, safer and more automated design characteristics of SMRs. As a first step in a process to identify where regulatory requirements may be met with reduced staffing and therefore lower cost, this report identifies the regulatory requirements and associated guidance utilized in the licensing of existing reactors. The potential applicability of these regulations to advanced SMR designs is identified taking into account the unique features of these types of reactors.

LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wheeler, Timothy A.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Middleton, Bobby D.; Jordan, Sabina Erteza; Duran, Felicia Angelica; Baum, Gregory A.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Beaver Valley Unit 1, Unit 2","1,777","14,994",19.3,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "Limerick Unit 1, Unit 2","2,264","18,926",24.3,"Exelon Nuclear" "PPL Susquehanna Unit 1, Unit 2","2,450","18,516",23.8,"PPL Susquehanna LLC" "Peach Bottom Unit 2, Unit 3","2,244","18,759",24.1,"Exelon Nuclear" "Three Mile Island Unit 1",805,"6,634",8.5,"Exelon Nuclear"

208

Nuclear Thermal Rockets: The Physics of the Fission Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Thermal Rockets: The Physics of the Fission Reactor Shane D. Ross Control and Dynamical combustion are those powered by nuclear fission. Comparison of Chemical and Nuclear Rockets. Most existent.g., hydrogen and oxygen). In a nuclear rocket, or more precisely, a nuclear thermal rocket, the propellant

Ross, Shane

209

Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fundamental aspects of nuclear reactor fuel elements.Unlike permanent nuclear reactor core components, nuclearof the first nuclear reactors, commercial nuclear fuel still

Terrani, Kurt Amir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Owners of nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Nuclear reactor I  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor, particularly a liquid-metal breeder reactor whose upper internals include provision for channeling the liquid metal flowing from the core-component assemblies to the outlet plenum in vertical paths in direction generally along the direction of the respective assemblies. The metal is channeled by chimneys, each secured to, and extending from, a grid through whose openings the metal emitted by a plurality of core-component assemblies encompassed by the grid flows. To reduce the stresses resulting from structural interaction, or the transmissive of thermal strains due to large temperature differences in the liquid metal emitted from neighboring core-component assemblies, throughout the chimneys and the other components of the upper internals, the grids and the chimneys are supported from the heat plate and the core barrel by support columns (double portal support) which are secured to the head plate at the top and to a member, which supports the grids and is keyed to the core barrel, at the bottom. In addition to being restrained from lateral flow by the chimneys, the liquid metal is also restrained from flowing laterally by a peripheral seal around the top of the core. This seal limits the flow rate of liquid metal, which may be sharply cooled during a scram, to the outlet nozzles. The chimneys and the grids are formed of a highly-refractory, high corrosion-resistant nickel-chromium-iron alloy which can withstand the stresses produced by temperature differences in the liquid metal. The chimneys are supported by pairs of plates, each pair held together by hollow stubs coaxial with, and encircling, the chimneys. The plates and stubs are a welded structure but, in the interest of economy, are composed of stainless steel which is not weld compatible with the refractory metal. The chimneys and stubs are secured together by shells of another nickel-chromium-iron alloy which is weld compatible with, and is welded to, the stubs and has about the same coefficient of expansion as the highly-refractory, high corrosion-resistant alloy.

Ference, Edward W. (Central City, PA); Houtman, John L. (Acme, PA); Waldby, Robert N. (New Stanton, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Nuclear Power and the Environment  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This Nuclear Issue Paper discusses Nuclear Plant Wastes, Interactions of Fossil Fuel and Nuclear Power Waste Decisions, and the Environmental Position of Nuclear Power.

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

213

Corrosion in the Nuclear Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...The U.S. nuclear industry generates approximately 20% of the electricity needs primarily from reactors designed and built over 30 years ago. Safety concerns continue to plague the industry. Severe cracks found at one nuclear power reactor (ca 2001) and the boric acid...

214

Advanced Nuclear Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This report describes technical modifications implemented by INVAP to improve the safety of the Research Reactors the company designs and builds.

Lolich, J.V.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

215

Export possibilities for small nuclear reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worldwide deployment of peaceful nuclear technology is predicated on conformance with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty of 1972. Under this international treaty, countries have traded away pursuit of nuclear weapons in exchange for access to commercial nuclear technology that could help them grow economically. Realistically, however, most nuclear technology has been beyond the capacity of the NPT developing countries to afford. Even if the capital cost of the plant is managed, the costs of the infrastructure and the operational complexity of most nuclear technology have taken it out of the hands of the nations who need it the most. Now, a new class of small sodium cooled reactors has been specifically designed to meet the electrical power, water, hydrogen and heat needs of small and remote users. These reactors feature small size, long refueling interval, no onsite fuel storage, and simplified operations. Sized in the 10 MW(e) to 50 MW(e) range these reactors are modularized for factory production and for rapid site assembly. The fuel would be <20% U-235 uranium fuel with a 30-year core life. This new reactor type more appropriately fills the needs of countries for lower power distributed systems that can fill the gap between large developed infrastructure and primitive distributed energy systems. Looking at UN Resolution 1540 and the impact of other agreements, there is a need to address the issues of nuclear security, fuel, waste, and economic/legal/political-stakeholder concerns. This paper describes the design features of this new reactor type that specifically address these issues in a manner that increases the availability of commercial nuclear technology to the developing nations of the world. (authors)

Campagna, M.S.; Hess, C.; Moor, P. [Burns and Roe Enterprises, Inc., Oradell, NJ (United States); Sawruk, W. [ABSG Consulting, Inc., Shillington, PA (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Innovative fuel designs for high power density pressurized water reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the ways to lower the cost of nuclear energy is to increase the power density of the reactor core. Features of fuel design that enhance the potential for high power density are derived based on characteristics of ...

Feng, Dandong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these quantities for commercial power plants and their impact on the calculated interaction rates in {bar {nu}}{sub e} detectors is examined. We discuss reactor-to-reactor correlations between the leading uncertainties, and their relevance to reactor {bar {nu}}{sub e} experiments.

Djurcic, Zelimir; Detwiler, Jason A.; Piepke, Andreas; Foster Jr., Vince R.; Miller, Lester; Gratta, Giorgio

2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

218

Safety of next generation power reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book is organized under the following headings: Future needs of utilities regulators, government, and other energy users, PRA and reliability, LMR concepts, LWR design, Advanced reactor technology, What the industry can deliver: advanced LWRs, High temperature gas-cooled reactors, LMR whole-core experiments, Advanced LWR concepts, LWR technology, Forum: public perceptions, What the industry can deliver: LMRs and HTGRs, Criteria and licensing, LMR modeling, Light water reactor thermal-hydraulics, LMR technology, Working together to revitalize nuclear power, Appendix A, luncheon address, Appendix B, banquet address.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

An extended conventional fuel cycle for the B and W mPower{sup TM} small modular nuclear reactor  

SciTech Connect

The B and W mPower{sup TM} reactor is a small pressurized water reactor (PWR) with an integral once-through steam generator and a thermal output of about 500 MW; it is intended to replace aging fossil power plants of similar output. The core is composed of 69 reduced-height PWR assemblies with the familiar 17 x 17 fuel rod array. The Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W) is offering a core loading and cycle management plan for a four-year cycle based on its presumed attractiveness to potential customers. This option is a once-through fuel cycle in which the entire core is discharged and replaced after four years. In addition, a conventional fuel utilization strategy, employing a periodic partial reload and shuffle, was developed as an alternative to the four-year once-through fuel cycle. This study, which was performed using the Studsvik core design code suite, is a typical multi-cycle projection analysis of the type performed by most fuel management organizations such as fuel vendors and utilities. In the industry, the results of such projections are used by the financial arms of these organizations to assist in making long-term decisions. In the case of the B and W mPower reactor, this analysis demonstrates flexibility for customers who consider the once-through fuel cycle unacceptable from a fuel utilization standpoint. As expected, when compared to the once-through concept, reloads of the B and W mPower reactor will achieve higher batch average discharge exposure, will have adequate shut-down margin, and will have a relatively flat hot excess reactivity trend at the expense of slightly increased peaking. (authors)

Scarangella, M. J. [Babcock and Wilcox Company, 109 Ramsey Place, Lynchburg, VA 24502 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL SYSTEMS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Homogeneous reactor fuel solutions are reported which provide automatic recombination of radiolytic gases and exhibit large thermal expansion characteristics, thereby providing stability at high temperatures and enabling reactor operation without the necessity of apparatus to recombine gases formed by the radiolytic dissociation of water in the fuel and without the necessity of liquid fuel handling outside the reactor vessel except for recovery processes. The fuels consist of phosphoric acid and water solutions of enriched uranium, wherein the uranium is in either the hexavalent or tetravalent state.

Thamer, B.J.; Bidwell, R.M.; Hammond, R.P.

1959-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Request for Naval Reactors Comment on Proposed Prometheus Space Flight Nuclear Reactor High Tier Reactor Safety Requirements and for Naval Reactors Approval to Transmit These Requirements to JPL  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this letter is to request Naval Reactors comments on the nuclear reactor high tier requirements for the PROMETHEUS space flight reactor design, pre-launch operations, launch, ascent, operation, and disposal, and to request Naval Reactors approval to transmit these requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory to ensure consistency between the reactor safety requirements and the spacecraft safety requirements. The proposed PROMETHEUS nuclear reactor high tier safety requirements are consistent with the long standing safety culture of the Naval Reactors Program and its commitment to protecting the health and safety of the public and the environment. In addition, the philosophy on which these requirements are based is consistent with the Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group recommendations on space nuclear propulsion safety (Reference 1), DOE Nuclear Safety Criteria and Specifications for Space Nuclear Reactors (Reference 2), the Nuclear Space Power Safety and Facility Guidelines Study of the Applied Physics Laboratory.

D. Kokkinos

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

222

Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors Z. Djurcic 1 , ?emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined fromlarge commercial nuclear reactors are playing an important

Djurcic, Zelimir

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Plutonium Discharge Rates and Spent Nuclear Fuel Inventory Estimates for Nuclear Reactors Worldwide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a preliminary survey and analysis of the five primary types of commercial nuclear power reactors currently in use around the world. Plutonium mass discharge rates from the reactors’ spent fuel at reload are estimated based on a simple methodology that is able to use limited reactor burnup and operational characteristics collected from a variety of public domain sources. Selected commercial reactor operating and nuclear core characteristics are also given for each reactor type. In addition to the worldwide commercial reactors survey, a materials test reactor survey was conducted to identify reactors of this type with a significant core power rating. Over 100 material or research reactors with a core power rating >1 MW fall into this category. Fuel characteristics and spent fuel inventories for these material test reactors are also provided herein.

Brian K. Castle; Shauna A. Hoiland; Richard A. Rankin; James W. Sterbentz

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Energy Secretary to Visit Georgia Nuclear Reactor Site and Tennessee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary to Visit Georgia Nuclear Reactor Site and Secretary to Visit Georgia Nuclear Reactor Site and Tennessee Laboratory to Highlight Administration Support for Nuclear Energy Energy Secretary to Visit Georgia Nuclear Reactor Site and Tennessee Laboratory to Highlight Administration Support for Nuclear Energy February 13, 2012 - 6:16pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Secretary of Energy Secretary Steven Chu will visit the Vogtle nuclear power plant in Waynesboro, Georgia, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory on Wednesday, February 15 to highlight steps the Obama Administration is taking to restart America's nuclear energy industry. In Waynesboro, Secretary Chu will join Southern Company CEO Thomas A. Fanning, Georgia Power CEO W. Paul Bowers, and local leaders for a tour of Vogtle units 3 and 4 -- the site of the first two new nuclear power units

225

RADIATION FACILITY FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation facility is designed for irradiating samples in close proximity to the core of a nuclear reactor. The facility comprises essentially a tubular member extending through the biological shield of the reactor and containing a manipulatable rod having the sample carrier at its inner end, the carrier being longitudinally movable from a position in close proximity to the reactor core to a position between the inner and outer faces of the shield. Shield plugs are provided within the tubular member to prevent direct radiation from the core emanating therethrough. In this device, samples may be inserted or removed during normal operation of the reactor without exposing personnel to direct radiation from the reactor core. A storage chamber is also provided within the radiation facility to contain an irradiated sample during the period of time required to reduce the radioactivity enough to permit removal of the sample for external handling. (AEC)

Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

1961-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

226

Nuclear power plant construction activity, 1988  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Power Plant Construction Activity 1988 presents cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in commercial operation and units in the construction pipeline as of December 31, 1988. This report, which is updated annually, was prepared to provide an overview of the nuclear power plant construction industry. The report contains information on the status of nuclear generating units, average construction costs and lead-times, and construction milestones for individual reactors.

1989-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

227

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials for Nuclear Power ... Nuclear Power Background, Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle ...

228

NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel plate is designed for incorporation into control rods of the type utilized in high-flux test reactors. The fuel plate is designed so that the portion nearest the poison section of the control rod contains about one-half as much fissionable material as in the rest of the plate, thereby eliminating dangerous flux peaking in that portion. (AEC)

Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

1963-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

229

Executive Director for Operations UPDATE OF ISSUES RELATED TO NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR FINANCIAL QUALIFICATIONS IN RESPONSE TO RESTRUCTURING OF THE ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To provide the Commission with an update of electric utility deregulation and restructuring issues regarding the financial qualifications of power reactor licensees to operate their facilities safely. BACKGROUND: On October 24, 1997, the staff sent to the Commission SECY-97-253, "Policy Options for Nuclear Power Reactor Financial Qualifications in Response to Restructuring of the Electric Utility Industry. " In that paper, the staff discussed three options for the Commission's consideration regarding possible approaches that the NRC could use in assessing the financial qualifications of power reactor licensees to operate their plants safely. (The impact of deregulation and restructuring on decommissioning funding assurance is being addressed in a separate rulemaking, which was published in the Federal Register on September 10, 1997. A final rule is scheduled to be sent to the Commission by June 30, 1998.) In response to SECY-97-253, the Commission issued a staff requirements memorandum on January 15, 1998, and directed the staff to maintain the existing financial qualifications framework as discussed in Option 2 of SECY-97-253 and to "develop a coherent, efficient plan that would allow timely confirmation of the status of licensees (i.e., whether they meet the definition of 'electric utility')as deregulation actions are finalized by States. " In response, on April 16, 1998, the

L. Joseph Callan /s; Robert S. Wood

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Passive heat transfer means for nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved passive cooling arrangement is disclosed for maintaining adjacent or related components of a nuclear reactor within specified temperature differences. Specifically, heat pipes are operatively interposed between the components, with the vaporizing section of the heat pipe proximate the hot component operable to cool it and the primary condensing section of the heat pipe proximate the other and cooler component operable to heat it. Each heat pipe further has a secondary condensing section that is located outwardly beyond the reactor confinement and in a secondary heat sink, such as air ambient the containment, that is cooler than the other reactor component. Means such as shrouding normally isolated the secondary condensing section from effective heat transfer with the heat sink, but a sensor responds to overheat conditions of the reactor to open the shrouding, which thereby increases the cooling capacity of the heat pipe. By having many such heat pipes, an emergency passive cooling system is defined that is operative without electrical power.

Burelbach, James P. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

This homogeneous reactor comprises a core occupied by a solution of a fissile material in a moderator liquid and a breeder region enclosing the core and having a suspension of fertile material in the same moderator liquid. There is communication between the core and breeder to allow mass transfer and pressure equalization between the regions. The zones each have a separate circuit for removing heat by a mixer chamber situated inside the reactor vessel. The effluents coming from the two regions are mixed and led to a common device for separation into a clear solution and suspension, which are each led back to its corresponding circuit. To control the relative concentration of the two regions, an evaporator is provided separating a part of the moderator liquid from the solution occupying the core, the condensed separated moderator liquid being led into the breeder region. (NPO)

1960-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

232

Resergence of U.S. Nuclear Power  

SciTech Connect

Over the past quarter century, things have not gone well for the nuclear industry. First came the Three Mile Island accident in America in 1979, then the disaster at the Chernobyl plant in Ukraine in 1986. In Japan, Tokyo Electric Power, the world's largest private electricity company, shut its 17 nuclear reactors after it was caught falsifying safety records to hide cracks at some of its plants in 2002. In addition, the attacks on September 11, 2001 were a sharp reminder that the risks of nuclear power generation were not only those inherent in the technology. But lately, prospects have brightened for the nuclear industry. Nuclear power is an important source of electricity in many countries. In 2003, 19 countries depended on nuclear power for at least 20 percent of their electricity generation. As of March 2005, there were 441 nuclear power reactors in operation around the world, and another 25 were under construction. Five new nuclear power plants began operation in 2004 - one each in China, Japan, and Russia and two in Ukraine. In addition, Canada?s Bruce 3 reactor was reconnected to the grid. Five nuclear power plants were permanently shut down in 2004 - one in Lithuania and four in the United Kingdom. Nuclear power is expected to see a revival in the next decade given the availability of uranium and the prospect of emission-free power generation, Also, with conventional energy sources such as oil and gas likely to see severe depletion over the next 30 years, the price of conventional power generation is set to rise significantly, which would put nuclear power generation in focus again. The report provides an overview of the opportunities for nuclear power in the U.S. electric industry and gives a concise look at the challenges faced by nuclear power, the ability of advanced nuclear reactors to address these challenges, and the current state of nuclear power generation. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of U.S. Nuclear Power including its history, the current market environment, and the future of nuclear power in the U.S.; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving renewed interest in nuclear power; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of new nuclear power plants; a description of nuclear power technology including existing reactors, as well as 3rd and 4th generation reactor designs; a review of the economics of new nuclear power projects and comparison to other generation alternatives; a discussion of the key government initiatives supporting nuclear power development; profiles of the key reactor manufacturers participating in the U.S. nuclear power market; and, profiles of the leading U.S. utilities participating in the U.S. nuclear power market.

none

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Current Abstracts Nuclear Reactors and Technology  

SciTech Connect

This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

Bales, J.D.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

METHOD OF OPERATING NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for obtaining enhanced utilization of natural uranium in heavy water moderated nuclear reactors by charging the reactor with an equal number of fuel elements formed of natural uranium and of fuel elements formed of uranium depleted in U/sup 235/ to the extent that the combination will just support a chain reaction. The reactor is operated until the rate of burnup of plutonium equals its rate of production, the fuel elements are processed to recover plutonium, the depleted uranium is discarded, and the remaining uranium is formed into fuel elements. These fuel elements are charged into a reactor along with an equal number of fuel elements formed of uranium depleted in U/sup 235/ to the extent that the combination will just support a chain reaction, and reuse of the uranium is continued as aforesaid until it wlll no longer support a chain reaction when combined with an equal quantity of natural uranium.

Untermyer, S.

1958-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

235

Powering the Nuclear Navy | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powering the Nuclear Navy Powering the Nuclear Navy Home > About Us > Our Programs > Powering the Nuclear Navy Powering the Nuclear Navy The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program provides militarily effective nuclear propulsion plants and ensures their safe, reliable and long-lived operation. This mission requires the combination of fully trained U.S. Navy men and women with ships that excel in endurance, stealth, speed, and independence from supply chains. NNSA's Navy Reactors Program provides the design, development and operational support required to provide militarily effective nuclear propulsion plants and ensure their safe, reliable and long-lived operation. This budget requests more than $1 billion to power a modern nuclear Navy: Continuation of design and development work for the OHIO-class

236

Can Next-Generation Reactors Power a Safe Nuclear Futur By Clay Dillow Posted 03.17.2011 at 12:18 pm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for three new plants, announced that country would undertake a "measured" exit from nuclear power, and even for in the latest nuclear power plant technology. Keeping a nuclear plant safe means keeping it cool in any to the new designs." Truly safe, secure nuclear power requires plants that simply cannot melt down

Danon, Yaron

237

Nuclear power to the Pacific  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear power industry is increasingly being pressured to export reactors to the Third World. The experiences of the five ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) are recounted. To date, only the Philippine Republic has formally committed itself to a nuclear generator. The Republic lacks oil and has only limited hydroelectric potential. Its geothermal energy program is being accelerated. It appears Indonesia will be the next ASEAN country ''to go nuclear'', hoping to have a nuclear plant on-line in 1985. The island of Singapore has been voicing a desire for a nuclear power plant, but the country does not have space for a plant. The possibility of a floating station has been mentioned, but the World Bank does not finance unproved projects. Singapore could obtain an island from Indonesia or share a plant with Malaysia if a plant were built on the mainland of the Malay peninsula. The Thai Energy Generating Authority (EGAT) is preparing ''to go nuclear'' with the emergence of a stable coalition rule in Bangkok; the financial restrictions are discussed. Thailand is diligently searching for its own oil and gas. The article closes by projecting the problem that could arise with IAEA having only 40 inspectors who are charged with monitoring nuclear power plants all over the world. The authors point out that the industrial countries themselves have proved wholly incapable of monitoring their own systems. (MCW)

Wasserman, H.; Wainer, A.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Nuclear Power  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

nuclear.jpg (5137 bytes) nuclear.jpg (5137 bytes) Nuclear electricity generation remains flat in the IEO99 reference case, representing a declining share of the worldÂ’s total electricity consumption. Net reductions in nuclear capacity are projected for most industrialized nations. In 1997, a total of 2,276 billion kilowatthours of electricity was generated from nuclear power worldwide, providing 17 percent of the worldÂ’s electricity generation. Among the countries with operating nuclear power plants, national dependence on nuclear power for electricity varies greatly (Figure 53). Ten countries met at least 40 percent of their total electricity demand with generation from nuclear reactors. The prospects for nuclear power to maintain a significant share of worldwide electricity generation are uncertain, despite projected growth of

239

Statement on Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities before the House Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy & Water Development | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > Statement on Defense Nuclear

240

Statement on Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities before the House Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy & Water Development | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > Statement on Defense Nuclear

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Net energy from nuclear power  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of net energy from nuclear power plants is dependent on a large number of variables and assumptions. The energy requirements as they relate to reactor type, concentration of uranium in the ore, enrichment tails assays, and possible recycle of uranium and plutonium were examined. Specifically, four reactor types were considered: pressurized water reactor, boiling water reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, and heavy water reactor (CANDU). The energy requirements of systems employing both conventional (current) ores with uranium concentration of 0.176 percent and Chattanooga Shales with uranium concentration of 0.006 percent were determined. Data were given for no recycle, uranium recycle only, and uranium plus plutonium recycle. Starting with the energy requirements in the mining process and continuing through fuel reprocessing and waste storage, an evaluation of both electrical energy requirements and thermal energy requirements of each process was made. All of the energy, direct and indirect, required by the processing of uranium in order to produce electrical power was obtained by adding the quantities for the individual processes. The energy inputs required for the operation of a nuclear power system for an assumed life of approximately 30 years are tabulated for nine example cases. The input requirements were based on the production of 197,100,000 MWH(e), i.e., the operation of a 1000 MW(e) plant for 30 years with an average plant factor of 0.75. Both electrical requirements and thermal energy requirements are tabulated, and it should be emphasized that both quantities are needed. It was found that the electricity generated far exceeded the energy input requirements for all the cases considered. (auth)

Rotty, R.M.; Perry, A.M.; Reister, D.B.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

IMPROVEMENTS RELATING TO NUCLEAR REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

In order to reduce the pumping power for the coolant in a steam-cooled reactor, in which the steam being passed through successive sections of the reactor core and being superheated there, the sections are connected in series with one another, while a plurality of de-superheaters is provided such that steam flowing from one section to the next passes through a de-superheater. The condensed steam returning to the reactor from the means utilizing the steam heat content is divided into a number of separate streams. The first stream going to the first section in the reactor core is raised at least to saturated steam outside the reactor, while the remaining streams of condensed steam are conveyed to the de-superheaters to be mixed with steam passing therethrough between successive sections of the reactor, cooling in this manner said steam and being themselves converted into steam. Increasing amounts of condensate are added in successive de-superheaters until the steam returning to the reactor from the final desuperheater is equivalent to the full mass flow of steam circulating to the heat utilizing means. (NPO)

1960-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center Text Topic - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 28, 2007 ... Scientists and engineers concerned with the environmental ... of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems—Water Reactors (Warrendale, PA: TMS, ...

244

ALPR PRELIMINARY DESIGN STUDY (ARGONNE LOW POWER REACTOR). PHASE I  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary design study, Phase I of the ALPR . project, has been made in accordance with the Army Reactors Branch specifications for a nuclear ''package'' power plant with a 200 to 260 kw electric and 400 kw heating capacity..The plant is to be installed at the Idaho Reactor Testing Station as a prototype for remote arctic installations. The ''conventiornl'' power plant as well as the exterior reactor components are described, and cost estimates are given. ''Nuclear'' components of the reactor are described. (auth)

Treshow, M.; Hamer, E.; Pearlman, H.; Rossin, D.; Shaftman, D.

1956-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

245

TerraPower Traveling Wave Reactor: Design and Development Status...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aug 28 2013 09:00 AM - 10:00 AM Pat Schweiger, TerraPower, LLC, Bellevue, Washington Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division Seminar ORNL Conference Center (Bldg. 5200), TN Rm...

246

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters Rob Goldston MIT IAP biomass wind hydro coal CCS coal nat gas CCS nat gas nuclear Gen IV nuclear Gen III nuclear Gen II 5-1 Electricity Generation: CCS and Nuclear Power Technology Options Available Global Electricity Generation WRE

247

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applies, not only to the nuclear reactor, but also to otherdetailed de- sign of nuclear reactor power s tations is vgreat importance in nuclear reactor accidents. 3.2 Increase

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Gravity Scaling of a Power Reactor Water Shield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water based reactor shielding is being considered as an affordable option for potential use on initial lunar surface reactor power systems. Heat dissipation in the shield from nuclear sources must be rejected by an auxillary thermal hydraulic cooling system. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection between the core surface and an array of thermosyphon radiator elements. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design has been previously evaluated at lower power levels (Pearson

Robert S. Reid; J. Boise Pearson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Powering the Nuclear Navy | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

The National Nuclear Security Administration Powering the Nuclear Navy Home > Our Mission > Powering the Nuclear Navy Powering the Nuclear Navy The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program...

250

Propellant actuated nuclear reactor steam depressurization valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fission reactor combined with a propellant actuated depressurization and/or water injection valve is disclosed. The depressurization valve releases pressure from a water cooled, steam producing nuclear reactor when required to insure the safety of the reactor. Depressurization of the reactor pressure vessel enables gravity feeding of supplementary coolant water through the water injection valve to the reactor pressure vessel to prevent damage to the fuel core.

Ehrke, Alan C. (San Jose, CA); Knepp, John B. (San Jose, CA); Skoda, George I. (Santa Clara, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Software: Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis > Analysis > Software Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Overview Current Projects Software Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Software Bookmark and Share An extensive powerful suite of computer codes developed and validated by the NE Division and its predecessor divisions at Argonne supports the development of fast reactors; many of these codes are also applicable to other reactor types. A brief description of these codes follows. Contact

252

Commercial nuclear power 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

Not Available

1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

253

Flow duct for nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved liquid sodium flow ducts for nuclear reactors are described wherein the improvement comprises varying the wall thickness of each of the walls of a polygonal tubular duct structure so that each of the walls is of reduced cross-section along the longitudinal center line and of a greater cross-section along wall junctions with the other walls to form the polygonal tubular configuration.

Straalsund, Jerry L. (Richland, WA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

NUCLEAR REACTOR COMPENENT CLADDING MATERIAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fuel elements and coolant tubes used in nuclear reactors of the heterogeneous, water-cooled type are described, wherein the coolant tubes extend through the moderator and are adapted to contain the fuel elements. The invention comprises forming the coolant tubes and the fuel element cladding material from an alloy of aluminum and nickel, or an alloy of aluminum, nickel, alloys are selected to prevent intergranular corrosion of these components by water at temperatures up to 35O deg C.

Draley, J.E.; Ruther, W.E.

1959-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

255

New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Indian Point Unit 2, Unit 3","2,063","16,321",39.0,"Entergy Nuclear Indian Point" "James A Fitzpatrick Unit 1",855,"6,361",15.2,"Entergy Nuc Fitzpatrick LLC" "Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station Unit 1, Unit 2","1,773","14,239",34.0,"Nine Mile Point Nuclear Sta LLC" "R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1",581,"4,948",11.8,"R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, LLC" "4 Plants

256

Research Reactor Conversion | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

257

Transactions of the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these papers include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, refractory alloys and high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D. (eds.)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Transactions of the fifth symposium on space nuclear power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these paper include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D. (eds.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

EU in push for support on nuclear fusion reactor September 26, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EU in push for support on nuclear fusion reactor September 26, 2004 Page Tool EU ministers have agreed to try to win broad international support for a plan to build a futuristic nuclear reactor to obtain power through nuclear fusion, a clean energy source. But views are split on where the ITER reactor

260

Energy Secretary to Visit Georgia Nuclear Reactor Site and Tennessee...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Reactor Site and Tennessee Laboratory to Highlight Administration Support for Nuclear Energy Energy Secretary to Visit Georgia Nuclear Reactor Site and Tennessee...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Minimizing or eliminating refueling of nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Demand for refueling of a liquid metal fast nuclear reactor having a life of 30 years is eliminated or reduced to intervals of at least 10 years by operating the reactor at a low linear-power density, typically 2.5 kw/ft of fuel rod, rather than 7.5 or 15 kw/ft, which is the prior art practice. So that power of the same magnitude as for prior art reactors is produced, the volume of the core is increased. In addition, the height of the core and it diameter are dimensioned so that the ratio of the height to the diameter approximates 1 to the extent practicable considering the requirement of control and that the pressure drop in the coolant shall not be excessive. The surface area of a cylinder of given volume is a minimum if the ratio of the height to the diameter is 1. By minimizing the surface area, the leakage of neutrons is reduced. By reducing the linear-power density, increasing core volume, reducing fissile enrichment and optimizing core geometry, internal-core breeding of fissionable fuel is substantially enhanced. As a result, core operational life, limited by control worth requirements and fuel burnup capability, is extended up to 30 years of continuous power operation.

Doncals, Richard A. (Washington, PA); Paik, Nam-Chin (Pittsburgh, PA); Andre, Sandra V. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA); Porter, Charles A. (Rostraver Township, Westmoreland County, PA); Rathbun, Roy W. (Greensburg, PA); Schwallie, Ambrose L. (Greensburg, PA); Petras, Diane S. (Penn Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - Otwock, Poland | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - Otwock, Poland | National Nuclear Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - Otwock, Poland | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Video Gallery > Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - ... Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - Otwock, Poland Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - Otwock, Poland

263

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor comprises supports stacked above reactor core for holding control rods. Couplers associated with the supports and a vertically movable drive shaft have lugs at their lower ends for engagement with the supports.

Bollinger, Lawrence R. (Schenectady, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Environmental Assessment for Authorizing the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow Public Access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) Reactor Building, Ricon, Puerto Rico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

394: Public Access to the BONUS Facility January 2003 394: Public Access to the BONUS Facility January 2003 i DOE/EA-1394 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR AUTHORIZING THE PUERTO RICO ELECTRIC POWER AUTHORITY (PREPA) TO ALLOW PUBLIC ACCESS TO THE BOILING NUCLEAR SUPERHEAT (BONUS) REACTOR BUILDING, RINCĂ“N, PUERTO RICO January 2003 U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office Oak Ridge, Tennessee DOE/EA-1394: Public Access to the BONUS Facility January 2003 ii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES V LIST OF TABLES V ACRONYMS VI UNIT ABBREVIATIONS VII SUMMARY VIII 1. INTRODUCTION 10 1.1 Purpose and Need for Action 10 1.2 Operational and Decommissioning History 15 1.3 Summary of Radiological Conditions at the BONUS Facility 19 2. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 25

265

Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project  

SciTech Connect

This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

Benson, B.

1991-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

266

Average effluent releases from U. S. nuclear power reactors, compared with those from fossil-fueled plants, in terms of currently applicable environmental standards  

SciTech Connect

From 3rd international congress of the International Radiation Protection Association meeting; Washington, District of Columbia, USA(9 Sep 1973). Between 1967 and 1972, eighteen second generation'' lightwater-cooled nuclear power plants, with capacities in the range of 500 to 800 MW(e) have been put into operation in the United States. These were in addition to ten smaller demonstration plants and one high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear power plant in operation at the start of this period. The reported yearly air effluent releases of radioactive gases, halogens and particulates, and liquid effluent fission and activation products and of tritium from these plants are evaluated on a Ci/10/sup 3/ MW(e) basis, and the overall yearly averages for the various types of reactors (boiling water (BWR), pressurized water (PWR) and high temperature gas-cooled (HTGR)! are compared. These and the amounts of effluents released from reference 1,000 MW(e) fossil-fueled plants are compared in terms of relative environmental concentrations and their relationship to the applicable U. S. environmental standards for the principal constituents in their respective plant air-effluent streams. 21 references. (auth)

Hull, A.P.

1973-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

267

A unified theory of zero power and power reactor noise via backward master equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A unified theory of zero power and power reactor noise via backward master equations I. Pa´ zsit a, *, Z.F. Kuang a,b , A.K. Prinja c a Department of Reactor Physics, Chalmers University of Technology Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA Received

Pázsit, Imre

268

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor fuel element comprising high density ceramic fissionable material enclosed in a tubular cladding of corrosion-resistant material is described. The fissionable material is in the form of segments of a tube which have cooperating tapered interfaces which produce outward radial displacement when the segments are urged axially together. A resilient means is provided within the tubular housing to constantly urge the fuel segments axially. This design maintains the fuel material in tight contacting engagement against the inner surface of the outer cladding tube to eliminate any gap therebetween which may be caused by differential thermal expansion between the fuel material and the material of the tube.

Bassett, C.H.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Safety and licensing for small and medium power reactors  

SciTech Connect

Proposed new concepts for small and medium power reactors differ substantially from traditional Light Water Reactors (LWRs). Although designers have a large base of experience in safety and licensing, much of it is not relevant to new concepts. It can be a disadvantage if regulators apply LWR rules directly. A fresh start is appropriate. The extensive interactions between industry, regulators, and the public complicates but may enhance safety. It is basic to recognize the features that distinguish nuclear energy safety from that for other industries. These features include: nuclear reactivity, fission product radiation, and radioactive decay heat. Small and medium power reactors offer potential advantages over LWRs, particularly for reactivity and decay heat.

Trauger, D.B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Nuclear power plant construction activity, 1986  

SciTech Connect

Cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in commercial operation and units in the construction pipeline as of December 31, 1986, are presented. This report, which is updated annually, was prepared to provide an overview of the nuclear power plant construction industry. The report contains information on the status of nuclear generating units, average construction costs and lead-times, and construction milestones for individual reactors.

1987-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

271

Operational safety enhancement of Soviet-designed nuclear reactors via development of nuclear power plant simulators and transfer of related technology  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE), under the US government`s International Nuclear Safety Program (INSP), is implementing a program of developing and providing simulators for many of the Russian and Ukrainian Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) manage and provide technical oversight of the various INSP simulator projects for DOE. The program also includes a simulator technology transfer process to simulator design organizations in Russia and Ukraine. Training programs, installation of new simulators, and enhancements in existing simulators are viewed as providing a relatively fast and cost-effective technology transfer that will result in measurable improvement in the safety culture and operation of NPPs. A review of this program, its present status, and its accomplishments are provided in this paper.

Kohut, P.; Epel, L.G.; Tutu, N.K. [and others

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Reactors: Modern-Day Alchemy - Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Legacy > Reactors: Modern-Day Alchemy About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

273

Achievements: Nuclear Reactors designed/built by Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Argonne National Laboratory Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

274

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Diablo Canyon 2 nuclear reactors. Data were taken fromCapacity Operation of nuclear reactors for power generationby the operation of nuclear reactors. Therefore, ap-

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Photo of the Week: The Sixth Zero Power Reactor | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Sixth Zero Power Reactor The Sixth Zero Power Reactor Photo of the Week: The Sixth Zero Power Reactor November 13, 2013 - 4:41pm Addthis In 1958, Argonne National Laboratory began the construction of several zero-power reactors (ZPRs), which are nuclear fission reactors that don't actually generate any power. Scientists developed ZPRs to assess the performance of various reactor core configurations before actually building a full nuclear reactor. A series of ZPRs were built leading up to the construction of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, a sodium-cooled fast reactor power plant. In this 1970 photo, an Argonne scientist is loading the matrices of the ZPR-VI reactor prior to its first operation using plutonium fuel. | Photo courtesy of the Department of Energy. In 1958, Argonne National Laboratory began the construction of several

276

Nuclear reactor characteristics and operational history  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables Release date: November 22, 2011 Next release date: November 2012 See also: Table 2. Ownership Data, Table 3. Characteristics and Operational History Table 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, Generation, and Capacity Factor PDF XLS Plant/Reactor Name Generator ID State Type 2009 Summer Capacity Net MW(e)1 2010 Annual Generation Net MWh2 Capacity Factor Percent3 Arkansas Nuclear One 1 AR PWR 842 6,607,090 90 Arkansas Nuclear One 2 AR PWR 993 8,415,588 97 Beaver Valley 1 PA PWR 892 7,119,413 91 Beaver Valley 2 PA PWR 885 7,874,151 102 Braidwood Generation Station 1 IL PWR 1,178 9,196,689 89

277

Nuclear reactor characteristics and operational history  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables Release date: November 22, 2011 Next release date: November 2012 See also: Table 1. Capacity and Generation, Table 2. Ownership Data Table 3. Nuclear Reactor Characteristics and Operational History PDF XLS Plant Name Generator ID Type Reactor Supplier and Model Construction Start Grid Connection Original Expiration Date License Renewal Application License Renewal Issued Extended Expiration Arkansas Nuclear One 1 PWR Babcock&Wilcox, Lower Loop 10/1/1968 8/17/1974 5/20/2014 2/1/2000 6/20/2001 5/20/2034 Arkansas Nuclear One 2 PWR Combustion Eng. 7/1/1971 12/26/1978 7/17/2018 10/15/2003 6/30/2005 7/17/2038

278

Nuclear Power Technology for the Future  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ensuring sufficient energy for electricity, fresh water and transportation represents a major challenge for this century. Energy demand will increase dramatically as developing countries improve their standards of living. Nuclear power will become an increasingly important source of energy for production of electricity, fresh water and hydrogen as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbon sources of energy are not acceptable in the long term because of global warming and uneven supply. To ensure that nuclear power can meet this challenge, improved technologies are required to address the problems of nuclear waste, management of nuclear materials and safety as many more nuclear plants are built. These technologies are being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as part of the DOE international program of Generation IV reactors. Essential to meeting these challenges is the development of fast-spectrum nuclear reactors for which fuel and fission products are recycled to the reactor to be 'burned'. I will discuss work on fast-spectrum reactor and fuel-cycle design. The technologies discussed will be 'passively safe' reactor design and 'pyroprocessing' for fuel reprocessing.

Sackett, John I. (ANL)

2003-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

279

Adaptive nuclear reactor control for integral quadratic cost functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of optimally controlling the power level changes of a nuclear reactor is considered. The model of an existing power plant is used, which is a ninth-order nonlinear system, having time-varying parameters. A closed form solution of the optimal ...

George T. Bereznai; Naresh K. Sinha

1973-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors  

SciTech Connect

This document is a compilation and source list of nuclear safety criteria that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) applies to licensed reactors; it can be used by DOE and DOE contractors to identify NRC criteria to be evaluated for application to the DOE reactors under their cognizance. The criteria listed are those that are applied to the areas of nuclear safety addressed in the safety analysis report of a licensed reactor. They are derived from federal regulations, USNRC regulatory guides, Standard Review Plan (SRP) branch technical positions and appendices, and industry codes and standards.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Prospects for U.S. Nuclear Power After Fukushima  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The prospects for a revival of U.S. nuclear power were dim even before the tragic events at the Fukushima nuclear plant. Nuclear power has long been controversial because of concerns about nuclear accidents, proliferation risk, and the storage of spent fuel. These concerns are real and important. In the end, however, the key challenge for U.S. nuclear power is the high cost of construction for nuclear reactors. This article reviews the historical record of reactor orders and construction costs in the United States, highlighting some of the insights from the cancellations and cost overruns that have characterized the industry.

Lucas W. Davis; Lucas W. Davis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Electrochemistry of Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project developed a comprehensive mathematical and simulation model for calculating thermal hydraulic, electrochemical, and corrosion parameters, viz. temperature, fluid flow velocity, pH, corrosion potential, hydrogen injection, oxygen contamination, stress corrosion cracking, crack growth rate, and other important quantities in the coolant circuits of water-cooled nuclear power plants, including both Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The model is being used to assess the three major operational problems in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), which include mass transport, activity transport, and the axial offset anomaly, and provide a powerful tool for predicting the accumulation of SCC damage in BWR primary coolant circuits as a function of operating history. Another achievement of the project is the development of a simulation tool to serve both as a training tool for plant operators and as an engineering test-bed to evaluate new equipment and operating strategies (normal operation, cold shut down and others). The development and implementation of the model allows us to estimate the activity transport or "radiation fields" around the primary loop and the vessel, as a function of the operating parameters and the water chemistry.

Dgiby Macdonald; Mirna Urquidi-Macdonald; John Mahaffy, Amit Jain, Han Sang Kim, Vishisht Gupta; Jonathan Pitt

2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

283

Applicability of trends in nuclear safety analysis to space nuclear power systems  

SciTech Connect

A survey is presented of some current trends in nuclear safety analysis that may be relevant to space nuclear power systems. This includes: lessons learned from operating power reactor safety and licensing; approaches to the safety design of advanced and novel reactors and facilities; the roles of risk assessment, extremely unlikely accidents, safety goals/targets; and risk-benefit analysis and communication.

Bari, R.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Medium Power Lead Alloy Reactors: Missions for this Reactor Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiyear project at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology investigated the potential of medium-power lead-alloy-cooled technology to perform two missions: (1) the production of low-cost electricity and (2) the burning of actinides from light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The goal of achieving a high power level to enhance economic performance simultaneously with adoption of passive decay heat removal and modularity capabilities resulted in designs in the range of 600-800 MW(thermal), which we classify as a medium power level compared to the lower [~100 MW(thermal)] and higher [2800 MW(thermal)] power ratings of other lead-alloy-cooled designs. The plant design that was developed shows promise of achieving all the Generation-IV goals for future nuclear energy systems: sustainable energy generation, low overnight capital cost, a very low likelihood and degree of core damage during any conceivable accident, and a proliferation-resistant fuel cycle. The reactor and fuel cycle designs that evolved to achieve these missions and goals resulted from study of the following key trade-offs: waste reduction versus reactor safety, waste reduction versus cost, and cost versus proliferation resistance. Secondary trade-offs that were also considered were monolithic versus modular design, active versus passive safety systems, forced versus natural circulation, alternative power conversion cycles, and lead versus lead-bismuth coolant. These studies led to a selection of a common modular design with forced convection cooling, passive decay heat removal, and a supercritical CO2 power cycle for all our reactor concepts. However, the concepts adopt different core designs to optimize the achievement of the two missions. For the low-cost electricity production mission, a design approach based on fueling with low enriched uranium operating without costly reprocessing in a once-through cycle was pursued to achieve a long operating cycle length by enhancing in-core breeding. For the actinide-burning mission three design variants were produced: (1) a fertile-free actinide burner, i.e., a single-tier strategy, (2) a minor actinide burner with plutonium burned in the LWR fleet, i.e., a two-tier strategy, and (3) an actinide burner with characteristics balanced to also favor economic electricity production.

Neil E. Todreas; Philip E. MacDonald; Pavel Hejzlar; Jacopo Buongiorno; Eric Loewen

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Nuclear Power - Operation, Safety and Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today's nuclear reactors are safe and highly efficient energy systems that offer electricity and a multitude of co-generation energy products ranging from potable water to heat for industrial applications. At the same time, catastrophic earthquake and tsunami events in Japan resulted in the nuclear accident that forced us to rethink our approach to nuclear safety, design requirements and facilitated growing interests in advanced nuclear energy systems, next generation nuclear reactors, which are inherently capable to withstand natural disasters and avoid catastrophic consequences without any environmental impact. This book is one in a series of books on nuclear power published by InTech. Under the single-volume cover, we put together such topics as operation, safety, environment and radiation effects. The book is not offering a comprehensive coverage of the material in each area. Instead, selected themes are highlighted by authors of individual chapters representing contemporary interests worldwide. With all diversity of topics in 16 chapters, the integrated system analysis approach of nuclear power operation, safety and environment is the common thread. The goal of the book is to bring nuclear power to our readers as one of the promising energy sources that has a unique potential to meet energy demands with minimized environmental impact, near-zero carbon footprint, and competitive economics via robust potential applications. The book targets everyone as its potential readership groups - students, researchers and practitioners - who are interested to learn about nuclear power.

Tsvetkov, Pavel

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The future of nuclear power  

SciTech Connect

Present conditions and future prospects for the nuclear power industry in the United States are discussed. The presentation includes a review of trends in electrical production, the safety of coal as compared to nuclear generating plants, the dangers of radiation, the economics of nuclear power, the high cost of nuclear power in the United States, and the public fear of nuclear power. 20 refs. (DWL)

Zeile, H.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Fuel availability in nuclear power.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Nuclear power is in focus of attention due to several factors these days and the expression “nuclear renaissance” is getting well known. However, concerned… (more)

Söderlund, Karl

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Determining Yankee Nuclear Power Station neutron activation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yankee nuclear power station located in Rowe, Massachusetts, permanently ceased power operations on February 26, 1992, after 31 yr of operation. Yankee has since initiated decommissioning planning activities. A significant component of these activities is a determination of the extent of radiological contamination of the Yankee site. Included in this effort was determination of the extent of neutron activation of plant components. This paper describes the determination of the neutron activation of the Yankee reactor vessel, associated internals, and surrounding structures. The Yankee reactor vessel is a 600-MW(thermal) stainless steel-lined, carbon steel vessel with stainless steel internal components designed by Westinghouse. The reactor vessel is surrounded and supported by a carbon steel neutron shield tank that was filled with chromated water during plant operation. A 5-ft-thick concrete biological shield wall surrounds the neutron shield tank. A project is under way to remove the reactor vessel internals from the reactor vessel.

Heider, K.J.; Morrissey, K.J. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Table 3. Nuclear Reactor Characteristics and Operational ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Point Beach Nuclear Plant Quad Cities Generating Station R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant PSEG Salem Generating Station Harris South Texas Project PPL ...

290

Nuclear reactor characteristics and operational history  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Capacity and Generation, Table 3. Characteristics and Operational History 1. Capacity and Generation, Table 3. Characteristics and Operational History Table 2. U.S. Nuclear Reactor Ownership Data PDF XLS Plant/Reactor Name Generator ID Utility Name - Operator Owner Name % Owned Arkansas Nuclear One 1 Entergy Arkansas Inc Entergy Arkansas Inc 100 Arkansas Nuclear One 2 Entergy Arkansas Inc Entergy Arkansas Inc 100 Beaver Valley 1 FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company FirstEnergy Nuclear Generation Corp 100 Beaver Valley 2 FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company FirstEnergy Nuclear Generation Corp 100 Braidwood Generation Station 1 Exelon Nuclear Exelon Nuclear 100 Braidwood Generation Station 2 Exelon Nuclear Exelon Nuclear 100 Browns Ferry 1 Tennessee Valley Authority Tennessee Valley Authority 100

291

NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT ASSEMBLY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of fabricating nuclear reactor fuel element assemblies having a plurality of longitudinally extending flat fuel elements in spaced parallel relation to each other to form channels is presented. One side of a flat side plate is held contiguous to the ends of the elements and a welding means is passed along the other side of the platertransverse to the direction of the longitudinal extension of the elements. The setting and speed of travel of the welding means is set to cause penetration of the side plate with welds at bridge the gap in each channel between adjacent fuel elements with a weld-through bubble of predetermined size. The fabrication of a high strength, dependable fuel element is provided, and the reduction of distortion and high production costs are facilitated by this method. (AEC)

Stengel, F.G.

1963-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

292

Nuclear reactor composite fuel assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A core and composite fuel assembly for a liquid-cooled breeder nuclear reactor including a plurality of elongated coextending driver and breeder fuel elements arranged to form a generally polygonal bundle within a thin-walled duct. The breeder elements are larger in cross section than the driver elements, and each breeder element is laterally bounded by a number of the driver elements. Each driver element further includes structure for spacing the driver elements from adjacent fuel elements and, where adjacent, the thin-walled duct. A core made up of the fuel elements can advantageously include fissile fuel of only one enrichment, while varying the effective enrichment of any given assembly or core region, merely by varying the relative number and size of the driver and breeder elements.

Burgess, Donn M. (Richland, WA); Marr, Duane R. (West Richland, WA); Cappiello, Michael W. (Richland, WA); Omberg, Ronald P. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Nuclear reactor control apparatus. [FBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor safety rod release apparatus comprises a ring which carries detents normally positioned in an annular recess in outer side of the rod, the ring being held against the lower end of a drive shaft by magnetic force exerted by a solenoid carried by the drive shaft. When the solenoid is de-energized, the detent-carrying ring drops until the detents contact a cam surface associated with the lower end of the drive shaft, at which point the detents are cammed out of the recess in the safety rod to release the rod from the drive shaft. In preferred embodiments of the invention, an additional latch is provided to release a lower portion of a safety rod under conditions that may interfere with movement of the entire rod.

Sridhar, B.N.

1981-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

294

Reactivity Control Schemes for Fast Spectrum Space Nuclear Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several different reactivity control schemes are considered for future space nuclear reactor power systems. Each of these control schemes uses a combination of boron carbide absorbers and/or beryllium oxide reflectors to achieve sufficient reactivity swing to keep the reactor subcritical during launch and to provide sufficient excess reactivity to operate the reactor over its expected 7–15 year lifetime. The size and shape of the control system directly impacts the size and mass of the space reactor's reflector and shadow shield

Aaron E. Craft; Jeffrey C. King

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Digital computer operation of a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the safe operation of a complex system such as a nuclear reactor using a digital computer. The computer is supplied with a data base containing a list of the safe state of the reactor and a list of operating instructions for achieving a safe state when the actual state of the reactor does not correspond to a listed safe state, the computer selects operating instructions to return the reactor to a safe state.

Colley, R.W.

1982-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

296

Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Digital computer operation of a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the safe operation of a complex system such as a nuclear reactor using a digital computer. The computer is supplied with a data base containing a list of the safe state of the reactor and a list of operating instructions for achieving a safe state when the actual state of the reactor does not correspond to a listed safe state, the computer selects operating instructions to return the reactor to a safe state.

Colley, Robert W. (Richland, WA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Evidence from U.S. Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the first four decades of its existence the U.S. nuclear power industry was run by regulated utilities, with most companies owning only one or two reactors. Beginning in the late 1990s electricity markets in many states were deregulated and almost half of the nation’s 103 reactors were sold to independent power producers selling power in competitive wholesale markets. Deregulation has been accompanied by substantial market consolidation and today the three largest companies control more than one?third of all U.S. nuclear capacity. We find that deregulation and consolidation are associated with a 10 percent increase in operating efficiency, achieved primarily by reducing the frequency and duration of reactor outages. At average wholesale prices the value of this increased efficiency is approximately $2.5 billion annually and implies an annual decrease of almost 40 million metric tons of

Lucas W. Davis; Catherine Wolfram; Lucas W. Davis; Catherine Wolfram

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Nuclear reactor safety. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy Conservation and Power of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, May 22 and July 16, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two days of hearings addressed reactor safety and public perceptions that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has neglected the problem of utility mismanagement of nuclear power plants. One point of concern has been the proprietary approach to safety that has evolved since the NRC delegated much of the regulation to the industry-sponsored Institute for Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). Other points of contention were the move to standardize reactor designs which have already been identified as having safety problems. Attention during the second day focused on the Pilgrim plant in Massachusetts which was allowed to operate despite management deficiencies. The 18 witnesses included NRC commissioners, utilities, and several representatives of government agencies and private groups from Massachusetts. Additional material submitted for the record follows their testimony.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt3md6011 855 6,755 90.2 PWR 850 7,239 97.2 1,705 13,994 93.7 Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Unit Type Data for 2010 PWR = Pressurized Light Water Reactor.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Environmental impacts of nonfusion power systems. [Data on environmental effects of all power sources that may be competitive with fusion reactor power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data were collected on the environmental effects of power sources that may be competitive with future fusion reactor power plants. Data are included on nuclear power plants using HTGR, LMBR, GCFR, LMFBR, and molten salt reactors; fossil-fuel electric power plants; geothermal power plants; solar energy power plants, including satellite-based solar systems; wind energy power plants; ocean thermal gradient power plants; tidal energy power plants; and power plants using hydrogen and other synthetic fuels as energy sources.

Brouns, R.J.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

How many nuclear power plants are in the U.S. and where are they ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How many nuclear power plants are in the U.S. and where are they located? There are currently 65 commercially operating nuclear power plants with 104 nuclear reactors ...

303

President Obama Announces Loan Guarantees to Construct New Nuclear Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loan Guarantees to Construct New Nuclear Loan Guarantees to Construct New Nuclear Power Reactors in Georgia President Obama Announces Loan Guarantees to Construct New Nuclear Power Reactors in Georgia February 16, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington D.C. --- Underscoring his Administration's commitment to jumpstarting the nation's nuclear power industry, President Obama today announced that the Department of Energy has offered conditional commitments for a total of $8.33 billion in loan guarantees for the construction and operation of two new nuclear reactors at a plant in Burke, Georgia. The project is scheduled to be the first U.S. nuclear power plant to break ground in nearly three decades. "To meet our growing energy needs and prevent the worst consequences of climate change, we need to increase our supply of nuclear power and today's

304

Space nuclear power: a strategy for tomorrow  

SciTech Connect

Energy: reliable, portable, abundant and low cost will be a most critical factor, perhaps the sine qua non, for the unfolding of man's permanent presence in space. Space-based nuclear power, in turn, is a key technology for developing such space platforms and the transportation systems necessary to service them. A strategy for meeting space power requirements is the development of a 100-kW(e) nuclear reactor system for high earth orbit missions, transportation from Shuttle orbits to geosynchronous orbit, and for outer planet exploration. The component technology for this nuclear power plant is now underway at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. As permanent settlements are established on the Moon and in space, multimegawatt power plants will be needed. This would involve different technology similar to terrestrial nuclear power plants.

Buden, D.; Angelo, J. Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Brief paper: An optimal control algorithm for nuclear reactor load cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An optimal control algorithm for reactor reactivity controls during CANDU& nuclear station load cycling is presented. The minimized performance index is reactor operating cost during a load cycling interval. The algorithm is developed using Pontryagin's ... Keywords: Nuclear reactors, boundary value problems, control nonlinearities, load regulation, maximum principle, optimal control, power station control

Dale B. Cherchas; Ron. T. Lake

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Safer nuclear reactors could result from Los Alamos research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calendar Video Newsroom News Releases News Releases - 2010 March Safer nuclear reactors could result from research Safer nuclear reactors could result from Los...

307

Secretary Chu Visits Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant Secretary Chu Visits Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant February 15, 2012 - 3:54pm Addthis Secretary Chu traveled to Waynesboro, Georgia, to visit the Vogtle nuclear power plant, the site of what will be the first new nuclear reactors to be built in the United States in three decades. | Image credit: Southern Company. Secretary Chu traveled to Waynesboro, Georgia, to visit the Vogtle nuclear power plant, the site of what will be the first new nuclear reactors to be built in the United States in three decades. | Image credit: Southern Company. Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Just over 60 years ago, scientists in Arco, Idaho, successfully used nuclear energy to power four light bulbs, laying the foundation for U.S.

308

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Nuclear Power  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

In the IEO2000 reference case, nuclear power represents a declining share of the worldÂ’s total electricity consumption from 1997 through 2020. Plant retirements are expected to produce net reductions in nuclear capacity in most of the industrialized nations. In the IEO2000 reference case, nuclear power represents a declining share of the worldÂ’s total electricity consumption from 1997 through 2020. Plant retirements are expected to produce net reductions in nuclear capacity in most of the industrialized nations. In 1998, a total of 2,291 billion kilowatthours of electricity was generated by nuclear power worldwide, providing 16 percent of the worldÂ’s total generation[1]. Among the countries with operating nuclear power plants, national dependence on nuclear energy for electricity varies greatly. Nine countries met at least 40 percent of total electricity demand with generation from nuclear reactors. Figure 68. Nuclear Shares of National Electricity Generation, 1998 [Sources] The prospects for nuclear power to maintain a significant share of

309

Nuclear Power - Control, Reliability and Human Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advances in reactor designs, materials and human-machine interfaces guarantee safety and reliability of emerging reactor technologies, eliminating possibilities for high-consequence human errors as those which have occurred in the past. New instrumentation and control technologies based in digital systems, novel sensors and measurement approaches facilitate safety, reliability and economic competitiveness of nuclear power options. Autonomous operation scenarios are becoming increasingly popular to consider for small modular systems. This book belongs to a series of books on nuclear power published by InTech. It consists of four major sections and contains twenty-one chapters on topics from key subject areas pertinent to instrumentation and control, operation reliability, system aging and human-machine interfaces. The book targets a broad potential readership group - students, researchers and specialists in the field - who are interested in learning about nuclear power.

Tsvetkov, Pavel

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Nuclear power and nuclear-weapons proliferation  

SciTech Connect

The danger that fissile isotopes may be diverted from nuclear power production to the construction of nuclear weapons would be aggravated by a switch to the plutonium breeder: but future uranium supplies are uncertain.

Moniz, E.J.; Neff, T.L.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1, Unit 2","1,705","13,994",100.0,"Calvert Cliffs Nuclear PP Inc" "1 Plant 2...

312

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element is designed which is particularly adapted for reactors of high power density used to generate steam for the production of electricity. The fuel element consists of inner and outer concentric tubes forming an annular chamber within which is contained fissionable fuel pellet segments, wedge members interposed between the fuel segments, and a spring which, acting with wedge members, urges said fuel pellets radially into contact against the inner surface of the outer tube. The wedge members may be a fertile material convertible into fissionable fuel material by absorbing neutrons emitted from the fissionable fuel pellet segments. The costly grinding of cylindrical fuel pellets to close tolerances for snug engagement is reduced because the need to finish the exact size is eliminated. (AEC)

Bassett, C.H.

1961-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

313

Fuel leak detection apparatus for gas cooled nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus is disclosed for detecting nuclear fuel leaks within nuclear power system reactors, such as high temperature gas cooled reactors. The apparatus includes a probe assembly that is inserted into the high temperature reactor coolant gaseous stream. The probe has an aperture adapted to communicate gaseous fluid between its inside and outside surfaces and also contains an inner tube for sampling gaseous fluid present near the aperture. A high pressure supply of noncontaminated gas is provided to selectively balance the pressure of the stream being sampled to prevent gas from entering the probe through the aperture. The apparatus includes valves that are operable to cause various directional flows and pressures, which valves are located outside of the reactor walls to permit maintenance work and the like to be performed without shutting down the reactor.

Burnette, Richard D. (San Diego, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Nuclear Power Advisory Meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document combines the material previously included in the Instrumentation and Control (I&C) Briefing Book for the Nuclear Power Advisory Meeting (Electric Power Research Institute report 1023444) with the annual I&C Research Plan, replacing the latter document. This document contains key information on the I&C program and its projects, including: 1. A program executive summarya high-level document on the key activities of the I&C base program as well as its three supplemental groups 2. A consolidate...

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

315

NUCLEAR BATTERY POWERED TIMERS  

SciTech Connect

During the period from May 1957 to July 1958, four nuclear batiery powered timers were fabricated and tested from two basic designs in the time ranges of onesecond, three-second, annd half-hour intervals. The timers were temperature-tested over a range of -65 to +165 F with accuracics over this temperature range from plus or minus 10 perceat to plus or minus 15 percent. Each unit has a volume of 10 cubic inches, and the timer can be initiated either by an explosive squib or a pull-out wire. At the end of the timing interval, the timer has ann output of 30,000 ergs. The cost of the program was ,000. From the results of this development program, it appears quite feasible to build operable nuclear battery powered timers on a production basis. (auth)

DesJardin, R.L.

1958-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

316

Reactor Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation...

317

Gas-cooled nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-cooled nuclear reactor includes a central core located in the lower portion of a prestressed concrete reactor vessel. Primary coolant gas flows upward through the core and into four overlying heat-exchangers wherein stream is generated. During normal operation, the return flow of coolant is between the core and the vessel sidewall to a pair of motor-driven circulators located at about the bottom of the concrete pressure vessel. The circulators repressurize the gas coolant and return it back to the core through passageways in the underlying core structure. If during emergency conditions the primary circulators are no longer functioning, the decay heat is effectively removed from the core by means of natural convection circulation. The hot gas rising through the core exits the top of the shroud of the heat-exchangers and flows radially outward to the sidewall of the concrete pressure vessel. A metal liner covers the entire inside concrete surfaces of the concrete pressure vessel, and cooling tubes are welded to the exterior or concrete side of the metal liner. The gas coolant is in direct contact with the interior surface of the metal liner and transfers its heat through the metal liner to the liquid coolant flowing through the cooling tubes. The cooler gas is more dense and creates a downward convection flow in the region between the core and the sidewall until it reaches the bottom of the concrete pressure vessel when it flows radially inward and up into the core for another pass. Water is forced to flow through the cooling tubes to absorb heat from the core at a sufficient rate to remove enough of the decay heat created in the core to prevent overheating of the core or the vessel.

Peinado, Charles O. (La Jolla, CA); Koutz, Stanley L. (San Diego, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer cpacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

319

Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast-acting nuclear reactor control device for moving and positioning a fety control rod to desired positions within the core of the reactor between a run position in which the safety control rod is outside the reactor core, and a shutdown position in which the rod is fully inserted in the reactor core. The device employs a hydraulic pump/motor, an electric gear motor, and solenoid valve to drive the safety control rod into the reactor core through the entire stroke of the safety control rod. An overrunning clutch allows the safety control rod to freely travel toward a safe position in the event of a partial drive system failure.

Kotlyar, Oleg M. (Idaho Falls, ID); West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Shutdown system for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultimate shutdown system is provided for termination of neutronic activity in a nuclear reactor. The shutdown system includes bead chains comprising spherical containers suspended on a flexible cable. The containers are comprised of mating hemispherical shells which provide a ruggedized enclosure for reactor poison material. The bead chains, normally suspended above the reactor core on storage spools, are released for downward travel upon command from an external reactor monitor. The chains are capable of horizontal movement, so as to flow around obstructions in the reactor during their downward motion. 8 figs.

Groh, E.F.; Olson, A.P.; Wade, D.C.; Robinson, B.W.

1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Shutdown system for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultimate shutdown system is provided for termination of neutronic activity in a nuclear reactor. The shutdown system includes bead chains comprising spherical containers suspended on a flexible cable. The containers are comprised of mating hemispherical shells which provide a ruggedized enclosure for reactor poison material. The bead chains, normally suspended above the reactor core on storage spools, are released for downward travel upon command from an external reactor monitor. The chains are capable of horizontal movement, so as to flow around obstructions in the reactor during their downward motion.

Groh, Edward F. (Naperville, IL); Olson, Arne P. (Western Springs, IL); Wade, David C. (Naperville, IL); Robinson, Bryan W. (Oak Lawn, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Shutdown system for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultimate shutdown system is provided for termination of neutronic activity in a nuclear reactor. The shutdown system includes bead chains comprising spherical containers suspended on a flexible cable. The containers are comprised of mating hemispherical shells which provide a ruggedized enclosure for reactor poison material. The bead chains, normally suspended above the reactor core on storage spools, are released for downward travel upon command from an external reactor monitor. The chains are capable of horizontal movement, so as to flow around obstructions in the reactor during their downward motion.

Groh, E.F.; Olson, A.P.; Wade, D.C.; Robinson, B.W.

1982-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

323

Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Output and Performance of Nuclear Power Plants by Im- provedPower, Tomari Nuclear Power Plant (Units 1, 2) License

Djurcic, Zelimir

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Shielding considerations for advanced space nuclear reactor systems  

SciTech Connect

To meet the anticipated future space power needs, the Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing components for a compact, 100 kW/sub e/-class heat pipe nuclear reactor. The reactor uses uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/) as its fuel, and is designed to operate around 1500 k. Heat pipes are used to remove thermal energy from the core without the use of pumps or compressors. The reactor heat pipes transfer mal energy to thermoelectric conversion elements that are advanced versions of the converters used on the enormously successful Voyager missions to the outer planets. Advanced versions of this heat pipe reactor could also be used to provide megawatt-level power plants. The paper reviews the status of this advanced heat pipe reactor and explores the radiation environments and shielding requirements for representative manned and unmanned applications.

Angelo, J.P. Jr.; Buden, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Nuclear Reactor Safeguards and Monitoring with Antineutrino Detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cubic-meter-sized antineutrino detectors can be used to non-intrusively, robustly and automatically monitor and safeguard a wide variety of nuclear reactor types, including power reactors, research reactors, and plutonium production reactors. Since the antineutrino spectra and relative yields of fissioning isotopes depend on the isotopic composition of the core, changes in composition can be observed without ever directly accessing the core itself. Information from a modest-sized antineutrino detector, coupled with the well-understood principles that govern the core's evolution in time, can be used to determine whether the reactor is being operated in an illegitimate way. A group at Sandia is currently constructing a one cubic meter antineutrino detector at the San Onofre reactor site in California to demonstrate these principles.

Adam Bernstein; Yifang Wang; Giorgio Gratta; Todd West

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Reactor technology: power conversion systems and reactor operation and maintenance  

SciTech Connect

The use of advanced fuels permits the use of coolants (organic, high pressure helium) that result in power conversion systems with good thermal efficiency and relatively low cost. Water coolant would significantly reduce thermal efficiency, while lithium and salt coolants, which have been proposed for DT reactors, will have comparable power conversion efficiencies, but will probably be significantly more expensive. Helium cooled blankets with direct gas turbine power conversion cycles can also be used with DT reactors, but activation problems will be more severe, and the portion of blanket power in the metallic structure will probably not be available for the direct cycle, because of temperature limitations. A very important potential advantage of advanced fuel reactors over DT fusion reactors is the possibility of easier blanket maintenance and reduced down time for replacement. If unexpected leaks occur, in most cases the leaking circuit can be shut off and a redundant cooling curcuit will take over the thermal load. With the D-He/sup 3/ reactor, it appears practical to do this while the reactor is operating, as long as the leak is small enough not to shut down the reactor. Redundancy for Cat-D reactors has not been explored in detail, but appears feasible in principle. The idea of mobile units operating in the reactor chamber for service and maintenance of radioactive elements is explored.

Powell, J.R.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Nuclear propulsion apparatus with alternate reactor segments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

1. Nuclear propulsion apparatus comprising: A. means for compressing incoming air; B. nuclear fission reactor means for heating said air; C. means for expanding a portion of the heated air to drive said compressing means; D. said nuclear fission reactor means being divided into a plurality of radially extending segments; E. means for directing a portion of the compressed air for heating through alternate segments of said reactor means and another portion of the compressed air for heating through the remaining segments of said reactor means; and F. means for further expanding the heated air from said drive means and the remaining heated air from said reactor means through nozzle means to effect reactive thrust on said apparatus.

Szekely, Thomas (Santa Monica, CA)

1979-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

328

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2ct Millstone Unit 2, Unit 3 2,103 16,750 100.0 Dominion Nuclear Conn Inc 1 Plant 2 Reactors Owner Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent ...

329

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2ar Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 1, Unit 2 1,835 15,023 100.0 Entergy Arkansas Inc 1 Plant 2 Reactors Owner Note: Totals may not equal sum of ...

330

Microsoft PowerPoint - Why Nuclear Energy New Template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why Nuclear Energy? Why Nuclear Energy? Why Nuclear Energy? Nuclear energy already meets a significant share of the world's energy needs * There are 441 nuclear reactors in operation in 31 countries * These plants generate electricity for nearly a billion people, and account for 17% of the world's electricity production * The U.S. has 103 operating reactors producing 20% of the nation's electricity * Illinois leads all states with the highest share of nuclear (51%) * Technology significantly developed at Argonne forms the basis of all nuclear energy systems used worldwide Nuclear power is reliable and economical * In 2001, U.S. nuclear plants produced electricity for 1.68 cents per kilowatt-hour on average, second only to hydroelectric power among baseload generation options * U.S. nuclear power plant performance has steadily

331

Large Scale Weather Control Using Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is pointed out that controlled release of thermal energy from fission type nuclear reactors can be used to alter weather patterns over significantly large geographical regions. (1) Nuclear heat creates a low pressure region, which can be used to draw moist air from oceans, onto deserts. (2) Creation of low pressure zones over oceans using Nuclear heat can lead to Controlled Cyclone Creation (CCC).(3) Nuclear heat can also be used to melt glaciers and control water flow in rivers.

Moninder Singh Modgil

2002-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

332

China's Nuclear Power Program: Options for the US  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The issue of American nuclear cooperation with the People's Republic of China is examined with regards to political relations, commercial benefits to the United States, and nonproliferation. China's interest in nuclear power is examined, and its nuclear program is briefly reviewed from the 1950's to present. China's international nuclear relations with other countries are discussed, and implications for the United States examined, particularly with regards to China's intentions toward nuclear proliferation, danger of diversion of material for nuclear weapons, use of pressurized water reactor technology for Chinese naval reactors, and the terms of the nuclear cooperation agreement. (LEW)

Suttmeier, R.P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

Rouse, Carl A. (Del Mar, CA); Simnad, Massoud T. (La Jolla, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Fuel handling apparatus for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fuel handling apparatus for transporting fuel elements into and out of a nuclear reactor and transporting them within the reactor vessel extends through a penetration in the side of the reactor vessel. A lateral transport device carries the fuel elements laterally within the vessel and through the opening in the side of the vessel, and a reversible lifting device raises and lowers the fuel elements. In the preferred embodiment, the lifting device is supported by a pair of pivot arms.

Hawke, Basil C. (Solana Beach, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Today and Future Neutrino Experiments at Krasnoyarsk Nuclear Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The results of undergoing experiments and new experiment propositions at Krasnoyarsk underground nuclear reactor are presented

Yu. V. Kozlov; S. V. Khalturtsev; I. N. Machulin; A. V. Martemyanov; V. P. Martemyanov; A. A. Sabelnikov; V. G. Tarasenkov; E. V. Turbin; V. N. Vyrodov; L. A. Popeko; A. V. Cherny; G. A. Shishkina

1999-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

336

Dynamic detection of nuclear reactor core incident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surveillance, safety and security of evolving systems are a challenge to prevent accident. The dynamic detection of a hypothetical and theoretical blockage incident in the Phenix nuclear reactor is investigated. Such an incident is characterized by abnormal ... Keywords: Contrast, Dynamic detection of perturbations, Evolving system, Fast-neutron reactor, Neighbourhood, Noise

Laurent Hartert; Danielle Nuzillard; Jean-Philippe Jeannot

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Catawba Unit 1, Unit 2","2,258","18,964",36.5,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "H B Robinson Unit 2",724,"3,594",6.9,"Progress Energy Carolinas Inc" "Oconee Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3","2,538","20,943",40.3,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "V C Summer Unit 1",966,"8,487",16.3,"South Carolina Electric&Gas Co" "4 Plants 7 Reactors","6,486","51,988",100.0

338

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated energy, environment and economics modeling suggests electrical energy use will increase from 2.4 TWe today to 12 TWe in 2100. It will be challenging to provide 40% of this electrical power from combustion with carbon sequestration, as it will be challenging to provide 30% from renewable energy sources. Thus nuclear power may be needed to provide ~30% by 2100. Calculations of the associated stocks and flows of uranium, plutonium and minor actinides indicate that the proliferation risks at mid-century, using current light-water reactor technology, are daunting. There are institutional arrangements that may be able to provide an acceptable level of risk mitigation, but they will be difficult to implement. If a transition is begun to fast-spectrum reactors at mid-century, without a dramatic change in the proliferation risks of such systems, at the end of the century proliferation risks are much greater, and more resistant to mitigation. The risks of nuclear power should be compared with the risks of the estimated 0.64oC long-term global surface-average temperature rise predicted if nuclear power were replaced with coal-fired power plants without carbon sequestration. Fusion energy, if developed, would provide a source of nuclear power with much lower proliferation risks than fission.

Robert J. Goldston

2010-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

339

Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IX. Reactor and fuel cycle description  

SciTech Connect

The Nonproliferation Alterntive Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) has characterized and assessed various reactor/fuel-cycle systems. Volume IX provides, in summary form, the technical descriptions of the reactor/fuel-cycle systems studied. This includes the status of the system technology, as well as a discussion of the safety, environmental, and licensing needs from a technical perspective. This information was then used in developing the research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) program, including its cost and time frame, to advance the existing technology to the level needed for commercial use. Wherever possible, the cost data are given as ranges to reflect the uncertainties in the estimates.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Early Argonne reactor lit the way for worldwide nuclear industry -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Argonne reactor lit the way for worldwide Early Argonne reactor lit the way for worldwide nuclear industry About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

342

Nuclear power in the Soviet Bloc  

SciTech Connect

The growth of Soviet Bloc nuclear power generation to the end of the century is evaluated on the basis of policy statements of objectives, past and current nuclear power plant construction, and trends in the potential for future construction. Central to this study is a detailed examination of individual reactor construction and site development that provides specific performance data not given elsewhere. A major commitment to nuclear power is abundantly clear and an expansion of ten times in nuclear electric generation is estimated between 1980 and 2000. This rate of growth is likely to have significant impact upon the total energy economy of the Soviet Bloc including lessening demands for use of coal, oil, and gas for electricity generation.

Davey, W.G.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Computer simulations help design new nuclear reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer simulations help design new nuclear reactors Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share Reprinted from "Argonne Now" - Spring 2008 Physicist Won-Sik Yang and computer scientist Andrew Siegel hold a fuel rod assembly in front of a model of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II

344

Why Nuclear Energy? - Reactors designed/built by Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Energy: Nuclear Energy: Why Nuclear Energy? About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

345

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction October 2, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it has received 19 Part I applications from 17 electric power companies for federal loan guarantees to support the construction of 14 nuclear power plants in response to its June 30, 2008 solicitation. The applications reflect the intentions of those companies to build 21 new reactors, with some applications covering two reactors at the same site. All five reactor designs that have been certified, or are currently under review for possible certification, by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are

346

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction October 2, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it has received 19 Part I applications from 17 electric power companies for federal loan guarantees to support the construction of 14 nuclear power plants in response to its June 30, 2008 solicitation. The applications reflect the intentions of those companies to build 21 new reactors, with some applications covering two reactors at the same site. All five reactor designs that have been certified, or are currently under review for possible certification, by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are represented in the Part I applications. DOE also has received Part I

347

Strengthening the nuclear-reactor fuel cycle against proliferation  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducts several research programs that serve to reduce the risks of fissile-material diversion from the nuclear-reactor fuel cycle. The objectives are to provide economical and efficient neutron or power generation with the minimum of inherent risks, and to further minimize risks by utilizing sophisticated techniques to detect attempts at material diversion. This paper will discuss the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, the Isotope Correlation Technique (ICT), and Proliferation-Resistant Closed-Cycle Reactors. The first two are sponsored by the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation.

Travelli, A.; Snelgrove, J.; Persiani, P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Arms Control and Nonproliferation Program

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

348

Space Nuclear Power: Opening the Final Frontier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear power sources have enabled or enhanced some of the most challenging and exciting space missions yet conducted, including missions such as the Pioneer flights to Jupiter, Saturn, and beyond; the Voyager flights to Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and beyond; the Apollo lunar surface experiments; the Viking Lander studies of Mars; the Ulysses mission to study the polar regions of the Sun; the Galileo mission that orbited Jupiter; the Cassini mission orbiting Saturn and the recently launched New Horizons mission to Pluto. In addition, radioisotope heater units have enhanced or enabled the Mars exploration rover missions (Sojourner, Spirit and Opportunity). Since 1961, the United States has successfully flown 41 radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and one reactor to provide power for 24 space systems. The former Soviet Union has reportedly flown at least 35 nuclear reactors and at least two RTGs to power 37 space systems. 1.

Gary L. Bennett

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Nuclear power plant construction activity 1987  

SciTech Connect

This annual report published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) presents data on nuclear power plant construction activity. The previous report, Nuclear Power Plant Construction Activity 1986, included data for units that, as of December 31, 1986, were (1) in the construction pipeline, (2) canceled, or (3) commercial operation as of December 31, 1986. The data in this report, which were collected on Form EIA-254, ''Semiannual Report on Status of Reactor Construction,'' update the data in the previous report to be current as of December 31, 1987. Three types of information are included: plant characteristics and ownership; construction costs; and construction schedules and milestone dates.

1988-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

350

High-Fidelity Light Water Reactor Analysis with the Numerical Nuclear Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Mathematics and Computation, Supercomputing, Reactor Physics and Nuclear and Biological Applications

David P. Weber; Tanju Sofu; Won Sik Yang; Thomas J. Downar; Justin W. Thomas; Zhaopeng Zhong; Jin Young Cho; Kang Seog Kim; Tae Hyun Chun; Han Gyu Joo; Chang Hyo Kim

351

The role of computer systems in the nuclear power debate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the primary reasons for the current "decline" of nuclear power is that reactors have not operated reliably. This unreliability has raised questions of both safety and economics. Computer systems have been a part of this failure of technology. ...

Kevin W. Bowyer

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Advanced reactors, passive safety, and acceptance of nuclear energy  

SciTech Connect

If nuclear power is to make a serious impact on CO{sub 2} emission, the industry will have to be very large. A 1000-MWe coal-fired power plant releases about 1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} gigatons of carbon per year in the form of CO{sub 2}. The total of 6 GTC/yr of carbon released by human use of 300 quads/yr of energy worldwide then corresponds to the equivalent of about 4000 one-gigawatt power plants. By the middle of the next century, the world's energy demand might grow to about 500 quads/yr. One might halve the implied 10 GTC/yr by deploying 3500 1000-megawatt large reactors. Now the median core melt probability of today's fleet of reactors is according to Rasmussen 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} per reactor year which corresponds to a core melt frequency in such a large nuclear system of 0.18/yr - one accident equivalent to that at Three Mile Island Unit 2 every six years. This is almost surely unacceptable. Thus one concludes that a necessary condition for deployment of nuclear reactors on a scale sufficient to contribute significantly to mitigation of the greenhouse effect is reduction of the core melt probability considerably below Rasmussen's fiducial figure. In this paper, the authors summarize developments, both institutional and technical, since 1985 in the development of safer, if not inherently safe, reactors.

Forsberg, C.W. (Chemical Technology Div., Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (US)); Weinberg, A.M. (Oak Ridge Associated Univ., Oak Ridge, TN (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

PROCESSING OF MOLTEN SALT POWER REACTOR FUEL  

SciTech Connect

ABS> Fuel reprocessing methods are being investigated for molten salt nuclear reactors which use LiF--BeF/sub 2/ salt as a solvent for UF/sub 4/ and ThF/sub 4/. A liquid HF dissolution procedure coupled with fluorination has been developed for recovery of the uranium and LiF- BeF/sub 2/ solvent salt which is highly enriched in Li/sup 7/. The recovered salt is decontaminated in the process from the major reactor poisons; namely, rare earths and neptunium. A brief investigation of alternate methods, including oxide precipitation, partial freezing, and metal reduction, indicated that such methods may give some separation of the solvent salt from reactor poisons, but they do not appear to be sufficiently quantitative for a simple processing operation. Solubilities of LiF and BeF/sub 2/ in aqueous 70t0 100% HF are presented. The BeF/sub 2/ solubility is appreciably increased in the presence of water and large amounts of LiF. Salt solubilities of 150 g/liter are attainable. Tracer experiments indicate that rare earth solubilities, relative to LiF-- BeF/sub 2/ solvent salt solubility, increase from about 10/sup -4/ mole% in 98% HF to 0.003 mole% in 80% HF. Fluorination of uranium from LiF--BeF/sub 2/ salt was demonstrated. This appears feasible also for the recovery of the relatively small ccncentration of uranium produced in the LiF- BeF/sub 2/ThF/sub 4/ blanket. A proposed chemical flowsheet is presented on the basis of this exploratory work as applied to the semicontinuous processing of a 600 Mw power reactor. (auth)

Campbell, D.O.; Cathers, G.I.

1959-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Heat dissipating nuclear reactor with metal liner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment including a reactor vessel disposed within a cavity with capability for complete inherent decay heat removal in the earth and surrounded by a cast steel containment member which surrounds the vessel. The member has a thick basemat in contact with metal pilings. The basemat rests on a bed of porous particulate material, into which water is fed to produce steam which is vented to the atmosphere. There is a gap between the reactor vessel and the steel containment member. The containment member holds any sodium or core debris escaping from the reactor vessel if the core melts and breaches the vessel.

Gluekler, Emil L. (San Jose, CA); Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Lazarus, Jonathan D. (Sunnyvale, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Heat dissipating nuclear reactor with metal liner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor containment including a reactor vessel disposed within a cavity with capability for complete inherent decay heat removal in the earth and surrounded by a cast steel containment member which surrounds the vessel is described in this disclosure. The member has a thick basemat in contact with metal pilings. The basemat rests on a bed of porous particulate material, into which water is fed to produce steam which is vented to the atmosphere. There is a gap between the reactor vessel and the steel containment member. The containment member holds any sodium or core debris escaping from the reactor vessel if the core melts and breaches the vessel.

Gluekler, E.L.; Hunsbedt, A.; Lazarus, J.D.

1985-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

356

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention, which resulted from a contact with the United States Department of Energy, relates to a control mechanism for a nuclear reactor and, more particularly, to an assembly for selectively shifting different numbers of reactivity modifying rods into and out of the core of a nuclear reactor. It has been proposed heretofore to control the reactivity of a breeder reactor by varying the depth of insertion of control rods (e.g., rods containing a fertile material such as ThO/sub 2/) in the core of the reactor, thereby varying the amount of neutron-thermalizing coolant and the amount of neutron-capturing material in the core. This invention relates to a mechanism which can advantageously be used in this type of reactor control system.

Bollinger, L.R.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

357

Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat so as to insulate the reactor vessel bottom end wall from the containment structure base mat and allow the reactor vessel bottom end wall to freely expand as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof. Further, a deck is supported upon the side wall of the containment structure above the top open end of the reactor vessel, and a plurality of serially connected extendible and retractable annular bellows extend between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnect the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck. An annular guide ring is disposed on the containment structure and extends between its side wall and the top open end of the reactor vessel for providing lateral support of the reactor vessel top open end by limiting imposition of lateral loads on the annular bellows by the occurrence of a lateral seismic event.

Sharbaugh, John E. (Bullskin Township, Fayette County, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Nuclear reactor cooling system decontamination reagent regeneration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water-cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution.

Anstine, Larry D. (San Jose, CA); James, Dean B. (Saratoga, CA); Melaika, Edward A. (Berkeley, CA); Peterson, Jr., John P. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning Nuclear Reactors At Multiple-Reactor Stations  

SciTech Connect

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of large (1175-MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and large (1155-MWe) boiling water reactors {BWRs) at multiple-reactor stations. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). Safety and costs of decommissioning are estimated by determining the impact of probable features of multiple-reactor-station operation that are considered to be unavailable at a single-reactor station, and applying these estimated impacts to the decommissioning costs and radiation doses estimated in previous PWR and BWR decommissioning studies. The multiple-reactor-station features analyzed are: the use of interim onsite nuclear waste storage with later removal to an offsite nuclear waste disposal facility, the use of permanent onsite nuclear waste disposal, the dedication of the site to nuclear power generation, and the provision of centralized services. Five scenarios for decommissioning reactors at a multiple-reactor station are investigated. The number of reactors on a site is assumed to be either four or ten; nuclear waste disposal is varied between immediate offsite disposal, interim onsite storage, and immediate onsite disposal. It is assumed that the decommissioned reactors are not replaced in one scenario but are replaced in the other scenarios. Centralized service facilities are provided in two scenarios but are not provided in the other three. Decommissioning of a PWR or a BWR at a multiple-reactor station probably will be less costly and result in lower radiation doses than decommissioning an identical reactor at a single-reactor station. Regardless of whether the light water reactor being decommissioned is at a single- or multiple-reactor station: • the estimated occupational radiation dose for decommissioning an LWR is lowest for SAFSTOR and highest for DECON • the estimated cost of decommissioning a PWR is lowest for ENTOMB and highest for SAFSTOR • the estimated cost of decommissioning a BWR is lowest for OECON and highest for SAFSTOR. In all cases, SAFSTOR has the lowest occupational radiation dose and the highest cost.

Wittenbrock, N. G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Status of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

neutrinos from the nuclear reactors at different baselines.will be commissioned Nuclear Reactor Anti-neutrino detectorthe nuclear power complex has two pairs of reactor cores (

Lin, Cheng-Ju Stephen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Fukushima Nuclear Event and its Implications for Nuclear Power  

SciTech Connect

The combined strong earthquake and super tsunami of 12 March 2011 at the Fukushima nuclear power plant imposed the most severe challenges ever experienced at such a facility. Information regarding the plant response and status remains uncertain, but it is clear that severe damage has been sustained, that the plant staff have responded creatively and that the offsite implications are unlikely to be seriously threatening to the health, if not the prosperity, of the surrounding population. Re-examination of the regulatory constraints of nuclear power will occur worldwide, and some changes are likely, particularly concerning reliance upon active systems for achieving critical safety functions and concerning treatments of used reactor fuel. Whether worldwide expansion of the nuclear power economy will be slowed in the long run is perhaps unlikely and worth discussion.

Golay, Michael (MIT)

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

362

Business Case for Early Orders of New Nuclear Reactors Executive Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Early Orders of New Nuclear Reactors Early Orders of New Nuclear Reactors Executive Overview Page EX - 1 Business Case for New Business Case for New Nuclear Power Plants Nuclear Power Plants Bringing Public and Private Resources Together for Nuclear Energy Mitigating Critical Risks on Early Orders for New Reactors Briefing for NERAC October 1, 2002 Disclaimer: This draft report was prepared to help the Department of Energy determine the barriers related to the deployment of new nuclear power plants but does not necessarily represent the views or policy of the Department. Business Case for Early Orders of New Nuclear Reactors Executive Overview Page EX - 2 Integrated Project Team Process * Integrated project team (IPT) approach facilitated consideration of complex issues involved in the project and to ensure contractor access to important data from NE.

363

A COMPARISON OF THE NUCLEAR DEFENSE CAPABILITIES ON NUCLEAR AND COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS. FUEL COST STUDY VARIOUS REACTORS AT 100 AND 300 Mwe  

SciTech Connect

Appendices C and D may further be identified as SL1925 and CF-61-12- 20(Rev.), respectively. A comparative report is presented in which the economics and feasibility of plant protection from nuclear attack by plant hardening, remote siting, and utilization of optional fueling concepts for the coal-fired plant are evaluated. (J.R.D.)

Gift, E.H.

1962-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

364

ME 361E Nuclear Reactor Engineering ABET EC2000 syllabus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ME 361E ­ Nuclear Reactor Engineering Page 1 ABET EC2000 syllabus ME 361E ­ Nuclear Reactor; neutron diffusion and moderation; reactor equations; Fermi Age theory; multigroup and multiregional students should be able to: · Compare and contrast numerous nuclear reactor designs · Calculate the effects

Ben-Yakar, Adela

365

REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR TECHNICAL NUCLEAR FORENSICS  

SciTech Connect

Technical nuclear forensics (TNF) refers to the collection, analysis and evaluation of pre- and post-detonation radiological or nuclear materials, devices, and/or debris. TNF is an integral component, complementing traditional forensics and investigative work, to help enable the attribution of discovered radiological or nuclear material. Research is needed to improve the capabilities of TNF. One research area of interest is determining the isotopic signatures of research reactors. Research reactors are a potential source of both radiological and nuclear material. Research reactors are often the least safeguarded type of reactor; they vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power, and burn-up. Many research reactors are fueled with highly-enriched uranium (HEU), up to {approx}93% {sup 235}U, which could potentially be used as weapons material. All of them have significant amounts of radiological material with which a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) could be built. Therefore, the ability to attribute if material originated from or was produced in a specific research reactor is an important tool in providing for the security of the United States. Currently there are approximately 237 operating research reactors worldwide, another 12 are in temporary shutdown and 224 research reactors are reported as shut down. Little is currently known about the isotopic signatures of spent research reactor fuel. An effort is underway at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to analyze spent research reactor fuel to determine these signatures. Computer models, using reactor physics codes, are being compared to the measured analytes in the spent fuel. This allows for improving the reactor physics codes in modeling research reactors for the purpose of nuclear forensics. Currently the Oak Ridge Research reactor (ORR) is being modeled and fuel samples are being analyzed for comparison. Samples of an ORR spent fuel assembly were taken by SRNL for analytical and radiochemical analysis. The fuel assembly was modeled using MONTEBURNS(MCNP5/ ORIGEN2.2) and MCNPX/CINDER90. The results from the models have been compared to each other and to the measured data.

Nichols, T.; Beals, D.; Sternat, M.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

366

STEAM GENERATOR FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The steam generator described for use in reactor powergenerating systems employs a series of concentric tubes providing annular passage of steam and water and includes a unique arrangement for separating the steam from the water. (AEC)

Kinyon, B.W.; Whitman, G.D.

1963-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

367

MOLTEN FLUORIDE NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Molten-salt reactor fuel compositions consisting of mixtures of fluoride salts are reported. In its broadest form, the composition contains an alkali fluoride such as sodium fluoride, zirconium tetrafluoride, and a uranium fluoride, the latter being the tetrafluoride or trifluoride or a mixture of the two. An outstanding property of these fuel compositions is a high coeffieient of thermal expansion which provides a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity in reactors in which they are used.

Barton, C.J.; Grimes, W.R.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Nuclear Power - System Simulations and Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the onset of the 21st century, we are searching for reliable and sustainable energy sources that have a potential to support growing economies developing at accelerated growth rates, technology advances improving quality of life and becoming available to larger and larger populations. The quest for robust sustainable energy supplies meeting the above constraints leads us to the nuclear power technology. Today's nuclear reactors are safe and highly efficient energy systems that offer electricity and a multitude of co-generation energy products ranging from potable water to heat for industrial applications. Catastrophic earthquake and tsunami events in Japan resulted in the nuclear accident that forced us to rethink our approach to nuclear safety, requirements and facilitated growing interests in designs, which can withstand natural disasters and avoid catastrophic consequences. This book is one in a series of books on nuclear power published by InTech. It consists of ten chapters on system simulations and operational aspects. Our book does not aim at a complete coverage or a broad range. Instead, the included chapters shine light at existing challenges, solutions and approaches. Authors hope to share ideas and findings so that new ideas and directions can potentially be developed focusing on operational characteristics of nuclear power plants. The consistent thread throughout all chapters is the system-thinking approach synthesizing provided information and ideas. The book targets everyone with interests in system simulations and nuclear power operational aspects as its potential readership groups - students, researchers and practitioners.

Tsvetkov, Pavel

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Optimally moderated nuclear fission reactor and fuel source therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved nuclear fission reactor of the continuous fueling type involves determining an asymptotic equilibrium state for the nuclear fission reactor and providing the reactor with a moderator-to-fuel ratio that is optimally moderated for the asymptotic equilibrium state of the nuclear fission reactor; the fuel-to-moderator ratio allowing the nuclear fission reactor to be substantially continuously operated in an optimally moderated state.

Ougouag, Abderrafi M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Terry, William K. (Shelley, ID); Gougar, Hans D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

370

AN ANALYSIS OF POWER REACTOR FUEL REPROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an analysis of the projected economies and processing capacity requirements for a power reactor fuel reprocessing industry based on the recovery of fertile and fissionable materials from presently proposed power reactors within tbe confines of the continental United 8tates for the next five to ten years. An analysis of the present general state of development of a technology required for such an Industry is given. A summary of results of power reactor reprocessing chemical and engineering development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from July 1955 through December 1956 is given. (auth)

Culler, F.L. Jr.; Blanco, R.E.; Goeller, H.E.; Watson, C.D.

1957-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

371

Application of reactor-pumped lasers to power beaming  

SciTech Connect

Power beaming is the concept of centralized power generation and distribution to remote users via energy beams such as microwaves or laser beams. The power beaming community is presently performing technical evaluations of available lasers as part of the design process for developing terrestrial and space-based power beaming systems. This report describes the suitability of employing a nuclear reactor-pumped laser in a power beaming system. Although there are several technical issues to be resolved, the power beaming community currently believes that the AlGaAs solid-state laser is the primary candidate for power beaming because that laser meets the many design criteria for such a system and integrates well with the GaAs photodiode receiver array. After reviewing the history and physics of reactor-pumped lasers, the advantages of these lasers for power beaming are discussed, along with several technical issues which are currently facing reactor-pumped laser research. The overriding conclusion is that reactor-pumped laser technology is not presently developed to the point of being technially or economically competitive with more mature solid-state technologies for application to power beaming. 58 refs.

Repetti, T.E.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

THE PLUTONIUM FEEDBACK APPROACH TO NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear parameter variations are presented for sodium graphite reactors using Pu-spiked natural U as fuel. The fuel feed is assumed to be natural U, and the important variables are the initial amount of excess reactivity, lattice spacing, and alpha , the ratio of Pu/sup 239/ to U/sup 235/ in the feed material. The system is called "steady state" in that the ratios, N/sub 40/N/sub 49/ = sigma /sub c(49)// sigma /sub a(40)/ and N/sub 41//N/sub 4 9/ = sigma /sub c(49)/ / sigma /sub a(41)/, obtained from setting the build-up equations to zero are assumed for the feed concentrations, and the feed material to the reactor is always the same. During irradiation, the U/sup 235/ and U/sup 238/ concentrations steadily decline while the Pu isotope concentrations initially increase, then decline. To ensure sufficient plutonium for feed material, it is necessary to remove the fuel from the reactor before the Pu content drops below its initial value. Although the reactivity variations presented were calculated specifically for sodium graphite reactors, they may be applied to any thermal reactor using Pu-spiked natural U as fuel. The reactivity changes are determined primarily by the fuel characteristics and are only slightly dependent on the other material in the reactor core. An analysis which estimates the effect of Pu feedback opcration fuel costs is given. (auth) in terms of nuclear power cost reduction are discussed (auth)

Roderick, C.

1955-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Decommissioning License Termination Plan Documents and Lessons Learned: Summary of LTPs for Two Reactors and Nuclear Regulatory Comm ission Safety Evaluation Reports for Three Nuclear Power Plant LTPs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report offers those utilities beginning the preparation of License Termination Plans (LTPs) in the near future a comprehensive summary of the approaches currently taken in LTP preparation by major nuclear decommissioning projects. The report details the approach taken in addressing each element of the LTP, and the lessons learned by those utilities currently undergoing the license termination process. This document provides needed guidance for the LTP process, and will greatly benefit utilities cons...

2004-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

374

Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Investments in Advanced Nuclear Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power Reactors Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power Reactors June 27, 2013 - 2:20pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to accelerate clean energy leadership and to enable a low-carbon economy, the Energy Department today announced $3.5 million for four advanced nuclear reactor projects that go beyond traditional light water designs. These projects -- led by General Atomics, GE Hitachi, Gen4 Energy and Westinghouse -- will address key technical challenges to designing, building and operating the next generation of nuclear reactors. These steps support the President's plan to cut carbon pollution and spark innovation

375

Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power Reactors Energy Department Announces New Investments in Advanced Nuclear Power Reactors June 27, 2013 - 2:20pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to accelerate clean energy leadership and to enable a low-carbon economy, the Energy Department today announced $3.5 million for four advanced nuclear reactor projects that go beyond traditional light water designs. These projects -- led by General Atomics, GE Hitachi, Gen4 Energy and Westinghouse -- will address key technical challenges to designing, building and operating the next generation of nuclear reactors. These steps support the President's plan to cut carbon pollution and spark innovation

376

Structural mechanics of fast spectrum nuclear reactor cores  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mechanics of fast spectrum nuclear reactor cores A fast reactor core is composed of a closely packed hexagonal arrangement of fuel, control, blanket , and shielding assemblies....

377

GAS COOLED NUCLEAR REACTOR STUDY. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

An investigntion was made of the performance of a gas-cooled reactor, designed to provide a source of high temperature heat to a stream of helium. This reactor, in turn, is used as a source of heat for the air stream in a gas- turbine power plant. The reactor design was predicted primarily on the requirement for transferring a large amount of heat to the helium stream with a pressure drop low enough that it will not represent a major loss of power in the power plant. The mass of uranium e uired far criticality under various circumstances was investigated by multigroup calculations, both on desk calculators and on an IBM-704 machine. The gasturbine power plant perfarmance was studied based on a Studebaker-Packard-designed gas-turbine power plant for the propulsion of destroyer-escort vessels. A small experimental program was carried out to study some effects of helium on graphite and on structural steels. (auth)

Thompson, A.S.

1956-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

White paper report on using nuclear reactors to search for a value of theta13  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PAPER REPORT on Using Nuclear Reactors to Search for a valuetimely new experiment at a nuclear reactor sensitive to theand judicious choice of a nuclear reactor. The dominant

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Design and Transient Analysis of Passive Safety Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L. J. Hamilton Nuclear Reactor Analysis John Wiley and Sons,R. J. Neuhold, Introductury Nuclear Reactor Dynamics. ANSL. J. Hamilton Nuclear Reactor Analysis John Wiley and Sons,

Galvez, Cristhian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes  

SciTech Connect

The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted.

Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schenter, R.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Gas-cooled reactor for space power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactor characteristics based on extensive development work on the 500-MWt reactor for the Pluto nuclear ramjet are described for space power systems useful in the range of 2 to 20 MWe for operating times of 1 y. The modest pressure drop through the prismatic ceramic core is supported at the outlet end by a ceramic dome which also serves as a neutron reflector. Three core materials are considered which are useful at temperatures up to about 2000 K. Most of the calculations are based on a beryllium oxide with uranium dioxide core. Reactor control is accomplished by use of a burnable poison, a variable-leakage reflector, and internal control rods. Reactivity swings of 20% are obtained with a dozen internal boron-10 rods for the size cores studied. Criticality calculations were performed using the ALICE Monte Carlo code. The inherent high-temperature capability of the reactor design removes the reactor as a limiting condition on system performance. The low fuel inventories required, particularly for beryllium oxide reactors, make space power systems based on gas-cooled near-thermal reactors a lesser safeguard risk than those based on fast reactors.

Walter, C.E.; Pearson, J.S.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Cooling system for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed which includes at least one primary cooling loop adapted to pass coolant gas from the reactor core and an associated steam generator through a duct system having a main circulator therein, and at least one auxiliary cooling loop having communication with the reactor core and adapted to selectively pass coolant gas through an auxiliary heat exchanger and circulator. The main and auxiliary circulators are installed in a common vertical cavity in the reactor vessel, and a common return duct communicates with the reactor core and intersects the common cavity at a junction at which is located a flow diverter valve operative to effect coolant flow through either the primary or auxiliary cooling loops.

Amtmann, Hans H. (Rancho Santa Fe, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a fast-acting nuclear reactor control device for moving and positioning a safety control rod to desired elevations within the core of the reactor between a run position in which the safety control rod is outside the reactor core, and a shutdown position in which the rod is fully inserted in the reactor core. The device employs a hydraulic pump motor, an electric gear motor, and a solenoid valve to drive the safety control rod into the reactor core through the entire stroke of the safety control rod. An overrunning clutch, allows the safety control rod to freely travel toward a safe position in the event of a partial drive system failure.

Kotlyar, O.M.; West, P.B.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

Magnetically Controlled Reactor Shrinks Power Quality Costs and Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetically Controlled Reactor Shrinks Power Quality Costs and Power Magnetically Controlled Reactor Shrinks Power Quality Costs and Power Losses Speaker(s): Mark D. Galperin Date: December 18, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Diana Morris In a new, magnetically controlled reactor (MCR), in which DC pulsing through a special winding controls inductive susceptance, high saturation of the magnetic circuit steel with optimal magnetic and electrical circuit parameters ensures less than 2-3% main harmonic distortion even without special filters. Transformer-like construction ensures reliable operation. MCR's increase power quality through automatic voltage regulation, reduced fluctuation, and smoothing of reactive power surges at 1/2 the cost of thyristor-controlled reactors (TCR's). Damping of voltage-oscillation

385

Nuclear reactor fissile isotopes antineutrino spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Positron spectrum from inverse beta decay reaction on proton was measured in 1988-1990 as a result of neutrino exploration experiment. The measured spectrum has the largest statistics and lowest energy threshold between other neutrino experiments made that time at nuclear reactors. On base of the positron spectrum the standard antineutrino spectrum for typical reactor fuel composition was restored. In presented analysis the partial spectra forming this standard spectrum were extracted using specific method. They could be used for neutrino experiments data analysis made at any fuel composition of reactor core.

Sinev, V

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Nuclear reactor fissile isotopes antineutrino spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Positron spectrum from inverse beta decay reaction on proton was measured in 1988-1990 as a result of neutrino exploration experiment. The measured spectrum has the largest statistics and lowest energy threshold between other neutrino experiments made that time at nuclear reactors. On base of the positron spectrum the standard antineutrino spectrum for typical reactor fuel composition was restored. In presented analysis the partial spectra forming this standard spectrum were extracted using specific method. They could be used for neutrino experiments data analysis made at any fuel composition of reactor core.

V. Sinev

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

Radial power flattening in sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to improve a new design for a uranium startup sodium cooled fast reactor which was proposed at MIT, this thesis evaluated radial power flattening by varying the fuel volume fraction at a fixed U-235 enrichment of ...

Krentz-Wee, Rebecca (Rebecca Elizabeth)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Competitive economics of nuclear power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some 12 components of a valid study of the competitive economics of a newly ordered nuclear power plant are identified and explicated. These are then used to adjust the original cost projections of four authoritative studies of nuclear and coal power economics.

Hellman, R.

1981-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

389

Nuclear power plant design analysis  

SciTech Connect

Information concerning the engineering aspects of the design of commercial nuclear power plants is presented. Topics discussed include: electric utility economics; nuclear plant cconomics; thermal-transport systems and core design; nuclear analysis methods; safcty requirements; fuel-system analysis; dcsign considerations; and optimization approaches. (DCC)

Sesonske, A.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Theta 13 Determination with Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently there has been a lot of interest around the world in the use of nuclear reactors to measure theta 13, the last undetermined angle in the 3-neutrino mixing scenario. In this paper the motivations for theta 13 measurement using short baseline nuclear reactor experiments are discussed. The features of such an experiment are described in the context of Double Chooz, which is a new project planned to start data-taking in 2008, and to reach a sensitivity of sinsq(2 theta 13) < 0.03.

F. Dalnoki-Veress

2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

391

Some aspects of the decommissioning of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The major factors influencing the choice of a national concept for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants are examined. The operating lifetimes of power generating units with nuclear reactors of various types (VVER-1000, VVER-440, RBMK-1000, EGP-6, and BN-600) are analyzed. The basic approaches to decommissioning Russian nuclear power plants and the treatment of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are discussed. Major aspects of the ecological and radiation safety of personnel, surrounding populations, and the environment during decommissioning of nuclear installations are identified.

Khvostova, M. S., E-mail: marinakhvostova@list.ru [St. Petersburg State Maritime Technical University (Sevmashvtuz), Severodvinsk Branch (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Nuclear Safeguards Considerations For The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High temperature reactors (HTRs) have been considered since the 1940s, and have been constructed and demonstrated in the United Kingdom (Dragon), United States (Peach Bottom and Fort Saint Vrain), Japan (HTTR), Germany (AVR and THTR-300), and have been the subject of conceptual studies in Russia (VGM). The attraction to these reactors is that they can use a variety of reactor fuels, including abundant thorium, which upon reprocessing of the spent fuel can produce fissile U-233. Hence, they could extend the stocks of available uranium, provided the fuel is reprocessed. Another attractive attribute is that HTRs typically operate at a much higher temperature than conventional light water reactors (LWRs), because of the use of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coated (TRISO) fuel particles embedded in ceramic graphite. Rather than simply discharge most of the unused heat from the working fluid in the power plant to the environment, engineers have been designing reactors for 40 years to recover this heat and make it available for district heating or chemical conversion plants. Demonstrating high-temperature nuclear energy conversion was the purpose behind Fort Saint Vrain in the United States, THTR-300 in Germany, HTTR in Japan, and HTR-10 and HTR-PM, being built in China. This resulted in nuclear reactors at least 30% or more thermodynamically efficient than conventional LWRs, especially if the waste heat can be effectively utilized in chemical processing plants. A modern variant of high temperature reactors is the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Originally developed in the United States and Germany, it is now being redesigned and marketed by the Republic of South Africa and China. The team examined historical high temperature and high temperature gas reactors (HTR and HTGR) and reviewed safeguards considerations for this reactor. The following is a preliminary report on this topic prepared under the ASA-100 Advanced Safeguards Project in support of the NNSA Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI).

Phillip Casey Durst; David Beddingfield; Brian Boyer; Robert Bean; Michael Collins; Michael Ehinger; David Hanks; David L. Moses; Lee Refalo

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

NREL: Energy Analysis - Nuclear Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Nuclear Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Over the last 30 years, analysts have conducted life cycle assessments on the environmental impacts associated with a variety of nuclear power technologies and systems. These life cycle assessments have had wide-ranging results. To better understand greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from nuclear power systems, NREL completed a comprehensive review and analysis of life cycle assessments focused on light water reactors (LWRs)-including both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs)-published between 1980 and 2010. NREL developed and applied a systematic approach to review life cycle assessment literature, identify primary sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions

394

Nuclear reactor and materials science research: Final technical report, May 1, 1985-September 30, 1986. [Academic and research utilization of reactor  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the 17-month period of the grant, May 1, 1985 - September 30, 1986, the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) was operated in support of research and academic programs in the physical and life sciences and in related engineering fields. The period encompassed MIT's fiscal year utilization of the reactor during that period may be classified as follows: neutron beam tube research, nuclear materials research and development, radiochemistry and trace analysis, nuclear medicine, radiation health physics, computer control of reactors, dose reduction in nuclear power reactors, reactor irradiations and services for groups outside MIT, and MIT research reactor. This paper provides detailed information on this research academic utilization.

Harling, O.K.

1987-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

395

TABLE 2. U.S. Nuclear Reactor Ownership Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station Point Beach Nuclear Plant Prairie Island Quad Cities Generating Station R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant River Bend PSEG Salem Generating ...

396

Development of NERVA reactor for space nuclear propulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The general technology development and demonstration of a Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA), a joint AEC-NASA program, was undertaken successfully in the 1960's and terminated in 1971 for lack of a specific mission. Detailed flight engine specifications were defined and several candidate designs which would satisfy these specifications were completed just prior to termination of these efforts. However, the technology interest continued and efforts were extended during the early 1970's to consider space power applications including a manned Mars mission and dual mode (propulsion power and electrical power) operation. Subsequent efforts have continued in developing electric power applications. Light-weight solid core reactor nuclear power sources have been conceptually studied based upon this technology. This paper provides a short summary of the technology that evolved in this very complex and frequently changing program with some specific references to the Mars mission propulsion application as it evolved from the NERVA development program.

Holman, R.R.; Pierce, B.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is considering renewal of the operating licenses for the Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (HNP) for a period of an additional 20 years. The purpose of this assessment is to provide information to the U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service concerning the impacts of continued operation of the HNP on the shortnose sturgeon, Acipenser brevirostrum. The

unknown authors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Investigation of bond graphs for nuclear reactor simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work proposes a simple and effective approach to modeling multiphysics nuclear reactor problems using bond graphs. The conventional method of modeling the coupled multiphysics transients in nuclear reactors is operator ...

Sosnovsky, Eugeny

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

POWER COST NORMALIZATION STUDIES CIVILIAN POWER REACTOR PROGRAM--Sept. 1, 1959  

SciTech Connect

In connection with the development of a comprehensive plan for a ten- year civilian power reactor program, the AEC has had a series of status reports prepared to present a comprehensive review of the technical and economic status of various nuclear power reactor concepts. In as much as the economic data reported by the various contractors reflected different design philosophies, different estimating policies, and in some cases a technology not verified by the AEC definition of current status, Sargent and Lundy was requested to review the aforementioned status reports and to prepare normalized cost estimates of each of eight reactor concepts. The reactors were studied in three plant sizes: 75, 200, and 300 Mw(e). The reactor concepts considered were pressurized water, boiling water, organic cooled, sodium graphite, liquid metal cooled, fluid fuel (aqueous homogeneous), heavy water moderated, and gas cooled. (W.D.M.)

1960-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

Fast Transient And Spatially Non-Homogenous Accident Analysis Of Two-Dimensional Cylindrical Nuclear Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research about fast transient and spatially non-homogenous nuclear reactor accident analysis of two-dimensional nuclear reactor has been done. This research is about prediction of reactor behavior is during accident. In the present study, space-time diffusion equation is solved by using direct methods which consider spatial factor in detail during nuclear reactor accident simulation. Set of equations that obtained from full implicit finite-difference discretization method is solved by using iterative methods ADI (Alternating Direct Implicit). The indication of accident is decreasing macroscopic absorption cross-section that results large external reactivity. The power reactor has a peak value before reactor has new balance condition. Changing of temperature reactor produce a negative Doppler feedback reactivity. The reactivity will reduce excess positive reactivity. Temperature reactor during accident is still in below fuel melting point which is in secure condition.

Yulianti, Yanti [Dept. of Physics, Universitas Lampung (UNILA), Jl. Sumantri Brojonegor No.1 Bandar Lampung (Indonesia); Dept. of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB), Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung (Indonesia); Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Khotimah, S. N. [Dept. of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB), Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung (Indonesia); Shafii, M. Ali [Dept. of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB), Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung (Indonesia); Dept. of Physics, Universitas Andalas (UNAND), Kampus Limau Manis, Padang, Sumatera Barat (Indonesia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

More About NNSA's Naval Reactors Office | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Naval Reactors Office The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program provides militarily effective nuclear propulsion plants and ensures their safe, reliable and long-lived operation. This...

402

Damper mechanism for nuclear reactor control elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A damper mechanism which provides a nuclear reactor control element decelerating function at the end of the scram stroke. The total damping function is produced by the combination of two assemblies, which operate in sequence. First, a tapered dashram assembly decelerates the control element to a lower velocity, after which a spring hydraulic damper assembly takes over to complete the final damping.

Taft, William Elwood (Los Gatos, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL-BREEDER FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel-breeder fuel element was developed for a nuclear reactor wherein discrete particles of fissionable material are dispersed in a matrix of fertile breeder material. The fuel element combines the advantages of a dispersion type and a breeder-type. (AEC)

Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

1962-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

404

Nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A temperature responsive, self-actuated nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly 10. The upper end 18 of a lower drive line 17 fits within the lower end of an upper drive line 12. The lower end (not shown) of the lower drive line 17 is connected to a neutron absorber. During normal temperature conditions the lower drive line 17 is supported by detent means 22,26. When an overtemperature condition occurs thermal actuation means 34 urges ring 26 upwardly sufficiently to allow balls 22 to move radially outwardly thereby allowing lower drive line 17 to move downwardly toward the core of the nuclear reactor resulting in automatic reduction of the reactor powder.

Bilibin, Konstantin (North Hollywood, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with  ...

406

Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with  ...

407

Selection of power plant elements for future reactor space electric power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various types of reactor designs, electric power conversion equipment, and reject-heat systems to be used in nuclear reactor power plants for future space missions were studied. The designs included gas-cooled, liquid-cooled, and heat-pipe reactors. For the power converters, passive types such as thermoelectric and thermionic converters and dynamic types such as Brayton, potassium Rankine, and Stirling cycles were considered. For the radiators, heat pipes for transfer and radiating surface, pumped fluid for heat transfer with fins as the radiating surface, and pumped fluid for heat transfer with heat pipes as the radiating surface were considered. After careful consideration of weights, sizes, reliabilities, safety, and development cost and time, a heat-pipe reactor design, thermoelectric converters, and a heat-pipe radiator for an experimental program were selected.

Buden, D.; Bennett, G.A.; Copper, K.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Expanding Options for Nuclear Power | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expanding Options for Nuclear Power Expanding Options for Nuclear Power Expanding Options for Nuclear Power April 15, 2013 - 10:12am Addthis The development of clean, affordable nuclear power options is a key element of the Energy Department's Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. As a part of this strategy, a high priority of the Department has been to help accelerate the timelines for the commercialization and deployment of small modular reactor (SMR) technologies through the SMR Licensing Technical Support program. | Photo by the Energy Department. The development of clean, affordable nuclear power options is a key element of the Energy Department's Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. As a part of this strategy, a high priority of the Department has been to

409

The Decline and Death of Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

since the Cold War, nuclear power plants are being plannedthe fuel used in nuclear power plants is almost completelya mere 43% believe that more nuclear power plants should be

Melville, Jonathan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Chu Visits Site of America's First New Nuclear Reactor in Three Decades |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu Visits Site of America's First New Nuclear Reactor in Three Chu Visits Site of America's First New Nuclear Reactor in Three Decades Chu Visits Site of America's First New Nuclear Reactor in Three Decades February 15, 2012 - 12:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Just two days after the Department of Energy requested more than $770 million for nuclear energy in 2013, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu visited the Vogtle nuclear power plant in Waynesboro, Georgia and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to highlight the steps the Obama Administration is taking to restart America's nuclear industry as part of an all-of-the-above American energy strategy. During remarks to more than 500 workers at the Vogtle nuclear power plant, Secretary Chu highlighted the wide variety of steps the Obama Administration has taken to help restart America's nuclear energy

411

Chu Visits Site of America's First New Nuclear Reactor in Three Decades |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu Visits Site of America's First New Nuclear Reactor in Three Chu Visits Site of America's First New Nuclear Reactor in Three Decades Chu Visits Site of America's First New Nuclear Reactor in Three Decades February 15, 2012 - 2:12pm Addthis Just two days after the Department of Energy requested more than $770 million for nuclear energy in 2013, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu visited the Vogtle nuclear power plant in Waynesboro, Georgia and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to highlight the steps the Obama Administration is taking to restart America's nuclear industry as part of an all-of-the-above American energy strategy. During remarks to more than 500 workers at the Vogtle nuclear power plant, Secretary Chu highlighted the wide variety of steps the Obama Administration has taken to help restart America's nuclear energy

412

Nuclear power. Volume 2: nuclear power project management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following topics are discussed: review of nuclear power plants; licensing procedures; safety analysis; project professional services; quality assurance and project organization; construction, scheduling and operation; construction, scheduling and operation; nuclear fuel handling and fuel management; and plant cost management. 116 references, 115 figures, 33 tables.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

MA50177: Scientific Computing Nuclear Reactor Simulation Generalised Eigenvalue Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MA50177: Scientific Computing Case Study Nuclear Reactor Simulation ­ Generalised Eigenvalue of a malfunction or of an accident experimentally, the numerical simulation of nuclear reactors is of utmost balance in a nuclear reactor are the two-group neutron diffusion equations -div (K1 u1) + (a,1 + s) u1 = 1

Scheichl, Robert

414

1 INTRODUCTION Modern nuclear reactor concepts make use of pas-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 INTRODUCTION Modern nuclear reactor concepts make use of pas- sive safety features (Fong et al systems in advanced nuclear reactors; in (Cardoso et al. 2008), Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs: Special Issue "Natural Circulation in Nuclear Reactor Systems", Hindawi Publishing Corpo- ration, Paper

415

Polynomial regression with derivative information in nuclear reactor uncertainty quantification*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Polynomial regression with derivative information in nuclear reactor uncertainty quantification in the outputs. The usual difficulties in modeling the work of the nuclear reactor models include the large size, applying the existing AD tools to nuclear reactor models still takes considerable development effort

Anitescu, Mihai

416

Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated energy, environment and economics modeling suggests that worldwide electrical energy use will increase from 2.4 TWe today to ~12 TWe in 2100. It will be challenging to provide 40% of this electrical power from combustion with carbon sequestration, as it will be challenging to provide 30% from renewable energy sources derived from natural energy flows. Thus nuclear power may be needed to provide ~30%, 3600 GWe, by 2100. Calculations of the associated stocks and flows of uranium, plutonium and minor actinides indicate that the proliferation risks at mid-century, using current light-water reactor technology, are daunting. There are institutional arrangements that may be able to provide an acceptable level of risk mitigation, but they will be difficult to implement. If a transition is begun to fast-spectrum reactors at mid-century, without a dramatic change in the proliferation risks of such systems, at the end of the century global nuclear proliferation risks are much greater, and more resistant to mitigation. Fusion energy, if successfully demonstrated to be economically competitive, would provide a source of nuclear power with much lower proliferation risks than fission.

Robert J. Goldston

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

417

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel element comprising a large number og wafers of fissionable material and a protective jacket having compartments holding these wafers is described. The compartments of the jacket aid the removal of heat from the wafers, keep the wafers or fragments thereof from migrating in the jacket, and permit the escape of gaseous fission products.

Carney, K.G. Jr.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

418

Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

energy released during the neutron-induced fission of nuclear fuels is used for energy production in power reactors. The process of beta-n emission from fission products...

419

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program – Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Cables is to support the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) R&D pathway. The focus of the workshop was to identify the technical gaps in detecting aging cables and predicting their remaining life expectancy. The workshop was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on July 30, 2012, at Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation (AMS) headquarters. The workshop was attended by 30 experts in materials, electrical engineering, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory), NDE instrumentation development, universities, commercial NDE services and cable manufacturers, and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The motivation for the R&D roadmap comes from the need to address the aging management of in-containment cables at nuclear power plants (NPPs).

Simmons, Kevin L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Brenchley, David L.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hashemian, Hash; Konnik, Robert; Ray, Sheila

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

420

Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document is a safety evaluation report regarding the application to renew the operating licenses for Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Units 2 and 3. The application was filed by

Peach Bottom; Atomic Power; Peach Bottom; Atomic Power

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

India's nuclear power program : a study of India's unique approach to nuclear energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

India is in the middle of the biggest expansion of nuclear power in its history, adding 20 GWe in the next 14 years in the form of pressure water reactors and fast breeder reactors. At the same time, the United States is ...

Murray, Caitlin Lenore

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Nuclear reactor control room construction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control room for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects labelled 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 in the drawing are no less than four inches from walls labelled 10.2. A ceiling contains cooling fins that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates. A concrete slab is poured over the plates. Studs are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete. 6 figures.

Lamuro, R.C.; Orr, R.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

423

The Decline and Death of Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

world-nuclear.org/info/Nuclear-Fuel-Cycle/Nuclear- Wastes/fuel sources; the fuel used in nuclear power plants isphase out both nuclear energy and fossil fuels at the same

Melville, Jonathan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The Decline and Death of Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Y. , & Kitazawa, K. (2012). Fukushima in review: A complexin new nuclear power stations after Fukushima. The Guardian.nuclear-power- stations-fukushima Hvistendahl, M. (2007,

Melville, Jonathan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described whereby fuel tubes or pins are cut, loaded with fuel pellets and a heat transfer medium, sealed at each end with slotted fittings, and assembled into a rectangular tube bundle to form a fuel element. The tubes comprising the fuel element are laterally connected between their ends by clips and tabs to form a linear group of spaced parallel tubes, which receive their vertical support by resting on a grid. The advantages of this method are that it permits elimination of structural material (e.g., fuel-element cans) within the reactor core, and removal of at least one fuel pin from an element and replacement thereof so that a burnable poison may be utilized during the core lifetime. (AEC)

Dickson, J.J.

1963-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

426

Operating strategy generators for nuclear reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operating strategy generators, i.e., the software intended for increasing the efficiency of work of nuclear power plant operators, are discussed. The possibilities provided by the domestic and foreign operating-strategy generators are analyzed.

Solovyev, D. A., E-mail: and@est.mephi.ru; Semenov, A. A.; Shchukin, N. V. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

POWER GENERATING NEUTRONIC REACTOR SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to reactor systems of the type wherein the cooiing medium is a liquid which is converted by the heat of the reaction to steam which is conveyed directly to a pnime mover such as a steam turbine driving a generatore after which it is condensed and returred to the coolant circuit. In this design, the reactor core is disposed within a tank for containing either a slurry type fuel or an aggregation of solid fuel elements such as elongated rods submerged in a liquid moderator such as heavy water. The top of the tank is provided with a nozzle which extends into an expansion chamber connected with the upper end of the tank, the coolant being maintained in the expansion chamber at a level above the nozzle and the steam being formed in the expansion chamber.

Vernon, H.C.

1958-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described. Volume II: Monte Carlo Calculations for Nuclear Reactors. In-Core Management of Four Reactor Types. In-Core Management in CANDU-PHW Reactors. Reactor Dynamics. The Theory of Neutron Leakage in Reactor Lattices. Index.

Ronen, Y.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Rodded shutdown system for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A top mounted nuclear reactor diverse rodded shutdown system utilizing gas fed into a pressure bearing bellows region sealed at the upper extremity to an armature. The armature is attached to a neutron absorber assembly by a series of shafts and connecting means. The armature is held in an uppermost position by an electromagnet assembly or by pressurized gas in a second embodiment. Deenergizing the electromagnet assembly, or venting the pressurized gas, causes the armature to fall by the force of gravity, thereby lowering the attached absorber assembly into the reactor core.

Golden, Martin P. (Penn Township, Allegheny County, PA); Govi, Aldo R. (Greensburg, PA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Design, analysis and optimization of the power conversion system for the Modular Pebble Bed Reactor System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Modular Pebble Bed Reactor system (MPBR) requires a gas turbine cycle (Brayton cycle) as the power conversion system for it to achieve economic competitiveness as a GenIV nuclear system. The availability of controllable ...

Wang, Chunyun, 1968-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Advances in Tandem Mirror fusion power reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Tandem Mirror exhibits several distinctive features which make the reactor embodiment of the principle very attractive: Simple low-technology linear central cell; steady-state operation; high-..beta.. operation; no driven current or disruptions; divertorless operation; direction conversion of end-loss power; low-surface heat loads; and advanced fusion fuel capability. In this paper, we examine these features in connection with two tandem mirror reactor designs, MARS and MINIMARS, and several advanced reactor concepts including the wall-stabilized reactor and the field-reversed mirror. With a novel compact end plug scheme employing octopole stabilization, MINIMARS is expressly designed for short construction times, factory-built modules, and a small (600 MWe) but economic reactor size. We have also configured the design for low radioactive afterheat and inherent/passive safety under LOCA/LOFA conditions, thereby obviating the need for expensive engineered safety systems. In contrast to the complex and expensive double-quadrupole end-cell of the MARS reactor, the compact octopole end-cell of MINIMARS enables ignition to be achieved with much shorter central cell lengths and considerably improves the economy of scale for small (approx.250 to 600 MWe) tandem mirror reactors. Finally, we examine the prospects for realizing the ultimate potential of the tandem mirror with regard to both innovative configurations and novel neutron energy conversion schemes, and stress that advanced fuel applications could exploit its unique reactor features.

Perkins, L.J.; Logan, B.G.

1986-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

432

Heavy Liquid Metal Reactor Development - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

> Heavy Liquid Metal Reactor Development > Heavy Liquid Metal Reactor Development Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Overview Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR) Heavy Liquid Metal Reactor Development Generation IV Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Advanced Reactor Development and Technology Heavy Liquid Metal Reactor Development Bookmark and Share STAR-LM: Simplified, Modular, Small Reactor Featuring Flow-thru Fuel Cartridge STAR-LM: Simplified, Modular, Small Reactor Featuring Flow-thru Fuel Cartridge. Click on image to view larger image. Argonne has traditionally been the foremost institute in the US for

433

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors May 3, 2011 - 3:41pm Addthis Oak Ridge, Tenn. - Today the Department of Energy dedicated the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), an advanced research facility that will accelerate the advancement of nuclear reactor technology. CASL researchers are using supercomputers to study the performance of light water reactors and to develop highly sophisticated modeling that will help accelerate upgrades at existing U.S. nuclear plants. These upgrades could improve the energy output of our existing reactor fleet by as much as seven reactors' worth at a fraction of the cost of building new reactors, while providing continued improvements in

434

75,000 KILOWATTS OF ELECTRICITY BY NUCLEAR FISSION AT THE HALLAM NUCLEAR POWER FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

For presentation at ASCE Convention in Reno, Nevada on Thursday, June 23, 1860. A description of the Hallam Nuclear Power Facslity is presented. The history of the project, program participants, site description, component development program, reaetor building, reactor structure, reactor core, sodium systems, instrumentation and control, fuel and component handling, auxsilary sustems, special design features, and advantages of sodium graphite reactor systems are discussed. (M.C.G.)

Gronemeyer, F.C.; Merryman, J.W.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

DOE fundamentals handbook: Nuclear physics and reactor theory. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Physics and Reactor Theory Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of nuclear physics and reactor theory. The handbook includes information on atomic and nuclear physics; neutron characteristics; reactor theory and nuclear parameters; and the theory of reactor operation. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the scientific principles that are associated with various DOE nuclear facility operations and maintenance.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

DOE fundamentals handbook: Nuclear physics and reactor theory  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Physics and Reactor Theory Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of nuclear physics and reactor theory. The handbook includes information on atomic and nuclear physics; neutron characteristics; reactor theory and nuclear parameters; and the theory of reactor operation. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the scientific principles that are associated with various DOE nuclear facility operations and maintenance.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

DOE fundamentals handbook: Nuclear physics and reactor theory. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Physics and Reactor Theory Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of nuclear physics and reactor theory. The handbook includes information on atomic and nuclear physics; neutron characteristics; reactor theory and nuclear parameters; and the theory of reactor operation. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the scientific principles that are associated with various DOE nuclear facility operations and maintenance.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

FUEL ELEMENT FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element structure particularly useful in high temperature nuclear reactors is presented. Basically, the structure comprises two coaxial graphite sleeves integrally joined together by radial fins. Due to the high structural strength of graphite at high temperatures and the rigidity of this structure, nuclear fuel encased within the inner sleeve in contiguous relation therewith is supported and prevented from expanding radially at high temperatures. Thus, the necessity of relying on the usual cladding materials with relatively low temperature limitations for structural strength is removed. (AEC)

Davidson, J.K.

1963-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

439

COMSOL-based Nuclear Reactor Kinetics Studies at the HFIR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The computational ability to accurately predict the dynamic behavior of a nuclear reactor core in response to reactivity-induced perturbations is an important subject in reactor physics. Space-time and point kinetics methodologies were developed for the purpose of studying the transient-induced behavior of the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) compact core. The space-time simulations employed the three-energy-group neutron diffusion equations, and transients initiated by control cylinder and hydraulic tube rabbit ejections were studied. The work presented here is the first step towards creating a comprehensive multiphysics methodology for studying the dynamic behavior of the HFIR core during reactivity perturbations. The results of these studies show that point kinetics is adequate for small perturbations in which the power distribution is assumed to be time-independent, but space-time methods must be utilized to determine localized effects.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Passive heat-transfer means for nuclear reactors. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved passive cooling arrangement is disclosed for maintaining adjacent or related components of a nuclear reactor within specified temperature differences. Specifically, heat pipes are operatively interposed between the components, with the vaporizing section of the heat pipe proximate the hot component operable to cool it and the primary condensing section of the heat pipe proximate the other and cooler component operable to heat it. Each heat pipe further has a secondary condensing section that is located outwardly beyond the reactor confinement and in a secondary heat sink, such as air ambient the containment, that is cooler than the other reactor component. By having many such heat pipes, an emergency passive cooling system is defined that is operative without electrical power.

Burelbach, J.P.

1982-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear power reactors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

NUCLEAR REACTOR AND THERMIONIC FUEL ELEMENT THEREFOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The patent relates to the direct conversion of fission heat to electricity by use of thermionic plasma diodes having fissionable material cathodes, said diodes arranged to form a critical mass in a nuclear reactor. The patent describes a fuel element comprising a plurality of diodes each having a fissionable material cathode, an anode around said cathode, and an ionizable gas therebetween. Provision is made for flowing the gas and current serially through the diodes. (AEC)

Rasor, N.S.; Hirsch, R.L.

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

52] J.H. Rust. Nuclear Power Plant Engineering. Buchanan,the economics of nuclear power plants. In addition, the longin commercial nuclear power plants. The fuel designs and

Terrani, Kurt Amir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Executive Director for Operations RENEWAL OF FULL-POWER OPERATING LICENSE FOR PILGRIM NUCLEAR POWER STATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper (1) requests that the Commission authorize the Director of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) to renew the operating license for Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station (PNPS) for an additional 20 years, and (2) informs the Commission of the results of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff’s review of the PNPS license renewal application (LRA) (Ref. 1) submitted by Entergy Nuclear Generation Company (Entergy Nuclear) and Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. (ENO) (owner and operator, respectively, of PNPS). In the Staff Requirements Memorandum for SECY-02-0088, “Turkey Point Nuclear Plant, Units 3 and

R. W. Borchardt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Decommissioning in the mature nuclear power industry  

SciTech Connect

Procedures for decommissioning a nuclear power plant or a spent fuel reprocessing plant are described. (DCC)

Anderson, F.H.; Slansky, C.M.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

The Decline and Death of Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory Commission (2012). NRC: Nuclear Security andRegulatory Commission (2013). NRC: New Reactors. nrc.gov.Regulatory Commission [US NRC], 2012). The NRC mandates

Melville, Jonathan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described. Volume III: Control Rods and Burnable Absorber Calculations. Perturbation Theory for Nuclear Reactor Analysis. Thermal Reactors Calculations. Fast Reactor Calculations. Seed-Blanket Reactors. Index.

Ronen, Y.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

The Decline and Death of Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9. The Economist (2012). Nuclear power: The 30-year itch.Germany and France, the anti-nuclear movement has taken suchtime since the Cold War, nuclear power plants are being

Melville, Jonathan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Nuclear Design of the HOMER-15 Mars Surface Fission Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The next generation of robotic missions to Mars will most likely require robust power sources in the range of 3 to 20 kWe. Fission systems are well suited to provide safe, reliable, and economic power within this range. The goal of this study is to design a compact, low-mass fission system that meets Mars surface power requirements, while maintaining a high level of safety and reliability at a relatively low cost. The Heat pipe Power System (HPS) is one possible approach for producing near-term, low-cost, space fission power. The goal of the HPS project is to devise an attractive space fission system that can be developed quickly and affordably. The primary ways of doing this are by using existing technology and by designing the system for inexpensive testing. If the system can be designed to allow highly prototypic testing with electrical heating, then an exhaustive test program can be carried out quickly and inexpensively, and thorough testing of the actual flight unit can be performed - which is a major benefit to reliability. Over the past 4 years, three small HPS proof-of-concept technology demonstrations have been conducted, and each has been highly successful. The Heat pipe-Operated Mars Exploration Reactor (HOMER) is a derivative of the HPS designed especially for producing power on the surface of Mars. The HOMER-15 is a 15-kWt reactor that couples with a 3-kWe Stirling engine power system. The reactor contains stainless-steel (SS)-clad uranium nitride (UN) fuel pins that are structurally and thermally bonded to SS/sodium heat pipes. Fission energy is conducted from the fuel pins to the heat pipes, which then carry the heat to the Stirling engine. This paper describes conceptual design and nuclear performance the HOMER-15 reactor. (author)

Poston, David I. [Nuclear Systems Design Group, Decision Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, 87545 (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Nuclear Power Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Onofre Nuclear Generating Station San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Bob Ashe-Everest Southern California Edison 10 Incoming New Fuel Inspecting New Fuel SONGS Unit 1 Fuel Storage SONGS Unit 1 Fuel Storage History History u Shipped 270 Fuel Assemblies (F/A) from Unit 1 to Morris, Illinois. u Transshipped 70 U1 F/As to U2 spent fuel pool (SFP). u Transshipped 118 U1 F/As to U3 SFP. SONGS ISFSI Loading SONGS ISFSI Loading u Moved 5 dry shielded canisters (DSC) from U3 SFP to the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). Each DSC contains up to 24 F/As. u Moved 9 DSCs from U1 SFP to the ISFSI. u At total of 325 U1 F/As have been moved into dry storage to date. u Scheduled to move 3 DSCs from U2 SFP to the ISFSI May 2005. Canister into Cask FA being loaded into canister

450

Security of Nuclear Reactors and Special Nuclear Materials This revisiono  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Provides requirements for the recovery of lost, seized, or stolen special nuclear material (para 2-1b). o Prescribes that unclassified information pertaining to plans, procedures, and equipment for the physical protection of nuclear reactors and special nuclear material will be safeguarded as DoD Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (para 2-1f). o Requires the conduct of a vulnerability assessment at each facility where special nuclear material is used or stored (para 2-2a). o Provides that Headquarters, U. S. Army Materiel Command will develop the postulated threat as the basis for the vulnerability assessment (para 2-2b), as well as the standardized format for documenting the results of the assessment and for the after action reports (para 2-2h). o Designates special nuclear material as inherently dangerous to others for use of force purposes (para 2-4a). o Prescribes minimum storage standards for special nuclear material (para 3-1). o Provides for the protection of vital equipment (para 3-3). o Explains the concept of the required security system for nuclear reactors and special nuclear material (para 4-2). o Establishes specific physical security standards for the protection of nuclear reactors and special nuclear material (para 4-4), to include required access controls (para 4-5). o Prohibits the locksmith from being designated as the key control officer or lock custodian (para 4-5g(25)). o Provides guidance on meeting requirement to continuously man two alarm monitoring facilities (para 4-6b). o Allows continued use of monitoring console systems installed prior to publication of this regulation that do not meet the map or video display requirement (para 4-6g(1)). o Provides guidance for testing the perimeter intrusion detection system (para 4-6n(2)). o Requires appropriate security personnel be trained to manually start the standby generator if the automatic starter fails to function properly (para 4-9b(4)). o Provides that the size, composition, and response time of the response force will be set by the major subordinate commander and approved by the Commanding

unknown authors

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Power Reactors PROTECTION AGAINST SABOTAGE Protection Against Industrial Sabotage I1C-4 Decominarion and Decommissioning

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process September 19, 2012 Presenter: Undine Shoop, Chief, Health Physics and Human Performance Branch, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Topics covered: Purpose of the Reactor Oversight Process (ROP) ROP Framework Safety Culture within the ROP Safety Culture Assessments Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process More Documents & Publications A Commissioner's Perspective on USNRC Actions in Response to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Comparison of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for Fuel Cycle Facilities, 2/17/11

453

Issues in the flight qualification of a space power reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP). The program goals, the proposed mission, the spacecraft, and the Topaz II space nuclear power system are described. The subject of flight qualification is examined and the inherent difficulties of qualifying a space reactor are described. The differences between US and Russian flight qualification procedures are explored. A plan is then described that was developed to determine an appropriate flight qualification program for the Topaz II reactor to support a possible NEPSTP launch. Refocusing of the activities of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO), combined with budgetary pressures, forced the cancellation of the NEPSTP at the end of the 1993 fiscal year.

Polansky, G.F. [Phillips Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schmidt, G.L. [New Mexico Engineering Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Voss, S.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Reynolds, E.L. [Applied Physics Lab., Laurel, MD (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

The Future of Nuclear Power After Fukushima 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the impact of the Fukushima accident on the future of nuclear power around the world. We begin with a discussion of the ‘but for ’ baseline and the much discussed ‘nuclear renaissance. ’ Our pre-Fukushima benchmark for growth in nuclear generation in the U.S. and other developed countries is much more modest than many bullish forecasts of a big renaissance in new capacity may have suggested. For at least the next decade in developed countries, it is composed primarily of life extensions for many existing reactors, modest uprates of existing reactors as their licenses are extended, and modest levels of new construction. The majority of forecasted new

Paul L. Joskow; John E. Parsons; Paul L. Joskow; Alfred P. Sloan Foundation; John E. Parsons

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

CIVILIAN POWER REACTOR PROGRAM. PART II. ECONOMIC POTENTIAL AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM AS OF 1959  

SciTech Connect

The status of technology of nuclear power reactors in 1959 is reviewed. General research and engineering development activities are discussed. The reactors considered include the pressurized water, boiling water, light water moderated superheat, organic cooled, sodium graphite, gas cooled enriched fuel, gas cooled natural uranium, fast breeder, aqueous homogeneous, and heavy water. Power costs are compared with the cost of power from conventional plants. (C.H.)

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

PEBBLE-BED NUCLEAR REACTOR SYSTEM PHYSICS AND FUEL UTILIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Generation IV Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PMBR) design may be used for electricity production, co-generation applications (industrial heat, hydrogen production, desalination, etc.), and could potentially eliminate some high level nuclear wastes. Because of these advantages, as well as the ability to build cost-effective small-to-medium sized reactors, this design is currently being considered for construction in many countries, from Japan, where test reactors are being analyzed, to China. The use of TRISO-coated micro-particles as a fuel in these reactors leads to multi-heterogeneity physics features that must be properly treated and accounted for. Inherent interrelationships of neutron interactions, temperature effects, and structural effects, further challenge computational evaluations of High Temperature Reactors (HTRs). The developed models and computational techniques have to be validated in code-to-code and, most importantly, code-to-experiment benchmark studies. This report quantifies the relative accuracy of various multi-heterogeneity treatments in whole-core 3D models for parametric studies of Generation IV Pebble Bed Modular Reactors as well as provide preliminary results of the PBMR performance analysis. Data is gathered from two different models, one based upon a benchmark for the African PBMR-400 design, and another based on the PROTEUS criticality experiment, since the African design is a more realistic power reactor, but the PROTEUS experiment model can be used for calculations that cannot be performed on the more complex model. Early data was used to refine final models, and the resulting final models were used to conduct parametric studies on composition and geometry optimization based on pebble bed reactor physics in order to improve fuel utilization.

Kelly, Ryan 1989-

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Nuclear reactor pressure vessel support system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A support system for nuclear reactor pressure vessels which can withstand all possible combinations of stresses caused by a postulated core disrupting accident during reactor operation. The nuclear reactor pressure vessel is provided with a flange around the upper periphery thereof, and the flange includes an annular vertical extension formed integral therewith. A support ring is positioned atop of the support ledge and the flange vertical extension, and is bolted to both members. The plug riser is secured to the flange vertical extension and to the top of a radially outwardly extension of the rotatable plug. This system eliminates one joint through which fluids contained in the vessel could escape by making the fluid flow path through the joint between the flange and the support ring follow the same path through which fluid could escape through the plug risers. In this manner, the sealing means to prohibit the escape of contained fluids through the plug risers can also prohibit the escape of contained fluid through the securing joint.

Sepelak, George R. (McMurray, PA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Gravity Scaling of a Power Reactor Water Shield  

SciTech Connect

Water based reactor shielding is being considered as an affordable option for potential use on initial lunar surface reactor power systems. Heat dissipation in the shield from nuclear sources must be rejected by an auxillary thermal hydraulic cooling system. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection between the core surface and an array of thermosyphon radiator elements. Natural convection in a 100 kW