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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Seismic Margin Assessment of the Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Plant, Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A seismic margin assessment of the Georgia Power Company Edwin I. Hatch, unit 1 nuclear power plant showed the practicality of an EPRI methodology for assessing the ability of nuclear plants to withstand large earthquakes. The assessment, performed by the utility, established that the plant can withstand an earthquake at least twice the magnitude for which it was designed.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report The objective of this document is to provide the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear industry with the basis for a plan to ensure the availability of near-term nuclear energy options that can be in operation in the U.S. by 2010. This document identifies the technological, regulatory, and institutional gaps and issues that need to be addressed for new nuclear plants to be deployed in the U.S. in this timeframe. It also identifies specific designs that could be deployed by 2010, along with the actions and resource requirements that are needed to ensure their

3

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report The objective of this document is to provide the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear industry with the basis for a plan to ensure the availability of near-term nuclear energy options that can be in operation in the U.S. by 2010. This document identifies the technological, regulatory, and institutional gaps and issues that need to be addressed for new nuclear plants to be deployed in the U.S. in this timeframe. It also identifies specific designs that could be deployed by 2010, along with the actions and resource requirements that are needed to ensure their

4

Nuclear power plant performance assessment pertaining to plant aging in France and the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of aging on nuclear power plant performance has come under increased scrutiny in recent years. The approaches used to make an assessment of this effect strongly influence the economics of nuclear power plant ...

Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Mathematical model of steam generator feed system at power unit of nuclear plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model of a steam generator feed system at a power unit of a nuclear plant with variable values of transfer function coefficients is presented. The model is realized in the MATLAB/Simulink/Stateflow event-driven simulation.

E. M. Raskin; L. A. Denisova; V. P. Sinitsyn; Yu. V. Nesterov

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed--has been benchmarked against measurements.30 At the Ringhals nuclear power plant, this measurement is car a measurement performed at the PWR Unit 4 of the Ring hals Nuclear Power Plant was available to us

Demazière, Christophe

7

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed reactivity effects--has been benchmarked against measurements.30 At the Ringhals nuclear power plant a measurement performed at the PWR Unit 4 of the Ring- hals Nuclear Power Plant was available to us

Demazière, Christophe

8

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1, Unit 2","1,705","13,994",100.0,"Calvert Cliffs Nuclear PP Inc" "1 Plant 2...

9

Establishing a Groundwater Protection Program for New Nuclear Generating Units: Appendix to the EPRI Groundwater Protection Guidelines for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New nuclear power plants should plan for groundwater protection early in the planning process. The construction project team should be made aware of the need to establish the groundwater protection program prior to the construction planning process. This document provides guidance for establishing Groundwater Protection Programs for new nuclear generating units. It applies to new nuclear generating units on both new and existing nuclear power plant ...

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

10

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Braidwood Generation Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,330","19,200",20.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Byron Generating Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,300","19,856",20.6,"Exelon Nuclear" "Clinton Power Station Unit 1","1,065","8,612",9.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Dresden Generating Station Unit 2, Unit 3","1,734","14,593",15.2,"Exelon Nuclear" "LaSalle Generating Station

11

An examination of the pursuit of nuclear power plant construction projects in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent serious reconsideration of nuclear power as a means for U.S. electric utilities to increase their generation capacity provokes many questions regarding the achievable success of future nuclear power plant ...

Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

13

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

14

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Beaver Valley Unit 1, Unit 2","1,777","14,994",19.3,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "Limerick Unit 1, Unit 2","2,264","18,926",24.3,"Exelon Nuclear" "PPL Susquehanna Unit 1, Unit 2","2,450","18,516",23.8,"PPL Susquehanna LLC" "Peach Bottom Unit 2, Unit 3","2,244","18,759",24.1,"Exelon Nuclear" "Three Mile Island Unit 1",805,"6,634",8.5,"Exelon Nuclear"

15

EIS No. 20100312 EIS Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant Units 3 and 4  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with Section 309(a) of the Clean Air Act, EPA is required to make its comments on EISs issued by other Federal agencies public. Historically, EPA has met this mandate by publishing weekly notices of availability of EPA comments, which includes a brief summary of EPA's comment letters, in the Federal Register. Since February 2008, EPA has been including its comment letters on EISs on its Web site at: http://www.epa.gov/compliance/nepa/eisdata.html. Including the entire EIS comment letters on the Web site satisfies the Section 309(a) requirement to make EPA's comments on EISs available to the public. Accordingly, on March 31, 2010, EPA discontinued the publication of the notice of availability of EPA comments in the Federal Register. EIS No. 20100312, Draft EIS, NRC, TX, Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant Units 3 and 4, Application for Combined Licenses (COLs) for Construction Permits and Operating Licenses, (NUREG-1943), Hood and Somervell Counties, TX, Comment Period Ends: 10/26/2010.

Bjornstad, David J [ORNL

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2ct Millstone Unit 2, Unit 3 2,103 16,750 100.0 Dominion Nuclear Conn Inc 1 Plant 2 Reactors Owner Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent ...

17

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2ar Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 1, Unit 2 1,835 15,023 100.0 Entergy Arkansas Inc 1 Plant 2 Reactors Owner Note: Totals may not equal sum of ...

18

Development of the severe accident management guidelines (SAMG) for Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3, 4, 5 and 6  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the development process of the severe accident management guidelines (SAMG) for Units 3, 4, 5 and 6 of Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant. The units are Korean Standard Nuclear Power (KSNP) plant, 1000 MWe class pressurized water reactor (PWR) with two loops of primary coolant system. The severe accident management guidelines for the units have been completed in 2002. The generic severe accident management guidance for Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant has been used as the basis when developing Ulchin severe accident management guideline. Result of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for each unit was reviewed to integrate its insight into the SAMG. It indicates that each unit has a balanced design to any specific initiating events for core damage. Seven severe accident management strategies are applied in Ulchin SAMG. Seven strategies are (1) Inject into the steam generator (2) De-pressurize the RCS (3) Inject into the RCS (4) Inject into the containment (5) Control the fission product release into environment (6) Control the containment pressure and temperature and (7) Control hydrogen concentration in the containment. The range and capability of essential instrument for performing the strategies are assessed. Computational aids are developed to complement the unavailable instrument during the accident and to assist the operator's decision choosing strategies. To examine the ability of the SAMG to fulfill its intended function, small loss of coolant accident (SLOCA) with the failure of safety injection was selected as a reference scenario. The scenario was analyzed using MAAP code. The evaluation of the SAMG using this sequence has been successfully completed. (authors)

Kim, Hyeong T.; Yoo, Hojong; Lim, Hyuk Soon; Park, Jong W.; Lim, Woosang; Oh, Seung Jong [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 103-16 Munji-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon, 305-380 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chang Hyun [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung Chul [Future and Challenges, Inc (Korea, Republic of)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Indian Point Unit 2, Unit 3","2,063","16,321",39.0,"Entergy Nuclear Indian Point" "James A Fitzpatrick Unit 1",855,"6,361",15.2,"Entergy Nuc Fitzpatrick LLC" "Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station Unit 1, Unit 2","1,773","14,239",34.0,"Nine Mile Point Nuclear Sta LLC" "R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1",581,"4,948",11.8,"R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, LLC" "4 Plants

20

Power conversion unit studies for the next generation nuclear plant coupled to a high-temperature steam electrolysis facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold: 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in their early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. Many aspects of the NGNP must be researched and developed to make recommendations on the final design of the plant. Parameters such as working conditions, cycle components, working fluids, and power conversion unit configurations must be understood. Three configurations of the power conversion unit were modeled using the process code HYSYS; a three-shaft design with 3 turbines and 4 compressors, a combined cycle with a Brayton top cycle and a Rankine bottoming cycle, and a reheated cycle with 3 stages of reheat were investigated. A high temperature steam electrolysis hydrogen production plant was coupled to the reactor and power conversion unit by means of an intermediate heat transport loop. Helium, CO2, and an 80% nitrogen, 20% helium mixture (by weight) were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms cycle efficiency and development cost. In each of these configurations the relative heat exchanger size and turbomachinery work were estimated for the different working fluids. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the three-shaft and combined cycles were performed to determine the effect of varying conditions in the cycle. Recommendations on the optimal working fluid for each configuration were made. The helium working fluid produced the highest overall plant efficiency for the three-shaft and reheat cycle; however, the nitrogen-helium mixture produced similar efficiency with smaller component sizes. The CO2 working fluid is recommend in the combined cycle configuration.

Barner, Robert Buckner

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Owners of nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Induced Radioactivity and Waste Classification of Reactor Zone Components of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 After Final Shutdown  

SciTech Connect

The dismantlement of the reactor core materials and surrounding structural components is a major technical concern for those planning closure and decontamination and decommissioning of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Specific issues include when and how dismantlement should be accomplished and what the radwaste classification of the dismantled system would be at the time it is disassembled. Whereas radiation levels and residual radiological characteristics of the majority of the plant systems are directly measured using standard radiation survey and radiochemical analysis techniques, actual measurements of reactor zone materials are not practical due to high radiation levels and inaccessibility. For these reasons, neutron transport analysis was used to estimate induced radioactivity and radiation levels in the Chernobyl NPP Unit 1 reactor core materials and structures.Analysis results suggest that the optimum period of safe storage is 90 to 100 yr for the Unit 1 reactor. For all of the reactor components except the fuel channel pipes (or pressure tubes), this will provide sufficient decay time to allow unlimited worker access during dismantlement, minimize the need for expensive remote dismantlement, and allow for the dismantled reactor components to be classified as low- or medium-level radioactive waste. The fuel channel pipes will remain classified as high-activity waste requiring remote dismantlement for hundreds of years due to the high concentration of induced {sup 63}Ni in the Zircaloy pipes.

Bylkin, Boris K. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Davydova, Galina B. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Zverkov, Yuri A. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Krayushkin, Alexander V. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Neretin, Yuri A. [Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (Ukraine); Nosovsky, Anatoly V. [Slavutych Division of the International Chernobyl Center (Ukraine); Seyda, Valery A. [Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (Ukraine); Short, Steven M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (United States)

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

ASSESSMENT OF THE RADIONUCLIDE COMPOSITION OF "HOT PARTICLES" SAMPLED IN THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT FOURTH REACTOR UNIT  

SciTech Connect

Fuel-containing materials sampled from within the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) 4th Reactor Unit Confinement Shelter were spectroscopically studied for gamma and alpha content. Isotopic ratios for cesium, europium, plutonium, americium, and curium were identified and the fuel burnup in these samples was determined. A systematic deviation in the burnup values based on the cesium isotopes, in comparison with other radionuclides, was observed. The conducted studies were the first ever performed to demonstrate the presence of significant quantities of {sup 242}Cm and {sup 243}Cm. It was determined that there was a systematic underestimation of activities of transuranic radionuclides in fuel samples from inside of the ChNPP Confinement Shelter, starting from {sup 241}Am (and going higher), in comparison with the theoretical calculations.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.; Marra, J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

25

New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License...

26

Nuclear power plant construction activity, 1988  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Power Plant Construction Activity 1988 presents cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in commercial operation and units in the construction pipeline as of December 31, 1988. This report, which is updated annually, was prepared to provide an overview of the nuclear power plant construction industry. The report contains information on the status of nuclear generating units, average construction costs and lead-times, and construction milestones for individual reactors.

1989-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

27

Disparities in nuclear power plant performance in the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents data comparing the performance of light water reactors in the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). The comparisons are made for the years 1980-1983 and include 21 Westinghouse ...

Hansen, Kent F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Comparative analysis of United States and French nuclear power plant siting and construction regulatory policies and their economic consequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite the substantial commitments of time and money which are devoted to the nuclear power plant siting process, the effectiveness of the system in providing a balanced evaluation of the technical, environmental and ...

Golay, Michael Warren.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt3wi4046 506 3,954 89.2 PWR 512 4,336 96.7 1,018 8,291 93.0 Point Beach Nuclear Plant Unit Type Data for 2010 PWR = Pressurized Light Water Reactor. Note: Totals ...

30

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics: Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate SE- 10658 Stockholm, Sweden. NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 131 AUG. 2000 239 by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, contract 14.5-980942-98242. REFERENCES 1. A. M. WEINBERG and H. C

Pázsit, Imre

31

Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 12  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supplement No. 12 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for license to operate Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391, located in Rhea County, Tennessee, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of this supplement is to update the Safety Evaluation of (1) additional information submitted by the applicant since Supplement No. 11 was issued, and (2) matters that the staff had under review when Supplement No. 11 was issued.

Tam, P.S.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Wrong Unit, Train, and Component Events at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants: Joint EPRI-CRIEPI Human Factors Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant human-related errors can occur when plant personnel perform activities on a wrong unit, train, or component. Such errors can result in costly adverse events such as safety system actuations, technical specification violations, failure of multiple safety trains, and reactor trips. This report investigates the wrong unit, train, component (WUTC) phenomena, providing an assessment of the current state of WUTC events as well as possible interventions for reducing errors.

1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

33

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

34

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

35

Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

36

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

37

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

38

Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

39

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

40

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

42

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

43

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

44

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

45

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

46

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

47

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

48

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

49

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

50

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

51

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Catawba Unit 1, Unit 2","2,258","18,964",36.5,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "H B Robinson Unit 2",724,"3,594",6.9,"Progress Energy Carolinas Inc" "Oconee Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3","2,538","20,943",40.3,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "V C Summer Unit 1",966,"8,487",16.3,"South Carolina Electric&Gas Co" "4 Plants 7 Reactors","6,486","51,988",100.0

52

Design-Basis Flood Estimation for Site Characterization at Nuclear Power Plants in the United States of America  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to describe approaches and methods for estimation of the design-basis flood at nuclear power plant sites. Chapter 1 defines the design-basis flood and lists the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) regulations that require estimation of the design-basis flood. For comparison, the design-basis flood estimation methods used by other Federal agencies are also described. A brief discussion of the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency for estimation of the design-basis floods in its member States is also included.

Prasad, Rajiv; Hibler, Lyle F.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. Nuclear Power Plants: Construction and Technology Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Korean nuclear power industry has grown rapidly since Kori Unit 1, the first Korean nuclear power plant (NPP), which began operation in April 1978. Following the technology developments of the nuclear power industry in 1980s, the first standard Korean nuclear plants (Ulchin Units 3 and 4) were constructed in the 1990s. At present, 20 NPP units operate in Korea16 pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants and four pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) plants; eight PWR units are under construction. This ...

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

54

Nuclear power plant construction activity, 1986  

SciTech Connect

Cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in commercial operation and units in the construction pipeline as of December 31, 1986, are presented. This report, which is updated annually, was prepared to provide an overview of the nuclear power plant construction industry. The report contains information on the status of nuclear generating units, average construction costs and lead-times, and construction milestones for individual reactors.

1987-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

55

NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear power plant for use in an airless environment or other environment in which cooling is difficult is described. The power plant includes a boiling mercury reactor, a mercury--vapor turbine in direct cycle therewith, and a radiator for condensing mercury vapor. (AEC)

Carter, J.C.; Armstrong, R.H.; Janicke, M.J.

1963-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

56

New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt3ny6122 581 4,948 97.2 PWR R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant Unit Summer Capacity (MW) Net Generation (Thousand MWh) Summer Capacity Factor (Percent) Type

57

Shutdown and low-power operation at commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report contains the results of the NRC Staff`s evaluation of shutdown and low-power operations at US commercial nuclear power plants. The report describes studies conducted by the staff in the following areas: Operating experience related to shutdown and low-power operations, probabilistic risk assessment of shutdown and low-power conditions and utility programs for planning and conducting activities during periods the plant is shut down. The report also documents evaluations of a number of technical issues regarding shutdown and low-power operations performed by the staff, including the principal findings and conclusions. Potential new regulatory requirements are discussed, as well as potential changes in NRC programs. A draft report was issued for comment in February 1992. This report is the final version and includes the responses to the comments along with the staff regulatory analysis of potential new requirements.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Nuclear Plant Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 1990s several nuclear utilities proceeded with full decommissioning of their nuclear power plants based on perceived economics. This major shift to immediate decommissioning presented a significant challenge to the industry in terms of the development of a decommissioning process and a comprehensive updated regulatory framework. EPRI responded by undertaking the formation of the Decommissioning Support Program. The initial work involved conducting a series of topical workshops directed to specific...

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

59

Analysis of core damage frequency: Nuclear power plant Dukovany, VVER/440 V-213 Unit 1, internal events. Volume 1: Main report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the final results from the Level 1 probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for the Dukovany VVER/440 V-213 nuclear power plant, Unit 1. Section 1.1 describes the objectives of this study. Section 1.2 discusses the approach that was used for completing the Dukovany PSA. Section 1.3 summarizes the results of the PSA. Section 1.4 provides a comparison of the results of the Dukovany PSA with the results of other PSAs for different types of reactors worldwide. Section 1.5 summarizes the conclusions of the Dukovany PSA.

Pugila, W.J.

1994-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

60

Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

62

California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

63

Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

64

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

65

United States and Italy Sign Nuclear Energy Agreements | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States and Italy Sign Nuclear Energy Agreements United States and Italy Sign Nuclear Energy Agreements United States and Italy Sign Nuclear Energy Agreements September 30, 2009 - 1:23pm Addthis U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu and Italian Minister for Economic Development Claudio Scajola today signed two important nuclear energy agreements that may lead to construction of new nuclear power plants and improved cooperation on advanced nuclear energy systems and fuel cycle technologies in both countries. The U.S.-Italy Joint Declaration Concerning Industrial and Commercial Cooperation in the Nuclear Energy Sector, which was signed on behalf of the United States by Secretary Chu and Deputy Secretary of Commerce Dennis F. Hightower, affirms the strong interest of the United States and Italy to encourage their respective nuclear industries to seek opportunities for the

66

United States and Italy Sign Nuclear Energy Agreements | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States and Italy Sign Nuclear Energy Agreements United States and Italy Sign Nuclear Energy Agreements United States and Italy Sign Nuclear Energy Agreements September 30, 2009 - 1:23pm Addthis U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu and Italian Minister for Economic Development Claudio Scajola today signed two important nuclear energy agreements that may lead to construction of new nuclear power plants and improved cooperation on advanced nuclear energy systems and fuel cycle technologies in both countries. The U.S.-Italy Joint Declaration Concerning Industrial and Commercial Cooperation in the Nuclear Energy Sector, which was signed on behalf of the United States by Secretary Chu and Deputy Secretary of Commerce Dennis F. Hightower, affirms the strong interest of the United States and Italy to encourage their respective nuclear industries to seek opportunities for the

67

Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 15  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (SER), NUREG-0847 (June 1982), Supplement No. 1 (September 1982), Supplement No. 2 (January 1984), Supplement No. 3 (January 1985), Supplement No. 4 (March 1985), Supplement No. 5 (November 1990), Supplement No. 6 (April 1991), Supplement No. 7 (September 1991), Supplement No. 8 (January 1992), Supplement No. 9 (June 1992), Supplement No. 10 (October 1992), Supplement No. 11 (April 1993), Supplement No. 12 (October 1993), Supplement No. 13 (April 1994), and Supplement No. 14 (December 1994) issued by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority, as applicant and owner, for licenses to operate the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). The facility is located in Rhea County, Tennessee, near the Watts Bar Dam on the Tennessee River. This supplement provides recent information regarding resolution of some of the outstanding and confirmatory items, and proposed license conditions identified in the SER.

Tam, P.S.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Nuclear power plant design analysis  

SciTech Connect

Information concerning the engineering aspects of the design of commercial nuclear power plants is presented. Topics discussed include: electric utility economics; nuclear plant cconomics; thermal-transport systems and core design; nuclear analysis methods; safcty requirements; fuel-system analysis; dcsign considerations; and optimization approaches. (DCC)

Sesonske, A.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2tx Comanche Peak Unit 1, Unit 2 2,406 20,208 48.9 Luminant Generation Company LLC South Texas Project Unit 1, Unit 2 2,560 21,127 51.1 STP Nuclear Operating Co

70

Decommissioning San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Unit 1 (SONGS-1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning a nuclear power plant and termination of the plant license requires the removal of highly activated materials from inside the nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Such a task presents a major challenge in terms of technology, project management, and worker exposure. This report documents the approach taken by Southern California Edison (SCE) in their highly successful reactor vessel internals (RVI) segmentation of San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Unit 1 (SONGS-1). The report detail...

2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

71

Nuclear power plant construction activity 1987  

SciTech Connect

This annual report published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) presents data on nuclear power plant construction activity. The previous report, Nuclear Power Plant Construction Activity 1986, included data for units that, as of December 31, 1986, were (1) in the construction pipeline, (2) canceled, or (3) commercial operation as of December 31, 1986. The data in this report, which were collected on Form EIA-254, ''Semiannual Report on Status of Reactor Construction,'' update the data in the previous report to be current as of December 31, 1987. Three types of information are included: plant characteristics and ownership; construction costs; and construction schedules and milestone dates.

1988-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

72

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt3md6011 855 6,755 90.2 PWR 850 7,239 97.2 1,705 13,994 93.7 Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Unit Type Data for 2010 PWR = Pressurized Light Water Reactor.

73

Secretary Chu Visits Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant Secretary Chu Visits Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant February 15, 2012 - 3:54pm Addthis Secretary Chu traveled to Waynesboro, Georgia, to visit the Vogtle nuclear power plant, the site of what will be the first new nuclear reactors to be built in the United States in three decades. | Image credit: Southern Company. Secretary Chu traveled to Waynesboro, Georgia, to visit the Vogtle nuclear power plant, the site of what will be the first new nuclear reactors to be built in the United States in three decades. | Image credit: Southern Company. Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Just over 60 years ago, scientists in Arco, Idaho, successfully used nuclear energy to power four light bulbs, laying the foundation for U.S.

74

Draft audit report, human factors engineering control room design review: Saint Lucie Nuclear Power Plant, Unit No. 2  

SciTech Connect

A human factors engineering preliminary design review of the Saint Lucie Unit 2 control room was performed at the site on August 3 through August 7, 1981. This design review was carried out by a team from the Human Factors Engineering Branch, Division of Human Factors Safety. This report was prepared on the basis of the HFEB's review of the applicant's Preliminary Design Assessment and the human factors engineering design review/audit performed at the site. The review team included human factors consultants from BioTechnology, Inc., Falls Church, Virginia, and from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (University of California), Livermore, California.

Peterson, L.R.; Lappa, D.A.; Moore, J.W.

1981-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

75

Part 70 License NRC Docket No. 70-07018 Subject: References: SUPPLEMENT TO APPLICATION FOR A SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL LICENSE FOR WATTS BAR NUCLEAR PLANT UNIT 2 IN ACCORDANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(TAC NO. ME0853)" As part of TVA's application for a Special Nuclear Material (SNM) License for Watts Bar Unit 2

Watts Bar; Nuclear Plant; Watts Bar; Nuclear Plant

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants In naval nuclear propulsion plants, fissioning of uranium atoms in the reactor core produces heat. Because the fission process also produces...

77

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

78

New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (nw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

79

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

80

United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

qU oSoLTJRC qU oSoLTJRC United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Protecting People and the Environment NUREG-1872, Vol. 2 HudcD [jE©wftamfsýýpc Wafm(M oran EA Office of New Reactors AVAILABILITY OF REFERENCE MATERIALS IN NRC PUBLICATIONS NRC Reference Material As of November 1999, you may electronically access NUREG-series publications and other NRC records at NRC's Public Electronic Reading Room at http:t/www.nrc..ov/reading-rm.html. Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG-series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant, licensee, and vendor documents and correspondence; NRC correspondence and internal memoranda; bulletins and information notices; inspection and investigative reports; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States 2000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0095(2000) Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States 2000 March 2002 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric

82

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2mo Callaway Unit 1 1,190 8,996 100.0 Union Electric Co 1 Plant 1 Reactor Owner Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

83

Nuclear Energy In the United States Executive Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 10 Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States Executive Summary The U.S. nuclear power industry continues to make pro- gress toward the construction of new nuclear power plants in the United States. Currently, 13 license applica- tions are under active review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for up to 22 new reactors. The De- partment of Energy has awarded conditional commit- ments for loan guarantees to the partners in the Vogtle project and is negotiating terms for loan guarantees with several new nuclear projects. The 104 operating plants continue to perform well, turn- ing in sustained performance for output and capacity factor - an estimated 798.7 billion kilowatt-hours and 90.5 percent respectively in 2009.

84

United States -Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States -Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan United States -Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan President Bush of the United States and Prime Minister Koizumi of Japan...

85

ALARA at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Implementation of the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle at nuclear power plants presents a continuing challenge for health physicists at utility corporate and plant levels, for plant designers, and for regulatory agencies. The relatively large collective doses at some plants are being addressed though a variety of dose reduction techniques. It is planned that this report will include material on historical aspects, management, valuation of dose reduction, quantitative and qualitative aspects of optimization, design, operational considerations, and training. The status of this work is summarized in this report. 30 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Baum, J.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote Nuclear Energy Cooperation United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote Nuclear Energy...

87

The future of nuclear power in the United States : economic and regulatory challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the economic and regulatory challenges that must be faced by potential investors in new nuclear power plants in the United States. The historical development of the existing fleet of over 100 nuclear ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction and startup of the proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, Georgia. DOE adopted two Nuclear Regulatory Commission EISs associated with this project (i.e., NUREG-1872, issued 8/2008, and NUREG-1947, issued 3/2011).

89

San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station - Unit 1 Decommissioning Experience Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides detailed information on the successful decommissioning activities of San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1 (SONGS 1). The report describes their experiences and lessons learned for managers of US and international plants beginning or currently engaged in decommissioning.

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

90

Performance of nuclear plant RTDs  

SciTech Connect

Resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) are used for safety-related measurements in nuclear power plants and must therefore be accurate and respond to temperature changes in a timely fashion. Experience has shown that RTD calibration shift and response-time degradation can occur with aging. Therefore, periodic testing is performed to ensure that acceptable performance limits are not exceeded. A new method called the loop current step response (LCSR) test is used for periodic response-time testing of nuclear plant RTDs. This method permits testing the RTD as installed in an operating plant (in situ testing). The LCSR test is based on heating the RTD sensing element with a small electric current applied remotely through the sensor lead wires.

Hashemian, H.M.; Petersen, K.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Groundwater Protection Guidelines for Nuclear Power Plants: Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States nuclear power industry has undertaken a Groundwater Protection Initiative [NEI 07-07] at the direction of the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Nuclear Strategic Issues Advisory Committee (NSIAC). International nuclear power plants implement groundwater protection programs to ensure appropriate management of on-site groundwater and protection of the public and environment. This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) guideline provides essential technical guidance to utilities on the ...

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

92

Some aspects of the decommissioning of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The major factors influencing the choice of a national concept for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants are examined. The operating lifetimes of power generating units with nuclear reactors of various types (VVER-1000, VVER-440, RBMK-1000, EGP-6, and BN-600) are analyzed. The basic approaches to decommissioning Russian nuclear power plants and the treatment of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are discussed. Major aspects of the ecological and radiation safety of personnel, surrounding populations, and the environment during decommissioning of nuclear installations are identified.

Khvostova, M. S., E-mail: marinakhvostova@list.ru [St. Petersburg State Maritime Technical University (Sevmashvtuz), Severodvinsk Branch (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a demonstration of the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology for the production of process heat, electricity, and hydrogen. This nuclear- based technology can provide high-temperature process heat (up to 950C) that can be used as a substitute for the burning of fossil fuels for a wide range of commercial applications (see Figure 1). The substitution of the HTGR for burning fossil fuels conserves these hydrocarbon resources for other uses, reduces uncertainty in the cost and supply of natural gas and oil, and eliminates the emissions of greenhouse gases attendant with the burning of these fuels. The HTGR is a passively safe nuclear reactor concept with an easily understood safety basis that permits substantially reduced emergency planning requirements and improved siting flexibility compared to other nuclear technologies.

Dr. David A. Petti

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2nj Oyster Creek Unit 1 615 4,601 14.0 Exelon Nuclear PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station Unit 1 1,161 9,439 28.8 PSEG Nuclear LLC PSEG Salem Generating Station

95

Nuclear power plants: structure and function  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed include: steam electric plants; BWR type reactors; PWR type reactors; thermal efficiency of light water reactors; other types of nuclear power plants; the fission process and nuclear fuel; fission products and reactor afterheat; and reactor safety.

Hendrie, J.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan An outline on the United States and Japan's joint nuclear energy action...

97

Advanced nuclear plant control complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Plant Engineering: Predicting Nuclear Plant Output from Performance Losses and Gains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The marginal costs of generating electricity, together with the strong emphasis on maximizing production at today's nuclear power generating units, have increased the need for nuclear plant thermal performance engineers (TPEs) to determine the gap between the station's actual performance and its ultimate capability. This report from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) outlines the various items that influence the performance of a nuclear unit and gives the TPE methods to employ in estimating the...

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. INTRODUCTION 1.1. Yucca Mountain Project The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada has been designated as United States choice for nuclear waste repository. Yucca Mountain is in a remote dry area, on federal has been made to characterize the nature of the discontinuities of the Yucca Mountain proposed nuclear

100

Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis > Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Overview Current Projects Software Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Bookmark and Share Activities in Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety research and development fulfill a primary goal of the Nuclear Engineering (NE) Division to promote improvements in safe and reliable operation of present and future

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented.

Purvis, James W.

1999-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

102

A review of the methods of economic analysis of nuclear power plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nuclear power plants across the United States are reaching the end of their current operating licenses, forcing decision makers to think about the way forward. (more)

Cavender, Brittainy Anne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WASHINGTON, 0. C. 20555 WASHINGTON, 0. C. 20555 AUG i 3 1979 ,,~---Y--*. FCAF:Wi3 )I 70-364 : i: SNM-414,jAmendment No. 3 --A Babcock and Wilcox Company Nuclear Materials Division ATTN: Mr. Michael A. Austin Manager, Technical Control 609 North Warren Avenue Apollo, Pennsylvania 15613 Gentiemen: (1 i' \ (. \ In accordance with your application dated June 18, 1979, and pursuant to Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 70, Materials License SNM-414 is hereby amended to: 1. Delete the function of the Regulatory Projects Coordinator, and 2. Alter the experience requirements for the function of Licensing and Nuclear Safety Specialist. Replacement pages for the license and condition section of the application are attached. Included are changes to License SNM-414 pages to reflect

104

Analysis of the LaSalle Unit 2 nuclear power plant: Risk Methods Integration and Evaluation Program (RMIEP). Volume 8, Seismic analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the methodology used and the results obtained from the application of a simplified seismic risk methodology to the LaSalle County Nuclear Generating Station Unit 2. This study is part of the Level I analysis being performed by the Risk Methods Integration and Evaluation Program (RMIEP). Using the RMIEP developed event and fault trees, the analysis resulted in a seismically induced core damage frequency point estimate of 6.OE-7/yr. This result, combined with the component importance analysis, indicated that system failures were dominated by random events. The dominant components included diesel generator failures (failure to swing, failure to start, failure to run after started), and condensate storage tank.

Wells, J.E.; Lappa, D.A.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Chen, J.C.; Chuang, T.Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Johnson, J.J.; Campbell, R.D.; Hashimoto, P.S.; Maslenikov, O.R.; Tiong, L.W.; Ravindra, M.K.; Kincaid, R.H. [EQE, International, Irvine, CA (United States); Sues, R.H.; Putcha, C.S. [NTS Engineering, Long Beach, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Diesel Generator Tanks 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear power provides about 20 % of the total electricity generated in the United States. In 2005, this was about 782 Billion kWh of the total electricity generation (EIA 2006). 2 As with fossil-fueled electricity generating plants, electricity in a nuclear power plant is produced by heated steam that drives a turbine generator. In a nuclear power plant, however, nuclear fission reactions in the core produce heat that is absorbed by a liquid that flows through the system and is converted to steam. Nuclear power plants are highly efficient and have become more so over the last 25 years. Operational efficiency (also referred to as plant performance or electricity production) can be measured by the capacity factor. The capacity factor is the ratio of the actual amount of electricity generated to the maximum possible amount that could be generated in a given period of time usually a year. Today, nuclear power plants operate at an average 90 % capacity factor (compared to 56 % in 1980) (EIA 2006a). Thus, although nuclear generating capacity has remained roughly constant since 1990, at about 99 gigawatts (or about 10 % of the total U.S. electric generating capacity), the amount of electricity produced has increased 33 % since that time because of increased capacity utilization. Nuclear plants have the highest capacity factors of

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Balance of Plant Corrosion Issues in Aging Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... number of times, can be used to forecast the most probable number of leaks. ... Conditions for Long Term Operation of Nuclear Power Plants in Sweden.

107

Nuclear Plant/Hydrogen Plant Safety: Issues and Approaches  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, through its agents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, is working on developing the technologies to enable the large scale production of hydrogen using nuclear power. A very important consideration in the design of a co-located and connected nuclear plant/hydrogen plant facility is safety. This study provides an overview of the safety issues associated with a combined plant and discusses approaches for categorizing, quantifying, and addressing the safety risks.

Steven R. Sherman

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to present the results of a statistical analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs and lead-times (where lead-time is defined as the duration of the construction period), using a sample of units that entered construction during the 1966-1977 period. For more than a decade, analysts have been attempting to understand the reasons for the divergence between predicted and actual construction costs and lead-times. More importantly, it is rapidly being recognized that the future of the nuclear power industry rests precariously on an improvement in the cost and lead-time situation. Thus, it is important to study the historical information on completed plants, not only to understand what has occurred to also to improve the ability to evaluate the economics of future plants. This requires an examination of the factors that have affected both the realized costs and lead-times and the expectations about these factors that have been formed during the construction process. 5 figs., 22 tabs.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Organizational learning at nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nuclear Power Plant Advisory Panel on Organizational Learning provides channels of communications between the management and organization research projects of the MIT International Program for Enhanced Nuclear Power ...

Carroll, John S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Postconstruction report of the United Nuclear Corporation Disposal Site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remedial actions conducted under the auspices of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) were completed at the Y-12 United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) Disposal Site in August 1992. The purpose of this Postconstruction Report is to summarize numerous technical reports and provide CERCLA documentation for completion of the remedial actions. Other CERCLA reports, such as the Feasibility Study for the UNC Disposal Site, provide documentation leading up to the remedial action decision. The remedial action chosen, placement of a modified RCRA cap, was completed successfully, and performance standards were either met or exceeded. This remedial action provided solutions to two environmentally contaminated areas and achieved the goal of minimizing the potential for contamination of the shallow groundwater downgradient of the site, thereby providing protection of human health and the environment. Surveillance and maintenance of the cap will be accomplished to ensure cap integrity, and groundwater monitoring downgradient of the site will continue to confirm the acceptability of the remedial action chosen.

Oakley, L.B.; Siberell, J.K.; Voskuil, T.L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States The U.S. nuclear power industry continues to make pro- gress toward the construction of new nuclear power plants in the United States. Currently, 13 license applica- tions are under active review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for up to 22 new reactors. The De- partment of Energy has awarded conditional commit- ments for loan guarantees to the partners in the Vogtle project and is negotiating terms for loan guarantees with several new nuclear projects. The 104 operating plants continue to perform well, turn- ing in sustained performance for output and capacity factor - an estimated 798.7 billion kilowatt-hours and 90.5 percent respectively in 2009.

112

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the proposed action quite obviously entails an increased potential for offsite consequences. Instead by nuclear power plants operating in or proposed for Maryland.@ Id. at 1-2. NIRS explains miles of the proposed reactor. She further recounts that she is Aparticularly 21 See Shaw AREVA MOX

Laughlin, Robert B.

113

Materials in Nuclear Power Plant Construction - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

139th Annual Meeting & Exhibition. February 14 - 18, 2010, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, Washington USA. Materials in Nuclear Power. Plant ...

114

Steam Reheat in Nuclear Power Plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this work, reheating steam from a commercial nuclear power plant is explored in order to increase efficiency and power output. A thermal source in (more)

Marotta, Paul John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Secretary Bodman Announces Federal Risk Insurance for Nuclear Power Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Risk Insurance for Nuclear Power Federal Risk Insurance for Nuclear Power Plants & Touts Robust Economy Secretary Bodman Announces Federal Risk Insurance for Nuclear Power Plants & Touts Robust Economy August 4, 2006 - 8:42am Addthis ATLANTA, GA - After touring Georgia Power and speaking to its employees, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced completion of the final rule that establishes the process for utility companies building the next six new nuclear power plants in the United States to qualify for a portion of $2 billion in federal risk insurance. The rule will be available on DOE's web site soon. "Providing federal risk insurance is an important step in speeding the nuclear renaissance in this country," Secretary Bodman said. "Companies

116

The Need for Near-Term Deployment of New Nuclear Power Plants Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society (ANS) supports and encourages the near-term deployment of new nuclear power plants. Nuclear energy, the second-largest power source, contributes 20 % of the electricity production in the United States. 1 Nuclear power can be competitive with gas and coal plants. Like solar, wind, and hydropower, nuclear energy has near-zero emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants. The more than one hundred nuclear power plants currently operating in the United States have an excellent safety record and are proven reliable sources of power.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Inventory of power plants in the United States, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States is prepared annually by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this publication is to provide year-end statistics about electric generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). The publication also provides a 10-year outlook of future generating unit additions. Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Radionuclides in United States commercial nuclear power reactors  

SciTech Connect

In the next ten to twenty years, many of the commercial nuclear power reactors in the United States will be reaching their projected lifetime of forty years. As these power plants are decommissioned, it seems prudent to consider the recycling of structural materials such as stainless steel. Some of these materials and components have become radioactive through either nuclear activation of the elements within the components or surface contamination with radioactivity form the operational activities. In order to understand the problems associated with recycling stainless steel from decommissioned nuclear power reactors, it is necessary to have information on the radionuclides expected on or in the contaminated materials. A study has been conducted of radionuclide contamination information that is available for commercial nuclear power reactors in the United States. There are two types of nuclear power reactors in commercial use in the United States, pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs). Before presenting radionuclide activities information, a brief discussion is given on the major components and operational differences for the PWRs and BWRs. Radionuclide contamination information is presented from 11 PWRs and over 8 BWRs. These data include both the radionuclides within the circulating reactor coolant water as well as radionuclide contamination on and within component parts.

Bechtold, T.E. [ed.] [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dyer, N.C. [Oregon Graduate Inst. of Science and Technology, Beaverton, OR (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Survey of nuclear power plant construction costs, 1983  

SciTech Connect

This report presents cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in the construction pipeline, collected on Form EIA-254. The information on US nuclear power plants in the construction pipeline is reported voluntarily each quarter by the electric utilities. This report presents the data collected in the first quarter of 1983 on the 71 nuclear units in the construction pipeline. Historical data on 73 units, totalling 57,287 net megawatts (MWe) of design capacity, in commercial operation as of March 31, 1983, are also given. Three types of information are included: plant characteristics and ownership, construction costs, and construction schedule or chronology. Summary statistics are presented on direct component costs and construction leadtimes for a sample of operating units and units in the construction pipeline. The reactor-specific cost data included in Chapter 4 are the estimated final nuclear production plant costs and, for units in the construction pipeline, the disbursed and sunk costs as of March 31, 1983. 7 figures, 5 tables.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Pantex receives United Way leadership award | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

United Way leadership award | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

United States-Japan Nuclear Security Working Group Fact Sheet...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

United States-Japan Nuclear Security Working Group Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

122

Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Nuclear power plants in the United States currently produce about 20 percent of the nation's electricity. This nuclear-generated electricity is safe, clean and economical, and does not emit greenhouse gases. Continued and expanded reliance on nuclear energy is one key to meeting future demand for electricity in the U.S. and is called for in the National Energy Policy. Nevertheless, no new nuclear plants have been built in the U.S. in many years, and none are currently slated for construction. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been working with the nuclear

123

Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Nuclear power plants in the United States currently produce about 20 percent of the nation's electricity. This nuclear-generated electricity is safe, clean and economical, and does not emit greenhouse gases. Continued and expanded reliance on nuclear energy is one key to meeting future demand for electricity in the U.S. and is called for in the National Energy Policy. Nevertheless, no new nuclear plants have been built in the U.S. in many years, and none are currently slated for construction. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been working with the nuclear

124

Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect

This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2008. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

125

Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2007  

SciTech Connect

This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2007. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

Pantex Plant | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant | National Nuclear Security Administration Plant | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our Locations > Pantex Plant Pantex Plant http://www.pantex.com/ Field Office: The NNSA Production Office is responsible for contract management and oversight of the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas and the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tenn. The Pantex Plant is

127

Groundwater Protection Guidelines for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear power industry has entered into a voluntary initiative to implement groundwater monitoring programs at all nuclear power plant sites. This EPRI guideline provides essential technical guidance to nuclear power utilities on the necessary elements of a sound groundwater protection program.

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

128

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOTE TO EDITORS: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has received two reports from its independent Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. The attached reports, in the form of letters, comment on a proposed amendment to the NRC's rule on license renewal for nuclear power plants and a proposed revision to the decommissioning rule for nuclear power reactors. Attachments:

T. S. Kress

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nuclear power plant (NPP) involves complex engineering structures that are significant items of the structures, systems and components (SSC) important to the safe and reliable operation of the NPP. Concrete is the commonly used civil engineering construction material in the nuclear industry because of a number of advantageous properties. The NPP concrete structures underwent a great degree of evolution, since the commissioning of first NPP in early 1960. The increasing concern with time related to safety of the public and environment, and degradation of concrete structures due to ageing related phenomena are the driving forces for such evolution. The concrete technology underwent rapid development with the advent of chemical admixtures of plasticizer/super plasticizer category as well as viscosity modifiers and mineral admixtures like fly ash and silica fume. Application of high performance concrete (HPC) developed with chemical and mineral admixtures has been witnessed in the construction of NPP structures. Along with the beneficial effect, the use of admixtures in concrete has posed a number of challenges as well in design and construction. This along with the prospect of continuing operation beyond design life, especially after 60 years, the impact of extreme natural events ( as in the case of Fukushima NPP accident) and human induced events (e.g. commercial aircraft crash like the event of September 11th 2001) has led to further development in the area of NPP concrete structures. The present paper aims at providing an account of evolution of NPP concrete structures in last two decades by summarizing the development in the areas of concrete technology, design methodology and construction techniques, maintenance and ageing management of concrete structures.

Basu, Prabir [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)] [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Labbe, Pierre [Electricity of France (EDF)] [Electricity of France (EDF); Naus, Dan [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Inventory of power plants in the United States 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Inventory of Power Plants in the US provides year-end statistics on generating units operated by electric utilities in the US (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). Statistics presented in this report reflect the status of generating units as of December 31, 1994. The publication also provides a 10-year outlook for generating unit additions. This report is prepared annually by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy (DOE). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, Federal, and State agencies; the electric utility industry; and the general public. This is a report of electric utility data; in cases where summary data of nonutility capacity are presented, it is specifically noted as such.

NONE

1995-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

131

Inventory of Power Plants in the United States, October 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States is prepared annually by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this publication is to provide year-end statistics about electric generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). The publication also provides a 10-year outlook of future generating unit additions. Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The report is organized into the following chapters: Year in Review, Operable Electric Generating Units, and Projected Electric Generating Unit Additions. Statistics presented in these chapters reflect the status of electric generating units as of December 31, 1992.

Not Available

1993-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

132

Plutonium Processing Plant Deactivated | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Processing Plant Deactivated | National Nuclear Security Processing Plant Deactivated | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Plutonium Processing Plant Deactivated Plutonium Processing Plant Deactivated June 20, 1997 Hanford, WA Plutonium Processing Plant Deactivated The Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility (PUREX), the largest of the

133

Plutonium Processing Plant Deactivated | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Processing Plant Deactivated | National Nuclear Security Processing Plant Deactivated | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Plutonium Processing Plant Deactivated Plutonium Processing Plant Deactivated June 20, 1997 Hanford, WA Plutonium Processing Plant Deactivated The Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility (PUREX), the largest of the

134

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2mi Donald C Cook Unit 1, Unit 2 2,069 15,646 52.8 Indiana Michigan Power Co Fermi Unit 2 1,085 7,738 26.1 Detroit Edison Co Palisades Unit 1 793 ...

135

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the nuclear power plant, the Marine Corps base, thePower Plant Emergency Response Plan, July 1975. United States Marine

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction October 2, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis...

137

Figure 9.1 Nuclear Generating Units - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 9.1 Nuclear Generating Units Operable Units,1 1957-2011 Nuclear Net Summer Capacity Change, 1950-2011 Status of All Nuclear Generating Units, ...

138

Plant Support Engineering: Elastomer Handbook for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On a daily basis, engineers and maintenance personnel make judgments regarding the capabilities, degradation, and longevity of elastomeric material and its compatibility with other materials. Although most applications of elastomers in nuclear power plants are not unique to the industry, there is an extra emphasis in certain applications with regard to reliability, quality, and resistance to nuclear-plant-specific environments. Existing resources on elastomers are extensive, but they are not tailored to ...

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

139

Nuclear Power Plant NDE Challenges Past, Present, and Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operating fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants was built to fossil plant standards (of workmanship

S. R. Doctor

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Kansas City Plant | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our Locations > Kansas City Plant Kansas City Plant http://honeywell.com/sites/aero-kcp/Pages/Home.aspx Field Office: The Kansas City Field Office (KCFO) stewards the NNSA Kansas City Plant, the principal nonnuclear production site within the nuclear

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Kansas City Plant | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our Locations > Kansas City Plant Kansas City Plant http://honeywell.com/sites/aero-kcp/Pages/Home.aspx Field Office: The Kansas City Field Office (KCFO) stewards the NNSA Kansas City Plant, the principal nonnuclear production site within the nuclear

142

Plant Engineering: Performance Diagnostic Test Program for the Nuclear Turbine Cycle at Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, many power generating companies are challenged to reduce operating costs, and at the same time, the cost of unit unavailability can be significant in today's power markets. In the past decade, management of nuclear power plants, including Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power (KHNP), has been focused on reducing forced outage rates and nuclear-safety-related issues, with less attention paid to thermal performance. But recently, KHNP has been strongly challenged to increase unit thermal performance, as f...

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

143

Project Prioritization for Nuclear Plant Investments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluating investments, sometimes called project prioritization, is a central business process in a plant's or fleet's management of their nuclear assets. To date, a variety of project prioritization approaches have been used in the nuclear industry. Many nuclear utilities use an approach that can be characterized as an engineering work grading process. Project prioritization is related closely to long-range planning. Long-range plans help to avoid surprises from increased expenditures and reduced levels...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

144

US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

76: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 76: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4 Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction and startup of the proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, Georgia. DOE adopted two Nuclear Regulatory Commission EISs associated with this project (i.e., NUREG-1872, issued 8/2008, and NUREG-1947, issued 3/2011). Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download February 17, 2012 EIS-0476: Notice of Adoption of Final Environmental Impact Statement Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4, Issuance of a Loan Guarantee to Support Funding for Construction, Burke County, GA

146

The Politically Correct Nuclear Energy Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- and downstream processes Risks due to power plant emissions Coal Lignite Gas CC Nuclear PV (amorph) Wind Hydro-proliferation and waste. Then BUILD one! #12;Modular Pebble Bed Reactor Thermal Power 250 MW Core Height 10.0 m Core Product Barrier · Core Physics · Safety · Balance of Plant Design · Modularity Design · Core Power

147

Qualification of safety-critical systems in TVO nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) operates two nuclear power plant units in Finland and has started to build a third one. The current nuclear power units have to continuously maintain and update existing instrumentation and control systems (I&C). Each new ... Keywords: FMECA, SPICE, instrumentation and control, qualification, safety-critical systems

Juha Halminen; Risto Nevalainen

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Nuclear Power Plant Design Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................. 22 5.1.16 Decommissioning: AP600, HTGR, ALWR ............................................................................................................... 35 7.3.4 Decommissioning Cost #12;9 decommissioning. The long delayed nuclear waste disposal facility at Yucca Mountain is becoming

149

A holistic investigation of complexity sources in nuclear power plant control rooms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear power community in the United States is moving to modernize aging power plant control rooms as well as develop control rooms for new reactors. New generation control rooms, along with modernized control rooms, ...

Sasangohar, Farzan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

United States and Italy Sign Agreements to Advance Developments in Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Italy Sign Agreements to Advance Developments in Italy Sign Agreements to Advance Developments in Nuclear Energy United States and Italy Sign Agreements to Advance Developments in Nuclear Energy September 30, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu and Italian Minister for Economic Development Claudio Scajola today signed two important nuclear energy agreements that may lead to construction of new nuclear power plants and improved cooperation on advanced nuclear energy systems and fuel cycle technologies in both countries. The U.S.-Italy Joint Declaration Concerning Industrial and Commercial Cooperation in the Nuclear Energy Sector, which was signed on behalf of the United States by Secretary Chu and Deputy Secretary of Commerce Dennis F. Hightower, affirms the strong interest of the United States and Italy to

151

Nuclear plant cancellations: causes, costs, and consequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was commissioned in order to help quantify the effects of nuclear plant cancellations on the Nation's electricity prices. This report presents a historical overview of nuclear plant cancellations through 1982, the costs associated with those cancellations, and the reasons that the projects were terminated. A survey is presented of the precedents for regulatory treatment of the costs, the specific methods of cost recovery that were adopted, and the impacts of these decisions upon ratepayers, utility stockholders, and taxpayers. Finally, the report identifies a series of other nuclear plants that remain at risk of canellation in the future, principally as a result of similar demand, finance, or regulatory problems cited as causes of cancellation in the past. The costs associated with these potential cancellations are estimated, along with their regional distributions, and likely methods of cost recovery are suggested.

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Seismic Isolation of Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With increasing public concern for seismic safety in general and research findings that indicate that seismic hazards may be larger than expected in many parts of the world, it would be prudent for the nuclear industry to consider more fully the potential benefits, costs, and impediments associated with applying seismic isolation more widely and to identify actions needed to develop practical and cost-effective guidelines for the application of seismic isolation to nuclear power plants (NPPs) and ...

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

153

Virtual environments for nuclear power plant design  

SciTech Connect

In the design and operation of nuclear power plants, the visualization process inherent in virtual environments (VE) allows for abstract design concepts to be made concrete and simulated without using a physical mock-up. This helps reduce the time and effort required to design and understand the system, thus providing the design team with a less complicated arrangement. Also, the outcome of human interactions with the components and system can be minimized through various testing of scenarios in real-time without the threat of injury to the user or damage to the equipment. If implemented, this will lead to a minimal total design and construction effort for nuclear power plants (NPP).

Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.; Singleterry, R.C. Jr.; King, R.W. [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants January 31, 2012 - 2:09pm Addthis The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) released a new seismic study today that will help U.S. nuclear facilities in the central and eastern United States reassess seismic hazards. The Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities model and report is the culmination of a four-year effort among the participating organizations and replaces previous seismic source models used by industry and government since the late 1980s. The NRC is requesting U.S. nuclear power plants to reevaluate seismic

155

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants January 31, 2012 - 2:09pm Addthis The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) released a new seismic study today that will help U.S. nuclear facilities in the central and eastern United States reassess seismic hazards. The Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities model and report is the culmination of a four-year effort among the participating organizations and replaces previous seismic source models used by industry and government since the late 1980s. The NRC is requesting U.S. nuclear power plants to reevaluate seismic

156

Holdup measurement for nuclear fuel manufacturing plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assay of nuclear material holdup in fuel manufacturing plants is a laborious but often necessary part of completing the material balance. A range of instruments, standards, and a methodology for assaying holdup has been developed. The objectives of holdup measurement are ascertaining the amount, distribution, and how firmly fixed the SNM is. The purposes are reconciliation of material unbalance during or after a manufacturing campaign or plant decommissioning, to decide security requirements, or whether further recovery efforts are justified.

Zucker, M.S.; Degen, M.; Cohen, I.; Gody, A.; Summers, R.; Bisset, P.; Shaub, E.; Holody, D.

1981-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

157

Application of Nuclear Energy for Seawater Desalination: Design Concepts of Nuclear Desalination Plants  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear energy is playing an important role in electricity generation, producing 16% of the world's electricity. However, most of the world's energy consumption is in the form of heat, in which case nuclear energy could also play an important role. In particular, process heat for seawater desalination using nuclear energy has been of growing interest to some Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency over the past two decades. This growing interest stems from increasingly acute freshwater shortages in many arid and semi-arid zones around the world. Indeed, several national and international nuclear desalination demonstration programs are already under way or being planned. Of particular interest are projects for seawater nuclear desalination plants in coastal regions, where saline feed water can serve the dual purpose of cooling water for the nuclear reactor and as feed water for the desalination plant. In principle any nuclear reactor can provide energy (low-grade heat and/or electricity), as required by desalination processes. However, there are some additional requirements to be met under specific conditions in order to introduce nuclear desalination. Technical issues include meeting more stringent safety requirements (nuclear reactors themselves and nuclear-desalination integrated complexes in particular), and performance improvement of the integrated systems. Economic competitiveness is another important factor to be considered for a broader deployment of nuclear desalination. For technical robustness and economic competitiveness a number of design variants of coupling configurations of nuclear desalination integrated plant concepts are being evaluated. This paper identifies and discusses various factors, which support the attractiveness of nuclear desalination. It further summarizes some of the key approaches recommended for nuclear desalination complex design and gives an overview of various design concepts of nuclear desalination plants, which are experienced, being implemented or evaluated by several IAEA Member States. Operating experience with nuclear desalination using a liquid-metal reactor BN-350 in Kazakhstan and several Pressurized Water Reactor units in Japan is discussed. Results of economic analyses of nuclear desalination are also presented in order to illustrate the competitiveness of this technology with other conventional desalination operations. (authors)

Faibish, R.S.; Konishi, T.; Gasparini, M. [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, P.O. Box 100, Wagramer Strasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Nuclear plant construction and investment risk  

SciTech Connect

Escalated cost estimations, delays and cancellations in nuclear construction have caused a preoccupation with the risks of nuclear power plant construction that dominates utility stock investment, overshadowing increased earnings per share and recent growth in production. The issue will be resolved when increased power demand requires new construction, but the effect has so far been to erode the economic advantage of nuclear power and threaten the ability of utilities to get rate increases high enough to cover their costs. Projected delays and cost escalations and their effects must go into an economic appraisal of the investment risks.

Studness, C.M.

1984-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

159

Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Output and Performance of Nuclear Power Plants by Im- provedPower, Tomari Nuclear Power Plant (Units 1, 2) License

Djurcic, Zelimir

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Overview of Trends in Nuclear Power Plant Sensors and Instrumentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends in Nuclear Power Plant Sensors and Instrumentation SASAN BAKTIARI Nuclear Engineering Division Argonne National Laboratory Ph: (630) 252-8982 bakhtiati@anl.gov Abstract -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (kWh). There were 65 nuclear power plants with 104 operating nuclear reactors that generated a total of 790 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh), ...

162

Groundwater Monitoring Guidance for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent experience has shown that the initial design of nuclear power plant groundwater characterization programs can have a significant impact upon the resources needed to demonstrate regulatory compliance. This document provides technical experience and lessons learned in designing an optimized groundwater investigation program.

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

163

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the assay of waste materials generated in the decommissioning of nuclear installations in which one would

164

Trojan Nuclear Power Plant Reactor Vessel and Internals Removal: Trojan Nuclear Plant Decommissioning Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One goal of the EPRI Decommissioning Technology Program is to capture the growing utility experience in nuclear plant decommissioning activities for the benefit of other utilities facing similar challenges in the future. This report provides historical information on the background, scope, organization, schedule, cost, contracts, and support activities associated with the Trojan Nuclear Plant Reactor Vessel and Internals Removal (RVAIR) Project. Also discussed are problems, successes, and lessons learned...

2000-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

165

Extended outages at several nuclear plants led to high outage ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Outages at U.S. nuclear power plants so far in 2012 are generally higher than in recent years because of extended forced outages at four nuclear power plants.

166

SIGNAL GROUPING FOR CONDITION MONITORING OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SIGNAL GROUPING FOR CONDITION MONITORING OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS Piero Baraldi between those used to monitor the reactor coolant pump of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is considered Monitoring, Empirical Modeling, Power Plants, Safety Critical Nuclear Instrumentation, Autoassociative models

167

International Cooperation on Safety of Nuclear Plants - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

168

Advanced nuclear plant control room complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

NNSA presentation on Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant from May 13, 2011

170

Engineering Fundamentals - Nuclear Power Plant Materials, Version 2.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Engineering Fundamentals - Nuclear Power Plant Materials (EF-Materials) Version 2.0 computer-based training module provides new-hire engineering personnel with an overview of the basic concepts of nuclear power plant materials. Graphics and interactive features are used to enhance learning.EF-Materials covers the basic terms and concepts related to nuclear power plant materials and provides information about the significance of material degradation issues in nuclear power plants. ...

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

171

Incentive regulation of nuclear power plants by state regulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) monitors incentive programs established by state regulators in order to obtain current information and to consider the potential safety effects of the incentive programs as applied to nuclear units. The current report is an update of NUREG/CR-5509, Incentive Regulation of Nuclear Power Plants by State Public Utility Commissions, published in December 1989. The information in this report was obtained from interviews conducted with each state regulator and each utility with a minimum entitlement of 10%. The agreements, orders, and settlements from which each incentive program was implemented were reviewed as required. The interviews and supporting documentation form the basis for the individual state reports describing the structure and financial impact of each incentive program. The programs currently in effect represent the adoption of an existing nuclear performance incentive program proposal and one new program. In addition, since 1989 a number of nuclear units have been included in one existing program; while one program was discontinued and another one concluded. 6 refs., 27 tabs.

Martin, R.L.; Baker, K.; Olson, J. (Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, Seattle, WA (USA))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Minimal nuclear deterrence : a nuclear arsenal reduction plan for the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The global political climate has called for reductions to nuclear arsenals around the world. This thesis researches how potential deep cuts to the United States' large strategic nuclear arsenal would affect its current ...

Laderman, Sarah (Sarah Jane)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using...

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Balance of Plant Requirements for a Nuclear Hydrogen Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the requirements for the components and systems that support the hydrogen production portion of a 600 megawatt thermal (MWt) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). These systems, defined as the "balance-of-plant" (BOP), are essential to operate an effective hydrogen production plant. Examples of BOP items are: heat recovery and heat rejection equipment, process material transport systems (pumps, valves, piping, etc.), control systems, safety systems, waste collection and disposal systems, maintenance and repair equipment, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), electrical supply and distribution, and others. The requirements in this document are applicable to the two hydrogen production processes currently under consideration in the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. These processes are the sulfur iodide (S-I) process and the high temperature electrolysis (HTE) process. At present, the other two hydrogen production process - the hybrid sulfur-iodide electrolytic process (SE) and the calcium-bromide process (Ca-Br) -are under flow sheet development and not included in this report. While some features of the balance-of-plant requirements are common to all hydrogen production processes, some details will apply only to the specific needs of individual processes.

Bradley Ward

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1000 was designed by Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, and has been formally approved by NRC. See, and show that the member has authorized the organization to intervene on his or her behalf. Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corp. (Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station), CLI-00-20, 52 NRC 151, 163 (2000). B. Ruling

Laughlin, Robert B.

176

THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT GRAPHITE PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developing new nuclear grades of graphite used in the core of a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is one of the critical development activities being pursued within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program. Graphites thermal stability (in an inert gas environment), high compressive strength, fabricability, and cost effective price make it an ideal core structural material for the HTGR reactor design. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical nuclear grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermo-mechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. The NGNP graphite R&D program has selected a handful of commercially available types for research and development activities necessary to qualify this nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor. These activities fall within five primary areas; 1) material property characterization, 2) irradiated material property characterization, 3) modeling, and 4) ASTM test development, and 5) ASME code development efforts. Individual research and development activities within each area are being pursued with the ultimate goal of obtaining a commercial operating license for the nuclear graphite from the US NRC.

William E. Windes; Timothy D. Burchell; Robert L. Bratton

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This special report presents an analysis of natural gas processing plants This special report presents an analysis of natural gas processing plants in the United States as of 2009 and highlights characteristics of this segment of the industry. The purpose of the paper is to examine the role of natural gas processing plants in the natural gas supply chain and to provide an overview and summary of processing plant characteristics in the United States, such as locations, capacities, and operations. Key Findings There were 493 operational natural gas processing plants in the United States with a combined operating capacity of 77 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day. Overall, operating capacity increased about 12 percent between 2004 and 2009, not including the processing capacity in Alaska1. At the same time, the number of all processing plants in the lower 48 States decreased

178

Nuclear Plant Life Cycle Management Implementation Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The day-to-day pressures of operation, limited budgets, and regulatory scrutiny of nuclear power plants focus on the present or short term, and may preempt cost-beneficial activities with long-term pay-off. This guide to implementing life-cycle management (LCM) fosters long-range thinking and decision making focused on profitability in the new competitive era of electricity production.

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

179

Yonghuang Therm Power Plant Units 1 and 2, Inchon, South Korea  

SciTech Connect

Because South Korea depends heavily on imported fuels, its government continues to encourage energy diversification. Today Korea has about 60,000 MW of installed capacity that is fueled equally by coal, liquefied natural gas, and nuclear fission. Although the linchpins of the ongoing diversification program are more nukes and more plants powered by imported LNG, another piece of the plan is to make greater use of the country's domestic coal supplies. That is where Korea South-East Power Co. enters the picture, with two new supercritical units that showcase the technology's 40% efficiency. The plant has two 800-MW units and two identical units are under construction at the site. The plant has two-stage combustion and low NOx burners followed by selective catalytic reduction on each unit. SOx emissions are under 45 ppm. An integrated control and monitoring system helps keep down operating costs. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Peltier, R.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Fact Sheet: United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan Fact Sheet: United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan Fact Sheet: United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A Study of United States Hydroelectric Plant Ownership  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ownership of United States hydroelectric plants is reviewed from several perspectives. Plant owners are grouped into six owner classes as defined by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The numbers of plants and the corresponding total capacity associated with each owner class are enumerated. The plant owner population is also evaluated based on the number of owners in each owner class, the number of plants owned by a single owner, and the size of plants based on capacity ranges associated with each owner class. Plant numbers and corresponding total capacity associated with owner classes in each state are evaluated. Ownership by federal agencies in terms of the number of plants owned by each agency and the corresponding total capacity is enumerated. A GIS application that is publicly available on the Internet that displays hydroelectric plants on maps and provides basic information about them is described.

Douglas G Hall

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

United States nuclear tests, July 1945 through September 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document lists chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. Several tests conducted during Operation Dominic involved missile launches from Johnston Atoll. Several of these missile launches were aborted, resulting in the destruction of the missile and nuclear device either on the pad or in the air.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

First U. S. sulfreen unit in Dakota gas plant  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the first natural gas processing plant in the U.S. that uses Sulfreen as the optimum process for tail gas cleanup. A minimum overall recovery of 98.9% is expected. The Sulfreen process appears to be a viable tail gas treater for Claus units in the U.S., providing high overall recoveries and process reliability. The North Dakota plant joins more than 30 other units operating in Canada, Greece, China and throughout Europe.

Davis, G.W.

1985-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

184

United States Nuclear Data Program (USNDP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NNDC Databases: NuDat | NSR | XUNDL | ENSDF | MIRD | ENDF | CSISRS | Sigma NNDC Databases: NuDat | NSR | XUNDL | ENSDF | MIRD | ENDF | CSISRS | Sigma Search the NNDC: Go NNDC Site Index USNDP Meetings 2013 Nov. 18-22 USNDP Proceedings 2012 Annual Meeting Nov. 5-9 2011 Annual Meeting 2010 Annual Meeting 2009 Annual Meeting 2008 Annual Meeting 2007 Annual Meeting 2006 Annual Meeting Distributions CSEWG List USNDP List CSEWG & USNDP List Nuclear Data Needs for Homeland Security USNDP Structure Coordinating Committee Members Member Organizations Archival Webpage 1996 U.S. Nuclear Data Program Sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Physics - Office of Science - U.S. Department of Energy Reports FY 2012 Annual Report FY 2011 Annual Report FY 2010 Annual Report FY 2009 Annual Report FY 2008 Annual Report FY 2007 Annual Report FY 2006 Annual Report

185

EIA - AEO2010 - U.S. nuclear power plants: Continued life or replacement  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. nuclear power plants: continued life or replacement after 60? U.S. nuclear power plants: continued life or replacement after 60? Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 U.S. nuclear power plants: Continued life or replacement after 60? Background Nuclear power plants generate approximately 20 percent of U.S. electricity, and the plants in operation today are often seen as attractive assets in the current environment of uncertainty about future fossil fuel prices, high construction costs for new power plants (particularly nuclear plants), and the potential enactment of GHG regulations. Existing nuclear power plants have low fuel costs and relatively high power output. However, there is uncertainty about how long they will be allowed to continue operating. The nuclear industry has expressed strong interest in continuing the operation of existing nuclear facilities, and no particular technical issues have been identified that would impede their continued operation. Recent AEOs had assumed that existing nuclear units would be retired after 60 years of operation (the initial 40-year license plus one 20-year license renewal). Maintaining the same assumption in AEO2010, with the projection horizon extended to 2035, would result in the retirement of more than one-third of existing U.S. nuclear capacity between 2029 and 2035. Given the uncertainty about when existing nuclear capacity actually will be retired, EIA revisited the assumption for the development of AEO2010 and modified it to allow the continued operation of all existing U.S. nuclear power plants through 2035 in the Reference case.

186

EM Renews Information-Sharing Agreement with United Kingdom's Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renews Information-Sharing Agreement with United Kingdom's Renews Information-Sharing Agreement with United Kingdom's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority EM Renews Information-Sharing Agreement with United Kingdom's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis DOE Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga (left) and Mark Lesinski, U.K.'s Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) Executive Director for Delivery, renewed the Statement of Intent between DOE and NDA in a signing ceremony this week. DOE Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga (left) and Mark Lesinski, U.K.'s Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) Executive Director for Delivery, renewed the Statement of Intent between DOE and NDA in a signing ceremony this week. Florida International University's DOE Fellows gather for a photo with DOE Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga (eighth from left) and DOE Fellows director, Dr. Leo Lagos (tenth from left), at the 2012 Waste Management Symposia in Phoenix this week.

187

COMMERCIAL UTILITY PERSPECTIVES ON NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOM MODERNIZATION  

SciTech Connect

Commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States need to modernize their main control rooms (MCR). Many NPPs have done partial upgrades with some success and with some challenges. The Department of Energys (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, and in particular the Advanced Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) and Information Systems Technologies Research and Development (R&D) Pathway within LWRS, is designed to assist commercial nuclear power industry with their MCR modernization efforts. As part of this framework, a survey was issued to utility representatives of the LWRS Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems/Technologies (II&C) Utility Working Group to obtain their views on a range of issues related to MCR modernization, including: drivers, barriers, and technology options, and the effects these aspects will have on concepts of operations, modernization strategies, and staffing. This paper summarizes the key survey results and discusses their implications.

Jeffrey C. Joe; Ronald L. Boring; Julius J. Persensky

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Nuclear Plant Analyzer: Installation manual. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the installation instructions for the Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) System. The NPA System consists of the Computer Visual System (CVS) program, the NPA libraries, the associated utility programs. The NPA was developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to provide a highly flexible graphical user interface for displaying the results of these analysis codes. The NPA also provides the user with a convenient means of interactively controlling the host program through user-defined pop-up menus. The NPA was designed to serve primarily as an analysis tool. After a brief introduction to the Computer Visual System and the NPA, an analyst can quickly create a simple picture or set of pictures to aide in the study of a particular phenomenon. These pictures can range from simple collections of square boxes and straight lines to complex representations of emergency response information displays.

Snider, D.M.; Wagner, K.L.; Grush, W.H.; Jones, K.R. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)]|[Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Ongoing Space Nuclear Systems Development in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reliable, long-life power systems are required for ambitious space exploration missions. Nuclear power and propulsion options can enable a bold, new set of missions and introduce propulsion capabilities to achieve access to science destinations that are not possible with more conventional systems. Space nuclear power options can be divided into three main categories: radioisotope power for heating or low power applications; fission power systems for non-terrestrial surface application or for spacecraft power; and fission power systems for electric propulsion or direct thermal propulsion. Each of these areas has been investigated in the United States since the 1950s, achieving various stages of development. While some nuclear systems have achieved flight deployment, others continue to be researched today. This paper will provide a brief overview of historical space nuclear programs in the U.S. and will provide a summary of the ongoing space nuclear systems research, development, and deployment in the United States.

S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Werner; S. Johnson; Michael G. Houts; Donald T. Palac; Lee S. Mason; David I. Poston; A. Lou Qualls

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Recent Progress in U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Progress in U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Safety Speaker(s): Robert Budnitz Date: April 15, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The U.S. commercial nuclear-power industry consists...

191

Electromagnetic Compatibility in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) has long been a key element of qualification for mission critical instrumentation and control (I&C) systems used by the U.S. military. The potential for disruption of safety-related I&C systems by electromagnetic interference (EMI), radio-frequency interference (RFI), or power surges is also an issue of concern for the nuclear industry. Experimental investigations of the potential vulnerability of advanced safety systems to EMI/RFI, coupled with studies of reported events at nuclear power plants (NPPs) that are attributed to EMI/RFI, confirm the safety significance of EMC for both analog and digital technology. As a result, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been engaged in the development of the technical basis for guidance that addresses EMC for safety-related I&C systems in NPPs. This research has involved the identification of engineering practices to minimize the potential impact of EMI/RFI and power surges and an evaluation of the ambient electromagnetic environment at NPPs to tailor those practices for use by the nuclear industry. Recommendations for EMC guidance have been derived from these research findings and are summarized in this paper.

Ewing, P.D.; Kercel, S.W.; Korsah, K.; Wood, R.T.

1999-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

192

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate? ... tariff, and demand charge data? How is electricity used in U.S. homes?

193

Sensitivity analysis for the outages of nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 17, 2012 ... Abstract: Nuclear power plants must be regularly shut down in order to perform refueling and maintenance operations. The scheduling of the...

194

Guideline for Online Monitoring of Nuclear Power Plants: Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report continues a series of guidelines that assist member utilities in developing an online monitoring (OLM) program for equipment condition assessment at nuclear power plants.

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

195

Need for process/radiochemists at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Viewgraphs are presented concerning the operating requirements for chemists at nuclear power plants. The number of positions available, job duties, and training requirements are reviewed.

Wymer, R.G.; Skrable, K.W.; Alexander, E.L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

MANAGING MODERNIZATION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing modernization of nuclear power plant instrumentation and control systems February 2004The originating Section of this publication in the IAEA was:

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Risk-informed incident management for nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decision making as a part of nuclear power plant operations is a critical, but common, task. Plant management is forced to make decisions that may have safety and economic consequences. Formal decision theory offers the ...

Smith, Curtis Lee, 1966-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Announced United States nuclear tests, July 1945--December 1990  

SciTech Connect

This document lists chronologically and alphabetically by event name all nuclear tests conducted and announced by the United States from July 1945 to December 1990 with the exception of the GMX experiments. Discussion is included on test dates, test series, test yields, test locations, test types and purposes, test totals for Nevada Test Site (NTS) detection of radioactivity from NTS events, and categorization of NTS nuclear tests. Briefly discussed are agreements between the US and the Soviet Union regarding test banning. (MB)

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION REGION I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

REGION I REGION I 475 ALLENDALE ROAD KING OF PRUSSIA, PENNSYLVANIA 194061415 Docket No. 040-07123 JUL. 19 '996 License No. SUB-748 (Retired) United States -Department of Energy O ffice of EnvironmentalRestoration ATTN: W. Alexander Williams, Ph.D. EM-241 Cloverleaf Building 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, Maryland 20874-1290 SUBJECT: NL INDUSTRIES, ALBANY, NEW YORK Dear Dr. Williams: We are aware that DOE is responsible for the former National Lead Company (NL Industries) facility near Albany, New York. During a recent review of retired AEC License No. SUB-748, we found records which provide additional information concerning the use of source material at the facility. Copies of AEC documents which describe activities at that facility are enclosed. License No. SUB-00748 authorized possession of 38,000 pounds of uranium during

200

Inventory of power plants in the United States as of January 1, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States provides annual statistics on generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). Statistics presented in this report reflect the status of generating units as of January 1, 1997. The publication also provides a 10-yr outlook for generating unit additions. This report is prepared annually by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress; Federal and State agencies; the electric utility industry; and the general public. Data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Inventory of power plants in the United States as of January 1, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States provides annual statistics on generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). Statistics presented in this report reflect the status of generating units as of January 1, 1996. The publication also provides a 10-year outlook for generating unit additions. This report is prepared annually by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress; Federal and State agencies; the electric utility industry; and the general public. Data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 as amended.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

B Plant treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units inspection plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This inspection plan is written to meet the requirements of WAC 173-303 for operations of a TSD facility. Owners/operators of TSD facilities are required to inspection their facility and active waste management units to prevent and/or detect malfunctions, discharges and other conditions potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. A written plan detailing these inspection efforts must be maintained at the facility in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC), Chapter 173-303, ``Dangerous Waste Regulations`` (WAC 173-303), a written inspection plan is required for the operation of a treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facility and individual TSD units. B Plant is a permitted TSD facility currently operating under interim status with an approved Part A Permit. Various operational systems and locations within or under the control of B Plant have been permitted for waste management activities. Included are the following TSD units: Cell 4 Container Storage Area; B Plant Containment Building; Low Level Waste Tank System; Organic Waste Tank System; Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW) Tank System; Low Level Waste Concentrator Tank System. This inspection plan complies with the requirements of WAC 173-303. It addresses both general TSD facility and TSD unit-specific inspection requirements. Sections on each of the TSD units provide a brief description of the system configuration and the permitted waste management activity, a summary of the inspection requirements, and details on the activities B Plant uses to maintain compliance with those requirements.

Beam, T.G.

1996-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

204

Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Containment Structures  

SciTech Connect

Safety-related nuclear power plant (NPP) structures are designed to withstand loadings from a number of low-probability external and interval events, such as earthquakes, tornadoes, and loss-of-coolant accidents. Loadings incurred during normal plant operation therefore generally are not significant enough to cause appreciable degradation. However, these structures are susceptible to aging by various processes depending on the operating environment and service conditions. The effects of these processes may accumulate within these structures over time to cause failure under design conditions, or lead to costly repair. In the late 1980s and early 1990s several occurrences of degradation of NPP structures were discovered at various facilities (e.g., corrosion of pressure boundary components, freeze- thaw damage of concrete, and larger than anticipated loss of prestressing force). Despite these degradation occurrences and a trend for an increasing rate of occurrence, in-service inspection of the safety-related structures continued to be performed in a somewhat cursory manner. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) published the first of several new requirements to help ensure that adequate in-service inspection of these structures is performed. Current regulatory in-service inspection requirements are reviewed and a summary of degradation experience presented. Nondestructive examination techniques commonly used to inspect the NPP steel and concrete structures to identify and quantify the amount of damage present are reviewed. Finally, areas where nondestructive evaluation techniques require development (i.e., inaccessible portions of the containment pressure boundary, and thick heavily reinforced concrete sections are discussed.

Graves, H.L.; Naus, D.J.; Norris, W.E.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Pantex Plant | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Locations > Pantex Plant Pantex Plant http:www.pantex.com Field Office: The NNSA Production Office is responsible for contract management and oversight of the Pantex Plant in...

206

Replacement energy costs for nuclear electricity-generating units in the United States: 1997--2001. Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates previous estimates of replacement energy costs for potential short-term shutdowns of 109 US nuclear electricity-generating units. This information was developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory impact analyses, specifically those that examine the impacts of proposed regulations requiring retrofitting of or safety modifications to nuclear reactors. Such actions might necessitate shutdowns of nuclear power plants while these changes are being implemented. The change in energy cost represents one factor that the NRC must consider when deciding to require a particular modification. Cost estimates were derived from probabilistic production cost simulations of pooled utility system operations. Factors affecting replacement energy costs, such as random unit failures, maintenance and refueling requirements, and load variations, are treated in the analysis. This report describes an abbreviated analytical approach as it was adopted to update the cost estimates published in NUREG/CR-4012, Vol. 3. The updates were made to extend the time frame of cost estimates and to account for recent changes in utility system conditions, such as change in fuel prices, construction and retirement schedules, and system demand projects.

VanKuiken, J.C.; Guziel, K.A.; Tompkins, M.M.; Buehring, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Next Generation Nuclear Plant GAP Analysis Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a follow-up to the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) studies conducted recently by NRC on next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) safety, a study was conducted to identify the significant 'gaps' between what is needed and what is already available to adequately assess NGNP safety characteristics. The PIRT studies focused on identifying important phenomena affecting NGNP plant behavior, while the gap study gives more attention to off-normal behavior, uncertainties, and event probabilities under both normal operation and postulated accident conditions. Hence, this process also involved incorporating more detailed evaluations of accident sequences and risk assessments. This study considers thermal-fluid and neutronic behavior under both normal and postulated accident conditions, fission product transport (FPT), high-temperature metals, and graphite behavior and their effects on safety. In addition, safety issues related to coupling process heat (hydrogen production) systems to the reactor are addressed, given the limited design information currently available. Recommendations for further study, including analytical methods development and experimental needs, are presented as appropriate in each of these areas.

Ball, Sydney J [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Corwin, William R [ORNL; Fisher, Stephen Eugene [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Moses, David Lewis [ORNL

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Nuclear Power Plant Fire-Modeling Applications Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report replaces EPRI 1002981, Fire Modeling Guide for Nuclear Power Plant Applications, August 2002, as guidance for fire-modeling practitioners in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The report has benefited from insights gained since 2002 on the predictive capability of selected fire models to improve confidence in the use of fire modeling in NPP decision-making.

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

209

Welding and Fabrication Critical Factors for New Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welding and fabrication processes employed for manufacture of critical nuclear power plant components may adversely affect material performance and can potentially increase susceptibility to known degradation mechanisms. This report identifies important welding and fabrication processes for specific materials, assesses their effects on potential degradation mechanisms, and identifies process enhancements that can improve long-term asset management of new nuclear plant components.

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

210

Review of Polyimide Insulated Wire in Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of its toughness and other desirable properties, Kapton insulated wire has been test-qualified for use in nuclear power plants; however, failures of this material in military aircraft have raised safety questions. This report identifies the conditions of proper use and handling that will ensure reliable functioning of the wire under nuclear plant operating and accident conditions.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Groundwater Sampling and Analysis Sourcebook for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This sourcebook provides technical guidance and best practices for groundwater sampling and analysis at nuclear power plants. Robust sampling and analysis protocols are required to ensure accurate characterization of radionuclides in groundwater.BackgroundNuclear power plants implement groundwater protection programs to minimize contamination of on-site soil and groundwater, and to prevent the off-site migration of licensed material through groundwater ...

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

212

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2sc Catawba Unit 1, Unit 2 2,258 18,964 36.5 Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC H B Robinson Unit 2 724 3,594 6.9 Progress Energy Carolinas Inc Oconee Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3

213

Risk-Informed Evaluation of Protective Action Strategies for Nuclear Plant Off-Site Emergency Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All commercial nuclear power plants have developed formal emergency preparedness programs, which are implemented if actions required to protect public health and safety are deemed a necessary response to accident conditions. However, in the United States, the basis for these programs and the associated protective action strategies that would be implemented have not been modified since the time of the Three Mile Island accident. Based on the significant advancements in the knowledge of potential nuclear a...

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

214

Construction or Extended Operation of Nuclear Plant (Vermont) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction or Extended Operation of Nuclear Plant (Vermont) Construction or Extended Operation of Nuclear Plant (Vermont) Construction or Extended Operation of Nuclear Plant (Vermont) < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Utility Program Info State Vermont Program Type Siting and Permitting Any petition for approval of construction of a nuclear energy generating plant within the state, or any petition for approval of the operation of a nuclear energy generating plant beyond the date established in a certificate of public good issued under this title, must be submitted to the public service board no later than four years before the date upon which the approval may take effect. Upon receipt of a petition for approval of construction or operation as provided under this section, the public service board shall notify the

215

Program Change Management During Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning a nuclear power plant is a complex project, which involves the coordination of several different departments and the management of changing plant conditions, programs, and regulations. As plants meet certain project Milestones, the evolution of such plant programs and regulations can help optimize project execution and cost. This report provides information about these Milestones and the plant departments and programs that change throughout a decommissioning project.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

216

Guidelines for Nuclear Plant Response to an Earthquake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guidelines for nuclear plant response to earthquakes enable utilities to evaluate in a timely manner the need for post-earthquake plant shutdown and to provide procedures for evaluation of earthquake effects on the plant, as well as criteria for plant restart. The procedures enable the responding team of operators and engineers to identify and assess any earthquake effects and, if shutdown is necessary, to return the plant to safe operation as rapidly as possible. The guidelines presented herein ...

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Guidelines for Nuclear Plant Response to an Earthquake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guidelines for nuclear plant response to earthquakes enable utilities to evaluate in a timely manner the need for post-earthquake plant shutdown and to provide procedures for evaluation of earthquake effects on the plant, as well as criteria for plant restart. The procedures enable the responding team of operators and engineers to identify and assess any earthquake effects and, if shutdown is necessary, to return the plant to safe operation as rapidly as possible. The guidelines presented herein ...

2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

218

Financial and ratepayer impacts of nuclear power plant regulatory reform  

SciTech Connect

Three reports - ''The Future Market for Electric Generating Capacity,'' ''Quantitative Analysis of Nuclear Power Plant Licensing Reform,'' and ''Nuclear Rate Increase Study'' are recent studies performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory that deal with nuclear power. This presents a short summary of these three studies. More detail is given in the reports.

Turpin, A.G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants A funding opportunity announcement of the cost shared feasibility studies of nuclear energy based production of hydrogen using available technology. The objective of this activity is to select and conduct project(s) that will utilize hydrogen production equipment and nuclear energy as necessary to produce data and analysis on the economics of hydrogen production with nuclear energy. Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants More Documents & Publications https://e-center.doe.gov/iips/faopor.nsf/UNID/E67E46185A67EBE68 Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc Microsoft Word - hDE-FOA-0000092.rtf

220

United States and Czech Republic Establish a Joint Civil Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establish a Joint Civil Nuclear Establish a Joint Civil Nuclear Cooperation Center in Prague United States and Czech Republic Establish a Joint Civil Nuclear Cooperation Center in Prague June 12, 2013 - 12:17pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 PRAGUE, Czech Republic - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently joined with the U.S. Embassy in Prague and the Czech Republic's Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports to sign an agreement that establishes a joint Civil Nuclear Cooperation Center in Prague. The creation of this Center is another valued step in expanding U.S.-Czech energy collaboration and fulfills the commitment made by President Obama and Czech Prime Minister Nečas in October 2011 to establish such a Center to facilitate and coordinate joint activities and support regional initiatives in the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Operations and Maintenance Development: Preventive Maintenance Program Implementation Self-Assessment Guidelines for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preventive maintenance (PM) programs throughout nuclear plants in the United States have evolved from strict compliance with the supplier's general recommendations (which are likely to be much too conservative) to more flexible tasks that are intended to accommodate plant-specific service conditions. During the 1990s, the industry, with support from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), embarked on Preventive Maintenance Optimization (PMO) programs. Most utilities either have implemented or are i...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

222

A Dynamical Systems Model for Nuclear Power Plant Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a mathematical dynamical systems model of the effect of plant processes and programs on nuclear plant safety. That is, it models the safety risk management process. Responses of this model to postulated changes in performance and coupling parameters were verified to be in accordance with experience from years of commercial nuclear power plant operation. A preliminary analysis of the model was performed using the techniques of dynamical systems theory to determine regions of operation...

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

Tenth Nuclear Plant Performance Improvement (NPPI) Seminar Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information presented at the Tenth Nuclear Plant Performance Improvement (NPPI) Seminar held July 15-16, 2002, in Saratoga Springs, New York. The biannual seminar -- sponsored by EPRI Plant Support Engineering (PSE), EPRI Plant Performance Enhancement Program (P2EP), and Rochester Gas and Electric -- provided an opportunity for participants to exchange technical information and experience regarding the achievement of the highest possible megawatt electric (MWe) output from nuclear po...

2002-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Advanced Nuclear Technology: Equipment Reliability for New Nuclear Plants: Industry Recommendations for Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial and continued good operating performance of the current build of new nuclear plants is critical to the rebirth of the nuclear option in many countries. Good initial and continued performance is vital to the companies making the large investments required for new nuclear plants. One of the foundations of good performance is a sound process for establishing and sustaining plant equipment reliability (ER).

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

225

Multi-unit Operations in Non-Nuclear Systems: Lessons Learned for Small Modular Reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. Small modular reactors (SMRs) are one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants and may be operated quite differently. One difference is that multiple units may be operated by a single crew (or a single operator) from one control room. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is examining the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of SMRs to support licensing reviews. While we reviewed information on SMR designs to obtain information, the designs are not completed and all of the design and operational information is not yet available. Nor is there information on multi-unit operations as envisioned for SMRs available in operating experience. Thus, to gain a better understanding of multi-unit operations we sought the lesson learned from non-nuclear systems that have experience in multi-unit operations, specifically refineries, unmanned aerial vehicles and tele-intensive care units. In this paper we report the lessons learned from these systems and the implications for SMRs.

OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; DAgostino, A.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

226

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

L.E. Demick

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Estimation of Carbon-14 in Nuclear Power Plant Gaseous Effluents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants report the amount of radioactivity released through permitted effluent pathways in their plant annual reports. This report provides users with a method for calculating the amount of carbon-14 (14C) generated in a light water reactor (LWR) core and released through plant gaseous effluent pathways.

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

228

Plant Engineering: Advanced Nuclear Plant Cable System Design and Installation Concepts to Assure Longevity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the electrical cable systems for existing nuclear power plants have functioned well for up to 40 years, the desired service life for new plants is 60 or more years. Experience with existing plants indicates that relatively small changes during the design and construction of nuclear plants will lead to longer cable system lives and greater ease of testing and assessment of cables to verify their remaining service life. This report describes those changes and provides recommendations for their imp...

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

229

Unit Process Modeling [Nuclear Waste Management using Electrometallurg...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

230

Lesson 7 - Waste from Nuclear Power Plants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 - Waste from Nuclear Power Plants 7 - Waste from Nuclear Power Plants Lesson 7 - Waste from Nuclear Power Plants This lesson takes a look at the waste from electricity production at nuclear power plants. It considers the different types of waste generated, as well as how we deal with each type of waste. Specific topics covered include: Nuclear Waste Some radioactive Types of radioactive waste Low-level waste High-level waste Disposal and storage Low-level waste disposal Spent fuel storage Waste isolation Reprocessing Decommissioning Lesson 7 - Waste.pptx More Documents & Publications National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management

231

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction October 2, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it has received 19 Part I applications from 17 electric power companies for federal loan guarantees to support the construction of 14 nuclear power plants in response to its June 30, 2008 solicitation. The applications reflect the intentions of those companies to build 21 new reactors, with some applications covering two reactors at the same site. All five reactor designs that have been certified, or are currently under review for possible certification, by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are

232

Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers This report is a guidance document prepared for the benefit of commercial nuclear power plants' (NPPs) supporting organizations and personnel who are considering or undertaking deployment of mobile technology for the purpose of improving human performance and plant status control (PSC) for field workers in an NPP setting. This document especially is directed at NPP business managers, Electric Power Research Institute, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, and other non-Information Technology personnel. This information is not intended to replace basic project management practices or reiterate these processes, but is to support decision-making,

233

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction October 2, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it has received 19 Part I applications from 17 electric power companies for federal loan guarantees to support the construction of 14 nuclear power plants in response to its June 30, 2008 solicitation. The applications reflect the intentions of those companies to build 21 new reactors, with some applications covering two reactors at the same site. All five reactor designs that have been certified, or are currently under review for possible certification, by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are represented in the Part I applications. DOE also has received Part I

234

SUBJECT: PRAIRIE ISLAND NUCLEAR GENERATING PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generating Plant. The enclosed report documents the inspection findings which were discussed on February 22, 2001, with you and other members of your staff. This inspection examined activities conducted under your license as they relate to safety and compliance with the Commissions rules and regulations and with the conditions of your license. The inspectors reviewed selected procedures and records, observed activities, and interviewed personnel. Based on the results of this inspection, the inspectors identified two issues of very low safety significance (Green). One of these issues was determined to involve a violation of NRC requirements. However, because of its very low safety significance and because it has been entered into your corrective action program, the NRC is treating the issue as a non-cited violation, in accordance with Section VI.A.1 of the NRCs Enforcement Policy. If you deny the non-cited violation, you should provide a response with the basis for your denial, within 30 days of the date of this inspection report, to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, ATTN: Document Control Desk, Washington DC 20555-0001; with copies to the Regional Administrator,

Dear Mr. Sorensen; Roger D. Lanksbury

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Energy Systems Under Deep Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Power Plants. Number NUREG- 75/014. October 1975. [Nuclear Power Plants. Number NUREG-1150. 1991. [137] JohnMaking. Technical Report NUREG-1855, United States Nuclear

Kim, Lance Kyungwoo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Mesoscale to plant-scale models of nuclear waste reprocessing.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Imported oil exacerabates our trade deficit and funds anti-American regimes. Nuclear Energy (NE) is a demonstrated technology with high efficiency. NE's two biggest political detriments are possible accidents and nuclear waste disposal. For NE policy, proliferation is the biggest obstacle. Nuclear waste can be reduced through reprocessing, where fuel rods are separated into various streams, some of which can be reused in reactors. Current process developed in the 1950s is dirty and expensive, U/Pu separation is the most critical. Fuel rods are sheared and dissolved in acid to extract fissile material in a centrifugal contactor. Plants have many contacts in series with other separations. We have taken a science and simulation-based approach to develop a modern reprocessing plant. Models of reprocessing plants are needed to support nuclear materials accountancy, nonproliferation, plant design, and plant scale-up.

Noble, David Frederick; O'Hern, Timothy John; Moffat, Harry K.; Nemer, Martin B.; Domino, Stefan Paul; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant June 29, 2006 - 2:41pm Addthis Gen IV Reactor Capable of Producing Electricity and/or Hydrogen WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking expressions of interest from prospective industry teams interested in participating in the development and conceptual design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor prototype with the capability to produce process heat, electricity and/or hydrogen. The very high temperature reactor is based on research and development activities supported by DOE's Generation IV nuclear energy systems initiative.

238

Operating experience review for nuclear power plants in the Systematic Evaluation Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Systematic Evaluation Program Branch (SEPB) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) whose purpose is to determine the safety margins of the design and operation of the eleven oldest operating commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. This paper describes the methodology and results of the operational experience review portion of the SEP evaluation. SEPB will combine the results from these operational reviews with other safety topic evaluations to perform an integrated assessment of the SEP plants.

Mays, G.T.; Harrington, K.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Loss of benefits resulting from mandated nuclear plant shutdowns  

SciTech Connect

This paper identifies and discusses some of the important consequences of nuclear power plant unavailability, and quantifies a number of technical measures of loss of benefits that result from regulatory actions such as licensing delays and mandated nuclear plant outages. The loss of benefits that accompany such regulatory actions include increased costs of systems generation, increased demand for nonnuclear and often scarce fuels, and reduced system reliability. This paper is based on a series of case studies, supplemented by sensitivity studies, on hypothetical nuclear plant shutdowns. These studies were developed by Argonne in cooperation with four electric utilities.

Peerenboom, J.P.; Buehring, W.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Job Creation Due to Nuclear Power Resurgence in The United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent revival of global interest in the next generation of nuclear power reactors is causing a reexamination of the role of nuclear power in the United States. This renewed interest has led to questions regarding the capability and capacity of current U.S. industries to support a renewal of nuclear power plant deployment. Key among the many questions currently being asked is what potential exists for the creation of new jobs as a result of developing and operating these new plants? Idaho National Laboratory and Bechtel Power Corporation collaborated to perform a Department of Energy-sponsored study that evaluated the potential for job creation in the U.S. should these new next generation nuclear power plants be built. The study focused primarily on providing an initial estimate of the numbers of new manufacturing jobs that could be created, including those that could be repatriated from overseas, resulting from the construction of these new reactors. In addition to the growth in the manufacturing sector, the study attempted to estimate the potential increase in construction trades necessary to accomplish the new construction.

C. R. Kenley; R. D. Klingler; C. M. Plowman; R. Soto; R. J. Turk; R. L. Baker; S. A. Close; V. L. McDonnell; S. W. Paul; L. R. Rabideau; S. S. Rao; B. P. Reilly

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A CCA-compliant nuclear power plant simulator kernel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a parallel, component-oriented nuclear power plant simulator kernel. It is based on the high-performance computing oriented Common Component Architecture. The approach takes advantage of both the component paradigm and the parallel ...

Manuel Daz; Daniel Garrido; Sergio Romero; Bartolom Rubio; Enrique Soler; Jos M. Troya

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Mapping complexity sources in nuclear power plant domains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the sources of complexity in advanced Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms and their effects on human reliability is critical for ensuring safe performance of both operators and the entire system. New ...

Sasangohar, Farzan

243

United States-Russia Joint Statement on the Results of the Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

States-Russia Joint Statement on the Results of the Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Security Working Group Meeting United States-Russia Joint Statement on the Results of the Nuclear...

244

Training Module for Cyber Security in Nuclear Plant Digital Modifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants face increasing regulatory requirements from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for cyber security of digital devices, components, and systems. The focus of these cyber security requirements is to protect plant digital computer systems, communications systems, and networks from cyber attacks that would affect reactor safety or generation reliability. This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) computer-based training mod...

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

245

Advanced Sensor Diagnostics in Nuclear Power Plant Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensor Diagnostics in Nuclear Power Plant Applications Sensor Diagnostics in Nuclear Power Plant Applications R.B. Vilim Argonne National Laboratory Sensor degradation occurs routinely during nuclear power plant operation and can contribute to reduced power production and less efficient plant operation. Mechanisms include drift of sensor electronics and mechanical components, fouling and erosion of flow meter orifice plates, and general degradation of thermocouples. One solution to this problem is the use of higher quality instrumentation and of physical redundancy. This, however, increases plant cost and does not address the degradation problem in a fundamental way. An alternative approach is to use signal processing algorithms to detect a degraded sensor and to construct a replacement value using an

246

Department of Energy interest and involvement in nuclear plant license renewal activities  

SciTech Connect

Recognizing the importance of nuclear license renewal to the nation's energy strategy, the Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a plant lifetime improvement program during 1985 to determine the feasibility of the license renewal option for US nuclear plants. Initial activities of the DOE program focused on determining whether there were technical and economic obstacles that might preclude or limit the successful implementation of the license renewal option. To make this determination, DOE cosponsored with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) pilot-plant efforts by Virginia Electric Power and Northern States Power. Both pilot-plant efforts concluded that life extension is technically and economically feasible. In parallel with the pilot-plant activities, DOE performed national economic studies that demonstrated the economic desirability of life extension. Having demonstrated the feasibility of life extension, DOE, in conjunction with EPRI, selected two lead plants to demonstrate the license renewal process. These lead plants are Yankee Atomic's Yankee Rowe facility and Northern States Power's Monticello facility. DOE also initiated activities to develop the technical and regulatory bases to support the license renewal process in the United States. DOE has recently identified nuclear plant license renewal to be an important element of its National Energy Strategy. This paper summarizes the significant results, conclusions, and ongoing activities of the DOE effort. 18 refs.

Bustard, L.D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Harrison, D.L. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, Washington, DC (USA). Office of LWR Safety and Technology)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Y-12 PLANT NUCLEAR SAFETY HANDBOOK  

SciTech Connect

Information needed to solve nuclear safety problems is condensed into a reference book for use by persons familiar with the field. Included are a glossary of terms; useful tables; nuclear constants; criticality calculations; basic nuclear safety limits; solution geometries and critical values; metal critical values; criticality values for intermediate, heterogeneous, and interacting systems; miscellaneous and related information; and report number, author, and subject indexes. (C.H.)

Wachter, J.W. ed.; Bailey, M.L.; Cagle, T.J.; Mee, W.T.; Pletz, R.H.; Welfare, F.G.; Youngblood, B.J. comps

1963-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

248

Assessment of Electromagnetic Interference Events in Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a study and analysis of reported electromagnetic interference (EMI-) related incidents in nuclear power plants. These incidents were gathered primarily from the total body of incidents reported to the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) database, with a few incidents coming from U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reports. This report analyzes trends and common factors in these events. The analysis is intended to inform the estimation of risk from EMI and offer suggesti...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

249

Qinshan: China`s first nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect

Plant design, startup, and operation of the Qinshan-1 nuclear power plant in China are outlined in this article. Qinshan-1 is a 300 MW(e) pressurized water reactor designed and constructed in China. Approximately 70 percent of the equipment was also made in China. Findings of a preoperational safety inspection by the International Atomic Energy Agency are summarized.

NONE

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Life Expectancy of Motors in Mild Nuclear Plant Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predicted life expectancies of commercial-grade motors used in the milder environments of nuclear power plants indicate that those motors can last for the life of the plant if properly maintained. This report details methods by which utilities can make such predictions and supplies the extensive data on which the analytic techniques are based.

1985-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

251

Atmospheric Deposition of Tritium at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium source terms at nuclear power plants consist of several sources that include plant vents and cooling impoundments, cooling towers, and treatment ponds. Cooling lakes and reservoirs can be sources of airborne tritium. Methods are presented for estimating these source terms and predicting resulting deposition of tritium using metrological models and for estimating infiltration of tritium using hydrogeological models.

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

252

Data Mining for Monitoring Loose Parts in Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring the mechanical impact of a loose (detached or drifting) part in the reactor coolant system of a nuclear power plant is one of the essential functions for operation and maintenance of the plant.Large data tables are generated during this monitoring ...

J. W. Guan; David A. Bell

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Groundwater Protection Guidelines for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear power industry has undertaken a Groundwater Protection Initiative at the Direction of the NEI Nuclear Strategic Issues Advisory Committee (NSIAC). This EPRI guideline provides essential technical guidance to utilities on the necessary elements of a sound groundwater protection program.

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

254

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U. S. Conunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-1400 (for Light-Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants to Assess PlantStandards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Calibration of Radiation Monitors at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation monitors are installed in nuclear power plants to indicate to operators the levels of radioactivity in various processes and at specific plant locations. Plant personnel depend on radiation monitors for accurate and precise data in order to make informed decisions and take appropriate actions during normal, abnormal, and design basis events. As with all electronic measurement systems, error can be introduced by changing environmental conditions, aging components, and replaced parts. The radiati...

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

256

Acoustic emission monitoring of hot functional testing: Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of selected pressure boundary areas at TVA's Watts Bar, Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant during hot functional preservice testing is described in this report. The report deals with background, methodology, and results. The work discussed here is a major milestone in a program supported by NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. The subject work demonstrated that anticipated problem areas can be overcome. Work is continuing toward AE monitoring during reactor operation.

Hutton, P.H.; Dawson, J.F.; Friesel, M.A.; Harris, J.C.; Pappas, R.A.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Bioenergy plants in the United States and China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

181 (2011) 621- 622 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Plant Science j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / p l a n t s c i Editorial Bioenergy plants in the United States and China The emerging bio-economies of the US and China hinge on the development of dedicated bioenergy feedstocks that will increase the production of next-generation biofuels and bioproducts. While biofuels might have less eventual importance than bioproducts, transportation needs for both countries require increasingly more biofuels to be produced in the coming decades. The US Renewable Fuels Standard mandate 136 billion litres of biofuels by 2022. Nearly 80 billion litres are required to be "advanced biofuels," generally regarded as fuels from non-corn and soybean feedstocks. Because

258

Nuclear Navy United States Atomic Energy Commission Historical Advisory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Navy Navy United States Atomic Energy Commission Historical Advisory Committee Chairman, Alfred D. Chandler, Jr. Harvard University John T. Conway Consolidated Edison Company Lauchlin M. Currie Carmel, California A. Hunter Dupree Brown University Ernest R. May Harvard University Robert P. Multhauf Smithsonian Institution Nuclear Navy 1946-1962 Richard G. Hewlett and Francis Duncan The University of Chicago Press Chicago and London The University of Chicago Press Chicago 60637 The University of Chicago Press Ltd., London Published 1974 Printed in the United States of America International Standard Book Number: 0-226-33219-5 Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 74-5726 RICHARD G. HEWLETT is chief historian of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. He is coauthor, with Oscar E.

259

Use of expert systems in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The application of technologies, particularly expert systems, to the control room activities in a nuclear power plant has the potential to reduce operator error and increase plant safety, reliability, and efficiency. Furthermore, there are a large number of nonoperating activities (testing, routine maintenance, outage planning, equipment diagnostics, and fuel management) in which expert systems can increase the efficiency and effectiveness of overall plant and corporate operations. This document presents a number of potential applications of expert systems in the nuclear power field. 36 refs., 2 tabs.

Uhrig, R.E.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Texas refiner optimizes by integrating units from idle plant  

SciTech Connect

In 1993, Phibro Energy USA Inc. purchased Dow Chemical Co.`s idle 200,000 b/d refinery at Freeport, TX. The Dow facility, known as the Oyster Creek refinery, was incapable of producing gasoline, and therefore was somewhat incomplete as a stand-alone refinery. By relocating and integrating units from the Dow plant with Phibro`s 130,700 b/d refinery at Texas City, TX, and adding a new residual oil solvent extraction (ROSE) unit, Phibro will optimize its Texas refinery operations. The dismantling, movement, and re-erection phases of the project are all but finished, and installation of piping and new instrumentation for the major relocated units is well under way. When the project is complete, Phibro will drastically reduce fuel oil production at Texas City and increase output of middle distillate. Resid, which the company now produces in excess, will be converted to a heavy fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) feedstock. Most of this stream will be fed to the oversized FCC unit at Phibro`s 71,000 b/d Houston refinery, thus eliminating Phibro`s reliance on purchased FCC feed. The paper discusses the Oyster Creek refinery, the decision to reduce residual fuel oil production company-wide, building versus moving equipment, dismantling and transport, construction, products, operational changes, utilities, process wastes, regulations, preparations, and future prospects. The remaining equipment at Oyster Creek was sold to a South Korean refinery.

Rhodes, A.K.

1995-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy proposed action to conduct a lead test assembly program to confirm the viability of using a commercial light water reactor to produce tritium. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 22, 1997 EA-1210: Finding of No Significant Impact Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington July 22, 1997 EA-1210: Final Environmental Assessment

262

Nuclear plant owners move closer to life extension  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major debate is now underway about the safety of 40-year-old nuclear power plants. Under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 a nuclear power plant's license is limited to a maximum of 40 years. Although the act permits the renewal of an operating license, it does not outline any standards or procedures for determining when or under what conditions a plant's operating license should be renewed. This paper reports that the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-sponsors of a program to demonstrate the license renewal process for two nuclear power plants - Yankee Atomic Electric's 175-MW Yankee PWR plant and Northern States Power's 536-MW Monticello BWR plant. The demonstration is known as the lead plant project. Yankee Atomic has already analyzed the plant's condition and evaluated aging using computer-based expert systems and the plant's operating experience. During these tests Yankee Atomic found embrittlement of the reactor vessel.

Smith, D.J.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Unit-Contingent Power Purchase Agreement and Asymmetric Information About Plant Outage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes a unit-contingent power purchase agreement between an electricity distributor and a power plant. Under such a contract the distributor pays the plant a fixed price if the plant is operational and nothing if plant outage occurs. Pricing ... Keywords: electricity industry, risk allocation, spot market, unit-contingent contract

Owen Q. Wu; Volodymyr Babich

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Decommissioning of the Trino Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following a referendum in Italy in 1987, the four Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) owned and operated by the state utility ENEL were closed. After closing the NPPs, ENEL selected a ''safestore'' decommissioning strategy; anticipating a safestore period of some 40-50 years. This approach was consistent with the funds collected during plant operation, and was reinforced by the lack of both a waste repository and a set of national free release limits for contaminated materials in Italy. During 1999, twin decisions were made to privatize ENEL and to transform the nuclear division into a separate subsidiary of the ENEL group. This group was renamed Sogin and during the following year, ownership of the company was transferred to the Italian Treasury. On formation, Sogin was asked by the Italian government to review the national decommissioning strategy. The objective of the review was to move from a safestore strategy to a prompt decommissioning strategy, with the target of releasing all of the nuclear sites by 2020. It was recognized that this target was conditional upon the availability of a national LLW repository together with interim stores for both spent fuel and HLW by 2009. The government also agreed that additional costs caused by the acceleration of the decommissioning program would be considered as stranded costs. These costs will be recovered by a levy on the kWh price of electricity, a process established and controlled by the Regulator of the Italian energy sector. Building on the successful collaboration to develop a prompt decommissioning strategy for the Latina Magnox reactor (1), BNFL and Sogin agreed to collaborate on an in depth study for the prompt decommissioning of the Sogin PWR at Trino. BNFL is currently decommissioning six NPPs and is at an advanced stage of planning for two further units, having completed a full and rigorous exercise to develop Baseline Decommissioning Plans (BDP's) for these stations. The BDP exercise utilizes the full range of BNFL decommissioning experience and knowledge to develop a strategy, methodology and cost for the decommissioning of NPPs. Over the past year, a prompt decommissioning strategy for Trino has been developed. The strategy has been based on the principles of minimizing waste products that require long term storage, maximizing 'free release' materials and utilizing existing and regulatory approved technologies.

Brusa, L.; DeSantis, R.; Nurden, P. L.; Walkden, P.; Watson, B.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

265

How many nuclear power plants are in the U.S. and where are they ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How many nuclear power plants are in the U.S. and where are they located? There are currently 65 commercially operating nuclear power plants with 104 nuclear reactors ...

266

Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Phillips/United Nuclear site, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah, Inc., has reevaluated the Phillips/United Nuclear site in order to revise the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from 2.6 million dry tons of tailings at the Phillips/United Nuclear site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $21,500,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $45,200,000 for disposal at a distance of about 15 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Phillips/United Nuclear tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing.The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $87/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ by either heap leach or conventional plant process. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Reprocessing the Phillips/United Nuclear tailings for uranium recovery does not appear to be economically attractive under present or foreseeable market conditions.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project will demonstrate emissions-free nuclearassisted electricity and hydrogen production by 2015. The NGNP reactor will be a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with a design goal outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. The reactor thermal power and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during hypothetical accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. This paper provides a description of the project to build the NGNP at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The NGNP Project includes an overall reactor design activity and four major supporting activities: materials selection and qualification, NRC licensing and regulatory support, fuel development and qualification, and the hydrogen production plant. Each of these activities is discussed in the paper. All the reactor design and construction activities will be managed under the DOEs project management system as outlined in DOE Order 413.3. The key elements of the overall project management system discussed in this paper include the client and project management organization relationship, critical decisions (CDs), acquisition strategy, and the project logic and timeline. The major activities associated with the materials program include development of a plan for managing the selection and qualification of all component materials required for the NGNP; identification of specific materials alternatives for each system component; evaluation of the needed testing, code work, and analysis required to qualify each identified material; preliminary selection of component materials; irradiation of needed sample materials; physical, mechanical, and chemical testing of unirradiated and irradiated materials; and documentation of final materials selections. The NGNP will be licensed by the NRC under 10 CFR 50 or 10 CFR 52, for the purpose of demonstrating the suitability of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors for commercial electric power and hydrogen production. Products that will support the licensing of the NGNP include the environmental impact statement, the preliminary safety analysis report, the NRC construction permit, the final safety analysis report, and the NRC operating license. The fuel development and qualification program consists of five elements: development of improved fuel manufacturing technologies, fuel and materials irradiations, safety testing and post-irradiation examinations, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term modeling. Two basic approaches will be explored for using the heat from the high-temperature helium coolant to produce hydrogen. The first technology of interest is the thermochemical splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen. The most promising processes for thermochemical splitting of water are sulfur-based and include the sulfur-iodine, hybrid sulfur-electrolysis, and sulfur-bromine processes. The second technology of interest is thermally assisted electrolysis of water. The efficiency of this process can be substantially improved by heating the water to high-temperature steam before applying electrolysis.

F. H. Southworth; P. E. MacDonald

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Nuclear dual-purpose plants for industrial energy  

SciTech Connect

One of the major obstacles to extensive application of nuclear power to industrial heat is the difference between the relatively small energy requirements of individual industrial plants and the large thermal capacity of current power reactors. A practical way of overcoming this obstacle would be to operate a centrally located dual-purpose power plant that would furnish process steam to a cluster of industrial plants, in addition to generating electrical power. The present study indicates that even relatively remote industrial plants could be served by the power plant, since it might be possible to convey steam economically as much as ten miles or more. A survey of five major industries indicates a major potential market for industrial steam from large nuclear power stations.

Klepper, O.H.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

U.S. Job Creation Due to Nuclear Power Resurgence in The United States Volumes 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

The recent revival of interest in nuclear power is causing a reexamination of the role of nuclear power in the United States. This renewed interest has led to questions regarding the capability and capacity of current U.S. industries to support a renewal of nuclear power plant deployment. This study was conducted to provide an initial estimate of jobs to be gained in the U.S. through the repatriation of the nuclear manufacturing industry. In the course of the study, related job categories were also modeled to provide an additional estimate of the potential expansion of existing industries (i.e., plant construction and operations) in conjunction with the repatriation of manufacturing jobs.

Catherine M. Plowman

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Advanced Cooling Options for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alternative power plant cooling systems exist that offer significant opportunity for reducing the amount of water used in power plant cooling. These systems include direct dry cooling using air-cooled condensers, indirect dry cooling using air-cooled heat exchangers paired with water-cooled surface condensers, and a variety of hybrid systems incorporating both dry and wet cooling elements. The water savings afforded by the use of these systems, however, comes at a price in the form of more expensive ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

271

Losses of Offsite Power at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants: Summary of Experience Through 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the losses of offsite power that occurred during 2012 at nuclear power plants operating in the United States and offers insights into the causes of such events for the 10-year period from 2003 through 2012.BackgroundEach year the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) updates a summary of experience involving losses of offsite power. This update describes relevant events that occurred during 2012 and provides an evaluation of the ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Nuclear safety surveillance and control of National Nuclear Safety Administration of PRC during commissioning and operation of nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the method of nuclear safety surveillance and control of National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) of PRC during commissioning and operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs) and the practice for Qinshan NPP and for Guangdong Daya Bay NPP (GNPS). The results of the practice show that the surveillance models set up for Qinshan NPP and for GNPS commissioning were effective and the surveillance has played an important role for ensuring the quality and safety of the commissioning testing and consequently the nuclear safety of these two plants.

Feng, W.; Zhang, C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Plant Support Engineering: Aging Management Program Development Guidance for AC and DC Low-Voltage Power Cable Systems for Nuclear P ower Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulatory and management concern regarding the reliability of low-voltage power cable systems at nuclear plants has been increasing for the past 510 years. The staff of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission are concerned that wetted (up to and including submergence) low-voltage power cable circuits may be degrading to the point at which multiple cable circuits may fail when called on to perform functions affecting safety. Utility managers are concerned that cables may fail, causing adverse sa...

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

274

Advanced Nuclear Technology: Equipment Reliability for New Nuclear Plant Projects: Industry Recommendations for Storage, Construction, and Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial and continued good operating performance of the current build of new nuclear plants is critical to the rebirth of the nuclear option in many countries and vital to the companies making the large investments required for new nuclear plants. One of the foundations of good performance is a sound process for establishing and sustaining plant equipment reliability (ER).

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

275

Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the First United States Nuclear Plant Site in Over 30 Years Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the...

276

Nuclear Power Plant Containment Pressure Boundary Research  

SciTech Connect

Research to address aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants is summarized. This research is aimed at understanding the significant factors relating occurrence of corrosion, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containment and liners of concrete containment. This understanding will lead to improvements in risk-informed regulatory decision making. Containment pressure boundary components are described and potential aging factors identified. Quantitative tools for condition assessments of aging structures to maintain an acceptable level of reliability over the service life of the plant are discussed. Finally, the impact of aging (i.e., loss of shell thickness due to corrosion) on steel containment fragility for a pressurized water reactor ice-condenser plant is presented.

Cherry, J.L.; Chokshi, N.C.; Costello, J.F.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.

1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Effect of Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning Costs on Plant Life Cycle Decisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear utilities implementing Life Cycle Management (LCM) Programs and facing run-relicense-retire decisions need to evaluate the financial cost/benefit of such decisions. Decommissioning costs are one element of these evaluations. This report includes a decommissioning cost estimate for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP) that can be used as a reference source by nuclear utilities involved in LCM and license renewal (LR) decisions.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Integrating Process Unit Energy Metrics into Plant Energy Management Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As energy costs continue to rise across the process industry, many plants have responded by developing improved energy monitoring and reporting programs. At the center of such programs are typically spreadsheet or database applications that pull information, such as fired heater excess oxygen and steam vent rates, from the plant data historian and generate summary reports that compare and trend actual performance relative to targets. On average, plants can expect to reduce overall energy costs by up to 10% through improved management of plant variables, or metrics, that influence energy consumption. Energy metrics can generally be classified into three categories: Equipment, Utility System, and Process. Examples of each type of metric will be given in the paper. As a percentage of the overall savings sited above, the energy savings through stewardship and optimization of Equipment, Utility System and Process metrics are generally 50%, 40% and 10%, respectively. Plants have generally done a good job of stewarding the 90% of savings available through Utility and Equipment related energy metrics, primarily because target setting is fairly straightforward. However, the 10% of savings available from Process metrics, such as tower reflux ratios, pumparound rates, and steam stripping ratios, are typically missing from energy management systems due to the difficulty in first identifying them, and second in determining the optimum targets. Target setting is most difficult because with process metrics, yield considerations must be included in the target setting process. It is quite easy, for example, to save energy by cutting tower reflux rates. But too much reduction will sacrifice yield performance. Even at elevated energy prices, even the smallest reduction in yield will typically offset any energy savings that might have been captured. Therefore, in order to effectively incorporate Process energy metrics into the plant energy management system, knowledge of both energy and yield parameters is required. This paper will explore an effective methodology for determining what process unit energy metrics are important, how to effectively set their targets, and how to incorporate them into an effective energy management system. In terms of how to identify process energy metrics, the paper will discuss which energy intensive processes should be examined first, such as crude distillation and cat cracking. In terms of target setting, the paper will describe how process engineering experience is combined with simulation to develop meaningful targets that characterize the point where yield and energy are simultaneously optimized. Finally, the work process required

Davis, J. L.; Knight, N.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Program on Technology Innovation: The Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Update documents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, which will demonstrate the design, licensing, construction, and operation of a new nuclear energy source using high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. This new non-emitting energy source is applicable to a broad range of uses, from generating electricity to providing high-temperature industrial process heat to producing hydrogen. The NGNP project is sponsored as part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and envi...

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Nuclear Power Plant Fire Modeling Application Guide (NPP FIRE MAG)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a movement to introduce risk-informed and performance-based (RI/PB) analyses into fire protection engineering practice, both domestically and worldwide. This movement exists in both the general fire protection and the nuclear power plant (NPP) fire protection communities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has used risk-informed insights as a part of its regulatory decision making since the 1990s.In 2001, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) ...

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Materials Handbook for Nuclear Plant Pressure Boundary Applications (2013)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility engineers require accurate structural materials properties and performance data to make decisions regarding the adequacy of materials for nuclear power applications. To meet this need, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) publishes the Materials Handbook for Nuclear Plant Pressure Boundary Applications, which has been updated and revised since its initial publication in 1998. The primary focus of the handbook is on pressure boundary materials such as those used for piping ...

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

282

Toshiba's developments on construction techniques of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Reliable and economic energy supplies are fundamental requirements of energy policies in Japan. To accomplish these needs, nuclear power plants are being increased in Japan. In recent years, construction cost increases and schedule extensions have affected the capital cost of nuclear energy, compared with fossil power plants, due to lower costs of oil and coal. On the other hand, several severe regulations have been applied to nuclear power plant designs. High-quality and cooperative engineering and harmonized design of equipment and parts are strongly required. Therefore, reduced construction costs and scheduling, as well as higher quality and reliability, are the most important items for nuclear industry. Toshiba has developed new construction techniques, as well as design and engineering tools for control and management, that demonstrate the positive results achieved in the shorter construction period of 1100-MW(electric) nuclear power plants. The normal construction period so far is 64 months, whereas the current construction period is 52 months. (New construction techniques are partially applied). In future years, the construction period will be lowered to 48 months. (New construction techniques are fully applied). A construction period is defined as time from the start of rock inspection to the start of commercial operation.

Hayashi, Y.; Itoh, N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs.

Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fire models for assessment of nuclear power plant fires  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in available fire models for the assessment of nuclear power plants fires. The advantages and disadvantages of three basic types of fire models (zone, field, and control volume) and Sandia's experience with these models will be discussed. It is shown that the type of fire model selected to solve a particular problem should be based on the information that is required. Areas of concern which relate to all nuclear power plant fire models are identified. 17 refs., 6 figs.

Nicolette, V.F.; Nowlen, S.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

A methodology for evaluating ``new`` technologies in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

As obsolescence and spare parts issues drive nuclear power plants to upgrade with new technology (such as optical fiber communication systems), the ability of the new technology to withstand stressors present where it is installed needs to be determined. In particular, new standards may be required to address qualification criteria and their application to the nuclear power plants of tomorrow. This paper discusses the failure modes and age-related degradation mechanisms of fiber optic communication systems, and suggests a methodology for identifying when accelerated aging should be performed during qualification testing.

Korsah, K.; Clark, R.L.; Holcomb, D.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years.

G. O. Hayner; E.L. Shaber

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Proceedings of the Third International Workshop on the implementation of ALARA at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the papers presented and the discussions that took place at the Third International Workshop on ALARA Implementation at Nuclear Power Plants, held in Hauppauge, Long Island, New York from May 8--11, 1994. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together scientists, engineers, health physicists, regulators, managers and other persons who are involved with occupational dose control and ALARA issues. The countries represented were: Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Korea, Mexico, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States. The workshop was organized into twelve sessions and three panel discussions. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Khan, T.A. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Roecklein, A.K. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the United States Department Of Energy Public Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 The UNITED STATES 3 NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION and 4 the UNITED STATES 5 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 6 7 PUBLIC MEETING 8 9 DISCUSSION OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF SECTION 3116 OF 10 THE NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT 11 12 Commencing at 9:10 a.m., November 16, 2006 13 at the L'Enfant Plaza Hotel 14 480 L'Enfant Plaza, SW 15 Washington DC 20024 16 17 Public meeting organized by: 18 Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc. 19 20010 Century Boulevard, Suite 500 20 Germantown, Maryland 20874 21 (301) 972-4430 22 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 2 P R O C E E D I N G S MR. CAMERON: Good morning everyone. My name is Chip Cameron. I'm an assistant general counsel in the office of General Counsel at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. And I would like to

290

I UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGU.LATORYCOMMISS& REGION I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' \*-'- ' \*-'- I UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGU.LATORYCOMMISS& REGION I 63, PARK AVENUE KING OF PRUSSIA. PENNSY LVANIA 19406 I..*. :+ 2 6 JUN 1979 2.lr.b The Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Public Health Division of Health Care Standards 8 Regulation ATTN: Mr. Gerald S. Parker, Director Radiation Control Programs 80 Boylston Street, Room 835 Boston, Massachusetts 02116 Dear Mr. Parker: Enclosed for your information and retention is a copy of the NRC, Region I Investigation Report No. 078-154-A which documents our investigation into.the source of the radioactive material found at the privately owned landfill in Norton, Massachusetts. The report has been prepared in two parts. Confidential - Restricted data has been intentionally omitted.

291

An Assessment of the Impact of the Energy Bill of 2003 on the U.S. Market for the Nuclear Technologies and Potential New Plant Const ruction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Bill of 2003, still making its way through Congress, will have important implications for the United States nuclear power industry. These implications will depend critically on whether or not the bill passes with tax incentives, liability limits, and research and development provisions favorable to new nuclear power plant construction. This report analyzes the impacts of both scenarios on prospects for new nuclear power plant construction.

2004-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

292

Program on Technology Innovation: The Effects of High-Frequency Ground Motion on Structures, Components, and Equipment in Nuclear Po wer Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A current and significant area of uncertainty for nuclear siting approval in the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) is resolution of an appropriate treatment of the high-frequency component of site-specific seismic design response spectra for many planned nuclear plants. Existing nuclear power plants have been designed using either the site-independent Regulatory Guide 1.60 design spectrum shape or other site-independent spectral shapes. More recent probabilistic hazard-based site-specific spectra ...

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

293

Radiation Protection Program Resource Optimization Project; Brunswick Nuclear Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation protection (RP) managers face challenges in providing a necessary service that complies with stringent regulations, while simultaneously reducing operations and maintenance (O&M) costs. The results of this pilot project, hosted by Brunswick Nuclear Plant (BNP), will assist utilities in targeting resource commitments and cost effectiveness while optimizing overall performance. This report identifies specific program cost reduction and process performance enhancements for the host plant, and esta...

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

294

Optimization of Auxiliaries Consumption in Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operators of nuclear power plants face significant challenges to produce power more cost-effectively. One approach to producing power more cost-effectively is to reduce power consumption by auxiliary systems in the plant, leading to more power available for the grid. This report provides guidance for assessing auxiliary system performance and recommends approaches to reduce their power consumption. The report also presents results from questionnaires on auxiliary system consumption and, in some cases, ac...

2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

295

Plant Support Engineering: Guidance for Planned Replacement of Large Power Transformers at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities continue to pursue license renewal applications and power uprates, and these initiatives are being undertaken on an aging fleet of nuclear plants. Many plants are facing the necessity of replacing large power transformers to support these initiatives. However, industry expertise to support such activities has diminished since the days of plant construction8212there are fewer qualified vendors and equipment manufacturers, materials and standards might have changed, and licensees are typically no...

2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

296

Plant Support Engineering: Guidance for Replacing Inverters and Battery Chargers at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities are continuing to pursue license renewal applications and power uprates, and these initiatives are being undertaken on an aging fleet of nuclear plants. Many plants must replace inverters and battery chargers to support these initiatives. However, industry expertise to support such activities has diminished since the days of plant constructionthere are fewer qualified vendors and equipment manufacturers, materials have changed in many cases, and licensees are typically not currently staffed for...

2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

297

Plant Support Engineering: Guidance for Replacing Feedwater Heaters at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities continue to pursue license renewal applications and power uprates, and these initiatives are being undertaken in an aging fleet of nuclear plants. Many plants are facing the necessity of replacing feedwater heaters to support these initiatives. However, industry expertise to support such activities has diminished since the days of plant construction8212there are fewer qualified vendors and equipment manufacturers, materials might have changed, and licensees are typically not staffed for these m...

2007-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

298

Commercial Nuclear Electric Power in the United States: Problems and Prospects  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article briefly reviews the origins of commercial nuclear electric power, the efforts to dispose of high-level nuclear waste, the costs of building and operating nuclear electric power plants, and other energy-related developments pertinent to the future of nuclear electric power.

Information Center

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Viability of an expanded United States nuclear power program and its effects on energy markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The four biggest energy sources in the United States are coal, crude oil, natural gas, and nuclear power. While coal and nuclear power are produced domestically, more than 70% of crude oil and 20% of natural gas is imported. ...

Khan, Tanzeer S

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Carbon-14 Dose Calculation Methods at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon-14 (C-14) is a naturally occurring isotope of carbon produced by cosmic radiation interactions in the upper atmosphere. Nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 1960s significantly increased the amount of C-14 in the atmosphere. C-14 is also produced in commercial nuclear reactors, but the amounts produced are much less than those produced naturally or from weapons testing. C-14 is released through permitted effluent pathways of a nuclear power plant. This report provides the current industry best...

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Aging assessment of large electric motors in nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large electric motors serve as the prime movers to drive high capacity pumps, fans, compressors, and generators in a variety of nuclear plant systems. This study examined the stressors that cause degradation and aging in large electric motors operating in various plant locations and environments. The operating history of these machines in nuclear plant service was studied by review and analysis of failure reports in the NPRDS and LER databases. This was supplemented by a review of motor designs, and their nuclear and balance of plant applications, in order to characterize the failure mechanisms that cause degradation, aging, and failure in large electric motors. A generic failure modes and effects analysis for large squirrel cage induction motors was performed to identify the degradation and aging mechanisms affecting various components of these large motors, the failure modes that result, and their effects upon the function of the motor. The effects of large motor failures upon the systems in which they are operating, and on the plant as a whole, were analyzed from failure reports in the databases. The effectiveness of the industry`s large motor maintenance programs was assessed based upon the failure reports in the databases and reviews of plant maintenance procedures and programs.

Villaran, M.; Subudhi, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Enhancing Cross-Correlation Analysis with Artificial Neural Networks for Nuclear Power Plant Feedwater Flow Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the primary cost-saving objectives of the power plant industry, including the nuclear industry, has long been the efficient operation of plant systems. Since the maximum operating thermal power of any nuclear plant is bounded by the specific licensing ... Keywords: flow measurement, neural networks, nuclear power plant

Davide Roverso; Da Ruan

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ''U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries'' (NUREG/CR-6577, Supp. 2) report has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants during 2000-2001. Costs incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, which represent fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications, which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operations summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from operating reports submitted by the licensees, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) database for enforcement actions, and outage reports.

Reid, RL

2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

304

Comparison between the measured and calculated reactivity in measuring the effectiveness of the emergency protection at the stage of physical start-up of unit no. 3 at the Kalinin nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents comparisons between the effectiveness of the emergency protection under both stationary and nonstationary formulations calculated with the use of the RADUGA-7.5 package and experimental data obtained in measuring the 'weight' of the emergency protection in the process of physical start-up of the VVER-1000 reactor of unit no. 3 of the Kalinin NPP. On the basis of the results obtained, recommendations are given on comparing the measured and calculated reactivity and parameters determined by using its value.

Kavun, O. Yu.; Popykin, A. I.; Shevchenko, R. A., E-mail: rshevchenko@secnrs.ru; Shevchenko, S. A. [Scientific and Engineering Center for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Peach Bottom and Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dramatic and extraordinary instance of state and local government control of nuclear power, the purchase by New York of the Shoreham plant is nonetheless indicative of the political demands that some states confront for additional involvement in the regulation of the radiological hazards associated with commercial nuclear power plants. Although the Supreme Court has appeared to expand, in the eight years since PG&E and Silkwood, the acceptable extent of state regulation, some states, in addition to New York, have acquired, with the acquiescence of the NRC, a degree of involvement that exceeds the role for state and local governments provided by the Court. For example, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania concluded with the Philadelphia Electric Company (PECO) in June 1989 an agreement that commits PECO to various initiatives, not otherwise required under NRC regulations, for the safe operation of the Peach Bottom nuclear power plant in Pennsylvania. In July 1991 the State of Vermont and Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corporation (Vermont Yankee) concluded an agreement similar to that concluded between Pennsylvania and PECO. The agreement also commits Vermont Yankee to certain initiatives, not otherwise required under NRC regulations, related to its operation of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant in Vermont. The agreement was precipitated by a challenge to an application, submitted to the NRC by Vermont Yankee in April 1989, to amend the Vermont Yankee plant license to extend its expiration date from December 11, 2007 to March 21, 2012. The amendment would allow the Vermont Yankee plant to operate for forty full years.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

PM-1 NUCLEAR POWER PLANT PROGRAM PARAMETRIC STUDY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The study deals with narrowing the range of parameters prior to preliminary design of the PM-1, a factory prepackaged, air-transportable, pressurized water nuclear power plant. The plant is to produce 1000 kw of net electrical power and 7 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr of space heat that is suitable for use with a central heating system. The data and conclusions resulting from the parametric study will provide the basis for the preliminary design of the PM-1 power plant. (W.D.M.)

Sieg, J.S.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Assessment of inservice conditions of safety-related nuclear plant structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report is a compilation from a number of sources of information related to the condition Of structures and civil engineering features at operating nuclear power plants in the United States. The most significant information came from the hands-on inspection of the six old plants (licensed prior to 1977) performed by the staff of the Civil Engineering and Geosciences Branch (ECGB) in the Division of Engineering of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. For the containment structures, most of the information related to the degraded conditions came from the licensees as part of the Licensing Event Report System (10 CFR 50.73), or as part of the requirement under limiting condition of operation of the plant-specific Technical Specifications. Most of the information related to the degradation of other Structures and civil engineering features was extracted from the industry survey, the reported incidents, and the plant visits. The report discusses the condition of the structures and civil engineering features at operating nuclear power plants and provides information that would help detect, alleviate, and correct the degraded conditions of the structures and civil engineering features.

Ashar, H.; Bagchi, G.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Delays in nuclear power plant construction. Volume II. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report identifies barriers to shortening nuclear power plant construction schedules and recommends research efforts which should minimize or eliminate the identified barriers. The identified barriers include (1) Design and Construction Interfacing Problems; (2) Problems Relating to the Selection and Use of Permanent Materials and Construction Methods; (3) Construction Coordination and Communication Problems; and (4) Problems Associated with Manpower Availability and Productivity.

Mason, G.E.; Larew, R.E.; Borcherding, J.D.; Okes, S.R. Jr.; Rad, P.F.

1977-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

309

Radiation Data for Design and Qualification of Nuclear Plant Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graphic summaries in this report represent the most comprehensive collection to date of data on the degrading effects of radiation on organic materials used in nuclear plant equipment. The data, which can help designers in selecting radiation-resistant materials, can also help in qualifying equipment at minimum cost.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Is natural background or radiation from nuclear power plants leukemogenic  

SciTech Connect

The objective in this review is to provide some facts about normal hemopoietic cell proliferation relevant to leukemogenesis, physical, chemical, and biological facts about radiation effects with the hope that each person will be able to decide for themselves whether background radiation or emissions from nuclear power plants and facilities significantly add to the spontaneous leukemia incidence. 23 refs., 1 tab.

Cronkite, E.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Nuclear Plant Reliability: Data Collection and Usage Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most nuclear utility programs and regulatory compliance actions involve several organizations within a utility and often have overlapping elements. Nearly all of these programs need extensive data. This report discusses some issues associated with the identification, collection, and effective use of plant data in support of such utility programs.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

312

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I I Summary Report Prepared for the United States Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology and its Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Subcommittee on Generation IV Technology Planning October 31, 2001 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any of its employees make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe upon privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

313

Reprocessing of nuclear fuels at the Savannah River Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more than 30 years, the Savannah River Plant (SRP) has been a major supplier of nuclear materials such as plutonium-239 and tritium-3 for nuclear and thermonuclear weapons, plutonium-238 for space exploration, and isotopes of americium, curium, and californium for use in the nuclear research community. SRP is a complete nuclear park, providing most of the processes in the nuclear fuel cycle. Key processes involve fabrication and cladding of the nuclear fuel, target, and control assemblies; rework of heavy water for use as reactor moderator; reactor loading, operation, and unloading; chemical recovery of the reactor transmutation products and spent fuels; and management of the gaseous, liquid, and solid nuclear and chemical wastes; plus a host of support operations. The site's history and the key processes from fabrication of reactor fuels and targets to finishing of virgin plutonium for use in the nuclear weapons complex are reviewed. Emphasis has been given to the chemistry of the recovery and purification of weapons grade plutonium from irradiated reactor targets.

Gray, L.W.

1986-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

314

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PRESENTATONS: Reawakening of United States Nuclear Energy: Materials Challenges for a New Generation of Power Plants Presentations by Harold...

315

United States-Japan Nuclear Security Working Group Fact Sheet | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

United States-Japan Nuclear Security Working Group Fact Sheet | National United States-Japan Nuclear Security Working Group Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > United States-Japan Nuclear Security Working Group Fact Sheet Fact Sheet United States-Japan Nuclear Security Working Group Fact Sheet Mar 27, 2012

316

Online Monitoring of Plant Assets in the Nuclear Industry  

SciTech Connect

Todays online monitoring technologies provide opportunities to perform predictive and proactive health management of assets within many different industries, in particular the defense and aerospace industries. The nuclear industry can leverage these technologies to enhance safety, productivity, and reliability of the aging fleet of existing nuclear power plants. The U.S. Department of Energys Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is collaborating with the Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) Long-Term Operations program to implement online monitoring in existing nuclear power plants. Proactive online monitoring in the nuclear industry is being explored using EPRIs Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software, a set of web-based diagnostic and prognostic tools and databases that serves as an integrated health monitoring architecture. This paper focuses on development of asset fault signatures used to assess the health status of generator step-up transformers and emergency diesel generators in nuclear power plants. Asset fault signatures describe the distinctive features based on technical examinations that can be used to detect a specific fault type. Fault signatures are developed based on the results of detailed technical research and on the knowledge and experience of technical experts. The Diagnostic Advisor of the FW-PHM Suite software matches developed fault signatures with operational data to provide early identification of critical faults and troubleshooting advice that could be used to distinguish between faults with similar symptoms. This research is important as it will support the automation of predictive online monitoring techniques in nuclear power plants to diagnose incipient faults, perform proactive maintenance, and estimate the remaining useful life of assets.

Nancy Lybeck; Vivek Agarwal; Binh Pham; Richard Rusaw; Randy Bickford

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Inventory of Nonutility Electric Power Plants in the United States  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. Provides annual aggregate statistics on generating units operated by nonutilities in the United States and the District of Columbia. Provides a 5-year outlook for generating unit additions and changes.

Information Center

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Demonstration of Clyde Bergemann Water Cannons at Alabama Power Company's Plant Miller Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the findings of a demonstration of Clyde Bergemann Water Cannons at Alabama Power Company's Plant Miller Unit 1.

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

319

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Natural Gas Processing Plants Utilization Rates Based on 2008 Flows Figure 3. Natural Gas Processing Plants Utilization Rates Based on 2008 Flows Note: Average utilization rates...

320

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~ ties Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants. LBlr5921, Lawrencein U. S. Commercial Nuclear Power Plants. WASH-1400. Octoberand Content of for Nuclear Power Plants. Regulatory Guide

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Fact Sheet: United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan The United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan is intended to provide a framework for bilateral collaboration in nuclear energy. This Action Plan builds upon our significant, longstanding civilian nuclear cooperation, and will contribute to increasing energy security and managing nuclear waste, addressing nuclear nonproliferation and climate change, advancing goals put forth in President Bush's Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. The Action Plan was signed by representatives of both nations in April 2007. The Action Plan will be implemented by Steering Committee Co-Chairs. Assistant Secretary of Energy Dennis Spurgeon, or his designee, will serve as the U.S. Co-Chair. Japanese Co-Chairs will be selected

322

United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote Nuclear Energy Cooperation United States and Japan Sign Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan to Promote Nuclear Energy Cooperation April 25, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - United States Department of Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman and Japan's Ministers Akira Amari, Bunmei Ibuki, and Taro Aso, this week presented to U.S. President George W. Bush and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, the United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan. The Action Plan - a product of extensive negotiations between the U.S. and Japan - provides a framework for increased collaboration in nuclear energy. It builds upon the significant, longstanding civilian nuclear cooperation between the two nations and will contribute to increasing

323

Requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemicalseparation plants.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants that are of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. Justification for advanced simulation and some examples of grand challenges that will benefit from it are provided. An integrated software tool that has its main components, whenever possible based on first principles, is proposed as possible future approach for dealing with the complex problems linked to the simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants. The main benefits that are associated with a better integrated simulation have been identified as: a reduction of design margins, a decrease of the number of experiments in support of the design process, a shortening of the developmental design cycle, and a better understanding of the physical phenomena and the related underlying fundamental processes. For each component of the proposed integrated software tool, background information, functional requirements, current tools and approach, and proposed future approaches have been provided. Whenever possible, current uncertainties have been quoted and existing limitations have been presented. Desired target accuracies with associated benefits to the different aspects of the nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants were also given. In many cases the possible gains associated with a better simulation have been identified, quantified, and translated into economical benefits.

Palmiotti, G.; Cahalan, J.; Pfeiffer, P.; Sofu, T.; Taiwo, T.; Wei,T.; Yacout, A.; Yang, W.; Siegel, A.; Insepov, Z.; Anitescu, M.; Hovland,P.; Pereira, C.; Regalbuto, M.; Copple, J.; Willamson, M.

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

324

Indicator system for advanced nuclear plant control complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Plant Support Engineering: Aging Management Program Guidance for Medium- Voltage Cable Systems for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulatory and management concern regarding the reliability of medium-voltage cable systems at nuclear plants has been increasing for 510 years. The staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are concerned that wetted (up to and including submergence) medium-voltage cable circuits may be degrading to the point at which multiple cable circuits may fail when called on to perform functions affecting safety. Utility managers are concerned that cables may fail, causing adverse safety consequences ...

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

326

DOE Releases Filing Instructions for Federal Risk Insurance for New Nuclear Power Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Outlines Five Steps for New Nuclear Plant Sponsors to Enter Into a Conditional Agreement for Risk Insurance

327

Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction for Future Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction for Future Nuclear Power Plants

O' Connell, J. Michael

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

INFORMATION INTEGRATION IN CONTROL ROOMS AND TECHNICAL OFFICES IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information integration in control rooms and technical offices in nuclear power plants Report prepared within the framework of the

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

United States-Russia Joint Statement on the Results of the Nuclear Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

States-Russia Joint Statement on the Results of the Nuclear States-Russia Joint Statement on the Results of the Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Security Working Group Meeting United States-Russia Joint Statement on the Results of the Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Security Working Group Meeting December 10, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Moscow - Earlier this week, Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman, representing the United States government, signed a joint statement with Russia's Director General of the State Atomic Energy Corporation "Rosatom" Sergey Kirienko on the results of the Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Security Working Group meeting that took place on December 6-7, 2010. The Working Group meeting strengthened cooperation between the U.S. and Russia on civil nuclear energy and nuclear security. Read the joint statement (PDF - 412 kb) signed by Deputy Secretary Poneman

330

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Plant Engineering: Electrical Cable Test Applicability Matrix for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When assessing cable degradation or failure assessment, using the correct test and assessment methodology is critical to obtaining the correct answer. Many in-plant and laboratory tests exist. Some apply to the cable types used in nuclear plants. Some apply only to distribution cables. Most have pertinence to only one issue or even one cable design. This report provides a correlation between specific cable problems and the appropriate tests that may be used to resolve the issue. The report starts with su...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

332

Vulnerability Analysis of a Nuclear Power Plant Considering Detonations of Explosive Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vulnerability Analysis of a Nuclear Power Plant Considering Detonations of Explosive Devices Marko threats to a nuclear power plant in the year 1991 and after the 9/11 events in 2001. The methodology which strength and injuries of human beings with nuclear power plant models used in probabilistic safety

Cizelj, Leon

333

Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants ANL-AFCI-168 of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants ANL-AFCI-168 by G. Palmiotti, J. Cahalan, P. Pfeiffer, T;2 ANL-AFCI-168 Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants G

Anitescu, Mihai

334

Trade-offs in size, quantity and reliability of generalized nuclear power plants: a preliminary assessment  

SciTech Connect

An approximate method is used to estimate the effects of system reliability on optimal nuclear plant size, taking into account also scale factors and manufacturing learning curve slopes. The method is used to estimate the additional effective capability gained by adding units of different sizes to an existing electrical system. The number of additional units proves to be sensitive to forced outrage rate, estimated here from trends in US light-water reactors from 1971 to 1980. The relative cost of added units ranging in size from 200 to 800 MW is determined as a function of the parameters: scale factor and learning curve slope. The results generally corrobate the trends found in an earlier study in which the effect of reliability on required installed capacity was not explicitly considered. Optimal plant size decreases with weaker scale effects and stronger learning curve effects. Reliability considerations further reduce the optimal plant size, but the relative reduction is apparently not as great with steeper learning curves. This is a plausible finding inasmuch as the reduction in numbers of additional units due to reliability considerations will affect cost most where the learning curve is steepest. 9 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Hill, D.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Advanced Nuclear Technology: Supplier Quality Management for New Nuclear Plant Construction Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for new nuclear power plant construction projects on supplier quality-related risks associated with the procurement of materials, equipment, and services intended for use in a safety-related plant application. This guidance takes an in-depth look into the procurement-related challenges that new construction projects face and at measures for overcoming these challenges. A methodology is provided for identifying, managing, evaluating, and mitigating quality-related risks ...

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

336

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Passive Component Maintenance Guide for Nuclear Power Plant Personnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The information contained in this report represents a significant collection of technical and human performance information, including techniques and good practices, related to the design, maintenance, and operation of passive components common at most domestic nuclear power plants. Assemblage of this information provides a single point of reference for plant engineering and maintenance personnel, both in the present and in the future. Through the use of this guideline, in close conjunction with the indu...

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

337

Fast neutron fluence of yonggwang nuclear unit 1 reactor pressure vessel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 50, Appendix H, requires that the neutron dosimetry be present to monitor the reactor vessel throughout plant life. The Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry System has been installed for Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 1 after complete withdrawal of all six in-vessel surveillance capsules. This system has been installed in the reactor cavity annulus in order to measure the fast neutron spectrum coming out through the reactor pressure vessel. Cycle specific neutron transport calculations were performed to obtain the energy dependent neutron flux throughout the reactor geometry including dosimetry positions. Comparisons between calculations and measurements were performed for the reaction rates of each dosimetry sensors and results show good agreements. (authors)

Yoo, C.; Km, B.; Chang, K.; Leeand, S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., 150 Dukjin-dong, Yuseung-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Park, J. [Chungnam National Univ., 220 Gung-dong, Yuseung-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

U.S. Nuclear Power Plants: Continued Life or Replacement After 60? (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Nuclear power plants generate approximately 20 percent of U.S. electricity, and the plants in operation today are often seen as attractive assets in the current environment of uncertainty about future fossil fuel prices, high construction costs for new power plants (particularly nuclear plants), and the potential enactment of GHG regulations. Existing nuclear power plants have low fuel costs and relatively high power output. However, there is uncertainty about how long they will be allowed to continue operating.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

339

Design and construction of the Qinshan nuclear power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction work of China's first prototype nuclear power plant Qinshan NPP has already begun. This plant is located on the northern shore of Hangzhou Bay. It is designed to have a capacity of 300 MW electricity. The thermal power of the reactor is 966 MW. The primary circuit consists of 2 coolant loops and 16 auxiliary systems for normal operation. Safety is always the priority in design consideration. Preliminary safety analyses have been done and satisfactory results have been obtained. Excavation and clean out work has been finished.

Yu, O.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Effects of delaying the operation of a nuclear power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a study of an actual 24-month nuclear power plant licensing delay. A representative utility was chosen for examination. The research was oriented toward determination of the licensing delay's impact on the utility's operating results, ratepayers, and security issues. The methodology utilized to estimate those impacts involved the recursive interaction of a generation costing program to estimate replacement fuel costs and a financial regulatory model to concomitantly determine the impact on the utility, its ratepayers and security issues. The latter model was executed under six alternate scenarios: (1) no delay in the plant's operation; (2) a 24-month delay; (3) a 24-month delay but further assuming all replacement power was generated by coal-fired plants; (4) a 24-month delay assuming all replacement power from oil-fired plants; (5) no delay but assuming the capital cost of the plant was twice as large; and (6) a 24-month delay with the capital cost of the plant twice as large. Three primary conclusions were made. First, under all scenarios, a 24-month delay in operation of the plant has an adverse impact on the utility's internal generation of funds. Second, although electricity rates are not appreciably affected by the delay, the direction of electricity price changes is contingent on the source of fuel used for replacement power. Finally, a 24-month delay has an adverse impact on the indicators used to evaluate the financial soundness of the utility in all cases under consideration.

Hill, L.J.; Rainey, J.A.; Tepel, R.C.; Van Dyke, J.W.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Performance modelling and simulated availability of shell gasification and carbon recovery unit of urea plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present paper deals with the performance modelling and simulated availability of shell gasification and carbon recovery unit of urea plant. The fertilizer plant comprises of various units viz. shell gasification and carbon recovery, desulphurisation, ... Keywords: modelling, performance evaluation and maintenance strategies, steady state availability

Sunand Kumar; Sanjeev Kumar; P. C. Tewari

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Considerations in the evaluation of concrete structures for continued service in aged Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs)  

SciTech Connect

Currently, there are /approximately/119 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the US either under construction, operating at low-to-full power, or awaiting an operating license. Together, these units have a net generating capacity of /approximately/110 GW(e). Assuming no life extension of present facilities, the operating licenses for these plants will start to expire in the middle of the next decade with Yankee Rowe being the first plant to attain this status. Where it is noted that with no life extension of facilities, a potential loss of electrical generating capacity in excess of 75 GW(e) could occur during the time period 2006 to 2020 when the operating licenses of 80 to 90 NPPs are scheduled to expire. A potential timely and cost-effective solution to meeting future electricity demand, which has worked well for non-nuclear generating plants, is to extend the service life (operating licenses) of existing NPPs. Since the concrete components in these plants provide a vital safety function, any continued service considerations must include an in-depth assessment of the safety-related concrete structures. 7 refs.

Naus, D.; Marchbanks, M.; Oland, B.; Arndt, G.; Brown, T.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Advanced Nuclear Fuel Development for the Future in the United ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2010. Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance. Presentation Title, Advanced...

344

Predictive Maintenance Self-Assessment Guidelines for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a need at nuclear power plants for optimization and continuous improvement in the predictive maintenance (PdM) process. This need is based upon increased reliance on PdM to contribute to low unplanned capability loss factors, prevent significant equipment failures, reduce resources for maintenance, manage assets in support of license renewal and aging control, incorporate new technologies and advanced information management, and manage the risk associated with maintenance activities. This docume...

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

345

Introduction to Nuclear Plant Steam Turbine Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since Nuclear Power Plants produce their power through the use of Steam Turbine Generators, any problems associated with the Turbine Control System has a direct effect on power generation. Although considerable effort has been expended in improving control system reliability, failures resulting in lost generation and high maintenance cost still plague the industry. On an individual basis, improvements have been made through maintenance techniques, modifications and upgrades. Unfortunately, this informati...

1995-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

346

Human Factors Considerations in New Nuclear Power Plants: Detailed Analysis.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored study has identified human-performance issues in new and advanced nuclear power plants. To identify the issues, current industry developments and trends were evaluated in the areas of reactor technology, instrumentation and control technology, human-system integration technology, and human factors engineering (HFE) methods and tools. The issues were organized into seven high-level HFE topic areas: Role of Personnel and Automation, Staffing and Training, Normal Operations Management, Disturbance and Emergency Management, Maintenance and Change Management, Plant Design and Construction, and HFE Methods and Tools. The issues where then prioritized into four categories using a 'Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table' methodology based on evaluations provided by 14 independent subject matter experts. The subject matter experts were knowledgeable in a variety of disciplines. Vendors, utilities, research organizations and regulators all participated. Twenty issues were categorized into the top priority category. This Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) technical report provides the detailed methodology, issue analysis, and results. A summary of the results of this study can be found in NUREG/CR-6947. The research performed for this project has identified a large number of human-performance issues for new control stations and new nuclear power plant designs. The information gathered in this project can serve as input to the development of a long-term strategy and plan for addressing human performance in these areas through regulatory research. Addressing human-performance issues will provide the technical basis from which regulatory review guidance can be developed to meet these challenges. The availability of this review guidance will help set clear expectations for how the NRC staff will evaluate new designs, reduce regulatory uncertainty, and provide a well-defined path to new nuclear power plant licensing.

OHara,J.; Higgins, J.; Brown, W.; Fink, R.

2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

347

Optimization of Fire Protection Impairments at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, risk-informed and performance-based (RI/PB) fire protection is gaining further acceptance by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the industry. In addition, fire risk assessment methods are gaining some level of maturity since the first industrywide experience with individual plant examination for external events (IPEEE). RI/PB methods can reduce the cost of operating fire protection programs and maintaining fire safety.

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

348

Safety and Nonsafety Communications and Interactions in International Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current industry and NRC guidance documents such as IEEE 7-4.3.2, Reg. Guide 1.152, and IEEE 603 do not sufficiently define a level of detail for evaluating interdivisional communications independence. The NRC seeks to establish criteria for safety systems communications that can be uniformly applied in evaluation of a variety of safety system designs. This report focuses strictly on communication issues related to data sent between safety systems and between safety and nonsafety systems. Further, the report does not provide design guidance for communication systems nor present detailed failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) results for existing designs. This letter report describes communications between safety and nonsafety systems in nuclear power plants outside the United States. A limited study of international nuclear power plants was conducted to ascertain important communication implementations that might have bearing on systems proposed for licensing in the United States. This report provides that following information: 1.communications types and structures used in a representative set of international nuclear power reactors, and 2.communications issues derived from standards and other source documents relevant to safety and nonsafety communications. Topics that are discussed include the following: communication among redundant safety divisions, communications between safety divisions and nonsafety systems, control of safety equipment from a nonsafety workstation, and connection of nonsafety programming, maintenance, and test equipment to redundant safety divisions during operation. Information for this report was obtained through publicly available sources such as published papers and presentations. No proprietary information is represented.

Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Mullens, James Allen [ORNL; Wilson, Thomas L [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL; Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Loebl, Andy [ORNL

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Hydrogen Production from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor that will be capable of producing hydrogen, electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial use. The project has initiated the conceptual design phase and when completed will demonstrate the viability of hydrogen generation using nuclear produced process heat. This paper explains how industry and the U.S. Government are cooperating to advance nuclear hydrogen technology. It also describes the issues being explored and the results of recent R&D including materials development and testing, thermal-fluids research, and systems analysis. The paper also describes the hydrogen production technologies being considered (including various thermochemical processes and high-temperature electrolysis).

M. Patterson; C. Park

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Understanding seismic design criteria for Japanese nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the results of recent survey studies on the seismic design practice for nuclear power plants in Japan. The seismic design codes and standards for both nuclear as well as non-nuclear structures have been reviewed and summarized. Some key documents for understanding Japanese seismic design criteria are also listed with brief descriptions. The paper highlights the design criteria to determine the seismic demand and component capacity in comparison with US criteria, the background studies which have led to the current Japanese design criteria, and a survey of current research activities. More detailed technical descriptions are presented on the development of Japanese shear wall equations, design requirements for containment structures, and ductility requirements.

Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Costello, J.F. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

United States Department of Energy Nuclear Materials Stewardship  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy launched the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in January 2000 to accelerate the work of achieving integration and cutting long-term costs associated with the management of the Department's nuclear materials, with the principal focus on excess materials. Management of nuclear materials is a fundamental and enduring responsibility that is essential to meeting the Department's national security, nonproliferation, energy, science, and environmental missions into the distant future. The effective management of nuclear materials is important for a set of reasons: (1) some materials are vital to our national defense; (2) the materials pose physical and security risks; (3) managing them is costly; and (4) costs are likely to extend well into the future. The Department currently manages nuclear materials under eight programs, with offices in 36 different locations. Through the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative, progress was during calendar year 20 00 in achieving better coordination and integration of nuclear materials management responsibilities and in evaluating opportunities to further coordinate and integrate cross-program responsibilities for the treatment, storage, and disposition of excess nuclear materials. During CY 2001 the Departmental approach to nuclear materials stewardship changed consistent with the business processes followed by the new administration. This paper reports on the progress of the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in evaluating and implementing these opportunities, and the remaining challenges in integrating the long-term management of nuclear materials.

Newton, J. W.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

352

The Acceptance Strategy for Nuclear Power Plant In Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

Indonesia has planned to build nuclear power plants. Some feasibility studies have been conducted intensively. However, the processes of NPP introduction are still uncertain. National Energy Plan in Indonesia, which has been made by some governmental agencies, does not yet give positive impact to the government decision to construct the nuclear power plant (NPP). This paper discusses the process of NPP introduction in Indonesia, which has been colored with debate of stakeholder and has delayed decision for go-nuclear. The technology paradigm is used to promote NPP as an alternative of reliable energy resources. This paradigm should be complemented with international politic-economic point of view. The international politic-economic point of view shows that structural powers, consisting of security, production, finance, and knowledge structures, within which the NPP is introduced, have dynamic characteristics. The process of NPP introduction in Indonesia contains some infrastructure development (R and D, legislation, regulation, energy planning, site study, public acceptance efforts, etc), but they need a better coherent NPP implementation program and NPP Acceptance Program. Strategic patterns for NPP acceptance described in this paper are made by considering nuclear regulation development and the interest of basic domestic participation. The first NPP program in Indonesia having proven technology and basic domestic participation is and important milestone toward and optimal national energy-mix.

Suhaemi, Tjipta [Centre for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (Indonesia); Syaukat, Achmad [Centre for Nuclear Technology Business, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia, Kawasan PUSPIPTEK, Serpong-Tangerang Selatan (Indonesia)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

353

Conceivable new recycling of nuclear waste by nuclear power companies in their plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We outline the basic principles and the needed experiments for a conceivable new recycling of nuclear waste by the power plants themselves to avoid its transportation and storage to a (yet unknown) dumping area. Details are provided in an adjoining paper and in patents pending.

Ruggero Maria Santilli

1997-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

354

A Review of Sensor Calibration Monitoring for Calibration Interval Extension in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Currently in the United States, periodic sensor recalibration is required for all safety-related sensors, typically occurring at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration in some plants. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors that require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors that need it. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in United Kingdom, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. This issue is expected to also be important as the United States looks to the next generation of reactor designs (such as small modular reactors and advanced concepts), given the anticipated longer refueling cycles, proposed advanced sensors, and digital instrumentation and control systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no U.S. plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This report presents a state-of-the-art assessment of online calibration monitoring in the nuclear power industry, including sensors, calibration practice, and online monitoring algorithms. This assessment identifies key research needs and gaps that prohibit integration of the NRC-approved online calibration monitoring system in the U.S. nuclear industry. Several needs are identified, including the quantification of uncertainty in online calibration assessment; accurate determination of calibration acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and assessment of the feasibility of using virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors in order to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity. Understanding the degradation of sensors and the impact of this degradation on signals is key to developing technical basis to support acceptance criteria and set point decisions, particularly for advanced sensors which do not yet have a cumulative history of operating performance.

Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Hashemian, Hash; Shumaker, Brent; Cummins, Dara

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

United Kingdom HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Location United Kingdom United States 52 24' 15.1416" N, 1 34' 55.3116" W See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view...

356

The United States Plutonium Balance, 1944-2009 | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

The United States Plutonium Balance, 1944-2009 The United States has released an inventory of its plutonium balances from 1944 through 2009. The document serves as an update...

357

Validation of seismic probabilistic risk assessments of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

A seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of a nuclear plant requires identification and information regarding the seismic hazard at the plant site, dominant accident sequences leading to core damage, and structure and equipment fragilities. Uncertainties are associated with each of these ingredients of a PRA. Sources of uncertainty due to seismic hazard and assumptions underlying the component fragility modeling may be significant contributors to uncertainty in estimates of core damage probability. Design and construction errors also may be important in some instances. When these uncertainties are propagated through the PRA, the frequency distribution of core damage probability may span three orders of magnitude or more. This large variability brings into question the credibility of PRA methods and the usefulness of insights to be gained from a PRA. The sensitivity of accident sequence probabilities and high-confidence, low probability of failure (HCLPF) plant fragilities to seismic hazard and fragility modeling assumptions was examined for three nuclear power plants. Mean accident sequence probabilities were found to be relatively insensitive (by a factor of two or less) to: uncertainty in the coefficient of variation (logarithmic standard deviation) describing inherent randomness in component fragility; truncation of lower tail of fragility; uncertainty in random (non-seismic) equipment failures (e.g., diesel generators); correlation between component capacities; and functional form of fragility family. On the other hand, the accident sequence probabilities, expressed in the form of a frequency distribution, are affected significantly by the seismic hazard modeling, including slopes of seismic hazard curves and likelihoods assigned to those curves.

Ellingwood, B. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

AN ADVANCED SODIUM-GRAPHITE REACTOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

An advanced sodium-cooled, graphite-moderated nuclear power plant is described which utilizes high-pressure, high-temperature steam to generate electricity at a high thermal efficiency. Steam is generated at 2400 psig, superheated to 1050 deg F and, after partial expansion in the turbine, reheated to 1000 deg F. Net thermal efficiency of the plant is 42.3%. In a plant sized to produce a net electrical output of 256 Mw, the estimated cost is 8232/kw. Estimated cost of power generation is 6.7 mills/kwh. In a similar plant with a net electrical output of 530 Mw, the estimated power generating cost is 5.4 mills/ kwh. Most of the components of the plant are within the capability of current technology. The major exception is the fuel material, uranium carbide. Preliminary results of the development work now in progress indicate that uranium carbide would be an excellent fuel for high-temperature reactors, but temperature and burnup limitation have yet to be firmly established. Additional development work is also required on the steam generators. These are the single-barrier type similar to those which will be used in the Enrico Fernri Fast Breeder Reactor plant but produce steam at higher pressure and temperature. Questions also remain regarding the use of nitrogen as a cover gas over sodium at 1200 deg F and compatibility of the materials used in the primary neutron shield. All of these questions are currently under investigation. (auth)

Churchill, J.R.; Renard, J.

1960-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling April 16, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Mexican Minister of Finance and Public Credit Agustin Carstens today signed an agreement to help detect and prevent the smuggling of nuclear and other radioactive material. Under the Megaports agreement, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will collaborate with Mexican Customs to install radiation detection equipment at four Mexican seaports that account for nearly 90 percent of container traffic in Mexico. The agreement is part of the 2005 Security and Prosperity Partnership. "The Megaports Agreement signed today solidifies the United States and

360

Security by Design in the United States: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

by Design in the United States: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear by Design in the United States: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Security by Design in the United States: ... Fact Sheet Security by Design in the United States: Fact Sheet Mar 23, 2012 Since the events of September 11, 2001, security requirements for nuclear

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling April 16, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Mexican Minister of Finance and Public Credit Agustin Carstens today signed an agreement to help detect and prevent the smuggling of nuclear and other radioactive material. Under the Megaports agreement, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will collaborate with Mexican Customs to install radiation detection equipment at four Mexican seaports that account for nearly 90 percent of container traffic in Mexico. The agreement is part of the 2005 Security and Prosperity Partnership. "The Megaports Agreement signed today solidifies the United States and

362

NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT LICENSING BASIS EVENT SELECTION WHITE PAPER  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plant capable of producing the electricity and high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) application process, as recommended in the Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy. NRC licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy of licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This white paper is one in a series of submittals that will address key generic issues of the COL priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements.

Mark Holbrook

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Guide for monitoring equipment environments during nuclear plant operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide is intended to assist utilities in formulating and implementing improved monitoring programs by providing guidance on why, where and how to track environmental conditions such as temperature, radiation, and humidity for equipment in nuclear power plants during operation. The guide describes steps for implementing programs. It also gives advantages, disadvantages and costs for a variety of monitoring methods and devices such as sensors with recording devices, thermographic surveys, and passive thermal and radiation integrating devices. The guide also contains twenty technical papers presented at an environmental monitoring workshop covering the subjects of plant experience with elevated temperatures, plant environmental monitoring programs, and techniques for monitoring temperature and radiation. These individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Danahy, J.W.; Evans, R.W. (Grove Engineering, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants-pumps  

SciTech Connect

This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in BWR and PWR commercial nuclear power plant pumps important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

Booker, S.; Katz, D.; Daavettila, N.; Lehnert, D. [MDC-Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, Southfield, MI (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The United States Plutonium Balance, 1944-2009 | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

United States Plutonium Balance, 1944-2009 | National Nuclear Security United States Plutonium Balance, 1944-2009 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The United States Plutonium Balance, 1944-2009 Home > Our Mission > Managing the Stockpile > Plutonium Pits > The United States Plutonium Balance, 1944-2009 The United States Plutonium Balance, 1944-2009

366

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

population growth surrounding a nuclear power plant once thegrowth by requiring that certification of nuclear power plant

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Mercury-Free Dissolution of Aluminum-Based Nuclear Material: From Basic Science to the Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conditions were optimized for the first plant-scale dissolution of an aluminum-containing nuclear material without using mercury as a catalyst. This nuclear material was a homogeneous mixture of plutonium oxide and aluminum metal that had been compounded for use as the core matrix in Mark 42 nuclear fuel. Because this material had later failed plutonium distribution specifications, it was rejected for use in the fabrication of Mark 42 fuel tubes, and was stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) awaiting disposition. This powder-like material was composed of a mixture of approximately 80 percent aluminum and 11 percent plutonium. Historically, aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuels [13] have been dissolved using a mercuric nitrate catalyst in a nitric acid (HNO3) solution to facilitate the dissolution of the bulk aluminum cladding. Developmental work at SRS indicated that the plutonium oxide/aluminum compounded matrix could be dissolved without mercury. Various mercury-free conditions were studied to evaluate the rate of dissolution of the Mark 42 compact material and to assess the corrosion rate to the stainless steel dissolver. The elimination of mercury from the dissolution process fit with waste minimization and industrial hygiene goals to reduce the use of mercury in the United States. The mercury-free dissolution technology was optimized for Mark 42 compact material in laboratory-scale tests, and successfully implemented at the plant.

Crooks, W.J. III

2003-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

368

United States and Czech Republic Establish a Joint Civil Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

between our two nations. Last month, DOE completed the transfer of 75 kilograms of fluoride salt from the Department's Oak Ridge National Laboratory to the Czech Nuclear...

369

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION WAWINQTON, 0. C....  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WAWINQTON, 0. C. ZOSSS Hr. Ray Cooperstein Nuclear Environmental Department ,of Energy Germantown..Haryland fl Stop E-201 Dear Hr. Cooperstein: Application Branch ;;;osed please...

370

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report LBL-5287. "Power Plant Reliability-Availability andConunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-1400 (NUREG-Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Processing Plants and Production Basins, 2009 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, GasTran Natural Gas Transportation ...

372

Separation Requirements for a Hydrogen Production Plant and High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the engineering methods, models, and results used in an evaluation for locating a hydrogen production facility near a proposed next-generation nuclear power plant. Standard probabilistic safety assessment methodologies were used to answer the risk-related questions for a combined nuclear and chemical facility: what can go wrong? how likely is it to happen? and what are the consequences of it happening? As part of answering these questions, a model was developed suitable for determining the distances separating a hydrogen-production process and nuclear plant structures. The objective of the model-development and analysis is to answer key safety questions relating to the placement of one or more hydrogen production plants in the vicinity of a high-temperature nuclear reactor. From a thermal-hydraulic efficiency standpoint, close proximity of the two facilities is beneficial. Safety and regulatory implications, however, force the separation to be increased, perhaps substantially. The likelihood of obtaining a permit to construct and build such as facility in the United States without answering these safety questions is uncertain. The quantitative analysis performed and described in this paper offers a scoping mechanism to determine key parameters relating to the development of a nuclear-based hydrogen production facility. The calculations indicate that when the facilities are less than 100 m apart, the core damage frequency is large enough (greater than 1E-6/yr) to become problematic in a risk-informed environment. However, a variety of design modifications (blast-deflection barriers, for example) could significantly reduce risk and should be further explored as design of the hydrogen production facility evolves.

Curtis Smith; Scott Beck; William Galyean

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Economic impacts of the total nuclear waste management program envisioned for the United States  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents information on the costs of nuclear waste management and on the impacts of those costs on the price of power and on the capital and labor markets. It is assumed that the LWR would be the sole commercial reactor used through the year 2000. Two fuel cycle options are considered: the throwaway mode (spent fuel is waste), and the full recycle for comparison. Total costs are calculated for all facilities needed to store, package, and reposit all the spent fuel through the lifetime of 380 GW capacity installed by 2000 and operating for 30 y. The economic impact is: the price of power produced by the reactors would be increased by 1.4%; the capital for nuclear plants would apply to waste management; the average annual labor effort needed over the next 50 to 75 years is 3000 to 5000 man years; and the unit cost of spent fuel disposal is $129/kg ($119/kg for full recycle). 7 tables. (DLC)

Busch, L.; Zielen, A.J.; Parry, S.J.S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Status of Nuclear Energy Programs In the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhanced fuel properties ... Mission: Develop advanced fuels and non-intrusive reactor system components (e.g. .... Could replace aging fossil plants provide.

375

Safeguards Guidance for Designers of Commercial Nuclear Facilities International Safeguards Requirements for Uranium Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect

For the past two years, the United States National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of International Regimes and Agreements (NA-243), has sponsored the Safeguards-by-Design Project, through which it is hoped new nuclear facilities will be designed and constructed worldwide more amenable to nuclear safeguards. In the course of this project it was recognized that commercial designer/builders of nuclear facilities are not always aware of, or understand, the relevant domestic and international safeguards requirements, especially the latter as implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). To help commercial designer/builders better understand these requirements, a report was prepared by the Safeguards-by-Design Project Team that articulated and interpreted the international nuclear safeguards requirements for the initial case of uranium enrichment plants. The following paper summarizes the subject report, the specific requirements, where they originate, and the implications for design and construction. It also briefly summarizes the established best design and operating practices that designer/builder/operators have implemented for currently meeting these requirements. In preparing the subject report, it is recognized that the best practices are continually evolving as the designer/builder/operators and IAEA consider even more effective and efficient means for meeting the safeguards requirements and objectives.

Philip Casey Durst; Scott DeMuth; Brent McGinnis; Michael Whitaker; James Morgan

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

United States Nuclear Tests, July 1945 through September 1992, December 2000  

SciTech Connect

This document list chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. Revision 15, dated December 2000.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Maintenance practices for emergency diesel generator engines onboard United States Navy Los Angeles class nuclear submarines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States Navy has recognized the rising age of its nuclear reactors. With this increasing age comes increasing importance of backup generators. In addition to the need for decay heat removal common to all (naval ...

Hawks, Matthew Arthur

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Privatization of the gaseous diffusion plants and impacts on nuclear criticality safety administration  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 created the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) on July 1, 1993. The USEC is a government-owned business that leases those Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) facilities at the Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, sites from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that are required for enriching uranium. Lockheed Martin Utility Services is the operating contractor for the USEC-leased facilities. The DOE has retained use of, and regulation over, some facilities and areas at the Portsmouth and Paducah sites for managing legacy wastes and environmental restoration activities. The USEC is regulated by the DOE, but is currently changing to regulation under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The USEC is also preparing for privatization of the uranium enrichment enterprise. These changes have significantly affected the nuclear criticality safety (NCS) programs at the sites.

D`Aquila, D.M.; Holliday, R.T. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Dean, J.C. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

(Safety and reliability of nuclear power plant technology)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler attended the 16th MPA Seminar on the Safety and Reliability of Plant Technology with Special Emphasis on Nuclear Technology. The objective of the trip was to gather information and data that could prove useful to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) sponsored Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) and Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Programs and to present a paper entitled, Effects of Irradiation on Initiation and Crack-Arrest Toughness of Two High-Copper Welds and on Stainless Steel Cladding. This paper summarizes results from the 5th, 6th, and 7th Irradiation Series of experiments performed within the HSSI Program by the Metals and Ceramics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

Dickson, T.L.

1990-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

380

Guidelines for inservice testing at nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) gives licensees guidelines and recommendations for developing and implementing programs for the inservice testing of pumps and valves at commercial nuclear power plants. The staff discusses the regulations; the components to be included in an inservice testing program; and the preparation and content of cold shutdown justifications, refueling outage justifications, and requests for relief from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code requirements. The staff also gives specific guidance on relief acceptable to the NRC and advises licensees in the use of this information at their facilities. The staff discusses the revised standard technical specifications for the inservice testing program requirements and gives guidance on the process a licensee may follow upon finding an instance of noncompliance with the Code.

Campbell, P.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. Provides detailed statistics on existing generating units operated by electric utilities as of December 31, 2000, and certain summary statistics about new generators planned for operation by electric utilities during the next 5 years.

Information Center

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

United States -Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan -Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan 1. Introduction 1.1 Background and Objective President Bush of the U n i t e d States and Prime Minister Koizumi of Japan have both stated their strong support for the contribution of nuclear power to energy security and the global environment. Japan w a s the first nation to endorse President Bush's Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. During the June 29,2006 meeting between President Bush and Prime Minister Koizumi, "We discussed research and development that will help speed up fnt breeder reactors and new types of reprocessing so that we cmt help deal with the cost of globalization when it comes to energy; make ourselves more secure, economicallyI a s well n make us less dependent on hycirocmbons ..... " (I)

383

Table 9.1 Nuclear Generating Units, 1955-2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Data in columns 13 are based on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulation 10 CFR Part 50. Data in columns 46 are based on the NRC regulation 10 ...

384

United States -Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

have both stated their strong support for the contribution of nuclear power to energy security and the global environment. Japan w a s the first nation to endorse President Bush's...

385

Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. 1 figures.

Powell, J.G.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

386

Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel.

Powell, James G. (Clifton Park, NY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

Lynne M. Stevens

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Initial assessment of the operability of the VHTR-HTSE nuclear hydrogen plant.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The generation of hydrogen from nuclear power will need to compete on three fronts: production, operability, and safety to be viable in the energy marketplace of the future. This work addresses the operability of a coupled nuclear and hydrogen-generating plant while referring to other work for progress on production and safety. Operability is a measure of how well a plant can meet time-varying production demands while remaining within equipment limits. It can be characterized in terms of the physical processes that underlie operation of the plant. In this work these include the storage and transport of energy within components as represented by time constants and energy capacitances, the relationship of reactivity to temperature, and the coordination of heat generation and work production for a near-ideal gas working fluid. Criteria for assessing operability are developed and applied to the Very High Temperature Reactor coupled to the High Temperature Steam Electrolysis process, one of two DOE/INL reference plant concepts for hydrogen production. Results of preliminary plant control and stability studies are described. A combination of inventory control in the VHTR plant and flow control in the HTSE plant proved effective for maintaining hot-side temperatures near constant during quasi-static change in hydrogen production rate. Near constant electrolyzer outlet temperature is achieved by varying electrolyzer cell area to control cell joule heating. It was found that rates of temperature change in the HTSE plant for a step change in hydrogen production rate are largely determined by the thermal characteristics of the electrolyzer. It's comparatively large thermal mass and the presence of recuperative heat exchangers result in a tight thermal coupling of HTSE components to the electrolyzer. It was found that thermal transients arising in the chemical plant are strongly damped at the reactor resulting in a stable combined plant. The large Doppler reactivity component, three times greater than next reactivity component, per unit temperature, is mainly responsible. This is the case even when one of the conditions for out-of-phase oscillations between reactor inlet and outlet temperature, a large time for transport of process heat between the reactor and chemical plant, exists.

Vilim, R. B.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Ukraine Loads U.S. Nuclear Fuel into Power Plant as Part of DOE-Ukraine Nuclear Fuel Qualification Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

fficials from the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy today (April 8, 2010) participated in a ceremony in Ukraine to mark the insertion of Westinghouse-produced nuclear fuel into a nuclear power plant in Ukraine.

390

Economic Analysis of a Nuclear Reactor Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540C and 900C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating-current, AC, to direct-current, DC, conversion efficiency is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the lower heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Plant Support Engineering: Nuclear Power Plant Equipment Qualification Reference Manual, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This reference manual compiles information on technology, requirements, and experience pertaining to the qualification of safety-related equipment for use in nuclear power plants under normal operating conditions and under adverse environments such as steam line breaks and earthquakes. The manual covers both environmental and seismic qualification of all safety-related electrical and mechanical equipment, but places emphasis on environmental qualification of Class 1E electrical equipment subject to harsh...

2010-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

392

Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Closure Plan - Plutonium Finishing Plant Treatment Unit Glovebox HA-20MB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This closure plan describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) glovebox HA-20MB that housed an interim status ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' (RCRA) of 1976 treatment unit. This closure plan is certified and submitted to Ecology for incorporation into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit (HF RCRA Permit) in accordance with Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement; TPA) Milestone M-83-30 requiring submittal of a certified closure plan for ''glovebox HA-20MB'' by July 31, 2003. Glovebox HA-20MB is located within the 231-5Z Building in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility. Currently glovebox HA-20MB is being used for non-RCRA analytical purposes. The schedule of closure activities under this plan supports completion of TPA Milestone M-83-44 to deactivate and prepare for dismantlement the above grade portions of the 234-5Z and ZA, 243-Z, and 291-Z and 291-Z-1 stack buildings by September 30, 2015. Under this closure plan, glovebox HA-20MB will undergo clean closure to the performance standards of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 with respect to all dangerous waste contamination from glovebox HA-20MB RCRA operations. Because the intention is to clean close the PFP treatment unit, postclosure activities are not applicable to this closure plan. To clean close the unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or is environmentally impractical, the closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. Any information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. Clearance form only sent to RHA.

PRIGNANO, A.L.

2003-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

393

Comparison of Options for a Pilot Plant Fusion Nuclear Mission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fusion pilot plant study was initiated to clarify the development needs in moving from ITER to a first of a kind fusion power plant, following a path similar to the approach adopted for the commercialization of fission. The pilot plant mission encompassed component test and fusion nuclear science missions plus the requirement to produce net electricity with high availability in a device designed to be prototypical of the commercial device. Three magnetic configuration options were developed around this mission: the advanced tokamak (AT), spherical tokamak (ST) and compact stellarator (CS). With the completion of the study and separate documentation of each design option a question can now be posed; how do the different designs compare with each other as candidates for meeting the pilot plant mission? In a pro/con format this paper will examine the key arguments for and against the AT, ST and CS magnetic configurations. Key topics addressed include: plasma parameters, device configurations, size and weight comparisons, diagnostic issues, maintenance schemes, availability influences and possible test cell arrangement schemes.

Brown, T; Goldston, R J; El-Guebaly, L; Kessel, C; Neilson, G H; Malang, S; Menard, J E; Prager, S; Waganer, L; Titus, P

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

394

How many and what kind of power plants are there in the United ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How many and what kind of power plants are there in the United States? There are about 19,023 individual generators at about 6,997 operational power ...

395

Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Sean Ong, Clinton Campbell, Paul Denholm, Robert Margolis, and Garvin Heath Technical Report NRELTP-6A20-56290...

396

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Considerations for Developing a Critical Parts Program at a Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2003, Plant Support Engineering (PSE) of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) published the report Critical Component Identification Process8212Licensee Examples: Scoping and Identification of Critical Components in Support of INPO AP-913 (1007935). That report was the initial output from a project to assist utilities that were implementing Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) AP-913, Equipment Reliability Process Description. Two of the key aspects of INPO AP-913 are the accurate scop...

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

397

Plant Modernization with Digital Reactor Protection System Safety System Upgrades at US Nuclear Power Stations  

SciTech Connect

As the current fleet of nuclear power plants in the US reaches 25+ years of operation, obsolescence is driving many utilities to implement upgrades to both their safety and non-safety-related Instrumentation and Control (I and C) Systems. Digital technology is the predominant replacement technology for these upgrades. Within the last 15 years, digital control systems have been deployed in non-safety- related control applications at many utilities. In addition, a few utilities have replaced small safety-related systems utilizing digital technology. These systems have shown digital technology to be robust, reliable and simpler to maintain. Based upon this success, acceptance of digital technology has gained momentum with both utilities and regulatory agencies. Today, in an effort to extend the operating lives of their nuclear stations and resolve obsolescence of critical components, utilities are now pursuing digital technology for replacement of their primary safety systems. AREVA is leading this effort in the United States with the first significant digital upgrade of a major safety system. AREVA has previously completed upgrades to safety-related control systems emergency diesel engine controls and governor control systems for a hydro station which serves as the emergency power source for a nuclear station. Currently, AREVA is implementing the replacement of both the Reactor Protection System (RPS) and the Engineered Safety Features Actuation System (ESFAS) on all three units at a US PWR site. (authors)

Heckle, Wm. Lloyd; Bolian, Tricia W. [AREVA NP, an AREVA and Siemens Company, 1345 Ridgeland Parkway, Suite 130 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A Systems Engineering Framework for Design, Construction and Operation of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Not since the International Space Station has a project of such wide participation been proposed for the United States. Ten countries, the European Union, universities, Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, and industry will participate in the research and development, design, construction and/or operation of the fourth generation of nuclear power plants with a demonstration reactor to be built at a DOE site and operational by the middle of the next decade. This reactor will be like no other. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be passively safe, economical, highly efficient, modular, proliferation resistant, and sustainable. In addition to electrical generation, the NGNP will demonstrate efficient and cost effective generation of hydrogen to support the Presidents Hydrogen Initiative. To effectively manage this multi-organizational and technologically complex project, systems engineering techniques and processes will be used extensively to ensure delivery of the final product. The technological and organizational challenges are complex. Research and development activities are required, material standards require development, hydrogen production, storage and infrastructure requirements are not well developed, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission may further define risk-informed/performance-based approach to licensing. Detailed design and development will be challenged by the vast cultural and institutional differences across the participants. Systems engineering processes must bring the technological and organizational complexity together to ensure successful product delivery. This paper will define the framework for application of systems engineering to this $1.5B - $1.9B project.

Edward J. Gorski; Charles V. Park; Finis H. Southworth

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Challenges in Determining the Isotopic Mixture for the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

As part of the United States response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant emergency, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Consequence Management (CM) Teams were activated with elements deploying to Japan. The NNSA CM teams faced the urgent need for information regarding the potential radiological doses that citizens of might experience. This paper discusses the challenges and lessons learned associated with the analysis of field collected samples and gamma spectra in an attempt to determine the isotopic mixture present on the ground around the Plant. There were several interesting and surprising lessons to be learned from the sample analysis portion of the response. The paper discusses several elements of the response that were unique to the event occurring in Japan, as well as several elements that would have occurred in a U.S. nuclear reactor event. Sections of this paper address details of the specific analytical challenges faced during the efforts to analyze samples and try to understand the overall release source term.

Shanks, Arthur [Sandia National Laboratories; Fournier, Sean [Sandia National Laboratories; Shanks, Sonoya [Sandia National Laboratories

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: THE LICENSING PROCESSPlanning for Nuclear Power Plants Determination of Accidentnuclear power plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.2.4.3.

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Nuclear power plant Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL). Appendix B  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this generic aging lessons learned (GALL) review is to provide a systematic review of plant aging information in order to assess materials and component aging issues related to continued operation and license renewal of operating reactors. Literature on mechanical, structural, and thermal-hydraulic components and systems reviewed consisted of 97 Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) reports, 23 NRC Generic Letters, 154 Information Notices, 29 Licensee Event Reports (LERs), 4 Bulletins, and 9 Nuclear Management and Resources Council Industry Reports (NUMARC IRs) and literature on electrical components and systems reviewed consisted of 66 NPAR reports, 8 NRC Generic Letters, 111 Information Notices, 53 LERs, 1 Bulletin, and 1 NUMARC IR. More than 550 documents were reviewed. The results of these reviews were systematized using a standardized GALL tabular format and standardized definitions of aging-related degradation mechanisms and effects. The tables are included in volume s 1 and 2 of this report. A computerized data base has also been developed for all review tables and can be used to expedite the search for desired information on structures, components, and relevant aging effects. A survey of the GALL tables reveals that all ongoing significant component aging issues are currently being addressed by the regulatory process. However, the aging of what are termed passive components has been highlighted for continued scrutiny. This report consists of Volume 2, which consists of the GALL literature review tables for the NUMARC Industry Reports reviewed for the report.

Kasza, K.E.; Diercks, D.R.; Holland, J.W.; Choi, S.U. [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Cognitive skill training for nuclear power plant operational decision making  

SciTech Connect

Training for operator and other technical positions in the commercial nuclear power industry traditionally has focused on mastery of the formal procedures used to control plant systems and processes. However, decisionmaking tasks required of nuclear power plant operators involve cognitive skills (e.g., situation assessment, planning). Cognitive skills are needed in situations where formal procedures may not exist or may not be as prescriptive, as is the case in severe accident management (SAM). The Westinghouse research team investigated the potential cognitive demands of SAM on the control room operators and Technical Support Center staff who would be most involved in the selection and execution of severe accident control actions. A model of decision making, organized around six general cognitive processes, was developed to identify the types of cognitive skills that may be needed for effective performance. Also, twelve SAM scenarios were developed to reveal specific decision-making difficulties. Following the identification of relevant cognitive skills, 19 approaches for training individual and team cognitive skills were identified. A review of these approaches resulted in the identification of general characteristics that are important in effective training of cognitive skills.

Mumaw, R.J.; Swatzler, D.; Roth, E.M. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Thomas, W.A. [Quantum Technologies, Inc., Oak Brook, IL (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Interim guidelines for protecting fire-fighting personnel from multiple hazards at nuclear plant sites: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides interim guidelines for reducing the impact to fire fighting and other supporting emergency response personnel from the multiple hazards of radiation, heat stress, and trauma when fighting a fire in a United States commercial nuclear power plant. Interim guidelines are provided for fire brigade composition, training, equipment, procedures, strategies, heat stress and trauma. In addition, task definitions are provided to evaluate and further enhance the interim guidelines over the long term. 19 refs.

Klein, A.R.; Bloom, C.W.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Identification of good practices in the operation of nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work developed an approach to diagnose problems and identify good practices in the operation of nuclear power plants using the system dynamics technique. The research began with construction of the ORSIM (Nuclear Power ...

Chen, Haibo, 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Advanced design nuclear power plants: Competitive, economical electricity. An analysis of the cost of electricity from coal, gas and nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an updated analysis of the projected cost of electricity from new baseload power plants beginning operation around the year 2000. Included in the study are: (1) advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants; (2) low emissions coal-fired power plants; (3) gasified coal-fired power plants; and (4) natural gas-fired power plants. This analysis shows that electricity from advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants will be economically competitive with all other baseload electric generating system alternatives. This does not mean that any one source of electric power is always preferable to another. Rather, what this analysis indicates is that, as utilities and others begin planning for future baseload power plants, advanced-design nuclear plants should be considered an economically viable option to be included in their detailed studies of alternatives. Even with aggressive and successful conservation, efficiency and demand-side management programs, some new baseload electric supply will be needed during the 1990s and into the future. The baseload generating plants required in the 1990s are currently being designed and constructed. For those required shortly after 2000, the planning and alternatives assessment process must start now. It takes up to ten years to plan, design, license and construct a new coal-fired or nuclear fueled baseload electric generating plant and about six years for a natural gas-fired plant. This study indicates that for 600-megawatt blocks of capacity, advanced-design nuclear plants could supply electricity at an average of 4.5 cents per kilowatt-hour versus 4.8 cents per kilowatt-hour for an advanced pulverized-coal plant, 5.0 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gasified-coal combined cycle plant, and 4.3 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gas-fired combined cycle combustion turbine plant.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Heuristic solutions to the long-term unit commitment problem with cogeneration plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a long-term version of the unit commitment problem that spans over one year divided into hourly time intervals. It includes constraints on electricity and heating production as well as on biomass consumption. The problem is of interest for ... Keywords: Energy planning, Local search, Mixed integer programming heuristics, Unit commitment with cogeneration plants

Niels Hvidberg Kjeldsen; Marco Chiarandini

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Fire Events Database and Generic Ignition Frequency Model for U.S. Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains a revision of the EPRI Fire Events Database for U.S. Nuclear Power Plants last published in EPRI Report 1000894 in October 2000. This report also contains a revision of the generic fire ignition frequency models that were published in NSAC-178L, "Fire Events Database of U.S. Nuclear Power Plants" (January 1993) and EPRI TR-105929, "Fire Ignition Frequency Model at Shutdown for U.S. Nuclear Power Plants" (December 1995).

2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

408

Development of a New USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map for the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many regions of the world, the extremes of winter cold are a major determinant of the geographic distribution of perennial plant species and of their successful cultivation. In the United States, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Plant ...

Christopher Daly; Mark P. Widrlechner; Michael D. Halbleib; Joseph I. Smith; Wayne P. Gibson

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- United Nuclear Corp - MO 0-03  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

United Nuclear Corp - MO 0-03 United Nuclear Corp - MO 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNITED NUCLEAR CORP. (MO.0-03) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Mallinckrodt Chemical Works Mallinckrodt Nuclear Corporation MO.0-03-1 MO.0-03-2 Location: Hematite , Missouri MO.0-03-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 MO.0-03-3 Site Operations: Commercial fuel fabrication operation. Licensed to reclaim unirradiated enriched uranium from scrap generated in fuel fabrication and fuel material preparation. MO.0-03-1 MO.0-03-2 MO.0-03-3 MO.0-03-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - NRC licensed - Commercial operations MO.0-03-3 MO.0-03-5 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium MO.0-03-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

410

Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Phillips/United Nuclear site, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah, Inc., has reevaluated the Phillips/United Nuclear site in order to revise the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.6 million dry tons of tailings at the Phillips/United Nuclear site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $21,500,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $45,200,000 for disposal at a distance of about 15 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Phillips/United Nuclear tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $87/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ by either heap leach or conventional plant process. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Reprocessing the Phillips/United Nuclear tailings for uranium recovery does not appear to be economically attractive under present or foreseeable market conditions.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Success of the first nuclear power plant built on China`s self-reliance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Having overcome a series of difficulties and hard points, the first Chinese indigenous nuclear power plant, Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant of PWR type with the capacity of 300MW(e) is now in steady operation. Through tremendous works done for this project great achievements and experience as well as lessons learned have been obtained for systematic acquisition of nuclear power technology. The sound fact has demonstrated that China has the ability to develop nuclear power mainly depending on self-reliance.

Yu, O.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Analysis of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Costs: A 1995 Update, An  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report provides an analysis of nuclear power plant operating costs. EIA published three reports on this subject during the period 1988-1995.

James G. Hewlett

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Guideline for On-Line Monitoring of Nuclear Power Plant Instrument Channel Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a guideline for a utility to develop an on-line monitoring (OLM) program for evaluating instrument channel performance at nuclear power plants (NPPs).

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

414

Survey on the Use of Configuration Risk and Safety Management Tools at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A joint project of Electricite de France (EDF) and EPRI, this project analyzed use of configuration safety and risk management tools at nuclear power plants.

1998-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

415

Compilation of Results and Feedback Regarding Turbine Upgrades at Nuclear and Fossil Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles results and feedback and draws a number of conclusions and lessons learned regarding steam turbine generator upgrades at nuclear and fossil power plants.

2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

416

Bayesian Analysis for the Site-Specific Dose Modeling in Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Decommissioning is the process of closing down a facility. In nuclear power plant decommissioning, it must be determined that that any remaining radioactivity at a (more)

Ling, Xianbing

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Long term control of 3D engineering data for nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The engineering of the next generation of nuclear power plants requires to take into account the whole plant lifecycle: engineering, building, operating, maintaining and decommissioning. Satisfying stronger and stronger safety regulations requires the ...

Thomas Paviot; Christophe Mouton; Samir Lamouri

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2al Browns Ferry Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3 3,309 24,771 65.3 Tennessee Valley Authority Joseph M Farley Unit 1, Unit 2 1,734 13,170 34.7 Alabama ...

419

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R&D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management tools for managing the R&D program elements; (2) Developing a specific work package for the R&D activities to be performed during each government fiscal year; (3) Reporting the status and progress of the work based on committed deliverables and milestones; (4) Developing collaboration in areas of materials R&D of benefit to the NGNP with countries that are a part of the Generation IV International Forum; and (5) Ensuring that the R&D work performed in support of the materials program is in conformance with established Quality Assurance and procurement requirements. The objective of the NGNP Materials R&D Program is to provide the essential materials R&D needed to support the design and licensing of the reactor and balance of plant, excluding the hydrogen plant. The materials R&D program is being initiated prior to the design effort to ensure that materials R&D activities are initiated early enough to support the design process and support the Project Integrator. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge; thus, new materials and approaches may be required.

G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Risk Framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uncertainty can be either an opportunity or a risk. Every construction project begins with the expectation of project performance. To meet the expectation, construction projects need to be managed through sound risk assessment and management beginning with the front-end of the project life cycle to check the feasibility of a project. The Construction Industry Institutes (CII) International Project Risk Assessment (IPRA) tool has been developed, successfully used for a variety of heavy industry sector projects, and recently elevated to Best Practice status. However, its current format is inadequate to address the unique challenges of constructing the next generation of nuclear power plants (NPP). To understand and determine the risks associated with NPP projects, the goal of this thesis is to develop tailored risk framework for NPP projects that leverages and modifies the existing IPRA process. The IPRA has 82 elements to assess the risks associated with international construction projects. The modified IPRA adds five major issues (elements) to consider the unique risk factors of typical NPP projects based upon a review of the literature and an evaluation of the performance of previous nuclear-related facilities. The modified IPRA considers the sequence of NPP design that ultimately impacts the risks associated with plant safety and operations. Historically, financial risks have been a major chronic problem with the construction of NPPs. This research suggests that unstable regulations and the lack of design controls and oversight are significant risk issues. This thesis includes a consistency test to initially validate whether the asserted risks exist in actual conditions. Also, an overall risk assessment is performed based on the proposed risk framework for NPP and the list of assessed risk is proposed through a possible scenario. After the assessment, possible mitigation strategies are also provided against the major risks as a part of this thesis. This study reports on the preliminary findings for developing a new risk framework for constructing nuclear power plants. Future research is needed for advanced verification of the proposed elements. Follow-on efforts should include verification and validation of the proposed framework by industry experts and methods to quantify and evaluate the performance and risks associated with the multitude of previous NPP projects.

Yeon, Jaeheum 1981-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: (1) Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2) Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: (1) High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior; (2) High temperature materials qualification; (3) Design methods development and validation; (4) Hydrogen production technologies; and (5) Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen production [DOE 2004] and energy conversion technologies programs are described elsewhere.

None

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables (Information and data on nuclear power reactors Generation: by State and Reactor. Annual Energy Review, ...

423

Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) Seismic Source Characterization (SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 3 assessment process. The goal of the SSHAC process is to represent the center, body, and range of technically defensible interpretations of the available data, models, and methods. Input to a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) consists of both seismic source characterization and ground motion characterization. These two components are used to calculate probabilistic hazard results (or seismic hazard curves) at a particular site. This report provides a new seismic source model. Results and Findings The product of this report is a regional CEUS SSC model. This model includes consideration of an updated database, full assessment and incorporation of uncertainties, and the range of diverse technical interpretations from the larger technical community. The SSC model will be widely applicable to the entire CEUS, so this project uses a ground motion model that includes generic variations to allow for a range of representative site conditions (deep soil, shallow soil, hard rock). Hazard and sensitivity calculations were conducted at seven test sites representative of different CEUS hazard environments. Challenges and Objectives The regional CEUS SSC model will be of value to readers who are involved in PSHA work, and who wish to use an updated SSC model. This model is based on a comprehensive and traceable process, in accordance with SSHAC guidelines in NUREG/CR-6372, Recommendations for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis: Guidance on Uncertainty and Use of Experts. The model will be used to assess the present-day composite distribution for seismic sources along with their characterization in the CEUS and uncertainty. In addition, this model is in a form suitable for use in PSHA evaluations for regulatory activities, such as Early Site Permit (ESPs) and Combined Operating License Applications (COLAs). Applications, Values, and Use Development of a regional CEUS seismic source model will provide value to those who (1) have submitted an ESP or COLA for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review before 2011; (2) will submit an ESP or COLA for NRC review after 2011; (3) must respond to safety issues resulting from NRC Generic Issue 199 (GI-199) for existing plants and (4) will prepare PSHAs to meet design and periodic review requirements for current and future nuclear facilities. This work replaces a previous study performed approximately 25 years ago. Since that study was completed, substantial work has been done to improve the understanding of seismic sources and their characterization in the CEUS. Thus, a new regional SSC model provides a consistent, stable basis for computing PSHA for a future time span. Use of a new SSC model reduces the risk of delays in new plant licensing due to more conservative interpretations in the existing and future literature. Perspective The purpose of this study, jointly sponsored by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the NRC was to develop a new CEUS SSC model. The team assembled to accomplish this purpose was composed of distinguished subject matter experts from industry, government, and academia. The resulting model is unique, and because this project has solicited input from the present-day larger technical community, it is not likely that there will be a need for significant revision for a number of years. See also Sponsors Perspective for more details. The goal of this project was to implement the CEUS SSC work plan for developing a regional CEUS SSC model. The work plan, formulated by the project manager and a

Kevin J. Coppersmith; Lawrence A. Salomone; Chris W. Fuller; Laura L. Glaser; Kathryn L. Hanson; Ross D. Hartleb; William R. Lettis; Scott C. Lindvall; Stephen M. McDuffie; Robin K. McGuire; Gerry L. Stirewalt; Gabriel R. Toro; Robert R. Youngs; David L. Slayter; Serkan B. Bozkurt; Randolph J. Cumbest; Valentina Montaldo Falero; Roseanne C. Perman' Allison M. Shumway; Frank H. Syms; Martitia (Tish) P. Tuttle

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

424

Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) Seismic Source Characterization (SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 3 assessment process. The goal of the SSHAC process is to represent the center, body, and range of technically defensible interpretations of the available data, models, and methods. Input to a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) consists of both seismic source characterization and ground motion characterization. These two components are used to calculate probabilistic hazard results (or seismic hazard curves) at a particular site. This report provides a new seismic source model. Results and Findings The product of this report is a regional CEUS SSC model. This model includes consideration of an updated database, full assessment and incorporation of uncertainties, and the range of diverse technical interpretations from the larger technical community. The SSC model will be widely applicable to the entire CEUS, so this project uses a ground motion model that includes generic variations to allow for a range of representative site conditions (deep soil, shallow soil, hard rock). Hazard and sensitivity calculations were conducted at seven test sites representative of different CEUS hazard environments. Challenges and Objectives The regional CEUS SSC model will be of value to readers who are involved in PSHA work, and who wish to use an updated SSC model. This model is based on a comprehensive and traceable process, in accordance with SSHAC guidelines in NUREG/CR-6372, Recommendations for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis: Guidance on Uncertainty and Use of Experts. The model will be used to assess the present-day composite distribution for seismic sources along with their characterization in the CEUS and uncertainty. In addition, this model is in a form suitable for use in PSHA evaluations for regulatory activities, such as Early Site Permit (ESPs) and Combined Operating License Applications (COLAs). Applications, Values, and Use Development of a regional CEUS seismic source model will provide value to those who (1) have submitted an ESP or COLA for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review before 2011; (2) will submit an ESP or COLA for NRC review after 2011; (3) must respond to safety issues resulting from NRC Generic Issue 199 (GI-199) for existing plants and (4) will prepare PSHAs to meet design and periodic review requirements for current and future nuclear facilities. This work replaces a previous study performed approximately 25 years ago. Since that study was completed, substantial work has been done to improve the understanding of seismic sources and their characterization in the CEUS. Thus, a new regional SSC model provides a consistent, stable basis for computing PSHA for a future time span. Use of a new SSC model reduces the risk of delays in new plant licensing due to more conservative interpretations in the existing and future literature. Perspective The purpose of this study, jointly sponsored by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the NRC was to develop a new CEUS SSC model. The team assembled to accomplish this purpose was composed of distinguished subject matter experts from industry, government, and academia. The resulting model is unique, and because this project has solicited input from the present-day larger technical community, it is not likely that there will be a need for significant revision for a number of years. See also Sponsors Perspective for more details. The goal of this project was to implement the CEUS SSC work plan for developing a regional CEUS SSC model. The work plan, formulated by the project manager and a

Kevin J. Coppersmith; Lawrence A. Salomone; Chris W. Fuller; Laura L. Glaser; Kathryn L. Hanson; Ross D. Hartleb; William R. Lettis; Scott C. Lindvall; Stephen M. McDuffie; Robin K. McGuire; Gerry L. Stirewalt; Gabriel R. Toro; Robert R. Youngs; David L. Slayter; Serkan B. Bozkurt; Randolph J. Cumbest; Valentina Montaldo Falero; Roseanne C. Perman' Allison M. Shumway; Frank H. Syms; Martitia (Tish) P. Tuttle

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on soybean and maize production in the Midwest United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

had an important effect. 1 Introduction In the event of nuclear war, targets in cities and industrialImpacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on soybean and maize production in the Midwest United States decline in the Midwestern United States from climate change following a regional nuclear conflict between

Robock, Alan

426

An overview of the United States Department of Energy plant lifetime improvement program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, 109 nuclear power plants provide over 20 percent of the electrical energy generated in the US. The operating license of the first of these plants will expire in the year 2000; one third of the operating licenses will expire by 2010 and the remaining plant licenses are scheduled to expire by 2033. The National Energy Strategy assumes that 70 percent of these plants will continue to operate beyond their current license expiration to assist in ensuring an adequate, diverse, and environmentally acceptable energy supply for economic growth. In order to preserve this energy resource in the US three major tasks must be successfully completed: (1) establishment of the regulations, technical standards, and procedures for the preparation and review of a license renewal application; (2) development, verification, and validation of the various technical criteria and bases for needed monitoring, refurbishment, or replacement of plant equipment; and (3) demonstration of the regulatory process. Since 1985, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been working with the nuclear industry and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to establish and demonstrate the option to extend the life of nuclear power plants through the renewal of operating licenses. This paper focuses primarily on DOE`s Plant Lifetime Improvement (PLIM) Program efforts to develop the technical criteria and bases for effective aging management and lifetime improvement for continued operation of nuclear power plants. This paper describes current projects to resolve generic technical issues, including degradation of long-lived components, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) embrittlement management approaches, and analytical methodologies to characterize RPV integrity.

Rosinski, S.T.; Clauss, J.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harrison, D.L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

428

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

429

Prognostics and Life Beyond 60 for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safe, secure, reliable and sustainable energy supply is vital for advanced and industrialized life styles. To meet growing energy demand there is interest in longer term operation (LTO) for the existing nuclear power plant fleet and enhancing capabilities in new build. There is increasing use of condition based maintenance (CBM) for active components and periodic in service inspection (ISI) for passive systems: there is growing interest in deploying on-line monitoring. Opportunities exist to move beyond monitoring and diagnosis based on pattern recognition and anomaly detection to and prognostics with the ability to provide an estimate of remaining useful life (RUL). The adoption of digital I&C systems provides a framework within which added functionality including on-line monitoring can be deployed, and used to maintain and even potentially enhance safety, while at the same time improving planning and reducing both operations and maintenance costs.

Leonard J. Bond; Pradeep Ramuhalli; Magdy S. Tawfik; Nancy J. Lybeck

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

MEASUREMENTS OF THE CONFINEMENT LEAKTIGHTNESS AT THE KOLA NUCLEAR POWER STATION (UNIT 2) IN RUSSIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report on the INSP project entitled, ``Kola Confinement Leaktightness'' conducted by BNL under the authorization of Project Work Plan WBS 1.2.2.1. This project was initiated in February 1993 to assist the Russians to reduce risks associated with the continued operation of older Soviet-designed nuclear power plants, specifically the Kola VVER-440/230 Units 1 and 2, through upgrades in the confinement performance to reduce the uncontrolled leakage rate. The major technical objective of this-project was to improve the leaktightness of the Kola NPP VVER confinement boundaries, through the application of a variety of sealants to penetrations, doors and hatches, seams and surfaces, to the extent that current technology permitted. A related objective was the transfer, through training of Russian staff, of the materials application procedures to the staff of the Kola NPP. This project was part of an overall approach to minimizing uncontrolled releases from the Kola NPP VVER440/230s in the event of a serious accident, and to thereby significantly mitigate the consequences of such an accident. The US provided materials, application technology, and applications equipment for application of sealant materials, surface coatings, potting materials and gaskets, to improve the confinement leaktightness of the Kola VVER-440/23Os. The US provided for training of Russian personnel in the applications technology.

GREENE,G.A.; GUPPY,J.G.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

United States and South Africa Sign Agreement on Cooperation in Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Africa Sign Agreement on Cooperation in South Africa Sign Agreement on Cooperation in Nuclear Energy Research and Development United States and South Africa Sign Agreement on Cooperation in Nuclear Energy Research and Development September 16, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Vienna, Austria - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu and South African Minister of Energy Dipuo Peters signed a bilateral Agreement on Cooperation in Research and Development of Nuclear Energy on September 14 in Vienna. This Agreement will facilitate cooperation in the areas of advanced nuclear energy systems and reactor technology. The two countries will collaborate in research and development of advanced technologies for improving the cost, safety, and proliferation-resistance of nuclear power systems. The agreement will also expand efforts to promote and maintain nuclear science

432

Nuclear Safeguards Infrastructure Required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) to be constructed near Idaho Falls, Idaho The NGNP is intrinsically safer than current reactors and is planned for startup ca. 2021 Safety is more prominent in the minds of the Public and Governing Officials following the nuclear reactor meltdown accidents in Fukushima, Japan The authors propose that the NGNP should be designed with International (IAEA) Safeguards in mind to support export to Non-Nuclear-Weapons States There are two variants of the NGNP design; one using integral Prismatic-shaped fuel assemblies in a fixed core; and one using recirculating fuel balls (or Pebbles) The following presents the infrastructure required to safeguard the NGNP This infrastructure is required to safeguard the Prismatic and Pebble-fueled NGNP (and other HTGR/VHTR) The infrastructure is based on current Safeguards Requirements and Practices implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for similar reactors The authors of this presentation have worked for decades in the area of International Nuclear Safeguards and are recognized experts in this field Presentation for INMM conference in July 2012.

Dr. Mark Schanfein; Philip Casey Durst

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Capturing Historical Knowledge for Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Plants: Summary of Historical Site Assessments at Eight Decommis sioning Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes approaches utilized and experience gained in the development of early characterization activities by a number of nuclear power plants undergoing decommissioning. In particular, the report provides experience and lessons of performing the Historical Site Assessment, or HSA.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

License Stewardship Approach to Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

The paper explores both the conceptual approach to decommissioning commercial nuclear facilities using a license stewardship approach as well as the first commercial application of this approach. The license stewardship approach involves a decommissioning company taking control of a site and the 10 CFR 50 License in order to complete the work utilizing the established trust fund. In conclusion: The license stewardship approach is a novel way to approach the decommissioning of a retired nuclear power plant that offers several key advantages to all parties. For the owner and regulators, it provides assurance that the station will be decommissioned in a safe, timely manner. Ratepayers are assured that the work will be completed for the price they already have paid, with the decommissioning contractor assuming the financial risk of decommissioning. The contractor gains control of the assets and liabilities, the license, and the decommissioning fund. This enables the decommissioning contractor to control their work and eliminates redundant layers of management, while bringing more focus on achieving the desired end state - a restored site. (authors)

Daly, P.T.; Hlopak, W.J. [Commercial Services Group, EnergySolutions 1009 Commerce Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Environmental Assessment for the Modernization of Facilities and Infrastructure for the Non-Nuclear Production Activities Conducted at the Kansas City Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment for the Modernization of Facilities and Infrastructure for the Non-Nuclear Production Activities Conducted at the Kansas City Plant DOE/EA - 1592 April 21, 2008 - - This Page Intentionally Blank - - ii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCIES: United States General Services Administration (GSA) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) TITLE: Modernization of Facilities and Infrastructure for the Non-Nuclear Production Activities Conducted at the Kansas City Plant (DOE/EA-1592) CONTACT: For further information on this EA, write or call: Carlos Salazar GSA Public Buildings Service Heartland Region 1500 E. Bannister Road, Room 2191 (6PTA) Kansas City, MO 64131-3088 (816) 823-2305 Abstract: The United States General Services Administration (GSA) and the United States

436

Nuclear Safety Risk Management in Refueling Outage of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

The NPP is used to planning maintenance, in-service inspection, surveillance test, fuel handling and design modification in the refueling outage; the operator response capability will be reduced plus some of the plant systems out of service or loss of power at this time. Based on 8 times refueling outage experiences of the Qinshan NPP, this article provide some good practice and lesson learned for the nuclear safety risk management focus at four safety function areas of Residual Heat Removal Capability, Inventory Control, Power availability and Reactivity control. (authors)

Meijing Wu; Guozhang Shen [Qinshan Nuclear power company (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials in United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been engaged in an effort to develop and qualify next generation LWR fuel with enhanced performance and safety and reduced waste generation since 2010. This program, which has emphasized collaboration between the DOE, U.S. national laboratories and nuclear industry, was refocused from enhanced performance to enhanced accident tolerance following the events at Fukushima in 2011. Accident tolerant fuels have been specifically described as fuels that, in comparison with standard UO2-Zircaloy, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. The program maintains an ambitious goal to insert a lead test assembly (LTA) of the new design into a commercial power reactor by 2022 .

Daniel M. Wachs

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Advisory system for the diagnosis of lost electric output in nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The enhancement of efficiency is world-wide trend to survive under intense competition. In recent years, the efficiency in the power industry is also one of the important topics. In case of nuclear power plants(NPPs), the period and quality of maintenance ... Keywords: Advisory system, Bayesian network, Diagnosis, Nuclear power plant, Regression, Turbine cycle

Gyunyoung Heo; Soon Heung Chang; Seong Soo Choi; Gwang Hee Choi; Moon Hak Jee

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refabrication. through which nuclear fuel passes. Fusion.with the experience at the Nuclear Fuel Services Plant (seecommitment from the nuclear fuel cycle; see Section 3.2.3. )

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cooperative Agreement DE-FC07-06ID14788 was executed between the U.S. Department of Energy, Electric Transportation Applications, and Idaho National Laboratory to investigate the economics of producing hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity generated by nuclear power. The work under this agreement is divided into the following four tasks: Task 1 Produce Data and Analyses Task 2 Economic Analysis of Large-Scale Alkaline Electrolysis Task 3 Commercial-Scale Hydrogen Production Task 4 Disseminate Data and Analyses. Reports exist on the prospect that utility companies may benefit from having the option to produce electricity or produce hydrogen, depending on market conditions for both. This study advances that discussion in the affirmative by providing data and suggesting further areas of study. While some reports have identified issues related to licensing hydrogen plants with nuclear plants, this study provides more specifics and could be a resource guide for further study and clarifications. At the same time, this report identifies other area of risks and uncertainties associated with hydrogen production on this scale. Suggestions for further study in some of these topics, including water availability, are included in the report. The goals and objectives of the original project description have been met. Lack of industry design for proton exchange membrane electrolysis hydrogen production facilities of this magnitude was a roadblock for a significant period. However, recent design breakthroughs have made costing this facility much more accurate. In fact, the new design information on proton exchange membrane electrolyzers scaled to the 1 kg of hydrogen per second electrolyzer reduced the model costs from $500 to $100 million. Task 1 was delayed when the original electrolyzer failed at the end of its economic life. However, additional valuable information was obtained when the new electrolyzer was installed. Products developed during this study include a process model and a N2H2 economic assessment model (both developed by the Idaho National Laboratory). Both models are described in this report. The N2H2 model closely tracked and provided similar results as the H2A model and was instrumental in assessing the effects of plant availability on price when operated in the shoulder mode for electrical pricing. Differences between the H2A and N2H2 model are included in this report.

Stephen Schey

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Demonstrate safe and economical nuclearassisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior High temperature materials qualification Design methods development and validation Hydrogen production technologies Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen production [DOE 2004] and energy conversion technologies programs are described elsewhere.

P. E. MacDonald

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 58, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2011 277 Anomaly Detection in Nuclear Power Plants via  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applications (e.g., nuclear power reactor plants, petroleum industry and micro-gravity flow systems and Seungjin Kim Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University sensing. The underlying algorithm is built upon the recently reported theory of a statistical pattern

Ray, Asok

443

Activities in support of continuing the service of nuclear power plant concrete structures  

SciTech Connect

In general, nuclear power plant concrete structure s performance has been very good; however, aging of concrete structures occurs with the passage of time that can potentially result in degradation if is effects are not controlled. Safety-related nuclear power plant concrete structures are described. In-service inspection and testing requirements in the U.S. are summarized. The interaction of the license renewal process and concrete structures is noted. A summary of operating experience related to aging of nuclear power plant concrete structures is provided. Several candidate areas are identified where additional research would be beneficial for aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures. Finally, an update on recent activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory related to aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures is provided.

Naus, Dan J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

445

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

446

Project Plan: Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project plan outlines the Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities (CEUS SSC) Project, which will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI report NP-4726, July 1986. The objective of the CEUS SSC project is to develop an up-to-date assessment of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) SSC for CEUS. Input to a PSHA consists of both seismic source and ground motion characterization. These two components ...

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

447

A Reliability Improvement Program Planning Report for the SNAP 10A Space Nuclear Power Unit  

SciTech Connect

The estimated achieved reliability of SNAP 10A space nuclear power units will be relatively low at the timeof the first SNAPSHOT flight test in April 1963 and the existing R&D program does not provide a significant reliabiity growth thereafter. The total costs of an 8-satellite network using SNAP 10A units over a 5-year period has been approximated for the case where the total cost of a single satellite launched is 8 million dollars.

Coombs, M.G.; Smith C.K.; Wilson, L.A.

1961-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

448

Group Differences in Safety Climate Among Workers in the Nuclear Decommissioning and Demolition Industry in the United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study investigated group differences in safety climate among workers in the nuclear decommissioning and demolition (D&D) industry in the United States. The study population (more)

Findley, Michael Everett

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Study of Potential Sites for the Deployment of New Nuclear Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the United States The work reflected in this document represents Dominions and Bechtel's best judgment as recognized companies familiar with the engineering, construction, and operation of nuclear power plants. Nevertheless, since the work has been based on preliminary design information only, evaluations contained in this document should be considered preliminary in nature, and are not intended to be the basis of final financial and other management decisions. The information on which these evaluations have been based was provided to Dominion and Bechtel by DOE and third parties, and, except where specifically stated otherwise, has not been independently verified. Accordingly, neither Dominion, Bechtel, nor anyone acting on their behalf makes any warranty, express or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of the information or conclusions contained in this document or assumes any liability for damages resulting from the use of or reliance on such information or conclusions.

Bechtel Power Corporation; North Anna; Bechtel Power Corporation

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Thirty states sign ITER nuclear fusion plant deal 1 hour, 28 minutes ago  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

than 30 countries signed a deal on Tuesday to build the world's most advanced nuclear fusion reactor nuclear reactors, but critics argue it could be at least 50 years before a commercially viable reactorThirty states sign ITER nuclear fusion plant deal 1 hour, 28 minutes ago Representatives of more

451

State-of-Knowledge on Deposition, Part 2: Assessment of Deposition Activity in Fossil Plant Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last 20 years, substantial advances have been made in the understanding and control of fossil plant cycle chemistry. In spite of these advances, deposition activity, most notably in boilers and steam turbines, remains an issue of concern to many organizations that operate fossil units. The underlying science of deposition in fossil unit components has not, with the exception of steam turbines, been studied extensively under the EPRI Boiler and Turbine Steam and Cycle Chemistry Program. This repo...

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

452

Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012 Table A2. Natural gas processing plant capacity, by state, 2013 (million cubic feet per day) Alabama 1,403 Arkansas 24 California 926 Colorado 5,450 Florida 90 Illinois 2,100 Kansas 1,818 Kentucky 240 Louisiana 10,737 Michigan 479 Mississippi 1,123

453

Time-Limited Aging Analysis Report for the Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The option to operate a nuclear power plant beyond its initial license term of 40 years is an important factor in financial decisions and long-term planning for utility asset management and capital improvement. Southern Company has submitted an application for the renewal of its operating licenses for the E. I. Hatch Nuclear Power Plant. As part of the application preparation process, Southern Company has reviewed its design and licensing basis for Plant Hatch for time-limited, aging-related assumptions....

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

454

Impact of Nuclear Power Plant Operations on Carbon-14 Generation, Chemical Forms, and Release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As nuclear power plants continue to implement best practices to reduce the total radioactivity in plant effluents, other radionuclides that were not previously significant fractions of the effluent streams will need to be quantified and reported. Carbon-14 can become a principal radionuclide for the gaseous effluent pathway as the concentrations of other radionuclides decrease. This report documents the potential opportunities for further understanding the impact of nuclear power plant operations on Carb...

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

455

Process Data Network Architecture Plan for the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer networks are essential in efficiently managing the large volumes of data used in power plant operation. Nuclear plants, however, have been cautious in applying computer technology because of their unique safety, security, and regulatory requirements. This report describes a strategic plan developed to manage the evolution of the network that processes real-time operating data for Tennessee Valley Authority's Browns Ferry nuclear plants.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Aging assessment of essential HVAC chillers used in nuclear power plants. Phase 1, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a Phase I aging assessment of chillers used in the essential safety air-conditioning systems of nuclear power plants. Centrifugal chillers in the 75- to 750-ton refrigeration capacity range are the predominant type used. The chillers used, and air-conditioning systems served, vary in design from plant-to-plant. It is crucial to keep chiller internals very clean and to prevent the leakage of water, air, and other contaminants into the refrigerant containment system. Periodic operation on a weekly or monthly basis is necessary to remove moisture and noncondensable gases that gradually build up inside the chiller. This is especially desirable if a chiller is required to operate only as an emergency standby unit. The primary stressors and aging mechanisms that affect chillers include vibration, excessive temperatures and pressures, thermal cycling, chemical attack, and poor quality cooling water. Aging is accelerated by moisture, non-condensable gases (e.g., air), dirt, and other contamination within the refrigerant containment system, excessive start/stop cycling, and operating below the rated capacity. Aging is also accelerated by corrosion and fouling of the condenser and evaporator tubes. The principal cause of chiller failures is lack of adequate monitoring. Lack of performing scheduled maintenance and human errors also contribute to failures.

Blahnik, D.E.; Klein, R.F. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Experience forResponse Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Inventory of power plants in the United States 1989. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

This document is prepared annually by the Electric Power Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this publication is to provide year-end statistics about electric generating units in operation and to provide a 10-year outlook of future generating unit additions by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 states and the District of Columbia). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, federal and state agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA, to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The report is organized into the following chapters: Summary Statistics; Operable Electric Generating Units; and Projected Electric Generating Unit Additions.

Not Available

1990-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

459

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California," by W.W.S.Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero, C.H.

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear plant unit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Extended nuclear plant outages raise Southern California wholesale ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tools; Glossary All Reports ... weather; gasoline; capacity; exports; nuclear; forecast; View All Tags ...

462

Safeguards Issues at Nuclear Reactors and Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect

The Agency's safeguards technical objective is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection.

Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the highly ranked phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan -- PLN-2498  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the highly ranked phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the highly ranked phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS FOR PORTIONS OF THE MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT FROM UNITS 1 AND 2 AT THE HUMBOLDT BAY POWER PLANT, EUREKA, CALIFORNIA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E) operated the Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 nuclear reactor near Eureka, California under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) provisional license number DPR-7. HBPP Unit 3 achieved initial criticality in February 1963 and began commercial operations in August 1963. Unit 3 was a natural circulation boiling water reactor with a direct-cycle design. This design eliminated the need for heat transfer loops and large containment structures. Also, the pressure suppression containment design permitted below-ground construction. Stainless steel fuel claddings were used from startup until cladding failures resulted in plant system contaminationzircaloy-clad fuel was used exclusively starting in 1965 eliminating cladding-related contamination. A number of spills and gaseous releases were reported during operations resulting in a range of mitigative activities (see ESI 2008 for details).

W.C. Adams

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z