Sample records for nuclear outages mw

  1. Advanced Outage and Control Center: Strategies for Nuclear Plant Outage Work Status Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Weatherby

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research effort is a part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. LWRS is a research and development program sponsored by the Department of Energy, performed in close collaboration with industry to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS Program serves to help the US nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The Outage Control Center (OCC) Pilot Project was directed at carrying out the applied research for development and pilot of technology designed to enhance safe outage and maintenance operations, improve human performance and reliability, increase overall operational efficiency, and improve plant status control. Plant outage management is a high priority concern for the nuclear industry from cost and safety perspectives. Unfortunately, many of the underlying technologies supporting outage control are the same as those used in the 1980’s. They depend heavily upon large teams of staff, multiple work and coordination locations, and manual administrative actions that require large amounts of paper. Previous work in human reliability analysis suggests that many repetitive tasks, including paper work tasks, may have a failure rate of 1.0E-3 or higher (Gertman, 1996). With between 10,000 and 45,000 subtasks being performed during an outage (Gomes, 1996), the opportunity for human error of some consequence is a realistic concern. Although a number of factors exist that can make these errors recoverable, reducing and effectively coordinating the sheer number of tasks to be performed, particularly those that are error prone, has the potential to enhance outage efficiency and safety. Additionally, outage management requires precise coordination of work groups that do not always share similar objectives. Outage managers are concerned with schedule and cost, union workers are concerned with performing work that is commensurate with their trade, and support functions (safety, quality assurance, and radiological controls, etc.) are concerned with performing the work within the plants controls and procedures. Approaches to outage management should be designed to increase the active participation of work groups and managers in making decisions that closed the gap between competing objectives and the potential for error and process inefficiency.

  2. Nuclear Safety Risk Management in Refueling Outage of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meijing Wu; Guozhang Shen [Qinshan Nuclear power company (China)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NPP is used to planning maintenance, in-service inspection, surveillance test, fuel handling and design modification in the refueling outage; the operator response capability will be reduced plus some of the plant systems out of service or loss of power at this time. Based on 8 times refueling outage experiences of the Qinshan NPP, this article provide some good practice and lesson learned for the nuclear safety risk management focus at four safety function areas of Residual Heat Removal Capability, Inventory Control, Power availability and Reactivity control. (authors)

  3. Sensitivity analysis for the outages of nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kengy Barty

    2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 17, 2012 ... Abstract: Nuclear power plants must be regularly shut down in order to perform refueling and maintenance operations. The scheduling of the ...

  4. Resolving piping analysis issues to minimize impact on installation activities during refueling outage at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhavnani, D. [Public Service Electric and Gas Co., Hancocks Bridge, NJ (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While it is required to maintain piping code compliance for all phases of installation activities during outages at a nuclear plant, it is equally essential to reduce challenges to the installation personnel on how plant modification work should be performed. Plant betterment activities that incorporate proposed design changes are continually implemented during the outages. Supporting analysis are performed to back these activities for operable systems. The goal is to reduce engineering and craft man-hours and minimize outage time. This paper outlines how plant modification process can be streamlined to facilitate construction teams to do their tasks that involve safety related piping. In this manner, installation can proceed by minimizing on the spot analytical effort and reduce downtime to support the proposed modifications. Examples are provided that permit performance of installation work in any sequence. Piping and hangers including the branch lines are prequalified and determined operable. The system is up front analyzed for all possible scenarios. The modification instructions in the work packages is flexible enough to permit any possible installation sequence. The benefit to this approach is large enough in the sense that valuable outage time is not extended and on site analytical work is not required.

  5. GUIDELINES FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF AN ADVANCED OUTAGE CONTROL CENTER TO IMPROVE OUTAGE COORDINATION, PROBLEM RESOLUTION, AND OUTAGE RISK MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Germain, Shawn St; Farris, Ronald; Whaley, April M; Medema, Heather; Gertman, David

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE) and performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs that provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. Managing NPP outages is a complex and difficult task due to the large number of maintenance and repair activities that are accomplished in a short period of time. During an outage, the outage control center (OCC) is the temporary command center for outage managers and provides several critical functions for the successful execution of the outage schedule. Essentially, the OCC functions to facilitate information inflow, assist outage management in processing information, and to facilitate the dissemination of information to stakeholders. Currently, outage management activities primarily rely on telephone communication, face to face reports of status, and periodic briefings in the OCC. It is a difficult task to maintain current the information related to outage progress and discovered conditions. Several advanced communication and collaboration technologies have shown promise for facilitating the information flow into, across, and out of the OCC. The use of these technologies will allow information to be shared electronically, providing greater amounts of real-time information to the decision makers and allowing OCC coordinators to meet with supporting staff remotely. Passively monitoring status electronically through advances in the areas of mobile worker technologies, computer-based procedures, and automated work packages will reduce the current reliance on manually reporting progress. The use of these technologies will also improve the knowledge capture and management capabilities of the organization. The purpose of this research is to improve management of NPP outages through the development of an advanced outage control center (AOCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. This technical report for industry implementation outlines methods and considerations for the establishment of an AOCC. This report provides a process for implementation of a change management plan, evaluation of current outage processes, the selection of technology, and guidance for the implementation of the selected technology. Methods are presented for both adoption of technologies within an existing OCC and for a complete OCC replacement, including human factors considerations for OCC design and setup.

  6. Outage management and health physics issue, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles/reports in this issue include: India: a potential commercial opportunity, a U.S. Department of Commerce Report, by Joe Neuhoff and Justin Rathke; The changing climate for nuclear energy, by Skip Bowman, Nuclear Energy Insitute; Selecting protective clothing, by J. Mark Price, Southern California Edison; and Succssful refurbishment outage, by Sudesh K. Gambhir, Omaha Public Power District. Industry innovation articles in this issue are: Containment radiation monitoring spiking, by Michael W. Lantz and Robert Routolo, Arizona Public Service Company; Improved outage performance, by Michael Powell and Troy Wilfong, Arizona Public Service Company, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station; Stop repacking valves and achieve leak-free performance, by Kenneth Hart, PPL Susquehanna LLC; and Head assembly upgrade package, by Timothy Petit, Dominion Nuclear.

  7. Scheduled System Outages

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. Outage management and health physics issue, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles/reports in this issue include: A design with experience for the U.S., by Michael J. Wallace, Constellation Generation Group; Hope to be among the first, by Randy Hutchinson, Entergy Nuclear; Plans to file COLs in 2008, by Garry Miller, Progress Energy; Evolution of ICRP's recommendations, by Lars-Erik Holm, ICRP; European network on education and training in radiological protection, by Michele Coeck, SCK-CEN, Belgium; Outage managment: an important tool for improving nuclear power plant performance, by Thomas Mazour and Jiri Mandula, IAEA, Austria; and Plant profile: Exploring new paths to excellence, by Anne Thomas, Exelon Nuclear.

  9. Technology Integration Initiative In Support of Outage Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Weatherby; David Gertman

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant outage management is a high priority concern for the nuclear industry from cost and safety perspectives. Often, command and control during outages is maintained in the outage control center where many of the underlying technologies supporting outage control are the same as those used in the 1980’s. This research reports on the use of advanced integrating software technologies and hand held mobile devices as a means by which to reduce cycle time, improve accuracy, and enhance transparency among outage team members. This paper reports on the first phase of research supported by the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program that is performed in close collaboration with industry to examine the introduction of newly available technology allowing for safe and efficient outage performance. It is thought that this research will result in: improved resource management among various plant stakeholder groups, reduced paper work, and enhanced overall situation awareness for the outage control center management team. A description of field data collection methods, including personnel interview data, success factors, end-user evaluation and integration of hand held devices in achieving an integrated design are also evaluated. Finally, the necessity of obtaining operations cooperation support in field studies and technology evaluation is acknowledged.

  10. Development of Methodologies for Technology Deployment for Advanced Outage Control Centers that Improve Outage Coordination, Problem Resolution and Outage Risk Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shawn St. Germain; Ronald Farris; Heather Medeman

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE) and performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs that provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The long term viability of existing nuclear power plants in the U.S. will depend upon maintaining high capacity factors, avoiding nuclear safety issues and reducing operating costs. The slow progress in the construction on new nuclear power plants has placed in increased importance on maintaining the output of the current fleet of nuclear power plants. Recently expanded natural gas production has placed increased economic pressure on nuclear power plants due to lower cost competition. Until recently, power uprate projects had steadily increased the total output of the U.S. nuclear fleet. Errors made during power plant upgrade projects have now removed three nuclear power plants from the U.S. fleet and economic considerations have caused the permanent shutdown of a fourth plant. Additionally, several utilities have cancelled power uprate projects citing economic concerns. For the past several years net electrical generation from U.S. nuclear power plants has been declining. One of few remaining areas where significant improvements in plant capacity factors can be made is in minimizing the duration of refueling outages. Managing nuclear power plant outages is a complex and difficult task. Due to the large number of complex tasks and the uncertainty that accompanies them, outage durations routinely exceed the planned duration. The ability to complete an outage on or near schedule depends upon the performance of the outage management organization. During an outage, the outage control center (OCC) is the temporary command center for outage managers and provides several critical functions for the successful execution of the outage schedule. Essentially, the OCC functions to facilitate information inflow, assist outage management in processing information and to facilitate the dissemination of information to stakeholders. Currently, outage management activities primarily rely on telephone communication, face to face reports of status and periodic briefings in the OCC. Much of the information displayed in OCCs is static and out of date requiring an evaluation to determine if it is still valid. Several advanced communication and collaboration technologies have shown promise for facilitating the information flow into, across and out of the OCC. Additionally, advances in the areas of mobile worker technologies, computer based procedures and electronic work packages can be leveraged to improve the availability of real time status to outage managers.

  11. Olkiluoto 1 and 2 - Plant efficiency improvement and lifetime extension-project (PELE) implemented during outages 2010 and 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosonen, M.; Hakola, M. [Teollisuuden Voima Oyj, F- 27160 Eurajoki (Finland)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO) is a non-listed public company founded in 1969 to produce electricity for its stakeholders. TVO is the operator of the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant. TVO follows the principle of continuous improvement in the operation and maintenance of the Olkiluoto plant units. The PELE project (Plant Efficiency Improvement and Lifetime Extension), mainly completed during the annual outages in 2010 and 2011, and forms one part of the systematic development of Olkiluoto units. TVO maintains a long-term development program that aims at systematically modernizing the plant unit systems and equipment based on the latest technology. According to the program, the Olkiluoto 1 and Olkiluoto 2 plant units are constantly renovated with the intention of keeping them safe and reliable, The aim of the modernization projects is to improve the safety, reliability, and performance of the plant units. PELE project at Olkiluoto 1 was done in 2010 and at Olkiluoto 2 in 2011. The outage length of Olkiluoto 1 was 26 d 12 h 4 min and Olkiluoto 2 outage length was 28 d 23 h 46 min. (Normal service-outage is about 14 days including refueling and refueling-outage length is about seven days. See figure 1) The PELE project consisted of several single projects collected into one for coordinated project management. Some of the main projects were as follows: - Low pressure turbines: rotor, stator vane, casing and turbine instrumentation replacement. - Replacement of Condenser Cooling Water (later called seawater pumps) pumps - Replacement of inner isolation valves on the main steam lines. - Generator and the generator cooling system replacement. - Low voltage switchgear replacement. This project will continue during future outages. PELE was a success. 100 TVO employees and 1500 subcontractor employees participated in the project. The execution of the PELE projects went extremely well during the outages. The replacement of the low pressure turbines and seawater pumps improved the efficiency of the plant units, and a power increase of nearly 20 MW was achieved at both plant units. PELE wonderfully manifests one of the strategic goals of our company; developing the competence of our in-house personnel by working in projects. (authors)

  12. Status Report on the Development of Micro-Scheduling Software for the Advanced Outage Control Center Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shawn St. Germain; Kenneth Thomas; Ronald Farris; Jeffrey Joe

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long-term viability of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States (U.S.) is dependent upon a number of factors, including maintaining high capacity factors, maintaining nuclear safety, and reducing operating costs, particularly those associated with refueling outages. Refueling outages typically take 20-30 days, and for existing light water NPPs in the U.S., the reactor cannot be in operation during the outage. Furthermore, given that many NPPs generate between $1-1.5 million/day in revenue when in operation, there is considerable interest in shortening the length of refueling outages. Yet, refueling outages are highly complex operations, involving multiple concurrent and dependent activities that are difficult to coordinate. Finding ways to improve refueling outage performance while maintaining nuclear safety has proven to be difficult. The Advanced Outage Control Center project is a research and development (R&D) demonstration activity under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. LWRS is a R&D program which works with industry R&D programs to establish technical foundations for the licensing and managing of long-term, safe, and economical operation of current NPPs. The Advanced Outage Control Center project has the goal of improving the management of commercial NPP refueling outages. To accomplish this goal, this INL R&D project is developing an advanced outage control center (OCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. This report describes specific recent efforts to develop a capability called outage Micro-Scheduling. Micro-Scheduling is the ability to allocate and schedule outage support task resources on a sub-hour basis. Micro-Scheduling is the real-time fine-tuning of the outage schedule to react to the actual progress of the primary outage activities to ensure that support task resources are optimally deployed with the least amount of delay and unproductive use of resources. The remaining sections of this report describe in more detail the scheduling challenges that occur during outages, how a Micro-Scheduling capability helps address those challenges, and provides a status update on work accomplished to date and the path forward.

  13. Steam turbine maintenance and repair technology: Reducing planned-outage costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, H.P.; McClintock, M. (General Physics Corp., Columbia, MD (USA)); Lamping, G. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (USA))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The North American Electric Reliability Council (NAERC) reported that the average loss of equivalent availability per outage for a major fossil turbine overhaul is 323,000 MW-HR. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Generation and Storage Division, is in the first phase of a major research project to reduce the duration and/or frequency of steam turbine maintenance outages. This project consists of an assessment of the current state-of-the-art turbine maintenance and repair techniques and technologies. It is based on a review of current turbine maintenance practices of the US, European, Japanese, and Australian utility industries. Emphasized are maintenance and repair activities that have the most significant impact on outage duration or frequency. Twenty-six key turbine maintenance activities and the current best techniques were identified for use by utility maintenance personnel. Overall outage durations could be reduced if the duration of these activities were shortened or if they were performed more effectively. Recommended projects for development of advanced steam turbine maintenance technology were identified. 29 refs., 46 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. Contingency Analysis of Cascading Line Outage Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas L Baldwin; Magdy S Tawfik; Miles McQueen

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the US power systems continue to increase in size and complexity, including the growth of smart grids, larger blackouts due to cascading outages become more likely. Grid congestion is often associated with a cascading collapse leading to a major blackout. Such a collapse is characterized by a self-sustaining sequence of line outages followed by a topology breakup of the network. This paper addresses the implementation and testing of a process for N-k contingency analysis and sequential cascading outage simulation in order to identify potential cascading modes. A modeling approach described in this paper offers a unique capability to identify initiating events that may lead to cascading outages. It predicts the development of cascading events by identifying and visualizing potential cascading tiers. The proposed approach was implemented using a 328-bus simplified SERC power system network. The results of the study indicate that initiating events and possible cascading chains may be identified, ranked and visualized. This approach may be used to improve the reliability of a transmission grid and reduce its vulnerability to cascading outages.

  15. Hopper compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16 Hopper compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16 May 10, 2012 (0 Comments) Due to a scheduled maintenance for the License...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: electricity outage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  17. Power Outage 1. Remain Calm; provide assistance to others if necessary.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Power Outage 1. Remain Calm; provide assistance to others if necessary. 2. Report the outage, call. Campus-wide telephone communications will continue to operate during a power outage on standard phones. If emergency assistance is required, call UC Security on Extn 6111 and state "POWEr OUTAgE" or mobile 0800 823

  18. Outage Capacity and Code Design for Dying Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Meng

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    . The outage exponents are also studied to reveal how fast the outage probability improves over the number of sub-channels. Besides the information-theoretical results, we also study a practical coding scheme for the dying binary erasure channel (DBEC), which...

  19. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM MCU SOLIDS OUTAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Oji, L.; Coleman, C.; Poirier, M.

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has received several solid and liquid samples from MCU in an effort to understand and recover from the system outage starting on April 6, 2014. SRNL concludes that the presence of solids in the Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT) is the likely root cause for the outage, based upon the following discoveries ? A solids sample from the extraction contactor #1 proved to be mostly sodium oxalate ? A solids sample from the scrub contactor#1 proved to be mostly sodium oxalate ? A solids sample from the Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT) proved to be mostly sodium oxalate ? An archived sample from Tank 49H taken last year was shown to contain a fine precipitate of sodium oxalate ? A solids sample from the extraction contactor #1 drain pipe from extraction contactor#1 proved to be mostly sodium aluminosilicate ? A liquid sample from the SSFT was shown to have elevated levels of oxalate anion compared to the expected concentration in the feed Visual inspection of the SSFT indicated the presence of precipitated or transferred solids, which were likely also in the Salt Solution Receipt Tank (SSRT). The presence of the solids coupled with agitation performed to maintain feed temperature resulted in oxalate solids migration through the MCU system and caused hydraulic issues that resulted in unplanned phase carryover from the extraction into the scrub, and ultimately the strip contactors. Not only did this carryover result in the Strip Effluent (SE) being pushed out of waste acceptance specification, but it resulted in the deposition of solids into several of the contactors. At the same time, extensive deposits of aluminosilicates were found in the drain tube in the extraction contactor #1. However it is not known at this time how the aluminosilicate solids are related to the oxalate solids. The solids were successfully cleaned out of the MCU system. However, future consideration must be given to the exclusion of oxalate solids into the MCU system. There were 53 recommendations for improving operations recently identified. Some additional considerations or additional details are provided below as recommendations. ? From this point on, IC-Anions analyses of the DSSHT should be part of the monthly routine analysis in order to spot negative trends in the oxalate leaving the MCU system. Care must be taken to monitor the oxalate content to watch for sudden precipitation of oxalate salts in the system. ? Conduct a study to optimize the cleaning strategy at ARP-MCU through decreasing the concentration or entirely eliminating the oxalic acid. ? The contents of the SSFT should remain unagitated. Routine visual observation should be maintained to ensure there is not a large buildup of solids. As water with agitation provided sufficient removal of the solids in the feed tank, it should be considered as a good means for dissolving oxalate solids if they are found in the future. ? Conduct a study to improve prediction of oxalate solubility in salt batch feed materials. As titanium and mercury have been found in various solids in this report, evaluate if either element plays a role in oxalate solubility during processing. ? Salt batch characterization focuses primarily on characterization and testing of unaltered Tank 21H material; however, non-typical feeds are developed through cleaning, washing, and/or sump transfers. As these solutions are processed through MCU, they may precipitate solids or reduce performance. Salt batch characterization and testing should be expanded to encompass a broader range of feeds that may be processed through ARPMCU.

  20. Lassoing Line Outages in the Smart Power Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Hao

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast and accurate unveiling of power line outages is of paramount importance not only for preventing faults that may lead to blackouts, but also for routine monitoring and control tasks of the smart grid, including state estimation and optimal power flow. Existing approaches are either challenged by the \\emph{combinatorial complexity} issues involved, and are thus limited to identifying single- and double-line outages; or, they invoke less pragmatic assumptions such as \\emph{conditionally independent} phasor angle measurements available across the grid. Using only a subset of voltage phasor angle data, the present paper develops a near real-time algorithm for identifying multiple line outages at the affordable complexity of solving a quadratic program via block coordinate descent iterations. The novel approach relies on reformulating the DC linear power flow model as a \\emph{sparse} overcomplete expansion, and leveraging contemporary advances in compressive sampling and variable selection using the least-abso...

  1. Sensitivity analysis for the outages of nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 17, 2012 ... Energy generation in France is a competitive market, whereas ... from wind farms, solar energy or run of river plant without pondage.

  2. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Responding to Power Outages and Floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    People and the environment can be harmed if a home's onsite wastewater treatment system does not work properly after a flood or power outage. This publication explains the steps to take after such an event to get the system back into service. 4 pp...

  3. Proof of the outage probability conjecture for MISO channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbe, Emmanuel; Telatar, Emre

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Telatar 1999, it is conjectured that the covariance matrices minimizing the outage probability for MIMO channels with Gaussian fading are diagonal with either zeros or constant values on the diagonal. In the MISO setting, this is equivalent to conjecture that the Gaussian quadratic forms having largest tale probability correspond to such diagonal matrices. We prove here the conjecture in the MISO setting.

  4. Collaboration Surfaces for Outage Control Centers Lars Hurlen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deussen, Oliver

    Collaboration Surfaces for Outage Control Centers Lars Hurlen Institute for Energy Technology Os Allé 7 1777 Halden, Norway +47 69212242 lars.hurlen@hrp.no Bojana Petkov Institute for Energy for Energy Technology Os Allé 7 1777 Halden, Norway +47 69215028 oystein.veland@hrp.no Gisle Andresen

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: power outage modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  6. Outage Rate Regions for the MISO Interference Channel: Definitions and Interpretations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindblom, Johannes; Larsson, Erik G

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the slow-fading two-user multiple-input single-output (MISO) interference channel (IC), where the receivers treat the interference as additive Gaussian noise. We study the rate points that can be achieved, allowing a non-zero outage probability. The points which meet the outage probability specification constitute a so-called outage rate region. There exist several definitions of the outage rate regions for the IC, as for the broadcast and the multiple-access channels. We give four definitions for the outage region of the MISO IC. The definitions differ on whether the rates are declared in outage jointly or individually and whether there is instantaneous or statistical channel state information (CSI) at the transmitters. For the statistical CSI scenario, we discuss how to find the outage probabilities in closed form. We provide interpretations of the definitions and compare the corresponding regions via analytical and numerical results.

  7. RESOLVED: Projectb filesystem outage July 9, 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. Survey of tools for risk assessment of cascading outages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papic, Milorad; Bell, Keith; Chen, Yousu; Dobson, Ian; Fonte, Louis; Haq, Enamul; Hines, Paul; Kirschen, Daniel; Luo, Xiaochuan; Miller, Stephen; Samaan, Nader A.; Vaiman, Marianna; Varghese, Matthew; Zhang, Pei

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract-This paper is a result of ongoing activity carried out by Understanding, Prediction, Mitigation and Restoration of Cascading Failures Task Force under IEEE Computer Analytical Methods Subcommittee (CAMS). The task force's previous papers [1, 2] are focused on general aspects of cascading outages such as understanding, prediction, prevention and restoration from cascading failures. This is the second of two new papers, which extend this previous work to summarize the state of the art in cascading failure risk analysis methodologies and modeling tools. The first paper reviews the state of the art in methodologies for performing risk assessment of potential cascading outages [3]. This paper describes the state of the art in cascading failure modeling tools, documenting the view of experts representing utilities, universities and consulting companies. The paper is intended to constitute a valid source of information and references about presently available tools that deal with prediction of cascading failure events. This effort involves reviewing published literature and other documentation from vendors, universities and research institutions. The assessment of cascading outages risk evaluation is in continuous evolution. Investigations to gain even better understanding and identification of cascading events are the subject of several research programs underway aimed at solving the complexity of these events that electrical utilities face today. Assessing the risk of cascading failure events in planning and operation for power transmission systems require adequate mathematical tools/software.

  9. Number and propagation of line outages in cascading events in electric power transmission systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Ian

    of transmission lines. We estimate from observed utility data how transmission line outages propagate, and obtain is consistent with the utility data by using it to estimate the distribution of the total number of lines statistical behavior of cascading transmission line outages from standard utility data that records the times

  10. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 62, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2014 699 Outage Probability in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xiangyun "Sean"

    transform of a cumulative distribution and (ii) a reference link power gain-based framework which exploits the distribution of the fading power gain between the reference transmitter and receiver. The outage probability the outage probability at any location inside either a disk or polygon region. The analysis illustrates

  11. Tritium Reduction and Control in the Vacuum Vessel During TFTR Outage and Decommissioning *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tritium Reduction and Control in the Vacuum Vessel During TFTR Outage and Decommissioning * W of the torus, a three tier system was developed for the outage in order to reduce and control the free tritium. The first phase of the program to reduce the free tritium consisted of direct flowthrough of room air

  12. Tritium Reduction and Control in the Vacuum Vessel During TFTR Outage and Decommissioning*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tritium Reduction and Control in the Vacuum Vessel During TFTR Outage and Decommissioning* W, a three tier system was developed for the outage in order to reduce and control the free tritium. The first phase of the program to reduce the free tritium consisted of direct flowthrough of room air

  13. Annual Steam System Maintenance Outage (2014) Beginning on Sunday, June 8th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Annual Steam System Maintenance Outage (2014) Beginning on Sunday, June 8th at 12:00pm (Noon), the Central Utility Plant (CUP), which supplies steam service to over 100 buildings on the Newark campus, will be shut down for the annual Steam System Maintenance Outage. This effort is necessary each year to ensure

  14. Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  15. Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  16. Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  17. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  18. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  19. Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  20. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  1. Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  2. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  3. Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  4. Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  5. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  6. Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  7. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  8. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  9. Plant Outage Time Savings Provided by Subcritical Physics Testing at Vogtle Unit 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cupp, Philip [Southern Nuclear Company (United States); Heibel, M.D. [Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most recent core reload design verification physics testing done at Southern Nuclear Company's (SNC) Vogtle Unit 2, performed prior to initial power operations in operating cycle 12, was successfully completed while the reactor was at least 1% {delta}K/K subcritical. The testing program used was the first application of the Subcritical Physics Testing (SPT) program developed by the Westinghouse Electric Company LLC. The SPT program centers on the application of the Westinghouse Subcritical Rod Worth Measurement (SRWM) methodology that was developed in cooperation with the Vogtle Reactor Engineering staff. The SRWM methodology received U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval in August of 2005. The first application of the SPT program occurred at Vogtle Unit 2 in October of 2005. The results of the core design verification measurements obtained during the SPT program demonstrated excellent agreement with prediction, demonstrating that the predicted core characteristics were in excellent agreement with the actual operating characteristics of the core. This paper presents an overview of the SPT Program used at Vogtle Unit 2 during operating cycle 12, and a discussion of the critical path outage time savings the SPT program is capable of providing. (authors)

  10. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  11. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  12. Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer cpacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  13. Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Arkansas Nuclear One

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nuclear One" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  14. Electricity Case: Statistical Analysis of Electric Power Outages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    of the United States Department of Homeland Security. #12;0 Electricity Case, Report 3 Electricity Case was supported by the United States Department of Homeland Security through the Center for Risk and Economic, with an estimated increase of a bit more than 10,000 customers per incident per year. Similar analyses of MW lost

  15. bectso-10mw | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Clean Coal Power Initiative Power Plant Improvement Initiative Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program FutureGen 10-MW Demonstration of...

  16. North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  17. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  18. New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  19. OTRA-THS MAC to reduce Power Outage Data Collection Latency in a smart meter network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garlapati, Shravan K [ORNL] [ORNL; Kuruganti, Phani Teja [ORNL] [ORNL; Buehrer, Richard M [ORNL] [ORNL; Reed, Jeffrey H [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The deployment of advanced metering infrastructure by the electric utilities poses unique communication challenges, particularly as the number of meters per aggregator increases. During a power outage, a smart meter tries to report it instantaneously to the electric utility. In a densely populated residential/industrial locality, it is possible that a large number of smart meters simultaneously try to get access to the communication network to report the power outage. If the number of smart meters is very high of the order of tens of thousands (metropolitan areas), the power outage data flooding can lead to Random Access CHannel (RACH) congestion. Several utilities are considering the use of cellular network for smart meter communications. In 3G/4G cellular networks, RACH congestion not only leads to collisions, retransmissions and increased RACH delays, but also has the potential to disrupt the dedicated traffic flow by increasing the interference levels (3G CDMA). In order to overcome this problem, in this paper we propose a Time Hierarchical Scheme (THS) that reduces the intensity of power outage data flooding and power outage reporting delay by 6/7th, and 17/18th when compared to their respective values without THS. Also, we propose an Optimum Transmission Rate Adaptive (OTRA) MAC to optimize the latency in power outage data collection. The analysis and simulation results presented in this paper show that both the OTRA and THS features of the proposed MAC results in a Power Outage Data Collection Latency (PODCL) that is 1/10th of the 4G LTE PODCL.

  20. ISIS~1985 0.16MW SNS~2006 1.4MW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    m #12;3 J-PARC JSNS ILL ~1974 ISIS~1985 0.16MW SNS~2006 1.4MW JSNS~2008 1MW J-PARC BSNS #12;4 MLF-PARC 180 J-PARC/MLF #12;19 J-PARC #12;20 J-PARC J-PARC K GSI ISIS SNS FNAL CERN GSI J

  1. Coordinated Beamforming for Multiuser MISO Interference Channel under Rate Outage Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wei-Chiang; Lin, Che; Chi, Chong-Yung

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper studies the coordinated beamforming design problem for the multiple-input single-output (MISO) interference channel, assuming only channel distribution information (CDI) at the transmitters. For a given requirement on the rate outage probability for receivers, we aim to maximize the system utility (e.g., the weighted sum rate, weighted proportional fairness rate, and the weighed harmonic mean rate) subject to the rate outage constraints and individual power constraints. The outage constraints, however, lead to a complicated, nonconvex structure for the considered beamforming design problem and make the optimization problem difficult to handle. While this nonconvex optimization problem can be solved in an exhaustive search manner, this brute-force approach is only feasible when the number of transmitter-receiver pairs is small. For a system with a large number of transmitter-receiver pairs, computationally efficient alternatives are necessary. The focus of this paper is hence on the design of such e...

  2. Outage Constrained Robust Transmit Optimization for Multiuser MISO Downlinks: Tractable Approximations by Conic Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Kun-Yu; Chang, Tsung-Hui; Ma, Wing-Kin; Chi, Chong-Yung

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider a probabilistic signal-to-interference and-noise ratio (SINR) constrained problem for transmit beamforming design in the presence of imperfect channel state information (CSI), under a multiuser multiple-input single-output (MISO) downlink scenario. In particular, we deal with outage-based quality-of-service constraints, where the probability of each user's SINR not satisfying a service requirement must not fall below a given outage probability specification. The study of solution approaches to the probabilistic SINR constrained problem is important because CSI errors are often present in practical systems and they may cause substantial SINR outages if not handled properly. However, a major technical challenge is how to process the probabilistic SINR constraints. To tackle this, we propose a novel relaxation- restriction (RAR) approach, which consists of two key ingredients-semidefinite relaxation (SDR), and analytic tools for conservatively approximating probabilistic constraints. Th...

  3. California Nuclear Profile - San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  4. New York Nuclear Profile - Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  5. Maryland Nuclear Profile - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  6. New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License...

  7. California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  8. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  9. Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Columbia Generating Station Unit...

  10. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  11. Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Duane Arnold Energy Center Unit...

  12. MonteCarlo and Analytical Methods for Forced Outage Rate Calculations of Peaking Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rondla, Preethi 1988-

    2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    pessimistic results owing to its time spent in the reserve shut down state. Therefore the normal two state representation of a generating unit is not adequate. A four state model was proposed by an IEEE committee to calculate the forced outage rate...

  13. 96 IEEE power & energy magazine march/april 2005 THE MASSIVE POWER OUTAGE OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    power grid up to 21st century standards. I do not believe the American people would--or should96 IEEE power & energy magazine march/april 2005 T THE MASSIVE POWER OUTAGE OF August 2003 underscored the vulnerabil- ity of our nation's power grid and the fact that this vital yet complex infrastruc

  14. Asymptotic Outage Performance of Power Allocation in Block-Fading Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillén i Fàbregas, Albert

    .nguyen@postgrads.unisa.edu.au Albert Guill´en i F`abregas Department of Engineering University of Cambridge Cambridge CB2 1PZ, UK guillen@ieee.org Lars K. Rasmussen Institute for Telecommunications Research University of South Australia SA 5095, Australia lars.rasmussen@unisa.edu.au Abstract-- We characterize the asymptotic outage

  15. Joint Power Control and Beamforming Codebook Design for MISO Channels under the Outage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Wei

    Joint Power Control and Beamforming Codebook Design for MISO Channels under the Outage Criterion and beamforming codebooks for limited-feedback multiple-input single-output (MISO) wireless systems. The problem focuses on optimal design of single-user limited-feedback systems over multiple-input single-output (MISO

  16. Outage Probability of MISO Broadcast Systems with Noisy Channel Side Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Teng Joon

    Outage Probability of MISO Broadcast Systems with Noisy Channel Side Information Alon Shalev output (MISO) systems. However, these schemes generally require perfect channel information) of a linear zero forcing transmitter, operating in a fading MISO broadcast channel. We consider a rectangular

  17. An Efficient Energy Curtailment Scheme For Outage Management in Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durrani, Salman

    An Efficient Energy Curtailment Scheme For Outage Management in Smart Grid Wayes Tushar§, Jian--In this paper an efficient energy curtailment scheme is studied, which enables the power users of a smart grid. Considering the advantages of a two-way communications infrastructure for any future smart grid, a non

  18. Exact Outage Probability Analysis for Relay-aided Underlay Cognitive Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    --Outage probability, cognitive radio, spectrum shar- ing, underlay, QoS, primary system, secondary system. I. INTRODUCTION In response to the ever-growing stress put on the wireless spectrum medium, cognitive radio (CR secondary (unlicensed) users (SUs) to share the same licensed spectrum band with the primary users (PUs

  19. The Neutronics Design and Analysis of a 200-MW(electric) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tinkler, Daniel R.; Downar, Thomas J. [Purdue University (United States)

    2003-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 200-MW(electric) simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) was designed and analyzed under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Initiative program. The compact size of a 200-MW(electric) reactor makes it attractive for countries with a less well developed engineering infrastructure, as well as for developed countries seeking to tailor generation capacity more closely to the growth of their electricity demand. The 200-MW(electric) core design reported here is based on the 600-MW(electric) General Electric SBWR core, which was first analyzed in the work performed here in order to qualify the computer codes used in the analysis. Cross sections for the 8 x 8 fuel assembly design were generated with the HELIOS lattice physics code, and core simulation was performed with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission codes RELAP5/PARCS. In order to predict the critical heat flux, the Hench-Gillis correlation was implemented in the RELAP5 code. An equilibrium cycle was designed for the 200-MW(electric) core, which provided a cycle length of more than 2 yr and satisfied the minimum critical power ratio throughout the core life.

  20. PCFB Repowering Project 80 MW plant description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the design of a 80 MW Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) boiler for the repowering of Unit 1 at the Des Moines Energy Center. Objective is to demonstrate that PCFB combined-cycle technology is cost effective and environmentally superior compared to traditional pulverized coal burning facilities.

  1. Track NERSC Scheduled and Unscheduled Outages in Google Calendar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II: An EnzymePersonal ComputersoMarchTracey

  2. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  3. A convex approximation approach to Weighted Sum Rate Maximization of Multiuser MISO Interference Channel under outage constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wei-Chiang; Lin, Che; Chi, Chong-Yung

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper considers weighted sum rate maximization of multiuser multiple-input single-output interference channel (MISO-IFC) under outage constraints. The outage-constrained weighted sum rate maximization problem is a nonconvex optimization problem and is difficult to solve. While it is possible to optimally deal with this problem in an exhaustive search manner by finding all the Pareto-optimal rate tuples in the (discretized) outage-constrained achievable rate region, this approach, however, suffers from a prohibitive computational complexity and is feasible only when the number of transmitter-receive pairs is small. In this paper, we propose a convex optimization based approximation method for efficiently handling the outage-constrained weighted sum rate maximization problem. The proposed approximation method consists of solving a sequence of convex optimization problems, and thus can be efficiently implemented by interior-point methods. Simulation results show that the proposed method can yield near-optim...

  4. Confidence intervals for state probabilities of system capacity outages and for LOLP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stasinos, Athanasios

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONFID"NC. , INTERVALS FO- S'TATE PROBABILITIES OF SYSTEM CAPACITY OUTAGES AND FOR LOLP A Thcsi. , bv ATHANASIOS STASINOS Submi. tted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1974 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering CONFIDENCE INTERVALS FOR STA1'E PROBABILITIES OF STSTEM CAPACITY OVTAGES AND FOR LOLP A Thesis by ATHANASIOS STASINOS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

  5. Feature Extraction for Data-Driven Fault Detection in Nuclear Power Plants Xin Jin, Robert M. Edwards and Asok Ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    Feature Extraction for Data-Driven Fault Detection in Nuclear Power Plants Xin Jin, Robert M monitoring of nuclear power plants (NPP) is one of the key issues addressed in nuclear energy safety research is performed during each nuclear power plant refueling outage, which may not be cost effective [1

  6. Outages of electric power supply resulting from cable failures Boston Edison Company system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factual data are provided regarding 5 electric power supply interruptions that occurred in the Boston Metropolitan area during April to June, 1979. Common to all of these outages was the failure of an underground cable as the initiating event, followed by multiple equipment failures. There was significant variation in the voltage ratings and types of cables which failed. The investigation was unable to delineate a single specific Boston Edison design operating or maintenance practice that could be cited as the cause of the outages. After reviewing the investigative report the following actions were recommended: the development and implementation of a plan to eliminate the direct current cable network; develop a network outage restoration plan; regroup primary feeder cables wherever possible to minimize the number of circuits in manholes, and to separate feeders to high load density areas; develop a program to detect incipient cable faults; evaluate the separation of the north and south sections of Back Bay network into separate networks; and, as a minimum, install the necessary facilities to make it possible to re-energize one section without interfering with the other; and re-evaluate the cathodic protection scheme where necessary. (LCL)

  7. South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  8. Crossroads (3 MW) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC Jump to:InformationCrandall,CriteriaCrookstonLaminated MW)

  9. Calculational criticality analyses of 10- and 20-MW UF{sub 6} freezer/sublimer vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, W.C.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculational criticality analyses have been performed for 10- and 20-MW UF{sub 6} freezer/sublimer vessels. The freezer/sublimers have been analyzed over a range of conditions that encompass normal operation and abnormal conditions. The effects of HF moderation of the UF{sub 6} in each vessel have been considered for uranium enriched between 2 and 5 wt % {sup 235}U. The results indicate that the nuclearly safe enrichments originally established for the operation of a 10-MW freezer/sublimer, based on a hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratio of 0.33, are acceptable. If strict moderation control can be demonstrated for hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratios that are less than 0.33, then the enrichment limits for the 10-MW freezer/sublimer may be increased slightly. The calculations performed also allow safe enrichment limits to be established for a 20-NM freezer/sublimer under moderation control.

  10. Calculational criticality analyses of 10- and 20-MW UF[sub 6] freezer/sublimer vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, W.C.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculational criticality analyses have been performed for 10- and 20-MW UF[sub 6] freezer/sublimer vessels. The freezer/sublimers have been analyzed over a range of conditions that encompass normal operation and abnormal conditions. The effects of HF moderation of the UF[sub 6] in each vessel have been considered for uranium enriched between 2 and 5 wt % [sup 235]U. The results indicate that the nuclearly safe enrichments originally established for the operation of a 10-MW freezer/sublimer, based on a hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratio of 0.33, are acceptable. If strict moderation control can be demonstrated for hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratios that are less than 0.33, then the enrichment limits for the 10-MW freezer/sublimer may be increased slightly. The calculations performed also allow safe enrichment limits to be established for a 20-NM freezer/sublimer under moderation control.

  11. Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT R obert Cas a feedstock for gasification for a 3 MW power plant was

  12. Status of U.S. Nuclear Outages - U.S. Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWestThousand CubicYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayCubicYear(EIA)

  13. Ris-R-Report The DAN-AERO MW Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ull scale MW size rotor s as well as o n airfoils for MW size turbine s in wind tun nels. Shear ew insight into a number of fu ndamental aerodynamic and aero-acoustic issues, important and turbulence inflow characteristics were measured on a Si emens 3.6 MW turbine with a five hole pitot tube

  14. MATCASC: A tool to analyse cascading line outages in power grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koç, Yakup; Araujo, Nuno A M; Warnier, Martijn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Blackouts in power grids typically result from cascading failures. The key importance of the electric power grid to society encourages further research into sustaining power system reliability and developing new methods to manage the risks of cascading blackouts. Adequate software tools are required to better analyze, understand, and assess the consequences of the cascading failures. This paper presents MATCASC, an open source MATLAB based tool to analyse cascading failures in power grids. Cascading effects due to line overload outages are considered. The applicability of the MATCASC tool is demonstrated by assessing the robustness of IEEE test systems and real-world power grids with respect to cascading failures.

  15. Outage Log

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizing I/O performanceOther

  16. PG&E Plans for 500 MW of PV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PG&E has developed a plan to install 500 MW of PV by the year 2015. The plan calls for 250 MW to be acquired through Power Purchase Agreements (PPA) and the other 250 MW to be purchased and owned by the utility. PG&E presented the plan at a public forum on April 27, 2009. A copy of the power point presentation is attached.

  17. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budnitz, R.J. [Future Resources Associates, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States); Davis, P.R. [PRD Consulting (United States); Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H. [EQE International, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf), and the other at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1). Both the Sandia and Brookhaven projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults---so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling outage conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Grand Gulf. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human effort rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Grand Gulf have been adopted here, so that the results of the study can be as comparable as possible. Both the Sandia study and this study examine only one shutdown plant operating state (POS) at Grand Gulf, namely POS 5 representing cold shutdown during a refueling outage. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POS 5. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency for earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 5 is found to be quite low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}7}/year.

  18. Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Callaway Unit 1","1,190","8,996",100.0,"Union...

  19. Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Grand Gulf Unit 1","1,251","9,643",100.0,"Syste...

  20. Fuel strategy for 2 MW SF-TMSR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Zhiyong; Lin, Jun; Cao, Changqing; Zhang, Haiqing; Zhu, Tianbao; Li, Xiaoyun [Center for Thorium Molten Salt Reactor System, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.2019 Jialuo Road, Jiading District, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China has launched a series of projects for developing high performance nuclear energy systems. The 2 MW solid fuel thorium based molten salt reactor (TMSR-SF) is one of these projects, which uses TRISO fuel elements as the fuel carrier and the FLiBe molten salt (2LiF-BeF{sub 2}) as the coolant. TRISO fuel elements have been well developed in respect to manufacturing, testing experiments inside and outside reactors as well as their successful application in HTGRs. The application of LEU (low enriched uranium) spherical TRISO fuel elements in TMSR-SF can be safely conducted through careful control of temperature and power density. Although the soaking of molten salt into graphite has shown no damage to the graphite material as experienced by ORNL group in the sixties last century, the compatibility of FLiBe salt with graphite covering of the fuel elements should be tested before the application. It is expected that TMSR-SF can be an appropriate test reactor for high performance fuel element development. (authors)

  1. Understanding the Benefits of Dispersed Grid-Connected Photovoltaics: From Avoiding the Next Major Outage to Taming Wholesale Power Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letendre, Steven E.; Perez, Richard

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Thanks to new solar resource assessment techniques using cloud cover data available from geostationary satellites, it is apparent that grid-connected PV installations can serve to enhance electric grid reliability, preventing or hastening recovery from major power outages and serving to mitigate extreme price spikes in wholesale energy markets. (author)

  2. Outage Probability of the Gaussian MIMO Free-Space Optical Channel with PPM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letzepis, Nick

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The free-space optical channel has the potential to facilitate inexpensive, wireless communication with fiber-like bandwidth under short deployment timelines. However, atmospheric effects can significantly degrade the reliability of a free-space optical link. In particular, atmospheric turbulence causes random fluctuations in the irradiance of the received laser beam, commonly referred to as scintillation. The scintillation process is slow compared to the large data rates typical of optical transmission. As such, we adopt a quasi-static block fading model and study the outage probability of the channel under the assumption of orthogonal pulse-position modulation. We investigate the mitigation of scintillation through the use of multiple lasers and multiple apertures, thereby creating a multiple-input multiple output (MIMO) channel. Non-ideal photodetection is also assumed such that the combined shot noise and thermal noise are considered as signal-independent Additive Gaussian white noise. Assuming perfect re...

  3. Supplementary Data to Global risk of radioactive fallout after nuclear reactor accidents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Supplementary Data to Global risk of radioactive fallout after nuclear reactor accidents Jos Gross capacity Start of End of operation Energy supply in MW in MW operation (planned) in GWh South

  4. Low frequency noise from MW wind turbines --mechanisms of generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low frequency noise from MW wind turbines -- mechanisms of generation and its modeling Helge MW wind turbines -- mechanisms of generation and its modeling Department: Department of Wind Energy turbine has been simulated with a noise prediction model from NASA in US. Running the model

  5. bectno-180mw | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste andAnniversary, partReview64,783ENCOAL® Mild180-MWe

  6. bectso-10mw | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste andAnniversary, partReview64,783ENCOAL®Evaluation of3 Industrial

  7. Puna Geothermal Venture's Plan for a 25 MW Commercial Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Venture's Plan for a 25 MW Commercial Geothermal Power Plant on Hawaii's Big Island Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Puna...

  8. Operating and Maintaining a 465MW Cogeneration Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theisen, R. E.

    OPERATING AND HAINTAINING A 465MW COGENERATION PLANT -- R. E. Theisen Plant Hanager CoGen Lyondell PSE Inc. Houston, Texas ABSTRACT The on-line av ilability of the five Fr me-7E gas turbine generators installed at the 465MW Lyondell... performed promptly on discovered design, operating, and maintenance weaknesses uncovered during the early months of operation. INTRODUCTION In March, 1985, a pa"per was presented at the ASHE-Sponsored Gas Turbine Conference in Houston, Texas...

  9. Risk-based evaluation of Allowed Outage Times (AOTs) considering risk of shutdown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mankamo, T. [Avaplan Oy, Espoo (Finland); Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    When safety systems fail during power operation, Technical Specifications (TS) usually limit the repair within Allowed Outage Time (AOT). If the repair cannot be completed within the AOT, or no AOT is allowed, the plant is required to be shut down for the repair. However, if the capability to remove decay heat is degraded, shutting down the plant with the need to operate the affected decay-heat removal systems may impose a substantial risk compared to continued power operation over a usual repair time. Thus, defining a proper AOT in such situations can be considered as a risk-comparison between the repair in frill power state with a temporarily increased level of risk, and the altemative of shutting down the plant for the repair in zero power state with a specific associated risk. The methodology of the risk-comparison approach, with a due consideration of the shutdown risk, has been further developed and applied to the AOT considerations of residual heat removal and standby service water systems of a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant. Based on the completed work, several improvements to the TS requirements for the systems studied can be suggested.

  10. Risk-based evaluation of Allowed Outage Times (AOTs) considering risk of shutdown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mankamo, T. (Avaplan Oy, Espoo (Finland)); Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When safety systems fail during power operation, Technical Specifications (TS) usually limit the repair within Allowed Outage Time (AOT). If the repair cannot be completed within the AOT, or no AOT is allowed, the plant is required to be shut down for the repair. However, if the capability to remove decay heat is degraded, shutting down the plant with the need to operate the affected decay-heat removal systems may impose a substantial risk compared to continued power operation over a usual repair time. Thus, defining a proper AOT in such situations can be considered as a risk-comparison between the repair in frill power state with a temporarily increased level of risk, and the altemative of shutting down the plant for the repair in zero power state with a specific associated risk. The methodology of the risk-comparison approach, with a due consideration of the shutdown risk, has been further developed and applied to the AOT considerations of residual heat removal and standby service water systems of a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant. Based on the completed work, several improvements to the TS requirements for the systems studied can be suggested.

  11. Latest Results in SLAC 75-MW PPM Klystrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Haase, A.; Jongewaard, E.; Laurent, L.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.; /SLAC

    2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    75 MW X-band klystrons utilizing Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing have been undergoing design, fabrication and testing at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) for almost nine years. The klystron development has been geared toward realizing the necessary components for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The PPM devices built to date which fit this class of operation consist of a variety of 50 MW and 75 MW devices constructed by SLAC, KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) and industry. All these tubes follow from the successful SLAC design of a 50 MW PPM klystron in 1996. In 2004 the latest two klystrons were constructed and tested with preliminary results reported at EPAC2004. The first of these two devices was tested to the full NLC specifications of 75 MW, 1.6 microseconds pulse length, and 120 Hz. This 14.4 kW average power operation came with a tube efficiency >50%. The most recent testing of these last two devices will be presented here. Design and manufacturing issues of the latest klystron, due to be tested by the Fall of 2005, are also discussed.

  12. Managing nuclear predominant generating capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouget, Y.H.; Herbin, H.C.; Carbonnier, D.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most common belief, associated with nuclear power plant, leads to the conclusion that it can only operate, as a base load plant. This observation can be reversed, by just looking at large generating capacity, using an important nuclear generation mix. Nuclear plants may certainly load follow and contribute to the grid frequency control. The French example illustrates these possibilities. The reactor control of French units has been customized to accommodate the grid requests. Managing such a large nuclear plant fleet requires various actions be taken, ranging from a daily to a multi-annual perspective. The paper describes the various contributions leading to safe, reliable, well accepted and cost competitive nuclear plants in France. The combination of all aspects related to operations, maintenance scheduling, nuclear safety management, are presented. The use of PWR units carries considerable weight in economic terms, with several hundred million francs tied in with outage scheduling every year. This necessitates a global view of the entire generating system which can be mobilized to meet demand. There is considerable interaction between units as, on the one hand, they are competing to satisfy the same need, and, on the other hand, reducing maintenance costs means sharing the necessary resources, and thus a coordinated staggering of outages. In addition, nuclear fuel is an energy reserve which remains in the reactor for 3 or 4 years, with some of the fuel renewed each year. Due to the memory effect, the fuel retains a memory of past use, so that today's choices impact upon the future. A medium-term view of fuel management is also necessary.

  13. National University of Singapore MW5200 MSC SCIENCE COMMUNICATION PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aslaksen, Helmer

    National University of Singapore MW5200 MSC SCIENCE COMMUNICATION PROJECT Project Report Strengthening student engagement in the classroom. Course: Msc (Science Communication) Faculty of Science National University of Singapore Name: Ganeshini D/O Sri kanthan Student ID: A0075383Y Project Supervisor

  14. Ris-R-Report 12MW: final report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at the Horns Rev offshore wind farm deploying a lidar and a sodar on the transformer platform. The observed the scientific basis relevant for the next generation of huge 12 MW wind turbines operating offshore. The project data were successfully compared to offshore mast data and the wind profile was extended 100 m above

  15. Update report on the performance of 400 megawatt and larger nuclear and coal-fired generating units. Performance through 1977

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forty-seven nuclear generating units and 125 coal-fired generating plants that have had at least one full year of commercial operation are covered in this report. Their performances are evaluated using the capacity factor, availability factor, equivalent availability, and forced outage rate. The data are arranged by state and utility. (DLC)

  16. Low Beam Voltage, 10 MW, L-Band Cluster Klystron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teryaev, V.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Yakovlev, V.P.; /Fermilab; Kazakov, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Hirshfield, J.L.; /Yale U. /Omega-P, New Haven

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conceptual design of a multi-beam klystron (MBK) for possible ILC and Project X applications is presented. The chief distinction between this MBK design and existing 10-MW MBK's is the low operating voltage of 60 kV. There are at least four compelling reasons that justify development at this time of a low-voltage MBK, namely (1) no pulse transformer; (2) no oil tank for high-voltage components and for the tube socket; (3) no high-voltage cables; and (4) modulator would be a compact 60-kV IGBT switching circuit. The proposed klystron consists of four clusters containing six beams each. The tube has common input and output cavities for all 24 beams, and individual gain cavities for each cluster. A closely related optional configuration, also for a 10 MW tube, would involve four totally independent cavity clusters with four independent input cavities and four 2.5 MW output ports, all within a common magnetic circuit. This option has appeal because the output waveguides would not require a controlled atmosphere, and because it would be easier to achieve phase and amplitude stability as required in individual SC accelerator cavities.

  17. Title: Feasibility Study for 20 MW Hybrid Solar and Wind Park in Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    the realistic ROI for a potential 20 MW solar/wind farm. The information generated will be sufficiently detailed to present the expected energy performance and economics of a 20 MW solar/wind farm to potential investors1 of 2 Title: Feasibility Study for 20 MW Hybrid Solar and Wind Park in Colombia Principal

  18. INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE PROJECT 2 MW FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FuelCell Energy

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    With about 50% of power generation in the United States derived from coal and projections indicating that coal will continue to be the primary fuel for power generation in the next two decades, the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) has been conducted since 1985 to develop innovative, environmentally friendly processes for the world energy market place. The 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration was part of the Kentucky Pioneer Energy (KPE) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project selected by DOE under Round Five of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The participant in the CCTDP V Project was Kentucky Pioneer Energy for the IGCC plant. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), under subcontract to KPE, was responsible for the design, construction and operation of the 2 MW fuel cell power plant. Duke Fluor Daniel provided engineering design and procurement support for the balance-of-plant skids. Colt Engineering Corporation provided engineering design, fabrication and procurement of the syngas processing skids. Jacobs Applied Technology provided the fabrication of the fuel cell module vessels. Wabash River Energy Ltd (WREL) provided the test site. The 2 MW fuel cell power plant utilizes FuelCell Energy's Direct Fuel Cell (DFC) technology, which is based on the internally reforming carbonate fuel cell. This plant is capable of operating on coal-derived syngas as well as natural gas. Prior testing (1992) of a subscale 20 kW carbonate fuel cell stack at the Louisiana Gasification Technology Inc. (LGTI) site using the Dow/Destec gasification plant indicated that operation on coal derived gas provided normal performance and stable operation. Duke Fluor Daniel and FuelCell Energy developed a commercial plant design for the 2 MW fuel cell. The plant was designed to be modular, factory assembled and truck shippable to the site. Five balance-of-plant skids incorporating fuel processing, anode gas oxidation, heat recovery, water treatment/instrument air, and power conditioning/controls were built and shipped to the site. The two fuel cell modules, each rated at 1 MW on natural gas, were fabricated by FuelCell Energy in its Torrington, CT manufacturing facility. The fuel cell modules were conditioned and tested at FuelCell Energy in Danbury and shipped to the site. Installation of the power plant and connection to all required utilities and syngas was completed. Pre-operation checkout of the entire power plant was conducted and the plant was ready to operate in July 2004. However, fuel gas (natural gas or syngas) was not available at the WREL site due to technical difficulties with the gasifier and other issues. The fuel cell power plant was therefore not operated, and subsequently removed by October of 2005. The WREL fuel cell site was restored to the satisfaction of WREL. FuelCell Energy continues to market carbonate fuel cells for natural gas and digester gas applications. A fuel cell/turbine hybrid is being developed and tested that provides higher efficiency with potential to reach the DOE goal of 60% HHV on coal gas. A system study was conducted for a 40 MW direct fuel cell/turbine hybrid (DFC/T) with potential for future coal gas applications. In addition, FCE is developing Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) power plants with Versa Power Systems (VPS) as part of the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program and has an on-going program for co-production of hydrogen. Future development in these technologies can lead to future coal gas fuel cell applications.

  19. Project X: A Multi-MW Proton Source at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, Stephen D.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the Fermilab Tevatron Collider program draws to a close a strategy has emerged of an experimental program built around the high intensity frontier. The centerpiece of this program is a superconducting H- linac that will support world leading programs in long baseline neutrino experimentation and he study of rare processes. Based on technology shared with the International Linear Collider (ILC), Project X will provide multi-MW beams at 60-120 GeV from the Main Injector, simultaneous with very high intensity beams at lower energies. Project X will also support development of a Muon Collider as a uture facility at the energy frontier.

  20. The SANS facility at the Pitesti 14MW TRIGA reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ionita, I. [Institute for Nuclear Research (Romania)], E-mail: ionionita@lycos.com; Grabcev, B.; Todireanu, S. [National Institute of Materials Physics (NIMP) (Romania); Constantin, F. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (Romania); Shvetsov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Anghel, E. [Institute for Nuclear Research (Romania); Popescu, G. [National College Alexandru Odobescu (Romania); Mincu, M.; Datcu, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research (Romania)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The SANS facility existing at the Pitesti 14MW TRIGA reactor is presented. The main characteristics and the preliminary evaluation of the installation performances are given. A monochromatic neutron beam with 1.5 A {<=} {lambda} {<=} 5 A is produced by a mechanical velocity selector with helical slots. A fruitful partnership was established between INR Pitesti (Romania) and JINR Dubna (Russia). The first step in this cooperation consists in the manufacturing in Dubna of a battery of gas-filled positional detectors devoted to the SANS instrument.

  1. Property:Device Nameplate Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyoCoolingTowerWaterUseSummerConsumed Jump to:DOEInvolveDeploymentSector JumpMW)

  2. 5-MW Dynamometer Ground Breaking | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EERE Blog Posts of 2014ReviewsndSIMPLE WAYS TO USE4th U.S.-China5-MW

  3. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, first quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO{sub x} control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO{sub x} concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progess report presents the LNCFS Level III long-term data collected during this quarter. NO{sub x} emissions for each day of long-term testing are presented. The average NO{sub x} emission during long-term testing was 0.39 lb/MBtu at an average load of 155 MW. The effect of the low NO{sub x} combustion system on other combustion parameters such as carbon monoxide, excess oxygen level, and carbon carryover are also included.

  4. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company's Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO[sub x] combustion technologies on NO[sub x] emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO[sub x] reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO[sub x] control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO[sub x] concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progess report presents the LNCFS Level III long-term data collected during this quarter. NO[sub x] emissions for each day of long-term testing are presented. The average NO[sub x] emission during long-term testing was 0.39 lb/MBtu at an average load of 155 MW. The effect of the low NO[sub x] combustion system on other combustion parameters such as carbon monoxide, excess oxygen level, and carbon carryover are also included.

  5. Power Outages Update: Post-Tropical Cyclone Sandy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22,ReactorAbout Power > Financial Info

  6. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risks for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage. Main report and appendices, Volume 6, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T.D.; Kmetyk, L.N.; Whitehead, D.; Miller, L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Forester, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, J. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRAS) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Recent studies and operational experience have, however, implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. In response to this concern, in 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The program consists of two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (Surry) and Sandia National Laboratories (Grand Gulf). The program objectives include assessing the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and comparing the estimated risks with the risk associated with accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program is that of a Level-3 PRA. The subject of this report is the PRA of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Unit 1. The Grand Gulf plant utilizes a 3833 MWt BUR-6 boiling water reactor housed in a Mark III containment. The Grand Gulf plant is located near Port Gibson, Mississippi. The regime of shutdown analyzed in this study was plant operational state (POS) 5 during a refueling outage, which is approximately Cold Shutdown as defined by Grand Gulf Technical Specifications. The entire PRA of POS 5 is documented in a multi-volume NUREG report (NUREG/CR-6143). The internal events accident sequence analysis (Level 1) is documented in Volume 2. The Level 1 internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Vols 3 and 4, respectively.

  7. 2 MW upgrade of the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiren Chou

    2003-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In January 2002, the Fermilab Director initiated a design study for a high average power, modest energy proton facility. An intensity upgrade to Fermilab's 120-GeV Main Injector (MI) represents an attractive concept for such a facility, which would leverage existing beam lines and experimental areas and would greatly enhance physics opportunities at Fermilab and in the U.S. With a Proton Driver replacing the present Booster, the beam intensity of the MI is expected to be increased by a factor of five. Accompanied by a shorter cycle, the beam power would reach 2 MW. This would make the MI a more powerful machine than the SNS or the J-PARC. Moreover, the high beam energy (120 GeV) and tunable energy range (8-120 GeV) would make it a unique high power proton facility. The upgrade study has been completed and published. This paper gives a summary report.

  8. br Owner br Facility br Type br Capacity br MW br Commercial...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Magmatic Mendeleevskaya Geothermal Power Plant Ministry of Natural Resources of Russia Single Flash MW Mendeleevskaya Geothermal Area Kuril Kamchatka Arc Mindanao GEPP...

  9. Model Validation at the 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Poster for WindPower 2006 held June 4-7, 2006, in Pittsburgh, PA, describing model validation at the 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center.

  10. Ris-R-Report Multi-MW wind turbine power curve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-Report Multi-MW wind turbine power curve measurements using remote sensing instruments Wagner, Michael Courtney Title: Multi-MW wind turbine power curve measurements using remote sensing (max. 2000 char.): Power curve measurement for large wind turbines requires taking into account more

  11. Refinery Outages: Fall 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on Cokers Catalytic CrackersProduct:

  12. Navy Estimated Average Hourly Load Profile by Month (in MW)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohn Cyber Security NuclearNewNaturalOurNavillumNavy

  13. Experimental study of a 1.5-MW, 110-GHz gyrotron oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, James P. (James Paul), 1972-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis reports the design, construction and testing of a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz gyrotron oscillator. This high power microwave tube has been proposed as the next evolutionary step for gyrotrons used to provide electron ...

  14. Economics of a Conceptual 75 MW Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Electric...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caldera, a dormant volcanic complex in New Mexico, by connecting two wells with hydraulic fractures. Thermal power was generated at rates of up to 5 MW(t) and the reservoir...

  15. Ultra Clean 1.1 MW High Efficiency Natural Gas Engine Powered...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ultra Clean 1.1 MW High Efficiency Natural Gas Engine Powered CHP System Contract: DE-EE0004016 GE Energy, Dresser Inc. 102010 - 92014 Jim Zurlo, Principal Investigator...

  16. New two element steam turbine for 150 to 27 MW applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, H.F.; Vaccarro, F.R.; Conrad, J.D. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A modern high efficiency two element steam turbine for application in the 150 MW to 270 MW range is discussed. Innovations utilized and the experience base from which they are derived are presented. Benefits to the power producer resulting from this innovative approach are highlighted.They include reliability and efficiency improvement, delivery time reduction, and the application of design features, microprocessor control systems, and A. I. diagnostic techniques to reduce maintenance requirements, increase life, and enhance overall power plant productivity.

  17. EURISOL-DS MULTI-MW TARGET ISSUES: BEAM WINDOW AND TRANSVERSE FILM TARGET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adonai Herrera-Martínez, Yacine Kadi

    The analysis of the EURISOL-DS Multi_MW target precise geometry (Fig.1) has proved that large fission yields can be achieved with a 4 MW, providing a technically feasible design to evacuate the power deposited in the liquid mercury. Different designs for the mercury flow have been proposed, which maintain its temperature below the boiling point with moderate flow speeds (maximum 4 m/s).

  18. Development of a 2 MW CW Waterload for Electron Cyclotron Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Lawrence,Ives; Maxwell Mizuhara; George Collins; Jeffrey Neilson; Philipp Borchard

    2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. developed a load capable of continuously dissipating 2 MW of RF power from gyrotrons. The input uses HE11 corrugated waveguide and a rotating launcher to uniformly disperse the power over the lossy surfaces in the load. This builds on experience with a previous load designed to dissipate 1 MW of continuous RF power. The 2 MW load uses more advanced RF dispersion to double the capability in the same size device as the 1 MW load. The new load reduces reflected power from the load to significantly less than 1 %. This eliminates requirements for a preload to capture reflected power. The program updated control electronics that provides all required interlocks for operation and measurement of peak and average power. The program developed two version of the load. The initial version used primarily anodized aluminum to reduce weight and cost. The second version used copper and stainless steel to meet specifications for the ITER reactor currently under construction in France. Tests of the new load at the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency confirmed operation of the load to a power level of 1 MW, which is the highest power currently available for testing the load. Additional tests will be performed at General Atomics in spring 2013. The U.S. ITER organization will test the copper/stainless steel version of the load in December 2012 or early in 2013. Both loads are currently being marketed worldwide.

  19. Economic Development Impact of 1,000 MW of Wind Energy in Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reategui, S.; Hendrickson, S.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas has approximately 9,727 MW of wind energy capacity installed, making it a global leader in installed wind energy. As a result of the significant investment the wind industry has brought to Texas, it is important to better understand the economic development impacts of wind energy in Texas. This report analyzes the jobs and economic impacts of 1,000 MW of wind power generation in the state. The impacts highlighted in this report can be used in policy and planning decisions and can be scaled to get a sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other wind scenarios. This report can also inform stakeholders in other states about the potential economic impacts associated with the development of 1,000 MW of new wind power generation and the relationships of different elements in the state economy.

  20. Tucson Request for Proposal for 1-5 MW PV PPA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The mission of Tucson Water, a Department of the City of Tucson (the City), is to ensure that its customers receive high quality water and excellent service in a cost efficient, safe and environmentally responsible manner. In the interest of furthering Tucson Waters mission, the City is seeking a Contractor to finance, design, build, commission, own, operate and maintain up to a 1 megawatt (MW) DCSTC hotovoltaic (PV) system. The City also seeks an option for expanding the PV system up to a total of 5 MW DCSTC PV.

  1. U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, RL

    2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The ''U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries'' (NUREG/CR-6577, Supp. 2) report has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants during 2000-2001. Costs incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, which represent fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications, which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operations summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from operating reports submitted by the licensees, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) database for enforcement actions, and outage reports.

  2. Model Validation at the 204 MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we describe methods to derive and validate equivalent models for a large wind farm. FPL Energy's 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center, which is interconnected to the Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) transmission system, was used as a case study. The methods described are applicable to any large wind power plant.

  3. ME 303: Fluid Mechanics MW 10 AM-12 PM PHO 202

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xi

    ME 303: Fluid Mechanics MW 10 AM-12 PM PHO 202 Discussion Friday 12-1 PM PHO 211 Instructor: Dr@bu.edu Required Textbook/Coursewebsite: Munson, Young, Okiishi, Heubsch. Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, John.wiley.com/he-bcs/Books?action=index&itemId=0470262842&bcsId=4532 Supplemental Textbook Cenegal, Cimbala. Fluid Mechanics: Fundamentals and Applications

  4. ME 303: Fluid Mechanics MW 10 AM-12 PM PHO 202

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ME 303: Fluid Mechanics MW 10 AM-12 PM PHO 202 Discussion Friday 12-1 PM PHO 211 Instructor: Dr Textbook/Coursewebsite: Munson, Young, Okiishi, Heubsch. Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, John Wiley.wiley.com/he-bcs/Books?action=index&itemId=0470262842&bcsId=4532 Supplemental Textbook Cenegal, Cimbala. Fluid Mechanics: Fundamentals and Applications

  5. ME 303: Fluid Mechanics Lecture: MW 10 AM -12 PM PHO 202

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ME 303: Fluid Mechanics Lecture: MW 10 AM - 12 PM PHO 202 Discussion Section: F 12 ­ 1 PM PHO 202/Coursewebsite: Munson, Young, Okiishi, Heubsch. Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 6th ed. WileyPlus Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, http://edugen.wiley.com/edugen/class/cls204683/ Supplemental

  6. ME 303: Fluid Mechanics Lecture: MW 10 AM -12 PM PHO 202

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ME 303: Fluid Mechanics Lecture: MW 10 AM - 12 PM PHO 202 Discussion Section: F 12 ­ 1 PM PHO 202: Required Textbook/Coursewebsite: Munson, Young, Okiishi, Heubsch. Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, John.wiley.com/he-bcs/Books?action=index&itemId=0470262842&bcsId=4532 Supplemental Textbook Cenegal, Cimbala. Fluid Mechanics: Fundamentals and Applications

  7. An All Metal High Power Circularly Polarized 100 MW RF Load

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowkes, W.R.; Jongewaard, E.N.; Loewen, R.J.; Tantawi, S.G.; Vlieks, A.E.; /SLAC

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact RF load has been designed using a cascaded array of lossy radial RF chokes to dissipate 100 MW peak and 8 kW average power uniformly along the length of the load. Operation in the circularly polarized Te{_}11 mode assures uniform dissipation azimuthally as well.

  8. Management and Organizational Behavior Section 301-08 @ 2:00 3:15 MW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Paul Thomas

    MGMT 301 Management and Organizational Behavior Fall 2013 Section 301-08 @ 2:00 ­ 3:15 MW Beatty organizational goals by working with, and through, people and other resources. Organizations are treated factors. International as well as domestic situations are examined. Course Learning Objectives: 1

  9. EK 131/132 module: Introduction to Wind Energy MW 3-5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EK 131/132 module: Introduction to Wind Energy MW 3-5 Course. This course provides an overview of wind turbine technology and energy concepts. The question of whether wind. Students will measure personal energy use and analyze wind turbine data from the Museum of Science's wind

  10. Seismic reversal pattern for the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, MW 7.6 earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Seismic reversal pattern for the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, MW 7.6 earthquake Yih-Min Wu a , Chien the variations in seismicity patterns in the Taiwan region before and after the Chi-Chi earthquake. We have found that the areas with relatively high seismicity in the eastern Taiwan became abnormally quiet before the Chi

  11. Type II Transformation -Regeneration 2 Media -1 Liter Solution Substance []stock/MW Final Add ( )

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    Type II Transformation - Regeneration 2 Media - 1 Liter Solution Substance []stock/MW Final Add. bialaphos stock 10mg/ml 1mg/L 100ul/L Pour into 100x25mm Petri dishes in hood. 1L=30 plates. Dry plates lids

  12. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization for Glass-Fiber Epoxy-Matrix Composite 5 MW Horizontal-Axis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    -Axis Wind-Turbine Blades M. Grujicic, G. Arakere, B. Pandurangan, V. Sellappan, A. Vallejo, and M. Ozen optimization, fatigue-life assessment, horizon- tal axis wind turbine blades 1. Introduction The depletion for the development of cost-effective glass-fiber reinforced epoxy-matrix composite 5 MW horizontal-axis wind-turbine

  13. Climate Change and the Nuclear Wedge Climate change frames the issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the world's nuclear electricity capacity by 2055 The rate of installation required for a wedge from nuclear, it won't really impact Carbon Size (MW) 1350 50 100 80 50 California Energy Commission ­ June 2007 #12% by 2030", p, 96 #12;Issues with Wind: Variability Wind/solar resource inherently intermittent (mitigated

  14. Dose reduction at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baum, J.W.; Dionne, B.J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The collective dose equivalent at nuclear power plants increased from 1250 rem in 1969 to nearly 54,000 rem in 1980. This rise is attributable primarily to an increase in nuclear generated power from 1289 MW-y to 29,155 MW-y; and secondly, to increased average plant age. However, considerable variation in exposure occurs from plant to plant depending on plant type, refueling, maintenance, etc. In order to understand the factors influencing these differences, an investigation was initiated to study dose-reduction techniques and effectiveness of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) planning at light water plants. Objectives are to: identify high-dose maintenance tasks and related dose-reduction techniques; investigate utilization of high-reliability, low-maintenance equipment; recommend improved radioactive waste handling equipment and procedures; examine incentives for dose reduction; and compile an ALARA handbook.

  15. Active thrust faulting offshore Boumerdes, Algeria, and its relations to the 2003 Mw 6.9 earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Déverchère, Jacques

    Active thrust faulting offshore Boumerdes, Algeria, and its relations to the 2003 Mw 6.9 earthquake offshore Boumerdes, Algeria, and its relations to the 2003 Mw 6.9 earthquake, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L that strain is distributed over a broad area, from the Atlas front to the offshore margin [Buforn et al., 1995

  16. Perturbation of the Izmit earthquake aftershock decaying activity following the 1999 Mw 7.2 Duzce, Turkey, earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¨zce, Turkey, earthquake Guillaume Daniel,1 David Marsan,2 and Michel Bouchon1 Received 4 August 2005; revised patterns of seismicity in western Turkey, following the occurrence of the 12 November 1999 Mw 7.2 Du activity following the 1999 Mw 7.2 Du¨zce, Turkey, earthquake, J. Geophys. Res., 111, B05310, doi:10

  17. Seismic behavior in central Taiwan: Response to stress evolution following the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Seismic behavior in central Taiwan: Response to stress evolution following the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi of seismicity occurred in the Nantou region of central Taiwan. Among the seismic activities, eight Mw P 5 magnitudes took place from 1900 to 1998. Since the seismicity rate during the Chi-Chi postseismic period has

  18. Yolo County, California, made history in July when officials installed a 1 MW solar photovoltaic (PV) project to supply power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yolo County, California, made history in July when officials installed a 1 MW solar photovoltaic both buildings in Woodland, California, for the 1 MW ground-mounted solar PV system. Energy Analysis by examining the feasibility of installing a solar system, according to information provided by Ray Groom

  19. Economics of nuclear power in Finland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarjanne, Risto; Luostarinen, Kari [Lappeenranta University of Technology, Department of Energy and Environmental Technology, PO Box 20, FIN-53851 Lappeenranta (Finland)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear power generation fits perfectly with the long duration load profile of the Finnish power system. The good performance of the Finnish nuclear power has yielded benefits also to the consumers through its contribution to decreasing the electricity price. Furthermore, the introduction of nuclear power has resulted in a clear drop in carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation in the shift of 1970's and 1980's. In the year 2001 the four Finnish nuclear power units at Loviisa and Olkiluoto generated 22.8 TWh electricity, equivalent to 28 per cent of the total consumption. Loviisa power station has a net output capacity of 2 x 488 MW, and Olkiluoto 2 x 840 MW. The capacity factors of the four nuclear units have been above 90 per cent, which are among the highest in the world. The energy-intensive process industries in particular have strong belief in nuclear power. In November 2000, Teollisuuden Voima company (TVO) submitted to the Finnish Government an application for decision in principle concerning the construction of a new nuclear power plant unit. The arguments were among other things to guarantee for the Finnish industry the availability of cheap electric energy and to meet the future growth of electricity consumption in Finland. The carbon-free nuclear power also represents the most efficient means to meet the Greenhouse Gas abatement quota of Finland. Simultaneously, the energy policy of the Government includes intensive R and D and investment support for the renewable energy sources and energy conservation, and the objective is also to replace coal with natural gas as much as reasonably possible. The fifth nuclear unit would be located in one of the existing Finnish nuclear sites, i.e. Olkiluoto or Loviisa. The size of the new nuclear unit would be in the range of 1000 to 1600 MW electric. The ready infrastructure of the existing site could be utilised resulting in lower investment cost for the new unit. The Finnish Government accepted the application of TVO Company on January 17, 2002, but the final word will be said by the Parliament. During the spring 2002 there will be intensive discussion on all levels, whether nuclear power is for or against 'the total benefit of the society'. The Parliament decision is expected to be made by the summer 2002. In this paper, firstly a financial comparison of the new base-load power plant alternatives is carried out in the Finnish circumstances, and secondly the actual power production costs of the existing Olkiluoto nuclear power plant based on the operating history of about 20 years will be referred. (authors)

  20. A reactive contingency analysis algorithm using MW and MVAR distribution factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, D.G.; Maahs, L.J. (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland Interconnection, Norristown, PA (US))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an algorithm that can be used in analyzing reactive power flow contingencies. This approach uses MW distribution factors (DFAX) in conjunction with newly developed VAR distribution factors (RDFAX) to solve for the post-contingency bus voltage magnitude changes of an interconnecter EHV system. A prototype version of the algorithm described in this paper is presently being tested at the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland (PJM) interconnection office.

  1. Testing and Modeling of a 3-MW Wind Turbine Using Fully Coupled Simulation Codes (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCava, W.; Guo, Y.; Van Dam, J.; Bergua, R.; Casanovas, C.; Cugat, C.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This poster describes the NREL/Alstom Wind testing and model verification of the Alstom 3-MW wind turbine located at NREL's National Wind Technology Center. NREL,in collaboration with ALSTOM Wind, is studying a 3-MW wind turbine installed at the National Wind Technology Center(NWTC). The project analyzes the turbine design using a state-of-the-art simulation code validated with detailed test data. This poster describes the testing and the model validation effort, and provides conclusions about the performance of the unique drive train configuration used in this wind turbine. The 3-MW machine has been operating at the NWTC since March 2011, and drive train measurements will be collected through the spring of 2012. The NWTC testing site has particularly turbulent wind patterns that allow for the measurement of large transient loads and the resulting turbine response. This poster describes the 3-MW turbine test project, the instrumentation installed, and the load cases captured. The design of a reliable wind turbine drive train increasingly relies on the use of advanced simulation to predict structural responses in a varying wind field. This poster presents a fully coupled, aero-elastic and dynamic model of the wind turbine. It also shows the methodology used to validate the model, including the use of measured tower modes, model-to-model comparisons of the power curve, and mainshaft bending predictions for various load cases. The drivetrain is designed to only transmit torque to the gearbox, eliminating non-torque moments that are known to cause gear misalignment. Preliminary results show that the drivetrain is able to divert bending loads in extreme loading cases, and that a significantly smaller bending moment is induced on the mainshaft compared to a three-point mounting design.

  2. Ultra Clean 1.1MW High Efficiency Natural Gas Engine Powered System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zurlo, James; Lueck, Steve

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dresser, Inc. (GE Energy, Waukesha gas engines) will develop, test, demonstrate, and commercialize a 1.1 Megawatt (MW) natural gas fueled combined heat and power reciprocating engine powered package. This package will feature a total efficiency > 75% and ultra low CARB permitting emissions. Our modular design will cover the 1 – 6 MW size range, and this scalable technology can be used in both smaller and larger engine powered CHP packages. To further advance one of the key advantages of reciprocating engines, the engine, generator and CHP package will be optimized for low initial and operating costs. Dresser, Inc. will leverage the knowledge gained in the DOE - ARES program. Dresser, Inc. will work with commercial, regulatory, and government entities to help break down barriers to wider deployment of CHP. The outcome of this project will be a commercially successful 1.1 MW CHP package with high electrical and total efficiency that will significantly reduce emissions compared to the current central power plant paradigm. Principal objectives by phases for Budget Period 1 include: • Phase 1 – market study to determine optimum system performance, target first cost, lifecycle cost, and creation of a detailed product specification. • Phase 2 – Refinement of the Waukesha CHP system design concepts, identification of critical characteristics, initial evaluation of technical solutions, and risk mitigation plans. Background

  3. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian Joseph

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

  4. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Nonproliferation As more countries embrace nuclear power as a cost-effective and clean alternative to fossil fuels, the need exists to ensure that the nuclear fuel cycle is...

  5. Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety The Nuclear Engineering Division (NE) of Argonne National Laboratory is experienced in performing criticality safety and shielding evaluations for nuclear, and neutron spectra. The NE nuclear criticality safety (NCS) capabilities are based on a staff with decades

  6. US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

  7. Holocene versus modern catchment erosion rates at 300 MW Baspa II hydroelectric power plant (India, NW Himalaya)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bookhagen, Bodo

    Holocene versus modern catchment erosion rates at 300 MW Baspa II hydroelectric power plant (India private hydroelectric facility, located at the Baspa River which is an important left-hand tributary

  8. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, which will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay. Strong Los Alamos programs in nuclear data and nuclear theory supports...

  9. Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Energy Idaho National Laboratory is the Department of Energy's lead nuclear energy research and development facility. Building upon its legacy responsibilities,...

  10. Small spherical tokamaks for nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Y.K. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab, TN (United States); Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experimental tests have produced encouraging data concerning plasma properties in the spherical tokamak (ST), a tokamak configuration with the aspect ratio (R{sub 0}/a) significantly below two. Here R{sub 0} and a are the major and minor radii, respectively. Large gains in plasma performance and external field utilization are projected as R{sub 0}/a is reduced from the normal range (2.5 and higher) to 1.5 or less. This introduces the possibility for small, D-T fueled, driven, steady-state ST devices capable of producing a fusion neutron wall loading in the range of 0.5 to 2.0 MW/m{sup 2}. The cases with neutron wall loads in the range of 1 to 2 MW/m{sup 2} could serve as the fusion volume neutron source for testing full-function nuclear blankets of significant sizes (about 1 m by 1 m facing the plasma). Those in the range of 0.5 to 1 MW/m{sup 2} could serve as the fusion driver for transmutation of nuclear wastes. Important plasma physics, technology, and engineering issues in implementing such small fusion devices will be identified and discussed, together with the potential contributions by this line of research to reducing time and cost of fusion energy development.

  11. Global wind energy market report. Wind energy industry grows at steady pace, adds over 8,000 MW in 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cumulative global wind energy generating capacity topped 39,000 megawatts (MW) by the end of 2003. New equipment totally over 8,000 MW in capacity was installed worldwide during the year. The report, updated annually, provides information on the status of the wind energy market throughout the world and gives details on various regions. A listing of new and cumulative installed capacity by country and by region is included as an appendix.

  12. A new Main Injector radio frequency system for 2.3 MW Project X operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dey, J.; Kourbanis, I.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For Project X Fermilab Main Injector will be required to provide up to 2.3 MW to a neutrino production target at energies between 60 and 120 GeV. To accomplish the above power levels 3 times the current beam intensity will need to be accelerated. In addition the injection energy of Main Injector will need to be as low as 6 GeV. The current 30 year old Main Injector radio frequency system will not be able to provide the required power and a new system will be required. The specifications of the new system will be described.

  13. Fluidized bed combustor 50 MW thermal power plant, Krabi, Thailand. Feasibility study. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents the results of a study prepared by Burns and Roe for the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand to examine the technical feasibility and economic attractiveness for building a 50 MW Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion lignite fired power plant at Krabi, southern Thailand. The study is divided into seven main sections, plus an executive summary and appendices: (1) Introduction; (2) Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion Technology Overview; (3) Fuel and Limestone Tests; (4) Site Evaluation; (5) Station Design and Arrangements; (6) Environmental Considerations; (7) Economic Analysis.

  14. Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Colonna

    2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights on the recent research activity, carried out by the Italian Community involved in the "Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics" field, will be presented.

  15. Fusion Nuclear Science Pathways Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Kessel, et. al.

    2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    With the strong commitment of the US to the success of the ITER burning plasma mission, and the project overall, it is prudent to consider how to take the most advantage of this investment. The production of energy from fusion has been a long sought goal, and the subject of several programmatic investigations and time line proposals [1]. The nuclear aspects of fusion research have largely been avoided experimentally for practical reasons, resulting in a strong emphasis on plasma science. Meanwhile, ITER has brought into focus how the interface between the plasma and engineering/technology, presents the most challenging problems for design. In fact, this situation is becoming the rule and no longer the exception. ITER will demonstrate the deposition of 0.5 GW of neutron heating to the blanket, deliver a heat load of 10-20 MW/m2 or more on the divertor, inject 50-100 MW of heating power to the plasma, all at the expected size scale of a power plant. However, in spite of this, and a number of other technologies relevant power plant, ITER will provide a low neutron exposure compared to the levels expected to a fusion power plant, and will purchase its tritium entirely from world reserves accumulated from decades of CANDU reactor operations. Such a decision for ITER is technically well founded, allowing the use of conventional materials and water coolant, avoiding the thick tritium breeding blankets required for tritium self-sufficiency, and allowing the concentration on burning plasma and plasma-engineering interface issues. The neutron fluence experienced in ITER over its entire lifetime will be ~ 0.3 MW-yr/m2, while a fusion power plant is expected to experience 120-180 MW-yr/m2 over its lifetime. ITER utilizes shielding blanket modules, with no tritium breeding, except in test blanket modules (TBM) located in 3 ports on the midplane [2], which will provide early tests of the fusion nuclear environment with very low tritium production (a few g per year).

  16. Progress towards a 200 MW electron beam accelerator for the RDHWT/Mariah II Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Reed, Kim Warren; Pena, Gary Edward; Schneider, Larry X.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Glover, Steven Frank

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radiatively Driven Hypersonic Wind Tunnel (RDHWT) program requires an unprecedented 2-3 MeV electron beam energy source at an average beam power of approximately 200MW. This system injects energy downstream of a conventional supersonic air nozzle to minimize plenum temperature requirements for duplicating flight conditions above Mach 8 for long run-times. Direct-current electron accelerator technology is being developed to meet the objectives of a radiatively driven Mach 12 wind tunnel with a free stream dynamic pressure q=2000 psf. Due to the nature of research and industrial applications, there has never been a requirement for a single accelerator module with an output power exceeding approximately 500 kW. Although a 200MW module is a two-order of magnitude extrapolation from demonstrated power levels, the scaling of accelerator components to this level appears feasible. Accelerator system concepts are rapidly maturing and a clear technology development path has been established. Additionally, energy addition experiments have been conducted up to 800 kW into a supersonic airflow. This paper will discuss progress in the development of electron beam accelerator technology as an energy addition source for the RDHWT program and results of electron beam energy addition experiments conducted at Sandia National Laboratories.

  17. Internal Technical Report, Safety Analysis Report 5 MW(e) Raft River Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, E.S.; Homer, G.B.; Spencer, S.G.; Shaber, C.R.

    1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Raft River Geothermal Site is located in Southern Idaho's Raft River Valley, southwest of Malta, Idaho, in Cassia County. EG and G idaho, Inc., is the DOE's prime contractor for development of the Raft River geothermal field. Contract work has been progressing for several years towards creating a fully integrated utilization of geothermal water. Developmental progress has resulted in the drilling of seven major DOE wells. Four are producing geothermal water from reservoir temperatures measured to approximately 149 C (approximately 300 F). Closed-in well head pressures range from 69 to 102 kPa (100 to 175 psi). Two wells are scheduled for geothermal cold 60 C (140 F) water reinjection. The prime development effort is for a power plant designed to generate electricity using the heat from the geothermal hot water. The plant is designated as the ''5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant'' project. General site management assigned to EG and G has resulted in planning and development of many parts of the 5 MW program. Support and development activities have included: (1) engineering design, procurement, and construction support; (2) fluid supply and injection facilities, their study, and control; (3) development and installation of transfer piping systems for geothermal water collection and disposal by injection; and (4) heat exchanger fouling tests.

  18. Response of the Los Azufres Geothermal Field to Four Years of 25 MW Wellhead Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, P.; Ortiz, J.; Miranda, G.; Gallardo, M.

    1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Production and chemical data have been compiled and analyzed on a six-month averaged basis for the first four years of electric energy generation with five 5-MW wellhead generators at the Los Azufres geothermal field. The data were evaluated with respect to the extent of observable thermal drawdown of the reservoir from 25 MW of generation in relation to the estimated capacity of the field of several hundred megawatts of power. The analysis updates the previous one compiled after the first two years of continuous production, at which time the results indicated that differences in reservoir temperature estimated from geochemical thermometers and wellhead production data were not statistically significant based on the number of data and the standard deviations. Analysis of the data after four years of operation were made for the larger number of data and smaller standard deviations. The results review the adequacy of the sampling frequency and the reliability of the measurements from statistical t-Test of the means of the first and second two-year periods. 3 figs., 5 tabs., 20 refs.

  19. Initial operating experience of the 12-MW La Ola photovoltaic system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, Abraham; Lenox, Carl (SunPower Corporation, Richmond, CA); Johnson, Jay; Quiroz, Jimmy Edward; Schenkman, Benjamin L.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1.2-MW La Ola photovoltaic (PV) power plant in Lanai, Hawaii, has been in operation since December 2009. The host system is a small island microgrid with peak load of 5 MW. Simulations conducted as part of the interconnection study concluded that unmitigated PV output ramps had the potential to negatively affect system frequency. Based on that study, the PV system was initially allowed to operate with output power limited to 50% of nameplate to reduce the potential for frequency instability due to PV variability. Based on the analysis of historical voltage, frequency, and power output data at 50% output level, the PV system has not significantly affected grid performance. However, it should be noted that the impact of PV variability on active and reactive power output of the nearby diesel generators was not evaluated. In summer 2011, an energy storage system was installed to counteract high ramp rates and allow the PV system to operate at rated output. The energy storage system was not fully operational at the time this report was written; therefore, analysis results do not address system performance with the battery system in place.

  20. Internal Technical Report, Safety Analysis Report 5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, E.S.; Homer, G.B.; Shaber, C.R.; Thurow, T.L.

    1981-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Raft River Geothermal Site is located in Southern Idaho's Raft River Valley, southwest of Malta, Idaho, in Cassia County. EG and G idaho, Inc., is the DOE's prime contractor for development of the Raft River geothermal field. Contract work has been progressing for several years towards creating a fully integrated utilization of geothermal water. Developmental progress has resulted in the drilling of seven major DOE wells. Four are producing geothermal water from reservoir temperatures measured to approximately 149 C (approximately 300 F). Closed-in well head pressures range from 69 to 102 kPa (100 to 175 psi). Two wells are scheduled for geothermal cold 60 C (140 F) water reinjection. The prime development effort is for a power plant designed to generate electricity using the heat from the geothermal hot water. The plant is designated as the ''5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant'' project. General site management assigned to EG and G has resulted in planning and development of many parts of the 5 MW program. Support and development activities have included: (1) engineering design, procurement, and construction support; (2) fluid supply and injection facilities, their study, and control; (3) development and installation of transfer piping systems for geothermal water collection and disposal by injection; and (4) heat exchanger fouling tests.

  1. Refinery Outages: First Half 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data 2010Feet) Year JanInformation&Analysis

  2. Refinery Outages: First Half 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on Cokers Catalytic CrackersProduct:First

  3. outages | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flatshydro Home Water Home Jweers's pictureoutages Home

  4. OpenEI Community - outages

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/Geothermal < Oklahomast, 2012CoastfredResult

  5. Accelerator Driven Nuclear Energy - The Thorium Option

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajendran Raja

    2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional nuclear reactors use enriched Uranium as fuel and produce nuclear waste which needs to be stored away for over 10,000 years.   At the current rate of use, existing sources of Uranium will last for 50-100 years.  We describe a solution to the problem that uses particle accelerators to produce fast neutrons that can be used to burn existing nuclear waste and produce energy.  Such systems, initially proposed by Carlo Rubbia and collaborators in the 1990's, are being seriously considered by many countries as a possible solution to the green energy problem.  Accelerator driven reactors operate in a sub-critical regime and, thus, are safer and can obtain energy from plentiful elements such as Thorium-232 and Uranium-238. What is missing is the high intensity (10MW) accelerator that produces 1 GeV protons. We will describe scenarios which if implemented will make such systems a reality.  

  6. Accelerator Driven Nuclear Energy - The Thorium Option

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rajendran Raja

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional nuclear reactors use enriched Uranium as fuel and produce nuclear waste which needs to be stored away for over 10,000 years.   At the current rate of use, existing sources of Uranium will last for 50-100 years.  We describe a solution to the problem that uses particle accelerators to produce fast neutrons that can be used to burn existing nuclear waste and produce energy.  Such systems, initially proposed by Carlo Rubbia and collaborators in the 1990's, are being seriously considered by many countries as a possible solution to the green energy problem.  Accelerator driven reactors operate in a sub-critical regime and, thus, are safer and can obtain energy from plentiful elements such as Thorium-232 and Uranium-238. What is missing is the high intensity (10MW) accelerator that produces 1 GeV protons. We will describe scenarios which if implemented will make such systems a reality.  

  7. 150-MW S-band klystron program at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Phillips, R.M.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two S-Band klystrons operating at 150 MW have been designed, fabricated and tested at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) during the past two years for use in an experimental accelerator at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg, Germany. Both klystrons operate at the design power, 60 Hz repetition rate, 3 {micro}s pulsewidth, with an efficiency {gt} 40%, and agreement between the experimental results and simulations is excellent. The 535 kV, 700 A electron gun was tested by constructing a solenoidal focused beam stick which identified a source of oscillation, subsequently engineered out of the klystron guns. Design of the beam stick and the two klystrons is discussed, along with observation and suppression of spurious oscillations. Differences in design and the resulting performance of the Klystrons is emphasized.

  8. Small-angle scattering instruments on a 1 MW long pulse spallation source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olah, G.A.; Hjelm, R.P.; Seeger, P.A.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two small-angle neutron scattering instruments have been designed and optimized for installation at a 1 MW long pulse spallation source. The first of these instruments allows access to length scales in materials from 10 to 400 {angstrom}, and the second instrument from 40 to 1200 {angstrom}. Design characteristics were determined and optimization was done using the MCLIB Monte Carlo instrument simulation package. The code has been {open_quote}benchmarked{close_quote} by simulating the {open_quote}as-built{close_quote} D11 spectrometer at ILL and a performance comparison of the three instruments was made. Comparisons were made by evaluating the scattered intensity for {delta} scatterers at different Q values for various instrument configurations needed to span a Q-range of 0.0007 - 0.44 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1}.

  9. Investigation of the part-load performance of two 1. 12 MW regenerative marine gas turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korakianitis, T.; Beier, K.J. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regenerative and intercooled-regenerative gas turbine engines with low pressure ratio have significant efficiency advantages over traditional aero-derivative engines of higher pressure ratios, and can compete with modern diesel engines for marine propulsion. Their performance is extremely sensitive to thermodynamic-cycle parameter choices and the type of components. The performance of two 1.12 MW (1,500 hp) regenerative gas turbines are predicted with computer simulations. One engine has a single-shaft configuration, and the other has a gas-generator/power-turbine combination. The latter arrangement is essential for wide off-design operating regime. The performance of each engine driving fixed-pitch and controllable-pitch propellers, or an AC electric bus (for electric-motor-driven propellers) is investigated. For commercial applications the controllable-pitch propeller may have efficiency advantages (depending on engine type and shaft arrangements). For military applications the electric drive provides better operational flexibility.

  10. Definition of a 5MW/61.5m wind turbine blade reference model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resor, Brian Ray

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A basic structural concept of the blade design that is associated with the frequently utilized %E2%80%9CNREL offshore 5-MW baseline wind turbine%E2%80%9D is needed for studies involving blade structural design and blade structural design tools. The blade structural design documented in this report represents a concept that meets basic design criteria set forth by IEC standards for the onshore turbine. The design documented in this report is not a fully vetted blade design which is ready for manufacture. The intent of the structural concept described by this report is to provide a good starting point for more detailed and targeted investigations such as blade design optimization, blade design tool verification, blade materials and structures investigations, and blade design standards evaluation. This report documents the information used to create the current model as well as the analyses used to verify that the blade structural performance meets reasonable blade design criteria.

  11. Final Report, Validation of Novel Planar Cell Design for MW-Scale SOFC Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swartz, Dr Scott L.; Thrun, Dr Lora B.; Arkenberg, Mr Gene B.; Chenault, Ms Kellie M.

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the work completed by NexTech Materials, Ltd. during a three-year project to validate an electrolyte-supported planar solid oxide fuel cell design, termed the FlexCell, for coal-based, megawatt-scale power generation systems. This project was focused on the fabrication and testing of electrolyte-supported FlexCells with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the electrolyte material. YSZ based FlexCells were made with sizes ranging from 100 to 500 cm2. Single-cell testing was performed to confirm high electrochemical performance, both with diluted hydrogen and simulated coal gas as fuels. Finite element analysis modeling was performed at The Ohio State University was performed to establish FlexCell architectures with optimum mechanical robustness. A manufacturing cost analysis was completed, which confirmed that manufacturing costs of less than $50/kW are achievable at high volumes (500 MW/year).

  12. Validation of Novel Planar Cell Design for MW-Scale SOFC Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Swartz; Lora Thrun; Gene Arkenberg; Kellie Chenault

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the work completed by NexTech Materials, Ltd. during a three-year project to validate an electrolyte-supported planar solid oxide fuel cell design, termed the FlexCell, for coal-based, megawatt-scale power generation systems. This project was focused on the fabrication and testing of electrolyte-supported FlexCells with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the electrolyte material. YSZ based FlexCells were made with sizes ranging from 100 to 500 cm{sup 2}. Single-cell testing was performed to confirm high electrochemical performance, both with diluted hydrogen and simulated coal gas as fuels. Finite element analysis modeling was performed at The Ohio State University was performed to establish FlexCell architectures with optimum mechanical robustness. A manufacturing cost analysis was completed, which confirmed that manufacturing costs of less than $50/kW are achievable at high volumes (500 MW/year). DISCLAIMER

  13. Mineralogical study of borehole MW-206 Asarco smelter site, Tacoma, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, D.

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mobility of metals in ground water is an important consideration for evaluating remedial options at the Asarco smelter site. Tacoma, Washington. One factor in assessing metal mobility is the degree of secondary mineralization in a slag-fill aquifer extending into the intertidal zone along the Puget Sound shoreline. Samples of aquifer material were collected for mineralogical analysis from borehole MW-206 at five-foot intervals within the slag fill from 5 to 25 feet below the ground surface, and in the underlying marine sand and gravel at 27 feet. Grab samples of slag fragments with visually apparent secondary minerals were also collected at five intermediate depths between 12 and 19 feet. Samples were analyzed by a variety of techniques including hydride generation/atomic absorption for arsenic concentration, scanning electron microscopy/electron microprobe for mineralogical texture and microanalysis, powder x-ray diffraction for mineral identification, and optical microscopy for textural observations.

  14. High-power targets: experience and R&D for 2 MW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurh, P.; /Fermilab; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Loveridge, P.; /Rutherford; Simos, N.; /Brookhaven

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-power particle production targets are crucial elements of future neutrino and other rare particle beams. Fermilab plans to produce a beam of neutrinos (LBNE) with a 2.3 MW proton beam (Project X). Any solid target is unlikely to survive for an extended period in such an environment - many materials would not survive a single beam pulse. We are using our experience with previous neutrino and antiproton production targets, along with a new series of R&D tests, to design a target that has adequate survivability for this beamline. The issues considered are thermal shock (stress waves), heat removal, radiation damage, radiation accelerated corrosion effects, physics/geometry optimization and residual radiation.

  15. A miniaturized mW thermoelectric generator for nw objectives: continuous, autonomous, reliable power for decades.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aselage, Terrence Lee; Siegal, Michael P.; Whalen, Scott; Frederick, Scott K.; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Moorman, Matthew Wallace

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have built and tested a miniaturized, thermoelectric power source that can provide in excess of 450 {micro}W of power in a system size of 4.3cc, for a power density of 107 {micro}W/cc, which is denser than any system of this size previously reported. The system operates on 150mW of thermal input, which for this system was simulated with a resistive heater, but in application would be provided by a 0.4g source of {sup 238}Pu located at the center of the device. Output power from this device, while optimized for efficiency, was not optimized for form of the power output, and so the maximum power was delivered at only 41mV. An upconverter to 2.7V was developed concurrently with the power source to bring the voltage up to a usable level for microelectronics.

  16. A Pion Production and Capture System for a 4 MW Target Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, X.; Kirk, H.; Berg, J.S.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of a pion production and capture system for a 4 MW target station for a neutrino factory or muon collider is presented. Using the MARS code, we simulate the pion production produced by the interaction of a free liquid mercury jet with an intense proton beam. We study the variation of meson production with the direction of the proton beam relative to the target. We also examine the influence on the meson production by the focusing of the proton beam. The energy deposition in the capture system is determined and the shielding required in order to avoid radiation damage is discussed. The exploration for the multiple proton beam entry directions relative to mercury jet in the 8GeV proton beam case demonstrates that an asymmetric layout is required in order to achieve the same beam/jet crossing angle at the jet axis. We find a correlation between the distance of beam relative to the jet and the meson production. The peak meson production is 8% higher than for the lowest case. The examination of the influence on the meson production by the focusing of the proton beam shows the meson production loss is negligible (<1%) for a beta function to be 0.3m or higher for the proton beam. By investigating the energy deposition in the target/capture system, we see that the bulk of 4-MW proton beam power is deposited in the water cooled tungsten-carbide (WC) shielding, the mercury jet and the capture beam pipe. In addition, high power deposition in the first superconducting coil causes an issue for its operation and life time. Enhanced shielding is necessary to lower the radiation damage.

  17. Conceptual Design of a 50--100 MW Electron Beam Accelerator System for the National Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCHNEIDER,LARRY X.

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Hypersonic Wind Tunnel program requires an unprecedented electron beam source capable of 1--2 MeV at a beam power level of 50--100 MW. Direct-current electron accelerator technology can readily generate high average power beams to approximately 5 MeV at output efficiencies greater than 90%. However, due to the nature of research and industrial applications, there has never been a requirement for a single module with an output power exceeding approximately 500 kW. Although a 50--100 MW module is a two-order extrapolation from demonstrated power levels, the scaling of accelerator components appears reasonable. This paper presents an evaluation of component and system issues involved in the design of a 50--100 MW electron beam accelerator system with precision beam transport into a high pressure flowing air environment.

  18. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Cooper

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cooper" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  19. Missouri Nuclear Profile - Callaway

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Callaway" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  20. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Fermi

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fermi" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  1. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Sequoyah

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sequoyah" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License Expiration Date"...

  2. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Limerick

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Limerick" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  3. Virginia Nuclear Profile - Surry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Surry" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  4. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Kewaunee

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kewaunee" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer cpacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  5. Ohio Nuclear Profile - Perry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Perry" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  6. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Palisades

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Palisades" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  7. Nuclear Engineer (Nuclear Safety Specialist)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate of this position will serve as a Nuclear Engineer (Nuclear Safety Specialist) responsible for day-to-day technical monitoring, and evaluation of aspects of authorization...

  8. Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    or ash heap, the cost of the gas out of the stack, toxificaiton of the lakes and streams, plant decommision costs. For nuclear yiou are talking about managing the waste in...

  9. Online Sensor Calibration Assessment in Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hashemian, Hash

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safe, efficient, and economic operation of nuclear systems (nuclear power plants, fuel fabrication and storage, used fuel processing, etc.) relies on transmission of accurate and reliable measurements. During operation, sensors degrade due to age, environmental exposure, and maintenance interventions. Sensor degradation can affect the measured and transmitted signals, including sensor failure, signal drift, sensor response time, etc. Currently, periodic sensor recalibration is performed to avoid these problems. Sensor recalibration activities include both calibration assessment and adjustment (if necessary). In nuclear power plants, periodic recalibration of safety-related sensors is required by the plant technical specifications. Recalibration typically occurs during refueling outages (about every 18 to 24 months). Non-safety-related sensors also undergo recalibration, though not as frequently. However, this approach to maintaining sensor calibration and performance is time-consuming and expensive, leading to unnecessary maintenance, increased radiation exposure to maintenance personnel, and potential damage to sensors. Online monitoring (OLM) of sensor performance is a non-invasive approach to assess instrument calibration. OLM can mitigate many of the limitations of the current periodic recalibration practice by providing more frequent assessment of calibration and identifying those sensors that are operating outside of calibration tolerance limits without removing sensors or interrupting operation. This can support extended operating intervals for unfaulted sensors and target recalibration efforts to only degraded sensors.

  10. Feasible experimental study on the utilization of a 300 MW CFB boiler desulfurizating bottom ash for construction applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, X.F.; Amano, R.S. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    CFB boiler ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. The disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed boiler power plants. However for a 300 MW CFB boiler power plant, there will be 600,000 tons of ash discharged per year and will result in great volumes and disposal cost of ash byproduct. It was very necessary to solve the utilization of CFB ash and to decrease the disposal cost of CFB ash. The feasible experimental study results on the utilization of the bottom ashes of a 300 MW CFB boiler in Baima power plant in China were reported in this paper. The bottom ashes used for test came from the discharged bottom ashes in a 100 MW CFB boiler in which the anthracite and limestone designed for the 300 MW CFB project was burned. The results of this study showed that the bottom ash could be used for cementitious material, road concrete, and road base material. The masonry cements, road concrete with 30 MPa compressive strength and 4.0 MPa flexural strength, and the road base material used for base courses of the expressway, the main road and the minor lane were all prepared with milled CFB bottom ashes in the lab. The better methods of utilization of the bottom ashes were discussed in this paper.

  11. A 180mW InP HBT Power Amplifier MMIC at 214 GHz Thomas B. Reed1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    -- A solid state power amplifer MMIC is demonstrated with 180mW of saturated output power at 214GHz, from, MMICs, Power amplifier, Solid State Power Amplifier (SSPA). I. INTRODUCTION Active interest in increasing the saturated output power of solid-state power amplifiers has continued due to growing interest

  12. The role of inert gas in MW-enhanced plasmas for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    in polycrystalline diamond film CVD [3,4]. While the mechanical, thermal and acoustic properties of MCD films haveThe role of inert gas in MW-enhanced plasmas for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond thin diamond Nanocrystalline Inert gas Growth Nanocrystalline diamond thin films have been deposited using

  13. ATS 680 A6: Applied Numerical Weather Prediction MW, 1:00-1:50 PM, ACRC Room 212B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    experiments using a state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction model · Discuss the strengths and weaknesses, Parameterization Schemes: Keys to Understanding Numerical Weather Prediction Models, Cambridge University PressATS 680 A6: Applied Numerical Weather Prediction Fall 2013 MW, 1:00-1:50 PM, ACRC Room 212B Course

  14. Compression Losses In Cryocoolers J.S. Reed, G. Davey, M.W. Dadd and P.B. Bailey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of these losses is related to the irreversible compression of gas in the cylinder, and the magnitude of this loss1 Compression Losses In Cryocoolers J.S. Reed, G. Davey, M.W. Dadd and P.B. Bailey Department and conditions this 'lumped' loss varies with operating frequency, swept volume and pressure swing, suggesting

  15. The lower hybrid (LH) heating and current drive system can generate 10-12 MW of microwave power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Background The lower hybrid (LH) heating and current drive system can generate 10-12 MW reflecting optics · Remote vacuum window manufactured by CCFE · Industrial contract for periscope manufacture with Zemax model · Remote, IR compatible, double vacuum window with pumped interspace · 4, two colour

  16. Gas Spring Losses in Linear Clearance Seal Compressors P.B. Bailey, M.W. Dadd, J.S. Reed*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with a clearance seal linear compressor attached to a plain gas spring volume. The static flow through1 Gas Spring Losses in Linear Clearance Seal Compressors P.B. Bailey, M.W. Dadd, J.S. Reed* , C A fundamental loss mechanism in cryocoolers is associated with compression and expansion processes

  17. NYPA, Entergy begin nuclear management services plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The New York Power Authority (NYPA) and Entergy Corp. of New Orleans, La., announced recently the signing of a memorandum of understanding as a step toward a contract for Entergy to provide management services to NYPA`s two nuclear power plants. The agreement is the first of its kind. NYPA is the nation`s largest state-owned electric utility and supplier of one-quarter of New York`s electricity. Its nuclear plants are Indian Point 3 (IP3) in Buchanan, Westchester County, and James A. FitzPatrick in Scriba, Oswego County. Entergy is a utility holding company and its subsidiary, Entergy Operations Inc., is widely recognized as one of the leading nuclear operators in the United States. {open_quotes}NYPA`s nuclear plants are assets that belong to the people of New York,{close_quotes} said C.D. {open_quotes}Rapp{close_quotes} Rappleyea, NYPA`s chairman and CEO. {open_quotes}Our alliance with Entergy can provide the people of this state with added assurance that these plants will operate with the highest level of safety and efficiency.{close_quotes} FitzPatrick, an 800 MW boiling water reactor, has operated since 1975 and IP3, a 980 MW pressurized water reactor, since 1976. Although both are currently running well, they have had problems in recent years, and IP3 is on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) list of plants requiring increased regulatory attention. Entergy operated both types of reactors, has three single-unit sites like NYPA`s and is experienced in operating plants for different utility owners.

  18. A Review of Sensor Calibration Monitoring for Calibration Interval Extension in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Hashemian, Hash; Shumaker, Brent; Cummins, Dara

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently in the United States, periodic sensor recalibration is required for all safety-related sensors, typically occurring at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration in some plants. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors that require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors that need it. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in United Kingdom, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. This issue is expected to also be important as the United States looks to the next generation of reactor designs (such as small modular reactors and advanced concepts), given the anticipated longer refueling cycles, proposed advanced sensors, and digital instrumentation and control systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no U.S. plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This report presents a state-of-the-art assessment of online calibration monitoring in the nuclear power industry, including sensors, calibration practice, and online monitoring algorithms. This assessment identifies key research needs and gaps that prohibit integration of the NRC-approved online calibration monitoring system in the U.S. nuclear industry. Several needs are identified, including the quantification of uncertainty in online calibration assessment; accurate determination of calibration acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and assessment of the feasibility of using virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors in order to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity. Understanding the degradation of sensors and the impact of this degradation on signals is key to developing technical basis to support acceptance criteria and set point decisions, particularly for advanced sensors which do not yet have a cumulative history of operating performance.

  19. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events for Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage. Volume 2, Part 3: Internal Events Appendices I and J

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yakle, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Darby, J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whitehead, D.; Staple, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides supporting documentation for various tasks associated with the performance of the probablistic risk assessment for Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage at Grand Gulf, Unit 1 as documented in Volume 2, Part 1 of NUREG/CR-6143.

  20. Nuclear Counterterrorism

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order defines requirements for the protection of sensitive improvised nuclear device information and provides a framework to support DOE activities related to nuclear counterterrorism. (A supplemental DOE Manual, Control of and Access to Improvised Nuclear Device Information, provides requirements and procedures for protecting Sigma 20 information.) Appendices A and B are Official Use Only. Point of contact is Adam Boyd (NA-82), 202-586-0010. Cancels DOE O 457.1 and DOE M 457.1-1.

  1. Design and analysis of a 5-MW vertical-fluted-tube condenser for geothermal applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Llewellyn, G.H.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and analysis of an industtial-sized vertical-fluted-tube condenser. The condenser is used to condense superheated isobutane vapor discharged from a power turbine in a geothermal test facility operated for the US Department of Energy. The 5-MW condenser has 1150 coolant tubes in a four-pass configuration with a total heat transfer area of 725 m/sup 2/ (7800 ft/sup 2/). The unit is being tested at the Geothermal Components Test Facility in the Imperial Valley of East Mesa, California. The condenser design is based on previous experimental research work done at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on condensing refrigerants on a wide variety of single vertical tubes. Condensing film coefficients obtained on the high-performance vertical fluted tubes in condensing refrigerants are as much as seven times greater than those obtained with vertical smooth tubes that have the same diameter and length. The overall heat transfer performance expected from the fluted tube condenser is four to five times the heat transfer obtained from the identical units employing smooth tubes. Fluted tube condensers also have other direct applications in the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) program in condensing ammonia, in the petroleum industry in condensing light hydrocarbons, and in the air conditioning and refrigeration industry in condensing fluorocarbon vapors.

  2. Control system for 5 MW neutral beam ion source for SST1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, G.B.; Onali, Raja; Sharma, Vivek; Suresh, S.; Tripathi, V.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Singh, N.P.; Thakkar, Dipal; Gupta, L.N.; Singh, M.J.; Patel, P.J.; Chakraborty, A.K.; Baruah, U.K.; Mattoo, S.K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat, India-382428 (India)

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the control system for a 5 MW ion source of the NBI (neutral beam injector) for steady-state superconducting tokamak-1 (SST-1). The system uses both hardware and software solutions. It comprises a DAS (data acquisition system) and a control system. The DAS is used to read the voltage and current signals from eight filament heater power supplies and 24 discharge power supplies. The control system is used to adjust the filament heater current in order to achieve an effective control on the discharge current in the plasma box. The system consists of a VME (Verse Module Eurocard) system and C application program running on a VxWorks{sup TM} real-time operating system. A PID (proportional, integral, and differential) algorithm is used to control the filament heater current. Experiments using this system have shown that the discharge current can be controlled within 1% accuracy for a PID loop time of 20 ms. Response of the control system to the pressure variation of the gas in the chamber has also been studied and compared with the results obtained from those of an uncontrolled system. The present approach increases the flexibility of the control system. It not only eases the control of the plasma but also allows an easy changeover to various operation scenarios.

  3. Modelling of NO{sub x} reduction strategies applied to 350 MW(e) utility boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visona, S.P.; Singh, B. [AUSTA Electric, Brisbane (Australia); Stanmore, B.R. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Brisbane (Australia)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational fluid dynamics model has been combined with a NO{sub x} chemistry post-processor to predict the formation and destruction of nitric oxide in three-dimensional furnaces burning pulverized fuel. The model considers the complex interaction of turbulent flow, heat transfer, combustion, and NO{sub x} reaction chemistry. Lagrangian particle dynamics are used to track burning pulverized coal particles through the computational cells. Fuel nitrogen is released in proportion to the burnout of the particle. A range of combustion NO{sub x} reduction strategies has been applied to two 350 MW(e) utility boilers burning different coals. A medium volatile bituminous coal is fired using low NO{sub x} burners in one furnace and a sub-bituminous coal is burnt using conventional swirl burners in a different furnace. The strategies include: burner out of service, overfire air, reduction in excess air, change in particle size, and fuel reburn. In general NO{sub x} predictions are better for the sub-bituminous coal than for the medium volatile bituminous coal. Typical NO{sub x} prediction errors are {+-} 10 percent.

  4. System Modeling of ORNL s 20 MW(t) Wood-fired Gasifying Boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Wiggins, Gavin [ORNL; Hao, Ye [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of the new 20 MW(t) wood-fired steam plant currently under construction by Johnson Controls, Inc. at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. The new plant will utilize a low-temperature air-blown gasifier system developed by the Nexterra Systems Corporation to generate low-heating value syngas (producer gas), which will then be burned in a staged combustion chamber to produce heat for the boiler. This is considered a showcase project for demonstrating the benefits of clean, bio-based energy, and thus there is considerable interest in monitoring and modeling the energy efficiency and environmental footprint of this technology relative to conventional steam generation with petroleum-based fuels. In preparation for system startup in 2012, we are developing steady-state and dynamic models of the major process components, including the gasifiers and combustor. These tools are intended to assist in tracking and optimizing system performance and for carrying out future conceptual studies of process changes that might improve the overall energy efficiency and sustainability. In this paper we describe the status of our steady-state gasifier and combustor models and illustrate preliminary results from limited parametric studies.

  5. HFIR Vessel Maximum Permissible Pressures for Operating Period 26 to 50 EFPY (100 MW)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Inger, J.R.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extending the life of the HFIR pressure vessel from 26 to 50 EFPY (100 MW) requires an updated calculation of the maximum permissible pressure for a range in vessel operating temperatures (40-120 F). The maximum permissible pressure is calculated using the equal-potential method, which takes advantage of knowledge gained from periodic hydrostatic proof tests and uses the test conditions (pressure, temperature, and frequency) as input. The maximum permissible pressure decreases with increasing time between hydro tests but is increased each time a test is conducted. The minimum values that occur just prior to a test either increase or decrease with time, depending on the vessel temperature. The minimum value of these minimums is presently specified as the maximum permissible pressure. For three vessel temperatures of particular interest (80, 88, and 110 F) and a nominal time of 3.0 EFPY(100 MVV)between hydro tests, these pressures are 677, 753, and 850 psi. For the lowest temperature of interest (40 F), the maximum permissible pressure is 295 psi.

  6. Low NOx burner retrofits and enhancements for a 518 MW oil and gas fired boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, J.J. [Jacksonville Electric Authority, FL (United States); Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R. [International Combustion Ltd., Derby (United Kingdom). Rolls-Royce Industrial Power Group

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Low NOx oil/gas burners originally supplied to Jacksonville Electric Authority, Northside No. 3 .500 MW unit, were based on a duplex air register design with lobed spray oil atomizers providing additional fuel staging. Although the burners could meet the targeted NOx levels of 0.3 and 0.2 lbs/10{sup 6} BTU on oil and gas respectively. There was insufficient margin on these NOx levels to enable continuous low NOx operation to be achieved. Further burner development was undertaken based on improved aerodynamic control within the burner design to give an approximate 25% improvement in NOx emission reduction thus providing an adequate operating margin. This `RoBTAS` (Round Burner with Tilted Air Supply) burner design based on techniques developed successfully for front wall coal firing applications achieved the required NOx reductions in full scale firing demonstrations on both heavy fuel oil and natural gas firing. The paper describes the development work and the subsequent application of the `RoBTAS` burners to the Northside No. 3 boiler. The burner will also be test fired on Orimulsion fuel and thus the comparison between heavy fuel oil firing and Orimulsion firing under ultra low NOx conditions will be made.

  7. nuclear controls

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    the Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) is to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons, materials, technology, and expertise. NIS applies technical...

  8. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: SOLID EARTH, VOL. 118, 119, doi:10.1002/jgrb.50117, 2013 The 2011 Mw 7.1 Van (Eastern Turkey) earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mw 7.1 Van (Eastern Turkey) earthquake J. R. Elliott,1 A. C. Copley,2 R. Holley,3 K. Scharer,4 and B to constrain the fault parameters of the Mw 7.1 2011 Van (Eastern Turkey) reverse-slip earthquake Turkey) earthquake, J. Geophys. Res. Solid Earth, 118, doi:10.1002/jgrb.50117. 1. Introduction [2

  9. PROBING DENSE NUCLEAR MATTER VIA NUCLEAR COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University of California. LBL-12095 Probing Dense NuclearMatter Nuclear Collisions* v~a H. Stocker, M.Gyulassy and J. Boguta Nuclear Science Division Lawrence

  10. TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL ON THREE 90 MW COAL FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard E. Johnson

    2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. WE Energies has over 3,700 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90 MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the WE Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, WE Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} (TOXECON) system designed to clean the combined flue gases of units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed down stream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e. mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a novel multi-pollutant control system to reduce emissions of mercury and other air pollutants, while minimizing waste, from a coal-fired power generation system.

  11. The Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center conversion from HEU to LEU fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tehan, Terry

    2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2-MW Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC) open pool reactor was converted from 93% UAL-High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to 20% enrichment U3Si2-AL Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The conversion included redesign of the core to a more compact size and the addition of beryllium reflectors and a beryllium flux trap. A significant increase in thermal flux level was achieved due to greater neutron leakage in the new compact core configuration. Following the conversion, a second cooling loop and an emergency core cooling system were installed to permit operation at 5 MW. After re-licensing at 2 MW, a power upgrade request will be submitted to the NRC.

  12. Nuclear Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl R. Brune

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear physics has a long and productive history of application to astrophysics which continues today. Advances in the accuracy and breadth of astrophysical data and theory drive the need for better experimental and theoretical understanding of the underlying nuclear physics. This paper will review some of the scenarios where nuclear physics plays an important role, including Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, neutrino production by our sun, nucleosynthesis in novae, the creation of elements heavier than iron, and neutron stars. Big-bang nucleosynthesis is concerned with the formation of elements with A nuclear physics inputs required are few-nucleon reaction cross sections. The nucleosynthesis of heavier elements involves a variety of proton-, alpha-, neutron-, and photon-induced reactions, coupled with radioactive decay. The advent of radioactive ion beam facilities has opened an important new avenue for studying these processes, as many involve radioactive species. Nuclear physics also plays an important role in neutron stars: both the nuclear equation of state and cooling processes involving neutrino emission play a very important role. Recent developments and also the interplay between nuclear physics and astrophysics will be highlighted.

  13. 10MW Class Direct Drive HTS Wind Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00312

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes.

  14. Nuclear Counterterrorism

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order defines requirements for the protection of sensitive improvised nuclear device information and provides a framework to support DOE activities related to nuclear counterterrorism. (A supplemental DOE Manual, Control of and Access to Improvised Nuclear Device Information, provides requirements and procedures for protecting Sigma 20 information. The Manual is Official Use Only, and is not available on the Directives Portal. The point of contact for the Manual is Randall Weidman, NA-121.2, 202-586-4582.) Canceled by DOE O 457.1A

  15. Countering Nuclear Terrorism and Trafficking | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Countering Nuclear Terrorism and Trafficking | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  16. Steam Dryer Segmentation and Packaging at Grand Gulf Nuclear Station - 13577

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreitman, Paul J.; Sirianni, Steve R.; Pillard, Mark M. [Westinghouse Nuclear Services, 1 Energy Drive, Lake Bluff, Illinois 60044 (United States)] [Westinghouse Nuclear Services, 1 Energy Drive, Lake Bluff, Illinois 60044 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Entergy recently performed an Extended Power Up-rate (EPU) on their Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, near Port Gibson, Mississippi. To support the EPU, a new Steam Dryer Assembly was installed during the last refueling outage. Due to limited access into the containment, the large Replacement Steam Dryer (RSD) had to be brought into the containment in pieces and then final assembly was completed on the refueling floor before installation into the reactor. Likewise, the highly contaminated Original Steam Dryer (OSD) had to be segmented into manageable sections, loaded into specially designed shielded containers, and rigged out of containment where they will be safely stored until final disposal is accomplished at an acceptable waste repository. Westinghouse Nuclear Services was contracted by Entergy to segment, package and remove the OSD from containment. This work was performed on critical path during the most recent refueling outage. The segmentation was performed underwater to minimize radiation exposure to the workers. Special hydraulic saws were developed for the cutting operations based on Westinghouse designs previously used in Sweden to segment ABB Reactor Internals. The mechanical cutting method was selected because of its proven reliability and the minimal cutting debris that is generated by the process. Maintaining stability of the large OSD sections during cutting was accomplished using a custom built support stand that was installed into the Moisture Separator Pool after the Moisture Separator was installed back in the reactor vessel. The OSD was then moved from the Steam Dryer Pool to the Moisture Separator Pool for segmentation. This scenario resolved the logistical challenge of having two steam dryers and a moisture separator in containment simultaneously. A water filtration/vacuum unit was supplied to maintain water clarity during the cutting and handling operations and to collect the cutting chips. (authors)

  17. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics: Swedish Nuclear Powe

  18. Space Nuclear

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Space Nuclear Today the INL is preparing to assist with the Multi-Mission RTG (MMRTG). The INL is assigned the final assembly and testing of the RTG for the project which is...

  19. Nuclear Golf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Pay no attention to that nuclear warhead behind the 18th hole; just shout "Fore!" and drive your Titleist down the fairway. In a development that is bizarre even by North Korean standards, the country ...

  20. Nuclear Hydrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen High temperature options for nuclear generation of hydrogen on a commercial basis are several years in the future. Thermo-chemical water splitting has been proven to be...

  1. Nuclear forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machleidt, R. [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844 (United States)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    These lectures present an introduction into the theory of nuclear forces. We focus mainly on the modern approach, in which the forces between nucleons emerge from low-energy QCD via chiral effective field theory.

  2. Renewability and sustainability aspects of nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ?ahin, Sümer, E-mail: ssahin@atilim.edit.tr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, ATILIM University, 06836 ?ncek, Gölba??, Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewability and sustainability aspects of nuclear energy have been presented on the basis of two different technologies: (1) Conventional nuclear technology; CANDU reactors. (2) Emerging nuclear technology; fusion/fission (hybrid) reactors. Reactor grade (RG) plutonium, {sup 233}U fuels and heavy water moderator have given a good combination with respect to neutron economy so that mixed fuel made of (ThO{sub 2}/RG?PuO{sub 2}) or (ThC/RG-PuC) has lead to very high burn up grades. Five different mixed fuel have been selected for CANDU reactors composed of 4 % RG?PuO{sub 2} + 96 % ThO{sub 2}; 6 % RG?PuO{sub 2} + 94 % ThO{sub 2}; 10 % RG?PuO{sub 2} + 90 % ThO{sub 2}; 20 % RG?PuO{sub 2} + 80 % ThO{sub 2}; 30 % RG?PuO{sub 2} + 70 % ThO{sub 2}, uniformly taken in each fuel rod in a fuel channel. Corresponding operation lifetimes have been found as ? 0.65, 1.1, 1.9, 3.5, and 4.8 years and with burn ups of ? 30 000, 60 000, 100 000, 200 000 and 290 000 MW.d/ton, respectively. Increase of RG?PuO{sub 2} fraction in radial direction for the purpose of power flattening in the CANDU fuel bundle has driven the burn up grade to 580 000 MW.d/ton level. A laser fusion driver power of 500 MW{sub th} has been investigated to burn the minor actinides (MA) out of the nuclear waste of LWRs. MA have been homogenously dispersed as carbide fuel in form of TRISO particles with volume fractions of 0, 2, 3, 4 and 5 % in the Flibe coolant zone in the blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. Tritium breeding for a continuous operation of the fusion reactor is calculated as TBR = 1.134, 1.286, 1.387, 1.52 and 1.67, respectively. Fission reactions in the MA fuel under high energetic fusion neutrons have lead to the multiplication of the fusion energy by a factor of M = 3.3, 4.6, 6.15 and 8.1 with 2, 3, 4 and 5 % TRISO volume fraction at start up, respectively. Alternatively with thorium, the same fusion driver would produce ?160 kg {sup 233}U per year in addition to fission energy production in situ, multiplying the fusion energy by a factor of ?1.3.

  3. Microsoft PowerPoint - Create Business Case for SG Implement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (IT) A CIS Upgrade to accommodate AMI and DR functionality & Outage Management Demand Response (DR) The aggregated sum of 104 MW of DR from Residential, Commercial, and...

  4. SciTech Connect: NREL Controllable Grid Interface for Testing MW-Scale Wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2) Ca (2) CuFuture

  5. Plutonium Discharge Rates and Spent Nuclear Fuel Inventory Estimates for Nuclear Reactors Worldwide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian K. Castle; Shauna A. Hoiland; Richard A. Rankin; James W. Sterbentz

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a preliminary survey and analysis of the five primary types of commercial nuclear power reactors currently in use around the world. Plutonium mass discharge rates from the reactors’ spent fuel at reload are estimated based on a simple methodology that is able to use limited reactor burnup and operational characteristics collected from a variety of public domain sources. Selected commercial reactor operating and nuclear core characteristics are also given for each reactor type. In addition to the worldwide commercial reactors survey, a materials test reactor survey was conducted to identify reactors of this type with a significant core power rating. Over 100 material or research reactors with a core power rating >1 MW fall into this category. Fuel characteristics and spent fuel inventories for these material test reactors are also provided herein.

  6. Redundancy of Supply in the International Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Market: Are Fabrication Services Assured?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seward, Amy M.; Toomey, Christopher; Ford, Benjamin E.; Wood, Thomas W.; Perkins, Casey J.

    2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    For several years, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been assessing the reliability of nuclear fuel supply in support of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration. Three international low enriched uranium reserves, which are intended back up the existing and well-functioning nuclear fuel market, are currently moving toward implementation. These backup reserves are intended to provide countries credible assurance that of the uninterrupted supply of nuclear fuel to operate their nuclear power reactors in the event that their primary fuel supply is disrupted, whether for political or other reasons. The efficacy of these backup reserves, however, may be constrained without redundant fabrication services. This report presents the findings of a recent PNNL study that simulated outages of varying durations at specific nuclear fuel fabrication plants. The modeling specifically enabled prediction and visualization of the reactors affected and the degree of fuel delivery delay. The results thus provide insight on the extent of vulnerability to nuclear fuel supply disruption at the level of individual fabrication plants, reactors, and countries. The simulation studies demonstrate that, when a reasonable set of qualification criteria are applied, existing fabrication plants are technically qualified to provide backup fabrication services to the majority of the world's power reactors. The report concludes with an assessment of the redundancy of fuel supply in the nuclear fuel market, and a description of potential extra-market mechanisms to enhance the security of fuel supply in cases where it may be warranted. This report is an assessment of the ability of the existing market to respond to supply disruptions that occur for technical reasons. A forthcoming report will address political disruption scenarios.

  7. RSP-MW UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII RADIOACTIVE MIXED WASTE PICKUP REQUEST FORM Revision, 4/04 (WASTE CONTAINING BOTH RADIOISOTOPES AND HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Browder, Tom

    RSP-MW UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII RADIOACTIVE MIXED WASTE PICKUP REQUEST FORM Revision, 4/04 (WASTE AND UNDERSTAND ALL CONDITIONS ON THIS FORM. GENERATOR CERTIFICATION: I certify the above waste contains

  8. 1352 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 37, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2002 A 120-mW 3-D Rendering Engine With 6-Mb Embedded DRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    1352 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 37, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2002 A 120-mW 3-D Rendering digital assistant (PDA) in which the power has to be supplied by batteries. Since the lithium battery

  9. Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in West Virginia (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in West Virginia. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in West Virginia to be $1.0 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.3 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,763 million gallons.

  10. Design and testing of an internal mode converter for a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz gyrotron with a depressed collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tax, David Samuel

    We report experimental results on a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz, 3 microsecond pulsed gyrotron with a single-stage depressed collector. A simplified mode converter with smooth mirror surfaces has been installed in the tube. The converter ...

  11. Nuclear scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friar, J.L.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

  12. IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 42, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2007 2021 A 0.2-mW 2-Mb/s Digital Transceiver Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 42, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2007 2021 A 0.2-mW 2-Mb/s Digital rate of 1.1 10 7, dissipating only 0.2 mW from a 1-V supply generated by a 1.5-V battery. Index Terms body, corresponding to 1­2 m. Moreover, it should be powered by a very small battery in order

  13. Dynamometer Testing of Samsung 2.5MW Drivetrain: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-311

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallen, R.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SHI's prototype 2.5 MW wind turbine drivetrain was tested at the NWTC 2.5 MW dynamometer test facility over the course of 4 months between December 2009 and March 2010. This successful testing campaign allowed SHI to validate performance, safety, control tuning, and reliability in a controlled environment before moving to full-scale testing and subsequent introduction of a commercial product into the American market.

  14. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohnSecurityControls |Navy Nuclear NavyNuclear Physics

  15. Nuclear Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohnSecurityControls |NavyNuclear Speed-Dating Nuclear

  16. Nuclear Forensics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat Cornell BatteriesArchives Events/NewsYouNuclearNuclear Forensics

  17. Clean Coal Technology III: 10 MW Demonstration of Gas Suspension Absorption final project performance and economics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, F.E.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) program is a government and industry co-funded technology development. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the performance of the GSA system in treating a 10 MW slipstream of flue gas resulting from the combustion of a high sulfur coal. This project involves design, fabrication, construction and testing of the GSA system. The Project Performance and Economics Report provides the nonproprietary information for the ``10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) Project`` installed at Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) Shawnee Power Station, Center for Emissions Research (CER) at Paducah, Kentucky. The program demonstrated that the GSA flue-gas-desulfurization (FGD) technology is capable of achieving high SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies (greater than 90%), while maintaining particulate emissions below the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), without any negative environmental impact (section 6). A 28-day test demonstrated the reliability and operability of the GSA system during continuous operation. The test results and detailed discussions of the test data can be obtained from TVA`s Final Report (Appendix A). The Air Toxics Report (Appendix B), prepared by Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EERC) characterizes air toxic emissions of selected hazardous air pollutants (HAP) from the GSA process. The results of this testing show that the GSA system can substantially reduce the emission of these HAP. With its lower capital costs and maintenance costs (section 7), as compared to conventional semi-dry scrubbers, the GSA technology commands a high potential for further commercialization in the United States. For detailed information refer to The Economic Evaluation Report (Appendix C) prepared by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors.

  18. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 2, Part 1C: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events for plant operational State 5 during a refueling outage, Main report (Sections 11--14)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Darby, J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yakle, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the accident sequence analysis of internally initiated events for Grand Gulf, Unit 1 as it operates in the Low Power and Shutdown Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage. The report documents the methodology used during the analysis, describes the results from the application of the methodology, and compares the results with the results from two full power analyses performed on Grand Gulf.

  19. Thermoacoustic Thermometry for Nuclear Reactor Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Steven L. Garrett; Randall A. Ali

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On Friday, March 11, 2011, at 2:46pm (Japan Standard Trme), the Tohoku region on the east coast of northern Japan experi­enced what would become known as the largest earthquake in the country's history at magnitude 9.0 on the Richter scale. The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant suffered exten­sive and irreversible damage. Six operating units were at the site, each with a boiling water reactor. When the earthquake struck, three of the six reactors were operating and the others were in a periodic inspection outage phase. In one reactor, all of the fuel had been relocated to a spent fuel pool in the reactor building. The seismic acceleration caused by the earthquake brought the three operating units to an automatic shutdown. Since there was damage to the power transmission lines, the emergency diesel generators (EDG) were automat­ically started to ensure continued cooling of the reactors and spent fuel pools. The situation was under control until the tsunami hit about forty-five minutes later with a maximum wave height of approximately 15 meters, which was three times taller than the sea wall of 5m. The influx of water submerged the EDGs, the electrical switchgear, and dc batteries, resulting in the total loss of power to five of the six reactors. The flooding also resulted in the loss of instrumentation that would have other­ wise been used to monitor and control the emergency. The ugly aftermath included high radiation exposure to operators at the nuclear power plants and early contamina­tion of food supplies and water within several restricted areas in Japan, where high radiation levels have rendered them un­safe for human habitation. While the rest of the story will remain a tragic history, it is this part of the series of unfortunate events that has inspired our research. It has indubitably highlighted the need for a novel sensor and instrumentation system that can withstand similar or worse conditions to avoid future catastrophe and assume damage prevention as quickly as possible. This is the question which we are attempting to answer: Is it possible to implement a self-powered sensor that could transmit data independently of electronic networks while taking advantage of the harsh operating environment of the nuclear reactor?

  20. Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs SHARE Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs image Oak Ridge National Laboratory covers the entire spectrum of nuclear nonproliferation work, from...

  1. NUCLEAR PROXIMITY FORCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randrup, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One might summarize of nuclear potential energy has beendegree of freedom) for the nuclear interaction between anyUniversity of California. Nuclear Proximity Forces 'I< at

  2. Global Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Global Nuclear Security Both DOE and the National Nuclear Security Administration are working to reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation and provide technologies to improve...

  3. Nuclear Science/Nuclear Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat Cornell BatteriesArchivesNuclear Science/Nuclear Chemistry

  4. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Waterford 3

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Waterford 3" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License Expiration Date"...

  5. Florida Nuclear Profile - Turkey Point

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Turkey Point" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  6. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Beaver Valley

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Beaver Valley" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  7. New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Seabrook

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Seabrook" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  8. Virginia Nuclear Profile - North Anna

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Anna" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  9. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - River Bend

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    River Bend" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  10. California Nuclear Profile - Diablo Canyon

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Diablo Canyon" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  11. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - PPL Susquehanna

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    PPL Susquehanna" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  12. Florida Nuclear Profile - St Lucie

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    St Lucie" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  13. South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Catawba

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Catawba" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  14. Vermont Nuclear Profile - Vermont Yankee

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont Yankee" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  15. Arizona Nuclear Profile - Palo Verde

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Palo Verde" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  16. Texas Nuclear Profile - Comanche Peak

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Comanche Peak" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  17. Florida Nuclear Profile - Crystal River

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crystal River1" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  18. Ohio Nuclear Profile - Davis Besse

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Davis Besse" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License Expiration Date"...

  19. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Prairie Island

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Prairie Island" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  20. North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Brunswick

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Brunswick" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  1. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Browns Ferry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Browns Ferry" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  2. North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Harris

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Harris" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  3. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Fort Calhoun

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fort Calhoun" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License Expiration Date"...

  4. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Peach Bottom

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Peach Bottom" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  5. Multimegawatt space nuclear power supply, Phase 1 Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This Specification establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Boeing Multimegawatt Space Nuclear Power System (MSNPS). The Boeing Multimegawatt Space Power System is part of the DOE/SDIO Multimegawatt Space Nuclear Power Program. The purpose of this program is to provide a space-based nuclear power system to meet the needs of SDIO missions. The Boeing MSNPS is a category 1 concept which is capable of delivering 10's of MW(e) for 100's of seconds with effluent permitted. A design goal is for the system to have growth or downscale capability for other power system concepts. The growth objective is to meet the category 3 capability of 100's of MW(e) for 100's of seconds, also with effluent permitted. The purpose of this preliminary document is to guide the conceptual design effort throughout the Phase 1 study effort. This document will be updated through out the study. It will thus result in a record of the development of the design effort.

  6. Development of a 16-MW sub th coal-water/heavy oil burner for front-wall firing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thambimuthu, K.V.; Whaley, H. (EMR Canada/CANMET, Ottawa (CA)); Bennet, A.; Jonasson, K.A. (NRC Canada, Ottawa (CA))

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Canadian program of coal-water fuel (CWF) technology development has included the demonstration of commercial burners for CWF in both coal and oil-designed utility boilers. The demonstrations clearly showed that these burners were prototypes, and were, in fact, modified oil burners that were mismatched to the rheological properties of the CWF. As the demonstrations were proceeding, a simultaneous research program was undertaken in which the basic principles governing atomization and combustion of CWF were studied. Results from the fundamental studies which led to the development of a novel prototype dual fuel CWF/oil burner are described. In the various stages of development, the burner was scaled up from 1.5 MW{sub th} to an industrial scale of 16 MS{sub th} for demonstration in a 20-MW{sub (e)} oil-designed industrial utility boiler and for a single-burner commercial operation in an oil designed package steam boiler. A summary of the burner performance in these demonstrations is also given in this paper.

  7. RELAP5-3D Results for Phase I (Exercise 2) of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been initiated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to provide a fully coupled prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) system modeling capability as part of the NGNP methods development program. The PHISICS code consists of three modules: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. As part of the verification and validation activities, steady state results have been obtained for Exercise 2 of Phase I of the newly-defined OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark. This exercise requires participants to calculate a steady-state solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle 350 MW Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR), using the provided geometry, material, and coolant bypass flow description. The paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark and presents typical steady state results (e.g. solid and gas temperatures, thermal conductivities) for Phase I Exercise 2. Preliminary results are also provided for the early test phase of Exercise 3 using a two-group cross-section library and the Relap5-3D model developed for Exercise 2.

  8. Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

  9. Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography Stress Testing Rotation The Nuclear Medicine/CT angiography. Understand the indications for exercise treadmill testing and specific nuclear cardiology tests, safe use Level 2 proficiency in performing and interpreting cardiac nuclear imaging tests. Progression

  10. National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FROM: SUBJECT: USIUK Memorandum of Understanding between National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security (AADNS)...

  11. Lower Hybrid antennas for nuclear fusion experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hillairet, Julien; Bae, Young-Soon; Bai, X; Balorin, C; Baranov, Y; Basiuk, V; Bécoulet, A; Belo, J; Berger-By, G; Brémond, S; Castaldo, C; Ceccuzzi, S; Cesario, R; Corbel, E; Courtois, X; Decker, J; Delmas, E; Delpech, L; Ding, X; Douai, D; Ekedahl, A; Goletto, C; Goniche, M; Guilhem, D; Hertout, P; Imbeaux, F; Litaudon, X; Magne, R; Mailloux, J; Mazon, D; Mirizzi, F; Mollard, P; Moreau, P; Oosako, T; Petrzilka, V; Peysson, Y; Poli, S; Preynas, M; Prou, M; Saint-Laurent, F; Samaille, F; Saoutic, B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear fusion research goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of fusion power for peaceful purposes. In order to achieve the conditions similar to those expected in an electricity-generating fusion power plant, plasmas with a temperature of several hundreds of millions of degrees must be generated and sustained for long periods. For this purpose, RF antennas delivering multi-megawatts of power to magnetized confined plasma are commonly used in experimental tokamaks. In the gigahertz range of frequencies, high power phased arrays known as "Lower Hybrid" (LH) antennas are used to extend the plasma duration. This paper reviews some of the technological aspects of the LH antennas used in the Tore Supra tokamak and presents the current design of a proposed 20 MW LH system for the international experiment ITER.

  12. Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2010, Prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, May 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Lewis D. A. Hagemeyer Y. U. McCormick

    2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2010 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no NRC-licensed low-level waste disposal facilities currently in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Annual reports for 2010 were received from a total of 190 NRC licensees. The summation of reports submitted by the 190 licensees indicated that 192,424 individuals were monitored, 81,961 of whom received a measurable dose. When adjusted for transient workers who worked at more than one licensee during the year, there were actually 142,471 monitored individuals and 62,782 who received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 10,617 person-rem, which represents a 12% decrease from the 2009 value. This decrease was primarily due to the decrease in collective dose at commercial nuclear power reactors, as well as a decrease in the collective dose for most of the other categories of NRC licensees. The number of individuals receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in an average measurable dose of 0.13 rem for 2010. The average measurable dose is defined as the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) divided by the number of individuals receiving a measurable dose. In calendar year 2010, the average annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor (LWR) licensees was 83 person-rem. This represents a 14% decrease from the value reported for 2009 (96 person-rem). The decrease in collective dose for commercial nuclear power reactors was due to an 11% decrease in total outage hours in 2010. During outages, activities involving increased radiation exposure such as refueling and maintenance are performed while the reactor is not in operation. The average annual collective dose per reactor for boiling water reactors (BWRs) was 137 personrem for 35 BWRs, and 55 person-rem for 69 pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Analyses of transient individual data indicate that 29,333 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient individuals by multiple licensees. The adjustment to account for transient individuals has been specifically noted in footnotes in the figures and tables for commercial nuclear power reactors. In 2010, the average measurable dose per individual for all licensees calculated from reported data was 0.13 rem. Although the average measurable dose per individual from data submitted by licensees was 0.13 rem, a corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose per individual of 0.17 rem.

  13. Reviewing PSA-based analyses to modify technical specifications at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samanta, P.K.; Martinez-Guridi, G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Vesely, W.E. [Science Applications International Corporation, Dublin, OH (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes to Technical Specifications (TSs) at nuclear power plants (NPPs) require review and approval by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). Currently, many requests for changes to TSs use analyses that are based on a plant`s probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). This report presents an approach to reviewing such PSA-based submittals for changes to TSs. We discuss the basic objectives of reviewing a PSA-based submittal to modify NPP TSs; the methodology of reviewing a TS submittal, and the differing roles of a PSA review, a PSA Computer Code review, and a review of a TS submittal. To illustrate this approach, we discuss our review of changes to allowed outage time (AOT) and surveillance test interval (STI) in the TS for the South Texas Project Nuclear Generating Station. Based on this experience gained, a check-list of items is given for future reviewers; it can be used to verify that the submittal contains sufficient information, and also that the review has addressed the relevant issues. Finally, recommended steps in the review process and the expected findings of each step are discussed.

  14. Nuclear photonics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  15. POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as partial outages or load following. is more directly ahigh demand periods. Load Following:Varying the output of a

  16. Nuclear Waffles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Schneider; D. K. Berry; C. M. Briggs; M. E. Caplan; C. J. Horowitz

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The dense neutron-rich matter found in supernovae and neutron stars is expected to form complex nonuniform phases referred to as nuclear pasta. The pasta shapes depend on density, temperature and proton fraction and determine many transport properties in supernovae and neutron star crusts. We use two recently developed hybrid CPU/GPU codes to perform large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with $51200$ and $409600$ nucleons of nuclear pasta. From the output of the MD simulations we characterize the topology and compute two observables, the radial distribution function $g(r)$ and the structure factor $S(q)$, for systems with proton fractions $Y_p=0.10, 0.20, 0.30$ and $0.40$ at about one third of nuclear saturation density and temperatures near $1.0$ MeV. We observe that the two lowest proton fraction systems simulated, $Y_p=0.10$ and $0.20$, equilibrate quickly and form liquid-like structures. Meanwhile, the two higher proton fraction systems, $Y_p=0.30$ and $0.40$, take a longer time to equilibrate and organize themselves in solid-like periodic structures. Furthermore, the $Y_p=0.40$ system is made up of slabs, lasagna phase, interconnected by defects while the $Y_p=0.30$ systems consist of a stack of perforated plates, the nuclear waffle phase. The periodic configurations observed in our MD simulations for proton fractions $Y_p\\ge0.30$ have important consequences for the structure factors $S(q)$ of protons and neutrons, which relate to many transport properties of supernovae and neutron star crust. A detailed study of the waffle phase and how its structure depends on temperature, size of the simulation and the screening length showed that finite-size effects appear to be under control and, also, that the plates in the waffle phase merge at temperatures slightly above $1.0$ MeV and the holes in the plates form an hexagonal lattice at temperatures slightly lower than $1.0$ MeV.

  17. Nuclear Forensics

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review ofElectronic InputNuclearNature of7379583Forensics

  18. Nuclear Science

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced ScorecardReactor Technology Subcommittee of NEACSummary Nuclear

  19. Nuclear Nonproliferation,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohnSecurityControls |Navy Nuclear Navy Posted:Sensor

  20. Nuclear Astrophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat Cornell BatteriesArchives Events/NewsYouNuclear Astrophysics One

  1. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF TEMPORAL GROUNDWATER MONITORING VARIABILITY IN MW66 AND NEARBY WELLS, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of disposal records, soil data, and spatial/temporal groundwater data from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 7 indicate that the peak contaminant concentrations measured in monitoring well (MW) 66 result from the influence of the regional PGDP NW Plume, and does not support the presence of significant vertical transport from local contaminant sources in SWMU 7. This updated evaluation supports the 2006 conceptualization which suggested the high and low concentrations in MW66 represent different flow conditions (i.e., local versus regional influences). Incorporation of the additional lines of evidence from data collected since 2006 provide the basis to link high contaminant concentrations in MW66 (peaks) to the regional 'Northwest Plume' and to the upgradient source, specifically, the C400 Building Area. The conceptual model was further refined to demonstrate that groundwater and the various contaminant plumes respond to complex site conditions in predictable ways. This type of conceptualization bounds the expected system behavior and supports development of environmental cleanup strategies, providing a basis to support decisions even if it is not feasible to completely characterize all of the 'complexities' present in the system. We recommend that the site carefully consider the potential impacts to groundwater and contaminant plume migration as they plan and implement onsite production operations, remediation efforts, and reconfiguration activities. For example, this conceptual model suggests that rerouting drainage water, constructing ponds or basin, reconfiguring cooling water systems, capping sites, decommissioning buildings, fixing (or not fixing) water leaks, and other similar actions will potentially have a 'direct' impact on the groundwater contaminant plumes. Our conclusion that the peak concentrations in MW66 are linked to the regional PGDP NW Plume does not imply that there TCE is not present in SWMU 7. The available soil and groundwater data indicate that the some of the waste disposed in this facility contacted and/or were contaminated by TCE. In our assessment, the relatively small amount of TCE associated with SWMU 7 is not contributing detectable TCE to the groundwater and does not represent a significant threat to the environment, particularly in an area where remediation and/or management of TCE in the NW plume will be required for an extended timeframe. If determined to be necessary by the PGDP team and regulators, additional TCE characterization or cleanup activities could be performed. Consistent with the limited quantity of TCE in SWMU 7, we identify a range of low cost approaches for such activities (e.g., soil gas surveys for characterization or SVE for remediation). We hope that this information is useful to the Paducah team and to their regulators and stakeholders to develop a robust environmental management path to address the groundwater and soil contamination associated with the burial ground areas.

  2. Rotational Augmentation on a 2.3 MW Rotor Blade with Thick Flatback Airfoil Cross-Sections: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreck, S.; Fingersh, L.; Siegel, K.; Singh, M.; Medina, P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rotational augmentation was analyzed for a 2.3 MW wind turbine, which was equipped with thick flatback airfoils at inboard radial locations and extensively instrumented for acquisition of time varying surface pressures. Mean aerodynamic force and surface pressure data were extracted from an extensive field test database, subject to stringent criteria for wind inflow and turbine operating conditions. Analyses of these data showed pronounced amplification of aerodynamic forces and significant enhancements to surface pressures in response to rotational influences, relative to two-dimensional, stationary conditions. Rotational augmentation occurrence and intensity in the current effort was found to be consistent with that observed in previous research. Notably, elevated airfoil thickness and flatback design did not impede rotational augmentation.

  3. Comparative ranking of 0. 1 to 10 MW(e) solar thermal electric power systems. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kowalik, J.S.; Kriz, T.A.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1 to 10 MW(e), operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW(e), a range that is attractive to industrial and other non-utility applications. This volume summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 10 MW(e). Volume II presents data on performance and cost and ranking methodology.

  4. PNW Coal Closure Study Resource Adequacy Advisory Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PNW Coal Closure Study 1 y Resource Adequacy Advisory Committee Steering Committee Meeting outage calculations)100 MW (for forced outage calculations) #12;Coal Replacement Plans 4 Coal Replacement Plans · Boardman ­ 601 MW · The 2016 PGE IRP process will include the Boardman coal plant replacement

  5. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4C, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons by LtCol Karl Basham Functional areas: Nuclear Explosives, Nuclear Weapons, Security The Order establishes...

  6. REACTOR DOSIMETRY STUDY OF THE RHODE ISLAND NUCLEAR SCIENCE CENTER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLDEN, N.E.,; RECINIELLO, R.N.; HU, J.-P.

    2005-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC), located on the Narragansett Bay Campus of the University of Rhode Island, is a state-owned and US NRC-licensed nuclear facility constructed for educational and industrial applications. The main building of RINSC houses a two-megawatt (2 MW) thermal power critical reactor immersed in demineralized water within a shielded tank. As its original design in 1958 by the Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission focused on the teaching and research use of the facility, only a minimum of 3.85 kg fissile uranium-235 was maintained in the fuel elements to allow the reactor to reach a critical state. In 1986 when RINSC was temporarily shutdown to start US DOE-directed core conversion project for national security reasons, all the U-Al based Highly-Enriched Uranium (HEU, 93% uranium-235 in the total uranium) fuel elements were replaced by the newly developed U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al based Low Enriched Uranium (LEU, {le}20% uranium-235 in the total uranium) elements. The reactor first went critical after the core conversion was achieved in 1993, and feasibility study on the core upgrade to accommodate Boron Neutron-Captured Therapy (BNCT) was completed in 2000 [3]. The 2-MW critical reactor at RINSC which includes six beam tubes, a thermal column, a gamma-ray experimental station and two pneumatic tubes has been extensive utilized as neutron-and-photon dual source for nuclear-specific research in areas of material science, fundamental physics, biochemistry, and radiation therapy. After the core conversion along with several major system upgrade (e.g. a new 3-MW cooling tower, a large secondary piping system, a set of digitized power-level instrument), the reactor has become more compact and thus more effective to generate high beam flux in both the in-core and ex-core regions for advance research. If not limited by the manpower and operating budget in recent years, the RINSC built ''in concrete'' structure and control systems should have been systematically upgraded to a 5 Mw power facility to further enhance its experimental capability while still maintaining its safe margin as designed.

  7. Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Arkansas (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Arkansas. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Arkansas to be $1.15 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.7 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,507 million gallons.

  8. Nuclear reactor engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapters are presented concerning energy from nuclear fission; nuclear reactions and radiations; diffusion and slowing-down of neutrons; principles of reactor analysis; nuclear reactor kinetics and control; energy removal; non-fuel reactor materials; the reactor fuel system; radiation protection and environmental effects; nuclear reactor shielding; nuclear reactor safety; and power reactor systems.

  9. Reactor & Nuclear Systems Publications | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Publications and Reports | Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications SHARE Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications...

  10. The Search for Sustainable Legitimacy: Environmental Law and Bureaucracy in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Alex

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nuclear, wind, and solar power), energy conservation andFaces into the Wind, Shows a “Power Outage Storm,” Operate

  11. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, or successor directive, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

  12. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

  13. RELATIVISTIC NUCLEAR COLLISIONS: THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gyulassy, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions", Preprint LBL-Pion Interferometry of Nuclear Collisions. 18.1 M.Gyulassy,was supported by the Office of Nuclear Physics of the U.S.

  14. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, R.B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALIFORNIA NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE R. B. Firestone and E.11089 NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE by R.B. Firestone and E.iii- NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE R.B Firestone and E. Browne

  15. Nuclear Safety (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nuclear Safety Division conducts a comprehensive nuclear power plant oversight review program of the nine reactors at the five nuclear power sites in Pennsylvania. It also monitors the...

  16. Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards system should be designed to provide credible assurances that there has been no diversion of declared nuclear material and no undeclared nuclear material and activities.

  17. Nuclear Safeguards | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

  18. Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

  19. IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 32, NO. 12, DEC 1997 1 A 12mW Wide Dynamic Range CMOS Front-End

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Thomas H.

    IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 32, NO. 12, DEC 1997 1 A 12mW Wide Dynamic Range CMOS into their products. For many of these hand-held devices, one of the primary concerns is battery life. Thus

  20. Representative Syllabus for P140 Prof. Sandra Shapshay P140 M/W 11:15pm-12:05pm Woodburn Hall 009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Representative Syllabus for P140 Prof. Sandra Shapshay P140 M/W 11:15pm-12:05pm Woodburn Hall 009-10:30am, SY 021 Syllabus: P140 Introduction to Ethics Welcome to Introduction to Ethics. This is a lecture

  1. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The 2011 Mw 7.1 Van (Eastern Turkey) Earthquake -1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The 2011 Mw 7.1 Van (Eastern Turkey, 2012, 5:45pm D R A F T #12;X - 2 ELLIOTT ET AL.: 2011 VAN EARTHQUAKE, EASTERN TURKEY moment and source.: 2011 VAN EARTHQUAKE, EASTERN TURKEY X - 3 Interferograms from the ENVISAT satellite were derived from

  2. Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System--A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location, Location, Location

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Develop a baseline cost model of a 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System, including all aspects of the project, from finding the resource through to operation, for a particularly challenging scenario: the deep, radioactively decaying granitic rock of the Pioneer Valley in Western Massachusetts.

  3. Nuclear Power Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Bob Ashe-Everest Southern California Edison 10 Incoming New Fuel Inspecting New Fuel SONGS Unit 1 Fuel...

  4. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristensen, Hans M. [Federation of American Scientists, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  5. Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC), formerly the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC), was established on October 1, 1998, to provide independent advice to the Office of...

  6. National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the safety, security and effectiveness of the nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing, consistent with the principles of the Stockpile Management Program...

  7. Nuclear Waste Reduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Waste Reduction Pyroprocessing is a promising technology for recycling used nuclear fuel and improving the associated waste management options. The process...

  8. Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Security of the National Nuclear Security Administration, USof Energys National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  9. Nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomson, Wallace B. (Severna Park, MD)

    2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

  10. Analysis and simulation of a small-angle neutron scattering instrument on a 1 MW long pulse spallation source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olah, G.A.; Hjelm, R.P.; Lujan, M. Jr.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the design and performance of a small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument for a proposed 1 MW, 60 Hz long pulsed spallation source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). An analysis of the effects of source characteristics and chopper performance combined with instrument simulations using the LANSCE Monte Carlo instrument simulations package shows that the T{sub 0} chopper should be no more than 5 m from the source with the frame overlap and frame definition choppers at 5.6 and greater than 7 m, respectively. The study showed that an optimal pulse structure has an exponential decaying tail with {tau} {approx} 750 {mu}s. The Monte Carlo simulations were used to optimize the LPSS SANS, showing that an optimal length is 18 m. The simulations show that an instrument with variable length is best to match the needs of a given measurement. The performance of the optimized LPSS instrument was found to be comparable with present world standard instruments.

  11. Wake Turbulence of Two NREL 5-MW Wind Turbines Immersed in a Neutral Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashioum, Jessica L; Schmitz, Sven; Duque, Earl P N

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fluid dynamics video considers an array of two NREL 5-MW turbines separated by seven rotor diameters in a neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The neutral atmospheric boundary-layer flow data were obtained from a precursor ABL simulation using a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) framework within OpenFOAM. The mean wind speed at hub height is 8m/s, and the surface roughness is 0.2m. The actuator line method (ALM) is used to model the wind turbine blades by means of body forces added to the momentum equation. The fluid dynamics video shows the root and tip vortices emanating from the blades from various viewpoints. The vortices become unstable and break down into large-scale turbulent structures. As the wakes of the wind turbines advect further downstream, smaller-scale turbulence is generated. It is apparent that vortices generated by the blades of the downstream wind turbine break down faster due to increased turbulence levels generated by the wake of the upstream wind turbine.

  12. Multi-MW 22.8 GHz Harmonic Multiplier - RF Power Source for High-Gradient Accelerator R&D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrodynamic and particle simulation studies have been carried out to optimize design of a two-cavity harmonic frequency multiplier, in which a linear electron beam is energized by rotating fields near cyclotron resonance in a TE111 cavity in a uniform magnetic field, and in which the beam then radiates coherently at the nth harmonic into a TEn11 output cavity. Examples are worked out in detail for 7th and 2nd harmonic converters, showing RF-to-RF conversion efficiencies of 45% and 88%, respectively at 19.992 GHz (K-band) and 5.712 GHz (C-band), for a drive frequency of 2.856 GHz. Details are shown of RF infrastructure (S-band klystron, modulator) and harmonic converter components (drive cavity, output cavities, electron beam source and modulator, beam collector) for the two harmonic converters to be tested. Details are also given for the two-frequency (S- and C-band) coherent multi-MW test stand for RF breakdown and RF gun studies.

  13. Operation of the NRCh constriction of boilers in 300 MW energy units during combustion of anthracite dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaminskii, V.P.; Mironov, S.N.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of the furnace constriction of boilers in 300 MW units during combustion of anthracite dust with liquid slag removal now requires special attention on the part of both operating personnel at thermal power plants and designers. The reason behind this is charring of the studs and carborundum mass on the roof portion of the constriction with subsequent exposure of the tubes; external high-temperature corrosion of the tubes on the roof portion and on the upper incline of the constriction with subsequent tapering of the tube walls to 1.5 mm and their breaking; the presence of corrosion-fatigue destruction of the tube walls in the upper incline of the constriction with formation of scale, transverse deep grooves and fissures on the front side of the tubes. Overall, at the present time the constriction is a point of failure that requires intensified control and greater repair costs to replace damaged sections of the heating surfaces. In conjunction with this, complex analysis of operation of the constriction has been carried out.

  14. The Joys of Nuclear Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Carmack

    2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear fuels researcher Jon Carmack talks about the satisfactions of a career in nuclear engineering.

  15. The Joys of Nuclear Engineering

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jon Carmack

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear fuels researcher Jon Carmack talks about the satisfactions of a career in nuclear engineering.

  16. Steam turbine-generator outage interval extension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCloskey, T.H. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Pollard, M. [Carolina Power & Light Company, Raleigh, NC (United States); Dewey, R.; Roemer, M. [Stress Technology Inc., Rochester, NY (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the industry`s growing competitive climate, utilities are seeking ways to tap the economic benefits to be derived from maximizing intervals between major turbine-generator (T-G) inspections and overhauls--while ensuring protection of these assets. EPRI and others have developed a substantial body of technology which addresses many of the condition assessment issues that underlie T-G inspection and overhaul decisions. Examples include remaining life determination of critical components such as rotors and blades. While the initial focus of this technology had previously been to support T-G run-repair-replace decision making, this technology can also serve as a basis for run-inspect decisions. This paper describes EPRI`s initiative to develop and implement a T-G Health Management System. By providing key status reports reflecting the on-line health of critical components, in terms of life consumption, performance degradation and probability of failure, this system will provide a means to justify extending T-G operations between inspections and overhauls.

  17. North American Electric Reliability Council Outage Announcement |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment of Energy Advanced Framing -Nissan: ISO 50001Department

  18. August 14, 2003 Power Outages Â… Announcement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope ChangeL-01-06 AuditAugust 5, 2010 VIA U.S. MAIL andEllen

  19. Systems and Services Outage Notification Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout »LabSustainabilitySynthetic fuel concepthasRadiation

  20. PRODUCTION START-UP OF 2 MW a-Si PV MANUFACTURING LINE AT SOVLUX M. Im, X. Den& II. C. Ovshinsky,R. Crucetand S.R Ovshimky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    PRODUCTION START-UP OF 2 MW a-Si PV MANUFACTURING LINE AT SOVLUX PLANT M. Im, X. Den& II. C start-up efforts at the 2MW Sovlux photovoltaic production line. Triple-junction solar cells with higher than 10% initial effXency were producedin this production line with subcell yield up to 96

  1. Advanced nuclear fuel

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Terrani, Kurt

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Kurt Terrani uses his expertise in materials science to develop safer fuel for nuclear power plants.

  2. Advanced nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrani, Kurt

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Kurt Terrani uses his expertise in materials science to develop safer fuel for nuclear power plants.

  3. Focus Article Nuclear winter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    the climatic effects of nuclear war. Smoke from the fires started by nuclear weapons, especially the black in recorded human history. Although the number of nuclear weapons in the world has fallen from 70,000 at its and Russia could still produce nuclear winter. This theory cannot be tested in the real world. However

  4. INSTRUCTIONS FOR SUBMITTING NUCLEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Decommissioning 13 I. Performance 13 J. Nuclear Fuel 14 K. Nuclear Insurance 14 L. Relicensing or Plant RetirementCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INSTRUCTIONS FOR SUBMITTING NUCLEAR POWER PLANT-RELATED DATA of Submitted Data 3 NUCLEAR POWER PLANT DATA REQUESTS 6 A. Environmental Impacts 6 B. Spent Fuel Generation 8 C

  5. Nuclear Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 1 Nuclear Science & Engineering Nuclear Energy Present and Future Ian H. Hutchinson Head, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering CoPrincipal, Alcator Tokamak Project, Plasma Science and Fusion Science & Engineering Nuclear Power Plants Worldwide · US: 103 plants in operation, none under

  6. Crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004: Representatives of a novel protein family that adopt a four-helical bundle fold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozbial, Piotr; Xu, Qingping; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Elsliger, Marc-André; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Koesema, Eric; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Murphy, Kevin D.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Spraggon, Glen; Trout, Christina V.; ban den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Zubieta, Chloe; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps); (SSRL); (JCSG); (UCSD); (Burnham)

    2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    To extend the structural coverage of proteins with unknown functions, we targeted a novel protein family (Pfam accession number PF08807, DUF1798) for which we proposed and determined the structures of two representative members. The MW1337R gene of Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Rosenbach (Wood 46) encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 13.8 kDa (residues 1-116) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.15. The lin2004 gene of the nonspore-forming bacterium Listeria innocua Clip11262 encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 14.6 kDa (residues 1-121) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.45. MW1337R and lin2004, as well as their homologs, which, so far, have been found only in Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Listeria, and related genera (Geobacillus, Exiguobacterium, and Oceanobacillus), have unknown functions and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. The genomic contexts of MW1337R and lin2004 are similar and conserved in related species. In prokaryotic genomes, most often, functionally interacting proteins are coded by genes, which are colocated in conserved operons. Proteins from the same operon as MW1337R and lin2004 either have unknown functions (i.e., belong to DUF1273, Pfam accession number PF06908) or are similar to ypsB from Bacillus subtilis. The function of ypsB is unclear, although it has a strong similarity to the N-terminal region of DivIVA, which was characterized as a bifunctional protein with distinct roles during vegetative growth and sporulation. In addition, members of the DUF1273 family display distant sequence similarity with the DprA/Smf protein, which acts downstream of the DNA uptake machinery, possibly in conjunction with RecA. The RecA activities in Bacillus subtilis are modulated by RecU Holliday-junction resolvase. In all analyzed cases, the gene coding for RecU is in the vicinity of MW1337R, lin2004, or their orthologs, but on a different operon located in the complementary DNA strand. Here, we report the crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004, which were determined using the semiautomated, high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG), part of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Protein Structure Initiative.

  7. Isotope Development & Production | Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery |...

  8. TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL-ON THREE 90 MW COAL FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard E. Johnson

    2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. We Energies has over 3,200 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90 MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, We Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} (TOXECON) system designed to clean the combined flue gases of units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed down stream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e. mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a novel multi-pollutant control system to reduce emissions of mercury while minimizing waste, from a coal-fired power generation system.

  9. TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL ON THREE 90-MW COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven T. Derenne

    2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particulate control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. We Energies has over 3,200 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90-MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, We Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} system designed to clean the combined flue gases of Units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON{trademark} is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed downstream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium-based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON{trademark} baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e., mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a control system to reduce emissions of mercury while minimizing waste from a coal-fired power generation system.

  10. A 12-MW-scale pilot study of in-duct scrubbing (IDS) using a rotary atomizer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel, E.A.; Murphy, K.R.; Demian, A.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-cost, moderate-removal efficiency, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology was selected by the US Department of Energy for pilot demonstration in its Acid Rain Precursor Control Technology Initiative. The process, identified as In-Duct Scrubbing (IDS), applies rotary atomizer techniques developed for lime-based spray dryer FGD while utilizing existing flue gas ductwork and particulate collectors. IDS technology is anticipated to result in a dry desulfurization process with a moderate removal efficiency (50% or greater) for high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. The critical elements for successful application are: (1) adequate mixing of sorbent droplets with flue gas for efficient reaction contact, (2) sufficient residence time to produce a non-wetting product, and (3) appropriate ductwork cross-sectional area to prevent deposition of wet reaction products before particle drying is comple. The ductwork in many older plants, previously modified to meet 1970 Clean Air Act requirements for particulate control, usually meet these criteria. A 12 MW-scale IDS pilot plant was constructed at the Muskingum River Plant of the American Electric Power System. The pilot plant, which operates from a slipstrem attached to the air-preheater outlet duct from the Unit 5 boiler at the Muskingum River Plant (which burns about 4% sulfur coal), is equipped with three atomizer stations to test the IDS concept in vertical and horizontal configurations. In addition, the pilot plant is equipped to test the effect of injecting IDS off- product upstream of the atomizer, on SO{sub 2}and NO{sub x} removals.

  11. Nuclear Structure Aspects in Nuclear Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Astrophysics as a broad and diverse field of study can be viewed as a magnifier of the impact of microscopic processes on the evolution of macroscopic events. One of the primary goals in Nuclear Astrophysics is the understanding of the nucleosynthesis processes that take place in the cosmos and the simulation of the correlated stellar and explosive burning scenarios. These simulations are strongly dependent on the input from Nuclear Physics which sets the time scale for all stellar dynamic processes--from giga-years of stellar evolution to milliseconds of stellar explosions--and provides the basis for most of the signatures that we have for the interpretation of these events--from stellar luminosities, elemental and isotopic abundances to neutrino flux from distant supernovae. The Nuclear Physics input comes through nuclear structure, low energy reaction rates, nuclear masses, and decay rates. There is a common perception that low energy reaction rates are the most important component of the required nuclear physics input; however, in this article we take a broader approach and present an overview of the close correlation between various nuclear structure aspects and their impact on nuclear astrophysics. We discuss the interplay between the weak and the strong forces on stellar time scales due to the limitations they provide for the evolution of slow and rapid burning processes. The effects of shell structure in nuclei on stellar burning processes as well as the impact of clustering in nuclei is outlined. Furthermore we illustrate the effects of the various nuclear structure aspects on the major nucleosynthesis processes that have been identified in the last few decades. We summarize and provide a coherent overview of the impact of all aspects of nuclear structure on nuclear astrophysics.

  12. Dynamics of nuclear envelope and nuclear pore complex formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Limited expression of nuclear pore membrane glycoprotein 210suggests cell-type specific nuclear pores in metazoans. Expand Dultz, E. (2008). Nuclear pore complex assembly through

  13. The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroenig, Matthew

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organizations, accidents, and nuclear weapons. Princeton,the likelihood of a nuclear accident (Sagan 1993, 1995). “potential for a nuclear accident. Yet it seems implausible

  14. The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroenig, Matthew

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nature of the nuclear recipient’s security environment. ThisKeywords: Nuclear weapons proliferation; security; securitynature of the nuclear recipient’s security environment. This

  15. 1010 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 43, NO. 4, APRIL 2008 A Scalable 515 Gbps, 1475 mW Low-Power I/O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palermo, Sam

    1010 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 43, NO. 4, APRIL 2008 A Scalable 5­15 Gbps, 14­75 mW Low-Power I/O Transceiver in 65 nm CMOS Ganesh Balamurugan, Member, IEEE, Joseph Kennedy, Member, IEEE'Mahony, Bryan Casper, and Randy Mooney, Member, IEEE Abstract--We present a scalable low-power I/O transceiver

  16. Automatic system for regulating the frequency and power of the 500 MW coal-dust power generating units at the Reftinskaya GRES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilenko, V. A.; Gal'perina, A. I.; Mikushevich, E. E.; Nikol'skii, D. Yu. [JSC 'Interavtomatka' (Russian Federation); Zhugrin, A. G.; Bebenin, P. A.; Syrchin, M. V. [JSC 'Reftinskaya GRES' (Russian Federation)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The monitoring and control systems at the 500 MW coal-dust power generating units No. 7, 8, and 9 at the Reftinskaya GRES have been modernized using information-regulator systems. Layouts for instrumental construction of these systems and expanded algorithmic schemes for the automatic frequency and power control system and for the boiler supply and fuelling are discussed. Results from tests and normal operation of the automatic frequency and power control system are presented.

  17. Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

  18. Design & development fo a 20-MW flywheel-based frequency regulation power plant : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rounds, Robert (Beacon Power, Tyngsboro, MA); Peek, Georgianne Huff

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the successful efforts of Beacon Power to design and develop a 20-MW frequency regulation power plant based solely on flywheels. Beacon's Smart Matrix (Flywheel) Systems regulation power plant, unlike coal or natural gas generators, will not burn fossil fuel or directly produce particulates or other air emissions and will have the ability to ramp up or down in a matter of seconds. The report describes how data from the scaled Beacon system, deployed in California and New York, proved that the flywheel-based systems provided faster responding regulation services in terms of cost-performance and environmental impact. Included in the report is a description of Beacon's design package for a generic, multi-MW flywheel-based regulation power plant that allows accurate bids from a design/build contractor and Beacon's recommendations for site requirements that would ensure the fastest possible construction. The paper concludes with a statement about Beacon's plans for a lower cost, modular-style substation based on the 20-MW design.

  19. NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY ANNUAL REPORT 1970

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Laboratories, AECL, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada.Nuclear Laboratories, AECL, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. 1.Nuclear Laboratories, AECL, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. 1.

  20. Nuclear Safety Research and Development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nuclear Safety Research and Development Proposal Review and Prioritization Process and Criteria Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Office of Nuclear Safety Office of...

  1. What is spent nuclear fuel?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    What is Spent Nuclear Fuel? Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is irradiated fuel or targets containing uranium, plutonium, or thorium that is permanently withdrawn from a nuclear reactor or...

  2. Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    009-0270-y Is Nuclear Energy the Solution? Milton H. Saier &in the last 50 years, nuclear energy subsidies have totaledadministration, the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP)

  3. NUCLEAR SCIENCE ANNUAL REPORT 1975

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gove and A. H. Wapstra, Nuclear Data Tables 11, 127 (1972).P. Jackson, Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories Report (1975)national Conference on Nuclear Structure and Spec­ troscopy,

  4. Nuclear & Radiological Activity Center (NRAC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear & Radiological Activity Center (NRAC) Where nuclear research and deployment capabilities come together to solve nuclear nonproliferation challenges. Skip Navigation Links...

  5. Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters Rob Goldston MIT IAP plays a large role in replacing coal red plants. al hydro electricity options penetrate in the climate way across scenarios, showing a slight severe climate targets. In Industry, the climate target has

  6. The prospect of nuclear energy in Türkiye especially after Fukushima accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ?ahin, Sümer, E-mail: ssahin@atilim.edu.tr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, ATILIM University, 06836 ?ncek, Gölba??, Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Türkiye considers since mid-50's to use nuclear electricity, but Government and bureaucracy have continuously postponed reactor construction. However, since 2010 the case has gained a real shape. Official agreement has been signed for the construction of 4 units of Russian VVER type reactors with installed power of 4×1200 MW{sub el}. It is expected that they will begin to deliver electricity early 20's. Further negotiations are being conducted with Japanese Mitsubashi and French AREVA. The target is to have nuclear electricity by 2023 at the 100{sup th} anniversary of Turkish Republic. Turkish Nuclear Energy Strategy aims; • Decrease country's dependency on foreign suppliers of energy sources • Provide fuel supply mix diversification • Utilization of environmentally friendly energy production technologies Possess advanced and prestigious power generation technologies.

  7. Parameter Study of the LIFE Engine Nuclear Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, K J; Meier, W R; Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P

    2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    LLNL is developing the nuclear fusion based Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) power plant concept. The baseline design uses a depleted uranium (DU) fission fuel blanket with a flowing molten salt coolant (flibe) that also breeds the tritium needed to sustain the fusion energy source. Indirect drive targets, similar to those that will be demonstrated on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), are ignited at {approx}13 Hz providing a 500 MW fusion source. The DU is in the form of a uranium oxycarbide kernel in modified TRISO-like fuel particles distributed in a carbon matrix forming 2-cm-diameter pebbles. The thermal power is held at 2000 MW by continuously varying the 6Li enrichment in the coolants. There are many options to be considered in the engine design including target yield, U-to-C ratio in the fuel, fission blanket thickness, etc. Here we report results of design variations and compare them in terms of various figures of merit such as time to reach a desired burnup, full-power years of operation, time and maximum burnup at power ramp down and the overall balance of plant utilization.

  8. Toxecon Retrofit for Mercury and Mulit-Pollutant Control on Three 90-MW Coal-Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Derenne; Robin Stewart

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) project was based on a cooperative agreement between We Energies and the DOE Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to design, install, evaluate, and demonstrate the EPRI-patented TOXECON{trademark} air pollution control process. Project partners included Cummins & Barnard, ADA-ES, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The primary goal of this project was to reduce mercury emissions from three 90-MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant in Marquette, Michigan. Additional goals were to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter emissions; allow reuse and sale of fly ash; advance commercialization of the technology; demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use at power plants; and demonstrate recovery of mercury from the sorbent. Mercury was controlled by injection of activated carbon upstream of the TOXECON{trademark} baghouse, which achieved more than 90% removal on average over a 44-month period. During a two-week test involving trona injection, SO{sub 2} emissions were reduced by 70%, although no coincident removal of NOx was achieved. The TOXECON{trademark} baghouse also provided enhanced particulate control, particularly during startup of the boilers. On this project, mercury CEMs were developed and tested in collaboration with Thermo Fisher Scientific, resulting in a reliable CEM that could be used in the power plant environment and that could measure mercury as low as 0.1 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. Sorbents were injected downstream of the primary particulate collection device, allowing for continued sale and beneficial use of captured fly ash. Two methods for recovering mercury using thermal desorption on the TOXECON{trademark} PAC/ash mixture were successfully tested during this program. Two methods for using the TOXECON{trademark} PAC/ash mixture in structural concrete were also successfully developed and tested. This project demonstrated a significant reduction in the rate of emissions from Presque Isle Units 7, 8, and 9, and substantial progress toward establishing the design criteria for one of the most promising mercury control retrofit technologies currently available. The Levelized Cost for 90% mercury removal at this site was calculated at $77,031 per pound of mercury removed with a capital cost of $63,189 per pound of mercury removed. Mercury removal at the Presque Isle Power Plant averages approximately 97 pounds per year.

  9. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains brief papers that discusses the following topics: Fundamental Symmetries in the Nucleus; Internucleon Interactions; Dynamics of Very Light Nuclei; Facets of the Nuclear Many-Body Problem; and Nuclear Instruments and Methods.

  10. Hegemony and nuclear proliferation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Nicholas L. (Nicholas LeSuer)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contrary to longstanding of predictions of nuclear tipping points, the number of states interested in nuclear weapons has sharply declined in recent decades. In contrast to existing explanations, this dissertation argues ...

  11. Promulgating Nuclear Safety Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Applies to all Nuclear Safety Requirements Adopted by the Department to Govern the Conduct of its Nuclear Activities. Cancels DOE P 410.1. Canceled by DOE N 251.85.

  12. Nuclear disarmament verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVolpi, A.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Arms control treaties, unilateral actions, and cooperative activities -- reflecting the defusing of East-West tensions -- are causing nuclear weapons to be disarmed and dismantled worldwide. In order to provide for future reductions and to build confidence in the permanency of this disarmament, verification procedures and technologies would play an important role. This paper outlines arms-control objectives, treaty organization, and actions that could be undertaken. For the purposes of this Workshop on Verification, nuclear disarmament has been divided into five topical subareas: Converting nuclear-weapons production complexes, Eliminating and monitoring nuclear-weapons delivery systems, Disabling and destroying nuclear warheads, Demilitarizing or non-military utilization of special nuclear materials, and Inhibiting nuclear arms in non-nuclear-weapons states. This paper concludes with an overview of potential methods for verification.

  13. Nuclear Engineer (Criticality Safety)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Nuclear Safety Division (NSD) which has specific responsibility for managing the development, analysis, review, and approval of non-reactor nuclear facility safety...

  14. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  15. General Engineer (Nuclear Safety)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) reports the US/M&P; in serving as the Central Technical Authority (CTA) for M&P; activities, ensuring the Departments nuclear safety policies and...

  16. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Donald C Cook

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Donald C Cook" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  17. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Joseph M Farley

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Joseph M Farley" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  18. Kansas Nuclear Profile - Wolf Creek Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    April 2012" "Next Release Date: February 2013" "Wolf Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor...

  19. Washington Nuclear Profile - Columbia Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Columbia Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  20. Texas Nuclear Profile - South Texas Project

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Texas Project" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  1. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Dresden Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dresden Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  2. Iowa Nuclear Profile - Duane Arnold Energy Center

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Duane Arnold Energy Center" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  3. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Clinton Power Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Clinton Power Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  4. South Carolina Nuclear Profile - H B Robinson

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    H B Robinson" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License Expiration Date"...

  5. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Byron Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Byron Generating Station" ,"Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  6. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Oyster Creek

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oyster Creek" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  7. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Three Mile Island

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Three Mile Island" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  8. North Carolina Nuclear Profile - McGuire

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    McGuire" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  9. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Braidwood Generation Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Braidwood Generation Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  10. New York Nuclear Profile - James A Fitzpatrick

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    James A Fitzpatrick" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  11. South Carolina Nuclear Profile - V C Summer

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    V C Summer" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  12. Georgia Nuclear Profile - Edwin I Hatch

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Edwin I Hatch" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  13. Nuclear Multifragmentation Critical Exponents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Bauer; William Friedman

    1994-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the critical exponents of nuclear multi-fragmentation have not been determined conclusively yet.

  14. Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides supplemental details to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety.

  15. 3D NUCLEAR SEGMENTAT

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003029WKSTN00 Delineation of nuclear structures in 3D multicellular systems  https://vision.lbl.gov/Software/3DMorphometry/ 

  16. Nuclear power browning out

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flavin, C.; Lenssen, N.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When the sad history of nuclear power is written, April 26, 1986, will be recorded as the day the dream died. The explosion at the Chernobyl plant was a terrible human tragedy- and it delivered a stark verdict on the hope that nuclear power will one day replace fossil fuel-based energy systems. Nuclear advocates may soldier on, but a decade after Chernobyl it is clear that nuclear power is no longer a viable energy option for the twenty-first century.

  17. Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Institute of Nuclear Material Management, Tucson, AZ,Assay, Institute of Nuclear Materials Management 51st Annual

  18. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, 7-10-13

  19. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs). Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.2D.

  20. NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA: 2007 STATUS REPORT CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION October 2007 CEC-100, California Contract No. 700-05-002 Prepared For: California Energy Commission Barbara Byron, Senior Nuclear public workshops on nuclear power. The Integrated Energy Policy Report Committee, led by Commissioners

  1. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed absorption cross-section behavior. Consequently, if NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;Demazière

  2. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper- ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed. Consequently, if*E-mail: demaz@nephy.chalmers.se NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;high-burnup fuel

  3. NUCLEAR PLANT AND CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: software require- ments, safety analysis, formal for the digital protection systems of a nuclear power plant. When spec- ifying requirements for software and CRSA processes are described using shutdown system 2 of the Wolsong nuclear power plants as the digital

  4. Nuclear Transmutations in HFIR's Beryllium Reflector and Their Impact on Reactor Operation and Reflector Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Proctor, Larry Duane [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory utilizes a large cylindrical beryllium reflector that is subdivided into three concentric regions and encompasses the compact reactor core. Nuclear transmutations caused by neutron activation occur in the beryllium reflector regions, which leads to unwanted neutron absorbing and radiation emitting isotopes. During the past year, two topics related to the HFIR beryllium reflector were reviewed. The first topic included studying the neutron poison (helium-3 and lithium-6) buildup in the reflector regions and its affect on beginning-of-cycle reactivity. A new methodology was developed to predict the reactivity impact and estimated symmetrical critical control element positions as a function of outage time between cycles due to helium-3 buildup and was shown to be in better agreement with actual symmetrical critical control element position data than the current methodology. The second topic included studying the composition of the beryllium reflector regions at discharge as well as during decay to assess the viability of transporting, storing, and ultimately disposing the reflector regions currently stored in the spent fuel pool. The post-irradiation curie inventories were used to determine whether the reflector regions are discharged as transuranic waste or become transuranic waste during the decay period for disposal purposes and to determine the nuclear hazard category, which may affect the controls invoked for transportation and temporary storage. Two of the reflector regions were determined to be transuranic waste at discharge and the other region was determined to become transuranic waste in less than 2 years after being discharged due to the initial uranium content (0.0044 weight percent uranium). It was also concluded that all three of the reflector regions could be classified as nuclear hazard category 3 (potential for localized consequences only).

  5. Fusion option to dispose of spent nuclear fuel and transuranic elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gohar, Y.

    2000-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The fusion option is examined to solve the disposition problems of the spent nuclear fuel and the transuranic elements. The analysis of this report shows that the top rated solution, the elimination of the transuranic elements and the long-lived fission products, can be achieved in a fusion reactor. A 167 MW of fusion power from a D-T plasma for sixty years with an availability factor of 0.75 can transmute all the transuranic elements and the long-lived fission products of the 70,000 tons of the US inventory of spent nuclear fuel generated up to the year 2015. The operating time can be reduced to thirty years with use of 334 MW of fusion power, a system study is needed to define the optimum time. In addition, the fusion solution eliminates the need for a geological repository site, which is a major advantage. Meanwhile, such utilization of the fusion power will provide an excellent opportunity to develop fusion energy for the future. Fusion blankets with a liquid carrier for the transuranic elements can achieve a transmutation rate for the transuranic elements up to 80 kg/MW.y of fusion power with k{sub eff} of 0.98. In addition, the liquid blankets have several advantages relative to the other blanket options. The energy from this transmutation is utilized to produce revenue for the system. Molten salt (Flibe) and lithium-lead eutectic are identified as the most promising liquids for this application, both materials are under development for future fusion blanket concepts. The Flibe molten salt with transuranic elements was developed and used successfully as nuclear fuel for the molten salt breeder reactor in the 1960's.

  6. Preparing Non-nuclear Engineers for the Nuclear Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ervin, Elizabeth K.

    Preparing Non-nuclear Engineers for the Nuclear Field Elizabeth K. Ervin The University. An understanding of power generation is important for all modern-day engineers, and nuclear energy serves as a good-four universities have nuclear- related programs, including Nuclear or Radiological Engineering, Nuclear Science

  7. Advanced Pipe Replacement Procedure for a Defective CRDM Housing Nozzle Enables Continued Normal Operation of a Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, Geoff; Becker, Andrew [Climax Portable Machine Tools, Inc., 2712 East Second Street, Newberg, OR 97132 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the 2003 outage at the Ringhals Nuclear Plant in Sweden, a leak was found in the vicinity of a Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) housing nozzle at Unit 1. Based on the ALARA principle for radioactive contamination, a unique repair process was developed. The repair system includes utilization of custom, remotely controlled GTAW-robots, a CNC cutting and finishing machine, snake-arm robots and NDE equipment. The success of the repair solution was based on performing the machining and welding operations from the inside of the SCRAM pipe through the CRDM housing since accessibility from the outside was extremely limited. Before the actual pipe replacement procedure was performed, comprehensive training programs were conducted. Training was followed by certification of equipment, staff and procedures during qualification tests in a full scale mock-up of the housing nozzle. Due to the ingenuity of the overall repair solution and training programs, the actual pipe replacement procedure was completed in less than half the anticipated time. As a result of the successful pipe replacement, the nuclear power plant was returned to normal operation. (authors)

  8. ANNOUNCEMENT NUCLEAR ENGINEERING FACULTY POSITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    ANNOUNCEMENT NUCLEAR ENGINEERING FACULTY POSITION The Department of Nuclear Engineering undergraduate and graduate courses in general nuclear engineering. The Knoxville campus of the University, Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering; The University of Tennessee; 312 Pasqua Engineering Bldg

  9. Evaluation criteria and procedure for nuclear power plant temporary loads/temporary conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, H.T. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Minichiello, J.C. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Downers Grove, IL (United States); Olson, D.E. [Sargent and Lundy, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operating nuclear power plants frequently encounter temporary loads/temporary conditions in plant normal operation and maintenance (O and M). The most obvious examples are installation of temporary shielding and scaffolding, or removal of certain supports, to facilitate plant refueling and maintenance outage activities. Short-term operability calls such as those due to snubber failures or unanticipated transients also create temporary loads/temporary conditions. These temporary situations often generate loads that are outside the original plant design basis. Consequently, separate evaluations are needed to ensure that plant structures, systems and components (SSCs) maintain their integrity and functionality while these temporary loads are active. Also, the temporary structures and components need to be evaluated to ensure their integrity during the temporary duration of use. Three types of approaches are normally adopted either individually or in combination to perform needed evaluations: relax the design allowables, use a more refined analysis model but retain the design basis acceptance criteria, or offset temporary loads by eliminating or reducing part of the design basis loads based on short duration considerations. This paper reviews temporary loading/temporary condition issues and the current industry criteria and procedures proposed in dealing with these issues. Where appropriate, regulatory positions on temporary loads/temporary conditions are discussed.

  10. Developing Effective Continuous On-Line Monitoring Technologies to Manage Service Degradation of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, there has been increased interest in using prognostics (i.e, remaining useful life (RUL) prediction) for managing and mitigating aging effects in service-degraded passive nuclear power reactor components. A vital part of this philosophy is the development of tools for detecting and monitoring service-induced degradation. Experience with in-service degradation has shown that rapidly-growing cracks, including several varieties of stress corrosion cracks (SCCs), can grow through a pipe in less than one fuel outage cycle after they initiate. Periodic inspection has limited effectiveness at detecting and managing such degradation requiring a more versatile monitoring philosophy. Acoustic emission testing (AET) and guided wave ultrasonic testing (GUT) are related technologies with potential for on-line monitoring applications. However, harsh operating conditions within NPPs inhibit the widespread implementation of both technologies. For AET, another hurdle is the attenuation of passive degradation signals as they travel though large components, relegating AET to targeted applications. GUT is further hindered by the complexity of GUT signatures limiting its application to the inspection of simple components. The development of sensors that are robust and inexpensive is key to expanding the use of AET and GUT for degradation monitoring in NPPs and improving overall effectiveness. Meanwhile, the effectiveness of AET and GUT in NPPs can be enhanced through thoughtful application of tandem AET-GUT techniques.

  11. Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the potential of nuclear power to combat global warming havecompetitive today, and for nuclear power to succeed, it must

  12. Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability LANL has strengthened its capability in a key aspect of...

  13. Nuclear Systems Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArms Control R&D ConsortiumNuclearSafeguardsResearch AreasNuclear

  14. Engineering analysis of a power upgrade for the Texas A&M Nuclear Science Center Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rearden, Bradley Thomas

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to maintain a constant power level. Its maximum withdrawal rate is 24. 4 cm/min. The transient rod is held in position by high pressure air, and is capable of rapid ejection from the core for pulsing. Nuclear Design The design and operating characteristics... notable capabilities. When the transient rod is ejected, the reactor can reach powers as high as 1000 MW for millisecond time intervals; as heat begins to build up in the fuel, the power automatically decreases due to the prompt negative temperature...

  15. Nuclear spirals in galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witold Maciejewski

    2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent high-resolution observations indicate that nuclear spirals are often present in the innermost few hundred parsecs of disc galaxies. My models show that nuclear spirals form naturally as a gas response to non-axisymmetry in the gravitational potential. Some nuclear spirals take the form of spiral shocks, resulting in streaming motions in the gas, and in inflow comparable to the accretion rates needed to power local Active Galactic Nuclei. Recently streaming motions of amplitude expected from the models have been observed in nuclear spirals, confirming the role of nuclear spirals in feeding of the central massive black holes.

  16. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  17. Expansion of Michigan EOR Operations Using Advanced Amine Technology at a 600 MW Project Wolverine Carbon Capture and Storage Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H Hoffman; Y kishinevsky; S. Wu; R. Pardini; E. Tripp; D. Barnes

    2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Wolverine Power Supply Cooperative Inc, a member owned cooperative utility based in Cadillac Michigan, proposes to demonstrate the capture, beneficial utilization and storage of CO{sub 2} in the expansion of existing Enhanced Oil Recovery operations. This project is being proposed in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-FOA-0000015 Section III D, 'Large Scale Industrial CCS projects from Industrial Sources' Technology Area 1. The project will remove 1,000 metric tons per day of CO{sub 2} from the Wolverine Clean Energy Venture 600 MW CFB power plant owned and operated by WPC. CO{sub 2} from the flue gas will be captured using Hitachi's CO{sub 2} capture system and advanced amine technology. The capture system with the advanced amine-based solvent supplied by Hitachi is expected to significantly reduce the cost and energy requirements of CO{sub 2} capture compared to current technologies. The captured CO{sub 2} will be compressed and transported for Enhanced Oil Recovery and CO{sub 2} storage purposes. Enhanced Oil Recovery is a proven concept, widely used to recover otherwise inaccessible petroleum reserves. While post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture technologies have been tested at the pilot scale on coal power plant flue gas, they have not yet been demonstrated at a commercial scale and integrated with EOR and storage operations. Amine-based CO{sub 2} capture is the leading technology expected to be available commercially within this decade to enable CCS for utility and industrial facilities firing coal and waste fuels such as petroleum coke. However, traditional CO{sub 2} capture process utilizing commercial amine solvents is very energy intensive for regeneration and is also susceptible to solvent degradation by oxygen as well as SOx and NO{sub 2} in the flue gas, resulting in large operating costs. The large volume of combustion flue gas with its low CO{sub 2} concentration requires large equipment sizes, which together with the highly corrosive nature of the typical amine-based separation process leads to high plant capital investment. According to recent DOE-NETL studies, MEA-based CCS will increase the cost of electricity of a new pulverized coal plant by 80-85% and reduce the net plant efficiency by about 30%. Non-power industrial facilities will incur similar production output and efficiency penalties when implementing conventional carbon capture systems. The proposed large scale demonstration project combining advanced amine CO{sub 2} capture integrated with commercial EOR operations significantly advances post-combustion technology development toward the DOE objectives of reducing the cost of energy production and improving the efficiency of CO{sub 2} Capture technologies. WPC has assembled a strong multidisciplinary team to meet the objectives of this project. WPC will provide the host site and Hitachi will provide the carbon capture technology and advanced solvent. Burns and Roe bring expertise in overall engineering integration and plant design to the team. Core Energy, an active EOR producer/operator in the State of Michigan, is committed to support the detailed design, construction and operation of the CO{sub 2} pipeline and storage component of the project. This team has developed a Front End Engineering Design and Cost Estimate as part of Phase 1 of DOE Award DE-FE0002477.

  18. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company's Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO[sub x] combustion technologies on NO[sub x] emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO[sub x] reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO[sub x] control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO[sub x] concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progress report presents the LNCFS Level I short-term data collected during this quarter. In addition, a comparison of all the long-term emissions data that have been collected to date is included.

  19. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, [October--December, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NOx combustion technologies on NOx emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NOx reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NOx control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NOx concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NOx reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. During this quarter, tests of the LNCFS Level III system were conducted to determine the effect that fuel fineness has on NOx emissions and unburned carbon levels. Results showed that changing the fineness of the fuel has almost no effect on NOx emissions; however, unburned carbon levels can be reduced significantly by increasing fuel fineness.

  20. Niland development project geothermal loan guaranty: 49-MW (net) power plant and geothermal well field development, Imperial County, California: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed federal action addressed by this environmental assessment is the authorization of disbursements under a loan guaranteed by the US Department of Energy for the Niland Geothermal Energy Program. The disbursements will partially finance the development of a geothermal well field in the Imperial Valley of California to supply a 25-MW(e) (net) power plant. Phase I of the project is the production of 25 MW(e) (net) of power; the full rate of 49 MW (net) would be achieved during Phase II. The project is located on approximately 1600 acres (648 ha) near the city of Niland in Imperial County, California. Well field development includes the initial drilling of 8 production wells for Phase I, 8 production wells for Phase II, and the possible need for as many as 16 replacement wells over the anticipated 30-year life of the facility. Activities associated with the power plant in addition to operation are excavation and construction of the facility and associated systems (such as cooling towers). Significant environmental impacts, as defined in Council on Environmental Quality regulation 40 CFR Part 1508.27, are not expected to occur as a result of this project. Minor impacts could include the following: local degradation of ambient air quality due to particulate and/or hydrogen sulfide emissions, temporarily increased ambient noise levels due to drilling and construction activities, and increased traffic. Impacts could be significant in the event of a major spill of geothermal fluid, which could contaminate groundwater and surface waters and alter or eliminate nearby habitat. Careful land use planning and engineering design, implementation of mitigation measures for pollution control, and design and implementation of an environmental monitoring program that can provide an early indication of potential problems should ensure that impacts, except for certain accidents, will be minimized.

  1. Nuclear Science References Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Pritychenko; E. B?ták; B. Singh; J. Totans

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr and the International Atomic Energy Agency http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr.

  2. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  3. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levesque, Stephen

    2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) � Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : � Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. � Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. � Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. � Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. � Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. � Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. � Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. � Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium projects. Full technical reports for each of the projects have been submitted as well.

  4. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risks for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage. Supporting MELCOR calculations, Volume 6, Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kmetyk, L.N.; Brown, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To gain a better understanding of the risk significance of low power and shutdown modes of operation, the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research at the NRC established programs to investigate the likelihood and severity of postulated accidents that could occur during low power and shutdown (LP&S) modes of operation at commercial nuclear power plants. To investigate the likelihood of severe core damage accidents during off power conditions, probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) were performed for two nuclear plants: Unit 1 of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, which is a BWR-6 Mark III boiling water reactor (BWR), and Unit 1 of the Surry Power Station, which is a three-loop, subatmospheric, pressurized water reactor (PWR). The analysis of the BWR was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories while the analysis of the PWR was performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This multi-volume report presents and discusses the results of the BWR analysis. The subject of this part presents the deterministic code calculations, performed with the MELCOR code, that were used to support the development and quantification of the PRA models. The background for the work documented in this report is summarized, including how deterministic codes are used in PRAS, why the MELCOR code is used, what the capabilities and features of MELCOR are, and how the code has been used by others in the past. Brief descriptions of the Grand Gulf plant and its configuration during LP&S operation and of the MELCOR input model developed for the Grand Gulf plant in its LP&S configuration are given.

  5. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C. [eds.] [eds.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

  6. Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    overall Nuclear Safety Policy & ESH Goals Safety Basis Review and Approval In the DOE governance model, contractors responsible for the facility develop the safety basis and...

  7. Nuclear Physics from QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. van Kolck

    2008-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective field theories provide a bridge between QCD and nuclear physics. I discuss light nuclei from this perspective, emphasizing the role of fine-tuning.

  8. Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    To prevent unauthorized dissemination of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI). Cancels DOE 5635.4 and DOE 5650.3A

  9. Nuclear Spectra from Skyrmions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manton, N. S. [DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The structures of Skyrmions, especially for baryon numbers 4, 8 and 12, are reviewed. The quantized Skyrmion states are compared with nuclear spectra.

  10. 2013 Nuclear Workforce Development ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Patient Care Medical Imaging & Computers Moderator: Deborah M. Gibbs, MEd, PET, CNMT Lead Nuclear Medicine PET Facility Administrator Georgia Regents University...

  11. National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Reviews, etc., except those specifically reserved for the Administrator for the National Nuclear Security Administration and the Deputy Secretary. cc: Mike Hickman. NA-Stl...

  12. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 5660.1B.

  13. Reference handbook: Nuclear criticality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose for this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with the information necessary to understand the basic principles underlying a nuclear criticality.

  14. Nuclear | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat Cornell BatteriesArchivesNuclear Science/NuclearNuclear Nuclear

  15. National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Related Structures within TA-3 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico U. S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Area...

  16. Test and demonstration of a 1-MW wellhead generator: helical screw expander power plant, Model 76-1. Final report to the International Energy Agency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1-MW geothermal wellhead power plant incorporating a Lysholm or helical screw expander (HSE) was field tested between 1980 and 1983 by Mexico, Italy, and New Zealand with technical assistance from the United States. The objectives were to provide data on the reliability and performance of the HSE and to assess the costs and benefits of its use. The range of conditions under which the HSE was tested included loads up to 933 kW, mass flowrates of 14,600 to 395, 000 lbs/hr, inlet pressures of 64 to 220 psia, inlet qualities of 0 to 100%, exhaust pressures of 3.1 to 40 psia, total dissolved solids up to 310,000 ppM, and noncondensible gases up to 38% of the vapor mass flow. Typical machine efficiencies of 40 to 50% were calculated. For most operations efficiency increased approximately logarithmically with shaft power, while inlet quality and rotor speed had only small effects. The HSE was designed with oversized internal clearances in the expectation that adherent scale would form during operation. Improvements in machine efficiency of 3.5 to 4 percentage points were observed over some test periods with some scale deposition. A comparison with a 1-MW back-pressure turbine showed that the HSE can compete favorably under certain conditions. The HSE was found to be a rugged energy conversion machine for geothermal applications, but some subsystems were found to require further development. 7 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation Draft Advanced Nuclear Energy Projects Solicitation INFORMATIONAL MATERIALS DRAFT ADVANCED NUCLEAR ENERGY PROJECTS SOLICITATION...

  18. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems ... The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy enhance safety and security, and develop nuclear power as an energy source for industrial applications Information ... U.S. Department of Energy www.energy.gov DOE Office of Nuclear Energy www.nuclear

  19. Nuclear Security 101 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohnSecurityControls |Navy NuclearNuclear Science

  20. Nuclear Security Enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohnSecurityControls |Navy NuclearNuclear

  1. NUCLEAR ENERGY PERGAMON Annals of Nuclear Energy 27 (2000) 138551398

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    annafs of NUCLEAR ENERGY PERGAMON Annals of Nuclear Energy 27 (2000) 138551398 www-4549(00)00033-5 #12;1386 I. Phi!, V. Arzhanov. /Annals qf Nuclear Energy 27 (2000) 1385-1398 subcritical systems (ADS

  2. The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroenig, Matthew

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    204. Bhatia, Shyam. 1988. Nuclear rivals in the Middle East.of the merits of selective nuclear proliferation. Journal ofThe Case for a Ukranian nuclear deterrent. Foreign Affairs.

  3. National Nuclear Science Week 2012 - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Know Nuclear National Nuclear Science Week January 23 - 27, 2012 Fostering a deeper public understanding Logos for: National Nuclear Science Week, Nuclear Workforce Initiative,...

  4. Whither Nuclear Physics ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Syed Afsar Abbas

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Physics has had its ups and downs. However in recent years, bucked up by some new and often puzzling data, it has become a potentially very rich field. We review some of these exciting developments in a few important sectors of nuclear physics. Emphasis shall be on the study of exotic nuclei and the new physics that these nuclei are teaching us.

  5. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The directive establishes specific nuclear explosive safety (NES) program requirements to implement the DOE NES standards and other NES criteria for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2B. Canceled by DOE O 452.2D.

  6. [Nuclear theory: Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iachello, F.; Alhassid, Y.; Kusnezov, D.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses topics on : nuclear structure models; algebraic models of hadronic structure; nuclear reactions; hot rotating nuclei; chaos in nuclei; signatures of the quark-gluon plasma; hadronic spectroscopy; octupole collectivity in nuclei; finite-temperature methods for the many-body problem; and classical limit of algebraic hamiltonians. (LSP)

  7. (Nuclear theory: Annual report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iachello, F.; Alhassid, Y.; Kusnezov, D.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses topics on : nuclear structure models; algebraic models of hadronic structure; nuclear reactions; hot rotating nuclei; chaos in nuclei; signatures of the quark-gluon plasma; hadronic spectroscopy; octupole collectivity in nuclei; finite-temperature methods for the many-body problem; and classical limit of algebraic hamiltonians. (LSP)

  8. Nuclear physics and cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coc, Alain [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris Sud 11, UMR 8609, Bâtiment 104, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    There are important aspects of Cosmology, the scientific study of the large scale properties of the universe as a whole, for which nuclear physics can provide insights. Here, we will focus on Standard Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis and we refer to the previous edition of the School [1] for the aspects concerning the variations of constants in nuclear cosmo-physics.

  9. World nuclear outlook 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  10. World nuclear outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2010 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  11. NuclearNuclear ""BurningBurning"" of Nuclearof Nuclear ""WasteWaste"" Constantine P. Tzanos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as a geologic repository for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high level radioactive waste. #12;The YuccaNuclearNuclear ""BurningBurning"" of Nuclearof Nuclear ""WasteWaste"" Constantine P. Tzanos Argonne-level radioactive waste that has accumulated at 72 commercial and 4 DOE sites. s U.S. Congress adopted the Nuclear

  12. Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Legislation authorizes states' entrance into the Western Interstate Nuclear Compact, which aims to undertake the cooperation of participating states in deriving the optimum benefit from nuclear and...

  13. China's Nuclear Industry After Fukushima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YUAN, Jingdong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2013-9 January 2013 China’s Nuclear Industry After FukushimaMarch 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident has had a significanton the future of China’s nuclear power. First, it highlights

  14. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanni, Emilio Alessandro

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The ...

  15. NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY ANNUAL REPORT 1970

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Letters 24, 1507 (1970); Nuclear Data B4, 663 (1970). 5. R.S. Hager and E. C. Seltzer, Nuclear Data A4, 1 (1968). 6. H.J. Nijgh, and R. Van Lieshout, Nuclear Spectroscopy Tables (

  16. Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10.1007/s11270-009-0270-y Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?MHS) attended a lecture on “Nuclear Responsibility” on theof the Alliance for Nuclear Responsibility. The information

  17. Supporting Our Nation's Nuclear Industry

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lyons, Peter

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    On the 60th anniversary of the world's first nuclear power plant to produce electricity, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Peter Lyons discusses the Energy Department's and the Administration's commitment to promoting a nuclear renaissance in the United States.

  18. China's Nuclear Industry After Fukushima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YUAN, Jingdong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief 2013-9 January 2013 China’s Nuclear Industry Aftera significant impact on the future of China’s nuclear power.the importance of safety as China builds more nuclear power

  19. Design, construction, system integration, and test results of the 1 MW CW RF system for the e-gun cavity in the energy recovery LINAC at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenci,S.J.; Eisen, E. L.; Dickey, D. L.; Sainz, J. E.; Utay, P. F.; Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven's ERL (Energy Recovery LINAC) requires a 1 MW CW RF system for the superconducting electron gun cavity. The system consists primarily of a klystron tube, transmitter, and High-Voltage Power Supply (HVPS). The 703.75 MHz klystron made by CPl, Inc. provides RF power of 1MW CW with efficiency of 65%. It has a single output window, diode-type electron gun, and collector capable of dissipating the entire beam power. It was fully factory tested including 24-hour heat run at 1.1 MW CWo The solid state HVPS designed by Continental Electronics provides up to 100 kV at low ripple and 2.1 MW CW with over 95% efficiency. With minimal stored energy and a fast shut-down mode no crowbar circuit is needed. Continental 's transmitter includes PLC based user interface and monitoring, RF pre-amplifier, magnet and Vac-Ion pump supplies, cooling water instrumentation, and integral safety interlock system. BNL installed the klystron, HVPS, and transmitter along with other items, such as circulator, water load, and waveguide components. The collaboration of BNL, CPI, and Continental in the design, installation, and testing was essential to the successful operation of the 1MW system.

  20. Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first subchapter of the statute concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities provides for direct citizen participation in the decision to construct any nuclear power generating facility in...

  1. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Components," Journal of Nuclear Materials, 212-215, 1223 (1994). 13. Arnold, L, Windscale 1957, Anatomy of a Nuclear Accident, St Martin Press, London, 1992. 14....

  2. China's Nuclear Industry After Fukushima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YUAN, Jingdong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s Nuclear Industry After Fukushima Jingdong YUAN SummaryT he March 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident has had aand speedy responses to Fukushima-like and other unexpected

  3. Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    production, nuclear weapons, and nuclear threat reduction Proton radiography, muon tomography, proton active interrogation, wide-angle, fast-response optical telescopes, and...

  4. Nuclear Forensics | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear facilities, and inorganic mass spectrometry as applied to traditional nuclear forensic science applications. The application of classical forensic science tools (mass...

  5. Evaluated Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblozinsky, P.; Oblozinsky,P.; Herman,M.; Mughabghab,S.F.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter describes the current status of evaluated nuclear data for nuclear technology applications. We start with evaluation procedures for neutron-induced reactions focusing on incident energies from the thermal energy up to 20 MeV, though higher energies are also mentioned. This is followed by examining the status of evaluated neutron data for actinides that play dominant role in most of the applications, followed by coolants/moderators, structural materials and fission products. We then discuss neutron covariance data that characterize uncertainties and correlations. We explain how modern nuclear evaluated data libraries are validated against an extensive set of integral benchmark experiments. Afterwards, we briefly examine other data of importance for nuclear technology, including fission yields, thermal neutron scattering and decay data. A description of three major evaluated nuclear data libraries is provided, including the latest version of the US library ENDF/B-VII.0, European JEFF-3.1 and Japanese JENDL-3.3. A brief introduction is made to current web retrieval systems that allow easy access to a vast amount of up-to-date evaluated nuclear data for nuclear technology applications.

  6. Visual inspection submersible for nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, M.; Okano, H.; Ozaki, O.; Shimada, H. [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama (Japan)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) are currently in use for visual inspections within reactor pressure vessels (RPV). In boiling water reactors (BWR), there is a complex RPV consisting of structures which are not disassembled during outages. To inspect the large volume of the RPV and associated components, the inspection vehicle must be compact and easily maneuverable. Toshiba has developed an ROV for the purpose of visual inspections in BWRS. This paper describes this ROV, the most compact visual inspection submersible yet manufactured and used in a BWR.

  7. System Upgrades at the Advanced Test Reactor Help Ensure that Nuclear Energy Research Continues at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig Wise

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fully operational in 1967, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a first-of-its-kind materials test reactor. Located on the Idaho National Laboratory’s desert site, this reactor remains at the forefront of nuclear science, producing extremely high neutron irradiation in a relatively short time span. The Advanced Test Reactor is also the only U.S. reactor that can replicate multiple reactor environments concurrently. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Department of Energy recently invested over 13 million dollars to replace three of ATR’s instrumentation and control systems. The new systems offer the latest software and technology advancements, ensuring the availability of the reactor for future energy research. Engineers and project managers successfully completed the four year project in March while the ATR was in a scheduled maintenance outage. “These new systems represent state-of-the-art monitoring and annunciation capabilities,” said Don Feldman, ATR Station Manager. “They are comparable to systems currently used for advanced reactor designs planned for construction in the U.S. and in operation in some foreign countries.”

  8. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the March 1996 listing of NRC issuances. Included are: (1) NRC orders granting Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company`s petition for review of the ASLB order LBP-95-17, (2) NRC orders relating to the potential disqualification of two commissioners in the matter of the decommissioning of Yankee Nuclear Power Station, (3) ASLB orders pertaining to the Oncology Services Corporation, (4) ASLB orders pertaining to the Radiation Oncology Center, (5) ASLB orders pertaining to the Yankee Nuclear Power Station, and (6) Director`s decision pertaining to the Yankee Nuclear Power Station.

  9. Monitoring international nuclear activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, R.B.

    2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The LBNL Table of Isotopes website provides primary nuclearinformation to>150,000 different users annually. We have developedthe covert technology to identify users by IP address and country todetermine the kinds of nuclear information they are retrieving. Wepropose to develop pattern recognition software to provide an earlywarning system to identify Unusual nuclear activity by country or regionSpecific nuclear/radioactive material interests We have monitored nuclearinformation for over two years and provide this information to the FBIand LLNL. Intelligence is gleaned from the website log files. Thisproposal would expand our reporting capabilities.

  10. Nuclear Physics: Experiment Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArms Control R&D ConsortiumNuclear PairsNuclear Physicsfrom

  11. Nuclear Science & Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArms Control R&D ConsortiumNuclearSafeguards and Nuclear

  12. Nuclear Weapons Journal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArms Control R&D ConsortiumNuclearSafeguardsResearchNuclear Weapons

  13. Cooperation Reliability Testing of the Clipper Windpower Liberty 2.5 MW Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-210

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, S.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clipper Windpower (CWP) has developed the Liberty 2.5 MW wind turbine. The development, manufacturing, and certification process depends heavily on being able to validate the full-scale system design and performance under load in both an accredited structural test facility and through accredited field testing. CWP requested that DOE/ NREL upgrade blade test capabilities to perform a scope of work including structural testing of the C-96 blade used on the CWP Liberty turbine. This funds-in CRADA was developed to upgrade NREL blade test capability, while enabling certification testing of the C-96 blade through the facility and equipment upgrades. NREL shared resource funds were used to develop hardware necessary to structurally attach a large wind turbine to the test stand at the NWTC. Participant funds-in monies were used for developing the test program.

  14. Nuclear Physics Science Network Requirements Workshop, May 2008 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tierney, Ed., Brian L; Dart, Ed., Eli; Carlson, Rich; Dattoria, Vince; Ernest, Michael; Hitchcock, Daniel; Johnston, William; Kowalski, Andy; Lauret, Jerome; Maguire, Charles; Olson, Douglas; Purschke, Martin; Rai, Gulshan; Watson, Chip; Vale, Carla

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States of America. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In May 2008, ESnet and the Nuclear Physics (NP) Program Office of the DOE Office of Science organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the science programs funded by the NP Program Office. Most of the key DOE sites for NP related work will require significant increases in network bandwidth in the 5 year time frame. This includes roughly 40 Gbps for BNL, and 20 Gbps for NERSC. Total transatlantic requirements are on the order of 40 Gbps, and transpacific requirements are on the order of 30 Gbps. Other key sites are Vanderbilt University and MIT, which will need on the order of 20 Gbps bandwidth to support data transfers for the CMS Heavy Ion program. In addition to bandwidth requirements, the workshop emphasized several points in regard to science process and collaboration. One key point is the heavy reliance on Grid tools and infrastructure (both PKI and tools such as GridFTP) by the NP community. The reliance on Grid software is expected to increase in the future. Therefore, continued development and support of Grid software is very important to the NP science community. Another key finding is that scientific productivity is greatly enhanced by easy researcher-local access to instrument data. This is driving the creation of distributed repositories for instrument data at collaborating institutions, along with a corresponding increase in demand for network-based data transfers and the tools to manage those transfers effectively. Network reliability is also becoming more important as there is often a narrow window between data collection and data archiving when transfer and analysis can be done. The instruments do not stop producing data, so extended network outages can result in data loss due to analysis pipeline stalls. Finally, as the scope of collaboration continues to increase, collaboration tools such as audio and video conferencing are becoming ever more critical to the productivity of scientific collaborations.

  15. NUCLEAR ENERGY Annals of Nuclear Energy 32 (2005) 812842

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    annals of NUCLEAR ENERGY Annals of Nuclear Energy 32 (2005) 812­842 www of Nuclear Energy 32 (2005) 812­842 background noise is present, this technique is useful to indicate.elsevier.com/locate/anucene Identification and localization of absorbers of variable strength in nuclear reactors C. Demazie`re a,*, G

  16. Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Schenter, R.E. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted.

  17. Nuclear Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohnSecurityControls | National Nuclear Security

  18. Nuclear Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohnSecurityControls |Navy Nuclear Navy

  19. Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohnSecurityControls |NavyNuclear

  20. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - nuclear section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on nuclear electricity capacity, generation, and number of operable nuclear reactors.

  1. Nuclear Material Packaging Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual provides detailed packaging requirements for protecting workers from exposure to nuclear materials stored outside of an approved engineered contamination barrier. No cancellation. Certified 11-18-10.

  2. Nuclear Emergency Search Team

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1991-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy for Nuclear Emergency Search Team (NEST) operations to malevolent radiological incidents. This directive does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

  3. PDFs for nuclear targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karol Kovarik

    2010-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding nuclear effects in parton distribution functions (PDF) is an essential component needed to determine the strange and anti-strange quark contributions in the proton. In addition Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions (NPDF) are critically important for any collider experiment with nuclei (e.g. RHIC, ALICE). Here two next-to-leading order chi^2-analyses of NPDF are presented. The first uses neutral current charged-lepton Deeply Inelastic Scattering (DIS) and Drell-Yan data for several nuclear targets and the second uses neutrino-nucleon DIS data. We compare the nuclear corrections factors (F_2^Fe/F_2^D) for the charged-lepton data with other results from the literature. In particular, we compare and contrast fits based upon the charged-lepton DIS data with those using neutrino-nucleon DIS data.

  4. INL '@work' Nuclear Engineer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McLean, Heather

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Heather MacLean talks about her job as a Nuclear Engineer for Idaho National Laboratory. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  5. Relativistic Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinhard Stock

    2009-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive introduction is given to the field of relativistic nuclear collisions, and the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter. The content of this complex of reviews is shown.

  6. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1994-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish requirements and procedures for the management of nuclear materials within the Department of Energy (DOE). Cancels DOE 5660.1A. Canceled by DOE O 410.2.

  7. Western Nuclear Science Alliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Reese; George Miller; Stephen Frantz; Denis Beller; Denis Beller; Ed Morse; Melinda Krahenbuhl; Bob Flocchini; Jim Elliston

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the INIE program is to strengthen nuclear science and engineering programs at the member institutions and to address the long term goal of the University Reactor Infrastructure and Education Assistance Program.

  8. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 410.2. Admin Chg 1 dated 4-10-2014, cancels DOE O 410.2.

  9. State Nuclear Profiles 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    60 Vermont Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347...

  10. Pioneering the nuclear age

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the historical aspects of nuclear physics. The scientific aspects of the early transuranium elements are discussed and arms control measures are reviewed. 11 refs., 14 figs. (LSP)

  11. International Nuclear Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, James E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses: (1) Definitions of international nuclear security; (2) What degree of security do we have now; (3) Limitations of a nuclear security strategy focused on national lock-downs of fissile materials and weapons; (4) What do current trends say about the future; and (5) How can nuclear security be strengthened? Nuclear security can be strengthened by: (1) More accurate baseline inventories; (2) Better physical protection, control and accounting; (3) Effective personnel reliability programs; (4) Minimize weapons-usable materials and consolidate to fewer locations; (5) Consider local threat environment when siting facilities; (6) Implement pledges made in the NSS process; and (7) More robust interdiction, emergency response and special operations capabilities. International cooperation is desirable, but not always possible.

  12. Nuclear material operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.P.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual provides a concise and comprehensive documentation of the operating procedures currently practiced at Sandia National Laboratories with regard to the management, control, and accountability of nuclear materials. The manual is divided into chapters which are devoted to the separate functions performed in nuclear material operations-management, control, accountability, and safeguards, and the final two chapters comprise a document which is also issued separately to provide a summary of the information and operating procedures relevant to custodians and users of radioactive and nuclear materials. The manual also contains samples of the forms utilized in carrying out nuclear material activities. To enhance the clarity of presentation, operating procedures are presented in the form of playscripts in which the responsible organizations and necessary actions are clearly delineated in a chronological fashion from the initiation of a transaction to its completion.

  13. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The directive provides supplemental details to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2C, Nuclear Explosive Safety, dated 6-12-06. Canceled by DOE M 452.2-1A.

  14. Innovative clean coal technology: 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Final report, Phases 1 - 3B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) project demonstrating advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project was conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The technologies demonstrated at this site include Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation`s advanced overfire air system and Controlled Flow/Split Flame low NOx burner. The primary objective of the demonstration at Hammond Unit 4 was to determine the long-term effects of commercially available wall-fired low NOx combustion technologies on NOx emissions and boiler performance. Short-term tests of each technology were also performed to provide engineering information about emissions and performance trends. A target of achieving fifty percent NOx reduction using combustion modifications was established for the project. Short-term and long-term baseline testing was conducted in an {open_quotes}as-found{close_quotes} condition from November 1989 through March 1990. Following retrofit of the AOFA system during a four-week outage in spring 1990, the AOFA configuration was tested from August 1990 through March 1991. The FWEC CF/SF low NOx burners were then installed during a seven-week outage starting on March 8, 1991 and continuing to May 5, 1991. Following optimization of the LNBs and ancillary combustion equipment by FWEC personnel, LNB testing commenced during July 1991 and continued until January 1992. Testing in the LNB+AOFA configuration was completed during August 1993. This report provides documentation on the design criteria used in the performance of this project as it pertains to the scope involved with the low NOx burners and advanced overfire systems.

  15. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, second quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO{sub x} control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO{sub x} concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progress report presents the LNCFS Level I short-term data collected during this quarter. In addition, a comparison of all the long-term emissions data that have been collected to date is included.

  16. Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven National Laboratory William C. Horak, Chair Nuclear Science and Technology Department #12;BNL Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor - 1948 National&T Department #12;Nuclear Energy Today 435 Operable Power Reactors, 12% electrical generation (100 in US, 19

  17. CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS A Workshop on "NUCLEAR ENERGY RENAISSANCE" Addressing WAS DEEPLY INVOLVED IN ALMOST EVERY ASPECT OF BUILDING THE PLANTS THROUGH · Quality Assurance · Nuclear IN CONSTRUCTION OF ST. LUCIE-2 #12;LESSONS LEARNED FROM St. Lucie-2 NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS CAN BE BUILT

  18. NUCLEAR ENGINEERING Four Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    NUCLEAR ENGINEERING Four Year Plan Fall 2009 Nuclear Engineering (67 hrs) CH Grade Perspectives (15;Nuclear Engineering Four Year Plan Starting Fall 2009 FALL Year 1 Credits WINTER Year 1 Credits SPRING I NE 452 3 Neutronic Analysis II NE 457 2 Nuclear Reactor Lab Western Culture (3): NE 467 4 Nucl

  19. Panel report: nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Joseph A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hartouni, Edward P [LLNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear science is at the very heart of the NNSA program. The energy produced by nuclear processes is central to the NNSA mission, and nuclear reactions are critical in many applications, including National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsules, energy production, weapons, and in global threat reduction. Nuclear reactions are the source of energy in all these applications, and they can also be crucial in understanding and diagnosing the complex high-energy environments integral to the work of the NNSA. Nuclear processes are complex quantum many-body problems. Modeling and simulation of nuclear reactions and their role in applications, coupled tightly with experiments, have played a key role in NNSA's mission. The science input to NNSA program applications has been heavily reliant on experiment combined with extrapolations and physical models 'just good enough' to provide a starting point to extensive engineering that generated a body of empirical information. This body of information lacks the basic science underpinnings necessary to provide reliable extrapolations beyond the domain in which it was produced and for providing quantifiable error bars. Further, the ability to perform additional engineering tests is no longer possible, especially those tests that produce data in the extreme environments that uniquely characterize these applications. The end of testing has required improvements to the predictive capabilities of codes simulating the reactions and associated applications for both well known and well characterized cases as well as incompletely known cases. Developments in high performance computing, computational physics, applied mathematics and nuclear theory have combined to make spectacular advances in the theory of fission, fusion and nuclear reactions. Current research exploits these developments in a number of Office of Science and NNSA programs, and in joint programs such as the SciDAC (Science Discovery through Advanced Computing) that supports the project Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Fuctional whose goals are to provide the unified approach to calculating the properties of nuclei. The successful outcome of this, and similar projects is a first steps toward a predictive nuclear theory based on fundamental interactions between constituent nucleons. The application of this theory to the domain of nuclei important for national security missions will require computational resources at the extreme scale, beyond what will be available in the near term future.

  20. The elements of nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennet, D.J.; Thomson, J.R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An introduction to the principles of nuclear fission power generation. Describes the physical processes which occur in a nuclear reactor and discusses the theory behind the calculations. Also covers heat transfer in reactors, thermodynamic power cycles, reactor operators, and radiation shielding. Material covered includes topics on the effects of nuclear radiation on humans, the safety of nuclear reactors and of those parts of the nuclear fuel cycle which deal with fuel element manufacture and the reprocessing of irradiated fuel.