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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Summary of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Non-Proliferation Treaty rests on a basic bargain between the five declared nuclear-weapon states-the United States, Russia, Britain, France and China and 167 states that do not possess nuclear weapons. In addition, to the arms control and disarmaments commitments in Article VI, the parties pledge in the treaty`s pramble their determination to seek a comprehensive test ban (CTB) and express the understanding that in connection with the treaty on general and complete disarmament the parties should seek the cessation of manufacture of nuclear weapons, the liquidation of all their existing stock piles, and the elimination from national arsenals of nuclear weapons and means of their delivery. The author summaries key elements of these agreements.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

The future of the Non-Proliferation Treaty and U.S. nuclear weapons policy .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis addresses the viability of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons – NPT for short – in light of U.S. nuclear weapons… (more)

Claussen, Bjørn Ragnar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, the relationship  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) is the most important international security arrangement that we have that is protecting the world community and this has been true for many years. But it did not happen by accident, it is a strategic bargain in which 184 states gave up the right forever to acquire the most powerful weapon ever created in exchange for a commitment from the five states allowed to keep nuclear weapons under the NPT (U.S., U.K., Russia, France and China), to share peaceful nuclear technology and to engage in disarmament negotiations aimed at the ultimate elimination of their nuclear stockpiles. The most important part of this is the comprehensive nuclear test ban (CTBT); the thinking by the 184 NPT non-nuclear weapon states was and is that they understand that the elimination of nuclear weapon stockpiles is a long way off, but at least the NPT nuclear weapon states could stop testing the weapons. The CTBT has been ratified by 161 states but by its terms it can only come into force if 44 nuclear potential states ratify; 36 have of the 44 have ratified it, the remaining eight include the United States and seven others, most of whom are in effect waiting for the United States. No state has tested a nuclear weapon-except for complete outlier North Korea-in 15 years. There appears to be no chance that the U.S. Senate will approve the CTBT for ratification in the foreseeable future, but the NPT may not survive without it. Perhaps it is time to consider an interim measure, for the UN Security Council to declare that any future nuclear weapon test any time, anywhere is a 'threat to peace and security', in effect a violation of international law, which in today's world it clearly would be.

Graham, Thomas Jr. [7609 Glenbrook Rd., Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

4

Non-Proliferation Treaty at 25  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article is a review of nuclear nonproliferation issues during the 25 years that have passed since the signing of the first nonproliferation treaty. A historical background is provided, both declared and undeclared nuclear powers are noted, and considerable attention is given to issues brought about by the dissolution of the Soviet Union and by the renegade actions of a number of signatories, e.g. Iraq, and several of the non-signatories. Present/future policies are discussed, as is the impact of the present Administration in Washington.

Cooper, M.H.

1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

5

Nuclear Nonproliferation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Nonproliferation As more countries embrace nuclear power as a cost-effective and clean alternative to fossil fuels, the need exists to ensure that the nuclear fuel cycle is...

6

Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs SHARE Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs image Oak Ridge National Laboratory covers the entire spectrum of nuclear nonproliferation work, from...

7

Presentation: DOE Nuclear Nonproliferation | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Presentation: DOE Nuclear Nonproliferation Presentation: DOE Nuclear Nonproliferation A briefing to the Secretary's Energy Advisory Board on DOE nuclear nonproliferation activities...

8

Verifying nonproliferation treaties: Obligation, process, and sovereignty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The foregoing chapters examine what verification is and why states would bother with so difficult and politically sensitive an issue when negotiating agreements on arms control and disarmament issues. Now it is necessary to confront the question of whether there are any meaningful conclusions to be drawn from this exercise. Are the patterns discerned in the history of these treaties meaningful for understanding how other treaties have evolved or will evolve. Are there lessons here which might benefit future negotiators. This final chapter seeks to provide some answers, albeit partial ones, to these questions. There are in fact several interesting and potentially important conclusions to be drawn. Verification of multilateral treaty obligations contains its own intrinsic structure and logic, independent of the obligations undertaken by the parties and the political context in which those undertakings are negotiated and made. The many significant similarities in the verification processes for the CFE Treaty, the NPT, and the CWC demonstrate the degree to which there is such an underlying structure regardless of whether the behavior or activity is strictly military or has essentially civilian dimensions, whether all relevant states participate or only some of the most important states agree from the beginning to participate, and whether the agreement is global or regional in scope.

Kessler, J.C.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices One of the gravest threats the United States and the international

10

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices One of the gravest threats the United States and the international

11

Nuclear Proliferation And The Nuclear Deterrent: Will The Non-Proliferation Treaty Ever Achieve Total Nuclear Disarmament? Is The Nuclear Deterrent Worth Keeping?.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In 2009 President Obama outlined his utopic vision of a nuclear-free world, admitting that this would not be possible within his lifetime he claimed that while… (more)

Eckford, James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability LANL has strengthened its capability in a key aspect of nuclear nonproliferation by combining two groups within its Global Security organization. June 27, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

13

Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nonproliferation Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation Nonproliferation One of the gravest threats the United States and the international community face is the possibility that terrorists or rogue nations will acquire nuclear weapons or other weapons of mass destruction (WMD). NNSA,

14

Putting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Putting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation Jerry Gilfoyle Physics Department, University of Richmond, Virginia Outline: 1. Some Bits of History. 2. Nuclear Weapons 101. 3. The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. 4. Testing The Test Ban Treaty. 5. Why should you care

Gilfoyle, Jerry

15

Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nonproliferation & International Security Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nonproliferation & International Security Nonproliferation & International Security

16

Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nonproliferation & International Security Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nonproliferation & International Security Nonproliferation & International Security

17

Atoms for peace and the nonproliferation treaty: unintended consequences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 2009, President Obama revived nonproliferation and arms control efforts with a speech calling for the worldwide abolition of nuclear weapons. His speech correctly acknowledged the threat of nuclear terrorism and the vulnerabilities of the related unsecure nuclear materials. Unfortunately, the president did not mention and has not mentioned in any speech the threat posed by at-risk radiological materials. Nonproliferation efforts have a well documented history of focus on special nuclear materials (fissionable weapons usable materials or SNM), and other key materials (chemical and biological) and technologies for a Weapon of Mass Destruction (WMD). Such intense focus on WMD related materials/technologies is essential for international safety and security and merit continued attention and funding. However, the perception that radioactive sealed sources (sources) are of less concern than WMD is unfortunate. These perceptions are based solely on the potentially enormous and tragic consequences associated with their deliberate or accidental misuse and proliferation concerns. However, there is a documented history of overemphasis on the nuclear threat at the expense of ignoring the far more likely and also devastating chemical and biological threats. The radiological threat should not be minimized or excluded from policy discussions and decisions on these far ranging scopes of threat to the international community. Sources have a long history of use; and a wider distribution worldwide than fissile materials. Pair this with their broad ranges in isotopes/activities along with scant national and international attention and mechanisms for their safe and secure management and it is not difficult to envision a deadly threat. Arguments that minimize or divert attention away from sources may have the effect of distracting necessary policy attention on preventing/mitigating a radiological dispersal event. The terrorist attacks on 9/11 should be a clear reminder of the inherent danger of diminishing or dismissing lower-level threats in exchange for enhanced focus on high priority special nuclear materials with the basis for this emphasis being solely on the magnitude of the consequences of a single event. Mitigating all possible or likely terrorist attacks is impossible; however, weaponized sources, in the form of a radiological dispersal device, have been a declared target material of Al-Qaida. Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace initiative promoted the spread of the paradoxical beneficial yet destructive properties of the atom. Typically, the focus of nonproliferation efforts focuses on the fissile materials associated with Weapons of Mass Destruction, with less emphasis on radioactive materials that could be used for a Weapon of Mass Disruption. Most nonproliferation policy discussion involves securing or preventing the diversion of weapons grade fissile materials (uranium (U) with concentration of over 90% of the isotope {sup 235}U (HEU) and plutonium with more than 90% of the isotope {sup 239}Pu), with scant attention given to the threat posed by a prolific quantity of sources spread worldwide. Further acerbating the problem of inattention, it appears that the momentum of the continued evolution in the beneficial applications of sources will only increase in the near future. Several expert studies have demonstrated on the potentially devastating economic, psychological and public health impacts of terrorist use of a radiological dispersal or radiation emitting device (ROD/RED) in a metropolis. The development of such a weapon, from the acquisition of the radioactive material to the technical knowledge needed to fashion it into an ROD, is many orders of magnitude easier than diverting enough fissile material for and fabrication/acquisition of a nuclear weapon. Unlike nuclear weapons, worldwide, there are many well documented accounts of accidental and purposeful diversions of radioactive materials from regulatory control. As of the end of 2008, the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Illicit Trafficking Database had logge

Streeper, Charles Blamires [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Change in the U.S. Nuclear Nonproliferation Policy toward India (1998-2005):Accommodating the Anomaly.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??For more than three decades, the U.S. prohibited the transfer of advanced nuclear technologies to India—a nonsignatory of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT). In 1998,… (more)

Bhatia, Vandana

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

18: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning...

20

Putting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Some Bits of History. 2. Nuclear Weapons 101. 3. The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. 4. Testing The TestPutting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation Jerry Gilfoyle Physics Department, University of Richmond, Virginia Outline: 1. Some Bits of History. 2. Nuclear Weapons

Gilfoyle, Jerry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Nonproliferation and National Security - Nuclear Engineering Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation and Nonproliferation and National Security CAPABILITIES Overview Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Nuclear Systems Technologies Risk and Safety Assessments Nonproliferation and National Security Materials Testing Engineering Computation & Design Engineering Experimentation Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Capabilities Nonproliferation and National Security Bookmark and Share Nuclear Export Controls Nuclear Exports Controls We provide technical advisory services to DOE in the implementation of U.S. nonproliferation policy. This includes assessments of proliferation risks presented by emerging technologies and

22

Proactive Intelligence for Nuclear Nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project described in this paper leverages predictive models for proliferation detection in order to assess the complementary questions of capability and intent as they relate to the potential for nuclear weapon development. The ability to proactively assess the likelihood of a state to engage in nuclear power acquisition and development for non-peaceful purposes is one of the greatest challenges for analysts and policy makers working on proliferation detection and deterrence. Of further difficulty is determining whether a state is at risk to provide indirect support for proliferation via the relationship between industrial input/output and the legal framework of trade. In general, it is possible to gather evidence about precursor activities to the achieved nuclear potential of a state that function as indicators of the state's intent to acquire and develop capabilities to support nuclear weapons. Reasoning with these indicators to predict intent and capability to proliferate is of utmost importance to facilitate nuclear safeguards, e.g. through proactive implementation of countermeasures. Such a predictive reasoning task is difficult to perform without computational aid. While the need for a proactive and multi-perspective approach to proliferation detection is widely recognized, there is a lamentable lack of computational tools applied directly to the task. Applications of predictive modeling to the domain of nuclear nonproliferation are limited to physical/chemical properties of nuclear materials, such as nuclear weapons simulations and stockpile stewardship. The aim of this project is to address this gap by leveraging methods and data from different mission areas in support of proliferation detection and prevention in innovative ways. More specifically, the approach implemented in this project combines methods in information analysis and probabilistic evidentiary reasoning with expert knowledge from discipline areas germane to proliferation detection, and evidence extracted from relevant data sources, to assess alternative hypotheses about specific proliferation detection problems.

Peterson, Danielle J.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Baddeley, Robert L.; Franklin, Lyndsey

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

23

Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Safety » Nuclear Security & Safety » Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation Highly trained nuclear emergency response personnel and more than 17,000 pounds of equipment were sent to Japan as part of the Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration’s effort to assist Japanese personnel with nuclear issues related to the Fukushima nuclear power plant. Above, scientists, technicians and engineers from the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Nevada Site Office board an Air Force C-17. | Photo courtesy of NNSA. Highly trained nuclear emergency response personnel and more than 17,000 pounds of equipment were sent to Japan as part of the Department of Energy

24

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20).

25

Nuclear nonproliferation strategies for South Asia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continued expansion of the nuclear weapons capabilities of India and Pakistan, coupled with ongoing conflict between them, raises the probability of nuclear war in South Asia. A nuclear arms race between India and Pakistan could also harm efforts to discourage other nations from acquiring nuclear weapons. United States policy opposes the spread of nuclear weapons because proliferation increases threats to U.S. national security and to world peace and stability. However, there is debate on the dangers of an escalating arms race in South Asia. Steps taken by the United States and other countries to persuade India and Pakistan to end their nuclear weapons programs have had limited success, at most slowing down their pace. A complicating factor is that India maintains a nuclear capability in part to deter China, whereas Pakistan`s nuclear weapons capability is aimed at deterring India`s superior conventional and nuclear capabilities. Analysts and policy officials are divided on how to avoid an arms race in South Asia. The Clinton Administration has renewed efforts to break the deadlock over nonproliferation, but longstanding obstacles have blocked progress. Pakistan favors a regional approach to nonproliferation, while India insists on a global approach that treats the nuclear powers on an equal basis with non nuclear weapon countries. This report analyzes the nuclear capabilities of India and Pakistan and reviews several options for U.S. nonproliferation policy in South Asia.

Davis, Z.S.

1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

26

Regimes At Work: The Nonproliferation Order And Indian Nuclear Policy .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis claims that by constituting a certain range of possible identities for countries, the nuclear nonproliferation regime facilitated India's forging of non-weaponized nuclear deterrence… (more)

Sasikumar, Karthika

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Tag: nuclear nonproliferation | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nuclear ... Tag: nuclear nonproliferation Displaying 1 - 1 of 1... Category: News Jamaican Connection Y-12 joins Jamaica and Canada in helping a research reactor on the Caribbean...

28

The Linkage Between Non-Proliferation, Deterrence Policy, Nuclear Testing and the Arms Race  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A major focal point for strengthening the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), which is the central legal and political basis of the non-proliferation regime has been negotiation of a comprehensive test ban (CTB). ...

Lawrence Scheinman

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Nuclear Deterrence in the Age of Nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fallacy of zero nuclear weapons, even as a virtual goal, is discussed. Because the complete abolition of nuclear weapons is not verifiable, nuclear weapons will always play a role in the calculus of assure, dissuade, deter and defeat (ADDD). However, the relative contribution of nuclear weapons to international security has diminished. To reconstitute the Cold War nuclear capability, with respect to both the nuclear weapons capability and their associated delivery systems, is fiscally daunting and not warranted due to competing budgetary pressures and their relative contribution to international security and nonproliferation. A proposed pathway to a sustainable nuclear weapons capability end-state is suggested which provides enough ADDD; a Dyad composed of fewer delivery and weapon systems, with trickle production at the National Laboratories and private sector to maintain capability and guard against technological surprise.

Richardson, J

2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

30

Interim Report of the Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This interim report of the SEAB Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation sets forth its findings and recommendations to date in five timely and important areas

31

The doctrine of the nuclear-weapon states and the future of non-proliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Less than a year remains before the critical conference in April 1995 to review and extend the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the main international barrier to the proliferation of nuclear weapons. This is a critical moment for the United States. With the end of the Cold War, the likelihood of nuclear war with the states of the former Soviet Union has been radically reduced, but there is greatly increased concern over the potential threats from states or sub-state groups seeking to develop or acquire nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction.

Panofsky, W.K.H.; Bunn, G.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Steve Mladineo Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific

33

EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

18: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy 18: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel SUMMARY This study analyzes the potential environmental impacts of adopting a policy to manage foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel containing uranium enriched in the United States. In particular, the study examines the comparative impacts of several alternative approaches to managing the spent fuel. The analysis demonstrates that the impacts on the environmental, workers and the general public of implementing any of the alternative management approaches would be small and within applicable Federal and state regulator limits. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES

34

Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Steve Mladineo Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific

35

Limited Test Ban Treaty Signed | National Nuclear Security Administrat...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Limited Test Ban Treaty Signed | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

36

Senate Rejects Test Ban Treaty | National Nuclear Security Administrat...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Senate Rejects Test Ban Treaty | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

37

United States Nuclear Energy and Non-Proliferation Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

I believe that U.S. nuclear energy and non-proliferation policy is not well understood, and I hope ... I shall speak first about the role of nuclear energy within the context of overall energy policy, then about ...

Daniel P. Serwer

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Nonproliferation and National Security Program - Nuclear Engineering  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Major Programs > Nonproliferation and Major Programs > Nonproliferation and National Security Program Nonproliferation & National Security (NPNS) Overview Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Strategic Trade Control Review of export license applications Multilateral Export Control Arrangements Interdiction Engagement & Training INECP INSEP GIPP Safeguards Concepts and Approaches Human Capital Development Additional Protocol Technical Assistance National Security Systems & Assessments National Security Information Systems Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) Radiation Detection & Response (RDR) Contact NPNS Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nonproliferation and National Security Program (NPNS)

39

Administrator D'Agostino on Nuclear Forces and Nonproliferation | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Forces and Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Forces and Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Speeches > Administrator D'Agostino on Nuclear Forces and Nonproliferation Speech Administrator D'Agostino on Nuclear Forces and Nonproliferation Oct 28, 2010 As prepared for delivery at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for

40

Supporting the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PNNL operates the only certified laboratory in the U.S. for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty's International Monitoring System (IMS).

Bowyer, Ted

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Supporting the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

PNNL operates the only certified laboratory in the U.S. for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty's International Monitoring System (IMS).

Bowyer, Ted

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

42

FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactor Programs before the House Appropriations Committee, Energy and Water Development Subcommittee | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear ...

43

Statement on Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities before the House Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy & Water Development | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > Statement on Defense Nuclear

44

FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactor Programs before the House Appropriations Committee, Energy and Water Development Subcommittee | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear ...

45

Statement on Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities before the House Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy & Water Development | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > Statement on Defense Nuclear

46

The comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty and Seismological Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The predominant role for seismology will instead involve screening of all detected events to ensure that none of them are surreptitious nuclear explosions in violation of the Treaty. Applying seismology to detect nuclear explosions anywhere in the world is...

Thorne Lay

47

Nonproliferation Human Capital Development in Malaysia | National Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human Capital Development in Malaysia | National Nuclear Human Capital Development in Malaysia | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Nonproliferation Human Capital Development in Malaysia Nonproliferation Human Capital Development in Malaysia Posted By NNSA Public Affairs NNSA Blog Photo Credit: National University of Malaysia

48

DOE Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation DNN | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation DNN Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation DNN Jump to: navigation, search Name DOE Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN) Place Washington, Washington, DC Zip 20585 Product String representation "Washington D.C. ... ear operations." is too long. Coordinates 38.89037°, -77.031959° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.89037,"lon":-77.031959,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

49

Treaty Verification | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Treaty Verification SHARE Treaty Verification ORNL is a strong contributor to future nonproliferation and arms control initiatives through research and development of radiation...

50

The moral implications of the subversion of the Nonproliferation Treaty regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will look after their nuclear-related security interests. Asin Nuclear Proliferation and International Security, ed.Smoke, ‘National Security and the Nuclear Dilemma: An

Doyle, Thomas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Office Of NONprOliferatiON  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Of NONprOliferatiON Of NONprOliferatiON aNd iNterNatiONal Security July 2011 www.nnsa.doe.gov National Nuclear Security Administration ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Develop and implement DOE/NNSA nonproliferation and arms control policy to reduce the risk of weapons of mass destruction. control the spread of WMD-related material, equipment, technology and expertise. Safeguard and Secure nuclear material to prevent its diversion, theft and sabotage. Negotiate, monitor and verify compliance with international nonproliferation and arms control treaties and agreements. NNSA's Office of Nonproliferation and international Security (NiS) provides leadership in the formulation and implementation of nonproliferation, nuclear security and arms control

52

MCNPX-PoliMi for Nuclear Nonproliferation Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past few years, efforts to develop new measurement systems to support nuclear nonproliferation and homeland security have increased substantially. Monte Carlo radiation transport is one of the simulation methods of choice for the analysis of data from existing systems and for the design of new measurement systems; it allows for accurate description of geometries, detailed modeling of particle-nucleus interactions, and event-by-event detection analysis. This paper describes the use of the Monte Carlo code MCNPX-PoliMi for nuclear-nonproliferation applications, with particular emphasis on the simulation of spontaneous and neutron-induced nuclear fission. In fact, of all possible neutron-nucleus interactions, neutron-induced fission is the most defining characteristic of special nuclear material (such as U-235 and Pu-239), which is the material of interest in nuclear-nonproliferation applications. The MCNP-PoliMi code was originally released from the Radiation Safety Shielding Center (RSSIC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2003 [1]; the MCNPX-PoliMi code contains many enhancements and is based on MCNPX ver. 2.7.0. MCNPX-PoliMi ver. 2.0 was released through RSICC in 2012 as a patch to MCNPX ver. 2.7.0 and as an executable [2].

S. A. Pozzi; S. D. Clarke; W. Walsh; E. C. Miller; J. Dolan; M. Flaska; B. M. Wieger; A. Enqvist; E. Padovani; J. K. Mattingly; D. L. Chichester; P. Peerani

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Supporting the President's Arms Control and Nonproliferation Agenda: Transparency and Verification for Nuclear Arms Reductions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The President's arms control and nonproliferation agenda is still evolving and the details of initiatives supporting it remain undefined. This means that DOE, NNSA, NA-20, NA-24 and the national laboratories can help define the agenda, and the policies and the initiatives to support it. This will require effective internal and interagency coordination. The arms control and nonproliferation agenda is broad and includes the path-breaking goal of creating conditions for the elimination of nuclear weapons. Responsibility for various elements of the agenda will be widely scattered across the interagency. Therefore an interagency mapping exercise should be performed to identify the key points of engagement within NNSA and other agencies for creating effective policy coordination mechanisms. These can include informal networks, working groups, coordinating committees, interagency task forces, etc. It will be important for NA-20 and NA-24 to get a seat at the table and a functional role in many of these coordinating bodies. The arms control and nonproliferation agenda comprises both mature and developing policy initiatives. The more mature elements such as CTBT ratification and a follow-on strategic nuclear arms treaty with Russia have defined milestones. However, recent press reports indicate that even the START follow-on strategic arms pact that is planned to be complete by the end of 2009 may take significantly longer and be more expansive in scope. The Russians called for proposals to count non-deployed as well as deployed warheads. Other elements of the agenda such as FMCT, future bilateral nuclear arms reductions following a START follow-on treaty, nuclear posture changes, preparations for an international nuclear security summit, strengthened international safeguards and multilateral verification are in much earlier stages of development. For this reason any survey of arms control capabilities within the USG should be structured to address potential needs across the near-term (1-4) years and longer-term (5-10) years planning horizons. Some final observations include acknowledging the enduring nature of several key objectives on the Obama Administration's arms control and nonproliferation agenda. The CTBT, FMCT, bilateral nuclear arms reductions and strengthening the NPT have been sought by successive U.S. Administrations for nearly thirty years. Efforts towards negotiated arms control, although de-emphasized by the G.W. Bush Administration, have remained a pillar of U.S. national security strategy for decades and are likely to be of enduring if not increasing importance for decades to come. Therefore revitalization and expansion of USG capabilities in this area can be a positive legacy no matter what near-term arms control goals are achieved over the next four years. This is why it is important to reconstruct integrated bureaucratic, legislative, budgetary and diplomatic strategies to sustain the arms control and nonproliferation agenda. In this endeavor some past lessons must be taken to heart to avoid bureaucratic overkill and keep interagency policy-making and implementation structures lean and effective. On the Technical side a serious, sustained multilateral program to develop, down select and performance test nuclear weapons dismantlement verification technologies and procedures should be immediately initiated. In order to make this happen the United States and Russia should join with the UK and other interested states in creating a sustained, full-scale research and development program for verification at their respective nuc1ear weapons and defense establishments. The goals include development of effective technologies and procedures for: (1) Attribute measurement systems to certify nuclear warheads and military fissile materials; (2) Chain-of-custody methods to track items after they are authenticated and enter accountability; (3) Transportation monitoring; (4) Storage monitoring; (5) Fissile materials conversion verification. The remainder of this paper focuses on transparency and verification for nuclear arms a

Doyle, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meek, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

The Pelindaba Treaty: Africa joins the nuclear-free world  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pelindaba Treaty will encourage the creation of other nuclear-weapon-free zones, particularly in Southeast Asia and the Middle East, and set new patterns and precedents for such regional endeavors. The author examines the events leading up to Africa becoming a nuclear free zone.

Fischer, D.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

INTEGRATION OF FACILITY MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

Gorensek, M.; Hamm, L.; Garcia, H.; Burr, T.; Coles, G.; Edmunds, T.; Garrett, A.; Krebs, J.; Kress, R.; Lamberti, V.; Schoenwald, D.; Tzanos, C.; Ward, R.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

56

Gamma-Ray Bursts Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, 1963  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lecture 18 Gamma-Ray Bursts #12;Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, 1963 First Vela satellite pair launched and their predecessors, Vela 4, discovered the first gamma-ray bursts. The discovery was announced by Klebesadel, Strong, and Olson (ApJ, 182, 85) in 1973. #12;First Gamma-Ray Burst The Vela 5 satellites functioned from July, 1969

Harrison, Thomas

57

2012 Annual Planning Summary for NNSA Defense Nuclear NonProliferation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within the NNSA Defense Nuclear NonProliferation.

58

The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation comprises SEAB members and individuals with expertise and experience in the technologies, institutions, and...

59

Brazil's Nuclear Program: Carter's Nonproliferation Policy Backfires  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...capable of producing cancer in the future, or...nuclear reactors and a uranium enrichment facil-ity...radiation including skin cancer, would be reduced...that ozone could be depleted by 3 to 23 percent...some long-term cancer risk, people are...to discover enough uranium in excess of its...

ALLEN L. HAMMOND

1977-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

60

Non-proliferation: A nuclear exchange  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the only visible hint of what once lay inside the building: enough highly enriched uranium reactor fuel to make more than 18 nuclear bombs. A group of visiting journalists and ... the fuel's uranium will be converted into a safer form for use in power reactors. ...

Geoff Brumfiel

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Limited Test Ban Treaty | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home Limited Test Ban Treaty Limited Test Ban Treaty US Air Force Launches Satellite Carrying...

62

Evolution and resilience of the nuclear nonproliferation regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper introduces the concept of systems resilience as a new framework for thinking about the future of the nonproliferation regime. Resilience refers to the ability of a system to maintain its vital functions in the face of continuous and unpredictable change. First, I make the case that the nonproliferation regime can be viewed as a complex system. Next, I discuss key themes from the literature on systems resilience and apply them to the nonproliferation system: the difference between resilience and stability; the need for evolution to maintain function; the importance of functional diversity; and the concept of the adaptive cycle. I show that most existing nonproliferation strategies are aimed at stability rather than resilience and that the current nonproliferation system may be over-constrained by the cumulative evolution of strategies. According to the literature on systems resilience, this increases its vulnerability to collapse. I argue that the resilience of the nonproliferation system can be enhanced by increasing international participation in setting the nonproliferation agenda, developing general international response capabilities, focusing on non-coercive approaches to decreasing demand, and applying systems thinking more rigorously to nonproliferation.

Pregenzer, Arian L. [Senior Scientist, Retired, Sandia National Laboratories, 13013 Arroyo de Vista NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111 (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

63

Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) NBL Home About Programs Certified Reference Materials Program Measurement Evaluation Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support Measurement Services Measurement Development Training Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) Training Categorical Exclusion Determinations News Contact Information New Brunswick Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Building 350 9800 South Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439-4899 P: (630) 252-2442 (NBL) P: (630) 252-2767 (CRM sales) F: (630) 252-6256 E: usdoe.nbl@ch.doe.gov Programs Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) is owned and operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NBL is the U.S. Government's Certifying Authority for

64

Towards a tactical nuclear weapons treaty? Is There a Role of IAEA Tools of Safeguards?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, there is growing interest in formal negotiations on non-strategic or tactical nuclear weapons. With the negotiations of New START, there has been much speculation that a tactical nuclear weapons treaty should be included in the follow on to New START. This paper examines the current policy environment related to tactical weapons and some of the issues surrounding the definition of tactical nuclear weapons. We then map out the steps that would need to be taken in order to begin discussions on a tactical nuclear weapons treaty. These steps will review the potential role of the IAEA in verification of a tactical nuclear weapons treaty. Specifically, does IAEA involvement in various arms control treaties serve as a useful roadmap on how to overcome some of the issues pertaining to a tactical nuclear weapons treaty?

Saunders, Emily C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowberry, Ariana N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fearey, Bryan L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

65

Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation Collaboration Following Russian Delegation Visit to the United States Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation Collaboration Following Russian Delegation Visit to the United States December 10, 2013 - 2:30pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and State Corporation for Nuclear Energy (Rosatom) Director General Sergey Kirienko today held talks in Washington, D.C., about the future of U.S.-Russia collaborative work in the nuclear energy field, including nuclear research and development, commercial aspects of cooperation, nuclear safety, and nonproliferation. The meeting coincided with the arrival of the final shipment of low

66

The Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean, known as the Treaty of Tlatelolco, seeks to establish a nuclear-weapon-free zone (NWFZ) that will extend from the US-Mexican border to Antarctica`s territorial boundaries, including large areas of open ocean. Under the treaty, signatory states pledge not to test, use, produce, manufacture or acquire nuclear weapons; to use nuclear materials and facilities {open_quotes}exclusively for peaceful purposes;{close_quotes} and not to permit the stationing or development of nuclear weapons on their territories.

NONE

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

NNSA Signs Memorandum with Kuwait to Increase Cooperation on Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

On June 23, 2010, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation on nuclear safeguards and other nonproliferation topics with the Kuwait National Nuclear Energy Committee (KNNEC). NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino and KNNEC's Secretary General, Dr. Ahmad Bishara, signed the memorandum at a ceremony at U.S. Department of Energy headquarters in Washington.

Thomas D'Agostino

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

NNSA Signs Memorandum with Kuwait to Increase Cooperation on Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On June 23, 2010, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation on nuclear safeguards and other nonproliferation topics with the Kuwait National Nuclear Energy Committee (KNNEC). NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino and KNNEC's Secretary General, Dr. Ahmad Bishara, signed the memorandum at a ceremony at U.S. Department of Energy headquarters in Washington.

Thomas D'Agostino

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

69

South Africa’s peaceful use of nuclear energy under the nuclear non-proliferation treaty and related treaties .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Energy is the natural power stored in matter which can be potential and kinetic energy. This occurs in nature in various forms such as chemical… (more)

Qasaymeh, Khaled Ahmed

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Final text of the African nuclear-weapon-free zone treaty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 1996, African leaders will travel to Cairo, Egypt, to sign the African nuclear-weapon-free zone treaty, capping African countries` 35-year effort to ban all such weapons on the continent. Informally called the Pelindaba Treaty (ironically, the site of the South African nuclear research center where some of Pretoria`s nuclear weapons work was conducted), the accord will prohibit the development, manufacture, acquisition or possession of any nuclear explosive device as well as the dumping of radioactive material within the zone. Once it enters into force-after the 28th state deposits its instrument of ratification-Africa will become the world`s fourth nuclear-weapon-free zone. The treaty`s final text is printed provided.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Nuclear nonproliferation: Concerns with US delays in accepting foregin research reactors` spent fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One key US nonproliferation goal is to discourage use of highly enriched uranium fuel (HEU), which can be used to make nuclear bombs, in civilian nuclear programs worldwide. DOE`s Off-Site Fuels Policy for taking back spent HEU from foreign research reactors was allowed to expire due to environmental reasons. This report provides information on the effects of delays in renewing the Off-Site Fuels Policy on US nonproliferation goals and programs (specifically the reduced enrichment program), DOE`s efforts to renew the fuels policy, and the price to be charged to the operators of foreign reactors for DOE`s activities in taking back spent fuel.

NONE

1994-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

72

(Acts adopted under Title V of the Treaty on European Union) COUNCIL COMMON POSITION 2005/329/PESC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons THE COUNCIL OF THE EUROPEAN UNION, Having regard to the Treaty on European Union-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) as the cornerstone of the global nuclear non-proliferation regime, the essential foundation for the pursuit of nuclear disarmament in accordance with Article VI of the NPT and an important

Sussex, University of

73

Top UN officials call on hold-out States to ratify treaty banning nuclear tests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Top UN officials call on hold-out States to ratify treaty banning nuclear tests 29 August 2011 in Kurchatov, Kazakhstan. (June 2010) 29 August 2011 ­ Warning that voluntary moratoriums on nuclear weapon War, hundreds of nuclear weapon tests left behind a devastating legacy for local citizens

74

Joint DOE-PNC research on the use of transparency in support of nuclear nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PNC and LANL collaborated in research on the concept of transparency in nuclear nonproliferation. The research was based on the Action Sheet No. 21, which was signed in February 1996, ``The Joint Research on Transparency in Nuclear Nonproliferation`` under the ``Agreement between the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan (PNC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) for Cooperation in Research and Development Concerning Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Measures for Safeguards and Nonproliferation``. The purpose of Action Sheet 21 is to provide a fundamental study on Transparency to clarify the means to improve worldwide acceptability for the nuclear energy from the nuclear nonproliferation point of view. This project consists of independent research and then joint discussion at workshops that address a series of topics and issues in transparency. The activities covered in Action Sheet 21 took place over a period of 18 months. Three workshops were held; the first and the third hosted by PNC in Tokyo, Japan and the second hosted by LANL in Los Alamos, New Mexico, US. The following is a summary of the three workshops. The first workshop addressed the policy environment of transparency. Each side presented its perspective on the following issues: (1) a definition of transparency, (2) reasons for transparency, (3) detailed goals of transparency and (4) obstacles to transparency. The topic of the second workshop was ``Development of Transparency Options.`` The activities accomplished were (1) identify type of facilities where transparency might be applied, (2) define criteria for applying transparency, and (3) delineate applicable transparency options. The goal of the third workshop, ``Technical Options for Transparency,`` was to (1) identify conceptual options for transparency system design; (2) identify instrumentation, measurement, data collection and data processing options; (3) identify data display options; and (4) identify technical options for reprocessing, enrichment, and MOX fuel fabrication facilities.

Mochiji, Toshiro; Keeney, R.; Tazaki, Makiko [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. (Japan). Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation; Nakhleh, C.; Puckett, J.; Stanbro, W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Safeguards System Group

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Nuclear Nonproliferation and Arms Control Primer Prepared for the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To provide a brief overview of key arms control and nonproliferation arrangements for the layperson that may be relevant to the Commission's comprehensive review of policies for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Primer would be published by the Commission and made publicly available, probably as an appendix to a larger Commission report.

Williams, Laura S.

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

76

The Physics and Nuclear Nonproliferation Goals of WATCHMAN: A WAter CHerenkov Monitor for ANtineutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article describes the physics and nonproliferation goals of WATCHMAN, the WAter Cherenkov Monitor for ANtineutrinos. The baseline WATCHMAN design is a kiloton scale gadolinium-doped (Gd) light water Cherenkov detector, placed 13 kilometers from a civil nuclear reactor in the United States. In its first deployment phase, WATCHMAN will be used to remotely detect a change in the operational status of the reactor, providing a first- ever demonstration of the potential of large Gd-doped water detectors for remote reactor monitoring for future international nuclear nonproliferation applications. During its first phase, the detector will provide a critical large-scale test of the ability to tag neutrons and thus distinguish low energy electron neutrinos and antineutrinos. This would make WATCHMAN the only detector capable of providing both direction and flavor identification of supernova neutrinos. It would also be the third largest supernova detector, and the largest underground in the western hemisphere. In a...

Askins, M; Bernstein, A; Dazeley, S; Dye, S T; Handler, T; Hatzikoutelis, A; Hellfeld, D; Jaffke, P; Kamyshkov, Y; Land, B J; Learned, J G; Marleau, P; Mauger, C; Gann, G D Orebi; Roecker, C; Rountree, S D; Shokair, T M; Smy, M B; Svoboda, R; Sweany, M; Vagins, M R; van Bibber, K A; Vogelaar, R B; Wetstein, M J; Yeh, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Examination of the proposed conversion of the U.S. Navy nuclear fleet from highly enriched Uranium to low enriched Uranium .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??.The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons creates a loophole that allows a non-nuclear-weapon country to avoid international safeguards governing fissile materials if it… (more)

McCord, Cameron (Cameron Liam)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Towards a Comprehensive Nuclear Policy for the European Union  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear nonproliferation is a historical process which gradually led to an international regime, enshrined in treaties1, agreements2 and informal understandings3, comprising rights and obligations for participati...

Werner Ungerer

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Record of Decision for the Final EIS on Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5091 5091 Friday May 17, 1996 Part IV Department of Energy Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel; Notice 25092 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 97 / Friday, May 17, 1996 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Record of decision. SUMMARY: DOE, in consultation with the Department of State, has decided to implement a new foreign research reactor spent fuel acceptance policy as specified in the Preferred Alternative contained in the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed

80

The Los Alamos nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation technology development program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For nearly three decades, Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed and implemented nuclear measurement technology and training in support of national and international nuclear safeguards. This paper outlines the major elements of those technologies and highlights some of the latest developments.

Smith, H.A. Jr.; Menlove, H.O.; Reilly, T.D.; Bosler, G.E.; Hakkila, E.A.; Eccleston, G.W.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty and Seismological Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...political context of global monitoring of underground nuclear...the Nevada Test Site. Monitoring active nuclear test...that none of them are surreptitious nuclear explosions in...chal- lenges for CTBT monitoring will be to sustain the...

Thorne Lay

82

A Role for Industry in Promoting Nuclear Security and Nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industry has a unique opportunity and critical role to play in strengthening governmental efforts to prevent the spread of nuclear, radiological, and dual-use materials and technologies that could be used in a nuclear or radiological weapon. Governmental regulations and policies are in effect at both the national and international levels to inhibit access to such materials and technologies by illegitimate end-users. However, the discovery of an illegal nuclear network, spearheaded by Pakistani scientist A Q Khan, increased international concern about what more could be done to prevent proliferation. Industry is well-poised and has a strong incentive to take a more proactive role to complement existing governmental efforts. Companies can be a tremendous help in ensuring that illicit diversions do not occur by increasing their oversight over the supply chain.

Hund, Gretchen; Seward, Amy M.; Elkhamri, Oksana O.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Sensitive Change Detection for Remote Monitoring of Nuclear Treaties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is examined in case studies involving underground nuclear testing and location of clandestine uranium mining studies involving the location of underground nuclear explosions and detection of uranium mining sites

84

Xenon monitoring and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

How do you monitor (verify) a CTBT? It is a difficult challenge to monitor the entire world for nuclear tests, regardless of size. Nuclear tests 'normally' occur underground, above ground or underwater. Setting aside very small tests (let's limit our thinking to 1 kiloton or more), nuclear tests shake the ground, emit large amounts of radioactivity, and make loud noises if in the atmosphere (or hydroacoustic waves if underwater)

Bowyer, Theodore W. [Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Program, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

85

Nuclear proliferation and testing: A tale of two treaties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite progress in reducing stockpiles after the end of the Cold War, the disturbing actions of some nations could spread nuclear weapon capabilities and enlarge existing arsenals.

Corden, Pierce S.; Hafemeister, David

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Nonproliferation & Forensics | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation & Nuclear Forensics Argonne strives to strengthen the nation's ability to detect, prevent, and interdict proliferation of nuclear, radiological, chemical, and...

87

Nuclear Nonproliferation,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Wireless Sensing, Sensory Substitution, Multi-rotor Damage Detection, Drill Vibration Reduction, Laser Ultrasonics for Non Destructive Evaluation T y p i c a l P r o j e...

88

Limited Test Ban Treaty  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Detection System (USNDS), which monitors compliance with the international Limited Test Ban Treaty (LTBT). The LTBT, signed by 108 countries, prohibits nuclear testing in the...

89

Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) report provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Improving the nuclear data base for non-proliferation and homeland security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many of the technical advances in non-proliferation and homeland security require calculations of transport of neutrons and gamma-rays through materials. The nuclear data base on which these calculations are made must be of high quality in order for the calculated responses to be credible. At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, three spallation neutron sources are being used to provide high-quality cross section and structure data with reactions induced by neutrons. Neutron transmission, neutron-induced fission and capture cross sections, neutron emission in fission, and gamma-ray production by neutrons are principal areas of research. Furthermore, these sources are also being used to validate calculations of the characterization and response of new detectors and detection techniques. Current research activities are summarized here.

Haight, Robert C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bitteker, Leo J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Couture, Aaron J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Devlin, Matthew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fotiadis, Nikolaos [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gavron, Avigdor [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Tony S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laptev, Alexander B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Ronald O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O'donnell, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taddeucci, Terry N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tovesson, Fredrik K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ulmann, John L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wender, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Tags and seals for controling nuclear materials, Arms control and nonproliferation technologies. Second quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This issue of Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies summarizes demonstrations and addresses related topics. The first article, ``Basic Nuclear Material Control and Accountability Concepts as Might be Applied to the Uranium from the US-Russian HEU Purchase,`` describes safeguards sybsystems necessary for effective nuclear material safeguards. It also presents a general discussion on HEU-to-low-enrichment uranium (LEU) commingling processes and suggests applicable key measurement points. The second article, ``A Framework for Evaluating Tamper-Indicating-Device Technologies (TIDs),`` describes their uses, proper selection, and evaluation. The final three articles discuss the tags and seals applications and general characteristics of several nuclear material containers: the Type 30B uranium hexafluoride container, the AT-400R container, and the DOT Specification 6M container for SNM. Finally, the Appendix displays short descriptions and illustrations of seven tags and seals, including: the E-cup and wire seal, the python seal, the secure loop inspectable tag/seal (SLITS), bolt-and-loop type electronic identification devices, and the shrink-wrap seal.

Staehle, G; Talaber, C; Stull, S; Moulthrop, P [eds.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

SciTech Connect: Proceedings of the Symposium on the Non-Proliferation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Symposium on the Non-Proliferation Experiment: Results and Implications for Test Ban Treaties, Rockville, Maryland, April 19-21, 1994 Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

93

Nonproliferation - Tell-tale seals | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SHARE SHARE Nonproliferation - Tell-tale seals Using an Oak Ridge National Laboratory technology, inspectors of containers of nuclear material will be able to know with unprecedented confidence whether an intruder has tampered with a seal. The system uses a light source of entangled photons to verify the continuity of a fiber-based seal, according to Travis Humble, who led the development team. Entanglement is a feature of quantum physics that describes how two spatially disparate systems exhibit strong correlations in otherwise independent behaviors. The work, sponsored by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, is vital to ensure compliance with nonproliferation treaties because inspectors must confirm the uninterrupted containment and surveillance of any nuclear material.

94

Nuclear non-proliferation regime effectiveness : an integrated methodology for analyzing highly enriched uranium production scenarios at gas centrifuge enrichment plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dramatic change in the international security environment after the collapse of the bipolar system has had a negative impact on the effectiveness of the existing nuclear non-proliferation regime. Furthermore, the success ...

Kwak, Taeshin (Taeshin S.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The ''Radiation continuity Checker'', an Instrument for Monitoring Nuclear Disarmament Treaty Compliance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the design, construction and performance of an instrument designed to monitor compliance with future arms control treaties. By monitoring changes in the gamma-ray spectrum emitted by a stored nuclear weapon, our device is able to sense perturbations in the contents of a weapon storage container that would indicate treaty non-compliance. Our instrument (dubbed the Radiation Continuity Checker or RCC) is designed to detect significant perturbations in the gamma-ray spectra (indicative of tampering) while storing no classified information about the weapon, and having a negligible ''false alarm rate''. In this paper we describe the technical details of two prototype instruments and describe the strategies we have adopted to perform signal processing in these instruments. Our first instrument prototype uses a scintillation spectrometer and a massive tungsten alloy collimator to reject the gamma-ray background. Our second prototype instrument makes use of an active collimation scheme employing a multiple detector Compton scatter approach to reject background radiation. The signal processing method we employ uses linear algorithms applied pulse by pulse. This eliminates the need for storage of pulse height spectra, which are in many cases classified.

A. Bernstein; B. A. Brunett; N. R. Hilton; J. C. Lund; J. M. Van Scyoc

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

A Nuclear Iran? Why this particular topic?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Nuclear Iran? #12;#12;Why this particular topic? · State Department internship · Personal · NPT (Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty) developed after WWII and Japan · IAEA (International Atomic of capacity #12;Iran's nuclear program · Initiated in 1959 · Strong ties to Russia, China and Pakistan · 2002

New Hampshire, University of

97

The administration, Congress and nuclear testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Against the backdrop of ongoing consultations between Congress and the Clinton administration on the question of whether to resume nuclear testing, the Arms Control Association (ACA) held a news conference June 23 to provide greater information on the technical, political and arms control issues involved, including the wider implications for the non-proliferation regime and the 1995 nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review and Extension Conference.

NONE

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Report of a workshop on nuclear forces and nonproliferation Woodrow Wilson international center for scholars, Washington, DC October 28, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A workshop sponsored by the Los Alamos National Laboratory in cooperation with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars was held at the Wilson Center in Washington, DC, on October 28, 2010. The workshop addressed evolving nuclear forces and their impacts on nonproliferation in the context of the new strategic environment, the Obama Administration's Nuclear Posture Review and the 2010 NPT Review Conference. The discussions reflected the importance of the NPR for defining the role of US nuclear forces in dealing with 21st century threats and providing guidance for National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Department of Defense (DoD) programs and, for many but not all participants, highlighted its role in the successful outcome of the NPT RevCon. There was widespread support for the NPR and its role in developing the foundations for a sustainable nuclear-weapon program that addresses nuclear weapons, infrastructure and expertise in the broader nonproliferation, disarmament and international security contexts. However, some participants raised concerns about its implementation and its long-term effectiveness and sustainability.

Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

99

National Center for Nuclear Security: The Nuclear Forensics Project (F2012)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These presentation visuals introduce the National Center for Nuclear Security. Its chartered mission is to enhance the Nation’s verification and detection capabilities in support of nuclear arms control and nonproliferation through R&D activities at the NNSS. It has three focus areas: Treaty Verification Technologies, Nonproliferation Technologies, and Technical Nuclear Forensics. The objectives of nuclear forensics are to reduce uncertainty in the nuclear forensics process & improve the scientific defensibility of nuclear forensics conclusions when applied to nearsurface nuclear detonations. Research is in four key areas: Nuclear Physics, Debris collection and analysis, Prompt diagnostics, and Radiochemistry.

Klingensmith, A. L.

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

100

Measurement of 37Ar to support technology for On-site Inspection under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On-Site Inspection (OSI) is a key component of the verification regime for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Measurements of radionuclide isotopes created by an underground nuclear explosion are a valuable signature of a Treaty violation. Argon-37 is produced from neutron interaction with calcium in soil, 40Ca(n,{\\alpha})37Ar. For OSI, the 35-day half-life of 37Ar provides both high specific activity and sufficient time for completion of an inspection before decay limits sensitivity. This paper presents a low-background internal-source gas proportional counter with an 37Ar measurement sensitivity level equivalent to 45.1 mBq/SCM in whole air.

C. E. Aalseth; A. R. Day; D. A. Haas; E. W. Hoppe; B. J. Hyronimus; M. E. Keillor; E. K. Mace; J. L. Orrell; A. Seifert; V. T. Woods

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Non-Proliferation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Non-Proliferation Non-Proliferation Non-Proliferation GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding the transfer, storage or disposition of nuclear materials recovered by DOE for public health, safety or nonproliferation purposes. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) operates several domestic and international programs aimed at securing vulnerable nuclear materials, such as orphan and disused sealed sources and foreign research reactor fuel, in support of nuclear nonproliferation and nuclear security initiatives. GC-52 also supports DOE in its interactions with other federal agencies, state and local governments, and the public. Applicable Laws Atomic Energy Act of 1954 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978 National Nuclear Security Administration Act Further Information

102

Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VI. Safety and environmental considerations for licensing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program report addresses safety and environmental considerations in licensing the principal alternative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles in the United States for large-scale commercial nuclear power plants. In addition, this volume examines the safety and environmental considerations for licensing fuel service centers. These centers, which have been proposed for controlling sensitive fuel-cycle facilities and special nuclear materials, would contain a combination of such facilities as reprocessing plants, fabrication plants, and reactors. For this analysis, two fuel service center concepts were selected - one with power - generating capability and one without.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

National Center for Nuclear Security - NCNS  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

As the United States embarks on a new era of nuclear arms control, the tools for treaty verification must be accurate and reliable, and must work at stand-off distances. The National Center for Nuclear Security, or NCNS, at the Nevada National Security Site, is poised to become the proving ground for these technologies. The center is a unique test bed for non-proliferation and arms control treaty verification technologies. The NNSS is an ideal location for these kinds of activities because of its multiple environments; its cadre of experienced nuclear personnel, and the artifacts of atmospheric and underground nuclear weapons explosions. The NCNS will provide future treaty negotiators with solid data on verification and inspection regimes and a realistic environment in which future treaty verification specialists can be trained. Work on warhead monitoring at the NCNS will also support future arms reduction treaties.

None

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

104

National Center for Nuclear Security - NCNS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the United States embarks on a new era of nuclear arms control, the tools for treaty verification must be accurate and reliable, and must work at stand-off distances. The National Center for Nuclear Security, or NCNS, at the Nevada National Security Site, is poised to become the proving ground for these technologies. The center is a unique test bed for non-proliferation and arms control treaty verification technologies. The NNSS is an ideal location for these kinds of activities because of its multiple environments; its cadre of experienced nuclear personnel, and the artifacts of atmospheric and underground nuclear weapons explosions. The NCNS will provide future treaty negotiators with solid data on verification and inspection regimes and a realistic environment in which future treaty verification specialists can be trained. Work on warhead monitoring at the NCNS will also support future arms reduction treaties.

None

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

105

The USâ??India nuclear agreement: progress toward nuclear cooperation with India and a new paradigm in non-proliferation policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The enactment of the Henry J. Hyde United Statesâ??India Peaceful Atomic Energy Cooperation Act on December 18, 2006 opened the door to a sea change in US nuclear export policy toward India. The new legislation could reverse three decades of US nuclear non-proliferation policy by facilitating India's exemption from the requirement of full-scope safeguards as a prerequisite for nuclear trade and cooperation. Notwithstanding the Hyde Act, however, major US nuclear exports to India remain unlawful until further implementing steps are taken. This article outlines the history of the estranged nuclear trade relations between the US and India and the motivations for reviving substantial civil nuclear cooperation. It then describes the parties' recent agreements and the changes to US law necessary to fulfill those agreements. Finally, the article discusses the provisions of the Hyde Act itself and the remaining principal obstacles to USâ??India nuclear trade.

Jay R. Kraemer; Frank Aum

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Proceedings of the 21st Seismic Research Symposium: Technologies for Monitoring The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 21st Seismic Research Symposium: Technologies for Monitoring The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, held 21-24 September 1999 in Las Vegas, Nevada. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Department of Defense (DoD), the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Warren, N. Jill [Editor

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

107

A treaty to ban nuclear smuggling: The next step in nuclear material control?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the demise of the Soviet Union, reports have continued to surface that weapons-usable nuclear material has been smuggled out of former Soviet territory into the hands of proliferant states. So far, few examples of nuclear smuggling have involved serious quantities of weapons-usable material, and much purported smuggling has involved attempted fraud rather than an effort to transfer fissile material. In no instance has an actual transfer to a potential proliferant state been verified.

Carnahan, B.M. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States); Smith, J.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support (TNPS), Nonproliferation and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support (TNPS) Nonproliferation & National Security (NPNS) Overview Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Strategic Trade Control Review of export license applications Multilateral Export Control Arrangements Interdiction Engagement & Training INECP INSEP GIPP Safeguards Concepts and Approaches Human Capital Development Additional Protocol Technical Assistance National Security Systems & Assessments National Security Information Systems Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) Radiation Detection & Response (RDR) Contact NPNS Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nonproliferation and National Security Program Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support (TNPS)

109

SRS - Programs - Nonproliferation Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3/2012 3/2012 SEARCH GO spacer SRS Home Nonproliferation Programs In the crucial field of nuclear nonproliferation, SRS employee contributions helped to advance all three of the planned plutonium disposition facilities at the Savannah River Site: the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF); Waste Solidification Building (WSB); and the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility. A $345 million project, the WSB will process liquid waste from the MOX facility. After material is processed at the WSB, transuranic waste will be packaged and sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico, and low-level waste will be packaged and sent to onsite or commercial off-site low-level waste disposal facilities. The mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility will be a major component in the United States' program to dispose of excess weapons grade plutonium.

110

Nonproliferation and National Security Multimedia - Argonne National  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation and National Security Nonproliferation and National Security > Multimedia Multimedia Nuclear Systems Analysis Engineering Analysis Nonproliferation and National Security Detection & Diagnostic Systems Engineering Development & Applications Argonne's Nuclear Science & Technology Legacy Other Multimedia Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Bookmark and Share Nonproliferation and National Security: Multimedia Related Resources Nonproliferation and National Security Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) Click on the "Date" header to sort the videos/podcasts in chronological order (ascending or descending). You may also search for a specific keyword; click on the reset button refresh to remove the keyword filter and show again all the Videos/Podcasts.

111

International auspices for the storage of spent nuclear fuel as a nonproliferation measure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The maintenance of spent nuclear fuel from power reactors will pose problems regardless of how or when the debate over reprocessing is resolved. At present, many reactor sites contain significant buildups of spent fuel stored in holding pools, and no measure short of shutting down reactors with no remaining storage capacity will alleviate the need for away-from-reactor storage. Although the federal government has committed itself to dealing with the spent fuel problem, no solution has been reached, largely because of a debate over differing projections of storage capacity requirements. Proliferation of weapons grade nuclear material in many nations presents another pressing issue. If nations with small nuclear programs are forced to deal with their own spent fuel accumulations, they will either have to reprocess it indigenously or contract to have it reprocessed in a foreign reprocessing plant. In either case, these nations may eventually possess sufficient resources to assemble a nuclear weapon. The problem of spent fuel management demands real global solutions, and further delay in solving the problem of spent nuclear fuel accumulation, both nationally and globally, can benefit only a small class of elected officials in the short term and may inflict substantial costs on the American public, and possibly the world. (JMT)

O'Brien, J.N.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Use of open source information and commercial satellite imagery for nuclear nonproliferation regime compliance verification by a community of academics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In this study, the availability and use of commercial satellite imagery systems, commercial computer codes for satellite imagery analysis, Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT)verification International Monitoring System (IMS), publicly available information...

Solodov, Alexander

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

113

Sandia technology. Volume 13, number 2 Special issue : verification of arms control treaties.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear deterrence, a cornerstone of US national security policy, has helped prevent global conflict for over 40 years. The DOE and DoD share responsibility for this vital part of national security. The US will continue to rely on nuclear deterrence for the foreseeable future. In the late 1950s, Sandia developed satellite-borne nuclear burst detection systems to support the treaty banning atmospheric nuclear tests. This activity has continued to expand and diversify. When the Non-Proliferation Treaty was ratified in 1970, we began to develop technologies to protect nuclear materials from falling into unauthorized hands. This program grew and now includes systems for monitoring the movement and storage of nuclear materials, detecting tampering, and transmiting sensitive data securely. In the late 1970s, negotiations to further limit underground nuclear testing were being actively pursued. In less than 18 months, we fielded the National Seismic Station, an unattended observatory for in-country monitoring of nuclear tests. In the mid-l980s, arms-control interest shifted to facility monitoring and on-site inspection. Our Technical On-site Inspection Facility is the national test bed for perimeter and portal monitoring technology and the prototype for the inspection portal that was recently installed in the USSR under the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces accord. The articles in the special issue of Sundiu Technology describe some of our current contributions to verification technology. This work supports the US policy to seek realistic arms control agreements while maintaining our national security.

Not Available

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Terminating Safeguards on Excess Special Nuclear Material: Defense TRU Waste Clean-up and Nonproliferation - 12426  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) manages defense nuclear material that has been determined to be excess to programmatic needs and declared waste. When these wastes contain plutonium, they almost always meet the definition of defense transuranic (TRU) waste and are thus eligible for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The DOE operates the WIPP in a manner that physical protections for attractiveness level D or higher special nuclear material (SNM) are not the normal operating condition. Therefore, there is currently a requirement to terminate safeguards before disposal of these wastes at the WIPP. Presented are the processes used to terminate safeguards, lessons learned during the termination process, and how these approaches might be useful for future defense TRU waste needing safeguards termination prior to shipment and disposal at the WIPP. Also described is a new criticality control container, which will increase the amount of fissile material that can be loaded per container, and how it will save significant taxpayer dollars. Retrieval, compliant packaging and shipment of retrievably stored legacy TRU waste has dominated disposal operations at WIPP since it began operations 12 years ago. But because most of this legacy waste has successfully been emplaced in WIPP, the TRU waste clean-up focus is turning to newly-generated TRU materials. A major component will be transuranic SNM, currently managed in safeguards-protected vaults around the weapons complex. As DOE and NNSA continue to consolidate and shrink the weapons complex footprint, it is expected that significant quantities of transuranic SNM will be declared surplus to the nation's needs. Safeguards termination of SNM varies due to the wide range of attractiveness level of the potential material that may be directly discarded as waste. To enhance the efficiency of shipping waste with high TRU fissile content to WIPP, DOE designed an over-pack container, similar to the pipe component, called the criticality control over-pack, which will significantly enhance the efficiency of disposal. Hundreds of shipments of transuranic SNM, suitably packaged to meet WIPP waste acceptance criteria and with safeguards terminated have been successfully emplaced at WIPP (primarily from the Rocky Flats site clean-up) since WIPP opened. DOE expects that thousands more may eventually result from SNM consolidation efforts throughout the weapons complex. (authors)

Hayes, Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Carlsbad Operations Group (United States); Nelson, Roger [Department Of Energy, Carlsbad Operations Office (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Post?installation activities in the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) International Monitoring System (IMS) infrasound network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The provisional operation and maintenance of IMS infrasound stations after installation and subsequent certification has the objective to prepare the infrasound network for entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear?Test?Ban Treaty (CTBT). The goal is to maintain and fine tune the technical capabilities of the network to repair faulty equipment and to ensure that stations continue to meet the minimum specifications through evaluation of data quality and station recalibration. Due to the globally dispersed nature of the network this program constitutes a significant undertaking that requires careful consideration of possible logistic approaches and their financial implications. Currently 11 of the 60 IMS infrasound stations are transmitting data in the post?installation Testing & Evaluation mode. Another 5 stations are under provisional operation and are maintained in post?certification mode. It is expected that 20% of the infrasound network will be certified by the end of 2002. This presentation will focus on the different phases of post?installation activities of the IMS infrasound program and the logistical challenges to be tackled to ensure a cost?efficient management of the network. Specific topics will include Testing & Evaluation and Certification of Infrasound Stations as well as Configuration Management and Network Sustainment.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The nuclear-weapon states and article VI of the NPT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Non-Proliferation Treaty rests on a basic bargain between the five declared nuclear-weapon states - the United States, Russia, Britain, France and China and 167 states that do not possess nuclear weapons. In addition, to the arms control and disarmaments commitments in Article VI, the parties pledge in the treaty`s pramble their determination to seek a comprehensive test ban (CTB) and express the understanding that in connection with the treaty on general and complete disarmament the parties should seek the cessation of manufacture of nuclear weapons, the liquidation of all their existing stock piles, and the elimination from national arsenals of nuclear weapons and means of their delivery. The author discusses the status of these agreements and the extent to which they have been fulfilled.

Mendelsohn, J.; Lockwood, D.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A new type of Neutrino Detector for Sterile Neutrino Search at Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Nonproliferation Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a new detector, called NuLat, to study electron anti-neutrinos a few meters from a nuclear reactor, and search for anomalous neutrino oscillations. Such oscillations could be caused by sterile neutrinos, and might explain the "Reactor Antineutrino Anomaly". NuLat, is made possible by a natural synergy between the miniTimeCube and mini-LENS programs described in this paper. It features a "Raghavan Optical Lattice" (ROL) consisting of 3375 boron or $^6$Li loaded plastic scintillator cubical cells 6.3\\,cm (2.500") on a side. Cell boundaries have a 0.127\\,mm (0.005") air gap, resulting in total internal reflection guiding most of the light down the 3 cardinal directions. The ROL detector technology for NuLat gives excellent spatial and energy resolution and allows for in-depth event topology studies. These features allow us to discern inverse beta decay (IBD) signals and the putative oscillation pattern, even in the presence of other backgrounds. We discuss here test venues, efficiency, sensitivity an...

Lane, C; Blackmon, J; Rasco, C; Mumm, H P; Markoff, D; Jocher, G R; Dorrill, R; Duvall, M; Learned, J G; Li, V; Maricic, J; Matsuno, S; Milincic, R; Negrashov, S; Sakai, M; Rosen, M; Varner, G; Huber, P; Pitt, M L; Rountree, S D; Vogelaar, R B; Wright, T; Yokley, Z

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Bibliography of Environmental Treaties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

......................................................................................... 40 Treaties which Directly Impede Oil & Gas Production............................................................................................................................ 82 Treaties which May Impact Oil & Gas Production and the stakeholders involved, with a lens on the way these impact both the environment and oil and gas production

Gieg, Lisa

119

Arms control and nonproliferation technologies. Fourth quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report includes information concerning: the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation; the nuclear inspections in Iraq, lessons for verification; detection technologies needed for each step of nuclear weapon development; nuclear proliferation problems; strengthening the nuclear reactor fuel cycle against proliferation; monitoring using unattended remote nondestructive assay; seismic monitoring in a proliferation environment; forensic science center, remote infrared spectrometry for nonproliferation applications; and acoustic instrument for identifying chemical munitions.

Staehle, G.; Talaber, C.; Stull, S.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

US costs of verification and compliance under pending arms treaties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study examines the costs to the United States of compliance and verification associated with four new arms control treaties and one arms agreement. All five of these major accords are in advanced stages of negotiation or ratification. The five accords are: a Strategic Arms Reductions Talks (START) treaty; a Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE) treaty; a Threshold Test Ban Treaty (TTBT); a Peaceful Nuclear Explosions Treaty (PNET); and a Chemical Weapons Agreement (CWA). The cost estimates in the study are based on information about the status of the accords as of the summer of 1990.

O'Hanlon, M.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Attracts High Caliber Young  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Graduate Fellowship Program Attracts High Caliber Young Graduate Fellowship Program Attracts High Caliber Young Professionals to Careers in Nonproliferation and National Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Attracts High Caliber ... Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Attracts High Caliber Young

122

Columbia River Treaty  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

an understanding of the implications for post-2024 Treaty planning and Columbia River operations. The joint effort by the Entities to conduct initial post-2024 modeling and...

123

Proceedings of the 22nd Annual DoD/DOE Seismic Research Symposium: Planning for Verification of and Compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 22nd Annual DoD/DOE Seismic Research Symposium: Planning for Verification of and Compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), held 13-15 September 2000 in New Orleans, Louisiana. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Department of Defense (DoD), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Nichols, James W., LTC [Editor

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IX. Reactor and fuel cycle description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nonproliferation Alterntive Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) has characterized and assessed various reactor/fuel-cycle systems. Volume IX provides, in summary form, the technical descriptions of the reactor/fuel-cycle systems studied. This includes the status of the system technology, as well as a discussion of the safety, environmental, and licensing needs from a technical perspective. This information was then used in developing the research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) program, including its cost and time frame, to advance the existing technology to the level needed for commercial use. Wherever possible, the cost data are given as ranges to reflect the uncertainties in the estimates.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Sign Agreement to Allow Nonproliferation and Threat Reduction Cooperation Secretary Bodman and Rosatom Director Kiriyenko Meet to Discuss U.S.-Russia Nuclear Security Progress...

126

U.S. nuclear nonproliferation policy in the Northeast Asian region during the cold war: The South Korean case  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In over forty years of relations with the United States, South Korean decision-makers have had plenty of time to estimate the costs and benefits of acquiring nuclear weapons. The puzzle becomes why South Korea...

Michael J. Siler

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Verifying the INF and START treaties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INF and START Treaties form the basis for constraints on nuclear weapons. Their verification provisions are one of the great success stories of modern arms control and will be an important part of the foundation upon which the verification regime for further constraints on nuclear weapons will be constructed.

Ifft, Edward [School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057 (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

128

Nonproliferation through delegation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Weapons In a nuclear power plant, a nuclear reactionused for fuel in a nuclear power plant (Barnaby 1993). Theon converting nuclear power plants to fighting malaria with

Brown, Robert Louis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

U.S. and UAE Bolster Cooperation in the Area of Nuclear Energy...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Bolster Cooperation in the Area of Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation U.S. and UAE Bolster Cooperation in the Area of Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation February 24, 2010 -...

130

Chapter 27 - Nuclear weapons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter faces the realization that the same atoms that can produce life-saving electricity can also be used to construct weapons of mass destruction. Some facilities, such as enrichment and reprocessing, in the nuclear fuel cycle can also serve dual uses when considering proliferation. The original atomic bombs were constructed of highly enriched uranium and high-grade plutonium, but their development led to thermonuclear devices with much larger yields. Thus far, nuclear war has been avoided by policies such as mutual assured destruction and international agreements such as the Non-Proliferation Treaty. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is charged with performing worldwide nuclear material safeguards inspections. The legacy of the nuclear weapons arms race has left considerable weapons-grade materials that must be dealt with.

Raymond L. Murray; Keith E. Holbert

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The future of nuclear weapons: Proliferation in South Asia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The signing of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty in December 1987, followed by the dramatic changes in East-West relations since 1989 and the more recent Soviet-American strategic arms limitation agreement, have greatly eased public concerns about the danger of nuclear war. The context has also changed for the Nonaligned Movement, which had made nuclear disarmament and condemnation of the concept of nuclear deterrence the primary themes of its multilateral disarmament diplomacy. More important would be the interrelationship among the states possessing nuclear weapons (Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan). In any case, there is little risk of a revival of nuclear competition. Both France and China have decided to sign the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT); they are the only two nuclear-weapon states that have stayed outside the regime. Meanwhile, Brazil and Argentina have moved further down the nonproliferation road by engaging in confidence-building measures and moving closer to joining the Latin American nuclear-weapons-free zone established under the Treaty of Tlatelolco in 1967. South Africa has also agreed to embrace the NPT as well as a nuclear-weapons-free zone regime for the entire African continent, while North Korea has agreed to sign a safeguard agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), thereby allowing in principle international inspection of its nuclear facilities. In the third world regions, the dangers of nuclear proliferation and competitive nuclear buildup are most pronounced in South Asia, a region where a variety of complicating problems exist: acute threat perceptions, historical emity, religious and sectarian animosity, ethnic antagonism, territorial disputes, ambitions for regional dominance, and domestic political instability. This chapter will focus primarily on South Asia, although references will also be made to other regions, where relevant. 17 refs.

Kamal, N. [Institute of Strategic Studies, Islamabada (Pakistan)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOENNSA Participates in Large-Scale CTBT On-Site Inspection Exercise in Jordan Experts from U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories, including Sandia...

133

Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Related News DOENNSA Participates in Large-Scale CTBT On-Site Inspection Exercise in Jordan NIS receives two NAGC awards Charles E. Messick receives the Administrator's Gold...

134

Nonproliferation through delegation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weapons Reductions and Nuclear Security Cooperation. Sarov,of Foreign Nuclear Installations: National Security Archive.Past: Nuclear Proliferation and American Security Policy.

Brown, Robert Louis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Technical solutions to nonproliferation challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The threat of nuclear terrorism is real and poses a significant challenge to both U.S. and global security. For terrorists, the challenge is not so much the actual design of an improvised nuclear device (IND) but more the acquisition of the special nuclear material (SNM), either highly enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium, to make the fission weapon. This paper provides two examples of technical solutions that were developed in support of the nonproliferation objective of reducing the opportunity for acquisition of HEU. The first example reviews technologies used to monitor centrifuge enrichment plants to determine if there is any diversion of uranium materials or misuse of facilities to produce undeclared product. The discussion begins with a brief overview of the basics of uranium processing and enrichment. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), its safeguard objectives and how the technology evolved to meet those objectives will be described. The second example focuses on technologies developed and deployed to monitor the blend down of 500 metric tons of HEU from Russia's dismantled nuclear weapons to reactor fuel or low enriched uranium (LEU) under the U.S.-Russia HEU Purchase Agreement. This reactor fuel was then purchased by U.S. fuel fabricators and provided about half the fuel for the domestic power reactors. The Department of Energy established the HEU Transparency Program to provide confidence that weapons usable HEU was being blended down and thus removed from any potential theft scenario. Two measurement technologies, an enrichment meter and a flow monitor, were combined into an automated blend down monitoring system (BDMS) and were deployed to four sites in Russia to provide 24/7 monitoring of the blend down. Data was downloaded and analyzed periodically by inspectors to provide the assurances required.

Satkowiak, Lawrence [Director, Nonproliferation, Safeguards and Security Programs, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

136

Nuclear proliferation: Lessons learned from the Iraqi case. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear weapons inspection regime implemented in Iraq following the United Nations coalition victory in Desert Storm is the most intrusive in history. Important conclusions about the current non-proliferation regime can therefore be determined from a study of Iraq's progress. This thesis examines Iraq's efforts to acquire nuclear weapons. The supply side of the equation is also studied, with a concentration upon the contributions of NATO nations. The strategic culture of Iraq is discussed, in an effort to discover why Iraq sought nuclear weapons. Finally, policy prescriptions are advanced. The current non-proliferation regime needs to be improved if the spread of nuclear weapons is to be halted, or even slowed. The most promising way to improve this regime is to involve the U.N. Special Commission and the U.N. Security Council in the management of the problem of nuclear proliferation.... Iraq, Strategic culture, Non-Proliferation treaty, International atomic energy agency, Nuclear weapons, Middle east security, Nuclear suppliers group, United Nations.

Dixon, T.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Security Science & Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Consequence Management, Safeguards, and Non-Proliferation Tools Export Control Human Reliability International Collaborations on Nuclear Safeguards Nuclear Forensics Radiation...

138

Nuclear Energy Readiness Indicator Index (NERI): A benchmarking tool for assessing nuclear capacity in developing countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Declining natural resources, rising oil prices, looming climate change and the introduction of nuclear energy partnerships, such as GNEP, have reinvigorated global interest in nuclear energy. The convergence of such issues has prompted countries to move ahead quickly to deal with the challenges that lie ahead. However, developing countries, in particular, often lack the domestic infrastructure and public support needed to implement a nuclear energy program in a safe, secure, and nonproliferation-conscious environment. How might countries become ready for nuclear energy? What is needed is a framework for assessing a country's readiness for nuclear energy. This paper suggests that a Nuclear Energy Readiness Indicator (NERI) Index might serve as a meaningful basis for assessing a country's status in terms of progress toward nuclear energy utilization under appropriate conditions. The NERI Index is a benchmarking tool that measures a country's level of 'readiness' for nonproliferation-conscious nuclear energy development. NERI first identifies 8 key indicators that have been recognized by the International Atomic Energy Agency as key nonproliferation and security milestones to achieve prior to establishing a nuclear energy program. It then measures a country's progress in each of these areas on a 1-5 point scale. In doing so NERI illuminates gaps or underdeveloped areas in a country's nuclear infrastructure with a view to enable stakeholders to prioritize the allocation of resources toward programs and policies supporting international nonproliferation goals through responsible nuclear energy development. On a preliminary basis, the indicators selected include: (1) demonstrated need; (2) expressed political support; (3) participation in nonproliferation and nuclear security treaties, international terrorism conventions, and export and border control arrangements; (4) national nuclear-related legal and regulatory mechanisms; (5) nuclear infrastructure; (6) the utilization of IAEA technical assistance; (7) participation in regional arrangements; and (8) public support for nuclear power. In this paper, the Index aggregates the indicators and evaluates and compares the level of readiness in seven countries that have recently expressed various degrees of interest in establishing a nuclear energy program. The NERI Index could be a valuable tool to be utilized by: (1) country officials who are considering nuclear power; (2) the international community, desiring reassurance of a country's capacity for the peaceful, safe, and secure use of nuclear energy; (3) foreign governments/NGO's, seeking to prioritize and direct resources toward developing countries; and (4) private stakeholders interested in nuclear infrastructure investment opportunities.

Saum-Manning,L.

2008-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

139

Nuclear relations in South Asia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The strategic landscape of South Asia changed dramatically in 1998. With the reciprocal testing of nuclear weapons, India and Pakistan emerged from the world of threshold status to an overt posture which has yet to be fully defined. Each claims the status of a nuclear weapon state, yet the contours of that status are unclear. A number of important strategic issues have been raised by these dramatic events. This paper will attempt to examine the implications of this new posture for each country and for the region. First and foremost, the decisions to test nuclear weapons are a product of each individual state making a sovereign decision about its national security needs. Both have made clear for a number of years that their attitudes toward nuclear weapons-and by default, toward nuclear nonproliferation-will not be directed by outsiders. They have rejected the global norms that oppose the further proliferation of nuclear weapons, embodied in the Treaty on the Non- Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), and that embrace the ultimate elimination of nuclear weapons, captured in Article VI of that treaty. The decisions reached in New Delhi and lslamabad have been questioned by many, but the tests cannot be undone and it now falls on both countries to make further decisions about what strategies will best serve them, and what obligations they must now assume. Issues such as strategic planning, weaponization, deployment, and command and control, which heretofore were relegated to the back burner, may no longer be deferred.

Joeck, N.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

140

DOE Statement on UK Government's "Road to 2010" Report on Nuclear Security  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Statement on UK Government's "Road to 2010" Report on Nuclear Statement on UK Government's "Road to 2010" Report on Nuclear Security DOE Statement on UK Government's "Road to 2010" Report on Nuclear Security July 17, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Thomas P. D'Agostino, the Department of Energy's Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and Administrator of the National Nuclear Security Administration, today applauded the British government's new report on advancing the global nuclear security agenda. Issued yesterday, "The Road to 2010 - Addressing the Nuclear Question in the Twenty First Century" outlines a strategy for addressing the threat posed by the proliferation of nuclear weapons ahead of the 2010 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference. Among other steps, it includes the creation of a UK Center for Nuclear

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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141

Nonproliferation through delegation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Tomoko Yasaka. 2007. Iraq Profile: Nuclear Overview [webe_research/profiles/Iraq/Nuclear/index.html. Findlay,Intelligence, verification and Iraq's WMDs. In Verification

Brown, Robert Louis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Current developments in laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for use in geology, forensics, and nuclear nonproliferation research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation focused on new applications of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The diverse fields that were investigated show the versatility of the technique. In Chapter 2, LA-ICP-MS was used to investigate the rare earth element (REE) profiles of garnets from the Broken Hill Deposit in New South Wales, Australia. The normalized REE profiles helped to shed new light on the formation of deposits of sulfide ores. This information may be helpful in identifying the location of sulfide ore deposits in other locations. New sources of metals such as Pg, Zn, and Ag, produced from these ores, are needed to sustain our current technological society. The application of LA-ICP-MS presented in Chapter 3 is the forensics analysis of automotive putty and caulking. The elemental analysis of these materials was combined with the use of Principal Components Analysis (PCA). The PCA comparison was able to differentiate the automotive putty samples by manufacturer and lot number. The analysis of caulk was able to show a differentiation based on manufacturer, but no clear differentiation was shown by lot number. This differentiation may allow matching of evidence in the future. This will require many more analyses and the construction of a database made up of many different samples. The 4th chapter was a study of the capabilities of LA-ICP-MS for fast and precise analysis of particle ensembles for nuclear nonproliferation applications. Laser ablation has the ability to spatially resolve particle ensembles which may contain uranium or other actinides from other particles present in a sample. This is of importance in samples obtained from air on filter media. The particle ensembles of interest may be mixed in amongst dust and other particulates. A problem arises when ablating these particle ensembles directly from the filter media. Dust particles other than ones of interest may be accidentally entrained in the aerosol of the ablated particle ensemble. This would cause the analysis to be skewed. The use of a gelatin substrate allows the ablation a particle ensemble without disturbing other particles or the gelatin surface. A method to trap and ablate particles on filter paper using collodion was also investigated. The laser was used to dig through the collodion layer and into the particle ensemble. Both of these methods fix particles to allow spatial resolution of the particle ensembles. The use of vanillic acid as a possible enhancement to ablation was also studied. A vanillic acid coating of the particles fixed on top of the gelatin substrate was not found to have any positive effect on either signal intensity or precision. The mixing of vanillic acid in the collodion solution used to coat the filter paper increased ablation signal intensity by a factor of 4 to 5. There was little effect on precision, though. The collodion on filter paper method and the gelatin method of resolving particles have shown themselves to be possible tools in fighting proliferation of nuclear weapons and material. Future applications of LA-ICP-MS are only limited by the imagination of the investigator. Any material that can be ablated and aerosolized is a potential material for analysis by LA-ICP-MS. Improvements in aerosol transport, ablation chamber design, and laser focusing can make possible the ablation and analysis of very small amounts of material. This may perhaps lead to more possible uses in forensics. A similar method to the one used in Chapter 3 could perhaps be used to match drug residue to the place of origin. Perhaps a link could be made based on the elements leached from the soil by plants used to make drugs. This may have a specific pattern based on where the plant was grown. Synthetic drugs are produced in clandestine laboratories that are often times very dirty. The dust, debris, and unique materials in the lab environment could create enough variance to perhaps match drugs produced there to samples obtained off the street. Even if the match was not strong enough to be evidence, the knowledge that many sa

Messerly, Joshua D.

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

143

Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program, Annual Report, Class of 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 32-pp annual report/brochure describes the accomplishments of the Class of 2012 of the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (the last class of this program), which PNNL administers for the National Nuclear Security Administration. The time period covers Sept 2011 through June 2013.

McMakin, Andrea H.

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

144

Former Nonproliferation Graduate Fellow Served at U.S. Mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of her training and professional experiences, Rosalyn Leitch, a Security Specialist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and former Nonproliferation Graduate Fellow with NIS (2012-2013) was able to transition into temporary assignment as UNVIE Acting Nuclear Security Attaché from November 2013 through February 2014.

Brim, Cornelia P.

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

NPT Signed | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Signed | National Nuclear Security Administration Signed | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > NPT Signed NPT Signed March 05, 1970 New York, United States NPT Signed The United States, Great Britain, the Soviet Union, and forty-five other nations sign the Treaty for the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons

146

Nuclear & Radiological Activity Center (NRAC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear & Radiological Activity Center (NRAC) Where nuclear research and deployment capabilities come together to solve nuclear nonproliferation challenges. Skip Navigation Links...

147

Nonproliferation through delegation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

G. 1973. Historical Evolution of International Safeguards.In International Safeguards and Nuclear Industry, edited by1998. The Evolution of IAEA Safeguards. Vienna, Austria: The

Brown, Robert Louis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Nonproliferation through delegation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designs. For example, CANDU-type nuclear reactors are morenegotiations with Canada for a CANDU reactor and with Franceearlier acquisition of a CANDU reactor, did the US become

Brown, Robert Louis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Of carrots and sticks or air power as a nonproliferation tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proliferation of nuclear weapons has become one of the principal threats to international peace and security. Postwar revelations from Iraq demonstrate how close a determined nation can come to covertly developing nuclear weapons without detection. In the past two years the issue of nonproliferation has increased in importance and the regime is becoming more intrusive. On the other hand, a number of nations hostile to the international order are attempting to develop or otherwise obtain nuclear weapons These states include North Korea, Iran, and Iraq. This paper argues that the use or threat of force must be incorporated into the nonproliferation regime. When properly integrated into nonproliferation strategy, force offers positive effects in terms of deterrence, compellence, and defense. Thus, the paper calls for the institutionalization of force options into the nonproliferation tool kit, ideally as part of chapter 7 enforcement actions under the authority of the UN Security Council.

Wolf, F.R.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Testimony Before the Senate Armed Services Committee, New START Treaty  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Before the Senate Armed Services Committee, New START Treaty Before the Senate Armed Services Committee, New START Treaty Hearing | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > Testimony Before the Senate Armed Services Committee, ... Congressional Testimony Testimony Before the Senate Armed Services Committee, New START Treaty

151

Siegfried S. Hecker, Plutonium, and Nonproliferation  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Siegfried S. Hecker, Plutonium Siegfried S. Hecker, Plutonium and Nuclear Nonproliferation Resources with Additional Information · Awards Siegfried S. Hecker Photo Credit: Courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory LeRoy Sanchez On September 17, 2009, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu named Siegfried S. Hecker as a winner of the Enrico Fermi Award 'in recognition for his contributions to plutonium metallurgy, his broad scientific leadership and for his energetic and continuing efforts to reduce the danger of nuclear weapons around the globe. Dr. Hecker is credited with resolving a long-standing controversy involving the stability of certain structures (or phases) in plutonium alloys near equilibrium that arose from significant discrepancies between U.S. and former USSR research on plutonium metallurgy.'1

152

DNN Global Programs  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Barack Obama, Remarks in Prague: "Together we will strengthen the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty as a basis for cooperation...To strengthen the treaty, we should embrace...

153

Strategic Trade Control: Nonproliferation Engagement and Training  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation Engagement and Training Nonproliferation & National Security (NPNS) Overview Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Strategic Trade Control Review of export license applications Multilateral Export Control Arrangements Interdiction Engagement & Training INECP INSEP GIPP Safeguards Concepts and Approaches Human Capital Development Additional Protocol Technical Assistance National Security Systems & Assessments National Security Information Systems Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) Radiation Detection & Response (RDR) Contact NPNS Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nonproliferation and National Security Program Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support (TNPS)

154

Transparency in nuclear arms: Toward a nuclear weapons register  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In his press conference to present a {open_quotes}10-point non-proliferation initiative{close_quotes} last December, German Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel included a proposal calling for an international register for nuclear weapons, analogous to the UN Conventional Arms Register. When German diplomats explained the initiative to their allies in London, Paris and Washington, they were sharply rebuffed. Apparently the three nuclear-weapon states were strongly opposed to the idea and therefore discouraged Germany from pursuing it further in the Conference on Disarmament (CD) in Geneva, where the ad hoc group on transparency in armaments would be an appropriate forum for further discussion. Faced with these cold responses, German diplomats shelved the idea for the time being and concentrated on initiatives that promised better chances for agreement, such as the comprehensive test ban (CTB) treaty currently under discussion, a fissile material cutoff agreement and an international plutonium management regime.

Mueller, H. [Peace Research Institute, Frankfurt (Germany)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

The politics of verification: Limiting the testing of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From 1982 to 1990, the United States and the Soviet Union renegotiated verification arrangements for two unratified arms control agreements that had nevertheless been observed since 1977: the Threshold Test Ban Treaty and the Peaceful Nuclear Explosions Treaty. The negotiations yielded new verification procedures, changed attitudes regarding Soviet compliance, and established useful precedents for further restrictions on nuclear testing. The negotiations also demonstrated how technical arguments can be misused to promote a particular political agenda-in this case, the continued testing of nuclear weapons. By misrepresenting the uncertainties in US monitoring procedures, and then falsely characterizing these uncertainties as a fatal flaw of seismic verification techniques, opponents of a nuclear test ban clouded the sensitive issue of verification enough to delay progress towards a complete ban on nuclear weapons testing. The primary obstacle to further restrictions on nuclear testing was not the feasibility of adequate verification, but rather the unwillingness of several US administrations to address the real question of whether the United States and other nuclear weapon states should, in the interest of global nuclear nonproliferation, end the development of new nuclear weapons designs that require confirmation by underground nuclear tests. 51 refs., 6 figs.

Vink, G.E. van der (IRIS Consortion on Seismology, Arlington, VA (United States)); Paine, C.E. (Natural Reources Defense Council, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

North Korea: The next nuclear nightmare  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The crisis in the Persian Gulf has reawakened concerns over the spread of nuclear arms. Even before its invasion of Kuwait, Iraq's history of aggression and support for international terrorism triggered fears in Washington that its acquisition of nuclear weapons might damage international stability and US interests far more than the emergence of India, Israel, Pakistan, and South Africa as de facto nuclear powers. Thus, when the Gulf War began on January 16, Iraq's nuclear sites were among the first attacked by allied air strikes. Unfortunately, Iraq has not been the only hostile proliferator looming on the horizon. North Korea, which has been no less dedicated than Iraq to the use of violence to advance its expansionist goals, has also tenaciously pursued a nuclear-weapons capability. Moreover, the North Korean program is considerably closer to bearing fruit than the Iraqi effort. And although North Korea, like Iraq, has signed the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, unlike Iraq it has refused to conclude the safeguards agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency that the treaty requires.

Spector, L.S.; Smith, J.R.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Nuclear threat on the Korean peninsula: The present and the future. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forty years after they were divided by the Cold War, South and North Korea are closer to reunification than ever before. However, North Korea's nuclear weapons program might cause South Koreans to be much less sure about reunification. Today the Cold War is over, but the Korean peninsula is still divided into two Koreas despite the new era of reconciliation. Since December 1991 when a non-aggression pact was signed barring nuclear weapons, North Korea has pursued its nuclear weapon development. In March 1993, North Korea declared its intention to withdraw from the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, and has been refusing a full inspection of its nuclear program. North Korea's nuclear issue is an international issue today. This paper discusses 'what threat we have today' and 'what should be done in the future.'.

Kang, S.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Civilian Nuclear...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

(HLW) and Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Management of Nuclear Materials and Non-HLW Nuclear Fuel Cycle Energy Research and Development Non-Proliferation Nuclear Regulatory Commission...

159

Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty research and development FY95-96 program plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the United States Government`s (USG) research and development (R&D) functions for monitoring nuclear explosions in the context of a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). This responsibility includes the November 1993 transfer of the Department of Defense`s (DoD) CTBT R&D responsibility to DOE. The DOE research program builds on the broad base of USG expertise developed historically and includes R&D for detecting, locating, identifying, and characterizing nuclear explosions in all environments. The Office of Research and Development (NN-20), within the Department of Energy`s Office of Nonproliferation and National Security, formulates and executes the efforts necessary to meet the Department`s responsibilities. The following DOE laboratories as a team will support NN-20 in implementing the program plan: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. DOE has committed to a cooperative program that draws upon the core competencies of the national laboratories and upon the strengths of other government agencies and the private sector (academia and industry). The integration of resources under a common direction will allow the program to be flexible and responsive to changing technical and policy requirements while maximizing the effectiveness of funding appropriations. DOE will develop and demonstrate appropriate technologies, algorithms, procedures, and integrated systems in a cost-effective and timely manner. The program comprises seismic, radionuclide, hydroacoustic, and infrasound monitoring; on-site inspection; space-based monitoring; and automated data processing elements.

None

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center | Y-12 National Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Detection and ... Detection and ... Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center As part of our increased global nuclear nonproliferation efforts, Y-12 commissioned the Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center, which offers dedicated facilities for the testing of radiation detection capabilities using enriched and highly enriched uranium. In addition to supporting measurements of instrumentation for detecting ionizing radiation, non-destructive measurements of both fissile and non-fissile materials may be deployed at NDSTC. The NDSTC supports proliferation detection, nuclear safeguards, emergency response, treaty verification, and university research. We can test devices with various forms and quantities of HEU, and the Center offers subject matter experts to assist in planning measurements, safely deploy material,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

International Nonproliferation Export Control Program (INECP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation and Nonproliferation and National Security Program > TNPS > Strategic Trade Control > International Programs > INECP Nonproliferation & National Security (NPNS) Overview Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Strategic Trade Control Review of export license applications Multilateral Export Control Arrangements Interdiction Engagement & Training INECP INSEP GIPP Safeguards Concepts and Approaches Human Capital Development Additional Protocol Technical Assistance National Security Systems & Assessments National Security Information Systems Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) Radiation Detection & Response (RDR) Contact NPNS Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr

162

Fission Product Ratios as Treaty Monitoring Discriminants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is currently under construction. The IMS is intended for monitoring of nuclear explosions. The radionuclide branch of the IMS monitors the atmosphere for short-lived radioisotopes indicative of a nuclear weapon test, and includes field collection and measurement stations, as well as laboratories to provide reanalysis of the most important samples and a quality control function. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington hosts the United States IMS laboratory, with the designation “RL16.” Since acute reactor containment failures and chronic reactor leakage may also produce similar isotopes, it is tempting to compute ratios of detected isotopes to determine the relevance of an event to the treaty or agreement in question. In this paper we will note several shortcomings of simple isotopic ratios: (1) fractionation of different chemical species, (2) difficulty in comparing isotopes within a single element, (3) the effect of unknown decay times. While these shortcomings will be shown in the light of an aerosol sample, several of the problems extend to xenon isotopic ratios. The result of the difficulties listed above is that considerable human expertise will be required to convert a simple mathematical ratio into a criterion which will reliably categorize an event as ‘reactor’ or ‘weapon’.

Miley, Harry S.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Arthur, Richard J.

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Consequence Management, Safeguards & Non-Proliferation Tools | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Consequence Consequence Management, Safeguards, and Non-Proliferation Tools SHARE Consequence Management, Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Tools UF 6 Enrichment Facility Visualization of the gamma radiation field in a mock-up of a UF-6 enrichment facility. The solution was generated on a desktop computer using ORNL's Denovo SN transport code and ADVANTG interface, using geometry and material descriptions from an NRL SWORD input file. ORNL is a leader in developing state-of-the-art radiation transport modeling and simulation tools and in applying these tools to solve challenging problems in national and global nuclear security. Recent developments in high-performance, high-fidelity, deterministic Monte Carlo, and hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic radiation transport codes within

164

Nuclear regulatory legislation, 104th Congress. Volume 2, No. 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the second of two volumes compiling statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 104th Congress, 2nd Session. It is intended for use as a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) internal resource document. Legislative information reproduced in this document includes portions of the Paperwork Reduction Act, various acts pertaining to low-level radioactive waste, the Clean Air Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act, the West Valley Demonstration Project Act, Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Export Licensing Statutes, and selected treaties, agreements, and executive orders. Other information provided pertains to Commissioner tenure, NRC appropriations, the Chief Financial Officers Act, information technology management reform, and Federal civil penalties.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation Project with Kazakhstan U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation Project with Kazakhstan September 29, 2006 - 9:01am Addthis Agreement Reached To Downblend HEU and Convert Reactor WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI) today announced that they have reached an important agreement-in-principle with the Government of Kazakhstan to move forward with the down-blending of highly enriched uranium (HEU) currently stored at Kazakhstan's Institute of Nuclear Physics. The agreement also calls for the conversion of the VVR-K research reactor to operate on low enriched uranium fuel instead of HEU, which can be used in nuclear weapons. The

166

Nonproliferation  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

p>

Representatives at the workshop were from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Japan, Jordan, Mexico, South Africa, Taiwan, The Netherlands, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom...

167

Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center | Y-12 National Security...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Detection and ... Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center As part of our increased global nuclear nonproliferation efforts, Y-12 commissioned the Nuclear Detection and Sensor...

168

October 2014 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Harrington, NNSA Deputy Administrator, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation; and Morgan Smith, Chief Operating Officer, Consolidated Nuclear Security. The free course taught at...

169

2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference 2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference 2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference November 7, 2005 - 12:36pm Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Sam Bodman I am very glad to be with all of you today. Let me just say to Rose and to everyone associated with the Carnegie Endowment that the Bush Administration values the work that you do. This is particularly so with this series of conferences dedicated to exploring the complicated issues of nonproliferation policy. And allow me to offer the congratulations of my Department to Director General El Baradei and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the award conferred last month by the Nobel Foundation. We should applaud the Agency's staff and all the member nations that come

170

2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference 5 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference 2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference November 7, 2005 - 12:36pm Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Sam Bodman I am very glad to be with all of you today. Let me just say to Rose and to everyone associated with the Carnegie Endowment that the Bush Administration values the work that you do. This is particularly so with this series of conferences dedicated to exploring the complicated issues of nonproliferation policy. And allow me to offer the congratulations of my Department to Director General El Baradei and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the award conferred last month by the Nobel Foundation. We should applaud the Agency's staff and all the member nations that come

171

Nonproliferation, Nuclear Security, and the Insider Threat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Insider threat concept is evolving and getting more attention: (1) Domestically, internationally and in foreign countries, (2) At the government, academia, and industry levels, and (3) Public awareness and concerns are also growing. Negligence can be an insider's action. Technology advancements provide more opportunities, new tools for the insider. Our understanding of the insider is shaped by our cultural, social and ethnic perceptions and traditions. They also can limit our recognition of the issues and response actions.

Balatsky, Galya I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Duggan, Ruth [SNL

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

172

Nonproliferation Graduate Program | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

about the program and application information and deadlines, please visit the NGP web site off site link or call Program Manager Phyllis B. Byrd at (202) 586-2061 or e-mail...

173

A Coherence Perspective of Bilateral Investment Treaties.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Foreign investment is mainly protected through national laws. However the wide-spreading network of bilateral investment treaties aims to ensure a certain standard of protection. These… (more)

Al-Louzi, Rawan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Export possibilities for small nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The worldwide deployment of peaceful nuclear technology is predicated on conformance with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty of 1972. Under this international treaty, countries have traded away pursuit of nuclear weapons in exchange for access to commercial nuclear technology that could help them grow economically. Realistically, however, most nuclear technology has been beyond the capacity of the NPT developing countries to afford. Even if the capital cost of the plant is managed, the costs of the infrastructure and the operational complexity of most nuclear technology have taken it out of the hands of the nations who need it the most. Now, a new class of small sodium cooled reactors has been specifically designed to meet the electrical power, water, hydrogen and heat needs of small and remote users. These reactors feature small size, long refueling interval, no onsite fuel storage, and simplified operations. Sized in the 10 MW(e) to 50 MW(e) range these reactors are modularized for factory production and for rapid site assembly. The fuel would be <20% U-235 uranium fuel with a 30-year core life. This new reactor type more appropriately fills the needs of countries for lower power distributed systems that can fill the gap between large developed infrastructure and primitive distributed energy systems. Looking at UN Resolution 1540 and the impact of other agreements, there is a need to address the issues of nuclear security, fuel, waste, and economic/legal/political-stakeholder concerns. This paper describes the design features of this new reactor type that specifically address these issues in a manner that increases the availability of commercial nuclear technology to the developing nations of the world. (authors)

Campagna, M.S.; Hess, C.; Moor, P. [Burns and Roe Enterprises, Inc., Oradell, NJ (United States); Sawruk, W. [ABSG Consulting, Inc., Shillington, PA (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Development of Superconducting High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometers for Nuclear Safeguards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of smuggling. Today, nuclear security is significantly morecritical importance of nuclear security, stating that thereJ. Doyle. Nuclear Safeguards, Security and Nonproliferation:

Dreyer, Jonathan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Bilateral Investment Treaties and Foreign Direct Investment: Correlation versus Causation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and similar international investment agreements, as well asThe di?usion of bilateral investment treaties, 1960-2000. UCM. : 2003, Do bilateral investment treaties attract FDI?

Aisbett, Emma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Chair, CTBT working group B Radionuclide Expert Group and the...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

in the Office of Nonproliferation Policy at DOENNSA where he served as a scientific advisor on the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty and related Nuclear Testing Limitations...

178

Honoring Our Past, Securing Our Future | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

nuclear weapons into LEU fuel for U.S. power plants, generating 10 percent of U.S. electricity. Preventing nuclear smuggling and strengthening the nonproliferation regime -...

179

Alarm Response Training Academy opens at Y-12 | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Harrington, NNSA Deputy Administrator, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation; and Morgan Smith, Chief Operating Officer, Consolidated Nuclear Security. The free course taught at...

180

Nuclear Material Recovery | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nuclear material domestically and internationally is one part of Y-12's nuclear nonproliferation business. Miscellaneous scrap material is a diverse group of scrap materials...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Goals, Objectives, and Requirements (GOR) of the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team for the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal, objectives, and requirements (GOR) presented in this document define a framework for describing research directed specifically by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The intent of this document is to provide a communication tool for the GNDD Team with NNSA management and with its stakeholder community. It describes the GNDD expectation that much of the improvement in the proficiency of nuclear explosion monitoring will come from better understanding of the science behind the generation, propagation, recording, and interpretation of seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic, and radionuclide signals and development of "game-changer" advances in science and technology.

Casey, Leslie A.

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

182

Livermore scientist, engineers train to be inspectors for test ban treaty  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

scientist, engineers train to be inspectors for test ban treaty scientist, engineers train to be inspectors for test ban treaty organization | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Livermore scientist, engineers train to be inspectors ... Livermore scientist, engineers train to be inspectors for test ban treaty organization

183

Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

None

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

184

Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

None

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

185

The spread of nuclear-weapon-free zones: Building a new nuclear bargain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States (US), France and Britain took a small step in the direction of nuclear disarmament when they announced they would ratify the protocols of the Treaty of Rarotonga, also called the South Pacific nuclear-free-zone treaty. The author examines the protocols of this treaty and the implications for its adoption.

Davis, Z.S.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

SUBCHAPTER II?MIGRATORY BIRD TREATY  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

as to when and how migratory birds may be taken, killed, or possessed U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Office of Law Enforcement 16 USC 703-712 Migratory Bird Treaty Act...

187

Rapid Sampling Tools - Nuclear Engineering Multimedia  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation and National Security Nonproliferation and National Security > Multimedia > Rapid Sampling Tools Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Nonproliferation and National Security - Multimedia Bookmark and Share NPNS Multimedia, a collection of videos and audios featuring activities related to Nonproliferation and National Security

188

NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

established the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) in the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation to, as quickly as possible, identify, secure, remove andor...

189

material consolidation | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

of Material Consolidation and Civilian Sites (MCCS) is responsible for three key nuclear nonproliferation initiatives.Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A) Upgrades:...

190

Oregon Strategies for Transportation Compliance with the Migratory Bird Treaty Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prosecution and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act: an analysisAbstract: The Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), a federalthrough the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA, 16 USC 703-

Maguire, Chris C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferat...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation Collaboration Following Russian Delegation Visit to the United States Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy...

192

E-Print Network 3.0 - achieve sustainable nuclear Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

as a complementary avenue to achieving a nuclear-weapons-free world. Reinforce the political... Milan Document on Nuclear Disarmament and Non-Proliferation 29 January 2010 Below...

193

Framework for Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection for Nonproliferation Impact Assessments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a framework for proliferation resistance and physical protection evaluation for the fuel cycle systems envisioned in the expansion of nuclear power for electricity generation. The methodology is based on an approach developed as part of the Generation IV technical evaluation framework and on a qualitative evaluation approach to policy factors similar to those that were introduced in previous Nonproliferation Impact Assessments performed by DOE.

Bari,R.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Microsoft PowerPoint - 1_Cruz_Import Export_NMMSS 2013 Presentation...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and decision making processes Provide guidance to find more information 2 Atomic Energy Act of 1954 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978 Treaties, Conventions and...

195

Stopping the emergence of nuclear weapon states in the Third World: An examination of the Iraq weapons inspection program. Study project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the Gulf War and the implementation of United Nation (UN) resolutions uncovered an Iraqi multi-billion dollar nuclear weapons program. Iraq's ability to pursue this clandestine program for more than a decade, despite periodic inspections, suggest that the myriad of treaties and agreements designed to curb proliferation may be inadequate. Clearly more must be done to deter and counter the spread of these deadly weapon. The UN weapons inspections in Iraq provide insight into possible solutions to the proliferation of nuclear weapons technology in the developing world. This study examines the policy and operational aspects associated with an intrusive United Nations inspection program. In its final analysis, this paper suggests that an effective challenge inspection program is a necessary element in countering the spread of weapons of mass destruction. Further, it suggests that the UN, as the only internationally accepted enforcement organization, be fully engaged in nonproliferation issues and support the challenge inspection program.

Block, D.A.

1993-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Migratory Bird Treaty Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Migratory Bird Treaty Act Migratory Bird Treaty Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Migratory Bird Treaty Act Year 1918 Url [[File:|160px|link=http://law2.house.gov/uscode-cgi/fastweb.exe?getdoc+uscview+t13t16+6189+0++%28%29%20%20AND%20%28%2816%29%20ADJ%20USC%29%3ACITE%20AND%20%28USC%20w%2F10%20%28703%29%29%3ACITE%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20]] Description References FWS Overview[1] The original 1918 statute implemented the 1916 Convention between the U.S. and Great Britain (for Canada) for the protection of migratory birds. Later amendments implemented treaties between the U.S. and Mexico, the U.S. and Japan, and the U.S. and the Soviet Union (now Russia). Specific provisions in the statute include: Establishment of a Federal prohibition, unless permitted by regulations, to

197

Nuclear Proliferation Using Laser Isotope Separation -- Verification Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two levels of nonproliferation verification exist. Signatories of the basic agreements under the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty (NPT) agree to open their nuclear sites to inspection by the IAEA. A more detailed and intrusive level was developed following the determination that Iraq had begun a nuclear weapons development program that was not detected by the original level of verification methods. This level, referred to as 93+2 and detailed in model protocol INFCIRC/540, allows the IAEA to do environmental monitoring of non-declared facilities that are suspected of containing proliferation activity, and possibly further inspections, as well as allowing more detailed inspections of declared sites. 56 countries have signed a Strengthened Safeguards Systems Additional Protocol as of 16 July 2001. These additional inspections can be done on the instigation of the IAEA itself, or after requests by other parties to the NPT, based on information that they have collected. Since information able to cause suspicion of proliferation could arrive at any country, it is important that countries have procedures in place that will assist them in making decisions related to these inspections. Furthermore, IAEA inspection resources are limited, and therefore care needs to be taken to make best use of these resources. Most of the nonproliferation verification inspections may be concentrated on establishing that diversion of nuclear materials is not occurring, but some fraction will be related to determining if undeclared sites have nuclear materials production taking place within them. Of these, most suspicions will likely be related to the major existing technologies for uranium enrichment and reprocessing for plutonium extraction, as it would seem most likely that nations attempting proliferation would use tested means of producing nuclear materials. However, as technology continues to advance and new methods of enrichment and reprocessing are developed, inspection-related procedures will need to be adapted to keep up with them. In order to make 93+2 inspections more useful, a systematic way of finding clues to nuclear proliferation would be useful. Also, to cope with the possible use of newer technology for proliferation, the list of clues might need to be expanded. This paper discusses the development and recognition of such clues. It concentrates on laser isotope separation (LIS) as a new proliferation technology, and uses Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) as an example of LIS that is well known.

Erickson, S A

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

International Nuclear Safeguards Inspection Support Tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to developing technologies to meet escalating requirements for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) monitoring and associated inspections. This commitment involves the customization and transfer of existing remote monitoring/information management technologies for use by the IAEA. This paper describes an information management system called INSIST International Nuclear Safeguards Inspection Support Tool, which was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to support the IAEA Action Team in its role of monitoring and verifying compliance under United Nations Special Commission (UNSC) Resolutions 687, 707, and 715. Initial emphasis was placed on developing and deploying functionality and databases customized to support the Action Team. Throughout the design and customization of INSIST, emphasis was placed on information storage and retrieval capabilities for data gathered by the Action Team. In addition, PNL provided the Action Team with maps and satellite images and other relevant Iraqi databases to further facilitate the following activities: monitoring nuclear activities, facility operations, and nuclear material inventories assisting in inspection planning and training providing post inspection analysis providing onsite inspection support reporting on inspection findings.

Steinmaus, K.L.; Wukelic, G.E.; Beal, O.M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

On the dangers of C.I.S. specialists with nuclear weapons experience relocating to Third World countries: A Russian view. Nonproliferation Newsletter, February 1993: Volume 11, Issue 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This newsletter presents information on the effectiveness of rules and regulations; on the role of a qualified consultant in the possible design of a nuclear weapon for a Third World country; and on the possible dangers (and their elimination) of relocating nuclear technologists.

Hogsett, V.; Canavan, B. [eds.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Office of Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The Office of Nuclear Verification Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nonproliferation & International Security > The Office of Nuclear Verification The Office of Nuclear Verification

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A new era of nuclear test verification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The global network of sensors commissioned to monitor compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty has proven capable of that task and more.

Auer, Matthias; Prior, Mark K.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The European Safeguards Research and Development Association Addresses Safeguards and Nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The renaissance of efforts to expand the use of nuclear energy requires the parallel development of a renewed and more sophisticated work force. Growth in the nuclear sector with high standard of safety, safeguards and security requires skilled staff for design, operations, inspections etc. High-quality nuclear technology educational programs are diminished from past years, and the ability of universities to attract students and to meet future staffing requirements of the nuclear industry is becoming seriously compromised. Thus, education and training in nuclear engineering and sciences is one of the cornerstones for the nuclear sector. Teaching in the nuclear field still seems strongly influenced by national history but it is time to strengthen resources and collaborate. Moreover with the current nuclear security threats it becomes critical that nuclear technology experts master the basic principles not only of safety, but also of nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation and nuclear security. In Europe the European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association has established the certificate 'European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (EMSNE)' as the classic nuclear engineering program covering reactor operation and nuclear safety. However, it does not include courses on nonproliferation, safeguards, or dual-use technologies. The lack of education in nuclear safeguards was tackled by the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA), through development and implementation of safeguards course modules. Since 2005 the ESARDA Working Group, called the Training and Knowledge Management Working Group, (TKMWG) has worked with the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy to organize a Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation course. This five-day course is held each spring at the JRC, and continues to show increasing interest as evidenced by the positive responses of international lecturers and students. The standard set of lectures covers a broad range of subjects, including nuclear material accountancy principles, legal definitions and the regulatory base and inspection tools and techniques. This 60% core part is given by representatives from regulatory bodies (The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Directorate General for Nuclear Energy and Transport), industry (AREVA, British Nuclear Group), and research (Stockholm University, Hamburg University, Joint Research Centre-Institute of Transuranic Elements, and Joint Research Centre-Institute for the Protection of the Citizen). The remaining part is completed with topical lectures addressed by invited lecturers, such as from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the IAEA addressing topics of physical protection, illicit trafficking, the Iraq case study, exercises, including satellite imagery interpretation etc. With this structure of a stable core plus a variable set of invited lectures, the course will remain sustainable and up-to-date. A syllabus provides the students a homogeneous set of information material in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation matters at the European and international level. In this way, the ESARDA TKMWG aims to contribute to a two-fold scientific-technical and political-juridical education and training.

Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Kusumi, R.; Daures, Pascal A.; Janssens, Willem; Dickman, Deborah A.

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

203

Handbook for the implementation of IAEA inspection activities at Department of Energy nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nonproliferation Support Program (NSP) in the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS) has responsibility for supporting and aiding implementation of international and multilateral programs, agreements, and treaties at domestic facilities. In late 1995, the {open_quotes}Readiness Planning Guide for Nonproliferation Visits{close_quotes} (DOE 470.1-1) was issued to assist DOE sites prepare for the host foreign delegations visiting DOE facilities. Since then, field and head-quarters programs have expressed a need for a document that addresses domestic safeguards and security activities, specifically planning for and hosting International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) technical visits and inspections. As a result, OSS/NSP conducted a workshop to prepare a handbook that would contain guidance on domestic safeguards and security preparation and follow-on activities to ensure that this handbook could be utilized by all facilities to improve operational efficiencies and reduce implementation problems. The handbook has been structured to provide detailed background and guidance concerning the obligation, negotiation, inspection, and reporting processes for IAEH safeguards activities in DOE nuclear facilities as well as the lessons-learned by currently inspected facilities and how-we-do-it implementation examples. This paper will present an overview of the preparation and content of this new Handbook.

Zack, N.R.; Thomas, K.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Coady, K.J.; Desmond, W.J. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

High-Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometry for Arms Control and Treaty Verification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many nondestructive nuclear analysis techniques have been developed to support the measurement needs of arms control and treaty verification, including gross photon and neutron counting, low- and high-resolution gamma spectrometry, time-correlated neutron measurements, and photon and neutron imaging. One notable measurement technique that has not been extensively studied to date for these applications is high-resolution fast-neutron spectrometry (HRFNS). Applied for arms control and treaty verification, HRFNS has the potential to serve as a complimentary measurement approach to these other techniques by providing a means to either qualitatively or quantitatively determine the composition and thickness of non-nuclear materials surrounding neutron-emitting materials. The technique uses the normally-occurring neutrons present in arms control and treaty verification objects of interest as an internal source of neutrons for performing active-interrogation transmission measurements. Most low-Z nuclei of interest for arms control and treaty verification, including 9Be, 12C, 14N, and 16O, possess fast-neutron resonance features in their absorption cross sections in the 0.5- to 5-MeV energy range. Measuring the selective removal of source neutrons over this energy range, assuming for example a fission-spectrum starting distribution, may be used to estimate the stoichiometric composition of intervening materials between the neutron source and detector. At a simpler level, determination of the emitted fast-neutron spectrum may be used for fingerprinting 'known' assemblies for later use in template-matching tests. As with photon spectrometry, automated analysis of fast-neutron spectra may be performed to support decision making and reporting systems protected behind information barriers. This paper will report recent work at Idaho National Laboratory to explore the feasibility of using HRFNS for arms control and treaty verification applications, including simulations and experiments, using fission-spectrum neutron sources to assess neutron transmission through composite low-Z attenuators.

David L. Chichester; James T. Johnson; Edward H. Seabury

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

SNIF: A Futuristic Neutrino Probe for Undeclared Nuclear Fission Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Today reactor neutrino experiments are at the cutting edge of fundamental research in particle physics. Understanding the neutrino is far from complete, but thanks to the impressive progress in this field over the last 15 years, a few research groups are seriously considering that neutrinos could be useful for society. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) works with its Member States to promote safe, secure and peaceful nuclear technologies. In a context of international tension and nuclear renaissance, neutrino detectors could help IAEA to enforce the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). In this article we discuss a futuristic neutrino application to detect and localize an undeclared nuclear reactor from across borders. The SNIF (Secret Neutrino Interactions Finder) concept proposes to use a few hundred thousand tons neutrino detectors to unveil clandestine fission reactors. Beyond previous studies we provide estimates of all known background sources as a function of the detector's longitude, latitude and depth, and we discuss how they impact the detectability.

Thierry Lasserre; Maximilien Fechner; Guillaume Mention; Romain Reboulleau; Michel Cribier; Alain Letourneau; David Lhuillier

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

206

Columbia River Treaty 2014/2024 Review • Phase 1 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the Columbia River Treaty (Treaty or CRT) of 1964, Canada and the United States (U.S.) jointly regulate and manage the Columbia River as it flows from British Columbia into the U.S. The Treaty has provided substantial flood control and power generation benefits to both nations. The Treaty established Canadian and U.S. Entities as implementing agents for each government. British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority (BC Hydro) was designated as the Canadian Entity. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Administrator and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) Division Engineer, Northwestern Division, were designated as the U.S. Entity. The Canadian and U.S. Entities are empowered by their respective governments with broad discretion to implement the existing Columbia River Treaty. They are not, however, authorized to terminate, renegotiate, or otherwise modify the Treaty. In the U.S., authority over international treaties rests with the President, assisted in foreign relations and international negotiations by the Department of State and subject in certain cases to the advice and consent of the U.S. Senate. In Canada, international treaties are within the prerogative of the executive branch of the federal government. Under current policy, treaties are tabled in the House of Commons, and are subject to a waiting period before the executive branch brings the treaty into effect. In the case of the Columbia River Treaty, Canada has assigned certain rights and obligations relating to the Treaty to British Columbia pursuant to the Canada-B.C. Agreement. The Phase 1 report is provided to those respective governmental bodies to support possible independent and/or joint decisions that may be made with respect to the future of the Treaty. The Treaty contains two important provisions that take effect on and after September 16, 2024, that could impact the current power and flood control benefits: 1. Canadian flood control obligations automatically change from a pre-determined annual operation to a “Called Upon” operation. 2. The year 2024 is the earliest date that either Canada or the U.S. can terminate most of the provisions of the Treaty, with a minimum 10-years advance written notice. Hence, September 16, 2014, is the latest date that either nation could provide notice of intent to terminate and still have the termination effective at its earliest possible date in 2024. While termination would end most Treaty obligations, Called Upon flood control and Libby coordination provisions will continue regardless of termination. However, it is important to note that the Treaty has no end date and absent either country using the termination option will continue indefinitely.

none,

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Ionospheric measurements for the Non-Proliferation Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The detection of explosions using ionospheric techniques relies on measuring perturbations induced in radio propagation by acoustics waves which disturb the electron density of the ionosphere. Such techniques have been applied to the detection of atmospheric explosions, underground nuclear tests, earthquakes, and surface mining explosions. The nighttime ionosphere presents a difficulty for the detection of explosions because in the absence of solar ionization radiation the electron density in the altitude range of 90 to 200 km decays after sunset and perturbation effects are correspondingly reduced. On the other hand, acoustic waves produced by weak sources reach a maximum amplitude in the altitude range of 100 to 150 km and are highly attenuated at altitudes above 200 km. For safety reasons, most planned explosions are conducted during daylight which has limited the experimental measurements during nighttime. However a recent opportunity for a nighttime measurement occurred in connection with the Non-Proliferation Experiment which consisted of the detonation of a large chemical charge underground at the Nevada Test Site near midnight local time. the results, based on a new technique of using medium frequency radio transmissions provided by commercial broadcasts to detect explosion effects, were negative. The most likely explanation for the negative result is that the radio transmissions did not reflect at a low enough altitude to sense the perturbations produced by the acoustic waves.

Fitzgerald, T.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

EA-1238: Proposed Construction and Operation of the Nonproliferation and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

38: Proposed Construction and Operation of the 38: Proposed Construction and Operation of the Nonproliferation and International Security Center, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-1238: Proposed Construction and Operation of the Nonproliferation and International Security Center, Los Alamos, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to construct and operate the Nonproliferation and International Security Center within the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 3 located at Los Alamos, New Mexico. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 22, 1999 EA-1238: Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Construction and Operation of the Nonproliferation and International Security Center July 22, 1999

209

SciTech Connect: Arms control and nonproliferation technologies...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE), conducted by the Department of Energy at the Nevada Test Site. Through an introduction and pictorial walk-through, Marv Denny and Jay Zucca of...

210

THREE ESSAYS ON FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT AND BILATERAL INVESTMENT TREATIES.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In the past several decades, a significant, worldwide expansion in bilateral investment treaties (BITs) occurred and aimed to improve protection for foreign investors’ rights and… (more)

Vashchilko, Tatiana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Safeguards and Security | National Nuclear Security Safeguards and Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nonproliferation & International Security > The Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security The Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security

212

A Visual Analytics Approach to Structured Data Analysis to Enhance Nonproliferation and Arms Control Verification Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis activities for Nonproliferation and Arms Control verification require the use of many types of data. Tabular structured data, such as Excel spreadsheets and relational databases, have traditionally been used for data mining activities, where specific queries are issued against data to look for matching results. The application of visual analytics tools to structured data enables further exploration of datasets to promote discovery of previously unknown results. This paper discusses the application of a specific visual analytics tool to datasets related to the field of Arms Control and Nonproliferation to promote the use of visual analytics more broadly in this domain. Visual analytics focuses on analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces (Wong and Thomas 2004). It promotes exploratory analysis of data, and complements data mining technologies where known patterns can be mined for. Also with a human in the loop, they can bring in domain knowledge and subject matter expertise. Visual analytics has not widely been applied to this domain. In this paper, we will focus on one type of data: structured data, and show the results of applying a specific visual analytics tool to answer questions in the Arms Control and Nonproliferation domain. We chose to use the T.Rex tool, a visual analytics tool developed at PNNL, which uses a variety of visual exploration patterns to discover relationships in structured datasets, including a facet view, graph view, matrix view, and timeline view. The facet view enables discovery of relationships between categorical information, such as countries and locations. The graph tool visualizes node-link relationship patterns, such as the flow of materials being shipped between parties. The matrix visualization shows highly correlated categories of information. The timeline view shows temporal patterns in data. In this paper, we will use T.Rex with two different datasets to demonstrate how interactive exploration of the data can aid an analyst with arms control and nonproliferation verification activities. Using a dataset from PIERS (PIERS 2014), we will show how container shipment imports and exports can aid an analyst in understanding the shipping patterns between two countries. We will also use T.Rex to examine a collection of research publications from the IAEA International Nuclear Information System (IAEA 2014) to discover collaborations of concern. We hope this paper will encourage the use of visual analytics structured data analytics in the field of nonproliferation and arms control verification. Our paper outlines some of the challenges that exist before broad adoption of these kinds of tools can occur and offers next steps to overcome these challenges.

Gillen, David S.

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

213

Safeguards Guidance Document for Designers of Commercial Nuclear Facilities: International Nuclear Safeguards Requirements and Practices For Uranium Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the second in a series of guidelines on international safeguards requirements and practices, prepared expressly for the designers of nuclear facilities. The first document in this series is the description of generic international nuclear safeguards requirements pertaining to all types of facilities. These requirements should be understood and considered at the earliest stages of facility design as part of a new process called “Safeguards-by-Design.” This will help eliminate the costly retrofit of facilities that has occurred in the past to accommodate nuclear safeguards verification activities. The following summarizes the requirements for international nuclear safeguards implementation at enrichment plants, prepared under the Safeguards by Design project, and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of NA-243. The purpose of this is to provide designers of nuclear facilities around the world with a simplified set of design requirements and the most common practices for meeting them. The foundation for these requirements is the international safeguards agreement between the country and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). Relevant safeguards requirements are also cited from the Safeguards Criteria for inspecting enrichment plants, found in the IAEA Safeguards Manual, Part SMC-8. IAEA definitions and terms are based on the IAEA Safeguards Glossary, published in 2002. The most current specification for safeguards measurement accuracy is found in the IAEA document STR-327, “International Target Values 2000 for Measurement Uncertainties in Safeguarding Nuclear Materials,” published in 2001. For this guide to be easier for the designer to use, the requirements have been restated in plainer language per expert interpretation using the source documents noted. The safeguards agreement is fundamentally a legal document. As such, it is written in a legalese that is understood by specialists in international law and treaties, but not by most outside of this field, including designers of nuclear facilities. For this reason, many of the requirements have been simplified and restated. However, in all cases, the relevant source document and passage is noted so that readers may trace the requirement to the source. This is a helpful living guide, since some of these requirements are subject to revision over time. More importantly, the practices by which the requirements are met are continuously modernized by the IAEA and nuclear facility operators to improve not only the effectiveness of international nuclear safeguards, but also the efficiency. As these improvements are made, the following guidelines should be updated and revised accordingly.

Robert Bean; Casey Durst

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The CFE Treaty: In retrospect and under review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (CFE) Treaty is considered the cornerstone of European security. To verify the initial declarations of holdings, the obligatory reductions and the residual equipment levels, a system was established of regular periodic on-site inspections. The author examines the role of the treaty on European security.

Mendelsohn, J.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Advancing our Nuclear Collaboration with the Czech Republic ...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Obama addresses a crowd in Hradcany Square on April 5, 2009, touching on issues from green energy to nuclear treaties. Daniel B. Poneman Daniel B. Poneman Former Deputy...

216

Office of Nuclear Warhead Protection | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Warhead Protection | National Nuclear Security Warhead Protection | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Office of Nuclear Warhead Protection Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices > Office of International Material Protection and Cooperation > Material Protection, Control and Accounting

217

Chemical and biological nonproliferation program. FY99 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first of what will become an annual report documenting the progress made by the Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (CBNP). It is intended to be a summary of the program's activities that will be of interest to both policy and technical audiences. This report and the annual CBNP Summer Review Meeting are important vehicles for communication with the broader chemical and biological defense and nonproliferation communities. The Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program Strategic Plan is also available and provides additional detail on the program's context and goals. The body of the report consists of an overview of the program's philosophy, goals and recent progress in the major program areas. In addition, an appendix is provided with more detailed project summaries that will be of interest to the technical community.

NONE

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Implications for Research and Development in Safeguards Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) of 1968 aims at total nuclear disarmament, its immediate purpose and major function being to prevent the further spread of nuclear weapons. Although...

Hans Hermann Remagen; Bernd Richter

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Secure or seclude : U.S. nuclear policy and nuclear states, a comparison of India and Pakistan.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The U.S. has implemented a two-track nuclear policy since the Cold War. The first track is non-proliferation and the second track involves securing all nuclear… (more)

Chaney, Brent Buie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

2010 Annual Planning Summary for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Annual Planning Summaries briefly describe the status of ongoing NEPA compliance activities, any EAs expected to be prepared in the next 12 months, any EISs expected to be prepared in the next 24...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Income tax treaties, tax havens, and the foreign tax credit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Income tax treaties (also called income tax Conventions) are a crucial consideration for many foreign investors in the United States. They are an important consideration for all foreign investors.

Paul Brundage; Adam Starchild

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

A Non-Proliferating Fuel Cycle: No Enrichment, Reprocessing or Accessible Spent Fuel - 12375  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current fuel cycles offer a number of opportunities for access to plutonium, opportunities to create highly enriched uranium and access highly radioactive wastes to create nuclear weapons and 'dirty' bombs. The non-proliferating fuel cycle however eliminates or reduces such opportunities and access by eliminating the mining, milling and enrichment of uranium. The non-proliferating fuel cycle also reduces the production of plutonium per unit of energy created, eliminates reprocessing and the separation of plutonium from the spent fuel and the creation of a stream of high-level waste. It further simplifies the search for land based deep geologic repositories and interim storage sites for spent fuel in the USA by disposing of the spent fuel in deep sub-seabed sediments after storing the spent fuel at U.S. Navy Nuclear Shipyards that have the space and all of the necessary equipment and security already in place. The non-proliferating fuel cycle also reduces transportation risks by utilizing barges for the collection of spent fuel and transport to the Navy shipyards and specially designed ships to take the spent fuel to designated disposal sites at sea and to dispose of them there in deep sub-seabed sediments. Disposal in the sub-seabed sediments practically eliminates human intrusion. Potential disposal sites include Great Meteor East and Southern Nares Abyssal Plain. Such sites then could easily become international disposal sites since they occur in the open ocean. It also reduces the level of human exposure in case of failure because of the large physical and chemical dilution and the elimination of a major pathway to man-seawater is not potable. Of course, the recovery of uranium from sea water and the disposal of spent fuel in sub-seabed sediments must be proven on an industrial scale. All other technologies are already operating on an industrial scale. If externalities, such as reduced terrorist threats, environmental damage (including embedded emissions), long term care, reduced access to 'dirty' bomb materials, the social and political costs of siting new facilities and the psychological impact of no solution to the nuclear waste problem, were taken into account, the costs would be far lower than those of the present fuel cycle. (authors)

Parker, Frank L. [Vanderbilt University (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Reasoner: PNNL FY12 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building on previous internal investments and leveraging ongoing advancements in semantic technologies, PNNL implemented a formal reasoning framework and applied it to a specific challenge in nuclear nonproliferation. The Semantic Nonproliferation Analysis Platform (SNAP) was developed as a preliminary graphical user interface to demonstrate the potential power of the underlying semantic technologies to analyze and explore facts and relationships relating to the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). In developing this proof of concept prototype, the utility and relevancy of semantic technologies to the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D) has been better understood.

Hohimer, Ryan E.; Pomiak, Yekaterina G.; Neorr, Peter A.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Strasburg, Jana D.

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

224

6 Nuclear Fuel Designs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Message from the Director Message from the Director 2 Nuclear Power & Researrh Reactors 3 Discovery of Promethium 4 Nuclear Isotopes 4 Nuclear Medicine 5 Nuclear Fuel Processes & Software 6 Nuclear Fuel Designs 6 Nuclear Safety 7 Nuclear Desalination 7 Nuclear Nonproliferation 8 Neutron Scattering 9 Semiconductors & Superconductors 10 lon-Implanted Joints 10 Environmental Impact Analyses 11 Environmental Quality 12 Space Exploration 12 Graphite & Carbon Products 13 Advanced Materials: Alloys 14 Advanced Materials: Ceramics 15 Biological Systems 16 Biological Systems 17 Computational Biology 18 Biomedical Technologies 19 Intelligent Machines 20 Health Physics & Radiation Dosimetry 21 Radiation Shielding 21 Information Centers 22 Energy Efficiency: Cooling & Heating

225

The CFE Treaty review conference: Strengthening the {open_quote}Cornerstone{close_quote} of European security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (CFE) Treaty is considered the cornerstone of European security. The author examines the impact of the treaty on European security and the major issues involved in strengthening this Treaty in light of current status of the participants.

Graham, T. Jr.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Reasoner: PNNL FY13 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Fiscal Year 2012 (FY12) PNNL implemented a formal reasoning framework and applied it to a specific challenge in nuclear nonproliferation. The Semantic Nonproliferation Analysis Platform (SNAP) was developed as a preliminary graphical user interface to demonstrate the potential power of the underlying semantic technologies to analyze and explore facts and relationships relating to the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). In Fiscal Year 2013 (FY13) the SNAP demonstration was enhanced with respect to query and navigation usability issues.

Hohimer, Ryan E.; Strasburg, Jana D.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

227

July 2013 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). Training has been held in Austria, Jordan, South Korea and Hungary. Of the five U.S. surrogate inspectors selected for the...

228

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

planning and oversight for programs funded by the Weapons Activities, Defense Nuclear Non- proliferation, for Weapons Ac- tivities and Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, and Federal employees at the NNSA service379 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Federal Funds General and special

229

What Happens to Safeguards if the NPT Goes?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since 1989 the international scene has changed almost beyond recognition. It was then possible to speculate that the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) might lapse because the United State...

David Fischer

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

The Office of Nuclear Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The Office of Nuclear Controls Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nonproliferation & International Security > The Office of Nuclear Controls The Office of Nuclear Controls Certain terrorist groups and states are attempting to acquire WMD dual-use

231

Loose Nukes: Nuclear Material Security in G.P.Gilfoyle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-standing policy of nuclear nonproliferation. · A nuclear blast would have horrific consequences; loss of lifeLoose Nukes: Nuclear Material Security in Russia G.P.Gilfoyle Physics Department, University of Richmond, Virginia Outline: 1. Nuclear Weapons 101 2. What are loose nukes and why should you care? 3. What

Gilfoyle, Jerry

232

Proceedings of GLOBAL 2013: International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Conference - Nuclear Energy at a Crossroads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Global conference is a forum for the discussion of the scientific, technical, social and regulatory aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle. Relevant topics include global utilization of nuclear energy, current fuel cycle technologies, advanced reactors, advanced fuel cycles, nuclear nonproliferation and public acceptance.

NONE

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Verifying the CFE treaty: Any role for technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As recently as 1989, it was generally expected that arms control would provide vast opportunities for technologists to exercise their ingenuity in adapting the tried and true concepts of materials control to this novel regime. When the first phase of the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (the CFE Treaty) was finally agreed upon in October 1990, and signed on November 19, 1990, it became obvious that verification was less important than consensus. Aside from NTM, which receives only passing mention, technology, even at the level of what is commonly accepted practice in materials control, not to speak of advanced concepts, had no meaningful role. In this paper the non-existent role for new'' technology in the Phase I CFE verification process is explained. The explanation relies on (1) the perception that the benefits of having a treaty in place are far greater than the risk from possible violations, (2) the political liabilities that accompany the identification of insignificant violations and (3) the very large dimensions of a significant violation. 4 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Allentuck, J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Verifying the CFE treaty; Any role for technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As recently as 1989, it was generally expected that arms control would provide vast opportunities for technologists to exercise their ingenuity in adapting the tried and true concepts of materials control to this novel regime. When the first phase of the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (the CFE Treaty) was finally agreed upon in October 1990, and signed on November 19, 1990, it became obvious that verification was less important than consensus. Aside from NTM, which receives only passing mention, technology, even at the level of what is commonly accepted practice in materials control, not to speak of advanced concepts, had no meaningful role. In this paper the non-existent role for new technology in the Phase I CFE verification process is explained. The explanation relies on the perception that the benefits of having a treaty in place are far greater than the risk from possible violations, the political liabilities that accompany the identification of insignificant violations and, the very large dimensions of a significant violation.

Allentuck, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Energy Dept.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Office of National Infrastructure & Sustainability | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

National Infrastructure & Sustainability | National Nuclear National Infrastructure & Sustainability | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Office of National Infrastructure & Sustainability Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices > Office of International Material

236

Office of Material Consolidation & Civilian Sites | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Material Consolidation & Civilian Sites | National Nuclear Material Consolidation & Civilian Sites | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Office of Material Consolidation & Civilian Sites Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices > Office of International Material

237

India's baseline plan for nuclear energy self-sufficiency.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

India's nuclear energy strategy has traditionally strived for energy self-sufficiency, driven largely by necessity following trade restrictions imposed by the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) following India's 'peaceful nuclear explosion' of 1974. On September 6, 2008, the NSG agreed to create an exception opening nuclear trade with India, which may create opportunities for India to modify its baseline strategy. The purpose of this document is to describe India's 'baseline plan,' which was developed under constrained trade conditions, as a basis for understanding changes in India's path as a result of the opening of nuclear commerce. Note that this treatise is based upon publicly available information. No attempt is made to judge whether India can meet specified goals either in scope or schedule. In fact, the reader is warned a priori that India's delivery of stated goals has often fallen short or taken a significantly longer period to accomplish. It has been evident since the early days of nuclear power that India's natural resources would determine the direction of its civil nuclear power program. It's modest uranium but vast thorium reserves dictated that the country's primary objective would be thorium utilization. Estimates of India's natural deposits vary appreciably, but its uranium reserves are known to be extremely limited, totaling approximately 80,000 tons, on the order of 1% of the world's deposits; and nominally one-third of this ore is of very low uranium concentration. However, India's roughly 300,000 tons of thorium reserves account for approximately 30% of the world's total. Confronted with this reality, the future of India's nuclear power industry is strongly dependent on the development of a thorium-based nuclear fuel cycle as the only way to insure a stable, sustainable, and autonomous program. The path to India's nuclear energy self-sufficiency was first outlined in a seminal paper by Drs. H. J. Bhabha and N. B. Prasad presented at the Second United Nations Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy in 1958. The paper described a three stage plan for a sustainable nuclear energy program consistent with India's limited uranium but abundant thorium natural resources. In the first stage, natural uranium would be used to fuel graphite or heavy water moderated reactors. Plutonium extracted from the spent fuel of these thermal reactors would drive fast reactors in the second stage that would contain thorium blankets for breeding uranium-233 (U-233). In the final stage, this U-233 would fuel thorium burning reactors that would breed and fission U-233 in situ. This three stage blueprint still reigns as the core of India's civil nuclear power program. India's progress in the development of nuclear power, however, has been impacted by its isolation from the international nuclear community for its development of nuclear weapons and consequent refusal to sign the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT). Initially, India was engaged in numerous cooperative research programs with foreign countries; for example, under the 'Atoms for Peace' program, India acquired the Cirus reactor, a 40 MWt research reactor from Canada moderated with heavy water from the United States. India was also actively engaged in negotiations for the NPT. But, on May 18, 1974, India conducted a 'peaceful nuclear explosion' at Pokharan using plutonium produced by the Cirus reactor, abruptly ending the era of international collaboration. India then refused to sign the NPT, which it viewed as discriminatory since it would be required to join as a non-nuclear weapons state. As a result of India's actions, the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) was created in 1975 to establish guidelines 'to apply to nuclear transfers for peaceful purposes to help ensure that such transfers would not be diverted to unsafeguarded nuclear fuel cycle or nuclear explosive activities. These nuclear export controls have forced India to be largely self-sufficient in all nuclear-related technologies.

Bucher, R .G.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Future directions for arms control and nonproliferation. Conference summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of the presentations and discussions at the Spring 1994 CNSN-Wilton Park Conference. The Conference was one of a series on US-European security cooperation organized by The Center for National Security Negotiations (CNSN) of Science Applications International Corporation. These conferences bring together government and non-government experts, primarily from the United States and Europe, to discuss a range of regional and global security issues. The conferences provide an opportunity to explore, in a frank and off-the-record environment, common interests and concerns, as well as differences in approach that affect trans-Atlantic cooperation. This report is divided into the following three areas: (1) implementation of existing and pending agreements; (2) non-proliferation: prospects for trans-Atlantic cooperation; and (3) future directions in arms control.

Not Available

1994-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

239

GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection | National Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Protection | National Nuclear Protection | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Global Threat Reduction Initiative > GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection

240

Modeling hydroacoustic waveform envelopes for comprehensive test?ban treaty monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Robust and accurate localization of explosion events in the oceans requires modeling signal arrival times for a number of receivers. Additional information contained in the waveform envelope may also be used to recover other source properties and reduce the probability of false alarms in nuclear explosion monitoring. The feasibility of efficient envelope modeling was investigated by comparing adiabatic normal?mode model predictions with explosion data. The K R A K E N computer code com?bined with appropriate dispersion curve interpolation was used to compute modal shapes and wave numbers in each range segment. To facilitate CTBT knowledge base development the model has been used to illustrate the various factors that contribute to the shape of the received hydroacoustic waveform envelope and provide design feedback for sensor placement and data analysis algorithms. The model was compared with data for two source–receiver paths: (a) the Chase21 ship scuttling explosion on 25 June 1970 off the New Jersey coast and recorded at the Ascension Island hydroacoustic array; and (b) nuclear explosions on Mururoa Atoll and received at the hydrophone at Point Sur California. Adiabatic normal?mode approach was found inadequate for source and receiver located far from the SOFAR axis. [Work supported by U.S. DOE Office of Nonproliferation and National Security.

Yevgeniy Y. Dorfman; Jay J. Pulli

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Nuclear proliferation after the Cold War  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today, former Soviet republics threaten to gain control over nuclear weapons sited on their territories, and reports on North Korea, Pakistan, India, and Iraq reveal current or recent weapon development programs. This document offers a timely assessment of the prospects for nuclear nonproliferation.

Reiss, M.; Litwak, R.S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Of Gog and Naboth : the Christian response to the Panama Canal Treaties of 1977.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The debate over ratification of the Panama Canal Treaties in 1977 illuminated many fissures among American Christians. Theological conservatives such as evangelicals and fundamentalists, fearing… (more)

Hinkson, James Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

The nuclear dilemma and the just war tradition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book presents papers on the ethical aspects of nuclear weapons. Topics considered include the concept of a ''just'' war, national defense, political aspects, religion and politics, the failure of deterrence, conventional warfare, nuclear deterrence and democratic politics, the future of the nuclear debate, non-proliferation policy, arms control, national security, and government policies.

O'Brien, W.V.; Langan, J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Feasibility and options for purchasing nuclear weapons, highly enriched uranium (HEU) and plutonium from the former Soviet Union (FSU)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a recent tasking from the National Security Council, this report seeks to analyze the possible options open to the US for purchasing, from the former Soviet Union (FSU) substantial quantities of plutonium and highly enriched uranium recovered from the accelerated weapons retirements and dismantlements that will soon be taking place. The purpose of this paper is to identify and assess the implications of some of the options that now appear to be open to the United States, it being recognized that several issues might have to be addressed in further detail if the US Government, on its own, or acting with others seeks to negotiate any such purchases on an early basis. As an outgrowth of the dissolution of the Soviet Union three of the C.I.S. republics now possessing nuclear weapons, namely the Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan, have stated that it is their goal, without undue delay, to become non-nuclear weapon states as defined in the Non-Proliferation Treaty. Of overriding US concern is the proliferation of nuclear weapons in the Third World, and the significant opportunity that the availability of such a large quantity of surplus weapons grade material might present in this regard, especially to a cash-starved FSU Republic. Additionally, the US, in its endeavor to drawdown its own arsenal, needs to assure itself that these materials are not being reconfigured into more modern weapons within the CIS in a manner which would be inconsistent with the stated intentions and publicized activities. The direct purchase of these valuable materials by the US government or by interested US private enterprises could alleviate these security concerns in a straightforward and very expeditious manner, while at the same time pumping vitally needed hard currency into the struggling CIS economy. Such a purchase would seem to be entirely consistent with the Congressional mandate indicated by the Soviet Nuclear Threat Reduction Act of 1991.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Quotas for CFE Treaty declared site inspections for baseline validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CFE Treaty will provide for limits on NATO and WTO forces, particularly tanks, armored personnel carriers, artillery, and helicopters. In addition to the overall limits on TLEs in the ATTU zone, there are expected to be secondary limits on single country forces, limits on forces based in foreign nations, and geographic sublimits. To help validate WTO declarations of baseline forces, the treaty may provide for on-site inspections by NATO of declared WTO basing facilities. One important unresolved issue concerning baseline declared-site OSIs is the quota of such inspections allowed each country. This report presents a decision analysis and evaluation in support of recommendations for resolving this and related issues. It also indentifies key policy decisions that impact the determination of the number of declared-site OSIs. These decisions are: Desired probabilities of detecting a violation and of falsely accusing WTO; Trade-off between improved verification and the intrusiveness of additional OSIs; Force strength constituting a militarily significant violation; and Degree of coordination with and reliance on inspections by NATO allies. 10 figs.

Strait, R.S.; Sicherman, A.

1990-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

246

Royalty Payments & Tax Treaty Procedures Information and IRS forms for MIT Press authors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Royalty Payments & Tax Treaty Procedures Information and IRS forms for MIT Press authors Forms the forms. Royalty Payment Schedule Royalty statements and payments will be made for each royalty year will not be returned. Please see page 3 of the W-7 application for complete details. Tax Treaty Claim on Royalty

Jackson, Daniel

247

A unified risk-Informed framework to assess the proliferation risk and license the proliferation performance of nuclear energy systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to strengthen the current non-proliferation regime it is necessary to guarantee high standards of security for the sites that use, store, produce, or reprocess special nuclear materials (SNM). The current surge ...

Cavalieri d'Oro, Edoardo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A Unified Risk-Informed Framework to Assess the Proliferation Risk and License the Proliferation Performace of Nuclear Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to strengthen the current non-proliferation regime it is necessary to guarantee high standards of security for the sites that use, store, produce, or reprocess special nuclear materials (SNM). The current surge ...

d'Oro, Edoardo Cavalieri

249

Columbia River Treaty 2014/2024 Review: Phase 1 Technical Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1964, the Columbia River Treaty has provided signi?cant bene?ts to the United States and Canada through coordinated river management by the two countries. It remains the standard against which other international water coordination agreements around the world are compared. When the Treaty was negotiated, its goals were to provide signi?cant ?ood control and power generation bene?ts to both countries. However, the Treaty contains two provisions that may signi?cantly change these bene?ts as early as the year 2024. First, in 2024 the 60 years of purchased ?ood control space in Canadian Treaty projects expires. Instead of a coordinated and managed plan to regulate both Canadian and U.S. projects for ?ood control, the Treaty calls for a shift to a Canadian operation under which the United States can call upon Canada for ?ood control assistance. The United States can request this “called upon” assistance as needed but only to the extent necessary to meet forecast ?ood control needs in the United States that cannot adequately be met by U.S. projects. When called upon is requested, the United States will then have to pay Canada for its operational costs and any economic losses resulting from the called upon ?ood control operation. Second, while the Treaty has no speci?ed end date, it does allow either Canada or the United States the option to terminate most of the provisions of the Treaty on or after Sept. 16, 2024, with a minimum of 10 years advance written notice. Thus, the year 2024 is the ?rst year a notice of termination would take effect assuming written notice of termination is given by the Canadian or U.S. governments by 2014. Unless the Treaty is terminated or the federal governments elect to modify the Treaty, its provisions continue inde?nitely, except for the changes in ?ood control discussed above. Given the signi?cance of both of these provisions, it is important that the parties to the Treaty understand the implications for post-2024 Treaty planning and Columbia River operations. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bonneville Power Administration, the agencies that implement the Treaty in the United States on behalf of the U.S. Entity (see Treaty Governance sidebar), are conducting a multi-year effort to understand these implications. This effort is called the 2014/2024 Columbia River Treaty Review.

none,

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Anne Harrington | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Anne Harrington | National Nuclear Security Administration Anne Harrington | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our Leadership > Anne Harrington Anne Harrington Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Anne Harrington Anne Harrington was sworn in as Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation for the National Nuclear Security Administration in

251

Abraham Calls on Global Community to Aggressively Address Nuclear  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Abraham Calls on Global Community to Aggressively Address Nuclear Abraham Calls on Global Community to Aggressively Address Nuclear Nonproliferation Abraham Calls on Global Community to Aggressively Address Nuclear Nonproliferation January 13, 2005 - 9:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - In a lunchtime speech to the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, DC, Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham called on the global community to join in implementing a comprehensive nuclear nonproliferation strategy to address 21st century challenges. Outlining his vision for dealing with constantly evolving proliferation threats in an age of terrorism, Secretary Abraham said the international community must play a greater role in future efforts. "Terrorists have struck not just Washington, New York, Moscow, and Beslan," he said. "The challenge of confronting terrorism falls to every nation. .

252

Nonproliferation Boom Gives A Lift to the National Labs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Korea over its nascent nuclear weapons program, the...5-megawatt experimental nuclear reactor near theNorth...could extract waste fuel and process it to make plutonium for a nuclear weapon. But ifthe satellite...released during plutonium reprocessing to the thermal signature...

Christopher Anderson

1994-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

253

Programmed Death of Nonproliferating Androgen-independent Prostatic Cancer Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ablation induces an energy-dependent process...oligomers catalyzed by nuclear Ca2+, Mg2+-dependent...ablation induces an energy-dependent process...oligomers catalyzed by nuclear Ca2+, Mg(2...ablation induces an energy-dependent process...oligomers catalyzed by nuclear Ca2*, Mg2+-dependent...

Paula Martikainen; Natasha Kyprianou; Robert W. Tucker; and John T. Isaacs

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative's Contract Administration, OAS-L-12-01  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Audit and Inspections Audit and Inspections Audit Report The National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative's Contract Administration OAS-L-12-01 October 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 25, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR FOR DEFENSE NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION FROM: David Sedillo Director Western Audits Division SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative's Contract Administration" BACKGROUND The National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation established the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) in May 2004, as a vital part of the efforts to combat nuclear and radiological terrorism. GTRI's mission is to reduce

255

Constraining potential nuclear-weapons proliferation from civilian reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cessation of the Cold War and renewed international attention to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction are leading to national policies aimed at restraining nuclear-weapons proliferation that could occur through the nuclear-fuel cycle. Argonne, which has unique experience, technology, and capabilities, is one of the US national laboratories contributing to this nonproliferation effort.

Travelli, A.; Gaines, L.L.; Minkov, V.; Olson, A.P.; Snelgrove, J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Investigating Correlated Neutrons from Pulsed Photonuclear Interrogation for Treaty Verification Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems, and 2D gamma imaging technology.3 More modern efforts have again returned to singles neutron and gamma counting techniques, but have more specifically focused on adapting portal monitoring technology to fill roles in potential treaty...

Stewart, Scott

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

257

The wholesale natural gas market prospects in the Energy Community Treaty countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Treaty establishing the Energy Community in Southeastern (S.E.) Europe ... facilitate the creation of a common, competitive energy market in the region. However, the signatory ... this undertaking. This paper...

Fotios Thomaidis; Popi Konidari; Dimitrios Mavrakis

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Oregon Strategies for Transportation Compliance with the Migratory Bird Treaty Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), a federal law enforced byof non-compliance with the MBTA as the agency carries outsystem. ’ Although the MBTA is one of the oldest laws in the

Maguire, Chris C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Alternative treaty monitoring approaches using ultra-low background measurement technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty includes a network of stations and laboratories for collection and analysis of radioactive aerosols. Alternative approaches to IMS operations are considered as a method of enhancing treaty verification. Ultra-low background (ULB) detection promises the possibility of improvements to IMS minimum detectable activities (MDAs) well below the current approach, requiring MDAp30 mBq/m3 of air for 140Ba, or about 106 fissions per daily sample.

Miley, Harry S.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Fast, James E.; Hayes, James C.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Keillor, Martin E.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Seifert, Allen

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Nuclear Security Applications of Antineutrino Detectors: Current Capabilities and Future Prospects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Antineutrinos are electrically neutral, nearly massless fundamental particles produced in large numbers in the cores of nuclear reactors and in nuclear explosions. In the half century since their discovery, major advances in the understanding of their properties, and in detector technology, have opened the door to a new discipline: Applied Antineutrino Physics. Because antineutrinos are inextricably linked to the process of nuclear fission, many applications of interest are in nuclear nonproliferation. This white paper presents a comprehensive survey of applied antineutrino physics relevant for nonproliferation, summarizes recent advances in the field, describes the overlap of this nascent discipline with other ongoing fundamental and applied antineutrino research, and charts a course for research and development for future applications. It is intended as a resource for policymakers, researchers, and the wider nuclear nonproliferation community.

Bernstein, A; Boyer, B; Goodman, M; Learned, J; Lund, J; Reyna, D; Svoboda, R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Fresh nuclear fuel measurements at Ukrainian nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2005, the Provisions on Nuclear Material Measurement System was enacted in Ukraine as an important regulatory driver to support international obligations in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. It defines key provisions and requirements for material measurement and measurement control programs to ensure the quality and reliability of measurement data within the framework of the State MC&A System. Implementing the Provisions requires establishing a number of measurement techniques for both fresh and spent nuclear fuel for various types of Ukrainian reactors. Our first efforts focused on measurements of fresh nuclear fuel from a WWR-1000 power reactor.

Kuzminski, Jozef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ewing, Tom [ANL; Dickman, Debbie [PNNL; Gavrilyuk, Victor [UKRAINE; Drapey, Sergey [UKRAINE; Kirischuk, Vladimir [UKRAINE; Strilchuk, Nikolay [UKRAINE

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Columbia River Treaty History and 2014/2024 Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River, the fourth largest river on the continent as measured by average annual ?ow, generates more power than any other river in North America. While its headwaters originate in British Columbia, only about 15 percent of the 259,500 square miles of the Columbia River Basin is actually located in Canada. Yet the Canadian waters account for about 38 percent of the average annual volume, and up to 50 percent of the peak ?ood waters, that ?ow by The Dalles Dam on the Columbia River between Oregon and Washington. In the 1940s, of?cials from the United States and Canada began a long process to seek a joint solution to the ?ooding caused by the unregulated Columbia River and to the postwar demand for greater energy resources. That effort culminated in the Columbia River Treaty, an international agreement between Canada and the United States for the cooperative development of water resources regulation in the upper Columbia River Basin. It was signed in 1961 and implemented in 1964.

None

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Our Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Our Programs Home > About Us > Our Programs Our Programs NNSA's program support is divided into several key program areas including Defense, Nuclear Nonproliferation, Naval Reactors, Emergency Operations, Infrastructure and Environment, Nuclear Security, Management and

264

Presidential Initiatives | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Presidential Initiatives | National Nuclear Security Administration Presidential Initiatives | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Presidential Initiatives Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Countering Nuclear Terrorism and Trafficking > Presidential Initiatives Presidential Initiatives Bratislava Nuclear Security Initiative: President Putin and President

265

Lessons from post-war Iraq for the international full-scope safeguards regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The discovery after the Gulf War of the extensive Iraqi nuclear weapon program severely shook public confidence in the nuclear non-proliferation regime in general, and the safeguards program of the IAEA under the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, in particular. Iraq provided the justification for evaluating the safeguards regime under new political circumstances, so that appropriate corrective measures could be taken when necessary. It is now up to the individual states within the international system to take advantage of this opportunity.

Scheinman, L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

GTRI: Reducing Nuclear Threats | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reducing Nuclear Threats | National Nuclear Security Administration Reducing Nuclear Threats | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Reducing Nuclear Threats Fact Sheet GTRI: Reducing Nuclear Threats Apr 12, 2013 Mission In 2004, NNSA established the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) in the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation to, as quickly as possible,

267

Safeguarding and Protecting the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

International safeguards as applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are a vital cornerstone of the global nuclear nonproliferation regime - they protect against the peaceful nuclear fuel cycle becoming the undetected vehicle for nuclear weapons proliferation by States. Likewise, domestic safeguards and nuclear security are essential to combating theft, sabotage, and nuclear terrorism by non-State actors. While current approaches to safeguarding and protecting the nuclear fuel cycle have been very successful, there is significant, active interest to further improve the efficiency and effectiveness of safeguards and security, particularly in light of the anticipated growth of nuclear energy and the increase in the global threat environment. This article will address two recent developments called Safeguards-by-Design and Security-by-Design, which are receiving increasing broad international attention and support. Expected benefits include facilities that are inherently more economical to effectively safeguard and protect. However, the technical measures of safeguards and security alone are not enough - they must continue to be broadly supported by dynamic and adaptive nonproliferation and security regimes. To this end, at the level of the global fuel cycle architecture, 'nonproliferation and security by design' remains a worthy objective that is also the subject of very active, international focus.

Trond Bjornard; Humberto Garcia; William Desmond; Scott Demuth

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Future treaties: A proposed framework for verifying the reduction of conventional forces in Europe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared at the request of the US Department of Energy's Office of Arms Control to determine the implications of future treaties for the activities of the Department. It provides background on the negotiations on reduction of conventional forces in Europe (CFE) and, using the initial negotiating positions of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) alliance, develops a framework for verifying a postulated treaty. This framework identifies the main elements of one approach to verification as a way to generate discussion of the problem as a whole. Stemming from this verification scheme is a discussion of the technologies needed to verify the postulated treaty provisions. Finally, a section is devoted to possible implications that the reduction of CFE could have for the US Department of Energy (DOE) and, more specifically, for the Office of Arms Control (OAC). This report was developed separately from NATO and US government efforts and neither draws on their efforts nor represents the policy or views of NATO, the US government or DOE. This report does draw on the author's 30 years of experience in the US Army, working with the NATO organization and with the conventional forces of the United States, its allies, and the Warsaw Treaty Organization. 11 refs., 2 figs.

Houser, G.M.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Industry Self-Regulation as a Means to Promote Nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Companies within numerous industries that have been “early adopters” of self-regulation concept, considering the environment and society alongside business issues, have realized several benefits and some competitive advantage while substantially improving their environmental performance. Given that proliferation prevention is also a public good, our premise is that the experience gained and lessons learned from the self-regulation initiative in other industries and more broadly in the arena of sustainable development provide a basis for examining the feasibility of developing self-regulation mechanisms applicable to industries involved with sensitive technologies (nuclear, radiological source, and other dual-use industries)

Hund, Gretchen; Elkhamri, Oksana O.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Neutrinos, Dark Matter and Nuclear Detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solutions to problems in nuclear non-proliferation and counter-terrorism may be found at the forefront of modern physics. Neutrino oscillation experiments, dark matter searches, and high energy astrophysics, are based on technology advances that have may also have application to nuclear detection. The detection problems share many characteristics, including energy scales, time structures, particle-type, and, of course, the combination of high backgrounds and low signal levels. This convergence of basic and applied physics is realized in non-proliferation and homeland security projects at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Examples described here include reactor anti-neutrino monitoring, dual-phase noble liquid TPC development, gamma-ray telescopes, and nuclear resonance fluorescence.

Goldstein, W H; Bernstein, A; Craig, W W; Johnson, M

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

271

2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Ensuring America's nuclear  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ensuring America's Ensuring America's nuclear security 2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Ensuring America's nuclear security In 2000, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) was established as a new element within the Department in response to a Congressional mandate to reinvigorate the security posture throughout the nuclear weapons program and to reaffirm the Nation's commitment to maintaining the nuclear deterrence capabilities of the United States. NNSA was chartered to better focus management attention on enhanced security, proactive management practices, and mission focus within the Department's national defense and nonproliferation programs. The Department performs its national security mission involving nuclear weapons and nuclear materials and technology through the NNSA.

272

Seismological Evidence for a Low-Yield Nuclear Test on 12 May 2010 in North Korea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E Seismological Evidence for a Low-Yield Nuclear Test on 12 May 2010 in North Korea by Miao Zhang. INTRODUCTION Three nuclear tests (in 2006, 2009, and 2013) conducted by the Democratic People's Republic.g., the U. S. Geological Survey [USGS] and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization [CTBTO

Wen, Lianxing

273

National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog US, UK, France Discuss Stockpile Stewardship, Arms Control and Nonproliferation and Visit the Nevada National Security Site Learn More NNSA DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary Learn More DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary Tiffany A. Blanchard-Case receives 2013 Linton Brooks Medal

274

Fissile Materials Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Fissile Materials Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration Fissile Materials Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Fissile Materials Disposition Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Fissile Materials Disposition Fissile Materials Disposition Since the end of the Cold War, significant quantities of plutonium and

275

GTRI's Convert program | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

program | National Nuclear Security Administration program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog GTRI's Convert program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Global Threat Reduction Initiative > GTRI's Convert program GTRI's Convert program One of Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) three key pillars is

276

Global Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Global Threat Reduction Initiative Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Global Threat Reduction Initiative Global Threat Reduction Initiative The mission of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is to reduce

277

Global Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Global Threat Reduction Initiative Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Global Threat Reduction Initiative Global Threat Reduction Initiative The mission of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is to reduce

278

International Materials Protection and Cooperation | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Materials Protection and Cooperation | National Nuclear Materials Protection and Cooperation | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog International Materials Protection and Cooperation Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > International Materials Protection and Cooperation International Materials Protection and Cooperation

279

ATTACHMENT TO FORM 8233 (For use by students of Egypt who are claiming Tax Treaty exemption).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATTACHMENT TO FORM 8233 (For use by students of Egypt who are claiming Tax Treaty exemption). 1. I was a resident of Egypt on the date of my arrival in the United States. I am not a United States citizen. I have the United States and Egypt in an amount not in excess of $3000 for any taxable year. I have not previously

Daly, Samantha

280

Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis CAPABILITIES Overview Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Nuclear Systems Technologies Risk and Safety Assessments Nonproliferation and National Security Materials Testing Engineering Computation & Design Engineering Experimentation Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Bookmark and Share Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis We have played a major role in the design and analysis of most existing and past reactor types and of many

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Nuclear & Environmental Processes -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Safeguards Safeguards * Members * Overview Nuclear & Environmental Processes Home Process Safeguards Process Safeguards is the application of chemical and engineering expertise to improve safeguards and nonproliferation of nuclear materials in complex facilities. Researchers in this group are developing novel approaches that integrate process modeling, process monitoring, and radiochemistry to understand, track and confirm the movement of nuclear materials through multistage chemical processes. Recent work includes Describing system response and observables of relevant process changes Developing detectors for nuclear materials Developing techniques for safeguarding nuclear materials More Closing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Improved Safeguards for Spent Fuel Treatment Systems

282

Director`s series on proliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two essays are included in this booklet. Their titles are ``The Dynamics of the NPT Extension Decision`` and ``North Korea`s Nuclear Gambit.`` The first paper discusses the conference to be held in 1995 to review the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) which will decide whether the treaty shall continue in force indefinitely, or shall be extended for an additional fixed period or periods. Topics relevant to this discussion are: Arms control issues, the nuclear test ban, the limited test ban treaty, the French nuclear testing moratorium, former Soviet nuclear weapons, Iraq, North Korea, nuclear-weapon-free zones, security, controls on nuclear weapon materials, peaceful uses of nuclear energy, safeguards, politics, and organizational and procedural issues. The second paper examines short, medium, and long term issues entailed in Korea`s nuclear proliferation. Topics considered include: Korean unification, North Korean politics, the nuclear issue as leverage, and the Nuclear Non- Proliferation Treaty.

Bailey, K.C. [ed.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

283

Nuclear Energy | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy Argonne has contributed to the development of civilian nuclear power for over 50 years. Our scientists and engineers conduct research in advanced nuclear energy systems, nonproliferation and national security, and environmental management. Nuclear energy is the largest generator of carbon-free electricity in use today, and it will play an increasing role in worldwide power generation as advanced reactor designs and improved fuel-cycle technologies are brought into commercial application. Nearly every commercial reactor in operation today was developed from Argonne research. Building on this heritage, we are supporting the reliable, safe and secure use of nuclear power worldwide - and fostering its increased use in the future by incorporating science and engineering

284

Statement of Anne M. Harrington, Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Congressional Testimony > Statement of Anne M. Congressional Testimony > Statement of Anne M. Harrington, Deputy Administrator ... Congressional Testimony Statement of Anne M. Harrington, Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation to the Senate Armed Services Sub Committee On Emerging Threats and Capabilities May 10, 2011 Chairwoman Hagan, Ranking Member Portman, thank you for the opportunity to join you today to discuss the investments the President has requested for the National Nuclear Security Administration's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation programs. But more importantly, thank you for your continued support of the National Nuclear Security Administration, and the 35,000 men and women working across the enterprise to keep our country safe, protect our allies, and enhance global security. We could not do

285

Statement of Anne M. Harrington, Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Speeches > Statement of Anne M. Harrington, Deputy Speeches > Statement of Anne M. Harrington, Deputy Administrator ... Speech Statement of Anne M. Harrington, Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation to the Senate Armed Services Sub Committee On Emerging Threats and Capabilities May 10, 2011 Chairwoman Hagan, Ranking Member Portman, thank you for the opportunity to join you today to discuss the investments the President has requested for the National Nuclear Security Administration's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation programs. But more importantly, thank you for your continued support of the National Nuclear Security Administration, and the 35,000 men and women working across the enterprise to keep our country safe, protect our allies, and enhance global security. We could not do this work without strong, bipartisan support and engaged leadership from

286

Panamanian Politics and Panama’s Relationship with the United States Leading up To the Hull-Alfaro Treaty.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis explains the origins of the 1936 Hull-Alfaro Treaty between Panama and the United States. It examines how Panamanian politics and Panama’s relationship with… (more)

Hamilton, Sheila

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Micro-Analysis of Actinide Minerals for Nuclear Forensics and Treaty Verification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Micro-Raman spectroscopy has been demonstrated to be a viable tool for nondestructive determination of the crystal phase of relevant minerals. Collecting spectra on particles down to 5 microns in size was completed. Some minerals studied were weak scatterers and were better studied with the other techniques. A decent graphical software package should easily be able to compare collected spectra to a spectral library as well as subtract out matrix vibration peaks. Due to the success and unequivocal determination of the most common mineral false positive (zircon), it is clear that Raman has a future for complementary, rapid determination of unknown particulate samples containing actinides.

M. Morey, M. Manard, R. Russo, G. Havrilla

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

288

Our Mission | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Mission | National Nuclear Security Administration Mission | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Home > Our Mission Our Mission NNSA is responsible for the management and security of the nation's nuclear weapons, nuclear nonproliferation, and naval reactor programs. It also responds to nuclear and radiological emergencies in the United States

289

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons, signifying the Bush Administration's ongoing commitment to nonproliferation. Nine metric tons of plutonium is enough material to make over 1,000 nuclear weapons. The Secretary made today's announcement while speaking before the International Atomic Energy Agency's annual general conference.

290

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons, signifying the Bush Administration's ongoing commitment to nonproliferation. Nine metric tons of plutonium is enough material to make over 1,000 nuclear weapons. The Secretary made today's announcement while speaking before the International Atomic Energy Agency's annual general conference.

291

U.S. and Russia Cooperation Continues on Nuclear Security | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cooperation Continues on Nuclear Security Cooperation Continues on Nuclear Security U.S. and Russia Cooperation Continues on Nuclear Security June 28, 2007 - 2:08pm Addthis Newly Signed Fifth Bratislava Report Highlights Most Recent Advances in Nuclear Security and Nonproliferation WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Russian Federal Atomic Energy Agency (Rosatom) Director Sergey Kiriyenko today submitted to Presidents Bush and Putin the fifth report on nuclear security cooperation between the two countries. The report is known as the Bratislava Report after the 2005 historic nonproliferation agreement between the two presidents. It details significant work completed by the United States and Russia over the past six months in the areas of emergency response, nuclear security procedures and best practices, security culture,

292

Improved Technology To Prevent Nuclear Proliferation And Counter Nuclear Terrorism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the world moves into the 21st century, the possibility of greater reliance on nuclear energy will impose additional technical requirements to prevent proliferation. In addition to proliferation resistant reactors, a careful examination of the various possible fuel cycles from cradle to grave will provide additional technical and nonproliferation challenges in the areas of conversion, enrichment, transportation, recycling and waste disposal. Radiation detection technology and information management have a prominent role in any future global regime for nonproliferation. As nuclear energy and hence nuclear materials become an increasingly global phenomenon, using local technologies and capabilities facilitate incorporation of enhanced monitoring and detection on the regional level. Radiation detection technologies are an important tool in the prevention of proliferation and countering radiological/nuclear terrorism. A variety of new developments have enabled enhanced performance in terms of energy resolution, spatial resolution, passive detection, predictive modeling and simulation, active interrogation, and ease of operation and deployment in the field. For example, various gamma ray imaging approaches are being explored to combine spatial resolution with background suppression in order to enhance sensitivity many-fold at reasonable standoff distances and acquisition times. New materials and approaches are being developed in order to provide adequate energy resolution in field use without the necessity for liquid nitrogen. Different detection algorithms enable fissile materials to be distinguished from other radioisotopes.

Richardson, J; Yuldashev, B; Labov, S; Knapp, R

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

293

Revised ROD for FEIS on Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

720 720 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 144 / Thursday, July 25, 1996 / Notices 1995 (44 U. S. C. Chapter 35) requires that the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) provide interested Federal agencies and the public an early opportunity to comment on information collection requests. OMB may amend or waive the requirement for public consultation to the extent that public participation in the approval process would defeat the purpose of the information collection, violate State or Federal law, or substantially interfere with any agency's ability to perform its statutory obligations. The Director of the Information Resources Group publishes this notice containing proposed information collection requests prior to submission of these requests to OMB. Each proposed information collection,

294

Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS) which is sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The system serves national security and program management interests, and international interests in the programs for the peaceful application of nuclear energy and non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. Within the scope of the NMMSS are found all nuclear materials applied and controlled under United States law and related international agreements, including U.S. nuclear materials production programs and US private nuclear industrial activities. In addition, its national and international scope enables it to provide services to other organizations such as the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, the Department of State, and the US Congress.

Jacobsen, S.E.; Matthews, W.B. III; McKamy, E.D.; Pedigo, R.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Rivers, Roads, and Rails: The Influence of Transportation Needs and Internal Improvements on Cherokee Treaties and Removal from 1779 to 1838.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study examines the importance of transportation routes and internal improvements as factors in treaty negotiations and the removal of the Cherokees. Covering a period… (more)

Rozema, Vicki Bell

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

The relations between the European Union and Iraq from the Maastricht Treaty in 1992 to the historic Partnership and Cooperation Agreement in 2012.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This master’s thesis presents a historical overview of the relations between the EU and Iraq from the Maastricht Treaty in 1992 to the historic PCA… (more)

Ismail, Rasti

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Nuclear Proliferation Technology Trends Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is underway to develop mature, integrated methodologies to address nonproliferation issues. A variety of methodologies (both qualitative and quantitative) are being considered. All have one thing in common, a need for a consistent set of proliferation related data that can be used as a basis for application. One approach to providing a basis for predicting and evaluating future proliferation events is to understand past proliferation events, that is, the different paths that have actually been taken to acquire or attempt to acquire special nuclear material. In order to provide this information, this report describing previous material acquisition activities (obtained from open source material) has been prepared. This report describes how, based on an evaluation of historical trends in nuclear technology development, conclusions can be reached concerning: (1) The length of time it takes to acquire a technology; (2) The length of time it takes for production of special nuclear material to begin; and (3) The type of approaches taken for acquiring the technology. In addition to examining time constants, the report is intended to provide information that could be used to support the use of the different non-proliferation analysis methodologies. Accordingly, each section includes: (1) Technology description; (2) Technology origin; (3) Basic theory; (4) Important components/materials; (5) Technology development; (6) Technological difficulties involved in use; (7) Changes/improvements in technology; (8) Countries that have used/attempted to use the technology; (9) Technology Information; (10) Acquisition approaches; (11) Time constants for technology development; and (12) Required Concurrent Technologies.

Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Talbert, Robert J.

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

298

Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration Weapons | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Weapons Home > Our Mission > Managing the Stockpile > Weapons Weapons The New START Treaty, which was signed in 2010, between the United States and Russian Federation will cap the strategic deployed nuclear arsenals of each country at 1,550 warheads, a nearly 75% reduction compared with the

299

Nuclear rapprochement in Argentina and Brazil: Workshop summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On October 21 and 22, 1998, the Center for International Security Affairs at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Center for Global Security and Cooperation at Science Applications International Corporation hosted the first of a series of work-shops on states that have chosen to roll back their pursuit of nuclear arms. The objective of the workshop series is to conduct a systematic evaluation of the roles played by U.S. nonproliferation policy in cases of nuclear rollback or restraint and to provide recommendations for future nonproliferation efforts based on lessons learned. Key attendees at the workshop included officials and former officials from the foreign ministries of Argentina and Brazil, and current and former officials from the U.S. Department of State, the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA), and the Department of Energy (DOE). Scholars and independent researchers who have examined nuclear policy in Argentina and Brazil also participated. This workshop report includes important background information that helps set the stage for assessing nuclear policies in Argentina and Brazil. It describes national perspectives and areas of consensus and debate among the participants, particularly on the questions of lessons learned and their salience to proliferation challenges in other states. It also summarizes key questions and propositions regarding the roles played in these cases by U.S. nonproliferation policy.

James E. Doyle

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Nuclear power and safeguards at a crossroad  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After several decades of existence, both nuclear power for electricity generation and safeguards for assuring non-proliferation undergo a phase of transition, each on its own and to a lesser extent with each other. In many part of the world, nuclear power stagnates and its future seems to be put in question, while in areas with high population densities and strong economic development its use is being expanded. As to safeguards, the discovery of the clandestine weapon programme in Iraq raises questions about its ultimate effectiveness and sets the stage for an in-depth reassessment of the assumptions and methodologies used in the verification system.

Pellaud, B.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

NNSA Timeline | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Timeline | National Nuclear Security Administration Timeline | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog NNSA Timeline Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline NNSA Timeline The NNSA was established by Congress in 2000 as a separately organized agency within the U.S. Department of Energy, responsible for the management and security of the nation's nuclear weapons, nuclear nonproliferation,

302

Our History | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

History | National Nuclear Security Administration History | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Our History Home > About Us > Our History Our History The NNSA was established by Congress in 2000 as a separately organized agency within the U.S. Department of Energy, responsible for the management and security of the nation's nuclear weapons, nuclear nonproliferation,

303

Nonproliferation and arms control assessment of weapons-usable fissile material storage and excess plutonium disposition alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (DOE-NN) with support from the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). Its purpose is to analyze the nonproliferation and arms reduction implications of the alternatives for storage of plutonium and HEU, and disposition of excess plutonium, to aid policymakers and the public in making final decisions. While this assessment describes the benefits and risks associated with each option, it does not attempt to rank order the options or choose which ones are best. It does, however, identify steps which could maximize the benefits and mitigate any vulnerabilities of the various alternatives under consideration.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A Critical Step Toward Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Disposal | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Critical Step Toward Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Disposal A Critical Step Toward Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Disposal A Critical Step Toward Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Disposal January 26, 2012 - 2:30pm Addthis Secretary Chu Secretary Chu Former Secretary of Energy The Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future was formed at the direction of the President to conduct a comprehensive review of polices for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. If we are going to ensure that the United States remains at the forefront of nuclear safety and security, non-proliferation, and nuclear energy technology we must develop an effective strategy and workable plan for the safe and secure management and disposal of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. That is why I asked General Scowcroft and Representative Hamilton to draw on their

305

Measuring of fissile isotopes partial antineutrino spectra in direct experiment at nuclear reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The direct measuring method is considered to get nuclear reactor antineutrino spectrum. We suppose to isolate partial spectra of the fissile isotopes by using the method of antineutrino spectrum extraction from the inverse beta decay positron spectrum applied at Rovno experiment. This admits to increase the accuracy of partial antineutrino spectra forming the total nuclear reactor spectrum. It is important for the analysis of the reactor core fuel composition and could be applied for non-proliferation purposes.

V. V. Sinev

2009-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

306

U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Plan 13 In 2000, the National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 In 2000, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) was established as a new element within the Department in response to a Congressional mandate to reinvigorate the security posture throughout the nuclear weapons program and to reaffirm the Nation's commitment to maintaining the nuclear deterrence capabilities of the United States. NNSA was chartered to better focus management attention on enhanced security, proactive management practices, and mission focus within the Department's national defense and nonproliferation programs. The Department performs its national security mission involving nuclear weapons and nuclear materials and technology through the NNSA. Over the next six years, the Department will apply

307

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2010 Annual Report |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 Annual 10 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2010 Annual Report The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) is a research-oriented collaborative program that supports the advancement of nuclear science and technology in the United States and the world. Innovative research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses key issues affecting the future use of nuclear energy and its global deployment. The 2010 Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap issued by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), identifies these issues as high capital costs, safety, high-level nuclear waste management, and non-proliferation. Projects under the I-NERI program investigate ways to address these challenges and support future nuclear

308

Nuclear Separations Technologies Workshop Report | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Separations Technologies Workshop Report Nuclear Separations Technologies Workshop Report Nuclear Separations Technologies Workshop Report The Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a workshop on nuclear separations technologies in Bethesda, Maryland, on July 27 and 28, 2011, to (1) identify common needs and potential requirements in separations technologies and opportunities for program partnerships, and (2) evaluate the need for a DOE nuclear separations center of knowledge to improve cross- program collaboration in separations technology. The workshop supported Goal 3 of the DOE Strategic Plan1 to enhance nuclear security through defense, nonproliferation, and environmental management. The Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) jointly sponsored the workshop. The Office of Science

309

Virtual nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The term virtual nuclear weapons proliferation and arsenals, as opposed to actual weapons and arsenals, has entered in recent years the American lexicon of nuclear strategy, arms control, and nonproliferation. While the term seems to have an intuitive appeal, largely due to its cyberspace imagery, its current use is still vague and loose. The author believes, however, that if the term is clearly delineated, it might offer a promising approach to conceptualizing certain current problems of proliferation. The first use is in a reference to an old problem that has resurfaced recently: the problem of growing availability of weapon-usable nuclear materials in civilian nuclear programs along with materials made `excess` to defense needs by current arms reduction and dismantlement. It is argued that the availability of these vast materials, either by declared nuclear-weapon states or by technologically advanced nonweapon states, makes it possible for those states to rapidly assemble and deploy nuclear weapons. The second use has quite a different set of connotations. It is derived conceptually from the imagery of computer-generated reality. In this use, one thinks of virtual proliferation and arsenals not in terms of the physical hardware required to make the bomb but rather in terms of the knowledge/experience required to design, assemble, and deploy the arsenal. Virtual weapons are a physics reality and cannot be ignored in a world where knowledge, experience, materials, and other requirements to make nuclear weapons are widespread, and where dramatic army reductions and, in some cases, disarmament are realities. These concepts are useful in defining a continuum of virtual capabilities, ranging from those at the low end that derive from general technology diffusion and the existence of nuclear energy programs to those at the high end that involve conscious decisions to develop or maintain militarily significant nuclear-weapon capabilities.

Pilat, J.F.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Comprehensive test ban treaty international monitoring system security threats and proposed security attributes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To monitor compliance with a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), a sensing network, referred to as the International Monitoring System (IMS), is being deployed. Success of the IMS depends on both its ability to preform its function and the international community`s confidence in the system. To ensure these goals, steps must be taken to secure the system against attacks that would undermine it; however, it is not clear that consensus exists with respect to the security requirements that should be levied on the IMS design. In addition, CTBT has not clearly articulated what threats it wishes to address. This paper proposes four system-level threats that should drive IMS design considerations, identifies potential threat agents, and collects into one place the security requirements that have been suggested by various elements of the IMS community. For each such requirement, issues associated with the requirement are identified and rationale for the requirement is discussed.

Draelos, T.J.; Craft, R.L.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Alternative dispositioning methods for HEU spent nuclear fuel at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States has a strong policy on prevention of the international spread of nuclear weapons. This policy was announced in Presidential Directive PDD-13 and summarized in a White House press release September 27, 1993. Two cornerstones of this policy are: seek to eliminate where possible the accumulation of stockpiles of highly- enriched uranium or plutonium; propose{hor_ellipsis}prohibiting the production of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium for nuclear explosives purposes or outside international safeguards. The Department of Energy is currently struggling to devise techniques that safely and efficiently dispose of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) while satisfying national non-proliferation policies. SRS plans and proposals for disposing of their SNF are safe and cost effective, and fully satisfy non-proliferation objectives.

Krupa, J.F.; McKibben, J.M.; Parks, P.B.; DuPont, M.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Technical cooperation on nuclear security between the United States and China : review of the past and opportunities for the future.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States and China are committed to cooperation to address the challenges of the next century. Technical cooperation, building on a long tradition of technical exchange between the two countries, can play an important role. This paper focuses on technical cooperation between the United States and China in the areas of nonproliferation, arms control and other nuclear security topics. It reviews cooperation during the 1990s on nonproliferation and arms control under the U.S.-China Arms Control Exchange, discusses examples of ongoing activities under the Peaceful Uses of Technology Agreement to enhance security of nuclear and radiological material, and suggests opportunities for expanding technical cooperation between the defense nuclear laboratories of both countries to address a broader range of nuclear security topics.

Pregenzer, Arian Leigh

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Links | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Home > Field Offices > Welcome to the NNSA Production Office > Links Home > Field Offices > Welcome to the NNSA Production Office > Links Links NNSA HQ National Nuclear Security Administration Advanced Simulation & Computing NNSA Graduate Program NNSA Small Business Program Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Field Offices NNSA Albuquerque Complex Kansas City Field Office Livermore Field Office Los Alamos Field Office Naval Reactors Idaho Branch Office Nevada Field Office Sandia Field Office DOE Oak Ridge Sites Oak Ridge Office Oak Ridge National Laboratory UCOR Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board American Museum of Science and Energy City of Oak Ridge Plants Laboratories Bechtel Nevada Bettis Laboratory Kansas City Plant Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

314

2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Ensuring America's nuclear  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Ensuring America's 2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Ensuring America's nuclear security 2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Ensuring America's nuclear security In 2000, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) was established as a new element within the Department in response to a Congressional mandate to reinvigorate the security posture throughout the nuclear weapons program and to reaffirm the Nation's commitment to maintaining the nuclear deterrence capabilities of the United States. NNSA was chartered to better focus management attention on enhanced security, proactive management practices, and mission focus within the Department's national defense and nonproliferation programs. The Department performs its national security mission involving nuclear weapons and nuclear materials

315

World Institute for Nuclear Security Launch | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

World Institute for Nuclear Security Launch World Institute for Nuclear Security Launch World Institute for Nuclear Security Launch September 29, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Secretary Bodman Thank you. My thanks to Director General El Baradei and Senator Nunn for their opening remarks. I am pleased to be here with you this afternoon. Each nation has the responsibility to assist in the effort to make nuclear materials and facilities secure. This means we need cooperation at every level and every stage of the process: from government, to industry, to non-governmental organizations. As such, the World Institute for Nuclear Security will make an important contribution to the cause of nuclear nonproliferation and nuclear security. By bringing the private, public, and non-governmental sectors together,

316

World Institute for Nuclear Security Launch | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Institute for Nuclear Security Launch Institute for Nuclear Security Launch World Institute for Nuclear Security Launch September 29, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Secretary Bodman Thank you. My thanks to Director General El Baradei and Senator Nunn for their opening remarks. I am pleased to be here with you this afternoon. Each nation has the responsibility to assist in the effort to make nuclear materials and facilities secure. This means we need cooperation at every level and every stage of the process: from government, to industry, to non-governmental organizations. As such, the World Institute for Nuclear Security will make an important contribution to the cause of nuclear nonproliferation and nuclear security. By bringing the private, public, and non-governmental sectors together,

317

US nuclear weapons policy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are closing chapter one'' of the nuclear age. Whatever happens to the Soviet Union and to Europe, some of the major determinants of nuclear policy will not be what they have been for the last forty-five years. Part of the task for US nuclear weapons policy is to adapt its nuclear forces and the oganizations managing them to the present, highly uncertain, but not urgently competitive situation between the US and the Soviet Union. Containment is no longer the appropriate watchword. Stabilization in the face of uncertainty, a more complicated and politically less readily communicable goal, may come closer. A second and more difficult part of the task is to deal with what may be the greatest potential source of danger to come out of the end of the cold war: the breakup of some of the cooperative institutions that managed the nuclear threat and were created by the cold war. These cooperative institutions, principally the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the Warsaw Pact, the US-Japan alliance, were not created specifically to manage the nuclear threat, but manage it they did. A third task for nuclear weapons policy is that of dealing with nuclear proliferation under modern conditions when the technologies needed to field effective nuclear weapons systems and their command and control apparatus are ever more widely available, and the leverage over some potential proliferators, which stemmed from superpower military support, is likely to be on the wane. This paper will make some suggestions regarding these tasks, bearing in mind that the unsettled nature of that part of the world most likely to become involved in nuclear weapons decisions today must make any suggestions tentative and the allowance for surprise more than usually important.

May, M.

1990-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

318

Plutonium Disposition Program | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Plutonium Disposition Program Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Plutonium Disposition Program Fact Sheet Plutonium Disposition Program Jun 26, 2013 SUPPORTING NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION Weapon-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) are the critical ingredients for making a nuclear weapon. With the end of the Cold War, hundreds of tons of these materials were determined to be surplus to U.S. and Russian defense needs. Denying access to plutonium and HEU is the best way to prevent nuclear proliferation to rogue states and terrorist organizations. The most certain method to prevent these materials from falling into the wrong hands is to dispose of them. During the April 2010 Nuclear Security Summit, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov signed a protocol

319

December 2013 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 | National Nuclear Security Administration 3 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > December 2013 December 2013 NNSA Blog US, UK, France Discuss Stockpile Stewardship, Arms Control and Nonproliferation and Visit the Nevada National Security Site Posted By Office of Public Affairs On Dec. 18-19, 2013, the United States hosted a visit by delegations from

320

Engineering Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analysis Analysis DEPARTMENTS Engineering Analysis Nuclear Systems Analysis Research & Test Reactor Nonproliferation and National Security Detection & Diagnostic Systems Engineering Development & Applications Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Engineering Analysis Bookmark and Share The Engineering Analysis Department activities focus on development and application of new and innovative analysis methods for both nuclear and non-nuclear systems. The Department is organized into sections and groups for Engineering Simulations, Safety Analysis, Innovative Systems Development, Engineering Assessments, Plant Analysis & Control, Process

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

December 2013 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

3 | National Nuclear Security Administration 3 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > December 2013 December 2013 NNSA Blog US, UK, France Discuss Stockpile Stewardship, Arms Control and Nonproliferation and Visit the Nevada National Security Site Posted By Office of Public Affairs On Dec. 18-19, 2013, the United States hosted a visit by delegations from

322

Collaboration inspires nuclear engineering student Alexis Kaplan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alexis Kaplan Alexis Kaplan Collaboration inspires nuclear engineering student Alexis Kaplan Researcher designs a system that improves nuclear energy security August 27, 2013 Alexis Kaplan Alexis Kaplan has climbed many mountains: Wheeler Peak in New Mexico, 14-ners in Colorado, and Machu Picchu in Peru. When she is not doing science look for her outdoors or visiting another country. Inspired by the world-class nuclear research environment and invigorated by the small city's proximity to outdoor activities, the Berkeley graduate plans to pursue a nonproliferation career in this scientific hub. » Return to homepage Researcher designs a system that improves nuclear energy security When her state suffered from major blackouts during an energy crisis a decade ago, California native Alexis Kaplan was inspired to pursue her

323

NNSA Blog | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Blog | National Nuclear Security Administration Blog | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog NNSA Blog US, UK, France Discuss Stockpile Stewardship, Arms Control and Nonproliferation and Visit the Nevada National Security Site Posted By Office of Public Affairs On Dec. 18-19, 2013, the United States hosted a visit by delegations from

324

Russia`s Great Game in a nuclear South Asia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lost in the noise of Pakistan`s nuclear weapon tests in the western Baluchistan desert on 28 and 30 May was a surprising diplomatic move by Russia. On 23 May, Russia became the first state to express its willingness to recognize India as a nuclear-weapon state, provided that India commits itself to the international nonproliferation regime. Russia`s Ambassador to India, Albert Chernyshev, stated in the days after the Indian but before the Pakistani nuclear tests that ``India proclaimed itself a nuclear weapons power. One now hopes that India will behave as a nuclear weapons power by acting responsibly. Every nuclear weapons state has some rights. But for getting recognition it must have some obligations. Once it is ready to show these obligations by joining the nonproliferation regime, its recognition as a nuclear weapons power will follow.`` Russia`s Great Game in South Asia in pursuit of short-term economic and other interests appears to be a serious obstacle on the path to dealing effectively with the South Asian nuclear crisis. Grave damage to security, stability and nonproliferation has already resulted from India`s and Pakistan`s actions, but the situation does not have to spiral out of control. It is imperative that the international community respond appropriately to this challenge. The international community is at a crossroads and Russia`s actions will be critical. Will it be willing to go beyond the narrow economic and political calculations reflected in its diplomatic posturing, and take actions that will serve its long-term interests by bridging differences with other great powers in order to demonstrate to India that it has not chosen the right path. If Russia decides it can gain from India`s current, perilous path and blocks or otherwise frustrates appropriate responses, the nuclear danger on the subcontinent will escalate and the global regimes to promote nonproliferation and to ban testing will be seriously, perhaps fatally, weakened with unpredictable regional and global effects.

Pilat, J.F.; Taylor, T.T. [International Inst. for Strategic Studies, London (United Kingdom)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

Microsoft PowerPoint - 1_Cruz_Import Export_NMMSS 2013 Presentation.pptx  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Jeffrey Cruz, Senior Licensing Officer Jeffrey Cruz, Senior Licensing Officer Export Controls and International Organizations Branch Office of International Programs May 22, 2013  Describe NRC roles and responsibilities  Review 10 CFR Part 110 requirements  Summarize criteria and decision making processes  Provide guidance to find more information 2  Atomic Energy Act of 1954  Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978  Treaties, Conventions and Agreements including: ◦ Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty ◦ International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards ◦ Conventions: Nuclear Safety; Waste and Spent Fuel; Physical Protection; Early Notification; Assistance; and Liability ◦ 123 Agreements for peaceful nuclear cooperation 3  Exports: reactors; fuel cycle facilities; components; nuclear grade graphite for

326

April 2010 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0 | National Nuclear Security Administration 0 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Newsletters > April 2010 Newsletter April 2010 Apr 30, 2010 In this issue: New START Treaty and Security Summit Key to President's Agenda Nuclear Posture Review Highlights NNSA Mission NNSA Announces Special Tools and Processes for B53 Dismantlement

327

June 2010 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0 | National Nuclear Security Administration 0 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Newsletters > June 2010 Newsletter June 2010 Jun 27, 2010 In this issue: Administrator Visits Nonpro Sites, Promotes President's Nuclear Security Agenda Abroad NNSA Provides Support at World Cup NNSA Plays Key Role in New START Treaty Negotiations

328

Detection & Diagnostic Systems - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Departments > Detection & Diagnostic Departments > Detection & Diagnostic Systems DEPARTMENTS Engineering Analysis Nuclear Systems Analysis Research & Test Reactor Nonproliferation and National Security Detection & Diagnostic Systems Engineering Development & Applications Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Detection & Diagnostic Systems Bookmark and Share The Detection & Diagnostic Systems Department conducts research and development related to instruments and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for characterization of materials and determination of system parameters related to different energy systems (including fossil,

329

Deputy Secretary Poneman's Remarks at the Third Annual Nuclear Deterrence  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

at the Third Annual Nuclear at the Third Annual Nuclear Deterrence Summit - As Prepared for Delivery Deputy Secretary Poneman's Remarks at the Third Annual Nuclear Deterrence Summit - As Prepared for Delivery February 17, 2011 - 3:49pm Addthis Third Annual Nuclear Deterrence Summit Thursday, February 17, 2011 Arlington, Virginia "Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation" "We face a choice between the quick and the dead." These are the words that Bernard Baruch used to introduce his plan to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons, at the opening session of the UN Atomic Energy Commission, at Hunter College in NYC, in June 1946. Fortunately, throughout the intervening decades, we have been quick, or at least quick enough. Indeed, sometimes we seemed to be just a step or

330

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters | Department  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory and licensing matters of interest to DOE, either as an NRC license applicant or in connection with related authorities and responsibilities of DOE and NRC on nuclear material, nuclear waste, and nuclear nonproliferation matters. GC-52 attorneys provide advice and support on a variety of NRC matters including regulation and licensing of DOE independent spent fuel storage facilities (ISFSIs) and a mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facility, consultation with NRC on certain DOE waste determinations, and imports and exports of nuclear materials and radioactive sealed sources.

331

Nuclear Separations Technologies Workshop Report | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Separations Technologies Workshop Report Separations Technologies Workshop Report Nuclear Separations Technologies Workshop Report The Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a workshop on nuclear separations technologies in Bethesda, Maryland, on July 27 and 28, 2011, to (1) identify common needs and potential requirements in separations technologies and opportunities for program partnerships, and (2) evaluate the need for a DOE nuclear separations center of knowledge to improve cross- program collaboration in separations technology. The workshop supported Goal 3 of the DOE Strategic Plan1 to enhance nuclear security through defense, nonproliferation, and environmental management. The Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) jointly sponsored the workshop. The Office of Science

332

Deputy Secretary Poneman to Attend International Framework for Nuclear  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Attend International Framework for to Attend International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation Meeting in Jordan Deputy Secretary Poneman to Attend International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation Meeting in Jordan November 3, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman will represent the United States at the International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation (IFNEC) Executive Committee Meeting in Jordan on Thursday, November 4, 2010. The conference aims to advance cooperation among participating states to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy in a manner that meets high standards of safety, security and nonproliferation. IFNEC developed out of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. Last June, the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Steering Group agreed to transform to

333

The Nuclear Education and Staffing Challenge: Rebuilding Critical Skills in Nuclear Science and Technology.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory where 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of Nuclear Legacies, Global Security, Nonproliferation, Homeland Security and National Defense, Radiobiology and Nuclear Energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. This paper presents the current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs.

Wogman, Ned A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Waltar, Alan E.; Leber, R. E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Nuclear testing: Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have examined the experimental and analytic bases for understanding the performance of each of the weapon types that are currently planned to remain in the US enduring nuclear stockpile. They have also examined whether continued underground tests at various nuclear yield thresholds would add significantly to the confidence in this stockpile in the years ahead. The starting point for this examination was a detailed review of past experience in developing and testing modern nuclear weapons, their certification and recertification processes, their performance margins, and evidence of aging or other trends over time for each weapon type in the enduring stockpile. The findings, as summarized in Conclusions 1 through 6, are consistent with US agreement to enter into a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) of unending duration, that includes a standard ``supreme national interest`` clause. Recognizing that the challenge of maintaining an effective nuclear stockpile for an indefinite period without benefit of underground tests is an important and also a new one, the US should affirm its readiness to invoke the supreme national interest clause should the need arise as a result of unanticipated technical problems in the enduring stockpile.

Drell, S.; Cornwall, J.; Dyson, F. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

US nuclear forces and Japanese/Western pacific security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role that U.S. nuclear weapons historically played in maintaining the security of U.S. interests and allies in East Asia and the Pacific is examined because nuclear weapons were important but in a different context than Europe. Domestic difficulties finally compelled the former USSR to abandon its long-standing confrontational policy toward the United States, specifically, and the West, generally, thereby redirecting Russian foreign policy to one that is more conciliatory and cooperative than the policies of past years. This historic change, which has emerged in degrees over the last four to five years, has had multifaceted effects on international politics - the conclusion in December 1987 of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty; the fall of the Communist regimes in Eastern Europe and the unification of Germany; the signing of the Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE) Treaty in November 1990, which aims at stabilizing the conventional force balance in Europe; an unprecedented degree of American-Soviet cooperation within the framework of the United Nations during the Middle East crisis brought about by Iraq`s invasion of Kuwait; and the signing of the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) in July 1991, the framework of which has largely been negotiated on American terms. In Northeast Asia and the Western Pacific, the composition and deployment posture of former Soviet forces have not undergone so remarkable a change and, therefore, the percevied threat is not declining dramatically. 17 refs.

Ogawa, Shinichi [National Institute for Defense Studies, Tokyo (Japan)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities. Some conclusions are: (1) Analytical chemistry measurements on plutonium and uranium matrices are critical to numerous defense and non-defense programs including safeguards accountancy verification measurements; (2) Los Alamos National Laboratory operates capable actinide analytical chemistry and material science laboratories suitable for nuclear material forensic characterization; (3) Actinide analytical chemistry uses numerous means to validate and independently verify that measurement data quality objectives are met; and (4) Numerous LANL nuclear facilities support the nuclear material handling, preparation, and analysis capabilities necessary to evaluate samples containing nearly any mass of an actinide (attogram to kilogram levels).

Podlesak, David W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steiner, Robert E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burns, Carol J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; LaMont, Stephen P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

337

Utility of Social Modeling in Assessment of a State’s Propensity for Nuclear Proliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the third and final report out of a set of three reports documenting research for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Security Administration (NASA) Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development NA-22 Simulations, Algorithms, and Modeling program that investigates how social modeling can be used to improve proliferation assessment for informing nuclear security, policy, safeguards, design of nuclear systems and research decisions. Social modeling has not to have been used to any significant extent in a proliferation studies. This report focuses on the utility of social modeling as applied to the assessment of a State's propensity to develop a nuclear weapons program.

Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Whitney, Paul D.; Dalton, Angela C.; Olson, Jarrod; White, Amanda M.; Cooley, Scott K.; Youchak, Paul M.; Stafford, Samuel V.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Nuclear energy is an important source of power, supplying 20  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy is an important source of power, supplying 20 energy is an important source of power, supplying 20 percent of the nation's electricity. More than 100 nuclear power plants are operating in the U.S., and countries around the world are implementing nuclear power as a carbon-free alternative to fossil fuels. We can maximize the climate and energy security benefits provided by responsible global nuclear energy expansion by developing options to increase the energy extracted from nuclear fuel, improve waste management, and strengthen nuclear nonproliferation controls. To develop viable technical solutions, these interdependent challenges must be addressed through tightly integrated multidisciplinary research and development efforts. Los Alamos National Laboratory is playing a key role in

339

International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation to Hold  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation to Hold International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation to Hold Ministerial-Level Meeting Sept. 29 in Warsaw, Poland International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation to Hold Ministerial-Level Meeting Sept. 29 in Warsaw, Poland September 6, 2011 - 3:23pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced that Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman will lead the U.S. delegation to the International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation (IFNEC) Executive Committee Meeting on Sept. 29 in Warsaw, Poland. The ministerial-level conference aims to advance cooperation among participating states to support the peaceful use of nuclear energy in a manner that meets high standards of safety, security and nonproliferation. The meeting will also feature video remarks by Microsoft founder Bill

340

International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation to Hold  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation to Hold Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation to Hold Ministerial-Level Meeting Sept. 29 in Warsaw, Poland International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation to Hold Ministerial-Level Meeting Sept. 29 in Warsaw, Poland September 6, 2011 - 3:10pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced that Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman will lead the U.S. delegation to the International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation (IFNEC) Executive Committee Meeting on Sept. 29 in Warsaw, Poland. The ministerial-level conference aims to advance cooperation among participating states to support the peaceful use of nuclear energy in a manner that meets high standards of safety, security and nonproliferation. The meeting will also feature video remarks by Microsoft founder Bill

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Fact Sheet: United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan The United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan is intended to provide a framework for bilateral collaboration in nuclear energy. This Action Plan builds upon our significant, longstanding civilian nuclear cooperation, and will contribute to increasing energy security and managing nuclear waste, addressing nuclear nonproliferation and climate change, advancing goals put forth in President Bush's Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. The Action Plan was signed by representatives of both nations in April 2007. The Action Plan will be implemented by Steering Committee Co-Chairs. Assistant Secretary of Energy Dennis Spurgeon, or his designee, will serve as the U.S. Co-Chair. Japanese Co-Chairs will be selected

342

New Prototype Safeguards Technology Offers Improved Confidence and Automation for Uranium Enrichment Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important requirement for the international safeguards community is the ability to determine the enrichment level of uranium in gas centrifuge enrichment plants and nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. This is essential to ensure that countries with nuclear nonproliferation commitments, such as States Party to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, are adhering to their obligations. However, current technologies to verify the uranium enrichment level in gas centrifuge enrichment plants or nuclear fuel fabrication facilities are technically challenging and resource-intensive. NNSA’s Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) supports the development, testing, and evaluation of future systems that will strengthen and sustain U.S. safeguards and security capabilities—in this case, by automating the monitoring of uranium enrichment in the entire inventory of a fuel fabrication facility. One such system is HEVA—hybrid enrichment verification array. This prototype was developed to provide an automated, nondestructive assay verification technology for uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders at enrichment plants.

Brim, Cornelia P.

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

343

Discrimination of nuclear explosions against civilian sources based on atmospheric xenon isotopic activity ratios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A global monitoring system for atmospheric xenon radioactivity is being established as part of the International Monitoring System that will be used to verify compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) once the treaty has entered into force. This paper studies isotopic activity ratios to support interpretation of observed atmospheric concentrations of 135Xe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 131mXe. The goal is to distinguish nuclear explosion sources from civilian releases. Simulations of nuclear explosions, empirical data for both test and reactor releases as well as observations by measurement stations of the International Noble Gas Experiment (INGE) are used to provide a proof of concept for the isotopic ratio based method for source discrimination.

Kalinowski, Martin B.; Axelssson, A.; Bean, Marc; Blanchard, X.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Brachet, G.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Peters, Jana; Pistner, Christoph; Raith, Maria; Ringbom, Anders; Saey, P. R.; Schlosser, C.; Stocki, Trevor J.; Taffary, T.; Ungar, R. Kurt

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

EU, U.S., Russia, Asian States Sign Nuclear-Fusion Reactor May 24 (Bloomberg) --The European Union, the U.S., Russia and Asian nations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Europe EU, U.S., Russia, Asian States Sign Nuclear-Fusion Reactor Pact May 24 (Bloomberg) -- The European Union, the U.S., Russia and Asian nations including China signed a treaty to build the first percent, China, India, South Korea and Russia 10 percent each and France 8 percent, #12;according

345

Nuclear power and the fuel cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to rising energy costs and climate concerns, nuclear power is once again being seriously considered as an energy source by several countries. This revival of nuclear power is closely linked with the choice of fuel cycles available, and the intentions of countries pursuing nuclear power are likely to be, correctly or incorrectly, judged by the choice of fuel cycle they make. The needs and constraints of the emerging nuclear powers may, however, be different from the expectations of a segment of the world community. If this potential growth in nuclear power is not to be stifled, it is imperative that a climate of mutual trust is developed respecting every country's right to develop peaceful uses of nuclear power without leading to an atmosphere of mistrust regarding the 'intentions' behind the pursuit of peaceful nuclear power. While it will be a near impossibility to completely decouple the peaceful uses of nuclear power from its more destructive applications, it is important that aspiring countries develop a clear and transparent process. Technology-supplier countries also need to develop and follow clear and consistent treaties and national policies, avoiding ad hoc country-specific arrangements. We review here the state of interest in nuclear power and current policies and discuss fuel cycle options that may pave the way for the future growth of nuclear power.

Rizwan-uddin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Second Line of Defense Program | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Line of Defense Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Line of Defense Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Second Line of Defense Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > International Materials Protection and Cooperation > Second Line of Defense Program Second Line of Defense Program In April 2009, President Obama called the danger of a terrorist acquiring

347

Plutonium Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Plutonium Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Plutonium Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet Mar 27, 2012 Sweden has been a global leader on nonproliferation, and was one of the

348

Second Line of Defense Program | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Line of Defense Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Line of Defense Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Second Line of Defense Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > International Materials Protection and Cooperation > Second Line of Defense Program Second Line of Defense Program In April 2009, President Obama called the danger of a terrorist acquiring

349

Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Home > About Us > Our Locations > Y-12 National Security Complex Home > About Us > Our Locations > Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex http://www.y12.doe.gov/ Field Office: The NNSA Production Office is responsible for contract management and oversight of the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas and the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tenn. Y-12 supports the Nuclear Security Enterprise through nuclear material processing, manufacturing and storage operations and nuclear nonproliferation activities and provides enriched uranium feedstock for the U.S. Navy. National Security Complex: The Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) serves as the nation's only source of enriched uranium nuclear weapons components and provides enriched uranium for the U.S. Navy. Y-12 is a leader in materials science and precision manufacturing and serves as the

350

E-Print Network 3.0 - arms reduction treaty Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Telescope Science Institute Collection: Physics 35 EU, U.S., Russia, Asian States Sign Nuclear-Fusion Reactor May 24 (Bloomberg) --The European Union, the U.S., Russia and Asian...

351

An investigation of the usefulness of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic measurements for treaty verification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From FY 1986 through FY 1988, we monitored extremely low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic (EM) fields to determine whether these signals could be detected from underground nuclear explosions. Signals clearly related to underground tests were detected only when the ELF field sensors were located within 10 km of surface ground zero. Theoretical analysis, based on the results of these measurements, shows that the ELF impulse signals from underground nuclear tests are of longer duration than those from lightning sources and are, therefore, less efficient in exciting resonances in the earth-ionosphere cavity, even though the source strength for each may be the same. Thus, ELF signals from underground nuclear tests with yields of <150 kT are generally lower than the background signals caused by worldwide lightning activity. Our conclusion is that ELF monitoring probably will not be useful for detecting underground nuclear tests at distances >10 km from the tests. 16 refs., 24 figs., 3 tabs.

Sweeney, J.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Nuclear Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Energy ... A brief summary of the history and key concepts of nuclear energy. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

Charles D. Mickey

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Nuclear batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear batteries ... Describes the structure, operation, and application of nuclear batteries. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

Alfred B. Garrett

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Strengthening the nuclear-reactor fuel cycle against proliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducts several research programs that serve to reduce the risks of fissile-material diversion from the nuclear-reactor fuel cycle. The objectives are to provide economical and efficient neutron or power generation with the minimum of inherent risks, and to further minimize risks by utilizing sophisticated techniques to detect attempts at material diversion. This paper will discuss the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, the Isotope Correlation Technique (ICT), and Proliferation-Resistant Closed-Cycle Reactors. The first two are sponsored by the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation.

Travelli, A.; Snelgrove, J.; Persiani, P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Arms Control and Nonproliferation Program

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

Nuclear Forensics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nuclear forensics Nuclear Forensics AMS is a Powerful Tool for Nuclear Forensics Nuclear forensics, which can be applied to both interdicted materials and debris from a nuclear...

356

US, UK, France Discuss Stockpile Stewardship, Arms Control and...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

issues associated with the goals identified in the 2010 Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference Action Plan. About the photo: Policy and technical representatives from...

357

United States Department of Energy Nuclear Materials Stewardship  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy launched the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in January 2000 to accelerate the work of achieving integration and cutting long-term costs associated with the management of the Department's nuclear materials, with the principal focus on excess materials. Management of nuclear materials is a fundamental and enduring responsibility that is essential to meeting the Department's national security, nonproliferation, energy, science, and environmental missions into the distant future. The effective management of nuclear materials is important for a set of reasons: (1) some materials are vital to our national defense; (2) the materials pose physical and security risks; (3) managing them is costly; and (4) costs are likely to extend well into the future. The Department currently manages nuclear materials under eight programs, with offices in 36 different locations. Through the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative, progress was during calendar year 20 00 in achieving better coordination and integration of nuclear materials management responsibilities and in evaluating opportunities to further coordinate and integrate cross-program responsibilities for the treatment, storage, and disposition of excess nuclear materials. During CY 2001 the Departmental approach to nuclear materials stewardship changed consistent with the business processes followed by the new administration. This paper reports on the progress of the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in evaluating and implementing these opportunities, and the remaining challenges in integrating the long-term management of nuclear materials.

Newton, J. W.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

358

International Legal Framework for Denuclearization and Nuclear Disarmament – Present Situation and Prospects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis is the culminating project for my participation in the OECD NEA International School of Nuclear Law. This paper will begin by providing a historical background to current disarmament and denuclearization treaties. This paper will discuss the current legal framework based on current and historical activities related to denuclearization and nuclear disarmament. Then, it will propose paths forward for the future efforts, and describe the necessary legal considerations. Each treaty or agreement will be examined in respect to its requirements for: 1) limitations and implementation; 2) and verification and monitoring. Then, lessons learned in each of the two areas (limitations and verification) will be used to construct a proposed path forward at the end of this paper.

Gastelum, Zoe N.

2012-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

359

Revision to the Record of Decision for the Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (DOE/EIS-218) (7/19/00)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

767 767 Federal Register / Vol. 65, No. 139 / Wednesday, July 19, 2000 / Notices The office is located in the Pentagon which is guarded. RETENTION AND DISPOSAL: Records are kept until the person is deceased or the person seeks removal of information, whichever is sooner. SYSTEM MANAGER(S) AND ADDRESS: Chief of Naval Operations (N09BC), 2000 Navy Pentagon, Washington, DC 20350-2000. NOTIFICATION PROCEDURE: Individuals seeking to determine whether information about themselves is contained in this system should address written inquiries to the Chief of Naval Operations (N09BC), 2000 Navy Pentagon, Washington, DC 20350-2000. RECORD ACCESS PROCEDURES: Individuals seeking access to information about themselves contained in this system should address written inquiries to the Chief of Naval

360

U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress July 24, 2007 - 2:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman joined the U.S. Secretaries of Defense and State in sending to Congress the Bush Administration's nuclear weapons strategy. This document not only describes the history of nuclear deterrence during the Cold War, but reinforces how deterrence applies to present and future security threats, and what a nuclear stockpile of the 21st century will need to look like in order to meet those threats. The strategy emphasizes President Bush's goal of maintaining a credible nuclear deterrent with the lowest possible number of nuclear weapons. It is consistent with the Moscow Treaty that sets U.S. and Russian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress July 24, 2007 - 2:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman joined the U.S. Secretaries of Defense and State in sending to Congress the Bush Administration's nuclear weapons strategy. This document not only describes the history of nuclear deterrence during the Cold War, but reinforces how deterrence applies to present and future security threats, and what a nuclear stockpile of the 21st century will need to look like in order to meet those threats. The strategy emphasizes President Bush's goal of maintaining a credible nuclear deterrent with the lowest possible number of nuclear weapons. It is consistent with the Moscow Treaty that sets U.S. and Russian

362

Aerial Neutron Detection: Neutron Signatures for Nonproliferation and Emergency Response Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From 2007 to the present, the Remote Sensing Laboratory has been conducting a series of studies designed to expand our fundamental understanding of aerial neutron detection with the goal of designing an enhanced sensitivity detection system for long range neutron detection. Over 35 hours of aerial measurements in a helicopter were conducted for a variety of neutron emitters such as neutron point sources, a commercial nuclear power reactor, nuclear reactor spent fuel in dry cask storage, depleted uranium hexafluoride and depleted uranium metal. The goals of the project were to increase the detection sensitivity of our instruments such that a 5.4 × 104 neutron/second source could be detected at 100 feet above ground level at a speed of 70 knots and to enhance the long-range detection sensitivity for larger neutron sources, i.e., detection ranges above 1000 feet. In order to increase the sensitivity of aerial neutron detection instruments, it is important to understand the dynamics of the neutron background as a function of altitude. For aerial neutron detection, studies have shown that the neutron background primarily originates from above the aircraft, being produced in the upper atmosphere by galactic cosmic-ray interactions with air molecules. These interactions produce energetic neutrons and charged particles that cascade to the earth’s surface, producing additional neutrons in secondary collisions. Hence, the neutron background increases as a function of altitude which is an impediment to long-range neutron detection. In order to increase the sensitivity for long range detection, it is necessary to maintain a low neutron background as a function of altitude. Initial investigations show the variation in the neutron background can be decreased with the application of a cosmic-ray shield. The results of the studies along with a representative data set are presented.

Maurer, Richard J.; Stampahar, Thomas G.; Smith, Ethan X.; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wolff, Ronald S.; Rourke, Timothy J.; LeDonne, Jeffrey P.; Avaro, Emanuele; Butler, D. Andre; Borders, Kevin L.; Stampahar, Jezabel; Schuck, William H.; Selfridge, Thomas L.; McKissack, Thomas M.; Duncan, William W.; Hendricks, Thane J.

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

363

Detection of radioxenon in Darwin, Australia following the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A series of 133Xe detections in April 2011 made at the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) International Monitoring System noble gas station in Darwin, Australia, were analysed to determine the most likely source location. Forward and backwards atmospheric transport modelling simulations using FLEXPART were conducted. It was shown that the most likely source location was the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident. Other potential sources in the southern hemisphere were analysed, including the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) radiopharmaceutical facility, but it was shown that sources originating from these locations were highly unlikely to be the source of the observed 133Xe Darwin detections.

Blake Orr; Michael Schöppner; Rick Tinker; Wolfango Plastino

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Nuclear proliferation: The diplomatic role of non-weaponized programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the Cold War has not seen the end of reliance on nuclear weapons for deterrence or diplomacy purposes. The use of nuclear weapons for such purposes is as evident in the threshold states as in the nuclear powers. The nuclear weapon states used their nuclear weapons for deterrence, bargaining, and blackmail, even during the early years of the Cold War when the US was essentially non-Weaponized. In the nuclear non-Weaponized states in Asia a non-Weaponized deterrent relationship is developing between India and Pakistan and North Korea has used its nuclear program to restore diplomatic relations with the international community. The role of nuclear weapons in the post Cold War world is determined by the role of non-Weaponized programs in proliferating states. This paper describes examples in South Asia and the Korean peninsula and show that while an increased reliance on nuclear weapons programs may be a threat to the current non-proliferation regime, the focus on non-Weaponized programs rather than on weapons themselves actually improves international security by reducing the threat of nuclear war.

Reynolds, R.R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Bonus -- Cameras Designed to Strengthen Nuclear Security Can Also Detect  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Strengthen Nuclear Security Can Also to Strengthen Nuclear Security Can Also Detect Cancer Bonus -- Cameras Designed to Strengthen Nuclear Security Can Also Detect Cancer November 17, 2010 - 4:02pm Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? The cameras can detect prostate cancer -- as well as cervical, colorectal and breast cancers -- and can be optimized as a surgical probe that guides the removal of cancerous tumors. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Hybridyne Imaging Technologies, Inc. recently won the 2010 North American Frost & Sullivan Award for Technology Innovation of the Year. The award is given out each year to a company that finds a new application for a unique technology. With funding from the Energy Department's NNSA's Office of Nonproliferation and

366

Bonus -- Cameras Designed To Strengthen Nuclear Security Can Also Detect  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

To Strengthen Nuclear Security Can Also To Strengthen Nuclear Security Can Also Detect Cancer Bonus -- Cameras Designed To Strengthen Nuclear Security Can Also Detect Cancer November 17, 2010 - 4:04pm Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Thanks to researchers from Brookhaven National Laboratory, a high-resolution gamma camera exists that can be used to detect prostate cancer. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Hybridyne Imaging Technologies, Inc. recently won the 2010 North American Frost & Sullivan Award for Technology Innovation of the Year. The award is given out each year to a company that finds a new application for a unique technology. With funding from the Department of Energy's NNSA's Office of Nonproliferation and

367

Technical and Political Assessment of Peaceful Nuclear Power Program Prospects in North Africa and the Middle East  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An exceptional number of Middle Eastern and North African nations have recently expressed interest in developing nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. Many of these countries have explored nuclear research in limited ways in the past, but the current focused interest and application of resources towards developing nuclear-generated electricity and nuclear-powered desalination plants is unprecedented. Consequently, questions arise in response to this emerging trend: What instigated this interest? To what end(s) will a nuclear program be applied? Does the country have adequate technical, political, legislative, nonproliferation, and safety infrastructure required for the capability desired? If so, what are the next steps for a country in preparation for a future nuclear program? And if not, what collaboration efforts are possible with the United States or others? This report provides information on the capabilities and interests of 13 countries in the region in nuclear energy programs in light of safety, nonproliferation and security concerns. It also provides information useful for determining potential for offering technical collaboration, financial aid, and/or political support.

Windsor, Lindsay K.; Kessler, Carol E.

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

368

Stopping the spread of nuclear weapons. The Heritage lectures; No. 506  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This lecture is on the proliferation of nuclear arms. More precisely, it will be on how best to prevent the proliferation of nuclear arms. For as much as the policy community may disagree about the proper policies for preventing nuclear proliferation, the author thinks all share the goal of preventing proliferation. The best prescription for preventing all sorts of proliferation - biological, chemical, missile, and space technology, as well as nuclear is for the U.S. government to pursue a balanced non-proliferation policy. Such a balanced policy requires bringing four distinct approaches to addressing the proliferation problem together in a coherent fashion. These distinct approaches are: (1) deterring the use of the weapon in question, (2) defending against the use of the weapon in question, (3) destroying preemptively the weapon in question, and (4) controlling the spread of the weapon in question directly through arms control. In the authors view, a balanced and effective nonproliferation policy should not shun or slight any of these approaches. All make a unique contribution toward the whole and serve to reinforce one another in limiting the effects of proliferation and ultimately discouraging proliferation itself. This does not mean, however, that there is no requirement to make trade-offs among the four. Indeed, the real trick is assuring that there is an appropriate division of labor among the four. The author explains this general policy in terms of the specific challenges posed by the proliferation of nuclear arms.

Spring, B.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

EM Issues Amended Decision to Expand Use of Nuclear Facility | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Issues Amended Decision to Expand Use of Nuclear Facility Issues Amended Decision to Expand Use of Nuclear Facility EM Issues Amended Decision to Expand Use of Nuclear Facility April 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis H-Canyon at Savannah River Site. The building is called a canyon because of its long rectangular shape and two continuous trenches that contains process vessels. H-Canyon at Savannah River Site. The building is called a canyon because of its long rectangular shape and two continuous trenches that contains process vessels. AIKEN, S.C. - EM issued an amended Record of Decision (ROD) to the Savannah River Site (SRS) Spent Nuclear Fuel Environmental Impact Statement to expand the operations of the H-Canyon Facility at SRS to support a major nuclear non-proliferation goal and save taxpayer dollars. DOE recently signed a contract allowing Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

370

EM Issues Amended Decision to Expand Use of Nuclear Facility | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM Issues Amended Decision to Expand Use of Nuclear Facility EM Issues Amended Decision to Expand Use of Nuclear Facility EM Issues Amended Decision to Expand Use of Nuclear Facility April 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis H-Canyon at Savannah River Site. The building is called a canyon because of its long rectangular shape and two continuous trenches that contains process vessels. H-Canyon at Savannah River Site. The building is called a canyon because of its long rectangular shape and two continuous trenches that contains process vessels. AIKEN, S.C. - EM issued an amended Record of Decision (ROD) to the Savannah River Site (SRS) Spent Nuclear Fuel Environmental Impact Statement to expand the operations of the H-Canyon Facility at SRS to support a major nuclear non-proliferation goal and save taxpayer dollars. DOE recently signed a contract allowing Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

371

Plutonium Disposition Program | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plutonium Disposition Program Plutonium Disposition Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Fissile Materials Disposition > Plutonium Disposition Program Plutonium Disposition Program The U.S.-Russia Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement (PMDA), which entered into force on July 13, 2011, commits each country to dispose of at least 34 metric tons (MT) of weapon-grade plutonium withdrawn from their respective nuclear weapon programs. The U.S. remains firmly committed to its PMDA obligation to dispose of excess weapons plutonium. U.S. Plutonium Disposition The current U.S. plan to dispose of 34 MT of weapon-grade plutonium is to fabricate it into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiate it in existing light water reactors. This approach requires construction of new facilities

372

Nuclear Data Verification and Standardization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this interagency program is to provide accurate neutron interaction verification and standardization data for the U.S. Department of Energy Division of Nuclear Physics programs which include astrophysics, radioactive beam studies, and heavy-ion reactions. The measurements made in this program are also useful to other programs that indirectly use the unique properties of the neutron for diagnostic and analytical purposes. These include homeland security, personnel health and safety, nuclear waste disposal, treaty verification, national defense, and nuclear based energy production. The work includes the verification of reference standard cross sections and related neutron data employing the unique facilities and capabilities at NIST and other laboratories as required; leadership and participation in international intercomparisons and collaborations; and the preservation of standard reference deposits. An essential element of the program is critical evaluation of neutron interaction data standards including international coordinations. Data testing of critical data for important applications is included. The program is jointly supported by the Department of Energy and the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Karam, Lisa R.; Arif, Muhammad; Thompson, Alan K.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The new international treaties in the context of the European Union: a temporary solution for the current political challenges or a risk to the institutional future of the Union?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Treaty of Lisbon is a stage in a process—not a final outcome, but rather an intermediate result. The EU can be seen as a building that is currently under construction; but now for various reasons this proj...

Carlo Casini

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

A Passive Tamper Indicating Enclosure For Use Within A Nuclear Weapons Monitoring Regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AWE and PNNL are engaged in a technical collaboration investigating techniques to enhance continuity of knowledge over Treaty Accountable Items, with emphasis on a verified nuclear weapons dismantlement process. Tamper Indicating Enclosures (TIE) will likely be deployed as part of a chain of custody regime to indicate an unauthorised attempt to access a Treaty Accountable Item, or secure authenticated monitoring equipment. In 2011, the collaboration presented a paper at the INMM annual conference held in Palm Desert, CA titled “Passive Tamper Indicating Enclosures Incorporating Embedded Optical Fibre”, which discussed the concept of integrating optical fibres into TIEs for use as a passive tamper indicating mechanism. This paper provides an update on the Fibre Optic based TIE and introduces a second passive TIE concept based on the use of Poly(Methyl MethAcrylate) (PMMA). Concepts relating to deployment, tamper indication, and unique identification will be discussed.

White, Helen; Tanner, Jennifer E.; Allen, Keir; Benz, Jacob M.; McOmish, Sarah; Simmons, Kevin L.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

What to do with 50,000 nuclear weapons?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the world celebrates the peaceful disposal of nuclear weapons, energies now focus on their careful disassembly. Recently, the United States` main focus for dismantling has been the safe dispersal and storage of the various nuclear components and their uses for peaceful purposes rather than weapons of destruction. It should be noted that the treaties currently in effect do not require weapons to be dismantled, only that each country withdraw the weapons from the deployed status and remove the means of delivery. The US current program dismantles weapons into their various components. The disassembly of a nuclear weapon involves numerous components. Many of these components can be disposed of or recycled after changing their shape. The nuclear components create the most safety and proliferation concerns. These nuclear components typically consist of three materials: tritium, highly enriched uranium and plutonium. Some of these nuclear components will be placed in a strategic reserve, while other nuclear components will be declared surplus. Both tritium and uranium can be re-used. The tritium is repurified and used for the active weapons stockpile. The uranium can be blended down and used in commercial nuclear power plants. At this time, plutonium disposal is the most vexing challenge. This paper will briefly describe how a nuclear weapons works, the mission of the Pantex Plant which dismantles the weapons, and the research opportunities for use of dismantled nuclear weapon components.

Klein, D.E. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Coll. of Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Utility of tactical nuclear weapons following 1990 Conventional Forces Europe reduction agreement. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Not so long ago, the world was changing rapidly, the Cold War faded. At least one arms agreement, the Intermediate Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, which reduced the U.S. Pershing II and the Russian SS-21's missiles in the European theater, was in place. Then the euphoria evaporated. The Kremlin hardliners regained power and balked at signing a Conventional Forces Europe (CFE) agreement - a treaty which only a year ago would have reduced to approximate parity the size of United States and Soviet Forces in Europe. Was America ready for this new Soviet challenge. Thankfully the answer is still yes. The United States continues to maintain its Nuclear Triad -- land, sea and air deliverable nuclear weapons system's. On the European battlefield the U.S. maintains the ability to deliver tactical nuclear weapons to overcome the Russian Army's numerical advantage and remain responsive to the ground commander. All of this should give Kremlin hardliners (strict communist power brokers, primarily in the military and KGB) reason to pause. Given the reemergence of hostile Soviet leaders, this paper addresses the future need for land based Theater Army delivered tactical nuclear weapons in the European Theater and within Regional Theaters. It also, analyzes regional powers, indicating how they might influence nuclear strategy in a world where the Soviet Union may well be moving away from us again.

Keating, A.J.

1991-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Governance of Nuclear Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace speech in 1953 is remembered for engaging the world, and the Soviet Union in particular, in a dialogue about arms control and the formulation of a nuclear regime in which national and international security concerns growing from this unprecedented emerging and frightening new weapons capability would be addressed while tapping the civilian promise of nuclear applications for the good of mankind. Out of it came a series of initiatives, leading fifteen years later to the NPT, intended to allow the growth and spread of the beneficial uses of nuclear know-how while constraining the incentives and capabilities for nuclear weapons. The last 50 years has seen a gradual spread in nations with nuclear weapons, other nations with nuclear knowledge and capabilities, and still others with nuclear weapon intentions. Still most nations of the world have forgone weapon development, most have signed and abided by the NPT, and some that have had programs or even weapons, have turned these capabilities off. Yet despite this experience, and despite a relatively successful record up to a few years ago, there is today a clear and generally recognized crisis in nuclear governance, a crisis that affects the future of all the cross-cutting civilian/security issues we have cited. The crux of this crisis is a lack of consensus among the major powers whose support of international efforts is necessary for effective governance of nuclear activities. The lack of consensus focuses on three challenges: what to do about non-compliance, what to do about non-adherence, and what to do about the possible leakage of nuclear materials and technologies to terrorist groups. Short of regaining consensus on the priority to be given to nuclear material and technology controls, it is unlikely that any international regime to control nuclear materials and technologies, let alone oversee a growth in the nuclear power sector, will be successful in the tough cases where it needs to be successful. Regaining that consensus on the other hand means alleviating some fundamental insecurity on the part of states, and weakening the hold that terrorist groups have on some state governments. This in turn requires that some fundamental issues be addressed, with recognition that these are part of a suite of complex and dynamic interactions. Among these issues are: How will states provide for their own security and other central interests while preventing further proliferation, protecting against the use of nuclear weapons, and yet allowing for the possible expansion of nuclear power?; How best can states with limited resources to fight terrorist activities and safeguard nuclear materials be assisted in securing their materials and technologies?; What is the future role of international inspections? Does the IAEA remain the right organization to carry out these tasks? If not, what are the desired characteristics of a successor agency and can there be agreement on one?; How confident can we be of nonproliferation as latent nuclear weapon capabilities spread? The policies to address these and other issues must explicitly deal with NPT members who do not observe their obligations; NPT non-members; illicit trade in SNM and weapon technologies and the possibility of a regional nuclear war.

Vergino, E S; May, M

2003-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

378

Spent nuclear fuel policies in historical perspective: An international comparison  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is to explain why the world's nuclear power countries differ from each other with respect to their spent nuclear fuel (SNF) policies. The emergence and evolution of three principal SNF approaches are analyzed: direct disposal, reprocessing and SNF export. Five broad explanatory factors are identified and discussed in relation to the observed differences in policy outcomes: military ambitions and non-proliferation, technological culture, political culture and civil society, geological conditions, and energy policy. SNF policy outcomes can generally be seen to result from a complex interaction between these broad factors, but it is also possible to discern a number of important patterns. To the extent that the five factors may undergo far-reaching changes in the future, the historical experience of how they have shaped SNF policies also give a hint of possible future directions in SNF policymaking around the world.

Per Högselius

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

(Acts adopted under Title V of the Treaty on European Union) COUNCIL JOINT ACTION 2005/574/CFSP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Governors in September 2003 and the imple- mentation of its Nuclear Security Plan which is financed through

Sussex, University of

380

March 2011 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Operations NNSA, Rutgers University Hose Counterterrorism Exercise NNSA Expands Nonproliferation Work in Africa NNSA Establishes Security Commodity Team to Standardize Protective...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

U.S. and Mongolia Sign MOU to Increase Cooperation in Preventing Nuclear  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mongolia Sign MOU to Increase Cooperation in Preventing Mongolia Sign MOU to Increase Cooperation in Preventing Nuclear Smuggling U.S. and Mongolia Sign MOU to Increase Cooperation in Preventing Nuclear Smuggling October 23, 2007 - 3:21pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today the governments of the United States and Mongolia strengthened their efforts in the fight against nuclear terrorism. U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell and Mongolia's Minister of Finance Nadmid Bayartsaikhan signed a Memorandum of Understanding, which will kick off cooperation between the two countries to prevent illicit trafficking of nuclear and other radioactive material. "This Agreement signed today solidifies the United States and Mongolia's commitment to promote our joint security and nonproliferation goals," Deputy Secretary Sell said. "This initiative builds on our ongoing

382

DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile November 7, 2005 - 12:38pm Addthis Will Be Redirected to Naval Reactors, Down-blended or Used for Space Programs WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove up to 200 metric tons (MT) of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU), in the coming decades, from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons and prepare this material for other uses. Secretary Bodman made this announcement while addressing the 2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference in Washington, DC.

383

A New Seismic Data System for Determining Nuclear Test Yields At the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important capability in conducting underground nuclear tests is to be able to determine the nuclear test yield accurately within hours after a test. Due to a nuclear test moratorium, the seismic method that has been used in the past has not been exercised since a non-proliferation high explosive test in 1993. Since that time, the seismic recording system and the computing environment have been replaced with modern equipment. This report describes the actions that have been taken to preserve the capability for determining seismic yield, in the event that nuclear testing should resume. Specifically, this report describes actions taken to preserve seismic data, actions taken to modernize software, and actions taken to document procedures. It concludes with a summary of the current state of the data system and makes recommendations for maintaining this system in the future.

LEE, JONATHAN W.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

(Acts adopted under Title V of the Treaty on European Union) COUNCIL JOINT ACTION 2006/418/CFSP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of 12 June 2006 on support for IAEA activities in the areas of nuclear security and verification/495/CFSP (2) on support for IAEA activities under its Nuclear Security Programme and in the framework, the Council adopted Joint Action 2005/574/CFSP (3) on support for IAEA activities in the areas of nuclear

Sussex, University of

385

Achieving competitive excellence in nuclear energy: The threat of proliferation; the challenge of inertial confinement fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear energy will have an expanding role in meeting the twenty-first-century challenges of population and economic growth, energy demand, and global warming. These great challenges are non-linearly coupled and incompletely understood. In the complex global system, achieving competitive excellence for nuclear energy is a multi-dimensional challenge. The growth of nuclear energy will be driven by its margin of economic advantage, as well as by threats to energy security and by growing evidence of global warming. At the same time, the deployment of nuclear energy will be inhibited by concerns about nuclear weapons proliferation, nuclear waste and nuclear reactor safety. These drivers and inhibitors are coupled: for example, in the foreseeable future, proliferation in the Middle East may undermine energy security and increase demand for nuclear energy. The Department of Energy`s nuclear weapons laboratories are addressing many of these challenges, including nuclear weapons builddown and nonproliferation, nuclear waste storage and burnup, reactor safety and fuel enrichment, global warming, and the long-range development of fusion energy. Today I will focus on two major program areas at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): the proliferation of nuclear weapons and the development of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) energy.

Nuckolls, J.H.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

New Horizons and New Strategies in Arms Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the last ten years, since the break-up of the Soviet Union, remarkable progress in arms control and disarmament has occurred. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the completion of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), and the Chemical Weapons Treaty (CWC) are indicative of the great strides made in the non- proliferation arena. Simultaneously, the Intermediate Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF), the Conventional Forces Treaty in Europe (CFE), and the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaties (START), all associated with US-Soviet Union (now Russia) relations have assisted in redefining European relations and the security landscape. Finally, it now appears that progress is in the offing in developing enhanced compliance measures for the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC). In sum, all of these achievements have set the stage for the next round of arms control activities, which may lead to a much broader, and perhaps more diffused multilateral agenda. In this new and somewhat unpredictable international setting, arms control and disarmament issues will require solutions that are both more creative and innovative than heretofore.

Brown, J. editor

1998-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

387

Nonproliferation through delegation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production and continued as the petrochemical industry began to offer replacements for natural rubber

Brown, Robert Louis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Nonproliferation through delegation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Satellite Imagery, 1969-1999 [electronic briefing book]. National Securitysatellite as having resolution of 25-30 feet (Lindgren The National Security

Brown, Robert Louis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Compressive sensing for nuclear security.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Special nuclear material (SNM) detection has applications in nuclear material control, treaty verification, and national security. The neutron and gamma-ray radiation signature of SNMs can be indirectly observed in scintillator materials, which fluoresce when exposed to this radiation. A photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to the scintillator material is often used to convert this weak fluorescence to an electrical output signal. The fluorescence produced by a neutron interaction event differs from that of a gamma-ray interaction event, leading to a slightly different pulse in the PMT output signal. The ability to distinguish between these pulse types, i.e., pulse shape discrimination (PSD), has enabled applications such as neutron spectroscopy, neutron scatter cameras, and dual-mode neutron/gamma-ray imagers. In this research, we explore the use of compressive sensing to guide the development of novel mixed-signal hardware for PMT output signal acquisition. Effectively, we explore smart digitizers that extract sufficient information for PSD while requiring a considerably lower sample rate than conventional digitizers. Given that we determine the feasibility of realizing these designs in custom low-power analog integrated circuits, this research enables the incorporation of SNM detection into wireless sensor networks.

Gestner, Brian Joseph

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Nuclear Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Programs >> Nuclear Energy Error Error Nuclear Energy Home - RCC cannot be displayed due to a timeout error. We recommend: * Refresh Nuclear Energy Home - RCC * Increasing...

391

Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Agreement Between The United States of America and The International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Agreement Between The United States of America and The International Agreement Between The United States of America and The International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States Signed at Vienna November 18, 1977 Ratification advised by U.S. Senate July 2, 1980 Ratified by U.S. President July 31, 1980 Entered into force December 9, 1980 Proclaimed by U.S. President December 31, 1980 Whereas the United States of America (hereinafter referred to as the "United States") is a Party to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (hereinafter referred to as the "Treaty") which was opened for signature at London, Moscow and Washington on 1 July 1968 and which entered into force on 5 March 1970 1 ; Whereas States Parties to the Treaty undertake to co-operate in facilitating the application of

393

Cooperative global security programs modeling & simulation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The national laboratories global security programs implement sustainable technical solutions for cooperative nonproliferation, arms control, and physical security systems worldwide. To help in the development and execution of these programs, a wide range of analytical tools are used to model, for example, synthetic tactical environments for assessing infrastructure protection initiatives and tactics, systematic approaches for prioritizing nuclear and biological threat reduction opportunities worldwide, and nuclear fuel cycle enrichment and spent fuel management for nuclear power countries. This presentation will describe how these models are used in analyses to support the Obama Administration's agenda and bilateral/multinational treaties, and ultimately, to reduce weapons of mass destruction and terrorism threats through international technical cooperation.

Briand, Daniel

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Development of a nuclear fuel cycle transparency framework.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel cycle transparency can be defined as a confidence building approach among political entities to ensure civilian nuclear facilities are not being used for the development of nuclear weapons. Transparency concepts facilitate the transfer of nuclear technology, as the current international political climate indicates a need for increased methods of assuring non-proliferation. This research develops a system which will augment current non-proliferation assessment activities undertaken by U.S. and international regulatory agencies. It will support the export of nuclear technologies, as well as the design and construction of Gen. IV energy systems. Additionally, the framework developed by this research will provide feedback to cooperating parties, thus ensuring full transparency of a nuclear fuel cycle. As fuel handling activities become increasingly automated, proliferation or diversion potential of nuclear material still needs to be assessed. However, with increased automation, there exists a vast amount of process data to be monitored. By designing a system that monitors process data continuously, and compares this data to declared process information and plant designs, a faster and more efficient assessment of proliferation risk can be made. Figure 1 provides an illustration of the transparency framework that has been developed. As shown in the figure, real-time process data is collected at the fuel cycle facility; a reactor, a fabrication plant, or a recycle facility, etc. Data is sent to the monitoring organization and is assessed for proliferation risk. Analysis and recommendations are made to cooperating parties, and feedback is provided to the facility. The analysis of proliferation risk is based on the following factors: (1) Material attractiveness: the quantification of factors relevant to the proliferation risk of a certain material (e.g., highly enriched Pu-239 is more attractive than that of lower enrichment) (2) The static (baseline) risk: the quantification of risk factors regarding the expected value of proliferation risk under normal (not proliferating) operations. (3) The dynamic (changing) risk: the quantification of risk factors regarding the observed value of proliferation risk, based on monitor signals from facility operations. This framework could be implemented at facilities which have been exported (for instance, to third world countries), or facilities located in sensitive countries. Sandia National Laboratories is currently working with the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) to implement a demonstration of nuclear fuel cycle transparency technology at the Fuel Handling Training Model designed for the Monju Fast Reactor at the International Cooperation and Development Training Center in Japan. This technology has broad applications, both in the U.S. and abroad. Following the demonstration, we expect to begin further testing of the technology at an Enrichment Facility, a Fast Reactor, and at a Recycle Facility.

Love, Tracia L.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Nuclear Debate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Debate ... This month, the Senate will consider the nominations of two women to serve on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ... Svinicki is a nuclear engineer with experience in the Department of Energy’s nuclear energy programs. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

396

Germany and the future of nuclear deterrence in Europe. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dissolution of the Soviet Union and the unification of Germany have fundamentally changed the politics of security in Europe. This thesis analyzes German perspectives on the international security environment and offers judgments about the probable future role of nuclear deterrence in European security. The thesis begins with a survey of the role of nuclear deterrence in the security policy of the Federal Republic of Germany during the period prior to reunification in 1989-1990. This is followed by an analysis of German views on the West European nuclear powers: the United Kingdom and France. German views on the U.S. nuclear presence and U.S. commitments to Europe are then examined. German views on nuclear weapons in the former Soviet Union and the potential for proliferation on Europe's periphery complete the survey. For the short term, Germany will not change its present policies regarding nuclear deterrence in Europe. The German nation is likely to remain preoccupied with the re-unification process for several years, and German politicians are not disposed to seek a debate on nuclear deterrence. The Germans generally consider Britain and France incapable of providing adequate nuclear protection for the Federal Republic in the near term. so the Germans will continue to rely on the United States for a nuclear guarantee. Germany, North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), NATO Nuclear Policy, Nuclear Deterrence, Deterrence, Transatlantic Security, European Security, New National Security Strategy, Nuclear Weapons. Nuclear Strategy.

Gunning, E.G.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

IAEA safeguards and detection of undeclared nuclear activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Verification of State declarations is an essential feature of IAEA safeguards. The issue of completeness of the declaration of all nuclear material, nuclear activities and nuclear facilities arises only in full scope safeguards, like those pursuant to NPT. Concentrating on the accountability aspect of nuclear material the NPT safeguards system has achieved a high level of objective and quantified performance. Some of the basic ideas of the drafters of INFCIRC/153(corrected) have been stalled. Non-proliferation concerns demand also for a detection probability for undeclared nuclear activities. Following the example of the Chemical Weapon Convention, advanced detection techniques are proposed, which go beyond the classical nuclear material accountability approach. Recent proposals for additional measures to strengthen IAEA safeguards conform to rules of NPT and related safeguards. Some proposals have been agreed generally, others can only be implemented on a voluntary basis between the State and the IAEA. The implementation will require additional resources and support for the IAEA. Great care is required to maintain the existing capability of the IAEA for a technically sound, independent, objective, and internationally acceptable judgment with available resources, and at the same time to change emphasis on certain elements of the existing safeguards system.

Harry, R.J.S. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN, Petten (Netherlands)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

Model-Based Calculations of the Probability of a Country's Nuclear Proliferation Decisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first nuclear weapon was detonated in August 1945 over Japan to end World War II. During the past six decades, the majority of the world's countries have abstained from acquiring nuclear weapons. However, a number of countries have explored the nuclear weapons option, 23 in all. Among them, 14 countries have dropped their interest in nuclear weapons after initiating some efforts. And nine of them today possess nuclear weapons. These countries include the five nuclear weapons states - U.S., Russia, U.K., France, and China - and the four non- NPT member states - Israel, India, Pakistan, and North Korea. Many of these countries initially used civilian nuclear power technology development as a basis or cover for their military program. Recent proliferation incidents in Iraq, Iran, and North Korea brought the world together to pay much attention to nuclear nonproliferation. With the expected surge in the use of nuclear energy for power generation by developing countries, the world's nuclear nonproliferation regime needs to be better prepared for potential future challenges. For the world's nuclear nonproliferation regime to effectively cope with any future proliferation attempts, early detection of potentially proliferation-related activities is highly desirable. Early detection allows the international community to respond and take necessary actions - ideally using political and diplomatic influences without resorting to harsh measures such as sanctions or military actions. In this regard, a capability to quantitatively predict the chance of a country's nuclear proliferation intent or activities is of significant interest. There have been various efforts in the research community to understand the determinants of nuclear proliferation and develop quantitative tools to predict nuclear proliferation events. These efforts have shown that information about the political issues surrounding a country's security along with economic development data can be useful to explain the occurrences of proliferation decisions. However, predicting major historical proliferation events using model-based predictions has been unreliable. Nuclear proliferation decisions by a country is affected by three main factors: (1) technology; (2) finance; and (3) political motivation [1]. Technological capability is important as nuclear weapons development needs special materials, detonation mechanism, delivery capability, and the supporting human resources and knowledge base. Financial capability is likewise important as the development of the technological capabilities requires a serious financial commitment. It would be difficult for any state with a gross national product (GNP) significantly less than that of about $100 billion to devote enough annual governmental funding to a nuclear weapon program to actually achieve positive results within a reasonable time frame (i.e., 10 years). At the same time, nuclear proliferation is not a matter determined by a mastery of technical details or overcoming financial constraints. Technology or finance is a necessary condition but not a sufficient condition for nuclear proliferation. At the most fundamental level, the proliferation decision by a state is controlled by its political motivation. To effectively address the issue of predicting proliferation events, all three of the factors must be included in the model. To the knowledge of the authors, none of the exiting models considered the 'technology' variable as part of the modeling. This paper presents an attempt to develop a methodology for statistical modeling and predicting a country's nuclear proliferation decisions. The approach is based on the combined use of data on a country's nuclear technical capability profiles economic development status, security environment factors and internal political and cultural factors. All of the information utilized in the study was from open source literature. (authors)

Li, Jun; Yim, Man-Sung; McNelis, David N. [Department of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Safety Aspects of Wet Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel, OAS-L-13-11  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Safety Aspects of Wet Storage of Safety Aspects of Wet Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel OAS-L-13-11 July 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 July 10, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SENIOR ADVISOR FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FROM: Daniel M. Weeber Assistant Inspector General for Audits and Administration Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Safety Aspects of Wet Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (Department) is responsible for managing and storing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) generated by weapons and research programs and recovered through nonproliferation programs. The SNF consists of irradiated reactor fuel and cut up assemblies containing uranium, thorium and/or plutonium. The Department stores 34 metric tons of heavy metal SNF primarily

400

Safeguarding Nuclear Fuel Processing | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Safeguarding Nuclear Safeguarding Nuclear Fuel Processing Laboratory Policy and Evaluation (LPE) LPE Home Staff M&O Contracts SC Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Work for Others in the Office of Science Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) DOE's Philosophy on LDRD Frequently Asked Questions Success Stories Brochures Additional Information LDRD Program Contacts Technology Transfer DOE National Laboratories Contact Information Laboratory Policy and Evaluation U.S. Department of Energy SC-32/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5447 F: (202) 586-3119 Success Stories Safeguarding Nuclear Fuel Processing Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Idaho National Laboratory Develops International Nonproliferation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Quantitative assessment of proposals on assurance of nuclear fuel supply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The assurance of nuclear fuel supply has the potential to contribute to balancing peaceful use of nuclear power and nuclear nonproliferation. 5 proposals which provide the backup supply of the enrichment service in case of supply disruption, are investigated in this study. We investigated the 20 NPT countries which are non-nuclear-weapon states and possess operable commercial LWRs in October 2012 as potential participants for each proposal. As a result of literature researching, we have extracted factors that can be considered as important for a country to participate or not participate in the assurance of nuclear fuel supply. Then we have computed incentive and disincentive parameters for each country. The results show that the participation expectancy decreases in the order of IAEA Fuel Bank proposal, Russian LEU Reserve proposal, AFS proposal, WNA proposal and 6-Country proposal. The 'IAEA fuel bank proposal' would be triggered in case of the supply disruption which cannot be solved by the market mechanism and bilateral agreements.

Tanaka, T.; Kuno, Y.; Tanaka, S. [University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongou, Bunkyou-ku, Tokyo 112-0005 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Nuclear Returns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Returns ... For the first time since 1978, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has given the green light for a new U.S. nuclear power plant. ... NRC granted a license to Southern Co. to build and operate twin 1,100-MW reactors adjacent to two operating nuclear power plants at its Vogtle nuclear facility, near Waynesboro, Ga. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2012-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

404

effectively tax treaty?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for rent or royalty? Individual completes IRS form 1001. Payment will not be taxed. (Code "N") Taxes for rent, royalty, non- employee comp? * When no forms are submitted, taxes will be withheld at 30%. Rev. 5

Krovi, Venkat

405

Columbia River Treaty  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of interconnection (i.e., imports and exports) 3. Miscellaneous resources including some small hydro and other renewables (Step I firm load is reduced by these resources)...

406

Implementation of IAEA safeguards at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When President Clinton spoke to the United Nations General Assembly in September 1993, he offered to place US excess defense nuclear material under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards, before the next Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) Extension Conference. This set in motion a flurry of activities at three DOE facilities, including Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site). With general guidance from DOE Headquarters, the facility selected a suitable storage area, identified appropriate materials, and acquired the necessary instrumentation to implement full-scale IAEA safeguards on excess plutonium oxide.

Giacomini, J.J.; Finleon, C.A.; Larsen, R.K. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant; Lucas, M.; Langner, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

START Signed | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our History NNSA Timeline START Signed START Signed July 31, 1991 START Signed Russia Moscow, USSR President Bush signs the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START), which...

408

Nuclear Fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although not yet developed at the commercial stage, nuclear fusion technology is still being considered as a ... used in nuclear warfare. Since research in nuclear fusion for the production of energy started abou...

Ricardo Guerrero-Lemus; José Manuel Martínez-Duart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety The Nuclear Engineering Division (NE) of Argonne National Laboratory is experienced in performing criticality safety and shielding evaluations for nuclear, and neutron spectra. The NE nuclear criticality safety (NCS) capabilities are based on a staff with decades

Kemner, Ken

410

NUCLEAR REACTORS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Nuclear reactors are devices containing fissionable material in sufficient quantity and so arranged as to be capable of maintaining a controlled, self-sustaining NUCLEAR FISSION chain… (more)

Belachew, Dessalegn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

nuclear reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a complex atomic apparatus used to obtain energy from nuclear fission chain reaction. Used to produce nuclear energy, radioactive isotopes, and artificial elements.... atomic pile ...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Nuclear Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Energy Idaho National Laboratory is the Department of Energy's lead nuclear energy research and development facility. Building upon its legacy responsibilities,...

413

Nuclear Hydrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Error Error Nuclear Hydrogen - RCC cannot be displayed due to a timeout error. We recommend: * Refresh Nuclear Hydrogen - RCC * Increasing your portlet timeout setting. *...

414

Nuclear Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, which will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay. Strong Los Alamos programs in nuclear data and nuclear theory supports...

415

Microsoft Word - N Div Fact Sheet V3.docx  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

nuclear materials control and accountability for domestic DOE nuclear facilities, nuclear waste disposal, material stabilization, and international nonproliferation. From...

416

Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highlights on the recent research activity, carried out by the Italian Community involved in the "Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics" field, will be presented.

M Colonna

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

417

FY2012 LBNL LDRD Annual Report (PUB)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Nuclear Security (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs).

Ho, Darren

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2009 for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Nuclear Security (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs).

Hansen, Todd C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

NNSA NEWS DRAFT October final edits 19 2009  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0 0 National Nuclear Security Administration Monthly News (continued on page 2) On May 5, NNSA Administrator Thomas P. D'Agostino briefed more than 250 reporters and international nongovernmental organizations on how the U.S. is meeting its Article VI requirements under the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). Administrator D'Agostino spoke alongside Ellen Tauscher, undersecretary of State for Arms Control and International Security, Dr. Michael Nacht, assistant secretary of Defense for Global Strategic Affairs and Ambassador Susan Burk, the President's Special Representative for Nonproliferation. D'Agostino's presentation included the historic release of current and past U.S. stockpile numbers. The U.S. also disclosed the number of operationally deployed

420

Nuclear choices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains part of the series New Liberal Arts, which is intended to make science and technology more accessible to students of the liberal arts. Volume in hand provides a comprehensive, multifaceted examination of nuclear energy, in nontechnical terms. Wolfson explains the basics of nuclear energy and radiation, nuclear power..., and nuclear weapons..., and he invites readers to make their own judgments on controversial nuclear issues. Illustrated with photos and diagrams. Each chapter contains suggestions for additional reading and a glossary. For policy, science, and general collections in all libraries. (ES) Topics contained include Atoms and nuclei. Effects and uses of radiation. Energy and People. Reactor safety. Nuclear strategy. Defense in the nuclear age. Nuclear power, nuclear weapons, and nuclear futures.

Wolfson, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Abraham Calls on Global Community to Aggressively Address Nuclear...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Government Must Increase Its Global Leadership Role. Secretary Abraham argued that Russia must increase its share of nonproliferation responsibility by increasing the money it...

422

Cooperative efforts to improve nuclear materials accounting, control and physical protection at the National Science Center, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ukrainian Government are engaged in a program of cooperation to enhance the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons by developing a strong national system of nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A). This paper describes the capabilities and work of the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) and cooperative efforts to improve MPC and A at this facility. It describes how these cooperative efforts grew out of Ukraine`s decision to become a non-nuclear weapon state and the shortcomings in MPC and A that developed at KIPT after the disintegration of the former Soviet Union. It also envisions expanded future cooperation in other areas of nuclear materials management.

Zelensky, V.F.; Mikhailov, V.A. [Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology (Ukraine). National Science Center

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

Administrator Highlights U.S.-Georgian Nuclear Security Cooperation in Tbilisi  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino highlighted the strong U.S.-Georgian cooperation on nuclear security issues during a day-long visit to the Republic of Georgia in mid-June. He briefed the media at availability at the Tbilisi airport. In April 2009, President Obama outlined an ambitious agenda to secure vulnerable nuclear material around the world within four years, calling the danger of a terrorist acquiring nuclear weapons "the most immediate and extreme threat to global security." In this year's State of the Union, he called the threat of nuclear weapons, "the greatest danger to the American people." In order to meet that challenge, the President's FY2011 Budget Request includes close to $2.7 billion for the National Nuclear Security Administration's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation program -- an increase of 25.7 percent over FY2010. Included in that request is NNSA's Second Line of Defense (SLD) program, which works around the world to strengthen the capability of foreign governments to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime shipping system.

Thomas D'Agostino

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

International control of tritium to prevent horizontal proliferation and to foster nuclear disarmament  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, an approach to control tritium systematically on the international level is proposed. The first goal is to prevent the military use of tritium in states other than the five recognized nuclear weapons states. An {open_quotes}International Tritium Control System{close_quotes} (ITCS) would control all civilian facilities producing or handling tritium. The second goal is to restrict the availability of fresh tritium supplies for nuclear weapons programs as a means to avoid vertical proliferation in states that possess nuclear weapons, and as a step towards complete nuclear disarmament. This can be achieved by including tritium in a future weapons-usable materials production cutoff agreement and the approach proposed here is called an {open_quotes}Integrated Cutoff{close_quotes} (ICO). The simultaneous implementation of the ITCS and ICO aims at avoiding any new discrimination against non-nuclear weapon states. This paper will discuss the possible political and technical modalities to achieve both goals. The rules and decision making procedures are outlined for both control approaches and the implications for the nuclear non-proliferation regime are shown. Various control tasks are derived from a comprehensive analysis covering all diversion paths which can yield more than one gram of tritium within one year. In the appendix to this paper, the impact of a tritium shortage on the U.S. nuclear arsenal is illuminated. The extreme case of complete elimination of all tritium would result in a large yield reductions of the arsenal.

Kalinowski, M.B.; Colschen, L.C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

defense nuclear security | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

nuclear security | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

426

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

427

Countering Nuclear Terrorism and Trafficking | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Countering Nuclear Terrorism and Trafficking | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

428

Implications of mining practices in an open-pit gold mine for monitoring of a comprehensive test-ban treaty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an experiment at the Gold Quarry pit, operated by the Newmont Gold Company at Carlin, NV The purpose of the experiment was to obtain local and regional seismic data, together with ``ground truth``, from conventional surface blasting activity and to use these data to help determine the effectiveness with which conventional mining blasts can be discriminated from underground nuclear explosions.

Jarpe, S.P.; Moran, B.; Goldstein, P.; Glenn, L.A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Analysis of nuclear proliferation resistance reprocessing and recycling technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PUREX process has been progressively and continuously improved during the past three decades, and these improvements account for successful commercialization of reprocessing in a few countries. The renewed interest in nuclear energy and the international growth of nuclear electricity generation do not equate – and should not be equated -with increasing proliferation risks. Indeed, the nuclear renaissance presents a unique opportunity to enhance the culture of non-proliferation. With the recent revival of interest in nuclear technology, technical methods for prevention of nuclear proliferation are being revisited. Robust strategies to develop new advanced separation technologies are emerging worldwide for sustainability and advancement of nuclear energy with enhanced proliferation resistance. On the other hand, at this moment, there are no proliferation resistance advanced technologies. . Until now proliferation resistance as it applies to reprocessing has been focused on not separating a pure stream of weapons-usable plutonium. France, as an example, has proposed a variant of the PUREX process, the COEX TM process, which does not result on a pure plutonium product stream. A further step is to implement a process based on group extraction of actinides and fission products associated with a homogeneous recycling strategy (UNEX process in the US, GANEX process in France). Such scheme will most likely not be deployable on an industrial scale before 2030 or so because it requires intensive R&D and robust flowsheets. Finally, future generation recycling schemes will handle the used nuclear fuel in fast neutron reactors. This means that the plutonium throughput of the recycling process may increase. The need is obvious for advanced aqueous recycling technologies that are intrinsically more proliferation resistant than the commercial PUREX process. In this paper, we review the actual PUREX process along with the advanced recycling technologies that will enhance technical barriers, making plutonium diversion more difficult by not isolating plutonium or/and coexistence of fission products with plutonium.

Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; Gary Cerefice; Marcela Stacey; Steven Bakhtiar

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

The NPR, NPT and the prospects for disarmament  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Prague's Hradcany Square on April 5, 2009, President Barack Obama offered a bold vision of the nuclear future that encompasses both reducing nuclear dangers and pursuing the goal of a world without nuclear weapons while maintaining, as long as nuclear weapons remain, a safe secure, and effective arsenal, to deter potential adversaries and to assure U.S. allies and other security partners that they can count on America's security commitments. The agenda put forward in Prague involves the full range of issues from deterrence to nonproliferation and disarmament. The 2010 Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) report, reflecting the twin objectives of the Prague speech, for the first time places the United States effort to lead expanded international efforts to rebuild and strengthen the global nuclear nonproliferation regime at the top the U.S. nuclear agenda. This attention underscores the fact that the top priority of the United States is to discourage additional states from acquiring nuclear weapon capabilities and to stop terrorist groups from acquiring weapon-usable nuclear materials. It also reinforced the view that positively influencing the 2010 Review Conference (RevCon) of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) was a key objective of the Obama Administration. The NPR developed both the vision and the policy, but details of implementation will need to be developed and better understood. This paper will address the Nuclear Posture Review and its implementation, as well as it's relation to, and impact on, the NPT RevCon and the long term prospects for nonproliferation and disarmament.

Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

431

Electromagnetic Signature Technique as a Promising Tool to Verify Nuclear Weapons Storage and Dismantlement under a Nuclear Arms Control Regime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2010 ratification of the New START Treaty has been widely regarded as a noteworthy national security achievement for both the Obama administration and the Medvedev-Putin regime, but deeper cuts are envisioned under future arms control regimes. Future verification needs will include monitoring the storage of warhead components and fissile materials and verifying dismantlement of warheads, pits, secondaries, and other materials. From both the diplomatic and technical perspectives, verification under future arms control regimes will pose new challenges. Since acceptable verification technology must protect sensitive design information and attributes, non-nuclear non-sensitive signatures may provide a significant verification tool without the use of additional information barriers. The use of electromagnetic signatures to monitor nuclear material storage containers is a promising technology with the potential to fulfill these challenging requirements. Research performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has demonstrated that low frequency electromagnetic signatures of sealed metallic containers can be used to confirm the presence of specific components on a “yes/no” basis without revealing classified information. Arms control inspectors might use this technique to verify the presence or absence of monitored items, including both nuclear and non-nuclear materials. Although additional research is needed to study signature aspects such as uniqueness and investigate container-specific scenarios, the technique potentially offers a rapid and cost-effective tool to verify reduction and dismantlement of U.S. and Russian nuclear weapons.

Bunch, Kyle J.; Williams, Laura S.; Jones, Anthony M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Nuclear Science  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Science Science and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Editor and Founder John Gilligan Professor of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Version 5.13 Welcome to the 2013 Edition of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Education (NS&EE) Sourcebook. We have evolved and improved! The core mission of the Sourcebook has not changed, however. Our purpose is to facilitate interaction among faculty, students, industry, and government agencies to accomplish nuclear research, teaching and service activities. Since 1986 we have compiled critical information on nuclear

433

Nuclear reactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Much reference has been made in the last chapter to nuclear energy levels and their various properties (e.g ... ways of doing this — the use of nuclear reactions, and studies of how excited nuclei...

R. J. Blin-Stoyle FRS

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

nuclear security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

3%2A en Shaping the future of nuclear detection http:nnsa.energy.govblogshaping-future-nuclear-detection

435

Nuclear Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SIR - Your article (Nature 365, 599; 1993) on the US-Ukraine stalemate over nuclear weapons prompts the following remarks. The United States made a mistake ... nuclear weapons prompts the following remarks. The United States made a mistake in not recognizing Ukraine as a legitimate successor state to the Soviet nuclear arsenal and is still insisting that ...

Arno Arrak

1994-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

436

Surface effects of underground nuclear explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of nuclear explosions have been observed and studied since the first nuclear test (code named Trinity) on July 16, 1945. Since that first detonation, 1,053 nuclear tests have been conducted by the US, most of which were sited underground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The effects of underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) on their surroundings have long been the object of much interest and study, especially for containment, engineering, and treaty verification purposes. One aspect of these explosion-induced phenomena is the disruption or alteration of the near-surface environment, also known as surface effects. This report was prepared at the request of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to bring together, correlate, and preserve information and techniques used in the recognition and documentation of surface effects of UNEs. This report has several main sections, including pertinent background information (Section 2.0), descriptions of the different types of surface effects (Section 3.0), discussion of their application and limitations (Section 4.0), an extensive bibliography and glossary (Section 6.0 and Appendix A), and procedures used to document geologic surface effects at the NTS (Appendix C). Because a majority of US surface-effects experience is from the NTS, an overview of pertinent NTS-specific information also is provided in Appendix B. It is not within the scope of this report to explore new relationships among test parameters, physiographic setting, and the types or degree of manifestation of surface effects, but rather to compile, summarize, and capture surface-effects observations and interpretations, as well as documentation procedures and the rationale behind them.

Allen, B.M.; Drellack, S.L. Jr.; Townsend, M.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is unique among international organizations in its use of on-site inspections to verify that States are in compliance with the terms of a negotiated agreement. The legal basis for the inspections is agreements between the IAEA and the State, concluded in the framework of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, for full scope safeguards on all nuclear materials. In addition, other more limited agreements for safeguards on a portion of a State's nuclear material are also concluded with States not party to the Treaty. In either case, the role of the IAEA is to verify compliance with the terms of these agreements by auditing facility operating records and reports submitted to the IAEA by the State; by independent measurement of nuclear materials by IAEA inspectors; and by emplacement of surveillance devices to monitor facility operations in the inspector's absence. Although IAEA safeguards are applied only to peaceful nuclear activities and do not attempt to control or reduce the numbers of nuclear weapons, there are aspects of the IAEA methods and technology that may be applicable to treaty verification for arms control. Among these aspects are: (1) the form of the IAEA's agreements with States; (2) the IAEA approach to inspection planning; and (3) the instrumentation employed by the IAEA for monitoring facility activities and for measuring nuclear material.

Avenhaus, R.; Markin, J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Persistence of gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in proliferating and nonproliferating human mammary epithelial cells after exposure to gamma-rays or iron ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate {gamma}-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX) and 53BP1 (tumour protein 53 binding protein No. 1) foci formation and removal in proliferating and non-proliferating human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) after exposure to sparsely and densely ionizing radiation under different cell culture conditions. HMEC cells were grown either as monolayers (2D) or in extracellular matrix to allow the formation of acinar structures in vitro (3D). Foci numbers were quantified by image analysis at various time points after exposure. Our results reveal that in non-proliferating cells under 2D and 3D cell culture conditions, iron-ion induced {gamma}-H2AX foci were still present at 72 h after exposure, although 53BP1 foci returned to control levels at 48 h. In contrast in proliferating HMEC, both {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci decreased to control levels during the 24-48 h time interval after irradiation under 2D conditions. Foci numbers decreased faster after {gamma}-ray irradiation and returned to control levels by 12 h regardless of marker, cell proliferation status, and cell culture condition. Conclusions: The disappearance of radiation induced {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in HMEC have different dynamics that depend on radiation quality and proliferation status. Notably, the general patterns do not depend on the cell culture condition (2D versus 3D). We speculate that the persistent {gamma}-H2AX foci in iron-ion irradiated non-proliferating cells could be due to limited availability of double strand break (DSB) repair pathways in G0/G1-phase, or that repair of complex DSB requires replication or chromatin remodeling.

Groesser, Torsten; Chang, Hang; Fontenay, Gerald; Chen, James; Costes, Sylvain V.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Parvin, Bahram; Rydberg, Bjorn

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

439

Nuclear Engineer (Nuclear Safety Specialist)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate of this position will serve as a Nuclear Engineer (Nuclear Safety Specialist) responsible for day-to-day technical monitoring, and evaluation of aspects of authorization...

440

ENDF/B-VII.0: Next Generation Evaluated Nuclear Data Library for Nuclear Science and Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the next generation general purpose Evaluated Nuclear Data File, ENDF/B-VII.0, of recommended nuclear data for advanced nuclear science and technology applications. The library, released by the U.S. Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in December 2006, contains data primarily for reactions with incident neutrons, protons, and photons on almost 400 isotopes. The new evaluations are based on both experimental data and nuclear reaction theory predictions. The principal advances over the previous ENDF/B-VI library are the following: (1) New cross sections for U, Pu, Th, Np and Am actinide isotopes, with improved performance in integral validation criticality and neutron transmission benchmark tests; (2) More precise standard cross sections for neutron reactions on H, {sup 6}Li, {sup 10}B, Au and for {sup 235,238}U fission, developed by a collaboration with the IAEA and the OECD/NEA Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC); (3) Improved thermal neutron scattering; (4) An extensive set of neutron cross sections on fission products developed through a WPEC collaboration; (5) A large suite of photonuclear reactions; (6) Extension of many neutron- and proton-induced reactions up to an energy of 150 MeV; (7) Many new light nucleus neutron and proton reactions; (8) Post-fission beta-delayed photon decay spectra; (9) New radioactive decay data; and (10) New methods developed to provide uncertainties and covariances, together with covariance evaluations for some sample cases. The paper provides an overview of this library, consisting of 14 sublibraries in the same, ENDF-6 format, as the earlier ENDF/B-VI library. We describe each of the 14 sublibraries, focusing on neutron reactions. Extensive validation, using radiation transport codes to simulate measured critical assemblies, show major improvements: (a) The long-standing underprediction of low enriched U thermal assemblies is removed; (b) The {sup 238}U, {sup 208}Pb, and {sup 9}Be reflector biases in fast systems are largely removed; (c) ENDF/B-VI.8 good agreement for simulations of highly enriched uranium assemblies is preserved; (d) The underprediction of fast criticality of {sup 233,235}U and {sup 239}Pu assemblies is removed; and (e) The intermediate spectrum critical assemblies are predicted more accurately. We anticipate that the new library will play an important role in nuclear technology applications, including transport simulations supporting national security, nonproliferation, advanced reactor and fuel cycle concepts, criticality safety, medicine, space applications, nuclear astrophysics, and nuclear physics facility design. The ENDF/B-VII.0 library is archived at the National Nuclear Data Center, BNL. The complete library, or any part of it, may be retrieved from www.nndc.bnl.gov.

Chadwick, M B; Oblozinsky, P; Herman, M; Greene, N M; McKnight, R D; Smith, D L; Young, P G; MacFarlane, R E; Hale, G M; Haight, R C; Frankle, S; Kahler, A C; Kawano, T; Little, R C; Madland, D G; Moller, P; Mosteller, R; Page, P; Talou, P; Trellue, H; White, M; Wilson, W B; Arcilla, R; Dunford, C L; Mughabghab, S F; Pritychenko, B; Rochman, D; Sonzogni, A A; Lubitz, C; Trumbull, T H; Weinman, J; Brown, D; Cullen, D E; Heinrichs, D; McNabb, D; Derrien, H; Dunn, M; Larson, N M; Leal, L C; Carlson, A D; Block, R C; Briggs, B; Cheng, E; Huria, H; Kozier, K; Courcelle, A; Pronyaev, V; der Marck, S

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Nuclear Deterrence  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence Nuclear Deterrence LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. April 12, 2012 A B-2 Spirit bomber refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker A B-2 Spirit bomber refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Charlie McMillan, Director: "For the last 70 years there has not been a world war, and I have to think that our strong deterrent has something to do with that fact." Mission nuclear weapons Charlie McMillan, Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory 1:06 Director McMillan on nuclear deterrence While the role and prominence of nuclear weapons in U.S. security policy

442

Tagging and fissile material verification concepts for nuclear warhead dismantlement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arms control treaties that reduce the number of deployable nuclear-warhead delivery systems might also lead to provisions for the verified dismantlement of nuclear weapons. Based on public information and very simple conceptual models of nuclear warheads, one can visualize a set of procedural and technological requirements to account for warheads removed from deployed sites and ultimately dismantled. To accomplish the accounting function, verification-quality tags and/or seals might be needed in order that the warheads taken out of storage can be tracked to the dismantlement site. These tags/seals would represent an overlay on the existing chain of custody. The verified dismantlement of the warheads poses special problems in confirming their identity and in avoiding the loss of sensitive information. A central factor is the publicly recognized need for some minimum quantity of fissile material to constitute a nuclear warhead. A measurement system that could make such a determination without giving away unnecessary information would be desired. Some approaches based on existing fissile assay methods are discussed. 1 ref., 2 figs.

DeVolpi, A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

element nuclear physics research program. Accomplishmentsand Nuclear Security (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs).

Hansen, Todd

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

element nuclear physics research program. Accomplishmentsand Nuclear Security (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs).

ed, Todd Hansen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

De-alerting of U.S. nuclear forces: a critical appraisal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the end of the Cold War, there have been pressures by disarmament advocates to move more quickly to draw down, toward zero, the number of nuclear weapons in U.S. and Russian arsenals. They criticize the process of negotiating arms control agreements as being too slow, and point out that treaty implementation is hampered by the necessity of ratification by the U.S. Senate and Russian Duma. One method of moving more rapidly toward nuclear abolition suggested by some analysts is de-alerting of nuclear-weapon delivery systems. De-alerting is defined as taking steps that increase significantly the time required to launch a given delivery vehicle armed with a nuclear warhead. Although there is little inclination by the U.S. Government to de-alert its nuclear forces at present, some academic literature and press stories continue to advocate such steps. This paper offers a critique of de-alerting proposals together with an assessment of the dangers of accidental, unauthorized, or unintended use of nuclear weapons. It concludes that de-alerting nuclear forces would be extremely de-stabilizing, principally because it would increase the value to an opponent of launching a first strike.

Bailey, K C; Barish, F

1998-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

446

A Safer Nuclear Enterprise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2012 at the Nuclear Security...leadership in nuclear enterprise...multinational assessment of emerging risks and consequences...to assess nuclear risks in...or nuclear terrorism. States...and nuclear power. Since 1945...nuclear power plant can mean...

Sidney D. Drell; George P. Shultz; Steven P. Andreasen

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

447

Nuclear astrophysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

Haxton, W.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

Nuclear astrophysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

Haxton, W.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Nuclear Counterterrorism  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order defines requirements for the protection of sensitive improvised nuclear device information and provides a framework to support DOE activities related to nuclear counterterrorism. (A supplemental DOE Manual, Control of and Access to Improvised Nuclear Device Information, provides requirements and procedures for protecting Sigma 20 information.) Appendices A and B are Official Use Only. Point of contact is Adam Boyd (NA-82), 202-586-0010. Cancels DOE O 457.1 and DOE M 457.1-1.

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

450

Nuclear Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Power ... THIS WEEK’S issue contains six letters on nuclear power, a representative sample of the letters C&EN received in response to the editorial, “Resist Hysteria,” I wrote shortly after the earthquake and tsunami in Japan devastated the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (C&EN, March 21, page 5). ... Four of the six letters take sharp issue with the primary point I made in the editorial, which was that, despite the severity of the situation in Japan, nuclear power remains an essential component of our overall energy mix for the near to mid-term because it will help us avert the worst impacts of global climate disruption. ...

RUDY M. BAUM

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

451

NUCLEAR STUDIES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Japanese nuclear power plant crisis sparks examination of U.S. REACTORS ... Calls are particularly zeroing in on reactors similar in location and design to those in Japan. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

452

Nuclear radiation electronic gear  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear radiation electronic gear ... Examines the line of nuclear radiation instrumentation offered by Nuclear-Chicago Corporation and Victoreen Instrument Company. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

S. Z. Lewin

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Nuclear Weapons Journal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Weapons Journal Nuclear Weapons Journal x The Nuclear Weapons Journal ceased publication after Issue 2, 2009. Below are Nuclear Weapons Journal archived issues. Issue 2,...

454

Nuclear Forces and Nuclear Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forces and Nuclear Systems Forces and Nuclear Systems Our goal is to achieve a description of nuclear systems ranging in size from the deuteron to nuclear matter and neutron stars using a single parameterization of the nuclear forces. Our work includes both the construction of two- and three-nucleon potentials and the development of many-body techniques for computing nuclear properties with these interactions. Detailed quantitative, computationally intense studies are essential parts of this work. In the last decade we have constructed several realistic two- and three-nucleon potential models. The NN potential, Argonne v18, has a dominant charge-independent piece plus additional charge-dependent and charge-symmetry-breaking terms, including a complete electromagnetic interaction. It fits 4301 pp and np elastic scattering data with a chi**2

455

Multi-Detector Analysis System for Spent Nuclear Fuel Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Non-Destructive Analysis (NDA) program at INEEL is developing a system to characterize SNF for fissile mass, radiation source term, and fissile isotopic content. The system is based on the integration of the Fission Assay Tomography System (FATS) and the Gamma-Neutron Analysis Technique (GNAT) developed under programs supported by the DOE Office of Non-proliferation and National Security. Both FATS and GNAT were developed as separate systems to provide information on the location of special nuclear material in weapons configuration (FATS role), and to measure isotopic ratios of fissile material to determine if the material was from a weapon (GNAT role). FATS is capable of not only determining the presence and location of fissile material but also the quantity of fissile material present to within 50%. GNAT determines the ratios of the fissile and fissionable material by coincidence methods that allow the two prompt (immediately) produced fission fragments to be identified. Therefore, from the combination of FATS and GNAT, MDAS is able to measure the fissile material, radiation source term, and fissile isotopics content.

Reber, Edward Lawrence; Aryaeinejad, Rahmat; Cole, Jerald Donald; Drigert, Mark William; Jewell, James Keith; Egger, Ann Elizabeth; Cordes, Gail Adele

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation | Nuclear Science...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Areas Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation...

457

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards...

458

Nuclear options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... sad if transient commercial expediency led the country to take risks now by adopting nuclear reactor designs from abroad which are in some respects technically less sound than those produced at ... much lower priority. It can be anticipated, however; that although the types of nuclear reactor selected as the best that Britain could build next may be suitable for unit designs ...

G. R. Bainbridge

1974-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

459

Shielding design aspects of thermionic space nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been well documented that nuclear power sources will be required for the future exploration of space. Higher power levels (>10 kW (electric)) will be enabling, if not absolutely necessary, for the continued expansion of a human presence in the solar system and beyond. Space missions that will directly benefit continued life on Earth, including the monitoring for climate change and global warming, high-capacity communication satellites, and large, space-based radar systems to monitor the flow of airline traffic, will require progressively larger amounts of electrical power. Military applications, even with the ending of the Cold War, will continue to be needed for treaty verification activities. A thermionic energy conversion-based nuclear reactor system is one of the many different technologies proposed for the utilization of nuclear energy in space. How the energy conversion is accomplished and the equipment requiring shielding have a profound effect on the overall shielding requirements for the system. There exist two configurations of this technology that can be exploited and will have a significant effect on shielding needs. The paper discusses in-core thermionic conversion and out-of-core conversion concepts.

Klein, A.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Nuclear Reactor Materials and Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor materials and fuels can be classified into six categories: Nuclear fuel materials Nuclear clad materials Nuclear coolant materials Nuclear poison materials Nuclear moderator materials

Dr. James S. Tulenko

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear nonproliferation treaty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Relaxation Seen in Nonproliferation Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The authors feel that OPEC has been as much the bearer...Oil prices are high and OPEC is important because energy...write, adding that if OPEC were abolished and its...little effect on world oil production and prices. As for how...Arab oil em-bargo of 1973.-LUTHER J. CARTER...

LUTHER J. CARTER

1979-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

462

Science Office Grows, Nonproliferation Stalls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...role that science plays in national security,” adds Michael Lubell, a lobbyist for the American Physical Society in...role that science plays in national security, adds Michael Lubell, a lobbyist for the American Physical Society in Washington...

David Malakoff; Robert Koenig

2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

463

(Nuclear theory). [Research in nuclear physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion. (LSP)

Haxton, W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Nuclear Astrophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear physics has a long and productive history of application to astrophysics which continues today. Advances in the accuracy and breadth of astrophysical data and theory drive the need for better experimental and theoretical understanding of the underlying nuclear physics. This paper will review some of the scenarios where nuclear physics plays an important role, including Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, neutrino production by our sun, nucleosynthesis in novae, the creation of elements heavier than iron, and neutron stars. Big-bang nucleosynthesis is concerned with the formation of elements with A nuclear physics inputs required are few-nucleon reaction cross sections. The nucleosynthesis of heavier elements involves a variety of proton-, alpha-, neutron-, and photon-induced reactions, coupled with radioactive decay. The advent of radioactive ion beam facilities has opened an important new avenue for studying these processes, as many involve radioactive species. Nuclear physics also plays an important role in neutron stars: both the nuclear equation of state and cooling processes involving neutrino emission play a very important role. Recent developments and also the interplay between nuclear physics and astrophysics will be highlighted.

Carl R. Brune

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

465

International training course on implementation of state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials: proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the International Training Course on Implementation of State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials held October 17 through November 4, 1983, at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico and Richland, Washington, USA. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a State system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards requirements. Major emphasis for the 1983 course was placed on safeguards methods used at bulk-handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory and Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the Exxon Nuclear fuel fabrication plant, the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Westinghouse Fast Flux Test Facility Visitor Center, and Washington Public Power System nuclear reactor facilities in Richland, Washington. Individual presentations were indexed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

nuclear security | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

security | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

467

Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing...

468

nuclear navy | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

navy | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Man