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  1. DOE Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation DNN | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation DNN Jump to: navigation, search Name: DOE Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN) Place: Washington, Washington, DC Zip: 20585 Product: String...

  2. Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    or rogue nations will acquire nuclear weapons or other weapons of mass destruction (WMD). NNSA, through its Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN), works closely ...

  3. DNN Sentinel

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ii, no. 1  defense by other means u.s. department of energy (doe) national nuclear security administration (nnsa) defense nuclear nonproliferation (dnn) National Nuclear Security Administration 3 DNN Plays Central Role in Implementing Nuclear Security Summits 4 Workshop Furthers Goals of Maritime Security Gift Basket 5 Uzbekistan Becomes 28 th HEU-free Country Under DNN Partnership 6 Innovation: X-Rays that Measure Plutonium Content 7 Grant to Texas A&M Builds Human Capital 8 Thor and

  4. dnn | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    dnn NNSA Announces Elimination of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) from Indonesia All of Southeast Asia Now HEU-Free (WASHINGTON, D.C.) - The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Indonesian Nuclear Industry, LLC (PT INUKI), the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), and the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) of the... NNSA program strengthens national security from afar The Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence (NSDD) program is a key

  5. dnn

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    new-national-security-campus

    Anne Harrington, NNSA Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, visited the Kansas City Plant recently for a facility tour of the...

  6. DNN Sentinel

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    requests to be added to the electronic distribution list for d n n s e n t i n e l can be sent to dnnoutreach@nnsa.doe.gov. Vol. I, No. 1  defeNse by other meaNs us departmeNt of eNergy (doe) NatIoNal Nuclear securIty admINIstratIoN (NNsa) defeNse Nuclear NoNprolIferatIoN (dNN) National Nuclear Security Administration ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF 3 DNN Organization Looks to the Future 4 Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence-Integrating Detection and Law Enforcement 6 Field Training

  7. DNN Sentinel

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2  defense by other means u.s. department of energy (doe) national nuclear security administration (nnsa) defense nuclear nonproliferation (dnn) National Nuclear Security Administration 3 U.S.-China Peaceful Nuclear Cooperation 4 Yangshan Radiation Detection System Transitioned to China 5 LANL Hosts 5 th DOE/ Euratom Joint Steering Committee Meeting 6 Innovation: Sandia's Mobile Camera 7 Radiological Security Partnership 8 IAEA Co-hosts 25th International Nuclear Material Protection Course 9

  8. DNN Sentinel

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3  defense by other means u.s. department of energy (doe) national nuclear security administration (nnsa) defense nuclear nonproliferation (dnn) National Nuclear Security Administration 3 Jamaica SLOWPOKE Reactor Conversion 4 Integrating Cyber Analysis and Nuclear Security 5 Radiation Detection System Commissioned in Romania 6 Administrator Leads NNSA Team at CTBT SnT15 Conference 7 Innovation: Developing a New Fuel 8 LANL Scientist Recognized for Innovations 9 U.S., China, IAEA Advance

  9. dnn | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) and the U.K. Department of Energy and Climate Change concluded a workshop at Wilton Park, Shaping the future of nuclear...

  10. Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Programs Nonproliferation One of the gravest threats the United States and the international community face is the possibility that terrorists or rogue nations will acquire nuclear weapons or other weapons of mass destruction (WMD). NNSA, through its Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN), works closely with a wide range of international partners, key U.S. federal agencies, the U.S. national laboratories, and the private sector to secure, safeguard, and/or dispose of dangerous nuclear

  11. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  12. Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... to detect nuclear explosions near and far NNSA Deputy Administrator Creedon Travels to China DNN Sentinel Newsletter Volume II, No. 1 (March 2016) Volume I, No. 3 (November 2015) ...

  13. Goals, Objectives, and Requirements (GOR) of the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team for the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-13

    The goal, objectives, and requirements (GOR) presented in this document define a framework for describing research directed specifically by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The intent of this document is to provide a communication tool for the GNDD Team with NNSA management and with its stakeholder community. It describes the GNDD expectation that much of the improvement in the proficiency of nuclear explosion monitoring will come from better understanding of the science behind the generation, propagation, recording, and interpretation of seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic, and radionuclide signals and development of "game-changer" advances in science and technology.

  14. Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty | National Nuclear Security Administra...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy ... Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons off ...

  15. Nuclear Nonproliferation, International Safeguards and Nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Nuclear Nonproliferation, International Safeguards and Nuclear Security in the Middle East Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Nonproliferation, ...

  16. Nuclear Nonproliferation, International Safeguards and Nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Nonproliferation, International Safeguards and Nuclear Security in the Middle East Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Nonproliferation, International ...

  17. Meeting the Next Generation of Nuclear Nonproliferation Specialists...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... DNN R&D directs an integrated research and development portfolio in support of its mission to detect signs of nuclear proliferation and nuclear detonations. The DNN R&D-funded ...

  18. Nonproliferation and Arms Control | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Nonproliferation Nonproliferation and Arms Control The mission of the Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control (NPAC) is to prevent proliferation, ensure peaceful nuclear uses, and enable verifiable nuclear reductions. NPAC provides a comprehensive approach to strengthen nonproliferation and arms control regimes, achieving its mission through four subprograms: International Nuclear Safeguards Nuclear Controls Nuclear Verification Nonproliferation Policy Learn More

  19. Presentation: DOE Nuclear Nonproliferation | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Presentation: DOE Nuclear Nonproliferation Presentation: DOE Nuclear Nonproliferation A briefing to the Secretary's Energy Advisory Board on DOE nuclear nonproliferation activities prepared by: Anne Harrington, US Department of Energy. DOE Nuclear Nonproliferation (2.49 MB) More Documents & Publications Global Threat Reduction Initiative 2008_Transition_Program_Details_Book_Three.pdf Report of the Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation

  20. Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability LANL has strengthened its capability in a key aspect of nuclear nonproliferation by combining two groups within its Global Security organization. June 27, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

  1. Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nonproliferation NNSA Announces Elimination of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) from Indonesia All of Southeast Asia Now HEU-Free (WASHINGTON, D.C.) - The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Indonesian Nuclear Industry, LLC (PT INUKI), the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), and the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) of the... NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation leaders gather in nation's capital Recently, the NNSA held the fourth meeting

  2. Nonproliferation Policy | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nonproliferation Policy Challenge: Address evolving threats/challenges to the nonproliferation and arms control regimes. Solution: Develop programs and strategies to address emerging nonproliferation and arms control challenges and opportunities. Learn More 10 CFR Part 810 Related Topics international security international security policy NIS nuclear controls safeguards safeguards and security verification Related News Nuclear Verification International Nuclear Safeguards Nonproliferation and

  3. Fast reactors and nuclear nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avrorin, E.N.; Rachkov, V.I.; Chebeskov, A.N.

    2013-07-01

    Problems are discussed with regard to nuclear fuel cycle resistance in fast reactors to nuclear proliferation risk due to the potential for use in military programs of the knowledge, technologies and materials gained from peaceful nuclear power applications. Advantages are addressed for fast reactors in the creation of a more reliable mode of nonproliferation in the closed nuclear fuel cycle in comparison with the existing fully open and partially closed fuel cycles of thermal reactors. Advantages and shortcomings are also discussed from the point of view of nonproliferation from the start with fast reactors using plutonium of thermal reactor spent fuel and enriched uranium fuel to the gradual transition using their own plutonium as fuel. (authors)

  4. Energy Secretary Abraham Announces Nuclear Nonproliferation Effort...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Energy Secretary Abraham Announces Nuclear Nonproliferation Effort with Kazakhstan for Former Soviet Nuclear Weapons Facility January 30, 2002 Energy Secretary Abraham Announces ...

  5. Nuclear World Order and Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joeck, N

    2007-02-05

    The decision by India and Pakistan in May 1998 to conduct nuclear weapon tests and declare themselves as nuclear weapon states challenged South Asian regional stability calculations, US nonproliferation policy, and prevailing assumptions about international security. A decade later, the effects of those tests are still being felt and policies are still adjusting to the changed global conditions. This paper will consider non- and counter-proliferation policy options for the United States and Pakistan as they work as partners to prevent the transfer of nuclear technology and further nuclear proliferation.

  6. non-proliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    non-proliferation

  7. Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    span>

    WASHINGTON D.C - The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) announced today the removal of 36 kilograms...

  8. Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation NNSA Announces Elimination of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) from Indonesia All of Southeast Asia Now HEU-Free (WASHINGTON, D.C.) - The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Indonesian Nuclear Industry, LLC (PT INUKI), the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), and the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) of the... NNSA program strengthens national security from afar The Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence

  9. Principal Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Principal Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Ken Baker at the 32nd Annual International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors in ...

  10. NA 20 - Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) 20 - Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

  11. Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Safety » Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation President Truman signed the Atomic Energy Act in 1946, creating the Atomic Energy Commission -- which later became a part of the Department of Energy. Read more about the Department of Energy's role in nuclear security in <a href="/node/1041771/">our interactive timeline.</a> | Energy Department Photo. President Truman signed the Atomic Energy Act in 1946, creating the Atomic Energy

  12. DNN Sentinel

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... 2015 NFE groups at Heysham nuclear power plant (above) and at Sellafield nuclear ... When completed, the infrasound wind-filter testbed at the FACT Site will facilitate ...

  13. Advances in Nuclear Nonproliferation Technology & Policy Conference:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bridging the Gaps in Nuclear Nonproliferation Advances in Nuclear Nonproliferation Technology & Policy Conference Advances in Nuclear Nonproliferation Technology & Policy Conference: Bridging the Gaps in Nuclear Nonproliferation WHEN: Sep 25, 2016 8:00 AM - Sep 30, 2016 5:00 PM WHERE: La Fonda Hotel, Santa Fe, NM CONTACT: Bill Flor (505) 665-8768 CATEGORY: Community Science INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description This conference seeks to build upon previous ANS topical conferences

  14. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20).

  15. EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel SUMMARY ...

  16. DNN Global Programs

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NGSI Supports United States Government Nonproliferation Priorities: April 5, 2009 President Barack Obama, Remarks in Prague: "Together we will strengthen the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty as a basis for cooperation...To strengthen the treaty, we should embrace several principles. We need more resources and authority to strengthen international inspections. We need real and immediate consequences for countries caught breaking the rules or trying to leave the treaty without cause. And we

  17. Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report: Class of 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMakin, Andrea H.

    2012-08-20

    Annual report for the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP), which PNNL administers for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Features the Class of 2011. The NGFP is a NNSA program with a mission to cultivate future technical and policy leaders in nonproliferation and international security. Through the NGFP, outstanding graduate students with career interests in nonproliferation are appointed to program offices within the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN). During their one-year assignment, Fellows participate in programs designed to detect, prevent, and reverse the proliferation of nuclear weapons.

  18. Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Nuclear Nonproliferation Nuclear forensics, explained: NNSA analytic chemists help keep the world safe One of the gravest threats the world faces is the possibility that terrorists will acquire nuclear weapons or the necessary materials to construct a weapon. Part of the work of NNSA's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and the national laboratories is to support investigations into the... DOE/NNSA Successfully Establishes Uranium Lease and Takeback Program to Support

  19. Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation Support NBL Program Office NBL PO Home About Programs Certified Reference Materials Program Measurement Evaluation Nuclear Safeguards and ...

  20. Non-Proliferation Treaty | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Non-Proliferation Treaty

  1. Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    dispose of dangerous nuclear and radiological material, and detect and control the proliferation of related WMD technology and expertise. Vietnam Removal Working in close...

  2. Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and detect and control the proliferation of related WMD technology and expertise. ... both state- and non-state-based proliferation of nuclear and radiological materials ...

  3. Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    17, 2015

    Washington, D.C. -The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) will...

  4. Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... best practices in Russia. Expand nuclear security best practices exchanges , e.g., Israel, France, and the U.K. Increase SLD mobile detection support for law enforcement ...

  5. Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    community face is the possibility that terrorists or rogue nations will acquire nuclear weapons or other weapons of mass destruction (WMD). NNSA, through its Office of...

  6. NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation leaders gather in nation's

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    capital | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation leaders gather in nation's capital Wednesday, June 8, 2016 - 9:38am NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Science Council met at NNSA headquarters in Washington. Recently, the NNSA held the fourth meeting of the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Science Council in Washington, DC. The Science Council provides a way for senior-level leadership from NNSA headquarters and the labs,

  7. Nuclear Deterrence in the Age of Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, J

    2009-01-21

    The fallacy of zero nuclear weapons, even as a virtual goal, is discussed. Because the complete abolition of nuclear weapons is not verifiable, nuclear weapons will always play a role in the calculus of assure, dissuade, deter and defeat (ADDD). However, the relative contribution of nuclear weapons to international security has diminished. To reconstitute the Cold War nuclear capability, with respect to both the nuclear weapons capability and their associated delivery systems, is fiscally daunting and not warranted due to competing budgetary pressures and their relative contribution to international security and nonproliferation. A proposed pathway to a sustainable nuclear weapons capability end-state is suggested which provides enough ADDD; a Dyad composed of fewer delivery and weapon systems, with trickle production at the National Laboratories and private sector to maintain capability and guard against technological surprise.

  8. NNSA Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation visits Oak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ridge | Y-12 National Security Complex NNSA Deputy Administrator ... NNSA Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation visits Oak Ridge Posted: January 25, 2016 - 1:12pm NNSA Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Anne Harrington addresses the East Tennessee Economic Council. Making the world a safer place. That is the message Anne Harrington delivered to the East Tennessee Economic Council about NNSA's role in nuclear nonproliferation. Harrington, Deputy

  9. Workshop on nuclear power growth and nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph F

    2010-01-01

    It is widely viewed that an expansion of nuclear power would have positive energy, economic and environmental benefits for the world. However, there are concerns about the economic competitiveness, safety and proliferation and terrorism risks of nuclear power. The prospects for a dramatic growth in nuclear power will depend on the ability of governments and industry to address these concerns, including the effectiveness of, and the resources devoted to, plans to develop and implement technologies and approaches that strengthen nonproliferation, nuclear materials accountability and nuclear security. In his Prague speech, President Obama stated: 'we should build a new framework for civil nuclear cooperation, including an international fuel bank, so that countries can access peaceful power without increasing the risks of proliferation. That must be the right of every nation that renounces nuclear weapons, especially developing countries embarking on peaceful programs. And no approach will succeed if it's based on the denial of rights to nations that play by the rules. We must harness the power of nuclear energy on behalf of our efforts to combat climate change, and to advance peace opportunity for all people.' How can the President's vision, which will rekindle a vigorous public debate over the future of nuclear power and its relation to proliferation, be realized? What critical issues will frame the reemerging debate? What policies must be put into place to address these issues? Will US policy be marked more by continuity or change? To address these and other questions, the Los Alamos National Laboratory in cooperation with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars will host a workshop on the future of nuclear power and nonproliferation.

  10. Nuclear Nonproliferation Ontology Assessment Team Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strasburg, Jana D.; Hohimer, Ryan E.

    2012-01-01

    Final Report for the NA22 Simulations, Algorithm and Modeling (SAM) Ontology Assessment Team's efforts from FY09-FY11. The Ontology Assessment Team began in May 2009 and concluded in September 2011. During this two-year time frame, the Ontology Assessment team had two objectives: (1) Assessing the utility of knowledge representation and semantic technologies for addressing nuclear nonproliferation challenges; and (2) Developing ontological support tools that would provide a framework for integrating across the Simulation, Algorithm and Modeling (SAM) program. The SAM Program was going through a large assessment and strategic planning effort during this time and as a result, the relative importance of these two objectives changed, altering the focus of the Ontology Assessment Team. In the end, the team conducted an assessment of the state of art, created an annotated bibliography, and developed a series of ontological support tools, demonstrations and presentations. A total of more than 35 individuals from 12 different research institutions participated in the Ontology Assessment Team. These included subject matter experts in several nuclear nonproliferation-related domains as well as experts in semantic technologies. Despite the diverse backgrounds and perspectives, the Ontology Assessment team functioned very well together and aspects could serve as a model for future inter-laboratory collaborations and working groups. While the team encountered several challenges and learned many lessons along the way, the Ontology Assessment effort was ultimately a success that led to several multi-lab research projects and opened up a new area of scientific exploration within the Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Verification.

  11. Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy ... and monitor nuclear weapons production, proliferation, and nuclear explosions worldwide. ...

  12. Preventing Proliferation of Nuclear Materials and Technology | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Preventing Proliferation of Nuclear Materials and Technology January 31, 2011 NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN) Program plays a critical role in the nation's defense by preventing the spread of nuclear weapons and related materials, technologies and know-how. Leveraging the expertise and detection equipment developed as a result of a 60-year investment in nuclear security, DNN works with international partners and in more than 100

  13. Systems resilience : a new analytical framework for nuclear nonproliferation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, Arian Leigh

    2011-12-01

    This paper introduces the concept of systems resilience as a new framework for thinking about the future of nonproliferation. Resilience refers to the ability of a system to maintain its vital functions in the face of continuous and unpredictable change. The nonproliferation regime can be viewed as a complex system, and key themes from the literature on systems resilience can be applied to the nonproliferation system. Most existing nonproliferation strategies are aimed at stability rather than resilience, and the current nonproliferation system may be over-constrained by the cumulative evolution of strategies, increasing its vulnerability to collapse. The resilience of the nonproliferation system can be enhanced by diversifying nonproliferation strategies to include general international capabilities to respond to proliferation and focusing more attention on reducing the motivation to acquire nuclear weapons in the first place. Ideas for future research, include understanding unintended consequences and feedbacks among nonproliferation strategies, developing methodologies for measuring the resilience of the nonproliferation system, and accounting for interactions of the nonproliferation system with other systems on larger and smaller scales.

  14. Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Northwest National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Senior Adviser, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Placeholder image for Steve Mladineo. Steve Mladineo October 2009 Fellow of the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management Steve Mladineo joined Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 1993 and has managed the Nuclear Arms Control and Nonproliferation Product Line, has been the PNNL Account Manager for

  15. U.S. - Kazakhstan Cooperation on Nuclear Security and Nonproliferation |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) - Kazakhstan Cooperation on Nuclear Security and Nonproliferation October 12, 2011 The United States of America and the Republic of Kazakhstan have cooperated on a broad range of nuclear security and nonproliferation topics for nearly two decades. The partnership was established under the umbrella of the Cooperative Threat Reduction Agreement signed in December 1993. Today, the Departments of Energy, Defense, and State work closely with the

  16. FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Reactor Programs before the House Appropriations Committee, Energy and Water Development Subcommittee | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactor Programs before the House Appropriations Committee, Energy and Water Development Subcommittee March 02, 2011 Chairman Frelinghuysen and Ranking Member Pastor, thank you for the opportunity to join you today to discuss the investments the President has requested for our nuclear nonproliferation

  17. Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) and the U.K. Department of Energy and Climate Change concluded a workshop at Wilton Park, About This Site Budget IG Web Policy...

  18. India | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    India DOE/NNSA visits Mumbai in support of India's Global Center for Nuclear Energy Partnership On August 4 - 6, 2015, representatives from DOE/NNSA's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN) traveled to Mumbai, India, for meetings of the Joint Working Group (JWG), in support of India's Global Centre for Nuclear Energy Partnership (GCNEP). The GCNEP will be India's world-class

  19. NNSA Labs host U.S. and Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Labs host U.S. and Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Non-Nuclear Weapon State Representatives | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS...

  20. Statement on Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    before the House Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy & Water Development | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities before the House Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy & Water Development February 26, 2013 INTRODUCTION Chairman Frelinghuysen, Ranking Member Kaptur, and distinguished members of the Subcommittee, thank you for having me here today to discuss the National Nuclear

  1. Nonproliferation Graduate Program | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    students with academic specializations in International Affairs, Political Science, Economics, Chemical Sciences, Physics, Nuclear Science, Nuclear Engineering and Engineering. ...

  2. NNSA and the European Commission advance global nuclear nonproliferation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    goals at 6th annual Joint Steering Committee Meeting | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) and the European Commission advance global nuclear nonproliferation goals at 6th annual Joint Steering Committee Meeting Friday, July 15, 2016 - 11:13am NNSA and the European Commission's Joint Research Centre participants at the 6th Annual Joint Steering Committee meeting. NNSA and the European Commission (E.C.) recently met in Ispra, Italy, to review the status of collaborative efforts

  3. Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Nonproliferation and Arms Control NNSA and IAEA Hold the 20th International Training Course on Nuclear Material Accounting and Control Washington, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are hosting 35 representatives from 30 countries at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from April 26 to May 8, 2015 for the 20th International Training Course

  4. Nonproliferation and Arms Control | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy ... and Arms Control (NPAC) is to prevent proliferation, ensure peaceful nuclear uses, and ...

  5. Abraham Announces Second Major Nuclear Nonproliferation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    technicians at a former nuclear weapons plant in Kazakhstan will turn their talents to ... The ULBA Metallurgical Plant, a former nuclear weapons facility in Kazahkstan, will expand ...

  6. Energy Secretary Abraham Announces Nuclear Nonproliferation Effort...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    its nuclear program and joined the Non- Proliferation Treaty as a non-nuclear state. ... DOENNSA has committed 1.2 million in Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (IPP) ...

  7. Nonproliferation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    en Under U.S.-Russia Partnership, Final Shipment of Fuel Converted From 20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads Arrives in United States and Will Be Used for U.S. Electricity http:...

  8. Integration of facility modeling capabilities for nuclear nonproliferation analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, Humberto; Burr, Tom; Coles, Garill A; Edmunds, Thomas A.; Garrett, Alfred; Gorensek, Maximilian; Hamm, Luther; Krebs, John; Kress, Reid L; Lamberti, Vincent; Schoenwald, David; Tzanos, Constantine P; Ward, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  9. INTEGRATION OF FACILITY MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorensek, M.; Hamm, L.; Garcia, H.; Burr, T.; Coles, G.; Edmunds, T.; Garrett, A.; Krebs, J.; Kress, R.; Lamberti, V.; Schoenwald, D.; Tzanos, C.; Ward, R.

    2011-07-18

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  10. Advances in Nuclear Nonproliferation Technology & Policy Conference...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Verification and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC) Special Panel Sessions include: Iran Deal: 1 Year Later 2016 Nuclear Security Summit Lessons from the First 50 Years of ...

  11. Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a part of the Department of Energy. Read more about the Department of Energy's role in nuclear security in our interactive timeline. | Energy...

  12. Assessing the Institution of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toomey, Christopher

    2010-05-14

    The nuclear nonproliferation regime is facing a crisis of effectiveness. During the Cold War, the regime was relatively effective in stemming the proliferation of nuclear weapons and building an institutional structure that could, under certain conditions, ensure continued success. However, in the evolving global context, the traditional approaches are becoming less appropriate. Globalization has introduced new sets of stresses on the nonproliferation regime, such as the rise of non-state actors, broadening extensity and intensity of supply chains, and the multipolarization of power. This evolving global context demands an analytical and political flexibility in order to meet future threats. Current institutional capabilities established during the Cold War are now insufficient to meet the nonproliferation regime’s current and future needs. The research was based on information gathered through interviews and reviews of the relevant literature, and two dominant themes emerged. First, that human security should be integrated into the regime to account for the rise of non-state actors and networked violence. Second, confidence in the regime’s overall effectiveness has eroded at a time where verification-based confidence is becoming more essential. The research postulates that a critical analysis of the regime that fully utilizes institutional theory, with its focus on rules, normative structures, and procedures will be essential to adapting the regime to the current global context, building mechanisms for generating trust, creating better enforcement, and providing flexibility for the future.

  13. 2012 Annual Planning Summary for NNSA Defense Nuclear NonProliferation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within the NNSA Defense Nuclear NonProliferation.

  14. The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation comprises SEAB members and individuals with expertise and experience in the technologies, institutions, and...

  15. Nuclear Arms Control, Nonproliferation, and Counterterrorism: Impacts on Public Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreicer, Mona; Pregenzer, Arian

    2014-04-01

    Reducing the risks of nuclear war, limiting the spread of nuclear weapons and reducing global nuclear weapons stockpiles are key national and international security goals. They are pursued through a variety of international arms control, nonproliferation and counter-terrorism treaties and agreements. These legally binding and political commitments, together with the institutional infrastructure that supports them, work to establish global norms of behavior and have limited the spread of weapons of mass destruction. Beyond the primary security objectives, reducing the likelihood of the use of nuclear weapons, preventing environmental releases of radioactive material, increasing the availability of safe and secure nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, and providing scientific data relevant to predicting and managing the consequences of natural or human-caused disasters world-wide provide significant benefits to global public health.

  16. Nuclear Arms Control, Nonproliferation, and Counterterrorism: Impacts on Public Health

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dreicer, Mona; Pregenzer, Arian

    2014-04-01

    Reducing the risks of nuclear war, limiting the spread of nuclear weapons and reducing global nuclear weapons stockpiles are key national and international security goals. They are pursued through a variety of international arms control, nonproliferation and counter-terrorism treaties and agreements. These legally binding and political commitments, together with the institutional infrastructure that supports them, work to establish global norms of behavior and have limited the spread of weapons of mass destruction. Beyond the primary security objectives, reducing the likelihood of the use of nuclear weapons, preventing environmental releases of radioactive material, increasing the availability of safe and secure nuclearmore » technology for peaceful purposes, and providing scientific data relevant to predicting and managing the consequences of natural or human-caused disasters world-wide provide significant benefits to global public health.« less

  17. U.S. and Tunisia to Cooperate on Nuclear Safeguards, Nonproliferation and

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Peaceful Nuclear Energy Infrastructure | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) U.S. and Tunisia to Cooperate on Nuclear Safeguards, Nonproliferation and Peaceful Nuclear Energy Infrastructure September 22, 2010 VIENNA, AUSTRIA -The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) today announced that it has signed a Memorandum of Cooperation on nuclear safeguards and other nonproliferation topics with the Tunisia Ministry of Higher Education. NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino

  18. A parameter study to optimizing scintillator characteristics for increased sensitivity in nuclear nonproliferation, safeguards, and security based applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shy, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    A parameter study to optimizing scintillator characteristics for increased sensitivity in nuclear nonproliferation, safeguards, and security based applications

  19. DNN Global Programs

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NGSI Accomplishments in FY 2009 NGSI held three major international meetings in the past year: * The First Annual International Meeting on Next Generation Safeguards brought together high-level government officials and technical experts to reach a common understanding of next generation safeguards challenges and opportunities. * An inaugural international workshop was held in June 2009 to begin an effort to harmonize the safeguards infrastructure assistance provided by advanced nuclear states

  20. dnn

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7%2A en Anne Harrington tours new National Security Campus http:nnsa.energy.govbloganne-harrington-tours-new-national-security-campus

    Anne Harrington, NNSA Deputy...

  1. Evolution and resilience of the nuclear nonproliferation regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, Arian L.

    2014-05-09

    This paper introduces the concept of systems resilience as a new framework for thinking about the future of the nonproliferation regime. Resilience refers to the ability of a system to maintain its vital functions in the face of continuous and unpredictable change. First, I make the case that the nonproliferation regime can be viewed as a complex system. Next, I discuss key themes from the literature on systems resilience and apply them to the nonproliferation system: the difference between resilience and stability; the need for evolution to maintain function; the importance of functional diversity; and the concept of the adaptive cycle. I show that most existing nonproliferation strategies are aimed at stability rather than resilience and that the current nonproliferation system may be over-constrained by the cumulative evolution of strategies. According to the literature on systems resilience, this increases its vulnerability to collapse. I argue that the resilience of the nonproliferation system can be enhanced by increasing international participation in setting the nonproliferation agenda, developing general international response capabilities, focusing on non-coercive approaches to decreasing demand, and applying systems thinking more rigorously to nonproliferation.

  2. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Reasoner: PNNL FY12 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohimer, Ryan E.; Pomiak, Yekaterina G.; Neorr, Peter A.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Strasburg, Jana D.

    2013-05-03

    Building on previous internal investments and leveraging ongoing advancements in semantic technologies, PNNL implemented a formal reasoning framework and applied it to a specific challenge in nuclear nonproliferation. The Semantic Nonproliferation Analysis Platform (SNAP) was developed as a preliminary graphical user interface to demonstrate the potential power of the underlying semantic technologies to analyze and explore facts and relationships relating to the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). In developing this proof of concept prototype, the utility and relevancy of semantic technologies to the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D) has been better understood.

  3. Integration of facility modeling capabilities for nuclear nonproliferation analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burr, Tom; Gorensek, M. B.; Krebs, John; Kress, Reid L; Lamberti, Vincent; Schoenwald, David; Ward, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclearnonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facilitymodeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facilitymodeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facilitymodelingcapabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferationanalysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facilitymodeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facilitymodelingcapabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  4. Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Collaboration Following Russian Delegation Visit to the United States | Department of Energy Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation Collaboration Following Russian Delegation Visit to the United States Joint Statement on Future U.S.-Russia Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation Collaboration Following Russian Delegation Visit to the United States December 10, 2013 - 2:30pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and

  5. Microsoft Word - FY13 NSTec Performance Evaluation Report (Public...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Impacted programs included Defense Nuclear Non-proliferation (DNN), National Emergency ... Impacted programs included Defense Nuclear Non-proliferation (DNN), National Emergency ...

  6. DOE/NNSA visits Mumbai in support of India's Global Center for Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Energy Partnership | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) visits Mumbai in support of India's Global Center for Nuclear Energy Partnership Friday, August 21, 2015 - 12:00am On August 4 - 6, 2015, representatives from DOE/NNSA's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN) traveled to Mumbai, India, for meetings of the Joint Working Group (JWG), in support of India's Global Centre for Nuclear Energy Partnership (GCNEP). The GCNEP will be India's world-class national nuclear

  7. NNSA Signs Memorandum with Kuwait to Increase Cooperation on Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2010-09-01

    On June 23, 2010, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation on nuclear safeguards and other nonproliferation topics with the Kuwait National Nuclear Energy Committee (KNNEC). NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino and KNNEC's Secretary General, Dr. Ahmad Bishara, signed the memorandum at a ceremony at U.S. Department of Energy headquarters in Washington.

  8. material protection | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    protection Material Management and Minimization The Office of Material Management and Minimization (M3) presents an integrated approach to addressing the persistent threat posed by nuclear materials through a full cycle of materials management and minimization efforts. Consistent with the President's highly enriched uranium (HEU) and... Nonproliferation Working in close collaboration with DOE laboratories, DNN develops and tests new technologies to advance U.S. capabilities to monitor

  9. material recovery | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    recovery Material Management and Minimization The Office of Material Management and Minimization (M3) presents an integrated approach to addressing the persistent threat posed by nuclear materials through a full cycle of materials management and minimization efforts. Consistent with the President's highly enriched uranium (HEU) and... Nonproliferation Working in close collaboration with DOE laboratories, DNN develops and tests new technologies to advance U.S. capabilities to monitor

  10. material removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    removal Material Management and Minimization The Office of Material Management and Minimization (M3) presents an integrated approach to addressing the persistent threat posed by nuclear materials through a full cycle of materials management and minimization efforts. Consistent with the President's highly enriched uranium (HEU) and... Nonproliferation Working in close collaboration with DOE laboratories, DNN develops and tests new technologies to advance U.S. capabilities to monitor

  11. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VII. International perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this volume is to assess the proliferation vulnerabilities of the present deployment of civilian nuclear-power systems within the current nonproliferation regime and, in light of their prospective deployment, to consider technical and institutional measures and alternatives which may contribute to an improved regime in which nuclear power could play a significant part. An assessment of these measures must include consideration of their nonproliferation effectiveness as well as their bearing upon energy security, and their operational, economic, and political implications. The nature of these considerations can provide some measure of their likely acceptability to various nations.

  12. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, the relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Thomas Jr.

    2014-05-09

    The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) is the most important international security arrangement that we have that is protecting the world community and this has been true for many years. But it did not happen by accident, it is a strategic bargain in which 184 states gave up the right forever to acquire the most powerful weapon ever created in exchange for a commitment from the five states allowed to keep nuclear weapons under the NPT (U.S., U.K., Russia, France and China), to share peaceful nuclear technology and to engage in disarmament negotiations aimed at the ultimate elimination of their nuclear stockpiles. The most important part of this is the comprehensive nuclear test ban (CTBT); the thinking by the 184 NPT non-nuclear weapon states was and is that they understand that the elimination of nuclear weapon stockpiles is a long way off, but at least the NPT nuclear weapon states could stop testing the weapons. The CTBT has been ratified by 161 states but by its terms it can only come into force if 44 nuclear potential states ratify; 36 have of the 44 have ratified it, the remaining eight include the United States and seven others, most of whom are in effect waiting for the United States. No state has tested a nuclear weapon-except for complete outlier North Korea-in 15 years. There appears to be no chance that the U.S. Senate will approve the CTBT for ratification in the foreseeable future, but the NPT may not survive without it. Perhaps it is time to consider an interim measure, for the UN Security Council to declare that any future nuclear weapon test any time, anywhere is a 'threat to peace and security', in effect a violation of international law, which in today's world it clearly would be.

  13. Some thoughts on the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krikorian N.H.; Hawkins, H.T.

    1996-05-01

    This paper discusses factors controlling the dissemination of nuclear technologies and especially fissile materials.

  14. Preparation for the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Extension Conference in 1995. Workshop summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrzanowski, P.L.

    1993-05-07

    About 30 specialists in non-proliferation participated in a workshop to explore ideas for US Government preparatory steps leading to the 1995 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Extension Conference. To that end, workshop sessions were devoted to reviewing the lessons learned from previous Review Conferences, discussing the threats to the non-proliferation regime together with ways of preserving and strengthening it, and examining the management of international nuclear commerce. A fundamental premise shared by workshop participants was that extension of the NPT is immensely important to international security. The importance of stemming proliferation and, more specifically, extending the Treaty, is growing as a result of the significant changes in the world. If the conferees of the Extension Conference decide on no extension or extension for a short limited duration, some technically advanced states that have foregone development of nuclear weapons may begin to rethink their options. Also, other arms control measures, such as the Chemical Weapons Convention, could start to unravel. The US must provide strong international leadership to ensure that the Extension Conference is a success, resulting in Treaty extension, perhaps through successive terms, into the indefinite future. Workshop participants were struck by the urgent need for the US to take organizational steps so that it is highly effective in its advance preparations for the Extension Conference. Moreover, the Extension Conference provides both a challenge and an opportunity to mold a cohesive set of US policy actions to define the future role of nuclear weapons and combat their proliferation.

  15. AN ANALYTICAL FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING RELIABLE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICE APPROACHES: ECONOMIC AND NON-PROLIFERATION MERITS OF NUCLEAR FUEL LEASING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreyling, Sean J.; Brothers, Alan J.; Short, Steven M.; Phillips, Jon R.; Weimar, Mark R.

    2010-08-11

    The goal of international nuclear policy since the dawn of nuclear power has been the peaceful expansion of nuclear energy while controlling the spread of enrichment and reprocessing technology. Numerous initiatives undertaken in the intervening decades to develop international agreements on providing nuclear fuel supply assurances, or reliable nuclear fuel services (RNFS) attempted to control the spread of sensitive nuclear materials and technology. In order to inform the international debate and the development of government policy, PNNL has been developing an analytical framework to holistically evaluate the economics and non-proliferation merits of alternative approaches to managing the nuclear fuel cycle (i.e., cradle-to-grave). This paper provides an overview of the analytical framework and discusses preliminary results of an economic assessment of one RNFS approach: full-service nuclear fuel leasing. The specific focus of this paper is the metrics under development to systematically evaluate the non-proliferation merits of fuel-cycle management alternatives. Also discussed is the utility of an integrated assessment of the economics and non-proliferation merits of nuclear fuel leasing.

  16. Nuclear Nonproliferation and Arms Control Primer Prepared for the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Laura S.

    2011-05-25

    To provide a brief overview of key arms control and nonproliferation arrangements for the layperson that may be relevant to the Commission's comprehensive review of policies for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Primer would be published by the Commission and made publicly available, probably as an appendix to a larger Commission report.

  17. The Los Alamos nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation technology development program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, H.A. Jr.; Menlove, H.O.; Reilly, T.D.; Bosler, G.E.; Hakkila, E.A.; Eccleston, G.W.

    1994-04-01

    For nearly three decades, Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed and implemented nuclear measurement technology and training in support of national and international nuclear safeguards. This paper outlines the major elements of those technologies and highlights some of the latest developments.

  18. Report of a Workshop in Nuclear Forces and Nonproliferation held at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington, DC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph F

    2009-01-01

    The workshop addressed evolving nuclear forces and their impacts on nonproliferation in the context of the new strategic environment, the Obama Administration's Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) Review and the 2010 Conference (RevCon) of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The issues discussed are at the heart of the debate on nuclear policy issues such asfuture nuclear weapons requirements and nonproliferation, but also the stockpile stewardship program and infrastructure modernization. The workshop discussions reflected the importance of the NPRfor defining the role of US nuclear forces in dealing with 21s1 century threats and providing guidance that will shape NNSA and DoD programs. They also highlighted its importancefor NPT diplomacy. The discussion noted the report of the bipartisan Congressional Commission on the Strategic Posture of the United States, and the expectation that the NPR would likely reflect its consensus to a large degree (although the Administration was not bound by the report). There was widespread support for developing thefoundationsfor a sustainable nuclear-weapon program that addresses nuclear weapons, infrastructure and expertise in the broader nonproliferation, disarmament and international security contexts. The discussion also revealed a convergence of views, but no consensus, on a number of important issues, including the diminished role but continued importance of nuclear weapons; the need to take action to ensure the sustainability of the stockpile, and the recapitalization of the infrastructure and expertise; and the need to take action to promote nonproliferation, arms control and disarmament objectives.

  19. non-proliferation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    hosted representatives from 11StatesParties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and one representative from the United Nations Office for...

  20. Nuclear Nonproliferation,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signal Processing System Identification Controls Embedded systems Aerospace Systems Robotics Structural Health Monitoring Thinking Telescopes Machine Learning Los Alamos Dynamics...

  1. New Y-12 Mill Supports Non-Proliferation | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Mill Supports Non-Proliferation November 09, 2010 Microsoft Office document icon NR-11-09

  2. TOMORROW: Energy Secretary Moniz to Discuss Nuclear Non-Proliferation and the Iran Deal at Wilson Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz will participate in a Director’s Forum on the importance of nuclear non-proliferation and the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) at the Wilson Center in Washington, D.C.

  3. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) report provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest.

  4. National Nuclear Security Administration Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report in Brief: October 2007 - May 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkman, Clarissa O.; Fankhauser, Jana G.; Sandusky, Jessica A.

    2009-05-01

    This abbreviated Annual Report covers program activities of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP) from October 2007 through May 2008--the timeframe between the last Annual Report (which covered activities through September 2007) and the next report (which will begin with June 2008 activities). In that timeframe, the NGFP continued building a solid foundation as the program began reaping the benefits of recently implemented changes. This report is organized by Fellowship class and the pertinent program activities for each, including: October 2007 Recruiting events and final applications (Class of 2008) Winter 2007 Selection and hiring (Class of 2008) Spring 2008 Career development roundtables (Class of 2007) Orientation planning (Class of 2008) Recruitment planning and university outreach (Class of 2009) May 2008 Closing ceremony (Class of 2007)

  5. Nuclear nonproliferation and safety: Challenges facing the International Atomic Energy Agency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Chairman of the Senate Committee on Govermental Affairs asked the United States General Accounting Office (GAO) to review the safeguards and nuclear power plant safety programs of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report examines (1) the effectiveness of IAEA`s safeguards program and the adequacy of program funding, (2) the management of U.S. technical assistance to the IAEA`s safeguards program, and (3) the effectiveness of IAEA`s program for advising United Nations (UN) member states about nuclear power plant safety and the adequacy of program funding. Under its statute and the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, IAEA is mandated to administer safeguards to detect diversions of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful uses. Because of limits on budget growth and unpaid contributions, IAEA has had difficulty funding the safeguards program. IAEA also conducts inspections of facilities or locations containing declared nuclear material, and manages a program for reviewing the operational safety of designated nuclear power plants. The U.S. technical assistance program for IAEA safeguards, overseen by an interagency coordinating committee, has enhanced the agency`s inspection capabilities, however, some weaknesses still exist. Despite financial limitations, IAEA is meeting its basic safety advisory responsibilities for advising UN member states on nuclear safety and providing requested safety services. However, IAEA`s program for reviewing the operational safety of nuclear power plants has not been fully effective because the program is voluntary and UN member states have not requested IAEA`s review of all nuclear reactors with serious problems. GAO believes that IAEA should have more discretion in selecting reactors for review.

  6. Non-Proliferation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Non-Proliferation Non-Proliferation GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding the transfer, storage or disposition of nuclear materials recovered by DOE for public health, safety or nonproliferation purposes. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) operates several domestic and international programs aimed at securing vulnerable nuclear materials, such as orphan and disused sealed sources and foreign research reactor fuel, in support of nuclear nonproliferation and nuclear

  7. Preliminary Results from an Investigation into Nanostructured Nuclear Radiation Detectors for Non-Proliferation Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ,

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, the concept of embedding composite scintillators consisting of nanosized inorganic crystals in an organic matrix has been actively pursued. Nanocomposite detectors have the potential to meet many of the homeland security, non-proliferation, and border and cargo-screening needs of the nation and, by virtue of their superior nuclear identification capability over plastic, at roughly the same cost as plastic, have the potential to replace all plastic detectors. Nanocomposites clearly have the potential of being a gamma ray detection material that would be sensitive yet less expensive and easier to produce on a large scale than growing large, whole crystals of similar sensitivity. These detectors would have a broad energy range and a sufficient energy resolution to perform isotopic identification. The material can also be fabricated on an industrial scale, further reducing cost. This investigation focused on designing and fabricating prototype core/shell and quantum dot (QD) detectors. Fourteen core/shell and four QD detectors, all with the basic consistency of a mixture of nanoparticles in a polymer matrix with different densities of nanoparticles, were prepared. Nanoparticles with sizes <10 nm were fabricated, embedded in a polystyrene matrix, and the resultant scintillators radiation detector properties were characterized. This work also attempted to extend the gamma energy response on both low- and high-energy regimes by demonstrating the ability to detect low-energy and high-energy gamma rays. Preliminary results of this investigation are consistent with a significant response of these materials to nuclear radiation.

  8. Report of a workshop on nuclear forces and nonproliferation Woodrow Wilson international center for scholars, Washington, DC October 28, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph F

    2010-12-08

    A workshop sponsored by the Los Alamos National Laboratory in cooperation with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars was held at the Wilson Center in Washington, DC, on October 28, 2010. The workshop addressed evolving nuclear forces and their impacts on nonproliferation in the context of the new strategic environment, the Obama Administration's Nuclear Posture Review and the 2010 NPT Review Conference. The discussions reflected the importance of the NPR for defining the role of US nuclear forces in dealing with 21st century threats and providing guidance for National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Department of Defense (DoD) programs and, for many but not all participants, highlighted its role in the successful outcome of the NPT RevCon. There was widespread support for the NPR and its role in developing the foundations for a sustainable nuclear-weapon program that addresses nuclear weapons, infrastructure and expertise in the broader nonproliferation, disarmament and international security contexts. However, some participants raised concerns about its implementation and its long-term effectiveness and sustainability.

  9. EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This study analyzes the potential environmental impacts of adopting a policy to manage foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel containing uranium enriched in the United States. In particular, the study examines the comparative impacts of several alternative approaches to managing the spent fuel.

  10. Leveraging U.S. nuclear weapons policy to advance U.S. nonproliferation goals : implications of major theories of international relations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, Andrew

    2009-06-01

    National policymakers are currently considering a dilemma of critical importance to the continued security of the United States: how can U.S. nuclear weapons policies be leveraged to benefit U.S. nuclear nonproliferation goals in the near-term, without sacrificing U.S. national security? In its role supporting U.S. nuclear weapons policy, Sandia National Laboratories has a responsibility to provide objective technical advice to support policy deliberations on this question. However, to best fulfill this duty Sandia must have a broader understanding of the context of the problem. To help develop this understanding, this paper analyzes the two predominant analytical perspectives of international relations theory to explore their prescriptions for how nuclear weapons and nonproliferation policies interact. As lenses with which to view and make sense of the world, theories of international relations must play a crucial role in framing the trade-offs at the intersection of the nuclear weapons and nonproliferation policy domains. An analysis of what these theories suggest as courses of action to leverage nuclear weapons policies to benefit nonproliferation goals is then offered, with particular emphasis on where the policy prescriptions resulting from the respective theories align to offer near-term policy changes with broad theoretical support. These policy prescriptions are then compared to the 2001 Nuclear Posture Review to understand what the theories indicate policymakers may have gotten right in their dealing with the nuclear dilemma, and where they may have gone wrong. Finally, a brief international relations research agenda is proposed to help address the dilemma between nuclear deterrence and nuclear nonproliferation policies, with particular emphasis on how such an agenda can best support the needs of the policy community and a potential 'all things nuclear' policy deliberation and decision-support framework.

  11. Robust Indicators of Nonproliferation Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, Mara R.; Kurzrok, Andrew J.

    2014-02-13

    Understanding how the nuclear industry may benefit from self-regulation is closely linked with understanding how to report compliance activities for nonproliferation and export control objectives, as well as how to distinguish high and low compliance performance. Drawing on the corporate sustainability reporting model, nuclear and dual-use commodities industries can frame socially responsible self-regulatory activities to distinguish themselves as good nonproliferators.

  12. Report of a workshop on nuclear power growth and nonproliferation held at the Woodrow Wilson international center for scholars, Washington, DC, April 21, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph F

    2010-01-01

    The workshop addressed the future of nuclear power and nonproliferation in light of global nuclear energy developments, changing US policy and growing concerns about nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The discussion reflected wide agreement on the need for nuclear power, the necessity of mitigating any proliferation and terrorism risks and support for international cooperation on solutions. There were considerable differences on the nature and extent of the risks of differing fuel cycle choices. There was some skepticism about the prospects for a global nuclear energy renaissance, but there was a recognition that nuclear power would expand somewhat in the decades ahead with some states expanding capacity dramatically (e.g., China) and at least a few new states developing nuclear power programs. It was also argued by some participants that under the right conditions, a genuine renaissance could occur some decades from now. The prospects for a dramatic growth in nuclear power will depend on the ability of governments and industry to address these concerns, including the effectiveness of, and the resources devoted to, plans to develop and implement technologies and approaches that strengthen nonproliferation, nuclear materials accountability and nuclear security Several participants noted that the United States will not be able to continue to lead global nonproliferation efforts and to shape the growth of nuclear power as well as the global environment and energy debates without a robust US nuclear energy program. Some participants argued that fully integrating nuclear energy growth and nonproliferation, proliferation resistance and physical protection objectives was possible. The growing consensus on these objectives and the growing concern about the potential impact of further proliferation on the industry was one reason for optimism. The Blue Ribbon commission led by Scowcroft and Hamilton was seen as going far beyond the need to find an alternative to Yucca

  13. NNSA Labs host U.S. and Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Head of Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) Preparatory Commission Visits NNSA's Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) for First Time NNSA sites take home 15...

  14. David G. Huizenga

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    David G. Huizenga currently serves as the Principal Assistant Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN) at the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security...

  15. fmd | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    fmd Nonproliferation Working in close collaboration with DOE laboratories, DNN develops and tests new technologies to advance U.S. capabilities to monitor nonproliferation and arms control treaty and agreement implementation, provides unique training and capacity-building programs, and engages internationally to... Analysis of Surplus Weapons-Grade Plutonium Disposition Options The Administration remains firmly committed to disposing of surplus weapon-grade plutonium. However, through an

  16. Terminating Safeguards on Excess Special Nuclear Material: Defense TRU Waste Clean-up and Nonproliferation - 12426

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, Timothy; Nelson, Roger

    2012-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) manages defense nuclear material that has been determined to be excess to programmatic needs and declared waste. When these wastes contain plutonium, they almost always meet the definition of defense transuranic (TRU) waste and are thus eligible for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The DOE operates the WIPP in a manner that physical protections for attractiveness level D or higher special nuclear material (SNM) are not the normal operating condition. Therefore, there is currently a requirement to terminate safeguards before disposal of these wastes at the WIPP. Presented are the processes used to terminate safeguards, lessons learned during the termination process, and how these approaches might be useful for future defense TRU waste needing safeguards termination prior to shipment and disposal at the WIPP. Also described is a new criticality control container, which will increase the amount of fissile material that can be loaded per container, and how it will save significant taxpayer dollars. Retrieval, compliant packaging and shipment of retrievably stored legacy TRU waste has dominated disposal operations at WIPP since it began operations 12 years ago. But because most of this legacy waste has successfully been emplaced in WIPP, the TRU waste clean-up focus is turning to newly-generated TRU materials. A major component will be transuranic SNM, currently managed in safeguards-protected vaults around the weapons complex. As DOE and NNSA continue to consolidate and shrink the weapons complex footprint, it is expected that significant quantities of transuranic SNM will be declared surplus to the nation's needs. Safeguards termination of SNM varies due to the wide range of attractiveness level of the potential material that may be directly discarded as waste. To enhance the efficiency of shipping waste with high TRU fissile content to WIPP, DOE designed an over

  17. NNSA Leads Conference on Nonproliferation Research and Development |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Leads Conference on Nonproliferation Research and Development December 04, 2008 WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) concluded a conference showcasing the leading edge nuclear nonproliferation research being conducted at premier universities and by industry experts. The University and Industry Technical Interchange (UITI) included over 75 presentations by leading researchers to showcase nuclear detection

  18. Management Principles for Nonproliferation Organizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Hund, Gretchen

    2012-03-06

    This paper identifies business models and six management principles that can be applied by a nonproliferation organization to maximize the value and effectiveness of its products. The organizations responsible for reducing the nuclear proliferation threat have experienced a substantial growth in responsibility and visibility since the September 11 attacks. Since then, the international community has witnessed revelations of clandestine nuclear facilities, nuclear black markets, periodic nuclear tests, and a resurgence of interest by countries worldwide in developing nuclear capabilities. The security environment will likely continue to evolve in unexpected ways since most of the proliferation threats with which the world will be forced to contend remain unforeseen. To better prepare for and respond to this evolving security environment, many nonproliferation organizations are interested in finding new or better ways to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of their operations. Of course, all organizations, whether they are market driven or non-profit, must operate effectively and efficiently if they are to succeed. Indeed, as this study demonstrates, many of the management principles that this study recommends can help all organizations succeed. However, this study pays particular attention to nonproliferation organizations because of the mission they are responsible for fulfilling. Nonproliferation organizations, including nonproliferation programs that operate within a larger national security organization, are responsible for reducing the threat of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons. These organizations have an enduring mandate from the public and the international community not to fail in the completion of their mission for failure could have detrimental impacts on international security, public health and the environment. Moreover, the public expects nonproliferation organizations and programs to fulfill their mission, even when resources are limited

  19. Office Of NONprOliferatiON

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Office Of NONprOliferatiON aNd iNterNatiONal Security July 2011 www.nnsa.doe.gov National Nuclear Security Administration ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Develop and implement DOE/NNSA nonproliferation and arms control policy to reduce the risk of weapons of mass destruction. control the spread of WMD-related material, equipment, technology and expertise. Safeguard and Secure nuclear material to prevent its diversion, theft and sabotage. Negotiate, monitor and verify compliance with international

  20. NNSA Administrator honors nonproliferation research leader | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Administrator honors nonproliferation research leader Monday, May 16, 2016 - 11:41am NNSA Administrator Lt. Gen. Frank G. Klotz (Ret.), right, presents the agency's Distinguished Service Gold Medal Award to Assistant Deputy Administrator for Nonproliferation Research and Development Dr. Rhys Williams. Last week DOE Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and NNSA Administrator Lt. Gen. Frank G. Klotz (Ret.) presented the agency's Assistant Deputy

  1. DOE/NNSA's Nonproliferation Experts Lead First Workshop on the...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... During his welcoming remarks, DCM Kleine congratulated Lao PDR on signing the AP in November 2014 as a clear demonstration of its commitment to nuclear nonproliferation. He also ...

  2. Property:Product | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Inc CSG Contour Venture Partners Creative Environmental Networks D DOE Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation DNN Daly International UK Ltd Davenport Power LLC Davis Graham...

  3. A Digest of Nonproliferation Literature.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duggan, Ruth A.

    2006-04-01

    In preparation for the 2005 US/Russian Weapons Laboratories Directors Meeting, the six laboratories participating in the meeting endeavored to develop a strategy for nonproliferation technology research and development. A literature review was conducted to identify possible areas of technical collaboration and technology opportunities associated with improving nonproliferation associated with the civilian nuclear fuel cycle. The issue of multinationalization of the nuclear fuel cycle was also researched. This digest is the compilation of one-page summaries used by management of the three US nuclear weapons laboratories in preparation for strategy development. Where possible, the Web site address of the complete paper is referenced.3 AcknowledgementsThe author wishes to thank Jessica Ruyle, Nancy Orlando-Gay, and Barbara Dry for their research assistance and contributions.4

  4. Preliminary results of calculations for heavy-water nuclear-power-plant reactors employing {sup 235}U, {sup 233}U, and {sup 232}Th as a fuel and meeting requirements of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ioffe, B. L.; Kochurov, B. P.

    2012-02-15

    A physical design is developed for a gas-cooled heavy-water nuclear reactor intended for a project of a nuclear power plant. As a fuel, the reactor would employ thorium with a small admixture of enriched uranium that contains not more than 20% of {sup 235}U. It operates in the open-cycle mode involving {sup 233}U production from thorium and its subsequent burnup. The reactor meets the conditions of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons: the content of fissionable isotopes in uranium at all stages of the process, including the final one, is below the threshold for constructing an atomic bomb, the amount of product plutonium being extremely small.

  5. Arms control and nonproliferation technologies. Fourth quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staehle, G.; Talaber, C.; Stull, S.

    1992-12-31

    This report includes information concerning: the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation; the nuclear inspections in Iraq, lessons for verification; detection technologies needed for each step of nuclear weapon development; nuclear proliferation problems; strengthening the nuclear reactor fuel cycle against proliferation; monitoring using unattended remote nondestructive assay; seismic monitoring in a proliferation environment; forensic science center, remote infrared spectrometry for nonproliferation applications; and acoustic instrument for identifying chemical munitions.

  6. Non-Proliferation Treaty at 25

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, M.H.

    1995-01-20

    This article is a review of nuclear nonproliferation issues during the 25 years that have passed since the signing of the first nonproliferation treaty. A historical background is provided, both declared and undeclared nuclear powers are noted, and considerable attention is given to issues brought about by the dissolution of the Soviet Union and by the renegade actions of a number of signatories, e.g. Iraq, and several of the non-signatories. Present/future policies are discussed, as is the impact of the present Administration in Washington.

  7. Nonproliferation & Forensics | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nonproliferation & Nuclear Forensics Argonne strives to strengthen the nation's ability to detect, prevent, and interdict proliferation of nuclear, radiological, chemical, and biological weapons. Argonne is one of the world leaders in nuclear reactor design, fuel processing, radiation detection and radiological forensics. This enormous intellectual resource provides insight into the use and misuse of radiological and nuclear materials and equipment around the globe. Using our expertise, we

  8. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IX. Reactor and fuel cycle description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The Nonproliferation Alterntive Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) has characterized and assessed various reactor/fuel-cycle systems. Volume IX provides, in summary form, the technical descriptions of the reactor/fuel-cycle systems studied. This includes the status of the system technology, as well as a discussion of the safety, environmental, and licensing needs from a technical perspective. This information was then used in developing the research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) program, including its cost and time frame, to advance the existing technology to the level needed for commercial use. Wherever possible, the cost data are given as ranges to reflect the uncertainties in the estimates.

  9. Secretary Moniz awards Hutcheon memorial nonproliferation fellowship to

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Thomas Gray | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Secretary Moniz awards Hutcheon memorial nonproliferation fellowship to Thomas Gray Tuesday, February 9, 2016 - 12:00am NNSA Blog Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz (second from bottom left, clockwise) and Anne Harrington, NNSA deputy administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (sitting next to Moniz), discuss Ian Hutcheon's legacy with his wife Nancy (across from Harrington) and daughter Dana Hutcheon Gordon. Energy Secretary

  10. Siegfried S. Hecker, Plutonium, and Nonproliferation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Siegfried S. Hecker, Plutonium and Nuclear Nonproliferation Resources with Additional Information * Awards Siegfried S. Hecker Photo Credit: Courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory LeRoy Sanchez On September 17, 2009, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu named Siegfried S. Hecker as a winner of the Enrico Fermi Award 'in recognition for his contributions to plutonium metallurgy, his broad scientific leadership and for his energetic and continuing efforts to reduce the danger of nuclear weapons

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - NRC Nuclear Export Controls Implementing...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Legal Basis * Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended * Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978 * Treaties, Conventions and Agreements including: - Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty - ...

  12. Special Issue on University Nonproliferation Education and Training Introduction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leek, K. M.

    2006-07-31

    Nonproliferation, like many aspects of security, has not played out as many expected following the end of the cold war. The peace dividend has been elusive in many countries. The notion that the world would become a safer and more secure place as nuclear weapons stockpiles were reduced has been trumped by the rise in international terrorism. Hopes that nuclear weapons would lose their salience as markers of elite status among nations along with pressures to acquire them have been dashed. The drive by some countries and terrorist groups to acquire nuclear weapons has not diminished, and the threat of proliferation has increased. At the level of the nation state, the Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) itself is under pressure as more nations acquire nuclear weapons, de facto weapons states fail to join, and nations that want to acquire them leave or threaten to leave. At the sub-state level, the convergence of terrorism and weapons of mass destruction (WMD) has introduced an element of uncertainty into nonproliferation that is unprecedented. Another feature of the post-cold war era that has taken many by surprise is the continued, and growing need for trained specialists in nonproliferation and nuclear materials management. Contained within the notion of disarmament and reduced strategic importance of nuclear weapons was the expectation of a diminishing workforce of trained nonproliferation and nuclear materials specialists. Events have overtaken this assumption.

  13. Current developments in laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for use in geology, forensics, and nuclear nonproliferation research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messerly, Joshua D.

    2008-08-26

    This dissertation focused on new applications of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The diverse fields that were investigated show the versatility of the technique. In Chapter 2, LA-ICP-MS was used to investigate the rare earth element (REE) profiles of garnets from the Broken Hill Deposit in New South Wales, Australia. The normalized REE profiles helped to shed new light on the formation of deposits of sulfide ores. This information may be helpful in identifying the location of sulfide ore deposits in other locations. New sources of metals such as Pg, Zn, and Ag, produced from these ores, are needed to sustain our current technological society. The application of LA-ICP-MS presented in Chapter 3 is the forensics analysis of automotive putty and caulking. The elemental analysis of these materials was combined with the use of Principal Components Analysis (PCA). The PCA comparison was able to differentiate the automotive putty samples by manufacturer and lot number. The analysis of caulk was able to show a differentiation based on manufacturer, but no clear differentiation was shown by lot number. This differentiation may allow matching of evidence in the future. This will require many more analyses and the construction of a database made up of many different samples. The 4th chapter was a study of the capabilities of LA-ICP-MS for fast and precise analysis of particle ensembles for nuclear nonproliferation applications. Laser ablation has the ability to spatially resolve particle ensembles which may contain uranium or other actinides from other particles present in a sample. This is of importance in samples obtained from air on filter media. The particle ensembles of interest may be mixed in amongst dust and other particulates. A problem arises when ablating these particle ensembles directly from the filter media. Dust particles other than ones of interest may be accidentally entrained in the aerosol of the ablated particle

  14. nuclear enterprise

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Outlines Accomplishments in Stockpile Stewardship, Nuclear Nonproliferation, Naval Reactors and Managing the Nuclear Enterprise

    The...

  15. Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to...

  16. Beyond Compliance: Integrating Nonproliferation into Corporate Sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hund, Gretchen; Kurzrok, Andrew J.

    2013-06-01

    This paper investigates nonproliferation as a potential corporate sustainability value. It reviews the history of corporate sustainability, builds the case for nonproliferation as a sustainability value, and develops recommendations for the integration of nonproliferation into the frameworks of sustainability.

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - Australian Nuclear Cooperation Agreements...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Australian Nuclear Cooperation Agreements Dr Vanessa Robertson, Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office The Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office 2 Director ...

  18. National Nuclear Security Administration Honeywell FM&T

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... FM&T also fully supported NNSA non-proliferation, nuclear detection and prevention, ... Overall, FM&T performed above expectations to support NNSA non-proliferation priorities, ...

  19. Technical solutions to nonproliferation challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satkowiak, Lawrence

    2014-05-09

    The threat of nuclear terrorism is real and poses a significant challenge to both U.S. and global security. For terrorists, the challenge is not so much the actual design of an improvised nuclear device (IND) but more the acquisition of the special nuclear material (SNM), either highly enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium, to make the fission weapon. This paper provides two examples of technical solutions that were developed in support of the nonproliferation objective of reducing the opportunity for acquisition of HEU. The first example reviews technologies used to monitor centrifuge enrichment plants to determine if there is any diversion of uranium materials or misuse of facilities to produce undeclared product. The discussion begins with a brief overview of the basics of uranium processing and enrichment. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), its safeguard objectives and how the technology evolved to meet those objectives will be described. The second example focuses on technologies developed and deployed to monitor the blend down of 500 metric tons of HEU from Russia's dismantled nuclear weapons to reactor fuel or low enriched uranium (LEU) under the U.S.-Russia HEU Purchase Agreement. This reactor fuel was then purchased by U.S. fuel fabricators and provided about half the fuel for the domestic power reactors. The Department of Energy established the HEU Transparency Program to provide confidence that weapons usable HEU was being blended down and thus removed from any potential theft scenario. Two measurement technologies, an enrichment meter and a flow monitor, were combined into an automated blend down monitoring system (BDMS) and were deployed to four sites in Russia to provide 24/7 monitoring of the blend down. Data was downloaded and analyzed periodically by inspectors to provide the assurances required.

  20. Briefing to the IAEA and Conference on Disarmament on U.S. Nonproliferation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Dismantlement Efforts | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Briefing to the IAEA and Conference on Disarmament on U.S. Nonproliferation and Dismantlement Efforts February 06, 2008 Briefing to the IAEA and Conference on Disarmament on U.S. Nonproliferation and Dismantlement Efforts

  1. Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: ...

  2. Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program, Annual Report, Class of 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMakin, Andrea H.

    2013-09-23

    This 32-pp annual report/brochure describes the accomplishments of the Class of 2012 of the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (the last class of this program), which PNNL administers for the National Nuclear Security Administration. The time period covers Sept 2011 through June 2013.

  3. Former Nonproliferation Graduate Fellow Served at U.S. Mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brim, Cornelia P.

    2014-10-01

    Because of her training and professional experiences, Rosalyn Leitch, a Security Specialist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and former Nonproliferation Graduate Fellow with NIS (2012-2013) was able to transition into temporary assignment as UNVIE Acting Nuclear Security Attaché from November 2013 through February 2014.

  4. The Nonproliferation Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RAJEN,GAURAV; BIRINGER,KENT L.

    2000-07-28

    The aim of this paper is to understand the numerous nuclear-related agreements that involve India and Pakistan, and in so doing identify starting points for future confidence-creating and confidence-building projects. Existing nuclear-related agreements provide a framework under which various projects can be proposed that foster greater nuclear transparency and cooperation in South Asia. The basic assumptions and arguments underlying this paper can be summarized as follows: (1) Increased nuclear transparency between India and Pakistan is a worthwhile objective, as it will lead to the irreversibility of extant nuclear agreements, the prospects of future agreements; and the balance of opacity and transparency required for stability in times of crises; (2) Given the current state of Indian and Pakistani relations, incremental progress in increased nuclear transparency is the most likely future outcome; and (3) Incremental progress can be achieved by enhancing the information exchange required by existing nuclear-related agreements.

  5. Nuclear Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Control Nuclear Controls Challenge: Detect/deter illicit transfers of nuclear/dual-use materials, technology, and commodities. Solution: Build domestic and international capacity to implement and meet export control obligations. Related Topics international security international security policy NIS nuclear controls safeguards safeguards and security verification Related News Nuclear Verification International Nuclear Safeguards Nonproliferation Policy Nonproliferation and Arms Control NIS

  6. Of carrots and sticks or air power as a nonproliferation tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, F.R.

    1994-07-01

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons has become one of the principal threats to international peace and security. Postwar revelations from Iraq demonstrate how close a determined nation can come to covertly developing nuclear weapons without detection. In the past two years the issue of nonproliferation has increased in importance and the regime is becoming more intrusive. On the other hand, a number of nations hostile to the international order are attempting to develop or otherwise obtain nuclear weapons These states include North Korea, Iran, and Iraq. This paper argues that the use or threat of force must be incorporated into the nonproliferation regime. When properly integrated into nonproliferation strategy, force offers positive effects in terms of deterrence, compellence, and defense. Thus, the paper calls for the institutionalization of force options into the nonproliferation tool kit, ideally as part of chapter 7 enforcement actions under the authority of the UN Security Council.

  7. Material Protection, Control, & Accounting | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nonproliferation Nuclear and Radiological Material Security Material Protection, Control, & Accounting Material Protection, Control, & Accounting NNSA implements material...

  8. U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with Kazakhstan | Department of Energy NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation Project with Kazakhstan U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation Project with Kazakhstan September 29, 2006 - 9:01am Addthis Agreement Reached To Downblend HEU and Convert Reactor WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI) today announced that they have reached an important agreement-in-principle with the Government of Kazakhstan to move forward with

  9. Nuclear Energy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our scientists and engineers conduct research in advanced nuclear energy systems, nonproliferation and national security, and environmental management. Nuclear energy is the ...

  10. NNSA Contributions to Nonproliferation and Arms Control Highlighted at

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Generation Prague 2015 Conference | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Contributions to Nonproliferation and Arms Control Highlighted at Generation Prague 2015 Conference Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 10:48am The U.S. Department of State hosted the 6th Annual Generation Prague Conference in Washington, DC, on July 15-17, 2015. Generation Prague 2015: Bridging Divides, Defining the Future explored the potential for creative and cooperative solutions to global arms control and

  11. Savannah River Site hosts military interns | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    complex dedicated to environmental cleanup, nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship, and nuclear materials disposition in support of the U.S. nuclear non-proliferation efforts. ...

  12. Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center | Y-12 National Security...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Detection and ... Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center As part of our increased global nuclear nonproliferation efforts, Y-12 commissioned the Nuclear Detection and Sensor ...

  13. Office of Material Consolidation & Civilian Sites | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Material Consolidation & Civilian Sites The Office of Material Consolidation and Civilian Sites (MCCS) is responsible for three key nuclear nonproliferation initiatives. The Office of Material Consolidation and Civilian Sites (MCCS) is responsible for three key nuclear nonproliferation initiatives. The Office of Material Consolidation and Civilian Sites (MCCS) is responsible for three key nuclear nonproliferation initiatives. Material Protection, Control,

  14. Nonproliferation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Arrives in United States and Will Be Used for U.S. Electricity http:www.nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesmegatonstomegawatts

  15. Fact Sheets | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    As part of its nuclear nonproliferation mission, and in support of the American Medical Isotopes Production Act of 2012 (AMIPA), the Department of Energy's National Nuclear ...

  16. NNSA Timeline | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    agency within the U.S. Department of Energy, responsible for the management and security of the nation's nuclear weapons, nuclear nonproliferation, and naval reactor programs. ...

  17. National Nuclear Security Administration Announces University...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    maintains the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile, promotes international nuclear non-proliferation and safety, reduces global danger from weapons of mass destruction, provides the ...

  18. Press Releases | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... November 03, 2015 NNSA Labs host U.S. and Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) ... to Sign Agreement on Countering the Proliferation of Nuclear Materials and Technologies ...

  19. National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    support to NNSA programs engaged in Nuclear Non-proliferation, Emergency Response, Nuclear Counterterrorism and Counter-proliferation, and to NNSA's Inter- Agency partners. ...

  20. NNSA Announces University Contracts | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... maintains the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile, promotes international nuclear non-proliferation and safety, reduces global danger from weapons of mass destruction, provides the ...

  1. Cooperative Remote Monitoring, Arms control and nonproliferation technologies: Fourth quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonzo, G M

    1995-01-01

    The DOE`s Cooperative Remote Monitoring programs integrate elements from research and development and implementation to achieve DOE`s objectives in arms control and nonproliferation. The contents of this issue are: cooperative remote monitoring--trends in arms control and nonproliferation; Modular Integrated Monitoring System (MIMS); Authenticated Tracking and Monitoring Systems (ATMS); Tracking and Nuclear Materials by Wide-Area Nuclear Detection (WAND); Cooperative Monitoring Center; the International Remote Monitoring Project; international US and IAEA remote monitoring field trials; Project Dustcloud: monitoring the test stands in Iraq; bilateral remote monitoring: Kurchatov-Argonne-West Demonstration; INSENS Sensor System Project.

  2. non-proliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    This Site Budget IG Web Policy Privacy No Fear Act Accessibility FOIA Sitemap Federal Government The White House DOE.gov USA.gov Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA...

  3. NNSA Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    low enriched uranium to Mo99 producers in Australia, Belgium, South Africa and the Netherlands as well as working with producers to convert production from HEU to low-level ...

  4. Nuclear Nonproliferation | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in more than 20 countries. From a new on-site center dedicated to testing and validating radiation detection technologies to subject matter experts who secure vulnerable materials...

  5. Contact Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and are not part of the media*, feel free to call the program office's main ... Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (202) 586-2695 Address: U.S. Department of Energy ...

  6. Associate Assistant Deputy Administrator, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Assistant Secretary for EERE Danielson Keynote (text version) Assistant Secretary for EERE Danielson Keynote (text version) Below is the text version for the Keynote: The Honorable David T. Danielson, Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy Video. DAVID DANIELSON: Next up, we are going to have a very exciting panel with some major thought leaders in the private sector and then we will be moving to the incredibly value networking

  7. Nonproliferation, Nuclear Security, and the Insider Threat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balatsky, Galya I.; Duggan, Ruth

    2012-07-12

    Insider threat concept is evolving and getting more attention: (1) Domestically, internationally and in foreign countries, (2) At the government, academia, and industry levels, and (3) Public awareness and concerns are also growing. Negligence can be an insider's action. Technology advancements provide more opportunities, new tools for the insider. Our understanding of the insider is shaped by our cultural, social and ethnic perceptions and traditions. They also can limit our recognition of the issues and response actions.

  8. JCPOA | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    JCPOA NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation leaders gather in nation's capital Recently, the NNSA held the fourth meeting of the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Science Council in Washington, DC. The Science Council provides a way for senior-level leadership from NNSA headquarters and the labs, plants, and sites to share information and discuss strategies to... NNSA Delivers Annual Reports to Congress on Progress for Stockpile Stewardship and Nuclear Nonproliferation WASHINGTON,

  9. 2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 5 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference 2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference November 7, 2005 - 12:36pm Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Sam Bodman I am very glad to be with all of you today. Let me just say to Rose and to everyone associated with the Carnegie Endowment that the Bush Administration values the work that you do. This is particularly so with this series of conferences dedicated to exploring the complicated issues of

  10. gtri | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    European Union and the United States of America, which actively promote the use of the highest safety, security and non-proliferation standards in countries using nuclear energy. ...

  11. DOE/NNSA's Nonproliferation Experts Lead First Workshop on the IAEA

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Additional Protocol in Lao PDR | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) DOE/NNSA's Nonproliferation Experts Lead First Workshop on the IAEA Additional Protocol in Lao PDR October 07, 2015 Twenty-five participants from the Lao Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Science and Technology and other key stakeholder organizations attended the event. WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) sponsored the Fundamentals of Nuclear

  12. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the issue of nonproliferation. Final study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-19

    NIF, the next step proposed by DOE in a progression of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) facilities, is expected to reach the goal of ICF capsule ignition in the laboratory. This report is in response to a request of a Congressman that DOE resolve the question of whether NIF will aid or hinder U.S. nonproliferation efforts. Both technical and policy aspects are addressed, and public participation was part of the decision process. Since the technical proliferation concerns at NIF are manageable and can be made acceptable, and NIF can contribute positively to U.S. arms control and nonproliferation policy goals, it is concluded that NIF supports the nuclear nonproliferation objectives of the United States.

  13. National Nuclear Security Administration United States Department of Energy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    America Treaty Organization NCT Nuclear Counterterrorism NCTIR Nuclear Counterterrorism and Incident Response Program NDAA National Defense Authorization Act NELA Nuclear Explosive Like-Assembly NEST Nuclear Emergency Support Team NGSI Next Generation Safeguards Initiative NIS Nonproliferation and International Security Program NMF National Mission Force NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration NNSS Nevada Nuclear Security Site NPAC Nonproliferation Policy and Arms Control Program NPT

  14. National Nuclear Science Week Day 4: NNSA Highlights Science...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4: NNSA Highlights Science of Nuclear Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

  15. National Nuclear Security Administration ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Under Article III of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), each ... pillars designed to limit weapons proliferation, encourage nuclear disarmament, and ...

  16. hrp | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    hrp Personnel Security Program NNSA is responsible for managing national nuclear security and supports several key program areas including Defense, Nuclear Nonproliferation, Naval Reactors, Emergency Operations, Infrastructure and Environment, Nuclear Security, Management and Administration and the Office of the Administrator.

  17. iran deal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    iran deal NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation leaders gather in nation's capital Recently, the NNSA held the fourth meeting of the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Science Council in Washington, DC. The Science Council provides a way for senior-level leadership from NNSA headquarters and the labs, plants, and sites to share information and discuss strategies to... NNSA Delivers Annual Reports to Congress on Progress for Stockpile Stewardship and Nuclear Nonproliferation WASHINGTON,

  18. National Nuclear Security Administration honors Y-12 employees | Y-12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atlantic Treaty Organization NCT Nuclear Counterterrorism NCTIR Nuclear Counterterrorism and Incident Response Program NDAA National Defense Authorization Act NELA Nuclear Explosive Like-Assembly NEST Nuclear Emergency Support Team NGSI Next Generation Safeguards Initiative NIS Nonproliferation and International Security Program NMF National Mission Force NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration NNSS Nevada National Security Site NPAC Nonproliferation Policy and Arms Control Program NPT

  19. National Nuclear Security Administration United States Department of Energy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Atlantic Treaty Organization NCT Nuclear Counterterrorism NCTIR Nuclear Counterterrorism and Incident Response Program NDAA National Defense Authorization Act NELA Nuclear Explosive Like-Assembly NEST Nuclear Emergency Support Team NGSI Next Generation Safeguards Initiative NIS Nonproliferation and International Security Program NMF National Mission Force NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration NNSS Nevada National Security Site NPAC Nonproliferation Policy and Arms Control Program NPT

  20. Arms control and nonproliferation technologies: The non-proliferation experiment. First quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staehle, G.; Stull, S.; Talaber, C.

    1994-05-01

    In this issue of Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies we present the initial findings of the recent Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE), conducted by the Department of Energy at the Nevada Test Site. Through an introduction and pictorial walk-through, Marv Denny and Jay Zucca of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory describe the overall experiment. This is followed by scientific and technical abstracts of the complex suite of experiments and analyses, which were presented at the Symposium on Non-Proliferation Experiment Results and Implications for Test Ban Treaties, April 19--21, 1994. Questions regarding the ongoing analysis and conclusions from the NPE should be directed to Leslie Casey in the Office of Research and Development within the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security of DOE. Her phone number is 202-586-2151.

  1. Our Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    About Our Programs NNSA's program support is divided into several key program areas including Defense, Nuclear Nonproliferation, Naval Reactors, Emergency Operations, ...

  2. NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    established the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) in the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation to, as quickly as possible, identify, secure, remove andor...

  3. Presidential Initiatives | National Nuclear Security Administration...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Proliferation Security Initiative: For more information, click here off site link . ... called for closing the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty "loophole" by restricting the ...

  4. sandia national lab | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    sandia national lab NNSA Researchers Advance Technology for Remote Reactor Monitoring NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development Program drives the innovation ...

  5. Y-12 and the Nuclear Posture Review

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Non-Proliferation Treaty, by reversing the nuclear ambitions of North Korea and Iran and strengthening the International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards and enforcing compliance ...

  6. Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-11-10

    The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

  7. Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09

    The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

  8. NNSA Next Generation Safeguards Initiative | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) NNSA Next Generation Safeguards Initiative January 02, 2009 International safeguards are a central pillar of the nuclear nonproliferation regime. Administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), international safeguards serve to monitor nuclear activities under the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and are the primary vehicle for verifying compliance with peaceful use and nuclear nonproliferation undertakings. The Department of Energy's National Nuclear

  9. Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Control Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements, implement regimes to reduce nuclear weapons, and detect and dismantle undeclared nuclear programs. Specific subprogram activities include: Implementing current and developing future

  10. nuclear controls | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    controls Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements,... International Nuclear Safeguards Challenge: Detect/deter undeclared nuclear materials and activities. Solution: Build capacity of the International Atomic Energy Agency and

  11. Nuclear Workforce Initiative - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety » Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation Nuclear Security & Nonproliferation President Truman signed the Atomic Energy Act in 1946, creating the Atomic Energy Commission -- which later became a part of the Department of Energy. Read more about the Department of Energy's role in nuclear security in <a href="/node/1041771/">our interactive timeline.</a> | Energy Department Photo. President Truman signed the Atomic Energy Act in 1946, creating the Atomic Energy

  12. Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stationary Power/Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy Tara Camacho-Lopez 2016-06-29T14:02:38+00:00 Contributing to the Next Generation of Nuclear Power Generation Our nuclear energy and fuel cycle technologies supports the safe, secure, reliable, and sustainable use of nuclear power worldwide through strengths in repository science, nonproliferation, safety and security, transportation, modeling, and system demonstrations. Areas of Expertise Defense Waste Management Sandia advises the U.S. Department

  13. National Nuclear Science Week Day 4: NNSA Highlights Science of Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) National Nuclear Science Week Day 4: NNSA Highlights Science of Nuclear Nonproliferation January 27, 2011 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is committed to promoting excellence in nuclear science and attracting the next generation of nuclear security experts to the field. As part of that effort, NNSA is celebrating National Nuclear Science Week with five days of features on the NNSA

  14. Ukraine | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Ukraine NNSA program strengthens national security from afar The Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence (NSDD) program is a key component of NNSA's core mission to reduce nuclear threats. The program, part of NNSA's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, provides partners tools and training to deter, detect, and investigate smuggling of... NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation leaders gather in nation's capital Recently, the NNSA held the fourth meeting of the Office of Defense

  15. Proceedings of the Symposium on the Non-Proliferation Experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Symposium on the Non-Proliferation Experiment: Results and Implications for Test Ban ... Experiment: Results and Implications for Test Ban Treaties, Rockville, Maryland, April ...

  16. NPT Enters Into Force | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NPT Enters Into Force New York, United States The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) goes into effect

  17. DTRA | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    DTRA NNSA Administrator honors nonproliferation research leader Last week DOE Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and NNSA Administrator Lt. Gen. Frank G. Klotz (Ret.) presented the agency's Assistant Deputy Administrator for Nonproliferation Research and Development (R&D) Dr. Rhys Williams with the Distinguished Service Gold Medal Award at a

  18. safeguards | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    safeguards WSU Mechanical Engineering students unveil their solutions to help PNNL researchers with nonproliferation and international safeguards work Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has partnered with Washington State University students for the past seven years to develop new instruments, tools, and methods to support nonproliferation and international safeguards. The students unveiled their latest designs last month in Richland,... Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the

  19. Developing Effluent Analysis Technologies to Support Nonproliferation Initiatives, Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies, Third quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, S A; Staehle, G; Alonzo, G M

    1995-01-01

    This issue provides an overview of the Effluent Research Program of the DOE Office of Research and Development, highlighting a number of representative projects within this program in support of nonproliferation initiatives. Technologies reported include portable instruments for on-site inspections, standoff detectors, fieldable, real-time instruments, field collection techniques, and ultrasensitive laboratory techniques.

  20. Broadening Industry Governance to Include Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hund, Gretchen; Seward, Amy M.

    2008-11-11

    As industry is the first line of defense in detecting and thwarting illicit trade networks, the engagement of the private sector is critical to any government effort to strengthen existing mechanisms to protect goods and services throughout the supply chain. This study builds on previous PNNL work to continue to evaluate means for greater industry engagement to complement and strengthen existing governmental efforts to detect and stem the trade of illicit goods and to protect and secure goods that could be used in making a weapon of mass destruction. Specifically, the study evaluates the concept of Industry Self Regulation, defined as a systematic voluntary program undertaken by an industry or by individual companies to anticipate, implement, supplement, or substitute for regulatory requirements in a given field, generally through the adoption of best practices. Through a series of interviews with companies with a past history of non-compliance, trade associations and NGOs, the authors identify gaps in the existing regulatory infrastructure, drivers for a self regulation approach and the form such an approach might take, as well as obstacles to be overcome. The authors conclude that it is at the intersection of industry, government, and security thatthrough collaborative meansthe effectiveness of the international nonproliferation systemcan be most effectively strengthened to the mutual benefit of both government and the private sector. Industry has a critical stake in the success of this regime, and has the potential to act as an integrating force that brings together the existing mechanisms of the global nonproliferation regime: export controls, physical protection, and safeguards. The authors conclude that industry compliance is not enough; rather, nonproliferation must become a central tenant of a companys corporate culture and be viewed as an integral component of corporate social responsibility (CSR).

  1. Kazakhstan | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Kazakhstan NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation leaders gather in nation's capital Recently, the NNSA held the fourth meeting of the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Science Council in Washington, DC. The Science Council provides a way for senior-level leadership from NNSA headquarters and the labs, plants, and sites to share information and discuss strategies to... NNSA Hosts International Nuclear Forensics Workshop with Participants from Eight Countries WASHINGTON, D.C. - During

  2. International Atomic Energy Agency | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration International Atomic Energy Agency Secretary Moniz awards Hutcheon memorial nonproliferation fellowship to Thomas Gray Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz (second from bottom left, clockwise) and Anne Harrington, NNSA deputy administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (sitting next to Moniz), discuss Ian Hutcheon's legacy with his wife Nancy (across from Harrington) and daughter Dana Hutcheon Gordon. Energy... DOE/NNSA's Nonproliferation Experts Lead First Workshop on the

  3. 123 Agreements for Peaceful Cooperation | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Home 123 Agreements for Peaceful Cooperation Section 123 of the U.S. Atomic Energy Act requires the conclusion of a specific agreement for significant transfers of nuclear material, equipment, or components from the United States to another nation. Section 123 Agreements are important tools in advancing U.S. nonproliferation principles. These Agreements act in conjunction with other nonproliferation tools, particularly the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, to establish

  4. The European Safeguards Research and Development Association Addresses Safeguards and Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Kusumi, R.; Daures, Pascal A.; Janssens, Willem; Dickman, Deborah A.

    2010-06-16

    The renaissance of efforts to expand the use of nuclear energy requires the parallel development of a renewed and more sophisticated work force. Growth in the nuclear sector with high standard of safety, safeguards and security requires skilled staff for design, operations, inspections etc. High-quality nuclear technology educational programs are diminished from past years, and the ability of universities to attract students and to meet future staffing requirements of the nuclear industry is becoming seriously compromised. Thus, education and training in nuclear engineering and sciences is one of the cornerstones for the nuclear sector. Teaching in the nuclear field still seems strongly influenced by national history but it is time to strengthen resources and collaborate. Moreover with the current nuclear security threats it becomes critical that nuclear technology experts master the basic principles not only of safety, but also of nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation and nuclear security. In Europe the European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association has established the certificate 'European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (EMSNE)' as the classic nuclear engineering program covering reactor operation and nuclear safety. However, it does not include courses on nonproliferation, safeguards, or dual-use technologies. The lack of education in nuclear safeguards was tackled by the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA), through development and implementation of safeguards course modules. Since 2005 the ESARDA Working Group, called the Training and Knowledge Management Working Group, (TKMWG) has worked with the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy to organize a Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation course. This five-day course is held each spring at the JRC, and continues to show increasing interest as evidenced by the positive responses of international lecturers and students. The standard set of lectures covers a broad

  5. nuclear reactors | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    nuclear reactors NNSA Researchers Advance Technology for Remote Reactor Monitoring NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development Program drives the innovation of technical capabilities to detect, identify, and characterize foreign nuclear weapons development activities. To achieve this, NNSA leverages the unique capabilities of the national laboratories

  6. nuclear enterprise | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    enterprise New Report from NNSA Highlights Major Achievements for 2015 Outlines Accomplishments in Stockpile Stewardship, Nuclear Nonproliferation, Naval Reactors and Managing the Nuclear Enterprise The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) today released "NNSA Achievements: 2015 By the Numbers," a report highlighting major accomplishments and milestones

  7. verification | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    verification Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements,... International Nuclear Safeguards Challenge: Detect/deter undeclared nuclear materials and activities. Solution: Build capacity of the International Atomic Energy Agency and

  8. Nuclear Waste Partnership Contract Modifications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements, implement regimes to reduce nuclear weapons, and detect and dismantle undeclared nuclear programs. Specific subprogram activities include: Implementing current and developing future

  9. Ionospheric measurements for the Non-Proliferation Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, T.J.

    1994-05-01

    The detection of explosions using ionospheric techniques relies on measuring perturbations induced in radio propagation by acoustics waves which disturb the electron density of the ionosphere. Such techniques have been applied to the detection of atmospheric explosions, underground nuclear tests, earthquakes, and surface mining explosions. The nighttime ionosphere presents a difficulty for the detection of explosions because in the absence of solar ionization radiation the electron density in the altitude range of 90 to 200 km decays after sunset and perturbation effects are correspondingly reduced. On the other hand, acoustic waves produced by weak sources reach a maximum amplitude in the altitude range of 100 to 150 km and are highly attenuated at altitudes above 200 km. For safety reasons, most planned explosions are conducted during daylight which has limited the experimental measurements during nighttime. However a recent opportunity for a nighttime measurement occurred in connection with the Non-Proliferation Experiment which consisted of the detonation of a large chemical charge underground at the Nevada Test Site near midnight local time. the results, based on a new technique of using medium frequency radio transmissions provided by commercial broadcasts to detect explosion effects, were negative. The most likely explanation for the negative result is that the radio transmissions did not reflect at a low enough altitude to sense the perturbations produced by the acoustic waves.

  10. NNSA: Working to Prevent Nuclear Proliferation | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) NNSA: Working to Prevent Nuclear Proliferation February 01, 2011 NNSA's Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) provides leadership in the formulation and implementation of nonproliferation, nuclear security, and arms control strategies to advance U.S. national security objectives. NIS draws on and contributes to a wide range of technical resources within the U.S. National Laboratory complex, working in concert with international organizations and

  11. gold medal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    gold medal NNSA Administrator honors nonproliferation research leader Last week DOE Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and NNSA Administrator Lt. Gen. Frank G. Klotz (Ret.) presented the agency's Assistant Deputy Administrator for Nonproliferation Research and Development (R&D) Dr. Rhys Williams with the Distinguished Service Gold Medal Award at a

  12. Modeling and Simulation for Safeguards and Nonproliferation Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilligan, Kimberly V.; Kirk, Bernadette Lugue

    2015-01-01

    The Modeling and Simulation for Safeguards and Nonproliferation Workshop was held December 15–18, 2014, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This workshop was made possible by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Human Capital Development (NGSI HCD) Program. The idea of the workshop was to move beyond the tried-and-true boot camp training of nonproliferation concepts to spend several days on the unique perspective of applying modeling and simulation (M&S) solutions to safeguards challenges.

  13. cybersecurity | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    cybersecurity NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation leaders gather in nation's capital Recently, the NNSA held the fourth meeting of the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Science Council in Washington, DC. The Science Council provides a way for senior-level leadership from NNSA headquarters and the labs, plants, and sites to share information and discuss strategies to... NNSA lab stops bad guys from weaseling into critical infrastructure Weasels are adaptable, active predators known

  14. Post-Cold War Effects on the Non-proliferation Regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, Carol E.

    2006-03-31

    This journal article analyzes nuclear and security related events of the past 15 years to illustrate the changes in geopolitics and the shifting balance of power following the collapse of the Soviet Union. Reflection upon these events establishes the context for strengthening the nonproliferation regime. The author concludes that post Soviet communism hastened the movement towards a unipolar system with hegemonic power vested in the United States, and this geopolitical imbalance fostered insecurities and greater threats. Multilateral cooperation and commitment from the US would help this leader achieve its goal of security through increased global confidence in the international system.

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - Australian Nuclear Cooperation Agreements_Vanessa Robertson [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Australian Nuclear Cooperation Agreements Dr Vanessa Robertson, Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office The Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office 2 Director General Assistant Secretary Bilateral Safeguards IAEA Safeguards Nuclear Security Non- Proliferation CTBT and Disarmament CWC Implementation Support Unit Bilateral Safeguards Section  Bilateral Safeguards Section is responsible for: - Development and implementation of bilateral nuclear cooperation agreements

  16. A Visual Analytics Approach to Structured Data Analysis to Enhance Nonproliferation and Arms Control Verification Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillen, David S.

    2014-08-07

    the data can aid an analyst with arms control and nonproliferation verification activities. Using a dataset from PIERS (PIERS 2014), we will show how container shipment imports and exports can aid an analyst in understanding the shipping patterns between two countries. We will also use T.Rex to examine a collection of research publications from the IAEA International Nuclear Information System (IAEA 2014) to discover collaborations of concern. We hope this paper will encourage the use of visual analytics structured data analytics in the field of nonproliferation and arms control verification. Our paper outlines some of the challenges that exist before broad adoption of these kinds of tools can occur and offers next steps to overcome these challenges.

  17. NNSA Deploys Nuclear Detonation Detection Equipment Aboard Air Force

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stewardship and Nuclear Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Delivers Annual Reports to Congress on Progress for Stockpile Stewardship and Nuclear Nonproliferation April 01, 2016 WASHINGTON, D.C.-The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) today released the annual reports outlining the strategic direction for two of its vital and enduring missions-maintaining a safe, secure and effective nuclear deterrent and reducing the

  18. Development of nonproliferation and assessment scenarios.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finley, Melissa; Barnett, Natalie Beth

    2005-10-01

    The overall objective of the Nonproliferation and Assessments Scenario Development project is to create and analyze potential and plausible scenarios that would lead to an adversary's ability to acquire and use a biological weapon. The initial three months of funding was intended to be used to develop a scenario to demonstrate the efficacy of this analysis methodology; however, it was determined that a substantial amount of preliminary data collection would be needed before a proof of concept scenario could be developed. We have dedicated substantial effort to determine the acquisition pathways for Foot and Mouth Disease Virus, and similar processes will be applied to all pathogens of interest. We have developed a biosecurity assessments database to capture information on adversary skill locales, available skill sets in specific regions, pathogen sources and regulations involved in pathogen acquisition from legitimate facilities. FY06 funding, once released, will be dedicated to data collection on acquisition, production and dissemination requirements on a pathogen basis. Once pathogen data has been collected, scenarios will be developed and scored.

  19. Anne Harrington | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Anne Harrington Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Anne Harrington Anne Harrington was sworn in as Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation for the National Nuclear Security Administration in October 2010. Previously, Ms. Harrington was the Director of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences Committee on International Security and Arms Control (CISAC) a position she held from March 2005 to October 2010. While at CISAC, she managed several key studies on a

  20. National Nuclear Security Administration ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    to Article VI of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. iii Table of Contents Overview ... Article VI of the Treaty on the Non- Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), has proven ...

  1. U.S., Lithuania Expand Cooperation to Prevent Nuclear Smuggling...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    billion over the next five years to support NNSA's nuclear nonproliferation programs. ... 2012 and 14.2 billion over the next five years to reduce the global nuclear threat by ...

  2. international security policy | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    security policy Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements,... International Nuclear Safeguards Challenge: Detect/deter undeclared nuclear materials and activities. Solution: Build capacity of the International Atomic Energy Agency

  3. international security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    security Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements,... International Nuclear Safeguards Challenge: Detect/deter undeclared nuclear materials and activities. Solution: Build capacity of the International Atomic Energy Agency and

  4. Chemical and biological nonproliferation program. FY99 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-03-01

    This document is the first of what will become an annual report documenting the progress made by the Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (CBNP). It is intended to be a summary of the program's activities that will be of interest to both policy and technical audiences. This report and the annual CBNP Summer Review Meeting are important vehicles for communication with the broader chemical and biological defense and nonproliferation communities. The Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program Strategic Plan is also available and provides additional detail on the program's context and goals. The body of the report consists of an overview of the program's philosophy, goals and recent progress in the major program areas. In addition, an appendix is provided with more detailed project summaries that will be of interest to the technical community.

  5. National Center for Nuclear Security: The Nuclear Forensics Project (F2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klingensmith, A. L.

    2012-03-21

    These presentation visuals introduce the National Center for Nuclear Security. Its chartered mission is to enhance the Nations verification and detection capabilities in support of nuclear arms control and nonproliferation through R&D activities at the NNSS. It has three focus areas: Treaty Verification Technologies, Nonproliferation Technologies, and Technical Nuclear Forensics. The objectives of nuclear forensics are to reduce uncertainty in the nuclear forensics process & improve the scientific defensibility of nuclear forensics conclusions when applied to nearsurface nuclear detonations. Research is in four key areas: Nuclear Physics, Debris collection and analysis, Prompt diagnostics, and Radiochemistry.

  6. Non-Proliferation Treaty | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    This Site Budget IG Web Policy Privacy No Fear Act Accessibility FOIA Sitemap Federal Government The White House DOE.gov USA.gov Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA...

  7. Tag: nuclear nonproliferation | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Displaying 1 - 1 of 1... Category: News Jamaican Connection Y-12 joins Jamaica and Canada in helping a research reactor on the Caribbean island switch fuels. More......

  8. NNSA's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation leaders gather in nation...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    from NNSA headquarters and the labs, plants, and sites to share information and ... between Washington and one of the labs, plants, or sites For more information on DOE...

  9. Abraham Calls on Global Community to Aggressively Address Nuclear Nonproliferation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    WASHINGTON, DC - In a lunchtime speech to the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, DC, Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham called on the global community to join in implementing a comprehensive...

  10. Report of the Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    examining DOE's current areas of emphasis and potential misalignment, recommending actionable improvements, and suggesting how to overcome obstacles to successful implementation. ...

  11. 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Annual Planning Summaries briefly describe the status of ongoing NEPA compliance activities, any EAs expected to be prepared in the next 12 months, any EISs expected to be prepared in the next 24...

  12. NA 20 - Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 20 - Deputy Administrator for Defense ... NA 20 - Deputy Administrator for...

  13. Interim Report of the Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Integrated Safety Management (ISM) Integrated Safety Management (ISM) The objective of ISM is to perform work in a safe and environmentally sound manner. More specifically, as described in DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy: "The Department and Contractors must systematically integrate safety into management and work practices at all levels so that missions are accomplished while protecting the public, the worker, and the environment. This is to be accomplished through effective

  14. TOMORROW: Energy Secretary Moniz to Discuss Nuclear Non-Proliferation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    WASHINGTON - Tomorrow, U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz will participate in a ... Secretary Moniz will provide remarks outlining what steps Iran took to reach ...

  15. Nonproliferation Uncertainties, a Major Barrier to Used Nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    barrier to a decision to recycle UNF components in the United States, and (3) what ... barrier,? (3) the chemistry of UNF components and relative ease of separation, and ...

  16. Analytical and Radiochemistry for Nuclear Forensics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, Robert Ernest; Dry, Donald E.; Kinman, William Scott; Podlesak, David; Tandon, Lav

    2015-05-26

    Information about nonproliferation nuclear forensics, activities in forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory, radio analytical work at LANL, radiochemical characterization capabilities, bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities, and future interests in forensics interactions.

  17. NNSA Transfers Responsibility for Radiation Detection System to China

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Customs | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Transfers Responsibility for Radiation Detection System to China Customs January 13, 2015 SHANGHAI, CHINA - Today, the Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Principal Assistant Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN), David Huizenga, participated in a ceremony commemorating the transition of a radiation detection system at the Port of Yangshan to the General Administration of Customs of China (GACC). This

  18. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    million curies of radioactive material recovered December 22, 2014 Los Alamos expertise helps NNSA reduce global nuclear danger LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Dec. 22, 2014-Los Alamos National Laboratory expertise helped the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN) Radiological Material Removal Program's Off- Site Source Recovery Project (OSRP) recover more than 1 million curies of radioactive sources since 1999. The accomplishment

  19. Environmental measurements and technology for non-proliferation objectives. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broadway, J.A.

    1998-03-31

    The purpose of this study is to identify multi-disciplinary and single focus laboratories from the environmental and public health communities that can serve as technical center of opportunity for nuclear, inorganic and organic analyses. The objectives of the Office of Research and Development effort are twofold: (1) to identify the technology shortcomings and technologies gaps (thus requirements) within these communities that could benefit from state-of-the-art infield analysis technologies currently under development and (2) to promote scientist-to-scientist dialog and technical exchange under such existing US government internship programs (eg SABIT/USDOC) to improve skills and work relationships. Although the data analysis will focus on environmentally sensitive signatures and materials, the office of Research and Development wishes to further its nuclear non-proliferation objectives by assessing the current technical skill and ingenious analytical tools in less-developed countries so as to broaden the base of capability for multi-species measurement technology development.

  20. Defense Threat Reduction Agency | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Defense Threat Reduction Agency NNSA Administrator honors nonproliferation research leader Last week DOE Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and NNSA Administrator Lt. Gen. Frank G. Klotz (Ret.) presented the agency's Assistant Deputy Administrator for Nonproliferation Research and Development (R&D) Dr. Rhys Williams with the Distinguished Service Gold Medal Award at a

  1. npcr | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    npcr NNSA Delivers Annual Reports to Congress on Progress for Stockpile Stewardship and Nuclear Nonproliferation WASHINGTON, D.C.-The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) today released the annual reports outlining the strategic direction for two of its vital and enduring missions-maintaining a safe, secure and effective nuclear deterrent and reducing the threat of

  2. Afghanistan | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Afghanistan NNSA program strengthens national security from afar The Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence (NSDD) program is a key component of NNSA's core mission to reduce nuclear threats. The program, part of NNSA's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, provides partners tools and training to deter, detect, and investigate smuggling of

  3. Iraq | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Iraq NNSA program strengthens national security from afar The Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence (NSDD) program is a key component of NNSA's core mission to reduce nuclear threats. The program, part of NNSA's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, provides partners tools and training to deter, detect, and investigate smuggling of

  4. forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    forensics Nuclear forensics, explained: NNSA analytic chemists help keep the world safe One of the gravest threats the world faces is the possibility that terrorists will acquire nuclear weapons or the necessary materials to construct a weapon. Part of the work of NNSA's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and the national laboratories is to support investigations into the

  5. radiological | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    radiological NNSA program strengthens national security from afar The Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence (NSDD) program is a key component of NNSA's core mission to reduce nuclear threats. The program, part of NNSA's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, provides partners tools and training to deter, detect, and investigate smuggling of

  6. Secretary Moniz awards Hutcheon memorial nonproliferation fellowship...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Tuesday, February 9, 2016 - 12:00am NNSA Blog Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz (second from ... Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz last Thursday awarded the first Office of Defense Nuclear ...

  7. Nuclear and Radiochemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NR Nuclear and Radiochemistry We provide vital radiochemical and radioanalytical capabilities to a wide range of programs. Contact Us Group Leader Felicia Taw Deputy Group Leader Rich Oldenborg Group Office (505) 667-4546 The Nuclear and Radiochemistry (C-NR) Group provides vital radiochemical and radioanalytical capabilities to a wide range of programs. These programs include maintenance and stewardship of the nuclear stockpile, nuclear non-proliferation, environmental management, international

  8. Economic and Non-proliferation Policy Considerations of Uranium Enrichment in Brazil and Argentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, Steven M.; Phillips, Jon R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Mahy, Heidi A.

    2008-09-01

    The nuclear development programs of both Argentina and Brazil have, since the 1970s, been premised on the desire for self-sufficiency and assurance of nuclear fuel supply. While military rivalry and mutual distrust led to nuclear weapons related development programs in the 1970s and 1980s, both countries have since terminated these programs. Furthermore, the governments of both countries have pledged their commitment to exclusively non-explosive use of nuclear energy and have signed the Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT). Utilizing rights provided for under the NPT, both Argentina and Brazil have nuclear fuel production facilities, with the notable exception of enrichment plants, that provide much of the current indigenous fuel requirements for their nuclear power plants. However, both countries are actively developing enrichment capability to fill this gap. The purpose of this report is to assess the economic basis and non-proliferation policy considerations for indigenous enrichment capability within the context of their desired self-sufficiency and to evaluate possible United States Government policy options.

  9. nuclear security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    security U.S. and China Continue Cooperative Partnership to Advance Safe, Secure Civil Nuclear Energy for Clean Energy Future DOE/NNSA Hosts 11th U.S.-China Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Technology Meeting at Savannah River National Laboratory in Aiken, South Carolina (Aiken, South Carolina) - On May 10-11, 2016 the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the China... Secretary Moniz awards Hutcheon memorial nonproliferation fellowship to Thomas Gray

  10. A Non-Proliferating Fuel Cycle: No Enrichment, Reprocessing or Accessible Spent Fuel - 12375

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Frank L.

    2012-07-01

    Current fuel cycles offer a number of opportunities for access to plutonium, opportunities to create highly enriched uranium and access highly radioactive wastes to create nuclear weapons and 'dirty' bombs. The non-proliferating fuel cycle however eliminates or reduces such opportunities and access by eliminating the mining, milling and enrichment of uranium. The non-proliferating fuel cycle also reduces the production of plutonium per unit of energy created, eliminates reprocessing and the separation of plutonium from the spent fuel and the creation of a stream of high-level waste. It further simplifies the search for land based deep geologic repositories and interim storage sites for spent fuel in the USA by disposing of the spent fuel in deep sub-seabed sediments after storing the spent fuel at U.S. Navy Nuclear Shipyards that have the space and all of the necessary equipment and security already in place. The non-proliferating fuel cycle also reduces transportation risks by utilizing barges for the collection of spent fuel and transport to the Navy shipyards and specially designed ships to take the spent fuel to designated disposal sites at sea and to dispose of them there in deep sub-seabed sediments. Disposal in the sub-seabed sediments practically eliminates human intrusion. Potential disposal sites include Great Meteor East and Southern Nares Abyssal Plain. Such sites then could easily become international disposal sites since they occur in the open ocean. It also reduces the level of human exposure in case of failure because of the large physical and chemical dilution and the elimination of a major pathway to man-seawater is not potable. Of course, the recovery of uranium from sea water and the disposal of spent fuel in sub-seabed sediments must be proven on an industrial scale. All other technologies are already operating on an industrial scale. If externalities, such as reduced terrorist threats, environmental damage (including embedded emissions), long

  11. Statement of Anne M. Harrington, Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nonproliferation to the Senate Armed Services Sub Committee On Emerging Threats and Capabilities | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) of Anne M. Harrington, Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation to the Senate Armed Services Sub Committee On Emerging Threats and Capabilities May 10, 2011 Chairwoman Hagan, Ranking Member Portman, thank you for the opportunity to join you today to discuss the investments the President has requested for the National Nuclear

  12. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristensen, Hans M.

    2014-05-09

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  13. Under U.S.-Russia Partnership, Final Shipment of Fuel Converted From 20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads Arrives in United States and Will Be Used for U.S. Electricity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Last Delivery Arrived in Baltimore, MD, Under Landmark 1993 U.S.-Russia HEU Purchase Agreement; U.S. and Russia Pledge to Future Nuclear Nonproliferation Collaboration

  14. National independence and nonproliferation in the new states of Central Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleason, G.

    1993-12-01

    Five independent states emerged in Central Asia from the breakup of the USSR. One of these states, Kazakhstan, possesses nuclear weapons. The other four of these states, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan, are not known to possess nuclear weapons, however they occupy a geostrategic position which makes them important to non-proliferation efforts. The present report profiles the capabilities and intentions of these four Central Asian states. The analysis of capabilities suggests that none of these states has the capability to develop a usable nuclear weapon. However, all of these countries-- especially Uzbekistan--have components of the old Soviet nuclear weapons complex which are now orphans. They have no use for these facilities and must either re-profile them, destroy them, or transfer them. The analysis of intentions suggests that the dynamics of national independence have created a situation in which Uzbekistan has hegemonic designs in the region. Implications for retarding nuclear proliferation in the Central Asian region are examined. Opportunities for outside influence are assessed.

  15. NIS | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NIS Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements,... International Nuclear Safeguards Challenge: Detect/deter undeclared nuclear materials and activities. Solution: Build capacity of the International Atomic Energy Agency and Member

  16. NSDD | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NSDD NNSA program strengthens national security from afar The Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence (NSDD) program is a key component of NNSA's core mission to reduce nuclear threats. The program, part of NNSA's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, provides partners tools and training to deter, detect, and investigate smuggling of... NNSA Co-Hosts Nuclear Security Summit Workshop on Maritime Security with UK WASHINGTON - This week, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security

  17. heu | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    heu NNSA Announces Elimination of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) from Indonesia All of Southeast Asia Now HEU-Free (WASHINGTON, D.C.) - The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Indonesian Nuclear Industry, LLC (PT INUKI), the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), and the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) of the... NNSA deputy administrator travels to Ukraine Earlier this month, Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Anne

  18. Nuclear Proliferation Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Professor William Potter

    2005-11-28

    William C. Potter, Director of the Center for Non Proliferation Studies and the Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, will present nuclear proliferation challenges following the 2005 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference. In addition to elucidating reasons for, and implications of, the conferences failure, Dr. Potter will discuss common ground between nuclear proliferation and terrorism issues and whether corrective action can be taken.

  19. laos | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    laos DOE/NNSA's Nonproliferation Experts Lead First Workshop on the IAEA Additional Protocol in Lao PDR Twenty-five participants from the Lao Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Science and Technology and other key stakeholder organizations attended the event. WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) sponsored the Fundamentals of Nuclear

  20. visit | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    visit NNSA Hosts NPT Parties at Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories WASHINGTON D.C. - On March 25-27, 2015, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) hosted representatives from 11 States Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and one representative from the United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs. The

  1. research and development | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    research and development NNSA Administrator honors nonproliferation research leader Last week DOE Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and NNSA Administrator Lt. Gen. Frank G. Klotz (Ret.) presented the agency's Assistant Deputy Administrator for Nonproliferation Research and Development (R&D) Dr. Rhys Williams with the Distinguished Service Gold Medal Award at a... Global Material Security The mission of the Office of Global Material Security (GMS) is to help partner countries secure and

  2. Prevent Counter | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Prevent Counter NNSA Releases New Nuclear Prevent, Counter, and Respond Report Comprehensive Overview of NNSA's Nonproliferation and Anti-terror Strategy WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) released its report on NNSA's efforts to prevent nuclear proliferation and terrorism, Prevent, Counter, and Respond-A Strategic Plan to Reduce Global

  3. and Respond | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and Respond NNSA Releases New Nuclear Prevent, Counter, and Respond Report Comprehensive Overview of NNSA's Nonproliferation and Anti-terror Strategy WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) released its report on NNSA's efforts to prevent nuclear proliferation and terrorism, Prevent, Counter, and Respond-A Strategic Plan to Reduce Global

  4. NNSA Announces 2013 Sustainability Awards | National Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Administrator honors nonproliferation research leader Monday, May 16, 2016 - 11:41am NNSA Administrator Lt. Gen. Frank G. Klotz (Ret.), right, presents the agency's Distinguished Service Gold Medal Award to Assistant Deputy Administrator for Nonproliferation Research and Development Dr. Rhys Williams. Last week DOE Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and NNSA Administrator Lt. Gen. Frank G. Klotz (Ret.) presented the agency's Assistant Deputy

  5. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Reasoner: PNNL FY13 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohimer, Ryan E.; Strasburg, Jana D.

    2013-09-30

    In Fiscal Year 2012 (FY12) PNNL implemented a formal reasoning framework and applied it to a specific challenge in nuclear nonproliferation. The Semantic Nonproliferation Analysis Platform (SNAP) was developed as a preliminary graphical user interface to demonstrate the potential power of the underlying semantic technologies to analyze and explore facts and relationships relating to the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). In Fiscal Year 2013 (FY13) the SNAP demonstration was enhanced with respect to query and navigation usability issues.

  6. Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence Program | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration Smuggling Detection and Deterrence Program NNSA program strengthens national security from afar The Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence (NSDD) program is a key component of NNSA's core mission to reduce nuclear threats. The program, part of NNSA's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, provides partners tools and training to deter, detect, and investigate smuggling of... NNSA Co-Hosts Nuclear Security Summit Workshop on Maritime Security with UK WASHINGTON

  7. GTRI: Reducing Nuclear Threats | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) GTRI: Reducing Nuclear Threats May 29, 2014 Mission In 2004 NNSA established the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) in the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation to, as quickly as possible, identify, secure, remove and/or facilitate the disposition of high risk vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials around the world that pose a threat to the United States and the international community. GTRI's mission is to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological

  8. U.S. and UAE Bolster Cooperation in the Area of Nuclear Energy and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nonproliferation | Department of Energy Bolster Cooperation in the Area of Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation U.S. and UAE Bolster Cooperation in the Area of Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation February 24, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis ABU DHABI - As part of a trip to strengthen partnerships in the Middle East, today U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu signed an Implementing Arrangement on peaceful uses of nuclear energy with the United Arab Emirates' Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, Dr. Anwar

  9. Proceedings of GLOBAL 2013: International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Conference - Nuclear Energy at a Crossroads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Global conference is a forum for the discussion of the scientific, technical, social and regulatory aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle. Relevant topics include global utilization of nuclear energy, current fuel cycle technologies, advanced reactors, advanced fuel cycles, nuclear nonproliferation and public acceptance.

  10. Detection Technologies, Arms control and nonproliferation technologies. Third/fourth quarters 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staehle, G; Stull, S; Talaber, C; Moulthrop, P

    1993-12-31

    This issue of Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies is another in a series of issues about specific means for detecting and identifying proliferation and other suspect activities outside the realm of arms control treaties. All the projects discussed are funded by the Office of Research and Development of the Department of Energy`s Office of Nonproliferation and National Security.

  11. Promoting Intercultural Competency in the Nuclear Workplace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachner K. M.

    2015-07-12

    Intercultural preparedness training is a staple of many workplaces that require international competence, including government, business, and non-profits. Even highly experienced diplomats are often advised to attend training sessions on this topic. Intercultural preparedness training promises to be especially relevant and useful for professionals working in the field of nuclear nonproliferation, including in the application of international nuclear safeguards. This paper outlines the fundamental philosophies underlying a training program that will benefit professionals in the nuclear arena, whether practitioners of nonproliferation or other sub-fields relying on international cooperation and collaboration, and how such a training program might be implemented efficiently.

  12. Research and Development | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Nonproliferation Research and Development The mission of the Office of Research and Development (R&D) is to support U.S. national and nuclear security objectives in reducing global nuclear security threats through the innovation of unilateral and multi-lateral technical capabilities to detect, identify, and characterize: 1) foreign nuclear weapons programs, 2) illicit diversion of special nuclear materials, and 3) global nuclear detonations. R&D is organized into two offices:

  13. Mission | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Mission Mission Statement "Enhancing and ensuring the future of the Nuclear Security Enterprise through effective nuclear production operations" Mission Execute effective contract management and oversight to safely and securely maintain the nuclear weapon stockpile for the Nuclear Security Enterprise; provide enriched uranium for naval, research, and isotope production reactors, and support nonproliferation activities to reduce the global nuclear threat. Vision Make the world safer by

  14. NNSA Leads Conference on Nonproliferation Research and Development...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    methods to detect nuclear proliferation," said Deputy Administrator for ... detection materials and modeling technologies for detecting nuclear proliferation. ...

  15. NPT | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NPT NNSA Labs host U.S. and Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Non-Nuclear Weapon State Representatives NNSA Principal Deputy Administrator Madelyn Creedon with SNL Director and President Jill Hruby welcome Department of State Representatives and seven NPT Non-Nuclear Weapon State Representatives for 2nd NPT Transparency Visit. WASHINGTON - On October 26 and 27, 2015, Los Alamos National... NNSA Hosts NPT Parties at Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories WASHINGTON D.C. - On March

  16. SSMP | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SSMP NNSA Delivers Annual Reports to Congress on Progress for Stockpile Stewardship and Nuclear Nonproliferation WASHINGTON, D.C.-The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) today released the annual reports outlining the strategic direction for two of its vital and enduring missions-maintaining a safe, secure and effective nuclear deterrent and reducing the threat of... NNSA Releases Annual Stockpile Stewardship & Management Plan Annual Report Provides

  17. Nonproliferation, arms control and disarmament and extended deterrence in the new security environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph F

    2009-01-01

    important in themselves, and are essential to maintaining and strengthening the Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) bargain by bolstering two of its pillars - nonproliferation and peaceful nuclear energy cooperation. There is no alternative, and little prospect for a better deal.

  18. Nuclear proliferation after the Cold War

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiss, M.; Litwak, R.S.

    1994-01-01

    Today, former Soviet republics threaten to gain control over nuclear weapons sited on their territories, and reports on North Korea, Pakistan, India, and Iraq reveal current or recent weapon development programs. This document offers a timely assessment of the prospects for nuclear nonproliferation.

  19. Radiological Security Partnership Information | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Programs / Nonproliferation / Global Material Security / Radiological Security / Radiological Security Partnership Radiological Security Partnership Information Radioactive sources play an important role in a number of commercial, medical, and research facilities. The benefits of these sources must be balanced with proper security. The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is working with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and

  20. Arms control and nonproliferation technologies. First quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staehle, G; Alonzo, G M; Sanford, N M

    1995-01-01

    This first quarter issue for 1995 highlights the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The SBIR program is managed by the DOE`s Basic Energy Sciences program within the Office of Energy Research. Each year, the SBIR program solicits research ideas of interest to the DOE. Articles contained in this issue include: The Small Business Innovation Research Program supported by the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security; Automated cueing to man-made objects via multispectral image; Security systems get smart with advanced processing and thermal imaging; A breakthrough in cooling system technology; The APSTNG neutron probe; Lithium-doped fullerene neutron detector; Miniature GC-MS for on-site chemical analysis; and Winner of Sandia President`s Quality Award.

  1. Future directions for arms control and nonproliferation. Conference summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-06

    This report provides a summary of the presentations and discussions at the Spring 1994 CNSN-Wilton Park Conference. The Conference was one of a series on US-European security cooperation organized by The Center for National Security Negotiations (CNSN) of Science Applications International Corporation. These conferences bring together government and non-government experts, primarily from the United States and Europe, to discuss a range of regional and global security issues. The conferences provide an opportunity to explore, in a frank and off-the-record environment, common interests and concerns, as well as differences in approach that affect trans-Atlantic cooperation. This report is divided into the following three areas: (1) implementation of existing and pending agreements; (2) non-proliferation: prospects for trans-Atlantic cooperation; and (3) future directions in arms control.

  2. Verifying Missile Non-Proliferation in Northeast Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VANNONI, MICHAEL G.; BIRINGER, KENT L.; TROST, LAWRENCE C.

    2003-04-01

    Missiles are attractive weapon systems because of their flexibility, survivability, and relatively low cost. Consequently, many nations are seeking to build missile forces resulting in regional arms races. Missile forces can be both stabilizing (e.g., providing a survivable force for deterrence) and destabilizing (e.g., creating strategic asymmetries). Efforts to control missile proliferation must account for these effects. A number of strategies to control the destabilizing effects of missiles were developed during the Cold War. Some of these strategies are applicable to regional missile control but new approaches, tailored to regional geographic and security conditions, are needed. Regional missile nonproliferation can be pursued in a variety of ways: Reducing the demand for missiles by decreasing the perception of national threats; Restricting the export of missiles and associated equipment by supplier countries; Restricting information describing missile technology; Limiting missile development activities such as flight or engine tests; Restricting the operational deployment of existing missile forces; and Reducing existing missile forces by number and/or type. Even when development is complete, limits on deployment within range of potential targets or limits on operational readiness can help stabilize potential missile confrontations. Implementing these strategies often involves the collection and exchange of information about activities related to missile development or deployment. Monitoring is the process of collecting information used to for subsequent verification of commitments. A systematic approach to implementing verification is presented that identifies areas where monitoring could support missile nonproliferation agreements. The paper presents both non-technical and technical techniques for monitoring. Examples of non-technical techniques are declarations about planned test launches or on-site inspections. Examples of technical monitoring include

  3. National Nuclear Security Administration ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Operating Efficiently / Engaging Globally FY 2013 Annual Report Table of Contents 1 Operating Efficiently / Engaging Globally 2 Office of Nonproliferation and International Security 4 Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security 5 Next Generations Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) 6 International Nuclear Safeguards Engagement Program (INSEP): First Engagement with Burma 7 Safeguards Technology Development 9 Safeguards Policy: IAEA Transit Matching Workshop 10 International Nuclear Security (INS) 12

  4. Introduction to Special Edition (of the Journal of Nuclear Materials Management) on Reducing the Threat from Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2007-03-01

    Introductory article for special edition of the JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MATERIALS MANAGEMENT outlining the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management Nonproliferation and Arms Control Technical Division. In particular the International Nuclear and Radiological Security Standing Committee and its initial focus covering four topical areas--Radiological Threat Reduction, Nuclear Smuggling and Illicit Trafficking, Countering Nuclear Terrorism, and Radioligical Terrorism Consequence Management.

  5. The nuclear materials control technology briefing book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwell, J.K.; Fernandez, S.J.

    1992-03-01

    As national and international interests in nuclear arms control and non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, intensify, it becomes ever more important that contributors be aware of the technologies available for the measurement and control of the nuclear materials important to nuclear weapons development. This briefing book presents concise, nontechnical summaries of various special nuclear material (SNM) and tritium production monitoring technologies applicable to the control of nuclear materials and their production. Since the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) operates a multinational, on-site-inspector-based safeguards program in support of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), many (but not all) of the technologies reported in this document are in routine use or under development for IAEA safeguards.

  6. Proceedings of the Symposium on the Non-Proliferation Experiment: Results and Implications for Test Ban Treaties, Rockville, Maryland, April 19-21, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denny, Marvin D

    1994-01-01

    To address a critical verification issue for the current Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and for a possible future Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), the Department of Energy sought to measure certain differences between an underground nuclear test and a chemical test in the same geology, so that other explosions could be identified. This was done in a field experiment code-named the NonProliferation Experiment (NPE).This comprehensive experiment was designed to determine the signatures of chemical explosions for a broad range of phenomena for comparison with those of previous nuclear tests. If significant differences can be measured, then these measures can be used to discriminate between the two types of explosions. In addition, when these differences are understood, large chemical explosions can be used to seismically calibrate regions to discriminate earthquakes from explosions. Toward this end, on-site and off-site measurements of transient phenomena were made, and on-site measurements of residual effects are in progress.Perhaps the most striking result was that the source function for the chemical explosion was identical to that of a nuclear one of about twice the yield. These proceedings provide more detailed results of the experiment.

  7. nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2%2A en U.S-, Japan Exchange Best Practices on Nuclear Emergency Response http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesu.s-japan-exchange-best-practices-nuclear-emergency-respon...

  8. DNN Sentinel Vol. I, No. 3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... I now feel very confident traveling because of those experiences," she said. Jason Portner also found living in Beijing after graduating from Northeastern University to be ...

  9. NNSA Administrator D'Agostino's 2010 Nonproliferation Travel...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The Administrator also toured a nuclear reactor in Prague that NNSA is working with the ... the Administrator's visit to the nuclear reactor: Administrator D'Agostino at a Prague ...

  10. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory and licensing matters of interest to DOE, either as an NRC license applicant or in connection with related authorities and responsibilities of DOE and NRC on nuclear material, nuclear waste, and nuclear nonproliferation matters. GC-52 attorneys provide advice and support on a

  11. FY2015 Budget Request: Preserving President Obama's Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Vision | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) 5 Budget Request: Preserving President Obama's Nuclear Security Vision March 04, 2014 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The President's FY2015 Budget Request for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), delivered to Congress today, includes $11.7 billion to support NNSA's continued efforts to keep the American people safe by modernizing the U.S. nuclear stockpile, executing an aggressive international nuclear nonproliferation agenda and

  12. NNSA Releases New Nuclear Prevent, Counter, and Respond Report | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Releases New Nuclear Prevent, Counter, and Respond Report March 23, 2015 Comprehensive Overview of NNSA's Nonproliferation and Anti-terror Strategy WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) released its report on NNSA's efforts to prevent nuclear proliferation and terrorism, Prevent, Counter, and Respond-A Strategic Plan to Reduce Global Nuclear Threats (FY 2016-FY 2020) (NPCR). It provides a comprehensive overview for the

  13. Personnel Security Program | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Personnel Security Program NNSA is responsible for managing national nuclear security and supports several key program areas including Defense, Nuclear Nonproliferation, Naval Reactors, Emergency Operations, Infrastructure and Environment, Nuclear Security, Management and Administration and the Office of the Administrator. Each program area is focused on specific challenges. The Office of Personnel & Facility Clearances & Classification (OPFCC) is part of the NNSA, Office of

  14. Plutonium Disposition Program | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Plutonium Disposition Program June 26, 2013 SUPPORTING NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION Weapon-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) are the critical ingredients for making a nuclear weapon. With the end of the Cold War, hundreds of tons of these materials were determined to be surplus to U.S. and Russian defense needs. Denying access to plutonium and HEU is the best way to prevent nuclear proliferation to rogue states and terrorist organizations. The most certain method to

  15. radiological detection | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    detection NNSA program strengthens national security from afar The Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence (NSDD) program is a key component of NNSA's core mission to reduce nuclear threats. The program, part of NNSA's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, provides partners tools and training to deter, detect, and investigate smuggling of... NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiation Monitoring Survey Over Philadelphia July 18-20 Philadelphia - On July 18 through July 20, the U.S. Department of

  16. EM Issues Amended Decision to Expand Use of Nuclear Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – EM issued an amended Record of Decision (ROD) to the Savannah River Site (SRS) Spent Nuclear Fuel Environmental Impact Statement to expand the operations of the H-Canyon Facility at SRS to support a major nuclear non-proliferation goal and save taxpayer dollars.

  17. emergency preparedness | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    emergency preparedness NNSA hosts IAEA Directors to discuss emergency preparedness & response partnership NNSA hosted the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) - a core partner of the agency's global nonproliferation and counterterrorism efforts - to discuss cooperative efforts in emergency preparedness and response. Early in their visit, IAEA Deputy Director General Juan Carlos Lentijo... NNSA & Nuclear Security Enterprise support nation's preparedness Scientists at NNSA facilities

  18. material consolidation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    material consolidation Office of Material Consolidation & Civilian Sites The Office of Material Consolidation and Civilian Sites (MCCS) is responsible for three key nuclear nonproliferation initiatives.Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A) Upgrades: Manages cooperative efforts with the Russian Federation to enhance the security of proliferation-

  19. Fresh nuclear fuel measurements at Ukrainian nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuzminski, Jozef; Ewing, Tom; Dickman, Debbie; Gavrilyuk, Victor; Drapey, Sergey; Kirischuk, Vladimir; Strilchuk, Nikolay

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the Provisions on Nuclear Material Measurement System was enacted in Ukraine as an important regulatory driver to support international obligations in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. It defines key provisions and requirements for material measurement and measurement control programs to ensure the quality and reliability of measurement data within the framework of the State MC&A System. Implementing the Provisions requires establishing a number of measurement techniques for both fresh and spent nuclear fuel for various types of Ukrainian reactors. Our first efforts focused on measurements of fresh nuclear fuel from a WWR-1000 power reactor.

  20. The Science of Nuclear Materials: A Modular, Laboratory-based Curriculum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahill, C.L.; Feldman, G.; Briscoe, W.J.

    2014-06-15

    The development of a curriculum for nuclear materials courses targeting students pursuing Master of Arts degrees at The George Washington University is described. The courses include basic concepts such as radiation and radioactivity as well as more complex topics such the nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear weapons, radiation detection and technological aspects of non-proliferation.

  1. Nuclear Energy Readiness Indicator Index (NERI): A benchmarking tool for assessing nuclear capacity in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saum-Manning,L.

    2008-07-13

    Declining natural resources, rising oil prices, looming climate change and the introduction of nuclear energy partnerships, such as GNEP, have reinvigorated global interest in nuclear energy. The convergence of such issues has prompted countries to move ahead quickly to deal with the challenges that lie ahead. However, developing countries, in particular, often lack the domestic infrastructure and public support needed to implement a nuclear energy program in a safe, secure, and nonproliferation-conscious environment. How might countries become ready for nuclear energy? What is needed is a framework for assessing a country's readiness for nuclear energy. This paper suggests that a Nuclear Energy Readiness Indicator (NERI) Index might serve as a meaningful basis for assessing a country's status in terms of progress toward nuclear energy utilization under appropriate conditions. The NERI Index is a benchmarking tool that measures a country's level of 'readiness' for nonproliferation-conscious nuclear energy development. NERI first identifies 8 key indicators that have been recognized by the International Atomic Energy Agency as key nonproliferation and security milestones to achieve prior to establishing a nuclear energy program. It then measures a country's progress in each of these areas on a 1-5 point scale. In doing so NERI illuminates gaps or underdeveloped areas in a country's nuclear infrastructure with a view to enable stakeholders to prioritize the allocation of resources toward programs and policies supporting international nonproliferation goals through responsible nuclear energy development. On a preliminary basis, the indicators selected include: (1) demonstrated need; (2) expressed political support; (3) participation in nonproliferation and nuclear security treaties, international terrorism conventions, and export and border control arrangements; (4) national nuclear-related legal and regulatory mechanisms; (5) nuclear infrastructure; (6) the

  2. NNSA program strengthens national security from afar | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) program strengthens national security from afar Thursday, August 25, 2016 - 12:43pm A large radiation detector scans containerized cargo entering a seaport. The Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence (NSDD) program is a key component of NNSA's core mission to reduce nuclear threats. The program, part of NNSA's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, provides partners tools and training to deter, detect, and investigate smuggling of nuclear and

  3. Deputy Secretary Poneman's Remarks at the Third Annual Nuclear Deterrence

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summit - As Prepared for Delivery | Department of Energy the Third Annual Nuclear Deterrence Summit - As Prepared for Delivery Deputy Secretary Poneman's Remarks at the Third Annual Nuclear Deterrence Summit - As Prepared for Delivery February 17, 2011 - 3:49pm Addthis Third Annual Nuclear Deterrence Summit Thursday, February 17, 2011 Arlington, Virginia "Nuclear Energy and Nonproliferation" "We face a choice between the quick and the dead." These are the words that

  4. Presentation Title

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4/20/2015 2:07 PM Budget Atomization April 2015 National Nuclear Security Administration 2 4/20/2015 2:07 PM Overview of NNSA Budget Structure As of May 2014: * 4 Treasury Symbols o Weapons Activities (WA), Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN), Naval Reactors (NR), and Federal Salaries and Expenses (FSE) o Federal personnel accounts in FSE, WA, and NR have sub-accounts within 4 symbols o Congressional approval required to move funds between * 166 Congressional Controls o 123 (74%) < $50M o

  5. B61 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA Reaches Important Milestone with B61-12 Life Extension Program WASHINGTON - The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) announced that they recently formally authorized the production engineering phase of its B61-12 warhead life extension program (LEP). This important milestone comes after four years of work in... NNSA Delivers Annual Reports to Congress on Progress for Stockpile Stewardship and Nuclear Nonproliferation WASHINGTON, D.C.-The Department of

  6. Links | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Links NNSA HQ National Nuclear Security Administration Advanced Simulation & Computing NNSA Graduate Program NNSA Small Business Program Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Field Offices NNSA Albuquerque Complex Kansas City Field Office Livermore Field Office Los Alamos Field Office Naval Reactors Idaho Branch Office Nevada Field Office Sandia Field Office DOE Oak Ridge Sites Oak Ridge Office Oak Ridge National Laboratory UCOR Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Oak Ridge

  7. Maintaining the Stockpile | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Maintaining the Stockpile NNSA Hosts NPT Parties at Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories WASHINGTON D.C. - On March 25-27, 2015, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) hosted representatives from 11 States Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and one representative from the United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs. The... Flight Test of Weapons System Body by Navy Successful Third Flight Demonstrated Dynamics and Functional Performance

  8. Fact Sheets | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Fact Sheets Find out more information about key NNSA programs, initiatives and accomplishments. Find out more information about key NNSA programs, initiatives and accomplishments. October 29, 2014 NNSA Works to Establish a Reliable Supply of Mo-99 Produced Without Highly Enriched Uranium As part of its nuclear nonproliferation mission, and in support of the American Medical Isotopes Production Act of 2012 (AMIPA), the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration March 25, 2014

  9. Our History | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    History The NNSA was established by Congress in 2000 as a separately organized agency within the U.S. Department of Energy, responsible for the management and security of the nation's nuclear weapons, nuclear nonproliferation, and naval reactor programs. In 2002 NNSA reorganized, removing a layer of management by eliminating its regional operations offices in New Mexico, California and Nevada. Contract and project management oversight responsibility for NNSA's labs, plants and special facilities

  10. NNSA Timeline | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    History NNSA Timeline The NNSA was established by Congress in 2000 as a separately organized agency within the U.S. Department of Energy, responsible for the management and security of the nation's nuclear weapons, nuclear nonproliferation, and naval reactor programs. In 2002 NNSA reorganized, removing a layer of management by eliminating its regional operations offices in New Mexico, California and Nevada. NNSA headquarters retained responsibility for strategic and program planning, budgeting

  11. Strengthened IAEA Safeguards-Imagery Analysis: Geospatial Tools for Nonproliferation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pabian, Frank V

    2012-08-14

    This slide presentation focuses on the growing role and importance of imagery analysis for IAEA safeguards applications and how commercial satellite imagery, together with the newly available geospatial tools, can be used to promote 'all-source synergy.' As additional sources of openly available information, satellite imagery in conjunction with the geospatial tools can be used to significantly augment and enhance existing information gathering techniques, procedures, and analyses in the remote detection and assessment of nonproliferation relevant activities, facilities, and programs. Foremost of the geospatial tools are the 'Digital Virtual Globes' (i.e., GoogleEarth, Virtual Earth, etc.) that are far better than previously used simple 2-D plan-view line drawings for visualization of known and suspected facilities of interest which can be critical to: (1) Site familiarization and true geospatial context awareness; (2) Pre-inspection planning; (3) Onsite orientation and navigation; (4) Post-inspection reporting; (5) Site monitoring over time for changes; (6) Verification of states site declarations and for input to State Evaluation reports; and (7) A common basis for discussions among all interested parties (Member States). Additionally, as an 'open-source', such virtual globes can also provide a new, essentially free, means to conduct broad area search for undeclared nuclear sites and activities - either alleged through open source leads; identified on internet BLOGS and WIKI Layers, with input from a 'free' cadre of global browsers and/or by knowledgeable local citizens (a.k.a.: 'crowdsourcing'), that can include ground photos and maps; or by other initiatives based on existing information and in-house country knowledge. They also provide a means to acquire ground photography taken by locals, hobbyists, and tourists of the surrounding locales that can be useful in identifying and discriminating between relevant and non-relevant facilities and their associated

  12. NNSA Announces Recipient of $25 Million Grant to Improve Nuclear Arms

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Control Verification Technology | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Announces Recipient of $25 Million Grant to Improve Nuclear Arms Control Verification Technology March 31, 2014 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development today announced the award of a $25 million grant to a University of Michigan-led consortium for research and development (R&D) in nuclear arms control

  13. Nuclear Material Recovery | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recovery Nuclear Material Recovery Securing nuclear material domestically and internationally is one part of Y-12's nuclear nonproliferation business. Miscellaneous scrap material is a diverse group of scrap materials generated from reactor fuel production, weapons production, research and development activities and other uses by the U.S. Department of Energy. The majority of this material will require additional processing before it is down blended for low-enriched uranium reactor fuel. This

  14. NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material May 29, 2014 Mission In 2004 NNSA established the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) in the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation to, as quickly as possible, identify, secure, remove and/or facilitate the disposition of high risk nuclear and radiological materials around the world that pose a threat to the United States and the international community. GTRI's mission is to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear

  15. Nuclear forensics, explained: NNSA analytic chemists help keep the world

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    safe | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) forensics, explained: NNSA analytic chemists help keep the world safe Thursday, February 25, 2016 - 2:46pm One of the gravest threats the world faces is the possibility that terrorists will acquire nuclear weapons or the necessary materials to construct a weapon. Part of the work of NNSA's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and the national laboratories is to support investigations into the diversion, trafficking, or illicit

  16. Identifying, Visualizing, and Fusing Social Media Data to Support Nonproliferation and Arms Control Treaty Verification: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; Cramer, Nicholas O.; Benz, Jacob M.; Kreyling, Sean J.; Henry, Michael J.; Corley, Courtney D.; Whattam, Kevin M.

    2013-07-11

    While international nonproliferation and arms control verification capabilities have their foundations in physical and chemical sensors, state declarations, and on-site inspections, verification experts are beginning to consider the importance of open source data to complement and support traditional means of verification. One of those new, and increasingly expanding, sources of open source information is social media, which can be ingested and understood through social media analytics (SMA). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is conducting research to further our ability to identify, visualize, and fuse social media data to support nonproliferation and arms control treaty verification efforts. This paper will describe our preliminary research to examine social media signatures of nonproliferation or arms control proxy events. We will describe the development of our preliminary nonproliferation and arms control proxy events, outline our initial findings, and propose ideas for future work.

  17. EA-1238: Proposed Construction and Operation of the Nonproliferation and International Security Center, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to construct and operate the Nonproliferation and International Security Center within the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos...

  18. NNSA Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report June 2008 - May 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkman, Clarissa O.; Fankhauser, Jana G.

    2010-03-01

    In 2009, the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP) completed its 16th successful year in support of the NNSA’s mission by developing future leaders in nonproliferation and promoting awareness of career opportunities. We provide this annual report to review program activities from June 2008 through May 2009 - the fellowship term for the Class of 2008. Contents include: Welcome Letter Introduction The NGFP Team Program Management Highlights Class of 2008 Incoming Fellows Orientation Travel Career Development Management of the Fellows Performance Highlights Closing Ceremony Encore Performance Where They Are Now Alumnus Career Highlights: Christine Buzzard Class of 2009 Applicant Database Upgrades Fall Recruitment Activities Interviews Hiring and Clearances Introducing the Class of 2009 Class of 2010 Recruitment Strategy On the Horizon Appendix A: Class of 2009 Fellows

  19. NNSA Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report June 2009 - May 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkman, Clarissa O.; Fankhauser, Jana G.

    2011-04-01

    In 2009, the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP) completed its 17th successful year in support of the NNSA’s mission by developing future leaders in nonproliferation and promoting awareness of career opportunities. This annual report to reviews program activities from June 2009 through May 2010 - the fellowship term for the Class of 2009. Contents include: Welcome Letter (Mission Driven: It’s all about results), Introduction, Structure of the NGFP, Program Management Highlights, Annual Lifecycle, Class of 2009 Incoming Fellows, Orientation, Global Support of the Mission, Career Development, Management of the Fellows, Performance Highlights, Closing Ceremony, Where They Are Now, Alumni Highlight - Mission Success: Exceptional Leaders from the NGFP, Class of 2009 Fall Recruitment Activities, Established Partnerships, Face-to-Face, Recruiting Results, Interviews, Hiring and Clearances, Introducing the Class of 2010, Class of 2011 Recruitment Strategy, On the Horizon, Appendix A: Class of 2010 Fellow Biographies

  20. Industry Self-Regulation as a Means to Promote Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hund, Gretchen; Elkhamri, Oksana O.

    2005-10-01

    Companies within numerous industries that have been “early adopters” of self-regulation concept, considering the environment and society alongside business issues, have realized several benefits and some competitive advantage while substantially improving their environmental performance. Given that proliferation prevention is also a public good, our premise is that the experience gained and lessons learned from the self-regulation initiative in other industries and more broadly in the arena of sustainable development provide a basis for examining the feasibility of developing self-regulation mechanisms applicable to industries involved with sensitive technologies (nuclear, radiological source, and other dual-use industries)

  1. R&D | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    R&D NNSA Administrator honors nonproliferation research leader Last week DOE Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and NNSA Administrator Lt. Gen. Frank G. Klotz (Ret.) presented the agency's Assistant Deputy Administrator for Nonproliferation Research and Development (R&D) Dr. Rhys Williams with the Distinguished Service Gold Medal Award at a... NNSA sites take home 15 R&D Awards R&D Magazine named 15 NNSA lab projects as winners in the 53rd annual R&D 100 Awards, which honor

  2. Use of Social Media to Target Information-Driven Arms Control and Nonproliferation Verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreyling, Sean J.; Williams, Laura S.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Whattam, Kevin M.; Corley, Courtney D.; Cramer, Nicholas O.; Rose, Stuart J.; Bell, Eric B.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2012-07-19

    There has been considerable discussion within the national security community, including a recent workshop sponsored by the U.S. State Department, about the use of social media for extracting patterns of collective behavior and influencing public perception in areas relevant to arms control and nonproliferation. This paper seeks to explore if, and how, social media can be used to supplement nonproliferation and arms control inspection and monitoring activities on states and sites of greatest proliferation relevance. In this paper, we set the stage for how social media can be applied in this problem space and describe some of the foreseen challenges, including data validation, sources and attributes, verification, and security. Using information analytics and data visualization capabilities available at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), we provide graphical examples of some social media "signatures" of potential relevance for nonproliferation and arms control purposes. We conclude by describing a proposed case study and offering recommendations both for further research and next steps by the policy community.

  3. New Y-12 Mill Supports Non-Proliferation | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    This Site Budget IG Web Policy Privacy No Fear Act Accessibility FOIA Sitemap Federal Government The White House DOE.gov USA.gov Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA...

  4. Working Group on Social Internet Data Mining and Analytics for Nuclear Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairchild, Geoffrey; Bahran, Rian Mustafa; McMath, Garrett Earl

    2015-10-14

    We examined publicly accessible Wikipedia access logs to determine if safeguard relevant events would be evident through increases in visits to articles related to that event.

  5. Republic of Korea Increases Support of NNSA Work to Combat Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Smuggling | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Republic of Korea Increases Support of NNSA Work to Combat Nuclear Smuggling January 02, 2013 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Republic of Korea today announced that the Republic of Korea renewed its partnership to combat nuclear smuggling with a $300,000 contribution to support NNSA's ongoing nonproliferation work in Azerbaijan. The funding, provided by the Korean Ministry of Foreign

  6. NNSA Sites Host Head of Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (CTBTO) | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Sites Host Head of Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) Friday, December 4, 2015 - 10:48am NNSA Blog From left, NNSA Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Anne Harrington; Dr. Lassina Zerbo, Executive Secretary of the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO); and NNSA Acting Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs Brigadier General Stephen

  7. U.S. and Russia Cooperation Continues on Nuclear Security | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Russia Cooperation Continues on Nuclear Security U.S. and Russia Cooperation Continues on Nuclear Security June 28, 2007 - 2:08pm Addthis Newly Signed Fifth Bratislava Report Highlights Most Recent Advances in Nuclear Security and Nonproliferation WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Russian Federal Atomic Energy Agency (Rosatom) Director Sergey Kiriyenko today submitted to Presidents Bush and Putin the fifth report on nuclear security cooperation

  8. United States and China Mark 10th Anniversary of Peaceful Uses of Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Technology Joint Coordination Meetings | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) United States and China Mark 10th Anniversary of Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Technology Joint Coordination Meetings May 14, 2015 CHENGDU, CHINA - On May 6 and 7, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Anne Harrington and China National Energy Administration (NEA) Director General Liu Baohua co-chaired the 10th

  9. Prevent, Counter, and Respond-A Strategic Plan to Reduce Global Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Threats | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Programs / Nonproliferation Prevent, Counter, and Respond-A Strategic Plan to Reduce Global Nuclear Threats The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) is pleased to submit an update to Prevent, Counter, and Respond-A Strategic Plan to Reduce Global Nuclear Threats (FY 2016-FY 2020). This report, along with DOE/NNSA's Stockpile Stewardship and Management Plan, informs our planning and program

  10. Nuclear proliferation: Lessons learned from the Iraqi case. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    The nuclear weapons inspection regime implemented in Iraq following the United Nations coalition victory in Desert Storm is the most intrusive in history. Important conclusions about the current non-proliferation regime can therefore be determined from a study of Iraq's progress. This thesis examines Iraq's efforts to acquire nuclear weapons. The supply side of the equation is also studied, with a concentration upon the contributions of NATO nations. The strategic culture of Iraq is discussed, in an effort to discover why Iraq sought nuclear weapons. Finally, policy prescriptions are advanced. The current non-proliferation regime needs to be improved if the spread of nuclear weapons is to be halted, or even slowed. The most promising way to improve this regime is to involve the U.N. Special Commission and the U.N. Security Council in the management of the problem of nuclear proliferation.... Iraq, Strategic culture, Non-Proliferation treaty, International atomic energy agency, Nuclear weapons, Middle east security, Nuclear suppliers group, United Nations.

  11. September 2016 | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    September 2016 NNSA hosts IAEA Directors to discuss emergency preparedness & response partnership Wednesday, September 14, 2016 - 3:17pm NNSA hosted the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) - a core partner of the agency's global nonproliferation and counterterrorism efforts - to discuss cooperative efforts in emergency preparedness and response. Early in their visit, IAEA Deputy Director General Juan Carlos Lentijo, IAEA Division of Nuclear Security Raja Adnan, and Ambassador Laura

  12. Commercial Nuclear Reprocessing in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherrill, Charles Leland; Balatsky, Galya Ivanovna

    2015-09-09

    The short presentation outline: Reprocessing Overview; Events leading up to Carter’s Policy; Results of the decision; Policy since Nuclear Nonproliferation Act. Conclusions reached: Reprocessing ban has become an easy and visible fix to the public concern about proliferation, but has not completely stopped proliferation; and, Reprocessing needs to become detached from political considerations, so technical research can continue, regardless of the policy decisions we decide to take.

  13. NNSA Blog | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Home NNSA Blog NNSA hosts IAEA Directors to discuss emergency preparedness & response partnership Wednesday, September 14, 2016 - 3:17pm NNSA hosted the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) - a core partner of the agency's global nonproliferation and counterterrorism efforts - to discuss cooperative efforts in emergency preparedness and response. Early in their visit, IAEA Deputy Director General Juan Carlos Lentijo, IAEA Division of Nuclear Security Raja Adnan, and Ambassador Laura

  14. Material Management and Minimization | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Nonproliferation Material Management and Minimization The Office of Material Management and Minimization (M3) presents an integrated approach to addressing the persistent threat posed by nuclear materials through a full cycle of materials management and minimization efforts. Consistent with the President's highly enriched uranium (HEU) and plutonium minimization strategies, the primary objective of M3 is to achieve permanent threat reduction by minimizing and, when

  15. NNSA Program Develops the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Experts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brim, Cornelia P.; Disney, Maren V.

    2015-09-02

    NNSA is fostering the next generation of nuclear security experts is through its successful NNSA Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP). NGFP offers its Fellows an exceptional career development opportunity through hands-on experience supporting NNSA mission areas across policy and technology disciplines. The one-year assignments give tomorrow’s leaders in global nuclear security and nonproliferation unparalleled exposure through assignments to Program Offices across NNSA.

  16. Savannah River Site | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Savannah River Site NNSA operates facilities at the Savannah River Site to supply and process tritium, a radioactive form of hydrogen that is a key component of nuclear weapons. SRS loads tritium and non-tritium reservoirs; including reclamation of previously used tritium reservoirs, processing of reservoirs; recycling, extraction, and enrichment of tritium gas and lab operations. SRS also plays a critical role in NNSA's nonproliferation missions. SRS is run by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions.

  17. Security for Radioactive Sources: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Security for Radioactive Sources: Fact Sheet March 23, 2012 Radioactive materials are a critical and beneficial component of global medical, industrial, and academic efforts. The possibility that these materials could be used by terrorists is a national security concern. The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), along with international and domestic partners, addresses radiological material security as part of its nuclear nonproliferation mission. US

  18. B61-12 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    -12 NNSA Reaches Important Milestone with B61-12 Life Extension Program WASHINGTON - The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) announced that they recently formally authorized the production engineering phase of its B61-12 warhead life extension program (LEP). This important milestone comes after four years of work in... NNSA Delivers Annual Reports to Congress on Progress for Stockpile Stewardship and Nuclear Nonproliferation WASHINGTON, D.C.-The Department

  19. NGSI Safeguards by Design | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Nonproliferation and Arms Control / International Nuclear Safeguards NGSI Safeguards by Design NNSA's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) sponsors a project promoting international Safeguards by Design (SBD). The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA ) has described the SBD concept as an approach in which "international safeguards are fully integrated into the design process of a new nuclear facility from the initial planning through design, construction, operation,

  20. Italy Highly Enriched Uranium and Plutonium Removals | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Highly Enriched Uranium and Plutonium Removals March 24, 2014 Italy has been a global leader in nuclear nonproliferation, working with the United States since 1997 to eliminate more than 100 kilograms of highly enriched uranium (HEU) and separated plutonium. At the 2014 Nuclear Security Summit, the United States and Italy announced the successful removal of all eligible fresh HEU and plutonium from Italy. These shipments were completed via a joint effort

  1. Selected Examples of LDRD Projects Supporting Test Ban Treaty Verification and Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, K.; Al-Ayat, R.; Walter, W. R.

    2015-02-23

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at the DOE National Laboratories was established to ensure the scientific and technical vitality of these institutions and to enhance the their ability to respond to evolving missions and anticipate national needs. LDRD allows the Laboratory directors to invest a percentage of their total annual budget in cutting-edge research and development projects within their mission areas. We highlight a selected set of LDRD-funded projects, in chronological order, that have helped provide capabilities, people and infrastructure that contributed greatly to our ability to respond to technical challenges in support of test ban treaty verification and nonproliferation.

  2. Improved Technology To Prevent Nuclear Proliferation And Counter Nuclear Terrorism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, J; Yuldashev, B; Labov, S; Knapp, R

    2006-06-12

    As the world moves into the 21st century, the possibility of greater reliance on nuclear energy will impose additional technical requirements to prevent proliferation. In addition to proliferation resistant reactors, a careful examination of the various possible fuel cycles from cradle to grave will provide additional technical and nonproliferation challenges in the areas of conversion, enrichment, transportation, recycling and waste disposal. Radiation detection technology and information management have a prominent role in any future global regime for nonproliferation. As nuclear energy and hence nuclear materials become an increasingly global phenomenon, using local technologies and capabilities facilitate incorporation of enhanced monitoring and detection on the regional level. Radiation detection technologies are an important tool in the prevention of proliferation and countering radiological/nuclear terrorism. A variety of new developments have enabled enhanced performance in terms of energy resolution, spatial resolution, passive detection, predictive modeling and simulation, active interrogation, and ease of operation and deployment in the field. For example, various gamma ray imaging approaches are being explored to combine spatial resolution with background suppression in order to enhance sensitivity many-fold at reasonable standoff distances and acquisition times. New materials and approaches are being developed in order to provide adequate energy resolution in field use without the necessity for liquid nitrogen. Different detection algorithms enable fissile materials to be distinguished from other radioisotopes.

  3. Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, S.E.; Matthews, W.B. III; McKamy, E.D.; Pedigo, R.B. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS) which is sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The system serves national security and program management interests, and international interests in the programs for the peaceful application of nuclear energy and non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. Within the scope of the NMMSS are found all nuclear materials applied and controlled under United States law and related international agreements, including U.S. nuclear materials production programs and U.S. private nuclear industrial activities. In addition, its national and international scope enables it to provide services to other organizations such as the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, the Department of State, and the U.S. Congress.

  4. Nuclear Proliferation Technology Trends Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Talbert, Robert J.

    2005-10-04

    A process is underway to develop mature, integrated methodologies to address nonproliferation issues. A variety of methodologies (both qualitative and quantitative) are being considered. All have one thing in common, a need for a consistent set of proliferation related data that can be used as a basis for application. One approach to providing a basis for predicting and evaluating future proliferation events is to understand past proliferation events, that is, the different paths that have actually been taken to acquire or attempt to acquire special nuclear material. In order to provide this information, this report describing previous material acquisition activities (obtained from open source material) has been prepared. This report describes how, based on an evaluation of historical trends in nuclear technology development, conclusions can be reached concerning: (1) The length of time it takes to acquire a technology; (2) The length of time it takes for production of special nuclear material to begin; and (3) The type of approaches taken for acquiring the technology. In addition to examining time constants, the report is intended to provide information that could be used to support the use of the different non-proliferation analysis methodologies. Accordingly, each section includes: (1) Technology description; (2) Technology origin; (3) Basic theory; (4) Important components/materials; (5) Technology development; (6) Technological difficulties involved in use; (7) Changes/improvements in technology; (8) Countries that have used/attempted to use the technology; (9) Technology Information; (10) Acquisition approaches; (11) Time constants for technology development; and (12) Required Concurrent Technologies.

  5. Improving the Safeguardability of Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Bjornard; R. Bari; D. Hebditch; P. Peterson; M. Schanfein

    2009-07-01

    The application of a Safeguards-by-Design (SBD) process for new nuclear facilities has the potential to reduce security risks and proliferation hazards while improving the synergy of major design features and raising operational efficiency, in a world where significant expansion of nuclear energy use may occur. Correspondingly, the U.S. DOE’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) includes objectives to contribute to international efforts to develop SBD, and to apply SBD in the development of new U.S. nuclear infrastructure. Here, SBD is defined as a structured approach to ensure the timely, efficient and cost effective integration of international safeguards and other nonproliferation barriers with national material control and accountability, physical protection, and safety objectives into the overall design process for a nuclear facility, from initial planning through design, construction and operation. The SBD process, in its simplest form, may be applied usefully today within most national regulatory environments. Development of a mature approach to implementing SBD requires work in the areas of requirements definition, design processes, technology and methodology, and institutionalization. The U.S. efforts described in this paper are supportive of SBD work for international safeguards that has recently been initiated by the IAEA with the participation of many stakeholders including member States, the IAEA, nuclear technology suppliers, nuclear utilities, and the broader international nonproliferation community.

  6. Airborne Multisensor Pod System, Arms control and nonproliferation technologies: Second quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonzo, G M; Sanford, N M

    1995-01-01

    This issue focuses on the Airborne Multisensor Pod System (AMPS) which is a collaboration of many of the DOE national laboratories to provide a scientific environment to research multiple sensors and the new information that can be derived from them. The bulk of the research has been directed at nonproliferation applications, but it has also proven useful in environmental monitoring and assessment, and land/water management. The contents of this issue are: using AMPS technology to detect proliferation and monitor resources; combining multisensor data to monitor facilities and natural resources; planning a AMPS mission; SAR pod produces images day or night, rain or shine; MSI pod combines data from multiple sensors; ESI pod will analyze emissions and effluents; and accessing AMPS information on the Internet.

  7. Nuclear rapprochement in Argentina and Brazil: Workshop summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Doyle

    1999-10-01

    On October 21 and 22, 1998, the Center for International Security Affairs at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Center for Global Security and Cooperation at Science Applications International Corporation hosted the first of a series of work-shops on states that have chosen to roll back their pursuit of nuclear arms. The objective of the workshop series is to conduct a systematic evaluation of the roles played by U.S. nonproliferation policy in cases of nuclear rollback or restraint and to provide recommendations for future nonproliferation efforts based on lessons learned. Key attendees at the workshop included officials and former officials from the foreign ministries of Argentina and Brazil, and current and former officials from the U.S. Department of State, the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA), and the Department of Energy (DOE). Scholars and independent researchers who have examined nuclear policy in Argentina and Brazil also participated. This workshop report includes important background information that helps set the stage for assessing nuclear policies in Argentina and Brazil. It describes national perspectives and areas of consensus and debate among the participants, particularly on the questions of lessons learned and their salience to proliferation challenges in other states. It also summarizes key questions and propositions regarding the roles played in these cases by U.S. nonproliferation policy.

  8. The National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative's Contract Administration, OAS-L-12-01

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Audit and Inspections Audit Report The National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative's Contract Administration OAS-L-12-01 October 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 25, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR FOR DEFENSE NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION FROM: David Sedillo Director Western Audits Division SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative's Contract

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - NRC Nuclear Export Controls Implementing the NSG Trigger List_Gary Langlie [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    U.S. NRC Nuclear Export Controls: Implementing the NSG Trigger List Gary R. Langlie Licensing Officer Office of International Programs May 11-14, 2015 NRC's Mission 2 License and regulate the Nation's civilian use of byproduct, source, and special nuclear materials to ensure adequate protection of public health and safety, promote the common defense and security, and protect the environment. Legal Basis * Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended * Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978 * Treaties,

  10. Virtual nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, J.F.

    1997-08-01

    The term virtual nuclear weapons proliferation and arsenals, as opposed to actual weapons and arsenals, has entered in recent years the American lexicon of nuclear strategy, arms control, and nonproliferation. While the term seems to have an intuitive appeal, largely due to its cyberspace imagery, its current use is still vague and loose. The author believes, however, that if the term is clearly delineated, it might offer a promising approach to conceptualizing certain current problems of proliferation. The first use is in a reference to an old problem that has resurfaced recently: the problem of growing availability of weapon-usable nuclear materials in civilian nuclear programs along with materials made `excess` to defense needs by current arms reduction and dismantlement. It is argued that the availability of these vast materials, either by declared nuclear-weapon states or by technologically advanced nonweapon states, makes it possible for those states to rapidly assemble and deploy nuclear weapons. The second use has quite a different set of connotations. It is derived conceptually from the imagery of computer-generated reality. In this use, one thinks of virtual proliferation and arsenals not in terms of the physical hardware required to make the bomb but rather in terms of the knowledge/experience required to design, assemble, and deploy the arsenal. Virtual weapons are a physics reality and cannot be ignored in a world where knowledge, experience, materials, and other requirements to make nuclear weapons are widespread, and where dramatic army reductions and, in some cases, disarmament are realities. These concepts are useful in defining a continuum of virtual capabilities, ranging from those at the low end that derive from general technology diffusion and the existence of nuclear energy programs to those at the high end that involve conscious decisions to develop or maintain militarily significant nuclear-weapon capabilities.

  11. Deterring Nuclear Proliferation: The Importance of IAEA Safeguards: A TEXTBOOK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, M.D.; Fishbone, L.G.; Gallini, L.; Krass, A.; Kratzer, M.; Sanborn, J.; Ward, B.; Wulf, N. A.

    2012-03-13

    Nuclear terrorism and nuclear proliferation are among the most pressing challenges to international peace and security that we face today. Iran and Syria remain in non-compliance with the safeguards requirements of the NPT, and the nuclear ambitions of North Korea remain unchecked. Despite these challenges, the NPT remains a cornerstone of the nuclear non-proliferation regime, and the safeguards implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) under the NPT play a critical role in deterring nuclear proliferation.How do they work? Where did they come from? And what is their future? This book answers these questions. Anyone studying the field of nuclear non-proliferation will benefit from reading this book, and for anyone entering the field, the book will enable them to get a running start. Part I describes the foundations of the international safeguards system: its origins in the 1930s - when new discoveries in physics made it clear immediately that nuclear energy held both peril and promise - through the entry into force in 1970 of the NPT, which codified the role of IAEA safeguards as a means to verify states NPT commitments not to acquire nuclear weapons. Part II describes the NPT safeguards system, which is based on a model safeguards agreement developed specifically for the NPT, The Structure and Content of Agreements between the Agency and States required in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, which has been published by the IAEA as INFCIRC/153. Part III describes events, especially in South Africa, the DPRK, and Iraq in the early 1990s, that triggered a transformation in the way in which safeguards were conceptualized and implemented.

  12. Nicole Nelson-Jean | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nicole Nelson-Jean Manager - Livermore Field Office Nicole Nelson-Jean A member of the Senior Executive Service, Nicole Nelson-Jean is the Manager at the Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Livermore Field Office (LFO) where she oversees a Federal team of 85 employees and provides oversight for the management, security, quality assurance, environment, health, safety, nonproliferation and national security missions at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  13. November/December 2010 | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    November/December 2010 November/December 2010 December 22, 2010 In this issue: * NNSA Secures Highly Enriched Uranium and Plutonium in Kazakhstan * VP Biden Presents Baldrige Quality Award to Kansas City Plant Contractor * Ken Baker Honored for Public Service * Abigail Cuthbertson Receives 201 Linton Brooks Medal for Public Service * Employees Throughout the Nuclear Security Enterprise Give Back This Holiday Season * Nonproliferation R&D Leads to Award-winning Cancer Screening Device *

  14. Anne Harrington tours new National Security Campus | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Anne Harrington tours new National Security Campus Wednesday, May 14, 2014 - 9:39am Anne Harrington, NNSA Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, visited the Kansas City Plant recently for a facility tour of the new National Security Campus and to receive project briefings on its proliferation deterrence programs. During the visit, Harrington toured the Analytical Sciences Lab, one of the most complete and diverse labs under one roof. The

  15. NNSA deputy administrator travels to Ukraine | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) administrator travels to Ukraine Thursday, April 14, 2016 - 10:02am From left, NNSA Director of Strategic Planning/Integration Andy Hood, STCU Executive Director Curtis Bjelajac, NNSA Deputy Administrator Anne Harrington, and NNSA Assistant Deputy Administrator Pete Hanlon. Earlier this month, Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Anne Harrington traveled to Ukraine to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Science and Technology Center in Ukraine

  16. NNSA Celebrates Women's History Month 2016 | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Celebrates Women's History Month 2016 Wednesday, April 6, 2016 - 11:10am From left, Amanda Quiones of the Department of Energy's Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Joyce Kim of DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability, Anne Harrington of NNSA's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, and Dr. Sara Richardson of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. NNSA Blog Department of Energy employees celebrated the legacy of women trailblazers, past and

  17. NNSA Employee Receives Service to America Medal | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Employee Receives Service to America Medal September 29, 2004 WASHINGTON, D.C. - For the second year in a row, an employee of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has earned a prestigious Service to America medal. Nicole Nelson-Jean, an NNSA employee who directs the Department of Energy's (DOE) office in Tokyo, received the award last night for her nonproliferation work in Russia, including leading a delegation of U.S. security specialists and engineers

  18. Nuclear Regulatory legislation: 103d Congress. Volume 2, No. 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 103d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

  19. Nuclear regulatory legislation: 102d Congress. Volume 1, No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 102d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include: The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

  20. Nuclear regulatory legislation, 102d Congress. Volume 2, No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 102d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

  1. Nuclear Regulatory legislation: 103d Congress. Volume 1, No. 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 103d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

  2. Nonproliferation and arms control assessment of weapons-usable fissile material storage and excess plutonium disposition alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (DOE-NN) with support from the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). Its purpose is to analyze the nonproliferation and arms reduction implications of the alternatives for storage of plutonium and HEU, and disposition of excess plutonium, to aid policymakers and the public in making final decisions. While this assessment describes the benefits and risks associated with each option, it does not attempt to rank order the options or choose which ones are best. It does, however, identify steps which could maximize the benefits and mitigate any vulnerabilities of the various alternatives under consideration.

  3. The Power of Integrators, Financiers, and Insurers to Reduce Proliferation Risks: Nuclear Dual-Use Goods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weise, Rachel A.; Hund, Gretchen

    2015-05-01

    Globalization of manufacturing supply chains has changed the nature of nuclear proliferation. Before 1991, nonproliferation efforts focused almost exclusively on limiting the spread of materials and equipment specifically designed for nuclear use -- reactors, centrifuges, and fissile material. Dual-use items, those items with both nuclear and non-nuclear applications, were not closely scrutinized or controlled. However, in 1991 the international community discovered that Iraq had developed a fairly sophisticated nuclear weapons program by importing dual-use items; this discovery spurred the international community to increase controls on dual-use technologies. Despite these international efforts, dual-use items are still a challenge for those seeking to limit proliferation.

  4. Prevent, Counter, and Respond - A Strategic Plan to Reduce Global Nuclear Threats (FY 2016-FY2020)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-03-01

    NNSA’s second core mission is reducing global nuclear dangers by preventing the acquisition of nuclear weapons or weapons-usable materials, countering efforts to acquire such weapons or materials, and responding to nuclear or radiological incidents. In 2015, NNSA reorganized its nonproliferation activities based on core competencies and realigned its counterterrorism and counterproliferation functions to more efficiently address both current and emerging threats and challenges. The reorganization accompanied the March 2015 release of the first ever Prevent, Counter, and Respond – A Strategic Plan to Reduce Global Nuclear Threats. This report, which NNSA will update annually, highlights key nuclear threat trends and describes NNSA’s integrated threat reduction strategy.

  5. Fission-suppressed fusion breeder on the thorium cycle and nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moir, R. W.

    2012-06-19

    Fusion reactors could be designed to breed fissile material while suppressing fissioning thereby enhancing safety. The produced fuel could be used to startup and makeup fuel for fission reactors. Each fusion reaction can produce typically 0.6 fissile atoms and release about 1.6 times the 14 MeV neutron's energy in the blanket in the fission-suppressed design. This production rate is 2660 kg/1000 MW of fusion power for a year. The revenues would be doubled from such a plant by selling fuel at a price of 60/g and electricity at $0.05/kWh for Q=P{sub fusion}/P{sub input}=4. Fusion reactors could be designed to destroy fission wastes by transmutation and fissioning but this is not a natural use of fusion whereas it is a designed use of fission reactors. Fusion could supply makeup fuel to fission reactors that were dedicated to fissioning wastes with some of their neutrons. The design for safety and heat removal and other items is already accomplished with fission reactors. Whereas fusion reactors have geometry that compromises safety with a complex and thin wall separating the fusion zone from the blanket zone where wastes could be destroyed. Nonproliferation can be enhanced by mixing {sup 233}U with {sup 238}U. Also nonproliferation is enhanced in typical fission-suppressed designs by generating up to 0.05 {sup 232}U atoms for each {sup 233}U atom produced from thorium, about twice the IAEA standards of 'reduced protection' or 'self protection.' With 2.4%{sup 232}U, high explosive material is predicted to degrade owing to ionizing radiation after a little over 1/2 year and the heat rate is 77 W just after separation and climbs to over 600 W ten years later. The fissile material can be used to fuel most any fission reactor but is especially appropriate for molten salt reactors (MSR) also called liquid fluoride thorium reactors (LFTR) because of the molten fuel does not need hands on fabrication and handling.

  6. National Center for Nuclear Security - NCNS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-11-12

    As the United States embarks on a new era of nuclear arms control, the tools for treaty verification must be accurate and reliable, and must work at stand-off distances. The National Center for Nuclear Security, or NCNS, at the Nevada National Security Site, is poised to become the proving ground for these technologies. The center is a unique test bed for non-proliferation and arms control treaty verification technologies. The NNSS is an ideal location for these kinds of activities because of its multiple environments; its cadre of experienced nuclear personnel, and the artifacts of atmospheric and underground nuclear weapons explosions. The NCNS will provide future treaty negotiators with solid data on verification and inspection regimes and a realistic environment in which future treaty verification specialists can be trained. Work on warhead monitoring at the NCNS will also support future arms reduction treaties.

  7. National Center for Nuclear Security - NCNS

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09

    As the United States embarks on a new era of nuclear arms control, the tools for treaty verification must be accurate and reliable, and must work at stand-off distances. The National Center for Nuclear Security, or NCNS, at the Nevada National Security Site, is poised to become the proving ground for these technologies. The center is a unique test bed for non-proliferation and arms control treaty verification technologies. The NNSS is an ideal location for these kinds of activities because of its multiple environments; its cadre of experienced nuclear personnel, and the artifacts of atmospheric and underground nuclear weapons explosions. The NCNS will provide future treaty negotiators with solid data on verification and inspection regimes and a realistic environment in which future treaty verification specialists can be trained. Work on warhead monitoring at the NCNS will also support future arms reduction treaties.

  8. NNSA Nonproliferation R&D Leads to Development of Award-Winning...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    material NNSA and BNL are incorporating into the next generation of tools to help prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons and crack down on nuclear smuggling across the globe. ...

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - Programmatic Update Nuclear Material...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    P&PD Tritium Modeling Non-Proliferation Compliance with Peaceful use ... Department of State Non-proliferation Compliance Monitoring Department of Defense ...

  10. U.S., Russia Celebrate Graduation of Nuclear Security Experts...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    in the area of disarmament and non-proliferation has never been so great as today," ... of peace, disarmament and non-proliferation." "Since 1997 the National Research ...

  11. Technical cooperation on nuclear security between the United States and China : review of the past and opportunities for the future.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, Arian Leigh

    2011-12-01

    The United States and China are committed to cooperation to address the challenges of the next century. Technical cooperation, building on a long tradition of technical exchange between the two countries, can play an important role. This paper focuses on technical cooperation between the United States and China in the areas of nonproliferation, arms control and other nuclear security topics. It reviews cooperation during the 1990s on nonproliferation and arms control under the U.S.-China Arms Control Exchange, discusses examples of ongoing activities under the Peaceful Uses of Technology Agreement to enhance security of nuclear and radiological material, and suggests opportunities for expanding technical cooperation between the defense nuclear laboratories of both countries to address a broader range of nuclear security topics.

  12. Nuclear export controls and the CTBT: Where we`ve been and challenges ahead -- Views of an engineer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundy, A.S.

    1998-09-01

    The paper discusses the following topics: the importance of export controls; the uniqueness of nuclear weapons and their export control requirements; ``dual-use`` controls; and recent developments in nonproliferation beyond export control. Also discussed are some non-obvious challenges which include computer modeling and visualization, and fissile material availability and instant nukes. The author concludes by asking the Nuclear Suppliers Group to consider whether there are ways to make its controls more effective.

  13. Safeguards-by-Design: Early Integration of Physical Protection and Safeguardability into Design of Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Bjornard; R. Bean; S. DeMuth; P. Durst; M. Ehinger; M. Golay; D. Hebditch; J. Hockert; J. Morgan

    2009-09-01

    The application of a Safeguards-by-Design (SBD) process for new nuclear facilities has the potential to minimize proliferation and security risks as the use of nuclear energy expands worldwide. This paper defines a generic SBD process and its incorporation from early design phases into existing design / construction processes and develops a framework that can guide its institutionalization. SBD could be a basis for a new international norm and standard process for nuclear facility design. This work is part of the U.S. DOEs Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), and is jointly sponsored by the Offices of Non-proliferation and Nuclear Energy.

  14. Nuclear Symbiosis - A Means to Achieve Sustainable Nuclear Growth while Limiting the Spread of Sensititive Nuclear Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shropshire

    2009-09-01

    Global growth of nuclear energy in the 21st century is creating new challenges to limit the spread of nuclear technology without hindering adoption in countries now considering nuclear power. Independent nuclear states desire autonomy over energy choices and seek energy independence. However, this independence comes with high costs for development of new indigenous fuel cycle capabilities. Nuclear supplier states and expert groups have proposed fuel supply assurance mechanisms such as fuel take-back services, international enrichment services and fuel banks in exchange for recipient state concessions on the development of sensitive technologies. Nuclear states are slow to accept any concessions to their rights under the Non-Proliferation Treaty. To date, decisions not to develop indigenous fuel cycle capabilities have been driven primarily by economics. However, additional incentives may be required to offset a nuclear state’s perceived loss of energy independence. This paper proposes alternative economic development incentives that could help countries decide to forgo development of sensitive nuclear technologies. The incentives are created through a nuclear-centered industrial complex with “symbiotic” links to indigenous economic opportunities. This paper also describes a practical tool called the “Nuclear Materials Exchange” for identifying these opportunities.

  15. Deployable Plume and Aerosol Release Prediction and Tracking System. Nuclear Non-Proliferation Task 1. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleppe, John; Norris, William; Etezadi, Mehdi

    2006-07-19

    This contract was awarded in response to a proposal in which a deployable plume and aerosol release prediction and tracking system would be designed, fabricated, and tested. The system would gather real time atmospheric data and input it into a real time atmospheric model that could be used for plume predition and tracking. The system would be able to be quickly deployed by aircraft to points of interest or positioned for deployment by vehicles. The system would provide three dimensional (u, v, and w) wind vector data, inversion height measurements, surface wind information, classical weather station data, and solar radiation. The on-board real time computer model would provide the prediction of the behavior of plumes and released aerosols.

  16. The Coming Nuclear Renaissance for Next Generation Safeguards Specialists--Maximizing Potential and Minimizing the Risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eipeldauer, Mary D

    2009-01-01

    This document is intended to provide an overview of the workshop entitled 'The Coming Nuclear Renaissance for the Next Generation Safeguards Experts-Maximizing Benefits While Minimizing Proliferation Risks', conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in partnership with the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This document presents workshop objectives; lists the numerous participant universities and individuals, the nuclear nonproliferation lecture topics covered, and the facilities tours taken as part of the workshop; and discusses the university partnership sessions and proposed areas for collaboration between the universities and ORNL for 2009. Appendix A contains the agenda for the workshop; Appendix B lists the workshop attendees and presenters with contact information; Appendix C contains graphics of the evaluation form results and survey areas; and Appendix D summarizes the responses to the workshop evaluation form. The workshop was an opportunity for ORNL, Y-12, and SRNL staff with more than 30 years combined experience in nuclear nonproliferation to provide a comprehensive overview of their expertise for the university professors and their students. The overall goal of the workshop was to emphasize nonproliferation aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle and to identify specific areas where the universities and experts from operations and national laboratories could collaborate.

  17. U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Samuel W. Bodman. "Our cooperative efforts support the Bush Administration's Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism, recently announced by Presidents Bush and Putin." ...

  18. Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Wang, Zhiguo; Prange, Micah P.; Wu, Dangxin

    2014-12-01

    This Final Report presents work carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators” (Project number: PL10-Scin-theor-PD2Jf) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project was divided into four tasks: 1) Electronic response functions (ab initio data model) 2) Electron-hole yield, variance, and spatial distribution 3) Ab initio calculations of information carrier properties 4) Transport of electron-hole pairs and scintillation efficiency Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the four tasks is provided in this Final Report. Furthermore, published peer-reviewed articles based on the work carried under this project are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  19. Applications of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Glen A.; Detwiler, Rebecca S.; Peplowski, Patrick N.

    2010-11-11

    Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) has the potential of addressing a wide variety of applications, which require isotopic and/or elemental information about a sample. We have investigated a variety of non-proliferation applications that may be addressed by NRF. From these applications, we have selected two, measuring uranium enrichment in UF6 cylinders and material verification in dismantlement, to investigate in more detail. Analytical models have been developed to evaluate these applications, and test measurements have been conducted to validate those models. We found that it is unlikely with current technology to address the requirements for UF6 cylinder enrichment measurements. In contrast, NRF is a very promising approach for material verification for dismantlement.

  20. Alarm Response Training Academy opens at Y-12 | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Alarm Response Training Academy opens at Y-12 Friday, October 24, 2014 - 8:43am NNSA Blog The Alarm Response Training Academy officially celebrated its new location at the Y-12 National Security Complex today. On hand to cut the ribbon were (from left) Teresa Robbins, NNSA Production Office Acting Assistant Manager for Environment, Safety, Health and Quality; Anne Harrington, NNSA Deputy Administrator, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation; and Morgan Smith, Chief

  1. National Nuclear Security Administration Fact Sheet Preliminary Notice of Violation: Worker Safety and Health Violations at

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nevada National Security Site On August 25, 2015, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) for violations of Department of Energy (DOE) worker safety and health requirements. NSTec is the management and operating contractor to DOE's NNSA Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The violations are associated with the chemical explosion that injured two workers at NNSS's Nonproliferation Test and

  2. DOE/NNSA, Norway Sign a New Memorandum of Understanding | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) DOE/NNSA, Norway Sign a New Memorandum of Understanding June 16, 2014 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Royal Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs today signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) under which Norway will continue its partnership with DOE/NNSA's global nonproliferation efforts. The MOU was signed by Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and Norway's Minister of Foreign

  3. Emergence of the nuclear industry and associated crime. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaught, J.W.

    1991-08-01

    Nuclear energy, in weapons production and electrical power generation, is a technology that has endured public scrutiny since the late 1940s. Societal acceptance of this industry has been affected by controversy in the following areas: health effects of exposure to radiation, possible consequences resulting from accidents, and nuclear nonproliferation. The literature review begins in Chapter 2 by examining the changing public perceptions of nuclear energy over the last forty years. Support for the ideals and practices of the industry has often wavered, due to media representation of incidents, accidents, and potential catastrophic events. The second part of the chapter highlights the crimes associated with nuclear energy in a chronological order of concern by nuclear industry security specialists. Research has found certain types of crime to be more prevalent during particular eras than others. Crimes instigated by spies, peace activists, terrorists, and the insider (employee) are reviewed, with an emphasis on insider crime.

  4. United States and Latvian Governments Sign Agreement to Allow Nonproliferation and Threat Reduction Cooperation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – As part of the Bush administration’s ongoing efforts to secure vulnerable nuclear materials worldwide, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Latvian Ministry of Environment...

  5. A Nonproliferation Third Party for Dual-use Industries - Legal Issues for Consideration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Frederic A.; Seward, Amy M.; Kurzrok, Andrew J.

    2012-10-01

    This paper discusses legal issues in connection with formation of a “third party” to facilitate information sharing and best practices by companies in nuclear-related dual-use industries.

  6. NON-PROLIFERATION IMPACT ASSESSMENT FOR GNEP: ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH TRANSPORTATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radel, Ross; Rochau, Gary E.

    2008-03-01

    This report evaluates transportation issues for nuclear material in the proposed Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) fuel cycle. Since many details of the GNEP program are yet to be determined, this document is intended only to identify general issues. The existing regulatory environment is determined to be largely prepared to incorporate the changes that the GNEP program will introduce. Nuclear material vulnerability and attractiveness are considered with respect to the various transport stages within the GNEP fuel cycle. Physical protection options are then outlined for the transportation of this nuclear material. It is determined that increased transportation security will be required for the GNEP fuel cycle, particularly for international transport. Finally, transportation considerations for several fuel cycle scenarios are discussed. These scenarios compare the current %22once-through%22 fuel cycle with various aspects of the proposed GNEP fuel cycle. 3

  7. Recommendations for a Department of Energy Nuclear Energy R and D Agenda Volume 2 Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The current US nuclear energy policy is primarily formulated as part of the nation`s overall energy policy. In addition, nuclear energy policy is impacted by other US policies, such as those for defense and environment, and by international obligations through their effects on nuclear weapons dismantlement and stewardship, continued reliance on space and naval nuclear power sources, defense waste cleanup, and on nuclear nonproliferation. This volume is composed of the following appendices: Appendix 1--Objectives of the Federal Government Nuclear Energy Related Policies and Research and Development Programs; Appendix 2--Nuclear Energy and Related R and D in the US; Appendix 3--Summary of Issues That Drive Nuclear Energy Research and Development; Appendix 4: Options for Policy and Research and Development; Appendix 5--Pros and Cons of Objectives and Options; and Appendices 6--Recommendations.

  8. Utility of Social Modeling in Assessment of a State’s Propensity for Nuclear Proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Whitney, Paul D.; Dalton, Angela C.; Olson, Jarrod; White, Amanda M.; Cooley, Scott K.; Youchak, Paul M.; Stafford, Samuel V.

    2011-06-01

    This report is the third and final report out of a set of three reports documenting research for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Security Administration (NASA) Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development NA-22 Simulations, Algorithms, and Modeling program that investigates how social modeling can be used to improve proliferation assessment for informing nuclear security, policy, safeguards, design of nuclear systems and research decisions. Social modeling has not to have been used to any significant extent in a proliferation studies. This report focuses on the utility of social modeling as applied to the assessment of a State's propensity to develop a nuclear weapons program.

  9. Issues Associated with IAEA Involvement in Assured Nuclear Fuel Supply Arrangements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, Carol E.; Mathews, Carrie E.

    2008-02-08

    Assured nuclear fuel supply has been discussed at various times as a mechanism to help limit expansion of enrichment and reprocessing (E&R) capability beyond current technology holders. Given the events in the last few years in North Korea and Iran, concern over weapons capabilities gained from acquisition of E&R capabilities has heightened and brought assured nuclear fuel supply (AFS) again to the international agenda. Successful AFS programs can be valuable contributions to strengthening the nonproliferation regime and helping to build public support for expanding nuclear energy.

  10. International safeguards: Accounting for nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishbone, L.G.

    1988-09-28

    Nuclear safeguards applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are one element of the non-proliferation regime'', the collection of measures whose aim is to forestall the spread of nuclear weapons to countries that do not already possess them. Safeguards verifications provide evidence that nuclear materials in peaceful use for nuclear-power production are properly accounted for. Though carried out in cooperation with nuclear facility operators, the verifications can provide assurance because they are designed with the capability to detect diversion, should it occur. Traditional safeguards verification measures conducted by inspectors of the IAEA include book auditing; counting and identifying containers of nuclear material; measuring nuclear material; photographic and video surveillance; and sealing. Novel approaches to achieve greater efficiency and effectiveness in safeguards verifications are under investigation as the number and complexity of nuclear facilities grow. These include the zone approach, which entails carrying out verifications for groups of facilities collectively, and randomization approach, which entails carrying out entire inspection visits some fraction of the time on a random basis. Both approaches show promise in particular situations, but, like traditional measures, must be tested to ensure their practical utility. These approaches are covered on this report. 15 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. NNSA Hosts NPT Parties at Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and one ... Maintaining the Stockpile non-proliferation Non-Proliferation Treaty ...

  12. Nuclear programs in India and Pakistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mian, Zia

    2014-05-09

    India and Pakistan launched their respective nuclear programs in the 1940s and 1950s with considerable foreign technical support, especially from the United States Atoms for Peace Program. The technology and training that was acquired served as the platform for later nuclear weapon development efforts that included nuclear weapon testing in 1974 and in 1998 by India, and also in 1998 by Pakistan - which had illicitly acquired uranium enrichment technology especially from Europe and received assistance from China. As of 2013, both India and Pakistan were continuing to produce fissile material for weapons, in the case of India also for nuclear naval fuel, and were developing a diverse array of ballistic and cruise missiles. International efforts to restrain the South Asian nuclear build-up have been largely set aside over the past decade as Pakistani support became central for the U.S. war in Afghanistan and as U.S. geopolitical and economic interests in supporting the rise of India, in part as a counter to China, led to India being exempted both from U.S non-proliferation laws and international nuclear trade guidelines. In the absence of determined international action and with Pakistan blocking the start of talks on a fissile material cutoff treaty, nuclear weapon programs in South Asia are likely to keep growing for the foreseeable future.

  13. Mesoscale to plant-scale models of nuclear waste reprocessing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noble, David Frederick; O'Hern, Timothy John; Moffat, Harry K.; Nemer, Martin B.; Domino, Stefan Paul; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick

    2010-09-01

    Imported oil exacerabates our trade deficit and funds anti-American regimes. Nuclear Energy (NE) is a demonstrated technology with high efficiency. NE's two biggest political detriments are possible accidents and nuclear waste disposal. For NE policy, proliferation is the biggest obstacle. Nuclear waste can be reduced through reprocessing, where fuel rods are separated into various streams, some of which can be reused in reactors. Current process developed in the 1950s is dirty and expensive, U/Pu separation is the most critical. Fuel rods are sheared and dissolved in acid to extract fissile material in a centrifugal contactor. Plants have many contacts in series with other separations. We have taken a science and simulation-based approach to develop a modern reprocessing plant. Models of reprocessing plants are needed to support nuclear materials accountancy, nonproliferation, plant design, and plant scale-up.

  14. International Nuclear Safeguards Inspection Support Tool (INSIST)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    St. Pierre, D.E.; Steinmaus, K.L.; Moon, B.D.

    1994-07-01

    DOE is committed to providing technologies to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to meet escalating monitoring and inspection requirements associated with the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). One example of technology provided to the IAEA is the information management and remote monitoring capabilities being customized for the IAEA by the International Safeguards Division of the Office of Non-Proliferation and National Security. The ongoing Safeguards Information Management Systems (SIMS) program is an interlaboratory effort providing the IAEA with a range of information management capabilities designed to enhance the effectiveness of their nuclear inspection activities. The initial commitment involved the customization of computer capabilities to provide IAEA with the basic capability to geographically organize, store, and retrieve the large quantity of information involved in their nuclear on site inspection activities in Iraq. This initial system, the International Nuclear Safeguards Inspection Support Tool (INSIST), was developed by DOE`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). To date, two INSIST workstations have been deployed at the IAEA. The first has been used to support the IAEA Action Team in the inspection of Iraqi nuclear facilities since August 1993. A second, and similar, workstation has been deployed to support environmental monitoring under the IAEA 93+2 Programme. Both INSIST workstations geographically integrate analog (video) and digital data to provide an easy to use and effective tool for storing retrieving and displaying multimedia site and facility information including world-wide maps, satellite and aerial imagery, on site photography, live inspection videos, and treaty and inspection textual information. The interactive, UNIX-based workstations have a variety of peripheral devices for information input and output. INSIST software includes commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) modules and application-specific code developed at PNL.

  15. United States Department of Energy Nuclear Materials Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newton, J. W.

    2002-02-27

    The Department of Energy launched the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in January 2000 to accelerate the work of achieving integration and cutting long-term costs associated with the management of the Department's nuclear materials, with the principal focus on excess materials. Management of nuclear materials is a fundamental and enduring responsibility that is essential to meeting the Department's national security, nonproliferation, energy, science, and environmental missions into the distant future. The effective management of nuclear materials is important for a set of reasons: (1) some materials are vital to our national defense; (2) the materials pose physical and security risks; (3) managing them is costly; and (4) costs are likely to extend well into the future. The Department currently manages nuclear materials under eight programs, with offices in 36 different locations. Through the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative, progress was during calendar year 20 00 in achieving better coordination and integration of nuclear materials management responsibilities and in evaluating opportunities to further coordinate and integrate cross-program responsibilities for the treatment, storage, and disposition of excess nuclear materials. During CY 2001 the Departmental approach to nuclear materials stewardship changed consistent with the business processes followed by the new administration. This paper reports on the progress of the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in evaluating and implementing these opportunities, and the remaining challenges in integrating the long-term management of nuclear materials.

  16. RISK-INFORMED BALANCING OF SAFETY, NONPROLIFERATION, AND ECONOMICS FOR THE SFR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apostolakis, George; Driscoll, Michael; Golay, Michael; Kadak, Andrew; Todreas, Neil; Aldmir, Tunc; Denning, Richard; Lineberry, Michael

    2011-10-20

    A substantial barrier to the implementation of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) technology in the short term is the perception that they would not be economically competitive with advanced light water reactors. With increased acceptance of risk-informed regulation, the opportunity exists to reduce the costs of a nuclear power plant at the design stage without applying excessive conservatism that is not needed in treating low risk events. In the report, NUREG-1860, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission describes developmental activities associated with a risk-informed, scenario-based technology neutral framework (TNF) for regulation. It provides quantitative yardsticks against which the adequacy of safety risks can be judged. We extend these concepts to treatment of proliferation risks. The objective of our project is to develop a risk-informed design process for minimizing the cost of electricity generation within constraints of adequate safety and proliferation risks. This report describes the design and use of this design optimization process within the context of reducing the capital cost and levelized cost of electricity production for a small (possibly modular) SFR. Our project provides not only an evaluation of the feasibility of a risk-informed design process but also a practical test of the applicability of the TNF to an actual advanced, non-LWR design. The report provides results of five safety related and one proliferation related case studies of innovative design alternatives. Applied to previously proposed SFR nuclear energy system concepts We find that the TNF provides a feasible initial basis for licensing new reactors. However, it is incomplete. We recommend improvements in terms of requiring acceptance standards for total safety risks, and we propose a framework for regulation of proliferation risks. We also demonstrate methods for evaluation of proliferation risks. We also suggest revisions to scenario-specific safety risk acceptance standards

  17. Extra-Territorial Siting of Nuclear Installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shea, Thomas E.; Morris, Frederic A.

    2009-10-07

    Arrangements might be created for siting nuclear installations on land ceded by a host State for administration by an international or multinational organization. Such arrangements might prove useful in terms of resolving suspicions of proliferation in troubled areas of the world, or as a means to introduce nuclear activities into areas where political, financial or technical capabilities might otherwise make such activities unsound, or as a means to enable global solutions to be instituted for major nuclear concerns (e.g., spent fuel management). The paper examines practical matters associated with the legal and programmatic aspects of siting nuclear installations, including diplomatic/political frameworks, engaging competent industrial bodies, protection against seizure, regulation to ensure safety and security, waste management, and conditions related to the dissolution of the extra-territorial provisions as may be agreed as the host State(s) achieve the capabilities to own and operate the installations. The paper considers the potential for using such a mechanism across the spectrum of nuclear power activities, from mining to geological repositories for nuclear waste. The paper considers the non-proliferation dimensions associated with such arrangements, and the pros and cons affecting potential host States, technology vendor States, regional neighbors and the international community. It considers in brief potential applications in several locations today.

  18. Nuclear Naval Propulsion: A Feasible Proliferation Pathway?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, Alicia L.

    2014-01-31

    There is no better time than now to close the loophole in Article IV of the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty (NPT) that excludes military uses of fissile material from nuclear safeguards. Several countries have declared their intention to pursue and develop naval reactor technology, including Argentina, Brazil, Iran, and Pakistan, while other countries such as China, India, Russia, and the United States are expanding their capabilities. With only a minority of countries using low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel in their naval reactors, it is possible that a state could produce highly enriched uranium (HEU) under the guise of a nuclear navy while actually stockpiling the material for a nuclear weapon program. This paper examines the likelihood that non-nuclear weapon states exploit the loophole to break out from the NPT and also the regional ramifications of deterrence and regional stability of expanding naval forces. Possible solutions to close the loophole are discussed, including expanding the scope of the Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty, employing LEU fuel instead of HEU fuel in naval reactors, amending the NPT, creating an export control regime for naval nuclear reactors, and forming individual naval reactor safeguards agreements.

  19. North Korea: The next nuclear nightmare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spector, L.S.; Smith, J.R.

    1991-03-01

    The crisis in the Persian Gulf has reawakened concerns over the spread of nuclear arms. Even before its invasion of Kuwait, Iraq's history of aggression and support for international terrorism triggered fears in Washington that its acquisition of nuclear weapons might damage international stability and US interests far more than the emergence of India, Israel, Pakistan, and South Africa as de facto nuclear powers. Thus, when the Gulf War began on January 16, Iraq's nuclear sites were among the first attacked by allied air strikes. Unfortunately, Iraq has not been the only hostile proliferator looming on the horizon. North Korea, which has been no less dedicated than Iraq to the use of violence to advance its expansionist goals, has also tenaciously pursued a nuclear-weapons capability. Moreover, the North Korean program is considerably closer to bearing fruit than the Iraqi effort. And although North Korea, like Iraq, has signed the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, unlike Iraq it has refused to conclude the safeguards agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency that the treaty requires.

  20. Recent Fast Neutron Imaging Measurements with the Fieldable Nuclear Materials Identification System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellington, Tracey; Palles, Blake A; Mullens, James Allen; Mihalczo, John T; Archer, Daniel E; Thompson, Thad; Britton Jr, Charles L; Ezell, N Dianne Bull; Ericson, Milton Nance; Farquhar, Ethan; Lind, Randall F; Carter, Jake

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes some recent fast neutron imaging measurements of the fieldable nuclear materials identification system (FNMIS) under development by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA-NA-22) for possible future use in arms control and nonproliferation applications. The general configuration of FNMIS has been previously described, and a description of the application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) electronics designed for FNMIS has been reported. This paper presents initial imaging measurements performed at ORNL with a Thermo Fisher API 120 DT generator and the fast-neutron imaging module of FNMIS.

  1. Strategic Nuclear Research Collaboration - FY99 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. J. Leahy

    1999-07-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has created the Strategic Nuclear Research Collaboration. The SNRC brings together some of America's finest laboratory and university nuclear researchers in a carefully focused research program intended to produce ''breakthrough'' solutions to the difficult issues of nuclear economics, safety, non-proliferation, and nuclear waste. This integrated program aims to address obstacles that stand in the way of nuclear power development in the US These include fuel cycle concerns related to waste and proliferation, the need for more efficient regulatory practices, and the high cost of constructing and operating nuclear power plants. Funded at an FY99 level of $2.58M, the SNRC is focusing the efforts of scientists and engineers from the INEEL and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to solve complex nuclear energy challenges in a carefully chosen, integrated portfolio of research topics. The result of this collaboration will be research that serves as a catalyst for future direct-funded nuclear research and technology development and which preserves and enhances the INEEL's role as America's leading national laboratory for nuclear power research. In its first year, the SNRC has focused on four research projects each of which address one or more of the four issues facing further nuclear power development (economics, safety, waste disposition and proliferation-resistance). This Annual Report describes technical work and accomplishments during the first year of the SNRC's existence.

  2. EXAMINING THE ROLE AND RESEARCH CHALLENGES OF SOCIAL MEDIA AS A TOOL FOR NONPROLIFERATION AND ARMS CONTROL TREATY VERIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, Michael J.; Cramer, Nicholas O.; Benz, Jacob M.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Kreyling, Sean J.; West, Curtis L.

    2014-05-13

    Traditional arms control treaty verification activities typically involve a combination of technical measurements via physical and chemical sensors, state declarations, political agreements, and on-site inspections involving international subject matter experts. However, the ubiquity of the internet, and the electronic sharing of data that it enables, has made available a wealth of open source information with the potential to benefit verification efforts. Open source information is already being used by organizations such as the International Atomic Energy Agency to support the verification of state-declared information, prepare inspectors for in-field activities, and to maintain situational awareness . The recent explosion in social media use has opened new doors to exploring the attitudes, moods, and activities around a given topic. Social media platforms, such as Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube, offer an opportunity for individuals, as well as institutions, to participate in a global conversation at minimal cost. Social media data can also provide a more data-rich environment, with text data being augmented with images, videos, and location data. The research described in this paper investigates the utility of applying social media signatures as potential arms control and nonproliferation treaty verification tools and technologies, as determined through a series of case studies. The treaty relevant events that these case studies touch upon include detection of undeclared facilities or activities, determination of unknown events recorded by the International Monitoring System (IMS), and the global media response to the occurrence of an Indian missile launch. The case studies examine how social media can be used to fill an information gap and provide additional confidence to a verification activity. The case studies represent, either directly or through a proxy, instances where social media information may be available that could potentially augment the evaluation

  3. Nuclear Proliferation Using Laser Isotope Separation -- Verification Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, S A

    2001-10-15

    Two levels of nonproliferation verification exist. Signatories of the basic agreements under the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty (NPT) agree to open their nuclear sites to inspection by the IAEA. A more detailed and intrusive level was developed following the determination that Iraq had begun a nuclear weapons development program that was not detected by the original level of verification methods. This level, referred to as 93+2 and detailed in model protocol INFCIRC/540, allows the IAEA to do environmental monitoring of non-declared facilities that are suspected of containing proliferation activity, and possibly further inspections, as well as allowing more detailed inspections of declared sites. 56 countries have signed a Strengthened Safeguards Systems Additional Protocol as of 16 July 2001. These additional inspections can be done on the instigation of the IAEA itself, or after requests by other parties to the NPT, based on information that they have collected. Since information able to cause suspicion of proliferation could arrive at any country, it is important that countries have procedures in place that will assist them in making decisions related to these inspections. Furthermore, IAEA inspection resources are limited, and therefore care needs to be taken to make best use of these resources. Most of the nonproliferation verification inspections may be concentrated on establishing that diversion of nuclear materials is not occurring, but some fraction will be related to determining if undeclared sites have nuclear materials production taking place within them. Of these, most suspicions will likely be related to the major existing technologies for uranium enrichment and reprocessing for plutonium extraction, as it would seem most likely that nations attempting proliferation would use tested means of producing nuclear materials. However, as technology continues to advance and new methods of enrichment and reprocessing are developed, inspection

  4. International training course on nuclear materials accountability for safeguards purposes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The two volumes of this report incorporate all lectures and presentations at the International Training Course on Nuclear Materials Accountability and Control for Safeguards Purposes, held May 27-June 6, 1980, at the Bishop's Lodge near Santa Fe, New Mexico. The course, authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a National system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both National and IAEA International safeguards objectives. Volume I, covering the first week of the course, presents the background, requirements, and general features of material accounting and control in modern safeguard systems. Volume II, covering the second week of the course, provides more detailed information on measurement methods and instruments, practical experience at power reactor and research reactor facilities, and examples of operating state systems of accountability and control.

  5. Nuclear regulatory legislation, 104th Congress. Volume 2, No. 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This document is the second of two volumes compiling statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 104th Congress, 2nd Session. It is intended for use as a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) internal resource document. Legislative information reproduced in this document includes portions of the Paperwork Reduction Act, various acts pertaining to low-level radioactive waste, the Clean Air Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act, the West Valley Demonstration Project Act, Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Export Licensing Statutes, and selected treaties, agreements, and executive orders. Other information provided pertains to Commissioner tenure, NRC appropriations, the Chief Financial Officers Act, information technology management reform, and Federal civil penalties.

  6. Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, L W; Moody, K J; Bradley, K S; Lorenzana, H E

    2011-02-18

    Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount, and

  7. Proliferation and nonproliferation in Ukraine: Implications for European and US security. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blank, S.J.

    1994-07-01

    The author explores the background, terms, and aftermath of the January 1994 tripartite agreement among Russia, Ukraine, and the United States concerning the removal of nuclear missiles located in Ukraine after the fall of the Soviet Union. Inasmuch as Ukraine is the true Russian window on Europe and the key determinant of whether a post-Soviet empire or unitary state can be recreated, the security dilemmas it faces are significant not only to Russia and Ukraine's European neighbors, but also to the United States. The author also examines the nature of Russia's threat to Ukraine and the implications of the new agreement for U.S. policy vis-a-vis Ukraine and Russia.

  8. Aerial Neutron Detection: Neutron Signatures for Nonproliferation and Emergency Response Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maurer, Richard J.; Stampahar, Thomas G.; Smith, Ethan X.; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wolff, Ronald S.; Rourke, Timothy J.; LeDonne, Jeffrey P.; Avaro, Emanuele; Butler, D. Andre; Borders, Kevin L.; Stampahar, Jezabel; Schuck, William H.; Selfridge, Thomas L.; McKissack, Thomas M.; Duncan, William W.; Hendricks, Thane J.

    2012-10-17

    From 2007 to the present, the Remote Sensing Laboratory has been conducting a series of studies designed to expand our fundamental understanding of aerial neutron detection with the goal of designing an enhanced sensitivity detection system for long range neutron detection. Over 35 hours of aerial measurements in a helicopter were conducted for a variety of neutron emitters such as neutron point sources, a commercial nuclear power reactor, nuclear reactor spent fuel in dry cask storage, depleted uranium hexafluoride and depleted uranium metal. The goals of the project were to increase the detection sensitivity of our instruments such that a 5.4 × 104 neutron/second source could be detected at 100 feet above ground level at a speed of 70 knots and to enhance the long-range detection sensitivity for larger neutron sources, i.e., detection ranges above 1000 feet. In order to increase the sensitivity of aerial neutron detection instruments, it is important to understand the dynamics of the neutron background as a function of altitude. For aerial neutron detection, studies have shown that the neutron background primarily originates from above the aircraft, being produced in the upper atmosphere by galactic cosmic-ray interactions with air molecules. These interactions produce energetic neutrons and charged particles that cascade to the earth’s surface, producing additional neutrons in secondary collisions. Hence, the neutron background increases as a function of altitude which is an impediment to long-range neutron detection. In order to increase the sensitivity for long range detection, it is necessary to maintain a low neutron background as a function of altitude. Initial investigations show the variation in the neutron background can be decreased with the application of a cosmic-ray shield. The results of the studies along with a representative data set are presented.

  9. Technical cooperation between IAE/NNC and U.S. DOE National Laboratories on nuclear export controls in Kazakhstan -- a status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Picologlou, B.; Cernicek, A.; Pakhnitz, V.; Koltysheva, G.

    1997-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsors technical cooperative agreements, also known as Lab to Lab agreements, between its National Laboratories and similar institutions in the Newly Independent States (NIS) for the purpose of sharing some of the experience and expertise on nuclear export controls and nonproliferation of the former with their NIS counterparts so that, in turn, they can provide technical support to their respective governments in nonproliferation matters. In Kazakhstan, two separate technical cooperative agreements involving the Institute of Atomic Energy of the National Nuclear Center, Argonne National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory were established in 1996. The tasks carried out during the first year of these technical cooperative agreements are described and the objectives and end products of the tasks are discussed.

  10. Arms Control and nonproliferation technologies: Technology options and associated measures for monitoring a Comprehensive Test Ban, Second quarter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter contains reprinted papers discussing technology options and associated measures for monitoring a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). These papers were presented to the Conference on Disarmament (CD) in May and June 1994. An interagency Verification Monitoring Task Force developed the papers. The task force included participants from the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, the Intelligence Community, the Department of Interior, and the Department of State. The purpose of this edition of Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies is to share these papers with the broad base of stakeholders in a CTBT and to facilitate future technology discussions. The papers in the first group discuss possible technology options for monitoring a CTBT in all environments (underground, underwater, atmosphere, and space). These technologies, along with on-site inspections, would facilitate CTBT monitoring by treaty participants. The papers in the second group present possible associated measures, e.g., information exchanges and transparency measures, that would build confidence among states participating in a CTBT.

  11. Technical and Political Assessment of Peaceful Nuclear Power Program Prospects in North Africa and the Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windsor, Lindsay K.; Kessler, Carol E.

    2007-09-11

    An exceptional number of Middle Eastern and North African nations have recently expressed interest in developing nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. Many of these countries have explored nuclear research in limited ways in the past, but the current focused interest and application of resources towards developing nuclear-generated electricity and nuclear-powered desalination plants is unprecedented. Consequently, questions arise in response to this emerging trend: What instigated this interest? To what end(s) will a nuclear program be applied? Does the country have adequate technical, political, legislative, nonproliferation, and safety infrastructure required for the capability desired? If so, what are the next steps for a country in preparation for a future nuclear program? And if not, what collaboration efforts are possible with the United States or others? This report provides information on the capabilities and interests of 13 countries in the region in nuclear energy programs in light of safety, nonproliferation and security concerns. It also provides information useful for determining potential for offering technical collaboration, financial aid, and/or political support.

  12. Proliferation Persuasion. Coercive Bargaining with Nuclear Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volpe, Tristan A.

    2015-08-31

    Why do states wait for prolonged periods of time with the technical capacity to produce nuclear weapons? Only a handful of countries have ever acquired the sensitive nuclear fuel cycle technology needed to produce fissile material for nuclear weapons. Yet the enduring trend over the last five decades is for these states to delay or forgo exercising the nuclear weapons option provided by uranium enrichment or plutonium reprocessing capabilities. I show that states pause at this threshold stage because they use nuclear technology to bargain for concessions from both allies and adversaries. But when does nuclear latency offer bargaining benefits? My central argument is that challengers must surmount a dilemma to make coercive diplomacy work: the more they threaten to proliferate, the harder it becomes to reassure others that compliance will be rewarded with nuclear restraint. I identify a range of mechanisms able to solve this credibility problem, from arms control over breakout capacity to third party mediation and confidence building measures. Since each step towards the bomb raises the costs of implementing these policies, a state hits a sweet spot when it first acquires enrichment and/or reprocessing (ENR) technology. Subsequent increases in proliferation capability generate diminishing returns at the bargaining table for two reasons: the state must go to greater lengths to make a credible nonproliferation promise, and nuclear programs exhibit considerable path dependency as they mature over time. Contrary to the conventional wisdom about power in world politics, less nuclear latency thereby yields more coercive threat advantages. I marshal new primary source evidence from archives and interviews to identify episodes in the historical record when states made clear decisions to use ENR technology as a bargaining chip, and employ this theory of proliferation persuasion to explain how Japan, North Korea, and Iran succeeded and failed to barter concessions from the

  13. Nuclear Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science Nuclear Science Experimental and theoretical nuclear research carried out at NERSC is driven by the quest for improving our understanding of the building blocks of...

  14. The Governance of Nuclear Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vergino, E S; May, M

    2003-09-22

    be successful. Regaining that consensus on the other hand means alleviating some fundamental insecurity on the part of states, and weakening the hold that terrorist groups have on some state governments. This in turn requires that some fundamental issues be addressed, with recognition that these are part of a suite of complex and dynamic interactions. Among these issues are: How will states provide for their own security and other central interests while preventing further proliferation, protecting against the use of nuclear weapons, and yet allowing for the possible expansion of nuclear power?; How best can states with limited resources to fight terrorist activities and safeguard nuclear materials be assisted in securing their materials and technologies?; What is the future role of international inspections? Does the IAEA remain the right organization to carry out these tasks? If not, what are the desired characteristics of a successor agency and can there be agreement on one?; How confident can we be of nonproliferation as latent nuclear weapon capabilities spread? The policies to address these and other issues must explicitly deal with NPT members who do not observe their obligations; NPT non-members; illicit trade in SNM and weapon technologies and the possibility of a regional nuclear war.

  15. Export possibilities for small nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campagna, M.S.; Hess, C.; Moor, P.; Sawruk, W.

    2007-07-01

    The worldwide deployment of peaceful nuclear technology is predicated on conformance with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty of 1972. Under this international treaty, countries have traded away pursuit of nuclear weapons in exchange for access to commercial nuclear technology that could help them grow economically. Realistically, however, most nuclear technology has been beyond the capacity of the NPT developing countries to afford. Even if the capital cost of the plant is managed, the costs of the infrastructure and the operational complexity of most nuclear technology have taken it out of the hands of the nations who need it the most. Now, a new class of small sodium cooled reactors has been specifically designed to meet the electrical power, water, hydrogen and heat needs of small and remote users. These reactors feature small size, long refueling interval, no onsite fuel storage, and simplified operations. Sized in the 10 MW(e) to 50 MW(e) range these reactors are modularized for factory production and for rapid site assembly. The fuel would be <20% U-235 uranium fuel with a 30-year core life. This new reactor type more appropriately fills the needs of countries for lower power distributed systems that can fill the gap between large developed infrastructure and primitive distributed energy systems. Looking at UN Resolution 1540 and the impact of other agreements, there is a need to address the issues of nuclear security, fuel, waste, and economic/legal/political-stakeholder concerns. This paper describes the design features of this new reactor type that specifically address these issues in a manner that increases the availability of commercial nuclear technology to the developing nations of the world. (authors)

  16. Integrated Global Nuclear Materials Management Preliminary Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, E; Dreicer, M

    2006-06-19

    The world is at a turning point, moving away from the Cold War nuclear legacy towards a future global nuclear enterprise; and this presents a transformational challenge for nuclear materials management. Achieving safety and security during this transition is complicated by the diversified spectrum of threat 'players' that has greatly impacted nonproliferation, counterterrorism, and homeland security requirements. Rogue states and non-state actors no longer need self-contained national nuclear expertise, materials, and equipment due to availability from various sources in the nuclear market, thereby reducing the time, effort and cost for acquiring a nuclear weapon (i.e., manifestations of latency). The terrorist threat has changed the nature of military and national security requirements to protect these materials. An Integrated Global Nuclear Materials Management (IGNMM) approach would address the existing legacy nuclear materials and the evolution towards a nuclear energy future, while strengthening a regime to prevent nuclear weapon proliferation. In this paper, some preliminary concepts and studies of IGNMM will be presented. A systematic analysis of nuclear materials, activities, and controls can lead to a tractable, integrated global nuclear materials management architecture that can help remediate the past and manage the future. A systems approach is best suited to achieve multi-dimensional and interdependent solutions, including comprehensive, end-to-end capabilities; coordinated diverse elements for enhanced functionality with economy; and translation of goals/objectives or standards into locally optimized solutions. A risk-informed basis is excellent for evaluating system alternatives and performances, and it is especially appropriate for the security arena. Risk management strategies--such as defense-in-depth, diversity, and control quality--help to weave together various technologies and practices into a strong and robust security fabric. Effective

  17. Nuclear Astrophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear & Uranium Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Status of U.S. nuclear outages (interactive) Nuclear power plants Uranium & nuclear fuel Spent nuclear fuel All nuclear data reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Nuclear plants and reactors Projections Recurring Uranium All reports Browse by Tag Alphabetical Frequency Tag Cloud Current Issues & Trends See more › U.S. nuclear outages this summer were higher than in summer 2015

  18. Nuclear Forensics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear forensics Nuclear Forensics AMS is a Powerful Tool for Nuclear Forensics Nuclear forensics, which can be applied to both interdicted materials and debris from a nuclear explosion, is the application of laboratory analysis and interpretation to provide technical conclusions (provenance, design, etc.) about a nuclear device or interdicted nuclear material. Nuclear forensic analysts can build confidence in their conclusions by employing multiple signatures that collectively minimize the

  19. Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The nuclear sites list and map shows how DOE nuclear operations are mostly divided between nuclear weapons stockpile maintenance, research and environmental cleanup. The operations are performed within several different facilities supporting nuclear reactor operations, nuclear research, weapons disassembly, maintenance and testing, hot cell operations, nuclear material storage and processing and waste disposal.

  20. Extended Deterrence, Nuclear Proliferation, and START III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speed, R.D.

    2000-06-20

    Early in the Cold War, the United States adopted a policy of ''extended nuclear deterrence'' to protect its allies by threatening a nuclear strike against any state that attacks these allies. This threat can (in principle) be used to try to deter an enemy attack using conventional weapons or one using nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons. The credibility of a nuclear threat has long been subject to debate and is dependent on many complex geopolitical factors, not the least of which is the military capabilities of the opposing sides. The ending of the Cold War has led to a significant decrease in the number of strategic nuclear weapons deployed by the United States and Russia. START II, which was recently ratified by the Russian Duma, will (if implemented) reduce the number deployed strategic nuclear weapons on each side to 3500, compared to a level of over 11,000 at the end of the Cold War in 1991. The tentative limit established by Presidents Clinton and Yeltsin for START III would reduce the strategic force level to 2000-2500. However, the Russians (along with a number of arms control advocates) now argue that the level should be reduced even further--to 1500 warheads or less. The conventional view is that ''deep cuts'' in nuclear weapons are necessary to discourage nuclear proliferation. Thus, as part of the bargain to get the non-nuclear states to agree to the renewal of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, the United States pledged to work towards greater reductions in strategic forces. Without movement in the direction of deep cuts, it is thought by many analysts that some countries may decide to build their own nuclear weapons. Indeed, this was part of the rationale India used to justify its own nuclear weapons program. However, there is also some concern that deep cuts (to 1500 or lower) in the U.S. strategic nuclear arsenal could have the opposite effect. The fear is that such cuts might undermine extended deterrence and cause a crisis in confidence

  1. Achieving competitive excellence in nuclear energy: The threat of proliferation; the challenge of inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1994-06-01

    Nuclear energy will have an expanding role in meeting the twenty-first-century challenges of population and economic growth, energy demand, and global warming. These great challenges are non-linearly coupled and incompletely understood. In the complex global system, achieving competitive excellence for nuclear energy is a multi-dimensional challenge. The growth of nuclear energy will be driven by its margin of economic advantage, as well as by threats to energy security and by growing evidence of global warming. At the same time, the deployment of nuclear energy will be inhibited by concerns about nuclear weapons proliferation, nuclear waste and nuclear reactor safety. These drivers and inhibitors are coupled: for example, in the foreseeable future, proliferation in the Middle East may undermine energy security and increase demand for nuclear energy. The Department of Energy`s nuclear weapons laboratories are addressing many of these challenges, including nuclear weapons builddown and nonproliferation, nuclear waste storage and burnup, reactor safety and fuel enrichment, global warming, and the long-range development of fusion energy. Today I will focus on two major program areas at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): the proliferation of nuclear weapons and the development of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) energy.

  2. October 2010 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Completes Largest Fuel Return Campaign 32 Years of Reactor Conversion NNSA Committed to Energy Efficiency, Savings NNSA Nonproliferation Program Develops Cutting-edge Dental...

  3. National Nuclear Security Administration Lawrence Livermore

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... many expectations in non-proliferation, emergency operations, and counterterrorism. ... strategic sponsors including counter-proliferation analysis for Department of Defense; ...

  4. National Nuclear Security Administration Babcock & Wilcox Technical

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Pantex supported efforts to remove proliferation materials by completing a shipment of ... In the area of non-proliferation Research & Development, Pantex supported an Executive ...

  5. Global Material Security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    PNNL researchers with nonproliferation and international safeguards work NNSA Researchers Advance Technology for Remote Reactor Monitoring Ambassador Ensher visits Y-12 and NNSS

  6. October 2010 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA Senior Leadership Team in Place NNSA Completes Largest Fuel Return Campaign 32 Years of Reactor Conversion NNSA Committed to Energy Efficiency, Savings NNSA Nonproliferation ...

  7. EIS-0218: Revised Record of Decision

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

  8. EIS-0218: Revision to the Record of Decision

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

  9. EIS-0218: Record of Decision

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

  10. EIS-0218: Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

  11. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H-CANYON FACILITY: IMPACTS OF FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS ON SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magoulas, V.

    2013-06-03

    The US has a non-proliferation policy to receive foreign and domestic research reactor returns of spent fuel materials of US origin. These spent fuel materials are returned to the Department of Energy (DOE) and placed in storage in the L-area spent fuel basin at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The foreign research reactor returns fall subject to the 123 agreements for peaceful cooperation. These “123 agreements” are named after section 123 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and govern the conditions of nuclear cooperation with foreign partners. The SRS management of these foreign obligations while planning material disposition paths can be a challenge.

  12. Constructing a large-scale 3D Geologic Model for Analysis of the Non-Proliferation Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagoner, J; Myers, S

    2008-04-09

    We have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern Great Basin, in support of a seismic wave propagation investigation of the 1993 Nonproliferation Experiment (NPE) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The model is centered on the NPE and spans longitude -119.5{sup o} to -112.6{sup o} and latitude 34.5{sup o} to 39.8{sup o}; the depth ranges from the topographic surface to 150 km below sea level. The model includes the southern half of Nevada, as well as parts of eastern California, western Utah, and a portion of northwestern Arizona. The upper crust is constrained by both geologic and geophysical studies, while the lower crust and upper mantle are constrained by geophysical studies. The mapped upper crustal geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary deposits, pre-Tertiary deposits, intrusive rocks of all ages, and calderas. The lower crust and upper mantle are parameterized with 5 layers, including the Moho. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geology at the NTS. Digital geologic outcrop data were available for both Nevada and Arizona, whereas geologic maps for California and Utah were scanned and hand-digitized. Published gravity data (2km spacing) were used to determine the thickness of the Cenozoic deposits and thus estimate the depth of the basins. The free surface is based on a 10m lateral resolution DEM at the NTS and a 90m lateral resolution DEM elsewhere. Variations in crustal thickness are based on receiver function analysis and a framework compilation of reflection/refraction studies. We used Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. For seismic studies, the geologic units are mapped to specific seismic velocities. The gross geophysical structure of the crust and upper mantle is taken from regional surface

  13. North Korea at the crossroads: Nuclear renegade or regional partner?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-05-01

    On March 12, North korea announced its intention to withdraw from the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), rather than accede to the International Atomic Energy Agency`s (IAEA) request for a first-ever special inspection of two undeclared sites believed to hold evidence that Pyongyang had violated its IAEA safeguards agreement. North Korea`s announcement is unprecedented in the history of the NPT, and if Pyongyang takes the other steps necessary for formal withdrawal, it could have serious implications for the region and for the global non-proliferation regime. On April 6, the five permanent members of the UN Security Council (Britain, China, France, Russia and the United States) held private discussions to explore ways to deal with this new challenge posed by North Korea. On that same morning, the Arms Control Association (ACA) held a special news conference to discuss the event and its implications. So the matter is now before the Security Council, and the outcome is tgoing to depend very much on the true nature of the North Korean program, an issue about which there are many different views.

  14. Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site.

  15. nuclear security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3%2A en Shaping the future of nuclear detection http:nnsa.energy.govblogshaping-future-nuclear-detection

    Learning techniques to combat nuclear trafficking, touring the...

  16. Nuclear Science

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Editor and Founder John Gilligan Professor of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Version 5.13 Welcome to the 2013 Edition of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Education (NS&EE)

  17. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Physics Nuclear Physics Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy security. ...

  18. Spent Nuclear Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nuclear & Uranium Glossary FAQS Overview Data Status of U.S. nuclear outages (interactive) Nuclear power plants Uranium & nuclear fuel Spent nuclear fuel All nuclear data ...

  19. ORNL/TM-2010/87

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... assay NPT Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons PIV physical ... IAEA, concluded pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). ...

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - 1_Cruz_Import Export_NMMSS 2013 Presentation...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Energy Act of 1954 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978 Treaties, Conventions and Agreements including: Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty International Atomic Energy ...

  1. Nuclear Science/Nuclear Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear science nuclear chemistry Nuclear Science/Nuclear Chemistry Nuclear Physics The 10-MV tandem accelerator at CAMS provides a platform for conducting nuclear physics experiment both for basic science and lab mission-related programs. For example, we performed a new cross section measurement of the astrophysically important reaction 40Ca(a,g)44Ti in which high purity CaO targets were irradiated with helium ions at several different discrete energies. The reaction rate was measured on-line

  2. Elementary! A Nuclear Forensics Workshop Teaches Vital Skills to International Practitioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brim, Cornelia P.; Minnema, Lindsay T.

    2014-04-01

    The article describes the Nuclear Forensics Workshop sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) and hosted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory October 28-November 8, 2013 in Richland,Washington. Twenty-six participants from 10 countries attended the workshop. Experts from from Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Pacific Northwest national laboratories collaborated with an internationally recognized cadre of experts from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and other U.S. agencies, IAEA, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, the United Kingdom Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), and the European Union Joint Research Center Institute for Transuranium Elements, to train practitioners in basic methodologies of nuclear forensic examinations.

  3. Quantitative assessment of proposals on assurance of nuclear fuel supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, T.; Kuno, Y.; Tanaka, S.

    2013-07-01

    The assurance of nuclear fuel supply has the potential to contribute to balancing peaceful use of nuclear power and nuclear nonproliferation. 5 proposals which provide the backup supply of the enrichment service in case of supply disruption, are investigated in this study. We investigated the 20 NPT countries which are non-nuclear-weapon states and possess operable commercial LWRs in October 2012 as potential participants for each proposal. As a result of literature researching, we have extracted factors that can be considered as important for a country to participate or not participate in the assurance of nuclear fuel supply. Then we have computed incentive and disincentive parameters for each country. The results show that the participation expectancy decreases in the order of IAEA Fuel Bank proposal, Russian LEU Reserve proposal, AFS proposal, WNA proposal and 6-Country proposal. The 'IAEA fuel bank proposal' would be triggered in case of the supply disruption which cannot be solved by the market mechanism and bilateral agreements.

  4. Nuclear Energy!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Energy Technical Assistance Nuclear Energy Technical Assistance "The United States will continue to promote the safe and secure use of nuclear power worldwide through a variety of bilateral and multilateral engagements. For example, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission advises international partners on safety and regulatory best practices, and the Department of Energy works with international partners on research and development, nuclear waste and storage, training, regulations,

  5. Measurement and Characterization of Nuclear Material at Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Dolan; M. Flaska; S. A. Pozzi; D. L. Chichester

    2009-07-01

    A measurement plan and preliminary Monte Carlo simulations are presented for the investigation of well-defined mixed-oxide fuel pins. Measurement analysis including pulse-height distributions and time-dependent cross-correlation functions will be performed separately for neutrons and gamma rays. The utilization of Monte Carlo particle transport codes, specifically MCNP-PoliMi, is discussed in conjunction with the anticipated measurements. Four EJ-309 liquid scintillation detectors with an accurate pulse timing and digital, offline, optimized pulse-shape discrimination method will be used to prove the dependency of pulse-height distributions, cross-correlation functions, and material multiplicities upon fuel pin composition, fuel pin quantity, and detector geometry. The objective of the measurements and simulations is to identify novel methods for describing mixed-oxide fuel samples by relating measured quantities to fuel characteristics such as criticality, mass quantity, and material composition. This research has applications in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation.

  6. Developments in the Nuclear Safeguards and Security Engineering Degree Program at Tomsk Polytechnic University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boiko, Vladimir I.; Demyanyuk, Dmitry G.; Silaev, Maxim E.; Duncan, Cristen L.; Heinberg, Cynthia L.; Killinger, Mark H.; Goodey, Kent O.; Butler, Gilbert W.

    2009-10-06

    Over the last six years, Tomsk Polytechnic University (TPU) has developed a 5 year engineering degree program in the field of Material Protection Control and Accounting (MPC&A). In 2009 the first students graduated with this new degree. There were 25 job offers from nuclear fuel cycle enterprises of Russia and Kazakhstan for 17 graduates of the program. Due to the rather wide selection of workplaces, all graduates have obtained positions at nuclear enterprises. The program was developed within the Applied Physics and Engineering Department (APED). The laboratory and methodological base has been created taking into consideration the experience of the similar program at the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI). However, the TPU program has some distinguishing features such as the inclusion of special courses pertaining to fuel enrichment and reprocessing. During the last two years, three MPC&A laboratories have been established at APED. This was made possible due to several factors such as establishment of the State innovative educational program at TPU, assistance of the U.S. Department of Energy through Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the financial support of the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority and some Russian private companies. All three of the MPC&A laboratories are part of the Innovative Educational Center Nuclear Technologies and Non-Proliferation, which deals with many topics including research activities, development of new curricula for experts training and retraining, and training of masters students. In 2008, TPU developed a relationship with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which was familiarized with APEDs current resources and activities. The IAEA has shown interest in creation of a masters degree educational program in the field of nuclear security at TPU. A future objective is to acquaint nuclear fuel cycle enterprises with new APED capabilities and involve the enterprises

  7. Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    About Our Programs Nuclear Security Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials ...

  8. When Sukamo sought the bomb: Indonesian nuclear aspirations in the mid-1960s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornejo, R.M.

    1999-03-01

    Proponents of nuclear nonproliferation, such as the United States, seek to develop policies that address the root causes of nuclear proliferation. The discipline of international relations aids in this effort by providing theories that attempt to explain why states choose to build nuclear weapons. Most theories simplify the process of proliferation by using only one of three generally accepted explanations: security, domestic politics, or norms. The case of Indonesia, however, illustrates that proliferation is best explained by investigating all three dimensions as well as the role of technology. This thesis evaluates competing theories of nuclear proliferation using a historical case study of Indonesia's aspirations to acquire nuclear weapons during 1964--1965, and supports the view that multiple variables are necessary to explain the spread of nuclear weapons. As evidence, this thesis examines Indonesian President Sukamo's little-known nuclear aspirations in the mid-1960s. Although Sukamo was ultimately unsuccessful in his effort to acquire atomic weapons, his decision to seek them was influenced by a variety of factors that included Indonesia's security needs, domestic political considerations, norms, and available nuclear energy technology.

  9. Nuclear Navy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This video tells the story of the Navy`s development of nuclear power and its application in long-range submarines and the growing nuclear surface force. Narrated by Frank Blair.

  10. Production of an English/Russian glossary of terminology for nuclear materials control and accounting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schachowskoj, S.; Smith, H.A. Jr.

    1995-05-01

    The program plans for Former Soviet Union National Nuclear Materials Control and Accounting (MC and A) Systems Enhancements call for the development of an English/Russian Glossary of MC and A terminology. This glossary was envisioned as an outgrowth of the many interactions, training sessions, and other talking and writing exercises that would transpire in the course of carrying out these programs. This report summarizes the status of the production of this glossary, the most recent copy of which is attached to this report. The glossary contains over 950 terms and acronyms associated with nuclear material control and accounting for safeguards and nonproliferation. This document is organized as follows: English/Russian glossary of terms and acronyms; Russian/English glossary of terms and acronyms; English/Russian glossary of acronyms; and Russian/English glossary of acronyms.

  11. ASCeNews Quarterly Newsletter - September 2011 | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    During the last quarter the NNSA Administrator has assigned us a new mission of broader national security, which includes counter-terrorism, non-proliferation, forensic and ...

  12. VIDEO: 2015 By the Numbers | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    PNNL researchers with nonproliferation and international safeguards work NNSA Researchers Advance Technology for Remote Reactor Monitoring Ambassador Ensher visits Y-12 and NNSS

  13. Administrator Highlights U.S.-Georgian Nuclear Security Cooperation in Tbilisi

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2010-09-01

    NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino highlighted the strong U.S.-Georgian cooperation on nuclear security issues during a day-long visit to the Republic of Georgia in mid-June. He briefed the media at availability at the Tbilisi airport. In April 2009, President Obama outlined an ambitious agenda to secure vulnerable nuclear material around the world within four years, calling the danger of a terrorist acquiring nuclear weapons "the most immediate and extreme threat to global security." In this year's State of the Union, he called the threat of nuclear weapons, "the greatest danger to the American people." In order to meet that challenge, the President's FY2011 Budget Request includes close to $2.7 billion for the National Nuclear Security Administration's Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation program -- an increase of 25.7 percent over FY2010. Included in that request is NNSA's Second Line of Defense (SLD) program, which works around the world to strengthen the capability of foreign governments to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime shipping system.

  14. Analysis of nuclear proliferation resistance reprocessing and recycling technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; Gary Cerefice; Marcela Stacey; Steven Bakhtiar

    2011-05-01

    The PUREX process has been progressively and continuously improved during the past three decades, and these improvements account for successful commercialization of reprocessing in a few countries. The renewed interest in nuclear energy and the international growth of nuclear electricity generation do not equate – and should not be equated -with increasing proliferation risks. Indeed, the nuclear renaissance presents a unique opportunity to enhance the culture of non-proliferation. With the recent revival of interest in nuclear technology, technical methods for prevention of nuclear proliferation are being revisited. Robust strategies to develop new advanced separation technologies are emerging worldwide for sustainability and advancement of nuclear energy with enhanced proliferation resistance. On the other hand, at this moment, there are no proliferation resistance advanced technologies. . Until now proliferation resistance as it applies to reprocessing has been focused on not separating a pure stream of weapons-usable plutonium. France, as an example, has proposed a variant of the PUREX process, the COEX TM process, which does not result on a pure plutonium product stream. A further step is to implement a process based on group extraction of actinides and fission products associated with a homogeneous recycling strategy (UNEX process in the US, GANEX process in France). Such scheme will most likely not be deployable on an industrial scale before 2030 or so because it requires intensive R&D and robust flowsheets. Finally, future generation recycling schemes will handle the used nuclear fuel in fast neutron reactors. This means that the plutonium throughput of the recycling process may increase. The need is obvious for advanced aqueous recycling technologies that are intrinsically more proliferation resistant than the commercial PUREX process. In this paper, we review the actual PUREX process along with the advanced recycling technologies that will enhance

  15. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Physics Nuclear Physics Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy security. Isotopes» A roadmap of matter that will help unlock the secrets of how the universe is put together The DOE Office of Science's Nuclear Physics (NP) program supports the experimental and theoretical research needed to create this roadmap. This quest requires a broad approach to different, but related, scientific

  16. Nuclear Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Nuclear Security Centers of Excellence: Fact Sheet March 23, 2012 "We [the Participating States]... Acknowledge the need for capacity building for nuclear security and cooperation at bilateral, regional and multilateral levels for the promotion of nuclear security culture through technology development, human resource development, education, and training; and stress the importance of optimizing international cooperation and coordination of

  17. Nuclear Counterterrorism

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-08-26

    The Order defines requirements for the protection of sensitive improvised nuclear device information and provides a framework to support DOE activities related to nuclear counterterrorism. (A supplemental DOE Manual, Control of and Access to Improvised Nuclear Device Information, provides requirements and procedures for protecting Sigma 20 information.) Appendices A and B are Official Use Only. Point of contact is Adam Boyd (NA-82), 202-586-0010. Supersedes DOE O 457.1 and DOE M 457.1-1.

  18. NUCLEAR ENERGY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ROADMAP Table of Contents List of Acronyms ................................................................................................... iii Executive Summary ............................................................................................... v 1. Introduction ...................................................................................................... 1 2. Background

  19. nuclear smuggling

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    13, 2015

    SHANGHAI, CHINA - Today, the Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Principal Assistant Deputy Administrator for Defense...

  20. nuclear material

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    width"300" >WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), in partnership with the Defense Threat Reduction...

  1. nuclear weapons

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    09, 2015

    WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and United States Air Force completed eight successful...

  2. nuclear controls

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    which "international safeguards are fully integrated into the design process of a new nuclear facility from the initial planning through design, construction, operation, and...

  3. nuclear forensics

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    serves as the premier technical leader in responding to and successfully resolving nuclear and radiological threats worldwide. When the need arises, NNSA is prepared to...

  4. Naval reactors in need of redesign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, David

    2015-05-15

    Nonproliferation concerns should propel US Navy to switch to safer nuclear fuel, says FAS task force.

  5. BAYESLOC

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002677WKSTN00 Bayesian Mulitple-Event Location https://missions.llnl.gov/nonproliferation/nuclear-explosion

  6. U.S. and Russian Laboratory Directors Meet in California, Plan...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    cooperation in areas that include non-proliferation, fundamental and applied research, ... cooperation in key areas of nuclear non-proliferation, energy, and science collaboration." ...

  7. SECTION J, APPENDIX A - SOW

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ......... 16 7.2 Non-Proliferation, Treaty Related Issues and ... and Nuclear Non-Proliferation in addition to other Department of Energy (DOE) offices. ...

  8. Microsoft Word - SEC J_Table of Contents

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ......... 19 6.2 Non-Proliferation, Treaty Related Issues and ... and Nuclear Non-Proliferation in addition to other Department of Energy (DOE) offices. ...

  9. 2013-04-12 1.2 H-FM&T Mod 029 (Admin)(Edited for Internet Posting...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ......... 17 6.2 Non-Proliferation, Treaty Related Issues and ... and Nuclear Non-Proliferation in addition to other Department of Energy (DOE) offices. ...

  10. India's baseline plan for nuclear energy self-sufficiency.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucher, R .G.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-01-01

    United Nations Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy in 1958. The paper described a three stage plan for a sustainable nuclear energy program consistent with India's limited uranium but abundant thorium natural resources. In the first stage, natural uranium would be used to fuel graphite or heavy water moderated reactors. Plutonium extracted from the spent fuel of these thermal reactors would drive fast reactors in the second stage that would contain thorium blankets for breeding uranium-233 (U-233). In the final stage, this U-233 would fuel thorium burning reactors that would breed and fission U-233 in situ. This three stage blueprint still reigns as the core of India's civil nuclear power program. India's progress in the development of nuclear power, however, has been impacted by its isolation from the international nuclear community for its development of nuclear weapons and consequent refusal to sign the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT). Initially, India was engaged in numerous cooperative research programs with foreign countries; for example, under the 'Atoms for Peace' program, India acquired the Cirus reactor, a 40 MWt research reactor from Canada moderated with heavy water from the United States. India was also actively engaged in negotiations for the NPT. But, on May 18, 1974, India conducted a 'peaceful nuclear explosion' at Pokharan using plutonium produced by the Cirus reactor, abruptly ending the era of international collaboration. India then refused to sign the NPT, which it viewed as discriminatory since it would be required to join as a non-nuclear weapons state. As a result of India's actions, the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) was created in 1975 to establish guidelines 'to apply to nuclear transfers for peaceful purposes to help ensure that such transfers would not be diverted to unsafeguarded nuclear fuel cycle or nuclear explosive activities. These nuclear export controls have forced India to be largely self-sufficient in all nuclear

  11. Nuclear Weapons Journal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Weapons Journal Nuclear Weapons Journal The Nuclear Weapons Journal ceased publication after Issue 2, 2009. Below are Nuclear Weapons Journal archived issues. Issue 2, 2009 ...

  12. 2013 Nuclear Workforce Development ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Myths Topics: Can a Nuclear Reactor Explode Like a Bomb? Will Nuclear Waste Be Around for Millions of Years? Is Nuclear Energy Dangerous? Moderator: Suzy Hobbs ...

  13. Technosocial Modeling for Determining the Status and Nature of a State’s Nuclear Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; Harvey, Julia B.

    2009-09-25

    The International Atomic Energy Agency State Evaluation Process: The Role of Information Analysis in Reaching Safeguards Conclusions (Mathews et al. 2008), several examples of nonproliferation models using analytical software were developed that may assist the IAEA with collecting, visualizing, analyzing, and reporting information in support of the State Evaluation Process. This paper focuses on one of the examples a set of models developed in the Proactive Scenario Production, Evidence Collection, and Testing (ProSPECT) software that evaluates the status and nature of a state’s nuclear activities. The models use three distinct subject areas to perform this assessment: the presence of nuclear activities, the consistency of those nuclear activities with national nuclear energy goals, and the geopolitical context in which those nuclear activities are taking place. As a proof-of-concept for the models, a crude case study was performed. The study, which attempted to evaluate the nuclear activities taking place in Syria prior to September 2007, yielded illustrative, yet inconclusive, results. Due to the inconclusive nature of the case study results, changes that may improve the model’s efficiency and accuracy are proposed.

  14. nuclear | National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    nuclear Nuclear Science Week releases 2015 Impact Report and 2016 Request for Proposal Last week the Nuclear Science Week (NSW) National Steering Committee released its impact ...

  15. Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Chernobyl Nuclear Accident Chernobyl Nuclear Accident Chernobyl, Ukraine A catastrophic nuclear accident occurs at Chernobyl Reactor 4 in the then Soviet Republic of Ukraine

  16. Special nuclear materials cutoff exercise: Issues and lessons learned. Volume 1: Summary of exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Libby, R.A.; Davis, C.; Segal, J.E.; Stanbro, W.D.

    1995-08-01

    In a September 1993 address to the United Nations General Assembly, President Clinton announced a new nonproliferation and export control policy that established a framework for US efforts to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. The new policy proposed that the US undertake a comprehensive approach to the growing accumulation of fissile material. One of the key elements was for the US to support a special nuclear materials (SNM) multilateral convention prohibiting the production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium for nuclear explosives purposes or outside of international safeguards. This policy is often referred to as the President`s Cutoff Initiative or the Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty (FMCT). Because both the US Department of Energy (DOE) and foreign reprocessing facilities similar to PUREX will likely to be inspected under a FMCT, the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation, Negotiations and Analysis Division (DOE/NN-41) tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to perform an information gathering exercise, the PUREX Exercise, using the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant located on the Hanford Site in Washington State. PUREX is a former production reactor fuel reprocessing plant currently undergoing a transition to a ``decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) ready`` mode. The PUREX Exercise was conducted March 29--30, 1994, to examine aspects of the imposition of several possible cutoff regimes and to study verification of non-production of SNM for nuclear weapons purposes or outside of safeguards. A follow-up activity to further examine various additional verification regimes was held at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on May 10, 1994.

  17. partnership | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    partnership NNSA hosts IAEA Directors to discuss emergency preparedness & response partnership NNSA hosted the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) - a core partner of the agency's global nonproliferation and counterterrorism efforts - to discuss cooperative efforts in emergency preparedness and response. Early in their visit, IAEA Deputy Director General Juan Carlos Lentijo

  18. Nuclear Counterterrorism

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-02-07

    The Order defines requirements for the protection of sensitive improvised nuclear device information and provides a framework to support DOE activities related to nuclear counterterrorism. (A supplemental DOE Manual, Control of and Access to Improvised Nuclear Device Information, provides requirements and procedures for protecting Sigma 20 information. The Manual is Official Use Only, and is not available on the Directives Portal. The point of contact for the Manual is Randall Weidman, NA-121.2, 202-586-4582.) Canceled by DOE O 457.1A

  19. Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials: FY 2014 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Wu, Dangxin; Prange, Micah P.

    2014-10-01

    This annual reports presents work carried out during Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials” (Project number: PL13-SciDriScintMat-PD05) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project is divided into three tasks: 1) Ab initio calculations of electronic properties, electronic response functions and secondary particle spectra; 2) Intrinsic response properties, theoretical light yield, and microscopic description of ionization tracks; and 3) Kinetics and efficiency of scintillation: nonproportionality, intrinsic energy resolution, and pulse shape discrimination. Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the three tasks is provided in this Annual Report. Furthermore, peer-reviewed articles published this FY or currently under review and presentations given this FY are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  20. National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  1. RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; HISTORICAL

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The early days Richards, P. 38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; TECHNETIUM 99; COLLOIDS; MOLYBDENUM...

  2. Survey and discussion of models applicable to the transport and fate thrust area of the Department of Energy Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    The availability and easy production of toxic chemical and biological agents by domestic and international terrorists pose a serious threat to US national security, especially to civilian populations in and around urban areas. To address this threat, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (CBNP) with the goal of focusing the DOE`s technical resources and expertise on capabilities to deny, deter, mitigate and respond to clandestine releases of chemical and biological agents. With the intent to build on DOE core competencies, the DOE has established six technology thrust areas within the CBNP Program: Biological Information Resources; Point Sensor Systems; Stand-off Detection; Transport and Fate; Decontamination; and Systems Analysis and Integration. The purpose of the Transport and Fate Thrust is to accurately predict the dispersion, concentration and ultimate fate of chemical and biological agents released into the urban and suburban environments and has two major goals: (1) to develop an integrated and validated state-of-the-art atmospheric transport and fate modeling capability for chemical and biological agent releases within the complex urban environment from the regional scale down to building and subway interiors, and (2) to apply this modeling capability in a broad range of simulation case studies of chemical and biological agent release scenarios in suburban, urban and confined (buildings and subways) environments and provide analysis for the incident response user community. Sections of this report discuss subway transport and fate models; buildings interior transport and fate modeling; models for flow and transport around buildings; and local-regional meteorology and dispersion models.

  3. Safeguards Guidance Document for Designers of Commercial Nuclear Facilities: International Nuclear Safeguards Requirements and Practices For Uranium Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Bean; Casey Durst

    2009-10-01

    This report is the second in a series of guidelines on international safeguards requirements and practices, prepared expressly for the designers of nuclear facilities. The first document in this series is the description of generic international nuclear safeguards requirements pertaining to all types of facilities. These requirements should be understood and considered at the earliest stages of facility design as part of a new process called “Safeguards-by-Design.” This will help eliminate the costly retrofit of facilities that has occurred in the past to accommodate nuclear safeguards verification activities. The following summarizes the requirements for international nuclear safeguards implementation at enrichment plants, prepared under the Safeguards by Design project, and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of NA-243. The purpose of this is to provide designers of nuclear facilities around the world with a simplified set of design requirements and the most common practices for meeting them. The foundation for these requirements is the international safeguards agreement between the country and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). Relevant safeguards requirements are also cited from the Safeguards Criteria for inspecting enrichment plants, found in the IAEA Safeguards Manual, Part SMC-8. IAEA definitions and terms are based on the IAEA Safeguards Glossary, published in 2002. The most current specification for safeguards measurement accuracy is found in the IAEA document STR-327, “International Target Values 2000 for Measurement Uncertainties in Safeguarding Nuclear Materials,” published in 2001. For this guide to be easier for the designer to use, the requirements have been restated in plainer language per expert interpretation using the source documents noted. The safeguards agreement is fundamentally a

  4. Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty seismic monitoring: 2012 USNAS report and recent explosions, earthquakes, and other seismic sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, Paul G.

    2014-05-09

    A comprehensive ban on nuclear explosive testing is briefly characterized as an arms control initiative related to the Non-Proliferation Treaty. The work of monitoring for nuclear explosions uses several technologies of which the most important is seismology-a physics discipline that draws upon extensive and ever-growing assets to monitor for earthquakes and other ground-motion phenomena as well as for explosions. This paper outlines the basic methods of seismic monitoring within that wider context, and lists web-based and other resources for learning details. It also summarizes the main conclusions, concerning capability to monitor for test-ban treaty compliance, contained in a major study published in March 2012 by the US National Academy of Sciences.

  5. nuclear navy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7%2A en Powering the Nuclear Navy http:www.nnsa.energy.govourmissionpoweringnavy

    Page...

  6. nuclear navy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7%2A en Powering the Nuclear Navy http:nnsa.energy.govourmissionpoweringnavy

    Page...

  7. Nuclear option

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, P.S.

    1983-03-01

    The energy demand complexion of this country is always changing and promises to change in the future. The nuclear industry is responding to changing energy demands through standards writing activities. Since the oil embargo of 1973, there has been a change in the mix of fuels contributing to energy growth in this country; virtually all of the energy growth has come from coal and nuclear power. The predicted expansion of coal use by 1985, over 1977 level, is 37%, while the use of oil is expected to decline by 17%. Use of nuclear power is expected to increase 62% from the 1977 level. The feasibility of using nuclear energy to meet the needs of the USA for electric power is discussed.

  8. Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Morgan C.

    2014-01-23

    PowerPoint presentation targeted for educational use. Nuclear data comes from a variety of sources and in many flavors. Understanding where the data you use comes from and what flavor it is can be essential to understand and interpret your results. This talk will discuss the nuclear data pipeline with particular emphasis on providing links to additional resources that can be used to explore the issues you will encounter.

  9. Nontoxic quantum dot research improves solar cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nonproliferation Policy Challenge: Address evolving threats/challenges to the nonproliferation and arms control regimes. Solution: Develop programs and strategies to address emerging nonproliferation and arms control challenges and opportunities. Learn More 10 CFR Part 810 Related Topics international security international security policy NIS nuclear controls safeguards safeguards and security verification Related News Nuclear Verification International Nuclear Safeguards Nonproliferation and

  10. Persistence of gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in proliferating and nonproliferating human mammary epithelial cells after exposure to gamma-rays or iron ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groesser, Torsten; Chang, Hang; Fontenay, Gerald; Chen, James; Costes, Sylvain V.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Parvin, Bahram; Rydberg, Bjorn

    2010-12-22

    To investigate {gamma}-H2AX (phosphorylated histone H2AX) and 53BP1 (tumour protein 53 binding protein No. 1) foci formation and removal in proliferating and non-proliferating human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) after exposure to sparsely and densely ionizing radiation under different cell culture conditions. HMEC cells were grown either as monolayers (2D) or in extracellular matrix to allow the formation of acinar structures in vitro (3D). Foci numbers were quantified by image analysis at various time points after exposure. Our results reveal that in non-proliferating cells under 2D and 3D cell culture conditions, iron-ion induced {gamma}-H2AX foci were still present at 72 h after exposure, although 53BP1 foci returned to control levels at 48 h. In contrast in proliferating HMEC, both {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci decreased to control levels during the 24-48 h time interval after irradiation under 2D conditions. Foci numbers decreased faster after {gamma}-ray irradiation and returned to control levels by 12 h regardless of marker, cell proliferation status, and cell culture condition. Conclusions: The disappearance of radiation induced {gamma}-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in HMEC have different dynamics that depend on radiation quality and proliferation status. Notably, the general patterns do not depend on the cell culture condition (2D versus 3D). We speculate that the persistent {gamma}-H2AX foci in iron-ion irradiated non-proliferating cells could be due to limited availability of double strand break (DSB) repair pathways in G0/G1-phase, or that repair of complex DSB requires replication or chromatin remodeling.

  11. Advanced international training course on state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the Advanced International Training Course on State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material held April 27 through May 12, 1981 at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico, and Richland, Washington, USA. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a state system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards. Major emphasis for the 1981 course was placed on safeguards methods used at bulk-handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at both the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the Exxon Nuclear fuel fabrication plant, Richland, Washington.

  12. SIGNATURES OF ILLICIT NUCLEAR PROCUREMENT NETWORKS: AN OVERVIEW OF PRELIMINARY APPROACHES AND RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webster, Jennifer B.; Erikson, Luke E.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Lewis, Valerie A.; Best, Daniel M.; Hogan, Emilie A.; Chikkagoudar, Satish

    2014-05-12

    The illicit trafficking of strategic nuclear commodities (defined here as the goods needed for a covert nuclear program excluding special nuclear materials) poses a significant challenge to the international nuclear nonproliferation community. Export control regulations, both domestically and internationally, seek to inhibit the spread of strategic nuclear commodities by restricting their sale to parties that may use them for nefarious purposes. However, export controls alone are not sufficient for preventing the illicit transfer of strategic nuclear goods. There are two major pitfalls to relying solely on export control regulations for the deterrence of proliferation of strategic goods. First, export control enforcement today relies heavily on the honesty and willingness of participants to adhere to the legal framework already in place. Secondly, current practices focus on the evaluation of single records which allow for the necessary goods to be purchased separately and hidden within the thousands of legitimate commerce transactions that occur each day, disregarding strategic information regarding several purchases. Our research presents two preliminary data-centric approaches for investigating procurement networks of strategic nuclear commodities. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been putting significant effort into nonproliferation activities as an institution, both in terms of the classical nuclear material focused approach and in the examination of other strategic goods necessary to implement a nuclear program. In particular, the PNNL Signature Discovery Initiative (SDI) has codified several scientific methodologies for the detection, characterization, and prediction of signatures that are indicative of a phenomenon of interest. The methodologies and tools developed under SDI have already been applied successfully to problems in bio-forensics, cyber security and power grid balancing efforts and they have now made the nonproliferation of

  13. Nuclear Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fossion, Ruben [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico D. F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico)

    2010-09-10

    The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction).Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

  14. Nuclear pursuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This table lists quantities of warheads (in stockpile, peak number per year, total number built, number of known test explosions), weapon development milestones (developers of the atomic bomb and hydrogen bomb, date of first operational ICBM, first nuclear-powered naval SSN in service, first MIRVed missile deployed), and testing milestones (first fission test, type of boosted fission weapon, multistage thermonuclear test, number of months from fission bomb to multistage thermonuclear bomb, etc.), and nuclear infrastructure (assembly plants, plutonium production reactors, uranium enrichment plants, etc.). Countries included in the tally are the United States, Soviet Union, Britain, France, and China.

  15. EIS-0218: Revised Record of Decision

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Revision of the Record of Decision for a Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

  16. U.S. Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Security: Ensuring America's nuclear security Environmental Responsibility: Protecting the ... Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Environmental Management Fossil Energy Energy ...

  17. Defense Nuclear Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Defense Nuclear Facility NNSA's safety office accredited and recognized for leadership in safe operation of defense nuclear facilities Part of NNSA's commitment to maintaining the nation's safe, secure, and effective nuclear deterrent are relentlessly high standards for technically capable nuclear enterprise personnel qualifications for all aspects of Defense Nuclear Facility operations. In December 2015, the Department of Energy

  18. Nuclear disarmament, disposal of military plutonium and international security problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slipchenko, V.S.; Rybatchenkov, V.

    1995-12-31

    One of the major issues of the current debate deals with the question: what does real nuclear disarmament actually involve? It becomes more and more obvious for many experts that it can no longer be limited to the reduction or elimination of delivery vehicles alone, but must necessarily cove the warheads and the fissile materials recovered from them, which should totally or partially be committed to peaceful use and placed under appropriate international safeguards, thus precluding their re-use for as weapons. There are various options as to how to solve the problems of disposal of fissile materials released from weapons. The optimal choice can only be made on the basis of a thorough study. This study should treat the disposal of weapon-grade plutonium and weapon-grade uranium as separate problems. The possible options for plutonium disposition currently discussed are as follows: (a) Storage in a form or under conditions not suitable for use in the production of new types of nuclear weapons. This option seems to be most natural and inevitable at the first phase, subject to determination of storage period, volume, and technology. Besides, the requirements of the international nuclear weapons nonproliferation regime could be met easily. Safe, secure, and controlled temporary storage may provide an appropriate solution of disposal of weapon-grade plutonium in the near future. (b) Energy utilization (conversion) of weapon-grade plutonium. The most efficient option of utilization of plutonium appears to be for nuclear power generation. This option does not exclude storage, but considers it as a temporary phase, which can, however, be a prolonged one: its length is determined by the political decisions made and possibilities existing to transfer plutonium for processing.

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