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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Nuclear Medicine | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Medicine Nuclear Medicine SHARE Nuclear Medicine The Medical Isotope Program is focused on the development of: improved reactor production and processing methods to provide medical radioisotopes; new radionuclide generator systems; design and evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals for applications in nuclear medicine and oncology; and association with Medical Cooperative Programs throughout the world for the further pre-clinical testing and clinical evaluation of agents developed at ORNL. In the United States, only ORNL has the combined resources of a stable isotope inventory, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), hot cell processing capabilities, and a wide range of support functions required for such research. These collective resources provide unique capabilities for

2

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography Stress Testing Rotation The Nuclear Medicine/CT angiography. Understand the indications for exercise treadmill testing and specific nuclear cardiology tests, safe use patient and learn the importance of physical and pharmacologic stress in nuclear cardiology 3. Interpret

Ford, James

3

Nuclear medicine and imaging research (instrumentation and quantitative methods of evaluation)  

SciTech Connect

This document is the annual progress report for project entitled 'Instrumentation and Quantitative Methods of Evaluation.' Progress is reported in separate sections individually abstracted and indexed for the database. Subject areas reported include theoretical studies of imaging systems and methods, hardware developments, quantitative methods of evaluation, and knowledge transfer: education in quantitative nuclear medicine imaging.

Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.; Chen, C.T.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Advanced Nuclear Medicine Initiative Owen Lowe  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Advanced Nuclear Medicine Initiative Owen Lowe Office of Isotopes for Medicine and Science Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology October 1, 2002 Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Lowe/Oct01_02 ANMI to NERAC.ppt (2) Advanced Nuclear Medicine Initiative Advanced Nuclear Medicine Initiative 6 Sponsor nuclear medical science research using a peer-review selection process * 9 three-year research grants awarded 6 Sponsor the training of individuals in nuclear medical science * 5 three-year education grants awarded 6 Continue research and education programs to completion; however, no additional funds for new grants is in the FY 2003 budget Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life

5

Biomarkers & Personalized Medicine Research and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomarkers & Personalized Medicine Research and Diagnostics. Purpose: SomaLogic is working to find biomarkers for ...

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

6

Measurements of activity in nuclear medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Measurements of activity in nuclear medicine. National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) develop the standards of activity measurement ...

7

Nuclear methods in environmental and energy research  

SciTech Connect

A total of 75 papers were presented on nuclear methods for analysis of environmental and biological samples. Sessions were devoted to software and mathematical methods; nuclear methods in atmospheric and water research; nuclear and atomic methodology; nuclear methods in biology and medicine; and nuclear methods in energy research.

Vogt, J R [ed.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Society of Nuclear Medicine Procedure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this guideline is to assist nuclear medicine practitioners in recommending, performing, interpreting, and reporting the results of lung scintigraphy for pulmonary embolism. II. Background Information and Definitions A. Aerosol Ventilation Scintigraphy A diagnostic imaging test that records the bronchopulmonary distribution of an inhaled radioactive aerosol within the lungs. B. Gas Ventilation Scintigraphy A diagnostic imaging test that records the pulmonary distribution of a radioactive gas during breathing maneuvers. C. Pulmonary Perfusion Scintigraphy A diagnostic imaging test that records the distribution

Guideline For Lung Scintigraphy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

AN ADMINISTRATIVE CHALLENGE: NUCLEAR MEDICINE  

SciTech Connect

The development of nuclear medicine facilities in hospitals in the United States is discussed, particularly in relation to the problems presented to hospital administration for understanding, organizing, and planning such facilities. The increase in the number of hospital radioisotope departments from 1952 to 1958 was 300%, a growth unparalleled by any other major hospital service. Today, 20%, of the hospitals in the U. S. maintain radioisotope departments. Reasons for the relative lag among smaller hospitals are discussed. Responsibilities of administrations, in seeing that A.E.C. licensing requirements for the use of radioisotopes in general hospitals are maintained, are outlined. Organization of a hospital isotopes committee and appointment of a safety officer is commented on. After an outline of the various radioisotope techniques most useful to the general hospital, the cost of the necessary equipment and other laboratory facilities is estimated. Other problems discussed in relation to responsibilities of hospital administrators include laundry decontamination, shielding, training of nursing personnel, information programs for personnel, legalities arising over radiation exposure claims, and the corresponding need for the keeping of records, autopsies, insurance, waste disposal, public fears and misconceptions, sanitation, and film badge monitoring. (H.H.D.)

Hellman, J.S.

1961-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

EA-0896; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) Center For Nuclear Medicine Research In Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West 6; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 DOCUMENT SUMMARY 1.1. Description 1.2 Alternatives 1.3 Affected Environment 1.4 Construction Impacts 1.5 Operating Impacts 2.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION 3.0 DESCRIPTION OF ALTERNATIVES INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION 3.1 Description of the Proposed Action 3.2.1 Construction Activities 3.2.2 Operation Activities 3.3 The No Action Alternative 3.4 Site Alternatives 4.0 THE AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 5.0 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 5.1 Construction Impacts 5.1.1 Sensitive Resources

11

(Nuclear theory). [Research in nuclear physics  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion. (LSP)

Haxton, W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

LABORATORY OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND RADIATION BIOLOGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MEDICINE AND RADIATION BIOLOGY MEDICINE AND RADIATION BIOLOGY 900 VETERAN AVENUE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90024 AND DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCES UCLA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90024 This manuscript is a contribution to the monograph edited by Daniel S. Berman and Dean Mason, entitled "Clinical Nuclear Cardiology". These studies were supported by Contract #DE-AM03-76-SF00012 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract #DE-AM03-76-SF00012 POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY OF THE HEART Heinrich R. Schelbert, M.D., Michael E. Phelps, Ph.D. and David E. Kuhl, M.D. DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the

13

The A-bomb, 50 years later: The evolution of nuclear medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the wake of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, the U.S. government began to invest heavily in its nuclear program. Nuclear medicine stood to gain from these postwar policies, but it also suffered some setbacks. Fifty years ago this month, two atomic bombs were dropped on Japan, killing thousands of civilians and ushering in a quick and final end to World War II. The beginning of the post-war era signaled the birth of nuclear medicine as it is widely applied today. In fact, the same nuclear reactor that produced elements for the A-bomb project was turned over for the mass production of radionuclides for medicine and industry. The link between the A-bomb and nuclear medicine, however, has always been a sensitive subject among nuclear physicians whose patients may associate radionuclide injections with mushroom clouds. Although this link is not justified, the government`s interest in developing nuclear technology following World War II did have a significant impact on nuclear medicine: on the upside, millions of federal dollars were funneled into the production of radionuclides for research and medicine. On the downside, Congress established the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC)-which later became the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-to oversee safety issues, making nuclear medicine the only medical field regulated by a federal agency.

Kotz, D.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Research Areas | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Research Highlights Facilities and Capabilities Educational Outreach Publications and Reports News and Awards...

15

Fully three-dimensional tomographic evolutionary reconstruction in nuclear medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3-D reconstruction in Nuclear Medicine imaging using completeMonte-Carlo simulation of trajectories usually requires high computingpower. We are currently developing a Parisian Evolution Strategy in order toreduce the computing cost of reconstruction ... Keywords: artificial evolution, compton scattering, computer tomography, emission tomography, flyalgorithm, nuclear medicine, parisian evolution

Aurélie Bousquet; Jean Louchet; Jean-Marie Rocchisani

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Nuclear Energy Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy and environmental security. Full development of a science-based approach for nuclear reactor and fuel cycle technology and systems is a "grand challenge" well suited to...

17

Nuclear Safety Research and Development Committee Charter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research and Development Committee Charter I. Purpose The intent of the Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Committee is to identify nuclear safety research needs and...

18

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

sitesallmodulescontribredisredis.autoload.inc). You are here Home International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report 2005 International Nuclear Energy...

19

Nuclear methods in environmental and energy research  

SciTech Connect

The topics considered in the seven sessions were nuclear methods in atmospheric research; nuclear and atomic methodology; nuclear methods in tracer applications; energy exploration, production, and utilization; nuclear methods in environmental monitoring; nuclear methods in water research; and nuclear methods in biological research. Individual abstracts were prepared for each paper. (JSR)

Vogt, J.R. (ed.)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Advanced Nuclear Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This report describes technical modifications implemented by INVAP to improve the safety of the Research Reactors the company designs and builds.

Lolich, J.V.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The development and use of radionuclide generators in nuclear medicine -- recent advances and future perspectives  

SciTech Connect

Although the trend in radionuclide generator research has declined, radionuclide generator systems continue to play an important role in nuclear medicine. Technetium-99m obtained from the molybdenum-99/technetium-99m generator system is used in over 80% of all diagnostic clinical studies and there is increasing interest and use of therapeutic radioisotopes obtained from generator systems. This paper focuses on a discussion of the major current areas of radionuclide generator research, and the expected areas of future research and applications.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research and Development Roadmap Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap NuclearEnergyRoadmapFinal.pdf More Documents & Publications Before the House Science and...

23

Nuclear Energy Protocol for Research Isotopes Owen Lowe  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protocol for Protocol for Research Isotopes Owen Lowe Office of Isotopes for Medicine and Science Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology April 16, 2002 Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Lowe/April16_02 NEPRI to NERAC.ppt (2) Nuclear Energy Protocol For Research Isotopes Nuclear Energy Protocol For Research Isotopes Why NEPRI? 6 NEPRI implements DOE funding priorities for fiscal year 2003 6 NEPRI will * Bring order to DOE's responses to requests for research isotopes * Introduce a high-quality peer review to the selection of research isotopes * Enable DOE to concentrate on operating its unique isotope production facilities Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology

24

Dictionary/handbook of nuclear medicine and clinical imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book covers the following topics: Fundamentals of English medical etymology, Abbreviations, acronyms, symbols, denotations, and signs commonly used or defined in the dictionary, Characteristics of the elements, Characteristics of practicable radioisotopes and of selected radionuclides commonly used in nuclear medicine, Properties and production of radionuclides, Radioactive decay, Radiopharmaceuticals, and Radiation dosimetry.

Iturralde, M.P. (Univ. of Pretoria and H.S. Verwoerd Hospital, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (ZA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Replenishment prioritization of highly perishable goods : a case study on nuclear medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Serving customers in a nuclear medicine supply chain requires frequent and responsive replenishments. Nuclear medicine is a special category of perishable goods that is subject to rapid, but predictable radioactive decay. ...

Yea, Young-bai Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Medicine Technology NAME:________________________________ OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY UID___________________________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Medicine Technology NAME:________________________________ OLD________________________________ Entrance Writing Sample Placement Test:_________________ LOWER DIVISION GENERAL EDUCATION Credits/Grade A____________________ Students must complete the following courses (or equivalent) prior to entering the nuclear medicine

27

Research Highlights | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News and Awards News and Awards Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research Highlights SHARE Research Highlights 1-3 of 3 Results Neutron scattering continues as a vital tool in superconductivity studies January 01, 2011 - In 2008, the totally unexpected discovery of a New class of superconductors, the iron pnictides, set off A Feverish international effort to understand them. Fabrication and Characterization of Uranium-based High Temperature Reactor Fuel June 01, 2013 - The Uranium Fuel Development Laboratory is a modern R&D scale lab for the fabrication and characterization of uranium-based high temperature reactor fuel. Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research June 01, 2013 - ORNL is the focus point for Light Water Reactor (LWR)

28

Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement - Nuclear Facility...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement - Nuclear Facility (CMRR-NF SEIS) | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

29

Nuclear Science Research Facilities Nuclear Science User Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LANSCE User Guide Nuclear Science Research Facilities #12;#12;Nuclear Science User Guide Table of Contents Introduction 3 Nuclear Science Research Facilities 3 The LANSCE Accelerator 4 Time structure techniques 8 Nuclear Science User Program 11 Proposal Process 13 Information for Prospective Users 14

30

Assessment of OEP health's risk in nuclear medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of ionizing radiation has been increased in recent years within medical applications. Nuclear Medicine Department offers both treatment and diagnosis of diseases using radioisotopes to controlled doses. Despite the great benefits to the patient, there is an inherent risk to workers which remains in contact with radiation sources for long periods. These personnel must be monitored to avoid deterministic effects. In this work, we retrospectively evaluated occupationally exposed personnel (OEP) to ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine during the last five years. We assessed both area and personal dosimetry of this department in a known Clinic in Sonora. Our results show an annual equivalent dose average of 4.49 {+-} 0.70 mSv in OEP without showing alarming changes in clinical parameters analyzed. These results allow us to conclude that health of OEP in nuclear medicine of this clinic has not been at risk during the evaluated period. However, we may suggest the use of individual profiles based on specific radiosensitivity markers.

Santacruz-Gomez, K.; Manzano, C.; Melendrez, R.; Castaneda, B.; Barboza-Flores, M.; Pedroza-Montero, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico and Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados CIMAV, A.C. Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico); Centro de Diagnostico Integral del Noroeste, Luis Donaldo Colosio 23 83000 Centro Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

31

MIT Nuclear Space Research Andrew C. Kadak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SELENE MIT Nuclear Space Research Andrew C. Kadak Professor of the Practice Nuclear Science with Nuclear Energy ­ Selene - Sodium-Cooled Epithermal Long-term Exploration Nuclear Engine (MS thesis) ­ The Martian Surface Reactor: An Advanced Nuclear Power Station for Manned Extraterrestrial Exploration

32

2006 NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH INITIATIVE AWARDS | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH INITIATIVE AWARDS 2006 NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH INITIATIVE AWARDS A chart listing the recipients of the 2006 Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Awards. 2006...

33

2006 Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Awards | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Awards 2006 Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Awards This is the list of winners from the 2006 Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Awards. 2006...

34

Research in theoretical nuclear physics  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses topics in the following areas: Low energy nuclear reactions induced by light and heavy ions; medium energy physics; and nuclear structure. (LSP)

Udagawa, T.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Choosing transportation alternatives for highly perishable goods : a case study on nuclear medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transport of highly perishable goods, in particular nuclear medicine, is subject to stringent regulations. Carefully designed transport selection criteria considering available alternatives, product attributes, decay ...

Yang, Xiaowen, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

BMC Nuclear Medicine BioMed Central BMC 1 2001, Nuclear Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Re-HEDP: pharmacokinetic characterization, clinical and dosimetric evaluation in osseous metastatic patients with two levels of radiopharmaceutical dose

Eduardo Savio; Javier Gaudiano; Ana M Robles; Henia Balter; Andrea Paolino; Andrea López; Juan C Hermida; Eugenia De Marco; Eduardo Osinaga

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Research and Development | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Research and Development Home > About Us > Our Programs >...

38

Institutional Research & Development Reports | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Institutional Research & Development Reports Home > About Us > Our...

39

Institutional Research & Development | National Nuclear Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Institutional Research & Development Home > About Us > Our...

40

Mitsuru Uesaka Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory ,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plasma cathode by 12 TW, 50 fs laser and its application to radiation chemistry Mitsuru Uesaka Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory , University of Tokyo June 26, 2004...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Research in theoretical nuclear physics  

SciTech Connect

The work done during the past year covers three separate areas, low energy nuclear reactions intermediate energy physics, and nuclear structure studies. This manuscript summarizes our achievements made in these three areas.

Udagawa, T.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

University Research Reactor Task Force to the Nuclear Energy Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

University Research Reactor Task Force to the Nuclear Energy University Research Reactor Task Force to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee University Research Reactor Task Force to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee In mid-February, 2001 The University Research Reactor (URR) Task Force (TF), a sub-group of the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC), was asked to: * Analyze information collected by DOE, the NERAC "Blue Ribbon Panel," universities, and other sources pertaining to university reactors including their research and training capabilities, costs to operate, and operating data, and * Provide DOE with clear, near-term recommendations as to actions that should be taken by the Federal Government and a long-term strategy to assure the continued operation of vital university reactor facilities in

43

Nuclear decay data files of the Dosimetry Research Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the nuclear decay data files used by the Dosimetry Research Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the utility DEXRAX which provides access to the files. The files are accessed, by nuclide, to extract information on the intensities and energies of the radiations associated with spontaneous nuclear transformation of the radionuclides. In addition, beta spectral data are available for all beta-emitting nuclides. Two collections of nuclear decay data are discussed. The larger collection contains data for 838 radionuclides, which includes the 825 radionuclides assembled during the preparation of Publications 30 and 38 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and 13 additional nuclides evaluated in preparing a monograph for the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. The second collection is composed of data from the MIRD monograph and contains information for 242 radionuclides. Abridged tabulations of these data have been published by the ICRP in Publication 38 and by the Society of Nuclear Medicine in a monograph entitled ``MIRD: Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes.`` The beta spectral data reported here have not been published by either organization. Electronic copies of the files and the utility, along with this report, are available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Eckerman, K.F.; Westfall, R.J.; Ryman, J.C.; Cristy, M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Research in theoretical nuclear physics  

SciTech Connect

The work done during the past year or so may be divided into three separate areas, low energy nuclear reactions, intermediate energy physics and nuclear structure studies. In this paper, we shall separately summarize our achievements made in these three areas.

Udagawa, Takeshi.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Institutional Research & Development | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

| National Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Institutional Research & Development Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and

46

Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Subcommittee Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to the Minutes for the to the Minutes for the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Subcommittee Meeting September 30 to October 1, 2002 MEMORANDUM To: Chairman, Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) From: Thomas B. Cochran, Member of NERAC Date: October 16, 2002 Subject: "A Technology Roadmap on Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems," a report of the NERAC Subcommittee on Generation IV Technology Planning Please include these additional remarks in your transmittal of the subject report to DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. Perhaps the greatest security threat to the United States today, and of paramount concern to American citizens since September 11, 2001, is that nuclear weapon- usable materials will be stolen, seized, or secretly diverted from nuclear facilities and then used by

47

NNSA, Philippine Nuclear Research Institute to Prevent Radiological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Philippine Nuclear Research Institute to Prevent Radiological Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

48

DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Nobels in Medicine Associated  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Nobels in Medicine Associated with the DOE and Predecessors Nobels in Medicine Associated with the DOE and Predecessors Information about affiliations: Office of Science DOE Nobel Laureates Alphabetical Listing Chronological Listing A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 2003 1997 1983 1979 1962 1958 1946 1934 Name Year Nobel Prize In Year Nobel Prize In B 2003 George Wells Beadle 1958 Physiology or Medicine Sir Peter Mansfield Physiology or Medicine C 1997 Allan M. Cormack 1979 Physiology or Medicine Stanley Prusiner Physiology or Medicine M 1983 Sir Peter Mansfield 2003 Physiology or Medicine Barbara McClintock Physiology or Medicine Barbara McClintock 1983 Physiology or Medicine

49

Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) agenda 11...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

agenda 11303 Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) agenda 11303 This is an agenda of the 110303 and 110403 Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC)...

50

Nuclear Safety Research and Development Committee Charter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research and Development Committee Charter Research and Development Committee Charter I. Purpose The intent of the Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Committee is to identify nuclear safety research needs and opportunities within the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and their program offices. The Committee promotes communication and coordination among DOE and NNSA program offices to enhance synergy on NSR&D efforts that can benefit the Department. The Committee will foster and facilitate networking and information exchange on NSR&D needs and activities across DOE/NNSA programs and with external national and international organizations. The Committee should not be construed to have any authority to direct DOE and/or NNSA program

51

Advanced research workshop: nuclear materials safety  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) on Nuclear Materials Safety held June 8-10, 1998, in St. Petersburg, Russia, was attended by 27 Russian experts from 14 different Russian organizations, seven European experts from six different organizations, and 14 U.S. experts from seven different organizations. The ARW was conducted at the State Education Center (SEC), a former Minatom nuclear training center in St. Petersburg. Thirty-three technical presentations were made using simultaneous translations. These presentations are reprinted in this volume as a formal ARW Proceedings in the NATO Science Series. The representative technical papers contained here cover nuclear material safety topics on the storage and disposition of excess plutonium and high enriched uranium (HEU) fissile materials, including vitrification, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication, plutonium ceramics, reprocessing, geologic disposal, transportation, and Russian regulatory processes. This ARW completed discussions by experts of the nuclear materials safety topics that were not covered in the previous, companion ARW on Nuclear Materials Safety held in Amarillo, Texas, in March 1997. These two workshops, when viewed together as a set, have addressed most nuclear material aspects of the storage and disposition operations required for excess HEU and plutonium. As a result, specific experts in nuclear materials safety have been identified, know each other from their participation in t he two ARW interactions, and have developed a partial consensus and dialogue on the most urgent nuclear materials safety topics to be addressed in a formal bilateral program on t he subject. A strong basis now exists for maintaining and developing a continuing dialogue between Russian, European, and U.S. experts in nuclear materials safety that will improve the safety of future nuclear materials operations in all the countries involved because of t he positive synergistic effects of focusing these diverse backgrounds of nuclear experience on a common objectiveÑthe safe and secure storage and disposition of excess fissile nuclear materials.

Jardine, L J; Moshkov, M M

1999-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

52

Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10/03/02 10/03/02 Appendix A to the Minutes for the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting September 30 to October 1, 2002 Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report October 3, 2002 The Roadmap Context The development of advanced nuclear energy systems in the U.S. will depend greatly on the continued success of currently operating light water nuclear power plants and the ordering of new installations in the short term. DOE needs to give those immediate objectives the highest priority and any additional support they require to assure their success. DOE is pursuing two initiatives to encourage a greater use of nuclear energy systems. The initiatives have been reviewed by NERAC Subcommittee on Generation IV

53

2006 NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH INITIATIVE AWARDS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH INITIATIVE AWARDS 6 NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH INITIATIVE AWARDS Lead Organization Project Title Collaborators Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative Massachusetts Institute of Technology The Development and Production of Functionally Graded Composite for Pb-Bi Service Los Alamos National Laboratory Massachusetts Institute of Technology Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation None North Carolina State University Development and Utilization of Mathematical Optimization in Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Analysis Argonne National Laboratory Purdue University Engineered Materials for Cesium and Strontium Storage None University of California- Berkeley Feasibility of Recycling Plutonium and Minor Actinides in Light Water Reactors Using Hydride Fuel Massachusetts Institute of

54

Materials Research Needs for Near-Term Nuclear Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / NSF Workshop on the Research Needs of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Technology / Material

John R. Weeks

55

Nuclear reactor and materials science research: Final technical report, May 1, 1985-September 30, 1986. [Academic and research utilization of reactor  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the 17-month period of the grant, May 1, 1985 - September 30, 1986, the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) was operated in support of research and academic programs in the physical and life sciences and in related engineering fields. The period encompassed MIT's fiscal year utilization of the reactor during that period may be classified as follows: neutron beam tube research, nuclear materials research and development, radiochemistry and trace analysis, nuclear medicine, radiation health physics, computer control of reactors, dose reduction in nuclear power reactors, reactor irradiations and services for groups outside MIT, and MIT research reactor. This paper provides detailed information on this research academic utilization.

Harling, O.K.

1987-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

56

Report of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee, Subcommittee on  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee, Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee, Subcommittee on Nuclear Laboratory Requirements Report of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee, Subcommittee on Nuclear Laboratory Requirements As an element of its plans to return the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site in eastern Idaho to its historic mission of nuclear technology development, the DOE asked its Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) to establish a Subcommittee on Nuclear Laboratory Requirements. The Subcommittee was charged with identifying the "characteristics, capabilities, and attributes a world-class nuclear laboratory would possess". It was also asked "to become familiar with the practices, culture, and facilities of other world-class laboratories - not

57

THE LAUNDRY OF A NUCLEAR RESEARCH CENTRE  

SciTech Connect

The special demands on the laundry of a nuclear research center are described. By the example of cleaning and ironing in two days the radioactive contaminated work clothing of a staff of 1200 coworkers, a detailed plan is given for the construction of a serviceable laundry and an exact description of the flow sheet is added. (auth)

Meixner, A.

1962-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Safer nuclear reactors could result from Los Alamos research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calendar Video Newsroom News Releases News Releases - 2010 March Safer nuclear reactors could result from research Safer nuclear reactors could result from Los...

59

2009 Annual Reports Issued for Nuclear Energy Research Initiative and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2009 Annual Reports Issued for Nuclear Energy Research Initiative 2009 Annual Reports Issued for Nuclear Energy Research Initiative and International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative 2009 Annual Reports Issued for Nuclear Energy Research Initiative and International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative July 2, 2010 - 11:49am Addthis On July 2, 2010, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) issued annual reports for its Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) andInternational Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI), describing accomplishments achieved in 2009. The NERI and I-NERI programs have furthered DOE goals for the past decade, conducting research into many of the key technical issues that impact the expanded use of advanced nuclear energy systems. Researchers have fostered innovative ideas

60

The Nuclear Fuel Industry Research Program Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This overview introduces the Nuclear Fuel Industry (NFIR) program to member utilities while also serving as a research status update for program participants. It includes detailed descriptions of various projects, relating both the technical backgrounds and the overall scope of work. NFIR program activities are geared toward providing long-term benefits to utilities and vendors by ensuring the safe and reliable use of core materials and components. Specific information can be obtained from published tech...

1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Proceedings of seventh symposium on sharing of computer programs and technology in nuclear medicine, computer assisted data processing  

SciTech Connect

The Council on Computers (CC) of the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) annually publishes the Proceedings of its Symposium on the Sharing of Computer Programs and Technology in Nuclear Medicine. This is the seventh such volume and has been organized by topic, with the exception of the invited papers and the discussion following them. An index arranged by author and by subject is included.

Howard, B.Y.; McClain, W.J.; Landay, M. (comps.)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Department of Energy Announces 24 Nuclear Energy Research Awards...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24 Nuclear Energy Research Awards to U.S. Universities Department of Energy Announces 24 Nuclear Energy Research Awards to U.S. Universities December 15, 2005 - 4:46pm Addthis 12...

63

Research helps safeguard nuclear workers worldwide - Argonne's Historical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research helps safeguard nuclear workers Research helps safeguard nuclear workers worldwide About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

64

Basic Research for Evaluating Nuclear Waste Form Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Argonne National Laboratory Specialists’ Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Nuclear Waste Management / Radioactive Waste

Don J. Bradley

65

Spectral Factor Analysis for Multi-isotope Imaging in Nuclear Medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In nuclear medicine, simultaneous dual-isotope imaging is used to determine the distribution of two radiotracers from a single acquisition and for emission/transmission (E/T) imaging in SPECT. However, no general solution to the cross-talk problem caused ...

Irène Buvat; S. Hapdey; Habib Benali; Andrew Todd-Pokropek; R. Di Paola

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

FY 2014 Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA FY 2014 Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) conducts crosscutting nuclear energy research and development (R&D) and associated infrastructure support activities to develop innovative technologies that offer the promise of dramatically improved performance for advanced reactors and fuel cycle concepts while maximizing the impact of DOE resources. NE strives to promote integrated and collaborative research conducted by national laboratory, university, industry, and international partners under the direction of NE's programs. NE funds research activities through both competitive and direct mechanisms, as required to best meet the needs of

67

FY 2014 Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2014 Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA FY 2014 Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA FY 2014 Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) conducts crosscutting nuclear energy research and development (R&D) and associated infrastructure support activities to develop innovative technologies that offer the promise of dramatically improved performance for advanced reactors and fuel cycle concepts while maximizing the impact of DOE resources. NE strives to promote integrated and collaborative research conducted by national laboratory, university, industry, and international partners under the direction of NE's programs. NE funds research activities through both competitive and direct mechanisms, as required to best meet the needs of

68

Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) Meeting of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meeting of November 3 and 4, 2003 Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) Meeting of November 3 and 4, 2003 The agenda for the National Energy Research Advisory...

69

Background Long history of research and education in "nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). #12;Master Programme in Nuclear Engineering · Coupling education ­ research (reactor physics#12;Background · Long history of research and education in "nuclear engineering" at Chalmers. · "Nuclear engineering" = multi-disciplinary research area. #12;Background Establishment of the Sustainable

Lemurell, Stefan

70

R. Shane Johnson, Associate Director Office of Advanced Nuclear Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Nuclear Research Advanced Nuclear Research September 30, 2002 Generation IV International Forum Generation IV International Forum Presentation to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Generation IV International Forum Generation IV International Forum 6 Government-sanctioned organization working together to plan the future of nuclear energy * Chartered in July 2002 * Conduct joint R&D on next-generation nuclear energy systems * Voluntary member participation in specific projects 6 Observer Organizations * OECD-NEA * IAEA * Euratom South Korea U.S.A. Argentina Brazil Canada France Japan South Africa United Kingdom Switzerland Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology

71

Research Areas | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

72

Research and Development | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

73

Research Reactor Conversion | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

74

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2007 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2007 Annual International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2007 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2007 Annual Report The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) supports the National Energy Policy by pursuing international collaborations to conduct research that will advance the state of nuclear science and technology in the United States. I-NERI promotes bilateral and multilateral scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) with other nations. Innovative research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses key issues affecting the future of nuclear energy and its global deployment by improving cost performance, enhancing safety, and increasing proliferation resistance of future nuclear energy systems. Information on the program

75

Radiation risk and nuclear medicine: An interview with a Nobel Prize winner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a speech given years ago at the Veterans Administration Medical Center, Bronx, NY, Rosalyn S. Yalow, 1977 Nobel Prize recipient for her invention of radioimmunoassay, made several salient points on the perception of fear or hazards from exposure to low-level radiation and low-level radioactive wastes. For the past three years, Yalow has been concerned with the general fear of radiation. In this interview, Newsline solicited Yalow`s views on public perceptions on radiation risk and what the nuclear medicine community can do to emphasize the fact that, if properly managed, the use of isotopes in medicine and other cases is not dangerous.

Yalow, R.S.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan This document constitutes the first edition of a long-term research and development (R&D) plan for nuclear technology in the United States. The federally-sponsored nuclear technology programs of the United States are almost exclusively the province of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The nuclear energy areas in DOE include, but are not limited to, R&D related to power reactors and the responsibility for the waste management system for final disposition of the spent fuel resulting from nuclear power reactors. Although a major use of nuclear technology is to supply energy for electricity production, the DOE has far broader roles regarding nuclear

77

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation » Bilateral Cooperation » International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports August 13, 2013 International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report Nuclear energy represents the single largest carbon-free baseload source of energy in the United States, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low-carbon production. Worldwide, nuclear power generates 14 percent of global electricity. Continually increasing demand for clean energy both domestically and across the globe, combined with research designed to make nuclear power ever-safer and more cost-effective, will keep nuclear in the energy mix for the

78

Report of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee, Subcommittee on  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee, of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee, Subcommittee on Nuclear Laboratory Requirements Report of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee, Subcommittee on Nuclear Laboratory Requirements As an element of its plans to return the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site in eastern Idaho to its historic mission of nuclear technology development, the DOE asked its Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) to establish a Subcommittee on Nuclear Laboratory Requirements. The Subcommittee was charged with identifying the "characteristics, capabilities, and attributes a world-class nuclear laboratory would possess". It was also asked "to become familiar with the practices, culture, and facilities of other world-class laboratories - not

79

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report Nuclear energy represents the single largest carbon-free baseload source of energy in the United States, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low-carbon production. Worldwide, nuclear power generates 14 percent of global electricity. Continually increasing demand for clean energy both domestically and across the globe, combined with research designed to make nuclear power ever-safer and more cost-effective, will keep nuclear in the energy mix for the foreseeable future. U.S. researchers are collaborating with nuclear scientists and engineers around the world to develop new technologies that will lower costs,

80

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2010 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 Annual 10 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2010 Annual Report The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) is a research-oriented collaborative program that supports the advancement of nuclear science and technology in the United States and the world. Innovative research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses key issues affecting the future use of nuclear energy and its global deployment. The 2010 Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap issued by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), identifies these issues as high capital costs, safety, high-level nuclear waste management, and non-proliferation. Projects under the I-NERI program investigate ways to address these challenges and support future nuclear

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation | National Nuclear Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation

82

Solar and nuclear energy expertise to be enhanced by research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy frontier research centers Solar and nuclear energy expertise to be enhanced by research centers Los Alamos will be home to two new Energy Frontier Research Centers through a...

83

SRNL Project Supports Nuclear Energy Research  

will provide necessary data and analyses to further U.S. nuclear fuel cycle technology development, meet the need for advanced nuclear energy

84

Summary, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 1998, DOE established the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) to provide advice to the Secretary and to the Director, Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology (NE), on...

85

Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research | National Nuclear Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Jasper Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Research and Development >

86

Laboratory Directed Research & Development | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Laboratory Directed Research & Development | National Nuclear Security Laboratory Directed Research & Development | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratory Directed Research & Development Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and

87

Collaborative research helps Alexis Kaplan pursue her interest in nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaborative research helps Alexis Kaplan pursue her interest in Collaborative research helps Alexis Kaplan pursue her interest in nuclear engineering Collaborative research helps Alexis Kaplan pursue her interest in nuclear engineering Nuclear Engineering graduate research assistant designs a prototype for a system that will measure the used fuel that comes out of nuclear reactors. August 22, 2013 Alexis Kaplan Alexis Kaplan, a graduate research assistant, relocates to the small town of Los Alamos to finish her PhD thesis research with the Safeguards Science and Technology group. Alexis and her team of nuclear, mechanical, and electrical engineers are designing and building a prototype for a system that will measure the used fuel that comes out of nuclear reactors. "I feel like I have 4 or 5 mentors. That is one of my favorite things

88

Strategic Nuclear Research Collaboration - FY99 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has created the Strategic Nuclear Research Collaboration. The SNRC brings together some of America's finest laboratory and university nuclear researchers in a carefully focused research program intended to produce ''breakthrough'' solutions to the difficult issues of nuclear economics, safety, non-proliferation, and nuclear waste. This integrated program aims to address obstacles that stand in the way of nuclear power development in the US These include fuel cycle concerns related to waste and proliferation, the need for more efficient regulatory practices, and the high cost of constructing and operating nuclear power plants. Funded at an FY99 level of $2.58M, the SNRC is focusing the efforts of scientists and engineers from the INEEL and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to solve complex nuclear energy challenges in a carefully chosen, integrated portfolio of research topics. The result of this collaboration will be research that serves as a catalyst for future direct-funded nuclear research and technology development and which preserves and enhances the INEEL's role as America's leading national laboratory for nuclear power research. In its first year, the SNRC has focused on four research projects each of which address one or more of the four issues facing further nuclear power development (economics, safety, waste disposition and proliferation-resistance). This Annual Report describes technical work and accomplishments during the first year of the SNRC's existence.

T. J. Leahy

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

EIS-0310: Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

310: Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility...

90

EIS-0310: Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility...

91

EXPERIMENTAL AND CALCULATED RESEARCHES OF NUCLEAR-PHYSICS CHARACTERIST...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 Session 12: Engineering and Criticality Experimental And Calculated Researches of Nuclear-Physics Characteristics Of Assemblies Containing 237 Np + 239 Pu(98%) in The Core...

92

Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems. Summarizes current status ...

93

Energy Department Announces New Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces New Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Announces New Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Research Energy Department Announces New Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Research April 16, 2013 - 12:19pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of its commitment to developing an effective strategy for the safe and secure storage and management of used nuclear fuel, the Energy Department today announced a new dry storage research and development project led by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The project will design and demonstrate dry storage cask technology for high burn-up spent nuclear fuels that have been removed from commercial nuclear power plants. "The Energy Department is committed to advancing clean, reliable and safe nuclear power - which provides the largest source of low-carbon

94

Energy Department Announces New Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Research Energy Department Announces New Investment in Nuclear Fuel Storage Research April 16, 2013 - 12:19pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of its commitment to developing an effective strategy for the safe and secure storage and management of used nuclear fuel, the Energy Department today announced a new dry storage research and development project led by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The project will design and demonstrate dry storage cask technology for high burn-up spent nuclear fuels that have been removed from commercial nuclear power plants. "The Energy Department is committed to advancing clean, reliable and safe nuclear power - which provides the largest source of low-carbon

95

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2008 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Annual 8 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2008 Annual Report The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) is an international, research-oriented initiative that supports the advancement of nuclear science and technology in the United States and the world. I-NERI promotes bilateral scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) with other nations. Innovative research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses key issues affecting the future use of nuclear energy and its global deployment by improving cost performance, enhancing safety, and increasing proliferation resistance of future nuclear energy systems. A link to the program can be found at the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) website:

96

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2009 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 Annual 9 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2009 Annual Report The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) is an international, research-oriented collaboration that supports advancement of nuclear science and technology in the United States and the world. I-NERI promotes bilateral scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) with other nations. Innovative research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses key issues affecting the future use of nuclear energy and its global deployment by improving cost performance, enhancing safety, and increasing proliferation resistance of future nuclear energy systems. A link to the program can be found at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy website.

97

GENETICS RESEARCH PROGRAM OF THE DIVISION OF BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE  

SciTech Connect

The Atomic Energy Commission and its predecessor, the Manhattan Engineering District, have supported a number of studies on the genetic effects of radiation. Abstracts are presented of the individual research projects in effect in 1960. The name or names of the investigators, the home institution, and the title of each project are included. (C.H.)

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Nuclear Safety Research and Development Committee Charter | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research and Development Committee Charter Research and Development Committee Charter Nuclear Safety Research and Development Committee Charter July 5, 2012 Nuclear Safety Research and Development Committee Charter The intent of the Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Committee is to identify nuclear safety research needs and opportunities within the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and their program offices. The Committee promotes communication and coordination among DOE and NNSA program offices to enhance synergy on NSR&D efforts that can benefit the Department. The Committee will foster and facilitate networking and information exchange on NSR&D needs and activities across DOE/NNSA programs and with external national and international organizations. The Committee should not be construed to have

99

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report 2005 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report 2005 The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) supports the National Energy Policy by conducting research to advance the state of nuclear science and technology in the United States. I-NERI sponsors innovative scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) in cooperation with participating countries. The research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses the key issues affecting the future of nuclear energy and its global deployment. I-NERI research is directed towards improving cost performance, increasing proliferation resistance, enhancing safety, and improving the waste management of future nuclear energy systems. This I-NERI 2005 Annual Report serves to inform interested parties about

100

Institutional Research & Development | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

& Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs > Institutional Research & Development Institutional Research & Development...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Laboratory Directed Research & Development | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

& Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs > Institutional Research & Development > Laboratory Directed Research &...

102

Comparison of Brazilian researchers in clinical medicine: are criteria for ranking well-adjusted?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantifying the relative performance of individual scholars has become an integral part of decision-making in research policy. The objective of the present study was to evaluate if the scholarship rank of Brazilian Council for Scientific and Technological ... Keywords: Clinical medicine, H index, Health postgraduate programs, Health sciences, I23, Scientific publication indicators, Scopus

Eduardo A. Oliveira; Enrico A. Colosimo; Daniella R. Martelli; Isabel G. Quirino; Maria Christina Oliveira; Leonardo S. Lima; Ana Cristina Simões E Silva; Hercílio Martelli-Júnior

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Nuclear reactor and materials science research: Technical report, May 1, 1985-September 30, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Throughout the 17-month period of its grant, May 1, 1985-September 30, 1986, the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) was operated in support of research and academic programs in the physical and life sciences and in related engineering fields. The reactor was operated 4115 hours during FY 1986 and for 6080 hours during the entire 17-month period, an average of 82 hours per week. Utilization of the reactor during that period may be classified as follows: neutron beam tube research; nuclear materials research and development; radiochemistry and trace analysis; nuclear medicine; radiation health physics; computer control of reactors; dose reduction in nuclear power reactors; reactor irradiations and services for groups outside MIT; MIT Research Reactor. Data on the above utilization for FY 1986 show that the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) engaged in joint activities with nine academic departments and interdepartmental laboratories at MIT, the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory in Cambridge, and 22 other universities and nonprofit research institutions, such as teaching hospitals.

Not Available

1987-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

104

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Annual 2 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report Nuclear energy represents the single largest carbon-free baseload source of energy in the United States, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low-carbon production. Worldwide, nuclear power generates 14 percent of global electricity. Continually increasing demand for clean energy both domestically and across the globe, combined with research designed to make nuclear power ever-safer and more cost-effective, will keep nuclear in the energy mix for the foreseeable future. U.S. researchers are collaborating with nuclear scientists and engineers around the world to develop new technologies that will lower costs, maximize safety, minimize proliferation risk, and handle used fuel and

105

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative 2010 Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2010 I-NERI Annual Report 2010 I-NERI Annual Report  | i Foreword The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), established the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) in fiscal year (FY) 2001 to conduct advanced nuclear energy systems research in collaboration with international partners. This annual report provides an update on research and development (R&D) accomplishments which the I-NERI program achieved during FY 2010. I-NERI supports bilateral scientific and engineering collaboration in advanced reactor systems and the nuclear fuel cycle and is linked to two of DOE-NE's primary research programs: Reactor Concepts Research, Development and Demonstration and the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program. I-NERI is designed to foster international partnerships to address key issues

106

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report 2006 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report 2006 The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) supports the National Energy Policy by conducting research to advance the state of nuclear science and technology in the United States. I-NERI sponsors innovative scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) in cooperation with participating countries. The research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses key issues affecting the future of nuclear energy and its global deployment. A link to the program can be found at the NE website. This I-NERI 2006 Annual Report serves to inform interested parties about the program's organization, progress of collaborative research projects undertaken since FY 2003, and future plans for the program. Following is an

107

Researcher, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Paul Dodd Researcher, Sandia National Laboratories Paul Dodd Paul Dodd Role: Researcher, Sandia National Laboratories Award: Fellow of the Institute of Electrical & Electronics...

108

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2010 Annual...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I-NERI promotes bilateral scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) with other nations. U.S. researchers partner with international organizations,...

109

Institutional Research & Development Reports | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reports | National Nuclear Security Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Institutional Research & Development Reports Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and

110

Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - Otwock, Poland | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - Otwock, Poland | National Nuclear Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - Otwock, Poland | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Video Gallery > Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - ... Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - Otwock, Poland Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - Otwock, Poland

111

LANL researchers use computer modeling to study HIV | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

researchers use computer modeling to study HIV | National Nuclear researchers use computer modeling to study HIV | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > LANL researchers use computer modeling to study HIV LANL researchers use computer modeling to study HIV Posted By Office of Public Affairs Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers are investigating the complex

112

Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Operating Plan | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Operating Plan Program Operating Plan Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Operating Plan July 5, 2012 Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Operating Plan This operating plan outlines the mission, goals, and processes for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Safety Research & Development (NSR&D) Program. This first version of the operating plan also discusses the startup phase of the program. NSR&D involves a systematic search for knowledge to advance the fundamental understanding of nuclear safety science and technology through scientific study, analysis, modeling, and experiments. Maintaining an effective NSR&D program will support DOE and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in standards development, validation of analytical models and

113

Research Areas | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test Capabilities and Evaluation > University Partnerships Academic Alliances > National...

114

Future challenges for nuclear data research in fission (u)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I describe some high priority research areas in nuclear fission, where applications in nuclear reactor technologies and in modeling criticality in general are demanding higher accuracies in our databases. We focus on fission cross sections, fission neutron spectra, and fission product data.

Chadwick, Mark B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 598 (2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8,19; short X-ray pulse generation for light sources l'l|2-23 J. Shi et al. Nuclear lnstruments and Methods n Physics Research A 598 (2009) 388-393 '1.2. Emttance...

116

DOE, State of Idaho Sign Agreement on Nuclear Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE, State of Idaho Sign Agreement on Nuclear Research The State of Idaho and the U.S. Department of Energy signed an agreement on Jan. 6, 2011 that streamlines the process used by...

117

Researcher, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Laboratories Award: Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science Profile: Sandia researchers David Haaland and David Myers have been elected Fellows...

118

Institutional Research & Development Reports | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Development Reports Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing Institutional Research...

119

Institutional Research & Development News | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

& Development News Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing Institutional Research...

120

Basic Research for an Era of Nuclear Energy at LBNL, LLNL, AND...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Basic Research for an Era of Nuclear Energy at LBNL, LLNL, AND LANL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Nuclear Energy RenaissanceNuclear Energy Renaissance National Research Council andNational Research Council and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 1. HISTORY 1.1 Decommissioning of the Reactor The Gentilly-I nuclear power plant, located satisfactory for safe operation, and AECL decided to decommission it in 1978. The nuclear fuel was removedSP·215-18 FRP Retrofit of the Ring-Beam of a Nuclear Reactor Containment Structure by M. Demers. A

122

Researcher, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Bruce Macintosh Bruce Macintosh Researcher, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Bruce Macintosh Bruce Macintosh Role: Researcher, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Award: AAAS Newcomb Cleveland Prize Profile: A Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researcher's paper published in November 2008 is co-winner of this year's American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Newcomb Cleveland Prize. The Paper is one of two outstanding papers published in Science from June 1, 2008 through May 31, 2009. Bruce Macintosh of the Physics and Life Science Directorate was one of the lead authors of the paper titled, "Direct Imaging of Multiple Planets orbiting the Star HR 8799," which appeared in the Nov. 28, 2008 edition of Science. Christian Marois, a former LLNL postdoc now at NRC Herzberg

123

Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30-May 1, 2001, Crystal City Marriott, Arlington, Virginia 30-May 1, 2001, Crystal City Marriott, Arlington, Virginia NERAC members present: John Ahearne Benjamin F. Montoya Joseph Comfort Sekazi Mtingwa Michael L. Corradini Lura Powell Jose Luis Cortez Richard Reba Maureen S. Crandall Joy Rempe James Duderstadt (Chair) Allen Sessoms (Monday only) Marvin Fertel Daniel C. Sullivan (Monday only) Steve Fetter John Taylor Beverly Hartline Ashok Thadani (ad hoc) Leslie Hartz Charles E. Till Andrew Klein Neil Todreas Dale Klein Joan Woodard Robert Long NERAC members absent: Thomas Cochran Linda C. Knight Allen Croff Warren F. Miller, Jr. J. Bennett Johnston C. Bruce Tarter Also present: Ralph Bennet, Director, Advanced Nuclear Energy, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Nancy Carder, NERAC Staff Yoon I. Chang, Associate Laboratory Director, Argonne National Laboratory

124

SNERDI Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Institute | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SNERDI Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Institute SNERDI Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name SNERDI (Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Institute) Place Shanghai, China Product The Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Institute was established on July 28th, 1970, as a key research and design institute under direct administration of China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC). Coordinates 31.247709°, 121.472618° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.247709,"lon":121.472618,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

125

Joint nuclear safety research projects between the US and Russian Federation International Nuclear Safety Centers  

SciTech Connect

The Russian Federation Ministry for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and the US Department of Energy (USDOE) formed international Nuclear Safety Centers in October 1995 and July 1996, respectively, to collaborate on nuclear safety research. Since January 1997, the two centers have initiated the following nine joint research projects: (1) INSC web servers and databases; (2) Material properties measurement and assessment; (3) Coupled codes: Neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, mechanical and other; (4) Severe accident management for Soviet-designed reactors; (5) Transient management and advanced control; (6) Survey of relevant nuclear safety research facilities in the Russian Federation; (8) Advanced structural analysis; and (9) Development of a nuclear safety research and development plan for MINATOM. The joint projects were selected on the basis of recommendations from two groups of experts convened by NEA and from evaluations of safety impact, cost, and deployment potential. The paper summarizes the projects, including the long-term goals, the implementing strategy and some recent accomplishments for each project.

Bougaenko, S.E.; Kraev, A.E. [International Nuclear Safety Center of the Russian MINATOM, Moscow (Russian Federation); Hill, D.L.; Braun, J.C.; Klickman, A.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). International Nuclear Safety Center

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2011 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Annual 1 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2011 Annual Report Fiscal year (FY) 2011 marks the ten-year anniversary of the founding of the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative, or I-NERI. Designed to foster international partnerships that address key issues affecting the future global use of nuclear energy, I-NERI is perhaps even more relevant today than at its establishment. In the face of increasing energy demands coupled with clean energy imperatives, we must clear the hurdles to expanding the role of nuclear power in our energy portfolio. And in an increasingly global society, the importance of international cooperation in these efforts has escalated. For ten years, I-NERI has been a vehicle for establishing bilateral

127

Nuclear Power Plant Containment Pressure Boundary Research  

SciTech Connect

Research to address aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants is summarized. This research is aimed at understanding the significant factors relating occurrence of corrosion, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containment and liners of concrete containment. This understanding will lead to improvements in risk-informed regulatory decision making. Containment pressure boundary components are described and potential aging factors identified. Quantitative tools for condition assessments of aging structures to maintain an acceptable level of reliability over the service life of the plant are discussed. Finally, the impact of aging (i.e., loss of shell thickness due to corrosion) on steel containment fragility for a pressurized water reactor ice-condenser plant is presented.

Cherry, J.L.; Chokshi, N.C.; Costello, J.F.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.

1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Nuclear materials research progress reports for 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research is presented concerning iodide stress corrosion cracking of zircaloy, self-diffusion of oxygen in hypostoichiometric urania, surface chemistry of epitaxial silicon deposition by thermal cracking of silane, kinetics of laser pulse vaporization of UO/sub 2/, gas laser model for laser induced evaporation, solubility of hydrogen in uranium dioxide, thermal gradient migration of metallic inclusions in UO/sub 2/, molecular beam studies of atomic hydrogen reduction of oxides, and thermal gradient brine-inclusion migration in salt. (FS)

Olander, D.R.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Nuclear materials research progress reports for 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research is reported concerning radiation enhancement of stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy, surface chemistry of epitaxial Si deposited by thermal cracking of silane, thermal gradient migration of metallic inclusions in UO/sub 2/, molecular beam studies of atomic H and reduction of oxides, mass transfer and reduction of UO/sub 2/, kinetics of laser pulse vaporization of UO/sub 2/, retention and release of water by UO/sub 2/ pellets, and solubility of H in UO/sub 2/. (FS)

Olander, D.R.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

EIS-0310: Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

310: Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research 310: Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility EIS-0310: Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility Summary This PEIS will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of the proposed enhancement of the existing infrastructure, including the possible role of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located at DOE's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. This PEIS will analyze the potential environmental impacts of alternative ways to meet the projected irradiation needs for the next 35 years. Public Comment Opportunities

131

Nuclear safety research collaborations between the U.S. and Russian Federation International Nuclear Safety Centers  

SciTech Connect

The Russian Federation Ministry for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and the US Department of Energy (USDOE) have formed International Nuclear Safety Centers to collaborate on nuclear safety research. USDOE established the US Center (ISINSC) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in October 1995. MINATOM established the Russian Center (RINSC) at the Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (RDIPE) in Moscow in July 1996. In April 1998 the Russian center became a semi-independent, autonomous organization under MINATOM. The goals of the center are to: Cooperate in the development of technologies associated with nuclear safety in nuclear power engineering; Be international centers for the collection of information important for safety and technical improvements in nuclear power engineering; and Maintain a base for fundamental knowledge needed to design nuclear reactors. The strategic approach is being used to accomplish these goals is for the two centers to work together to use the resources and the talents of the scientists associated with the US Center and the Russian Center to do collaborative research to improve the safety of Russian-designed nuclear reactors. The two centers started conducting joint research and development projects in January 1997. Since that time the following ten joint projects have been initiated: INSC databases--web server and computing center; Coupled codes--Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic; Severe accident management for Soviet-designed reactors; Transient management and advanced control; Survey of relevant nuclear safety research facilities in the Russian Federation; Computer code validation for transient analysis of VVER and RBMK reactors; Advanced structural analysis; Development of a nuclear safety research and development plan for MINATOM; Properties and applications of heavy liquid metal coolants; and Material properties measurement and assessment. Currently, there is activity in eight of these projects. Details on each of these joint projects are given.

Hill, D. J.; Braun, J. C.; Klickman, A. E.; Bougaenko, S. E.; Kabonov, L. P.; Kraev, A. G.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

132

A Strategy for Nuclear Energy Research and Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States is facing unprecedented challenges in climate change and energy security. President-elect Obama has called for a reduction of CO2 emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, with a further 80% reduction by 2050. Meeting these aggressive goals while gradually increasing the overall energy supply requires that all non-emitting technologies must be advanced. The development and deployment of nuclear energy can, in fact, help the United States meet several key challenges: 1) Increase the electricity generated by non-emitting sources to mitigate climate change, 2) Foster the safe and proliferation-resistant use of nuclear energy throughout the world, 3) Reduce the transportation sector’s dependence on imported fossil fuels, and 4) Reduce the demand on natural gas for process heat and hydrogen production. However, because of the scale, cost, and time horizons involved, increasing nuclear energy’s share will require a coordinated research effort—combining the efforts of industry and government, supported by innovation from the research community. This report outlines the significant nuclear energy research and development (R&D) necessary to create options that will allow government and industrial decision-makers to set policies and create nuclear energy initiatives that are decisive and sustainable. The nuclear energy R&D strategy described in this report adopts the following vision: Safe and economical nuclear energy in the United States will expand to address future electric and non-electric needs, significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions and provide energy diversity, while providing leadership for safe, secure and responsible expansion of nuclear energy internationally.

Ralph G. Bennett

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

RECENT ACTIVITIES AT THE CENTER FOR SPACE NUCLEAR RESEARCH FOR DEVELOPING NUCLEAR THERMAL ROCKETS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nuclear power has been considered for space applications since the 1960s. Between 1955 and 1972 the US built and tested over twenty nuclear reactors/ rocket-engines in the Rover/NERVA programs. However, changes in environmental laws may make the redevelopment of the nuclear rocket more difficult. Recent advances in fuel fabrication and testing options indicate that a nuclear rocket with a fuel form significantly different from NERVA may be needed to ensure public support. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) is pursuing development of tungsten based fuels for use in a NTR, for a surface power reactor, and to encapsulate radioisotope power sources. The CSNR Summer Fellows program has investigated the feasibility of several missions enabled by the NTR. The potential mission benefits of a nuclear rocket, historical achievements of the previous programs, and recent investigations into alternatives in design and materials for future systems will be discussed.

Robert C. O'Brien

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Current Development of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion technologies at the Center for Space Nuclear Research  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power and propulsion has been considered for space applications since the 1950s. Between 1955 and 1972 the US built and tested over twenty nuclear reactors / rocket engines in the Rover/NERVA programs1. The Aerojet Corporation was the prime contractor for the NERVA program. Modern changes in environmental laws present challenges for the redevelopment of the nuclear rocket. Recent advances in fuel fabrication and testing options indicate that a nuclear rocket with a fuel composition that is significantly different from those of the NERVA project can be engineered; this may be needed to ensure public support and compliance with safety requirements. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) is pursuing a number of technologies, modeling and testing processes to further the development of safe, practical and affordable nuclear thermal propulsion systems.

Robert C. O'Brien; Steven K. Cook; Nathan D. Jerred; Steven D. Howe; Ronald Samborsky; Daniel Brasuell

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Executive Summary: Research in Nuclear Power—Workshop on the Needs of the Next Generation of Nuclear Power Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / NSF Workshop on the Research Needs of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Technology / Fission Reactor

A. David Rossin; Kunmo Chung; K. L. Peddicord

136

Dose received by occupationally exposed workers at a nuclear medicine department  

SciTech Connect

Personal Dose Equivalent (PDE) values were determined for occupational exposed workers (OEW) at the Nuclear Medicine Department (NMD) of 'Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia' (INCan), Mexico, using TLD-100 thermoluminescent dosemeters. OEW at NMD, INCan make use of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Radionuclides associated to a pharmaceutical compound used at this Department are {sup 131}I, {sup 18}F, {sup 68}Ga, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In and {sup 11}C with main gamma emission energies between 140 and 511 keV. Dosemeter calibration was performed at the metrology department of 'Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares' (ININ), Mexico. Every occupational worker used dark containers with three dosimeters which were replaced monthly for a total of 5 periods. Additionally, control dosemeters were also placed at a site free of radioactive sources in order to determine the background radiation. Results were adjusted to find PDE/day and estimating annual PDE values in the range between 2 mSv (background) and 9 mSv. The mean annual value is 3.51 mSv and the standard deviation SD is 0.78 mSv. Four of the 16 OEW received annual doses higher than the average +1 SD (4.29 mSv). Results depend on OEW daily activities and were consistent for each OEW for the 5 studied periods as well as with PDE values reported by the firm that performs the monthly service. All obtained values are well within the established annual OEW dose limit stated in the {sup R}eglamento General de Seguridad Radiologica{sup ,} Mexico (50 mSv), as well as within the lower limit recommended by the 'International Commission on Radiation Protection' (ICRP), report no.60 (20 mSv). These results verify the adequate compliance of the NMD at INCan, Mexico with the norms given by the national regulatory commission.

Avila, O.; Sanchez-Uribe, N. A.; Rodriguez-Laguna, A.; Medina, L. A.; Estrada, E.; Buenfil, A. E.; Brandan, M. E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, 11801, DF (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, 11801, DF (Mexico) and Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-542, 04510, DF (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia (INCan), Av. San Fernando No.22, C.P. 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 20-364, 01000 DF (Mexico) and Unidad de Investigacion Biomedica en Cancer INCan-UNAM, Av. San Fernando No.22 C.P. 4080 (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia (INCan), Av. San Fernando No.22, C.P. 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 20-364, 01000 DF (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

137

Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety (HS-30) Office of Nuclear Safety Home Directives Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Rules Nuclear Safety Workshops Technical Standards Program Search ...

138

Technological Transfer from Research Nuclear Reactors to New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this paper is the analysis of the technological transfer role in the nuclear field, with particular emphasis on nuclear reactors domain. The presentation is sustained by historical arguments. In this frame, it is very important to start with the achievements of the first nuclear systems, for instant those with natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as moderator, following in time through the history until the New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors.Starting with 1940, the accelerated development of the industry has implied the increase of the global demand for energy. In this respect, the nuclear energy could play an important role, being essentially an unlimited source of energy. However, the nuclear option faces the challenges of increasingly demanding safety requirements, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. Worldwide, a significant amount of experience has been accumulated during development, licensing, construction, and operation of nuclear power reactors. The experience gained is a strong basis for further improvements. Actually, the nuclear programs of many countries are addressing the development of advanced reactors, which are intended to have better economics, higher reliability, improved safety, and proliferation-resistant characteristics in order to overcome the current concerns about nuclear power. Advanced reactors, now under development, may help to meet the demand for energy power of both developed and developing countries as well as for district heating, desalination and for process heat.The paper gives historical examples that illustrate the steps pursued from first research nuclear reactors to present advanced power reactors. Emphasis was laid upon the fact that the progress is due to the great discoveries of the nuclear scientists using the technological transfer.

Radulescu, Laura ['Horia Hulubei' National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering, PO BOX MG-6, Bucharest 077125 (Romania); Pavelescu, Margarit [Academy of Romanian Scientists, Bucharest (Romania)

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

139

Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The ``IQNP`` agent is an antagonist for the cholinergic-muscarinic receptor. Since the IQNP molecule has two asymmetric centers and either cis or trans isomerism of the vinyl iodide, there are eight possible isomeric combinations. In this report, the systematic synthesis, purification and animal testing of several isomers of radioiodinated ``IQNP`` are reported. A dramatic and unexpected relation between the absolute configuration at the two asymmetric centers and the stereochemistry of the vinyl iodide on receptor specificity was observed. The E-(R)(R) isomer shows specific and significant localization (per cent dose/gram at 6 hours) in receptor-rich cerebral structures (i.e. Cortex = 1.38 + 0.31; Striatum = 1.22 + 0.20) and low uptake in tissues rich in the M{sub 2} subtype (Heart = 0.10; Cerebellum = 0.04). In contrast, the E-(R)(S) isomer shows very low receptor-specific uptake (Cortex = 0.04; Striatum = 0.02), demonstrating the importance of absolute configuration at the acetate center. An unexpected and important observation is that the stereochemistry of the vinyl iodine appears to affect receptor subtype specificity, since the Z-(R,S)(R) isomer shows much higher uptake in the heart (0.56 + 0.12) and cerebellum (0.17 + 0.04). Studies are now in progress to confirm these exciting results in vitro. Progress has also continued during this period with several collaborative programs. The first large-scale clinical tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator prototype (500 mCi) was fabricated and supplied to the Center for Molecular Medicine and Immunology (CMMI), in Newark, New Jersey, for Phase I clinical trials of rhenium-188-labeled anti CEA antibodies for patient treatment. Collaborative studies are also continuing in conjunction with the Nuclear Medicine Department at the University of Massachusetts where a generator is in use to compare the biological properties of {open_quotes}direct{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}indirect{close_quotes} labeled antibodies.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Callahan, A.P.; Hsieh, B.T.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Lambert, C.R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Threat Reduction Initiative: Global Threat Reduction Initiative: U.S. Nuclear Remove Program Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (FRR SNF) Acceptance 2007 DOE TEC Meeting Chuck Messick DOE/NNSA/SRS 2 Contents * Program Objective and Policy * Program implementation status * Shipment Information * Operational Logistics * Lessons Learned * Conclusion 3 U.S. Nuclear Remove Program Objective * To play a key role in the Global Threat Reduction Remove Program supporting permanent threat reduction by accepting program eligible material. * Works in conjunction with the Global Threat Reduction Convert Program to accept program eligible material as an incentive to core conversion providing a disposition path for HEU and LEU during the life of the Acceptance Program. 4 Reasons for the Policy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Safety » Nuclear Safety Research and Nuclear Safety » Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program In 2011, the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) created the Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program within the Office of Nuclear Safety to provide corporate-level leadership supporting nuclear safety research and development throughout the Department of Energy (DOE). The NSR&D Program solicits input from the Nuclear Safety Council which includes membership of senior management from each program office. NSR&D Program Objectives: To establish an enduring Departmental commitment and capability to utilize NSR&D in preventing and reducing the hazards and risks posed by DOE/NNSA nuclear facilities;

142

Medical Records for Animals Used in Research, Teaching, and Testing: Public Statement from the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Records for Animals Used in Research, Teaching, and Testing: Public Statement from the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine ACLAM Medical Records Committee: Karl Field (Chair), Michele. Suckow Abstract Medical records are considered to be a key element of a program of adequate veterinary

Oliver, Douglas L.

143

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Research Societies with Radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Societies with Radiation Concerns Academy of Radiology Research American Association of Physicists in Medicine American Nuclear Society American Roentgen Ray Society American...

144

Basic science research to support the nuclear material focus area  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

Boak, J. M. (Jeremy M.); Eller, P. Gary; Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Basic Science Research to Support the Nuclear Materials Focus Area  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.; Boak, J. M.; Eller, P. G.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

146

Implementation of test for quality assurance in nuclear medicine gamma camera  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In nuclear medicine (NM) over 90% of procedures are performed for diagnostic purposes. To ensure adequate diagnostic quality of images and the optimization of the doses received by patients originated from the radioactive material is essential for regular monitoring and equipment performance through a quality assurance program (QAP). The QAP consists of 15 proposed performance tomographic and not tomographic gamma camera (GC) tests, and is based on recommendations of international organizations. We describe some results of the performance parameters of QAP applied to a GC model e.cam Siemens, of the Department of NM of the National Cancer Institute of Mexico (INCan). The results were: (1) The average intrinsic spatial resolution (R{sub in}) was 4.67 {+-} 0.25 mm at the limit of acceptance criterion of 4.4 mm. (2) The sensitivity extrinsic (S{sub ext}), with maximum variations of 1.8% (less than 2% which is the criterion of acceptance). (3) Rotational Uniformity (U{sub rot}), with values of integral uniformity (IU) in the useful field of view detector (UFOV), with maximum percentage change of 0.97% and monthly variations equal angles, ranging from 0.13 to 0.99% less than 1%. (4) The displacement of the center of rotation (DCOR), indicated a maximum deviation of 0.155 {+-} 0.039 mm less than 4.795 mm, an absolute deviation of less than 0.5 where pixel 0.085 pixel is suggested, the criteria are assigned to low-energy collimator high resolution. (5) In tomographic uniformity (U{sub tomo}), UI values (%) and percentage noise level (rms%) were 7.54 {+-} 1.53 and 4.18 {+-} 1.69 which are consistent with the limits of acceptance of 7.0-12.0% and 3.0-6.0% respectively. The smallest cold sphere has a diameter of 11.4 mm. The implementation of a QAP allows for high quality diagnostic images, optimization of the doses given to patients, a reduction of exposure to occupationally exposed workers (POE, by its Spanish acronym), and generally improves the productivity of the service. This proposal can be used to develop a similar QAP in other facilities and may serve as a precedent for the proposed regulations for quality assurance (QA) teams in MN.

Montoya Moreno, A.; Rodriguez Laguna, A.; Trujillo Zamudio, Flavio E [Department of Nuclear Medicine, National Cancer Institute San Fernando Avenue No.22, Col. Section XVI (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

147

NNSA, Philippine Nuclear Research Institute to Prevent Radiological...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

148

Nuclear power and the public: an update of collected survey research on nuclear power  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research was to collect, analyze, and summarize all of the nuclear power-related surveys conducted in the United States through June 1981, that we could obtain. The surveys collected were national, statewide, and areawide in scope. Slightly over 100 surveys were collected for an earlier, similar effort carried out in 1977. About 130 new surveys were added to the earlier survey data. Thus, about 230 surveys were screened for inclusion in this report. Because of space limitations, national surveys were used most frequently in this report, followed distantly by state surveys. In drawing our conclusions about public beliefs and attitudes toward nuclear power, we placed most of our confidence in survey questions that were used by national polling firms at several points in time. A summary of the research findings is presented, beginning with general attitudes toward nuclear power, followed by a summary of beliefs and attitudes about nuclear power issues, and ended by a summary of beliefs and attitudes regarding more general energy issues.

Rankin, W.L.; Melber, B.D.; Overcast, T.D.; Nealey, S.M.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG) develops and provides sustainable nuclear technology for energy, environment, and health. NRG offers a wide range of services to energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG) develops and provides sustainable nuclear technology organizations and various branches of industry - including the nuclear, financial services and medical sectors configurations will contribute to an improved design, safety, and operation of nuclear reactors. In relation

Lindken, Ralph

150

SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS OF FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR srENT NUCLEAR FUEL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR srENT NUCLEAR FUEL FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR srENT NUCLEAR FUEL TRANSPORTATION ALONG OTHER THAN~. PRESENTATIVE ROUTE FROM CONCORD NAVAL WEAPO~~ STATION TO IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LADORA TORY Introduction The Department of Energy is planning to transport foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel by rail from the Concord Naval Weapons Station (CNWS), Concord, California, to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The environmental analysis supporting the decision to transport, by rail or truck, foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel from CNWS to the INEEL is contained in +he Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliftration Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor

151

Hydrogen Research and Development Initiative - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Research and Development Initiative Hydrogen Research and Development Initiative International Safety Projects Overview Hydrogen as an Energy Carrier Global access to energy and fresh water International cooperation on safety of nuclear plants Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Major Programs The Use of Hydrogen as an Energy Carrier Bookmark and Share President Bush initiated a major program to accelerate the development of a national hydrogen economy. The goal is to reverse America's growing dependence on foreign oil by developing science and technology for commercially viable fuel cells that use hydrogen to power cars, trucks, homes, and businesses without directly emitting pollution or greenhouse

152

Basic Research for an Era of Nuclear Energy at LBNL, LLNL, AND LANL | U.S.  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Basic Research for an Era of Nuclear Basic Research for an Era of Nuclear Energy at LBNL, LLNL, AND LANL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Basic Research for an Era of Nuclear Energy at LBNL, LLNL, AND LANL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Basic Research for an Era of Nuclear Energy Developed at: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National

153

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 356 (1995) l-4 INSTRUMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELSEVIER Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 356 (1995) l-4 NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS 8 METHODS IN PHYSICS REgtR?n Thermodynamics of dynamic nuclear polarization W.Th. Wenckebach Faculty ofApplied Physics, Delfr Unicersity of Technology, P.O.B. 5046, 2600 GA De& The Netherlands Abstract Dynamic nuclear

Dutz, Hartmut

154

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

SciTech Connect

IThe National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,000 users and hosting some 550 projects that involve nearly 700 codes for a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In addition to large-scale computing resources NERSC provides critical staff support and expertise to help scientists make the most efficient use of these resources to advance the scientific mission of the Office of Science. In May 2011, NERSC, DOE’s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE’s Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for NP research over the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC’s continuing involvement in anticipating future user needs and deploying necessary resources to meet these demands. The workshop revealed several key requirements, in addition to achieving its goal of characterizing NP computing. The key requirements include: 1. Larger allocations of computational resources at NERSC; 2. Visualization and analytics support; and 3. Support at NERSC for the unique needs of experimental nuclear physicists. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. The results are based upon representative samples, called “case studies,” of the needs of science teams within NP. The case studies were prepared by NP workshop participants and contain a summary of science goals, methods of solution, current and future computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, “multi-core” environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report also includes a section with NERSC responses to the workshop findings. NERSC has many initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings and all of the action items are aligned with NERSC strategic plans.

Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey J.

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

155

Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

safeguards and nonproliferation, environmental management and waste cleanup, and Navy nuclear propulsion systems development resides outside the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science...

156

Secretary Chu Announces Funding for 71 University-Led Nuclear Research and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Chu Announces Funding for 71 University-Led Nuclear Secretary Chu Announces Funding for 71 University-Led Nuclear Research and Development Projects Secretary Chu Announces Funding for 71 University-Led Nuclear Research and Development Projects May 6, 2009 - 1:49pm Addthis U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the selection of 71 university research project awards as part of the Department of Energy's investments in cutting-edge nuclear energy research and development (R&D). Under the Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP), these 71 projects will receive approximately $44 million over three years to advance new nuclear technologies in support of the nation's energy goals. By helping to develop the next generation of advanced nuclear technologies, the Nuclear Energy University Program will play a key role in addressing the global climate

157

Appendix B to the Minutes for the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix B to the Minutes for the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Appendix B to the Minutes for the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Appendix B to the Minutes for the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Please include these additional remarks in your transmittal of the subject report to DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. Perhaps the greatest security threat to the United States today, and of paramount concern to American citizens since September 11, 2001, is that nuclear weapon-usable materials will be stolen, seized, or secretly diverted from nuclear facilities and then used by terrorists to develop and deliver a crude nuclear explosive device, or by a hostile proliferant state to develop more sophisticated nuclear weapons. This is not the time for the United States to be launching an international research effort to develop

158

Secretary Chu Announces Funding for 71 University-Led Nuclear Research and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu Announces Funding for 71 University-Led Nuclear Chu Announces Funding for 71 University-Led Nuclear Research and Development Projects Secretary Chu Announces Funding for 71 University-Led Nuclear Research and Development Projects May 6, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the selection of 71 university research project awards as part of the Department of Energy's investments in cutting-edge nuclear energy research and development (R&D). Under the Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP), these 71 projects will receive approximately $44 million over three years to advance new nuclear technologies in support of the nation's energy goals. By helping to develop the next generation of advanced nuclear technologies, the Nuclear Energy University Program will play a key role in

159

FY 2013 Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA (DE-FOA-0000799) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA (DE-FOA-0000799) FY 2013 Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA (DE-FOA-0000799) The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) conducts crosscutting nuclear energy research and development (R&D) and associated infrastructure support activities to develop innovative technologies that offer the promise of dramatically improved performance for advanced reactors and fuel cycle concepts while maximizing the impact of DOE resources. NE funds research activities through both competitive and direct mechanisms, as required to best meet the needs of NE. These efforts are essential to balancing NE's R&D portfolio and encouraging new nuclear power deployment with creative solutions to the universe of nuclear energy

160

FY 2013 Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA (DE-FOA-0000799) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2013 Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA FY 2013 Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA (DE-FOA-0000799) FY 2013 Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA (DE-FOA-0000799) The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) conducts crosscutting nuclear energy research and development (R&D) and associated infrastructure support activities to develop innovative technologies that offer the promise of dramatically improved performance for advanced reactors and fuel cycle concepts while maximizing the impact of DOE resources. NE funds research activities through both competitive and direct mechanisms, as required to best meet the needs of NE. These efforts are essential to balancing NE's R&D portfolio and encouraging new nuclear power deployment with creative solutions to the universe of nuclear energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Department of Energy Announces 24 Nuclear Energy Research Awards to U.S.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 Nuclear Energy Research Awards to 4 Nuclear Energy Research Awards to U.S. Universities Department of Energy Announces 24 Nuclear Energy Research Awards to U.S. Universities December 15, 2005 - 4:46pm Addthis $12 Million in Support to Be Provided for Innovative R&D Projects WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced 24 research awards totaling $12 million over three years to U.S. universities to engage students and professors in DOE's advanced nuclear energy research and development programs, including the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative and Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. "These awards support the department's advanced nuclear technology development efforts and foster the education and training of the next generation of scientists and engineers needed to move this vital industry

162

Bibliography of reports on research sponsored by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, November 1975--June 1976  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography of 152 reports published by contractors of the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during the period November 1975 through June 1976 is presented along with abstracts from the Nuclear Safety Information Center computer file. The bibliography has been sorted into the subject categories used by NRC to organize the research program. Within the subject categories, the reports are sorted by contractor organization and then chronologically. A brief description of the NRC research program precedes the bibliography.

Buchanan, J.R.

1976-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

163

Secretary Chu Announces $38 Million for 42 University-Led Nuclear Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Million for 42 University-Led Nuclear 8 Million for 42 University-Led Nuclear Research and Development Projects Secretary Chu Announces $38 Million for 42 University-Led Nuclear Research and Development Projects May 20, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced the selection of 42 university-led research and development projects for awards totaling $38 million. These projects, funded over three to four years through the Department's Nuclear Energy University Program, will help advance nuclear education and develop the next generation of nuclear technologies. "We are taking action to restart the nuclear industry as part of a broad approach to cut carbon pollution and create new clean energy jobs," said Secretary Chu. "These projects will help us develop the nuclear

164

Secretary Chu Announces $38 Million for 42 University-Led Nuclear Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$38 Million for 42 University-Led Nuclear $38 Million for 42 University-Led Nuclear Research and Development Projects Secretary Chu Announces $38 Million for 42 University-Led Nuclear Research and Development Projects May 20, 2010 - 12:05pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced the selection of 42 university-led research and development projects for awards totaling $38 million. These projects, funded over three to four years through the Department's Nuclear Energy University Program, will help advance nuclear education and develop the next generation of nuclear technologies. "We are taking action to restart the nuclear industry as part of a broad approach to cut carbon pollution and create new clean energy jobs," said Secretary Chu. "These projects will help us develop the nuclear

165

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy dedicated the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), an advanced research facility that will accelerate the advancement of nuclear reactor technology.

166

Atomic and nuclear research with accelerators. Interim progress report, 1 October 1972--1 October 1973  

SciTech Connect

Research on ion-atom collisions and heavy-ion nuclear reactions is summarized. A list of publications is included. (JFP)

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Report of the Infrastructure Task Force of the Nuclear Energy Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Infrastructure Task Force of the Nuclear Energy of the Infrastructure Task Force of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Report of the Infrastructure Task Force of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee On October 1, 2002 the DOE Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee was asked to provide specific, focused updates to its Nuclear Science and Technology Infrastructure Roadmap and review the specific issues at the DOE key nuclear energy research and development (R&D) laboratories. This activity was assigned to a five-member Infrastructure Task Force (ITF). After receiving extensive written materials from DOE, the Idaho Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W), on November 6-8, 2002 the ITF visited the Idaho site and received briefings and tours of the INEEL and ANL-W facilities.

168

Nuclear Safety Research and Development Status Workshop Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NSR&D STATUS WORKSHOP SUMMARIES Caroline Garzon Chief of Nuclear Safety Staff NUCLEAR SAFETY R&D Perform a peer review of Risk Assessment Corporation WTP analysis by a team...

169

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: (1) Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2) Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: (1) High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior; (2) High temperature materials qualification; (3) Design methods development and validation; (4) Hydrogen production technologies; and (5) Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen production [DOE 2004] and energy conversion technologies programs are described elsewhere.

None

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Research of IPE Solution Applied to EPR Nuclear Power Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nuclear power company is currently in the process of constructing the advanced 3rd generation of EPR Nuclear Power Plant, and its corresponding information system is an overall integrated information management system based on the new concept design. ... Keywords: digital nuclear power plant, IPE solutions, comprehensive application

Daqiao Wang; Fangneng Hu; Yi Luo; Yi Ma

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

CERN-INTC-2011-053/INTC-P-317 EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an exacting test for nuclear models. Binding energies offer a clear signature for the presence (or disCERN-INTC-2011-053/INTC-P-317 06/10/2011 EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH Proposal. N. Wolf8 , K. Zuber9 1Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg, Germany 2GSI

172

Development of Technical Nuclear Forensics for Spent Research Reactor Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pre-detonation technical nuclear forensics techniques for research reactor spent fuel were developed in a collaborative project with Savannah River National Lab ratory. An inverse analysis method was employed to reconstruct reactor parameters from a spent fuel sample using results from a radiochemical analysis. In the inverse analysis, a reactor physics code is used as a forward model. Verification and validation of different reactor physics codes was performed for usage in the inverse analysis. The verification and validation process consisted of two parts. The first is a variance analysis of Monte Carlo reactor physics burnup simulation results. The codes used in this work are MONTEBURNS and MCNPX/CINDER. Both utilize Monte Carlo transport calculations for reaction rate and flux results. Neither code has a variance analysis that will propagate through depletion steps, so a method to quantify and understand the variance propagation through these depletion calculations was developed. The second verification and validation process consisted of comparing reactor physics code output isotopic compositions to radiochemical analysis results. A sample from an Oak Ridge Research Reactor spent fuel assembly was acquired through a drilling process. This sample was then dissolved in nitric acid and diluted in three different quantities, creating three separate samples. A radiochemical analysis was completed and the results were compared to simulation outputs at different levels ofdetail. After establishing a forward model, an inverse analysis was developed to re-construct the burnup, initial uranium isotopic compositions, and cooling time of a research reactor spent fuel sample. A convergence acceleration technique was used that consisted of an analytical calculation to predict burnup, initial 235U, and 236U enrichments. The analytic calculation results may also be used stand alone or in a database search algorithm. In this work, a reactor physics code is used as a for- ward model with the analytic results as initial conditions in a numerical optimization algorithm. In the numerical analysis, the burnup and initial uranium isotopic com- positions are reconstructed until the iterative spent fuel characteristics converge with the measured data. Upon convergence of the sample’s burnup and initial uranium isotopic composition, the cooling time can be reconstructed. To reconstruct cooling time, the standard decay equation is inverted and solved for time. Two methods were developed. One method uses the converged burnup and initial uranium isotopic compositions along in a reactor depletion simulation. The second method uses an isotopic signature that does not decay out of its mass bin and has a simple production chain. An example would be 137Cs which decays into the stable 137Ba. Similar results are achieved with both methods, but extended shutdown time or time away from power results in over prediction of the cooling time. The over prediction of cooling time and comparison of different burnup reconstruction isotope results are indicator signatures of extended shutdown or time away from power. Due to dynamic operation in time and function, detailed power history reconstruction for research reactors is very challenging. Frequent variations in power, repeated variable shutdown time length, and experimentation history affect the spectrum an individual assembly is burned with such that full reactor parameter reconstruction is difficult. The results from this technical nuclear forensic analysis may be used with law enforcement, intelligence data, macroscopic and microscopic sample characteristics in a process called attribution to suggest or exclude possible sources of origin for a sample.

Sternat, Matthew 1982-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R&D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management tools for managing the R&D program elements; (2) Developing a specific work package for the R&D activities to be performed during each government fiscal year; (3) Reporting the status and progress of the work based on committed deliverables and milestones; (4) Developing collaboration in areas of materials R&D of benefit to the NGNP with countries that are a part of the Generation IV International Forum; and (5) Ensuring that the R&D work performed in support of the materials program is in conformance with established Quality Assurance and procurement requirements. The objective of the NGNP Materials R&D Program is to provide the essential materials R&D needed to support the design and licensing of the reactor and balance of plant, excluding the hydrogen plant. The materials R&D program is being initiated prior to the design effort to ensure that materials R&D activities are initiated early enough to support the design process and support the Project Integrator. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge; thus, new materials and approaches may be required.

G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, FacilitiesNP) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)

Gerber, Richard A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

role in developing science and technology for nuclear power programs, nuclear propulsion, nuclear medicine, and the nation's nuclear weapon program among others. Many...

176

Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research: Progress report, January 1--March 31, 1989  

SciTech Connect

This progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the Division of Regulatory Applications, Division of Engineering, Division of Safety Issue Resolution, and Division of Systems Research of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research following the reorganization in July 1988. The previous reports have covered the period October 1, 1976 through December 31, 1988.

Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Detection and characterization of translational research in cancer and cardiovascular medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Scientists and experts in science policy have become increasingly interested in strengthening translational research. Efforts to understand the nature of translational research and monitor policy interventions ...

Cambrosio, Alberto

178

Record of Decision for the Final EIS on Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5091 5091 Friday May 17, 1996 Part IV Department of Energy Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel; Notice 25092 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 97 / Friday, May 17, 1996 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Record of decision. SUMMARY: DOE, in consultation with the Department of State, has decided to implement a new foreign research reactor spent fuel acceptance policy as specified in the Preferred Alternative contained in the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed

179

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Demonstrate safe and economical nuclearassisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior High temperature materials qualification Design methods development and validation Hydrogen production technologies Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen production [DOE 2004] and energy conversion technologies programs are described elsewhere.

P. E. MacDonald

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Plant Support Engineering: Degradation Research for Nuclear Service Level I Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants have experienced degradation of the protective coating systems (nuclear Service Level I coatings) inside reactor containment. The degradation is a matter of concern, but the history of degradation and its causes have not been thoroughly documented. In response, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Utilities Coating Council (NUCC) began a research project designed to gain an understanding of the degradation and the potential influence of aging on the qualified ...

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

rod system. * Note: Does not include the steam turbine generator portion of the power plant. - Sensitive nuclear technology: Any information (including information...

182

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

outlined in the 2011 DOE Strategic Plan†. † U.S. Departmentstrategic plans. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics DOE  

Gerber, Richard A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

day experimental fusion devices and in nuclear reactors thatnuclear energy both for next-generation fission reactors and for fusion reactors

Gerber, Richard A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Summary, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and nonproliferation activities, environmental management and waste cleanup, and Navy nuclear propulsion systems development.1 The department has a lead role in insuring that...

185

Nuclear Energy Research and Development in the Department of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

used nuclear fuel disposition, effective utilization and deployment of advanced reactor concepts, and eventual development of a permanent geologic repository(s). This should...

186

EA-0912: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent 2: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel EA-0912: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to accept 409 spent fuel elements from eight foreign research reactors in seven European countries. The spent fuel would be shipped across the ocean in spent fuel transportation casks from the country of origin to one or more United States eastern seaboard ports. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 22, 1994 EA-0912: Finding of No Significant Impact Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel April 22, 1994 EA-0912: Final Environmental Assessment Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

187

Office of Research and Development | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Office of Defense Science Office of Research and Development Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test,...

188

Summary of EPRI Research Applicable to Nuclear Accident Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The events at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant following the March 11, 2011, earthquake and the subsequent tsunami have heightened the need for widespread dissemination of information available within the nuclear industry that addresses subjects pertinent to the on-going situation at the plant. These subjects include, but are not necessarily limited to: Hydrogen generation Loss of off-site power Reactor core performance following a loss of coolant Iodine removal Emergency response planning Emergency...

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

189

Applied nuclear data research and development. Progress report, January 1--March 31, 1976. [Activities of LASL Nuclear Data Group  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the activities of the Los Alamos Nuclear Data Group for the period January 1 to March 31, 1976. The following areas are discussed: Theory and evaluation of nuclear cross sections, including calculations of neutron cross sections; Nuclear cross-section processing, including developments concerning the computer codes used; Cross sections for HTGR safety research; Effect of dispersion matrix structure on a data adjustment and consistency analysis; Fission product and decay data studies; and Medium-energy library. 20 figures, 18 tables. (RWR)

Baxman, C.I.; Hale, G.M.; Young, P.G. (comps.)

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Privacy and identifiability in clinical research, personalized medicine, and public health surveillance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electronic transmission of protected health information has become pervasive in research, clinical, and public health investigations, posing substantial risk to patient privacy. From clinical genetic screenings to publication ...

Cassa, Christopher A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

New Nuclear Energy Awards Give Students Hands-On Research Experience |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Nuclear Energy Awards Give Students Hands-On Research New Nuclear Energy Awards Give Students Hands-On Research Experience New Nuclear Energy Awards Give Students Hands-On Research Experience September 28, 2012 - 9:33am Addthis Bojan Petrovic, a senior researcher at Georgia Institute of Technology, will lead an IRP team in developing a high-power light water reactor design with inherent safety features. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology Bojan Petrovic, a senior researcher at Georgia Institute of Technology, will lead an IRP team in developing a high-power light water reactor design with inherent safety features. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology Bradley Williams Team Lead, Nuclear Energy University Programs What Colleges Received The Awards? Georgia Institute of Technology

192

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors May 3, 2011 - 3:41pm Addthis Oak Ridge, Tenn. - Today the Department of Energy dedicated the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), an advanced research facility that will accelerate the advancement of nuclear reactor technology. CASL researchers are using supercomputers to study the performance of light water reactors and to develop highly sophisticated modeling that will help accelerate upgrades at existing U.S. nuclear plants. These upgrades could improve the energy output of our existing reactor fleet by as much as seven reactors' worth at a fraction of the cost of building new reactors, while providing continued improvements in

193

Usefulness of specific calibration coefficients for gamma-emitting sources measured by radionuclide calibrators in nuclear medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: In nuclear medicine, the activity of a radionuclide is measured with a radionuclide calibrator that often has a calibration coefficient independent of the container type and filling. Methods: To determine the effect of the container on the accuracy of measuring the activity injected into a patient, The authors simulated a commercial radionuclide calibrator and 18 container types most typically used in clinical practice. The instrument sensitivity was computed for various container thicknesses and filling levels. Monoenergetic photons and electrons as well as seven common radionuclides were considered. Results: The quality of the simulation with gamma-emitting sources was validated by an agreement with measurements better than 4% in five selected radionuclides. The results show that the measured activity can vary by more than a factor of 2 depending on the type of container. The filling level and the thickness of the container wall only have a marginal effect for radionuclides of high energy but could induce differences up to 4%. Conclusions: The authors conclude that radionuclide calibrators should be tailored to the uncertainty required by clinical applications. For most clinical cases, and at least for the low-energy gamma and x-ray emitters, measurements should be performed with calibration coefficients specific to the container type.

Bochud, Francois O.; Laedermann, Jean-Pascal; Baechler, Sebastien; Kosinski, Marek; Bailat, Claude J. [Institute of Radiation Physics, University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Rue du Grand-Pre 1, CH-1007 Lausanne (Switzerland)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Nuclear excitations and reaction mechanisms. Progress report, November 1, 1975--October 31, 1976. [Summaries of research activities at Brown University  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical research on nuclear excitation and reaction mechanisms is summarized. A list of publications is included. (JFP)

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG) develops and provides sustainable nuclear technology for energy, environment, and health. NRG offers a wide range of services to energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG) develops and provides sustainable nuclear technology organizations and various branches of industry - including the nuclear, financial services and medical sectors: Better prediction of the flow and heat transfer in liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors will contribute

Lindken, Ralph

196

Carrier-free $sup 11$C-labeled catecholamines in nuclear medicine and biochemical research  

SciTech Connect

The catecholamines, dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine, are synthesized and secreted by tissues such as brain, sympathetic nerve endings, and chromaffin cells. Dopamine and norepinephrine are primarily neurotransmitters while epinephrine functions mainly as a hormone. The biosynthesis of the catecholamines from tyrosine is reviewed. Abnormalities in the quantities and metabolism of these compounds are associated with many pathological conditions such as hypertension, Parkinsonism, and chromaffin tissue tumors. Rapid synthetic methods (for the preparation off)/sup 11/C-labeled catecholamines have been developed. The potential use of these labeled catecholamines as scanning agents for the adrenal glands and heart myocardium was evaluated in dogs. (CH)

Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.; Christman, D.R.; MacGregor, R.R.; Ansari, A.; Atkins, H.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years.

G. O. Hayner; E.L. Shaber

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

1106 volume 15 | number 10 | october 2009 nature medicine The most transparent research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and solid-state physics, a handful of researchers are working on ways to render biological tissues is densely packed with many types of substances, such as bone and fat, and light travels through them

Yang, Changhuei

199

EA-0965: Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine, Argonne, Illinois  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to construct and equip the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC), which would be located on the Indianapolis campus of the Indiana...

200

LANL highlights cutting-edge research at annual LDRD Day | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

cutting-edge research at annual LDRD Day | National Nuclear cutting-edge research at annual LDRD Day | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > LANL highlights cutting-edge research at annual LDRD Day LANL highlights cutting-edge research at annual LDRD Day Posted By Office of Public Affairs Los Alamos National Laboratory recently showcased some of its cutting-edge

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

LANL highlights cutting-edge research at annual LDRD Day | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cutting-edge research at annual LDRD Day | National Nuclear cutting-edge research at annual LDRD Day | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > LANL highlights cutting-edge research at annual LDRD Day LANL highlights cutting-edge research at annual LDRD Day Posted By Office of Public Affairs Los Alamos National Laboratory recently showcased some of its cutting-edge

202

Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics JOINT INSTITUTE FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

role increasing the ``cold fusion'' probability in electronic molecules whose nuclear constituents have. Therefore, widths of such resonances giving a probability of a fusion of the nu­ clear constituents for the molecules LiD and H 2 O. There exists also a well­known exam­ ple [?] of muon catalyzed fusion of deuteron

203

Distributed and Asynchronous Bees Algorithm Applied to Nuclear Fusion Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, there have been several developments in the scientific community to model and solve complex optimization problems by employing natural metaphors. In some cases, due to their distributed schema, these algorithms can be adapted to distributed ... Keywords: Metaheuristics, Distributed Computing, Nuclear Fusion

Antonio Gomez-Iglesias; Miguel A. Vega-Rodriguez; Francisco Castejon; Miguel Cardenas-Montes

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Research in the nuclear sciences: summaries of FY 1978  

SciTech Connect

Programs funded in fiscal year 1978 by the Division of Nuclear Sciences/Office of Basic Energy Sciences are summarized. Each summary is preceded by a heading that includes institution, title, principal investigators, budget reporting category, and operating funds provided in FY 1978. The summaries are presented in alphabetical order by institution. Indexes are appended to facilitate the location of a summary according to an investigator's name or a budget reporting category. (RWR)

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Reactor physics teaching and research in the Swiss nuclear engineering master  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2008, a Master of Science program in Nuclear Engineering (NE) has been running in Switzerland, thanks to the combined efforts of the country's key players in nuclear teaching and research, viz. the Swiss Federal Inst.s of Technology at Lausanne (EPFL) and at Zurich (ETHZ), the Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI) at Villigen and the Swiss Nuclear Utilities (Swissnuclear). The present paper, while outlining the academic program as a whole, lays emphasis on the reactor physics teaching and research training accorded to the students in the framework of the developed curriculum. (authors)

Chawla, R. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Inst., CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Researcher, Los Alamos National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Turab Lookman Turab Lookman Researcher, Los Alamos National Laboratory Turab Lookman Turab Lookman Role: Researcher, Los Alamos National Laboratory Award: 2009 LANL Fellows Prize for Outstanding Research in Science or Engineering Profile: Turab Lookman has received the 2009 LANL Fellows Prize for Outstanding Research in Science or Engineering, which commends individuals for exemplary research performed at the Laboratory within the past 10 years that has had a significant impact on a scientific discipline or program. The committee selected Lookman for "his wide ranging contributions to the understanding of intrinsic inhomogeneity in functional materials." Lookman's work has described for the first time the coupling of elasticity to material functionality such as magnetism and charge polarization. His

207

Researcher, Los Alamos National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turab Lookman Turab Lookman Researcher, Los Alamos National Laboratory Turab Lookman Turab Lookman Role: Researcher, Los Alamos National Laboratory Award: 2009 LANL Fellows Prize for Outstanding Research in Science or Engineering Profile: Turab Lookman has received the 2009 LANL Fellows Prize for Outstanding Research in Science or Engineering, which commends individuals for exemplary research performed at the Laboratory within the past 10 years that has had a significant impact on a scientific discipline or program. The committee selected Lookman for "his wide ranging contributions to the understanding of intrinsic inhomogeneity in functional materials." Lookman's work has described for the first time the coupling of elasticity to material functionality such as magnetism and charge polarization. His

208

Annual Report Nucelar Energy Research and Development Program Nuclear Energy Research Initiative  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NERI Project No.2000-0109 began in August 2000 and has three tasks. The first project year addressed Task 1, namely development of nonlinear prognostication for critical equipment in nuclear power facilities. That work is described in the first year's annual report (ORNLTM-2001/195). The current (second) project year (FY02) addresses Task 2, while the third project year will address Tasks 2-3. This report describes the work for the second project year, spanning August 2001 through August 2002, including status of the tasks, issues and concerns, cost performance, and status summary of tasks. The objective of the second project year's work is a compelling demonstration of the nonlinear prognostication algorithm using much more data. The guidance from Dr. Madeline Feltus (DOE/NE-20) is that it would be preferable to show forewarning of failure for different kinds of nuclear-grade equipment, as opposed to many different failure modes from one piece of equipment. Long-term monitoring of operational utility equipment is possible in principle, but is not practically feasible for the following reason. Time and funding constraints for this project do not allow us to monitor the many machines (thousands) that will be necessary to obtain even a few failure sequences, due to low failure rates (ORNL) to contact other researchers for additional data from other test equipment. Consequently, we have revised the work plan for Tasks 2.1-2.2, with corresponding changes to the work plan as shown in the Status Summary of NERI Tasks. The revised tasks are as follows: Task 2.1--ORNL will obtain test data from a subcontractor and other researchers for various test equipment. This task includes development of a test plan or a description of the historical testing, as appropriate: test facility, equipment to be tested, choice of failure mode(s), testing protocol, data acquisition equipment, and resulting data from the test sequence. ORNL will analyze this data for quality, and subsequently via the nonlinear paradigm for prognostication. Task 2.2--ORNL will evaluate the prognostication capability of the nonlinear paradigm. The comparison metrics for reliability of the predictions will include the true positives, true negatives, and the forewarning times. Task 2.3--ORNL will improve the nonlinear paradigm as appropriate, in accord with the results of Tasks 2.1-2.2, to maximize the rate of true positive and true negative indications of failure. Maximal forewarning time is also highly desirable. Task 2.4--ORNL will develop advanced algorithms for the phase-space distribution function (PS-DF) pattern change recognition, based on the results of Task 2.3. This implementation will provide a capability for automated prognostication, as part of the maintenance decision-making. Appendix A provides a detailed description of the analysis methods, which include conventional statistics, traditional nonlinear measures, and ORNL's patented nonlinear PSDM. The body of this report focuses on results of this analysis.

Hively, LM

2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

209

Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants. Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-informed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and.lor confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go farther by focusing on the design of new plants.

Ritterbusch, S.E.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Researcher, Los Alamos National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

David Moore David Moore Researcher, Los Alamos National Laboratory David Moore David Moore Role: Researcher, Los Alamos National Laboratory Award: 2009 LANL Fellows Prize for Outstanding Leadership in Science or Engineering Profile: David S. Moore has received the 2009 LANL Fellows Prize for Outstanding Leadership in Science or Engineering, which commends individuals who stimulate the research interests of talented younger Laboratory staff members and who encourage junior researchers to make the personal sacrifices necessary to become effective leaders. The committee selected Moore for "his inspirational technical leadership in the fields of shock physics and the science of explosives detection." Moore has worked to develop the next generation of scientists in this field by mentoring

211

Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Systems. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, July 31-August 3, 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global utilization of nuclear energy has come a long way from its humble beginnings in the first sustained nuclear reaction at the University of Chicago in 1942. Today, there are over 440 nuclear reactors in 31 countries producing approximately 16% of the electrical energy used worldwide. In the United States, 104 nuclear reactors currently provide 19% of electrical energy used nationally. The International Atomic Energy Agency projects significant growth in the utilization of nuclear power over the next several decades due to increasing demand for energy and environmental concerns related to emissions from fossil plants. There are 28 new nuclear plants currently under construction including 10 in China, 8 in India, and 4 in Russia. In the United States, there have been notifications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission of intentions to apply for combined construction and operating licenses for 27 new units over the next decade. The projected growth in nuclear power has focused increasing attention on issues related to the permanent disposal of nuclear waste, the proliferation of nuclear weapons technologies and materials, and the sustainability of a once-through nuclear fuel cycle. In addition, the effective utilization of nuclear power will require continued improvements in nuclear technology, particularly related to safety and efficiency. In all of these areas, the performance of materials and chemical processes under extreme conditions is a limiting factor. The related basic research challenges represent some of the most demanding tests of our fundamental understanding of materials science and chemistry, and they provide significant opportunities for advancing basic science with broad impacts for nuclear reactor materials, fuels, waste forms, and separations techniques. Of particular importance is the role that new nanoscale characterization and computational tools can play in addressing these challenges. These tools, which include DOE synchrotron X-ray sources, neutron sources, nanoscale science research centers, and supercomputers, offer the opportunity to transform and accelerate the fundamental materials and chemical sciences that underpin technology development for advanced nuclear energy systems. The fundamental challenge is to understand and control chemical and physical phenomena in multi-component systems from femto-seconds to millennia, at temperatures to 1000?C, and for radiation doses to hundreds of displacements per atom (dpa). This is a scientific challenge of enormous proportions, with broad implications in the materials science and chemistry of complex systems. New understanding is required for microstructural evolution and phase stability under relevant chemical and physical conditions, chemistry and structural evolution at interfaces, chemical behavior of actinide and fission-product solutions, and nuclear and thermomechanical phenomena in fuels and waste forms. First-principles approaches are needed to describe f-electron systems, design molecules for separations, and explain materials failure mechanisms. Nanoscale synthesis and characterization methods are needed to understand and design materials and interfaces with radiation, temperature, and corrosion resistance. Dynamical measurements are required to understand fundamental physical and chemical phenomena. New multiscale approaches are needed to integrate this knowledge into accurate models of relevant phenomena and complex systems across multiple length and time scales.

Roberto, J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Gibala, R.; Zinkle, S.; Miller, J.R.; Pimblott, S.; Burns, C.; Raymond, K.; Grimes, R.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.; Clark, S.; Ewing, R.; Wagner, A.; Yip, S.; Buchanan, M.; Crabtree, G.; Hemminger, J.; Poate, J.; Miller, J.C.; Edelstein, N.; Fitzsimmons, T.; Gruzalski, G.; Michaels, G.; Morss, L.; Peters, M.; Talamini, K.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Proceedings of the 29th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 29th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 25-27 September, 2007 in Denver, Colorado. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Benson, Jody [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

213

Proceedings of the 30th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 30th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 23-25 September, 2008 in Portsmouth, Virginia. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States’ capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Wetovsky, Marv A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aguilar-chang, Julio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baker, Diane [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Begnaud, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harste, Hans [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maceira, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patton, Howard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Randall, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Revelle, Douglas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowe, Charlotte [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stead, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steck, Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitaker, Rod [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Xiaoning [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

214

Proceedings of the 2010 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2010: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 21-23 September, 2010 in Orlando, Florida,. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, National Science Foundation (NSF), Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

215

Proceedings of the 2011 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2011: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 13-15 September, 2011 in Tucson, Arizona. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), National Science Foundation (NSF), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States' capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor; Sandoval, Marisa N. [Editor

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

216

Proceedings of the 28th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 28th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 19-21 September, 2006 in Orlando, Florida. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Benson, Jody [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

217

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR ENGINEERING EDUCATION RESEARCH: HIGHLIGHTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR ENGINEERING EDUCATION RESEARCH: HIGHLIGHTS OF RECENT AND CURRENT RESEARCH--III Sponsored by the Education and Training Division Cosponsored by the Fusion Energy Division! emitted with various energies at different positions with respect to the crystal. These PXR have several

Danon, Yaron

218

ELSEVIER Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 403 (1998) 43 l-441 INSTRUMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELSEVIER Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 403 (1998) 43 l-441 INSTRUMENTS & METHODS IN PHYSICS RESEARCH Section A Theory of neutron fluctuations in source-driven subcritical systems I. P&At*, Y. Yamane' Department of Reactor Ph>aics, Chalmers Unicrrsi[\\' oj Technolo~~~. S-41-7 96

Pázsit, Imre

219

Workshop on the Role of the Nuclear Physics Research Community in Combating Terrorism: Scientific Posters  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This 2002 workshop brought together members of the nation's nuclear physics research community with expertise in nuclear physics, detector development, and accelerator development from DOE and NSF laboratories and universities, with terrorism experts from government agencies familiar with technologies, strategies and policy for the combat of terrorism. The focus of the workshop included conventional explosive and weapon detection and radiological and nuclear threats. Each of these topics included research for field applications, detector and accelerator research in transportation (air, surface, maritime), detector and accelerator research in laboratory forensic detection and preventive measures against clandestine activities [Copied, with editing, from http://www.sc.doe.gov/np/homeland/descript.html]. Of the 45 posters presented at the workshop, 35 have been made available in PDF format on this webpage. The 62 page report from the workshop is also available at http://www.sc.doe.gov/np/homeland/index.html.

220

Cable Polymer Aging and Condition Monitoring Research at Sandia National Laboratories Under the Nuclear Energy Plant Optimization (NEPO) Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes cable polymer aging and condition monitoring research performed at Sandia National Laboratories under the Nuclear Energy Plant Optimization (NEPO) Program from 2000 to 2005. The research results apply to low-voltage cable insulation and jacket materials that are commonly used in U.S. nuclear power plants. The research builds upon and is linked to research performed at Sandia from 1977 through 1986, sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Aged and unaged specimens from t...

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Welcome - Nuclear Medicine Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

combined resources of the stable isotope inventory, a High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), hot cell processing capabilities, and a wide range of support functions required for such...

222

Proceedings of the 23rd Seismic Research Symposium: Worldwide Monitoring of Nuclear Explosions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 23rd Seismic Research Review: Worldwide Monitoring of Nuclear Explosions, held 2-5 October, 2001 in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Warren, N. Jill [Editor; Chavez, Francesca C. [Editor

2001-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

223

Department of Energy Awards $3.8 Million in Funding to 38 U.S. Universities for Nuclear Research Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today strengthened its commitment to advancing nuclear power by awarding $100,000 to 38 universities to enhance nuclear research and development...

224

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 533 (2004) 612 Erratum to ``Dead time and pileup in pulsed parametric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 533 (2004) 612 Erratum Erratum to ``Dead time DanonÃ?, Bryndol Sones, Robert Block Department of Mechanical Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering

Danon, Yaron

225

Record of Decision for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the U.S. (DOE/EIS-0310) (1/26/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

77 77 Federal Register / Vol. 66, No. 18 / Friday, January 26, 2001 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Record of Decision for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility AGENCY: Department of Energy (the Department). ACTION: Record of Decision (ROD). SUMMARY: Under the authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, the Department's missions include: (1) Producing isotopes for research and applications in medicine and industry; (2) meeting nuclear material needs of other Federal agencies; and (3) conducting research and development activities for civilian use of nuclear power. The Department has evaluated

226

Proceedings of the 25th Seismic Research Review -- Nuclear Explosion Monitoring: Building the Knowledge Base  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 25th Seismic Research Review -- Nuclear Explosion Monitoring: Building the Knowledge Base, held 23-25 September, 2003 in Tucson, Arizona. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Chavez, Francesca C. [Editor; Mendius, E. Louise [Editor

2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

227

Proceedings of the 27th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 27th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 20-22 September, 2005 in Rancho Mirage, California. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Benson, Jody [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor

2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

228

Proceedings of the 26th Seismic Research Review: Trends in Nuclear Explosion Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 26th Seismic Research Review: Trends in Nuclear Explosion Monitoring, held 21-23 September, 2004 in Orlando, Florida. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Chavez, Francesca C. [Editor; Benson, Jody [Editor; Hanson, Stephanie [Editor; Mark, Carol [Editor; Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor

2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

229

Proceedings of the 2009 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2009: Ground -Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 21-23 September, 2009 in Tucson, Arizona,. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States’ capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Wetovsky, Marv A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aguilar - Chang, Julio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baker, Diane [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Begnaud, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harste, Hans [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maceira, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patton, Howard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Randall, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowe, Charlotte [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stead, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steck, Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitaker, Rod [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Xiaoning ( David ) [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

230

Fresh and Spent Nuclear Fuel Repatriation from the IRT-2000 Research Reactor Facility, Sofia, Bulgaria  

SciTech Connect

The IRT 2000 research reactor, operated by the Bulgarian Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE), safely shipped all of their Russian-origin nuclear fuel from the Republic of Bulgaria to the Russian Federation beginning in 2003 and completing in 2008. These fresh and spent fuel shipments removed all highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Bulgaria. The fresh fuel was shipped by air in December 2003 using trucks and a commercial cargo aircraft. One combined spent fuel shipment of HEU and low enriched uranium (LEU) was completed in July 2008 using high capacity VPVR/M casks transported by truck, barge, and rail. The HEU shipments were assisted by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) and the LEU spent fuel shipment was funded by Bulgaria. This report describes the work, approvals, organizations, equipment, and agreements required to complete these shipments and concludes with several major lessons learned.

K. J. Allen; T. G. Apostolov; I. S. Dimitrov

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Proceedings of the 24th Seismic Research Review: Nuclear Explosion Monitoring: Innovation and Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 24th Seismic Research Review: Nuclear Explosion Monitoring: Innovation and Integration, held 17-19 September, 2002 in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Warren, N. Jill [Editor

2002-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

232

Research and Development in Tritium Technology at the Institute of Radiochemistry, Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research and Development / Proceedings of the Second National Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Dayton, Ohio, April 30 to May 2, 1985)

Prof. Dr. H. J. Ache

233

REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR TECHNICAL NUCLEAR FORENSICS  

SciTech Connect

Technical nuclear forensics (TNF) refers to the collection, analysis and evaluation of pre- and post-detonation radiological or nuclear materials, devices, and/or debris. TNF is an integral component, complementing traditional forensics and investigative work, to help enable the attribution of discovered radiological or nuclear material. Research is needed to improve the capabilities of TNF. One research area of interest is determining the isotopic signatures of research reactors. Research reactors are a potential source of both radiological and nuclear material. Research reactors are often the least safeguarded type of reactor; they vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power, and burn-up. Many research reactors are fueled with highly-enriched uranium (HEU), up to {approx}93% {sup 235}U, which could potentially be used as weapons material. All of them have significant amounts of radiological material with which a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) could be built. Therefore, the ability to attribute if material originated from or was produced in a specific research reactor is an important tool in providing for the security of the United States. Currently there are approximately 237 operating research reactors worldwide, another 12 are in temporary shutdown and 224 research reactors are reported as shut down. Little is currently known about the isotopic signatures of spent research reactor fuel. An effort is underway at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to analyze spent research reactor fuel to determine these signatures. Computer models, using reactor physics codes, are being compared to the measured analytes in the spent fuel. This allows for improving the reactor physics codes in modeling research reactors for the purpose of nuclear forensics. Currently the Oak Ridge Research reactor (ORR) is being modeled and fuel samples are being analyzed for comparison. Samples of an ORR spent fuel assembly were taken by SRNL for analytical and radiochemical analysis. The fuel assembly was modeled using MONTEBURNS(MCNP5/ ORIGEN2.2) and MCNPX/CINDER90. The results from the models have been compared to each other and to the measured data.

Nichols, T.; Beals, D.; Sternat, M.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

234

Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Cooperative Agreement DE-FC03-99SF21902 Technical Progress Report 4Q99  

SciTech Connect

OAK B188 Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Cooperative Agreement DE-FC03-99SF21902 Technical Progress Report 4Q99.

Stanley E. Ritterbusch

2001-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

235

UCLA Intermediate Energy Nuclear and Particle Physics Research: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This project covers the following research: (a) Investigations into the structure of the proton and neutron. This is done by investigating the different resonance states of nucleons with beams of tagged, polarized photons, linearly as well as circularly, incident on polarized hydrogen/deuterium targets and measuring the production of {pi}{sup #25;0}, 2{pi}{sup #25;}0, 3{pi}{sup #25;0}, {eta}#17;, {eta}', {omega}, etc. The principal detector is the Crystal Ball multiphoton spectrometer which has an acceptance of nearly 4#25;. It has been moved to the MAMI accelerator facility of the University of Mainz, Germany. We investigate the conversion of electromagnetic energy into mesonic matter and conversely. (b) We investigate the consequences of applying the "standard" symmetries of isospin, G�parity, charge conjugation, C, P, T, and chirality using rare and forbidden decays of light mesons such as the {eta}#17;,{eta}' and {omega}. We also investigate the consequences of these symmetries being slightly broken symmetries. We do this by studying selected meson decays using the Crystal Ball detector. (c) We determine the mass, or more precisely the mass difference of the three light quarks (which are inputs to Quantum Chromodynamics) by measuring the decay rate of specially selected {eta}#17; and {eta}' decay modes, again we use the Crystal Ball. (d)We have started a new program to search for the 33 missing cascade baryons using the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson Laboratory. Cascade resonances are very special: they have double strangeness and are quite narrow. This implies that they can be discovered by the missing mass technique in photoproduction reactions such as in {gamma}p{yields}{Xi}{sup #4;�}K{sup +}K{sup +}. The cascade program is of particular importance for the upgrade to 12 GeV of the CLAS detector and for design of the Hall D at JLab. (e) Finally, we are getting more involved in a new program to measure the hadronic matter form factor of complex nuclei, in particular the "neutron skin" of {sup 208}Pb, which is of great interest to astroparticle physics for determining the properties of neutron stars. Processes of study are coherent and non�coherent #25;0 photoproduction. The Crystal Ball is uniquely suited for these studies because of the large acceptance, good direction and energy resolution and it is an inclusive detector for the #25;{pi}{sup 0} final state and exclusive for background such as 2#25;{pi}{sup 0}.

B.M.K. Nefkens (Principal Investigator, ed.); J. Goetz; A. Lapik; M. Korolija; S. Prakhov; A. Starostin (ed.)

2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

236

Standard Practice for Application and Analysis of Nuclear Research Emulsions for Fast Neutron Dosimetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 Nuclear Research Emulsions (NRE) have a long and illustrious history of applications in the physical sciences, earth sciences and biological sciences (1,2) . In the physical sciences, NRE experiments have led to many fundamental discoveries in such diverse disciplines as nuclear physics, cosmic ray physics and high energy physics. In the applied physical sciences, NRE have been used in neutron physics experiments in both fission and fusion reactor environments (3-6). Numerous NRE neutron experiments can be found in other applied disciplines, such as nuclear engineering, environmental monitoring and health physics. Given the breadth of NRE applications, there exist many textbooks and handbooks that provide considerable detail on the techniques used in the NRE method. As a consequence, this practice will be restricted to the application of the NRE method for neutron measurements in reactor physics and nuclear engineering with particular emphasis on neutron dosimetry in benchmark fields (see Matrix E706). 1...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Fusion Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research...

238

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 544 (2005) 225235 Neutralized transport experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 544 (2005) 225­235 Neutralized transport. Good agreement has been observed with theory and experiment throughout the study. r 2005 Elsevier B a reactor chamber to an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target. The present generation of indirect

Gilson, Erik

239

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 15, PAGES 22452248, AUGUST 1, 2000 Subsurface nuclear tests monitoring through the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nuclear tests down to 1 kiloton (kt) TNT equivalent anywhere on the planet. The IMS is based upon four waves will help check for underground, under­water and atmospheric nuclear tests. The fourth networkGEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 15, PAGES 2245­2248, AUGUST 1, 2000 Sub­surface nuclear

Hourdin, Chez Frédéric

240

Eastern Europe Research Reactor Initiative nuclear education and training courses - Current activities and future challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Eastern Europe Research Reactor Initiative was established in January 2008 to enhance cooperation between the Research Reactors in Eastern Europe. It covers three areas of research reactor utilisation: irradiation of materials and fuel, radioisotope production, neutron beam experiments, education and training. In the field of education and training an EERRI training course was developed. The training programme has been elaborated with the purpose to assist IAEA Member States, which consider building a research reactor (RR) as a first step to develop nuclear competence and infrastructure in the Country. The major strength of the reactor is utilisation of three different research reactors and a lot of practical exercises. Due to high level of adaptability, the course can be tailored to specific needs of institutions with limited or no access to research reactors. (authors)

Snoj, L. [Josef Stefan Inst., Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sklenka, L.; Rataj, J. [Dept. of Nuclear Reactor, Czech Technical Univ. in Prague, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Boeck, H. [Vienna Univ. of Technology/Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

COMMENTS ON "A NEW LOOK AT LOW-ENERGY NUCLEAR REACTION RESEARCH"  

SciTech Connect

Cold fusion researchers have accumulated a large body of anomalous results over the last 20 years that they claim proves a new, mysterious nuclear reaction is active in systems they study. Krivit and Marwan give a brief and wholly positive view of this body of research. Unfortunately, cold fusion researchers routinely ignore conventional explanations of their observations, and claim much greater than real accuracy and precision for their techniques. This paper attempts to equally briefly address those aspects of the field with the intent of providing a balanced view of the field, and to establish some criteria for subsequent publications in this arena.

Shanahan, K.

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

242

The unit cost factors and calculation methods for decommissioning - Cost estimation of nuclear research facilities  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The uncertainties of decommissioning costs increase high due to several conditions. Decommissioning cost estimation depends on the complexity of nuclear installations, its site-specific physical and radiological inventories. Therefore, the decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities must be estimated in accordance with the detailed sub-tasks and resources by the tasks of decommissioning activities. By selecting the classified activities and resources, costs are calculated by the items and then the total costs of all decommissioning activities are reshuffled to match with its usage and objectives. And the decommissioning cost of nuclear research facilities is calculated by applying a unit cost factor method on which classification of decommissioning works fitted with the features and specifications of decommissioning objects and establishment of composition factors are based. Decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities are composed of labor cost, equipment and materials cost. Of these three categorical costs, the calculation of labor costs are very important because decommissioning activities mainly depend on labor force. Labor costs in decommissioning activities are calculated on the basis of working time consumed in decommissioning objects and works. The working times are figured out of unit cost factors and work difficulty factors. Finally, labor costs are figured out by using these factors as parameters of calculation. The accuracy of decommissioning cost estimation results is much higher compared to the real decommissioning works. (authors)

Kwan-Seong Jeong; Dong-Gyu Lee; Chong-Hun Jung; Kune-Woo Lee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Deokjin-dong 150, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 582 (2007) 629637 Monte Carlo and analytical models of neutron detection with organic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unfolding, which have a variety of applications, including nuclear nonproliferation and homeland security materials in applications such as nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, and basic physics research

Pázsit, Imre

244

Nuclear nonproliferation: Concerns with US delays in accepting foregin research reactors` spent fuel  

SciTech Connect

One key US nonproliferation goal is to discourage use of highly enriched uranium fuel (HEU), which can be used to make nuclear bombs, in civilian nuclear programs worldwide. DOE`s Off-Site Fuels Policy for taking back spent HEU from foreign research reactors was allowed to expire due to environmental reasons. This report provides information on the effects of delays in renewing the Off-Site Fuels Policy on US nonproliferation goals and programs (specifically the reduced enrichment program), DOE`s efforts to renew the fuels policy, and the price to be charged to the operators of foreign reactors for DOE`s activities in taking back spent fuel.

1994-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

245

DOE/EIS-0218-SA-3: Supplement Analysis for the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program (November 2004)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE FOREIGN SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL ACCEPTANCE PROGRAM NOVEMBER 2004 DOE/EIS-0218-SA-3 U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Washington, DC Final Supplement Analysis for the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program Final i TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1. Introduction.............................................................................................................................................. 1 2. Background .............................................................................................................................................. 1 3. The Proposed Action ...............................................................................................................................

246

Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Aging Management of Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures - Overview and Suggested Research Topics  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power plant concrete structures are described and their operating experience noted. Primary considerations related to management of their aging are noted and an indication of their status provided: degradation mechanisms, damage models, and material performance; assessment and remediation (i.e., component selection, in-service inspection, nondestructive examinations, and remedial actions); and estimation of performance at present or some future point in time (i.e., application of structural reliability theory to the design and optimization of in-service inspection/maintenance strategies, and determination of the effects of degradation on plant risk). Several activities are identified that provide background information and data on areas of concern with respect to nondestructive examination of nuclear power plant concrete structures: inspection of thick-walled, heavily-reinforced sections, basemats, and inaccessible areas of the containment metallic pressure boundary. Topics are noted where additional research would be of benefit to aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures.

Naus, Dan J [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A confirmatory research approach to the measurement of EMI/RFI in commercial nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is conducting confirmatory research on the measurement of electromagnetic/radio frequency interference (EMI/RFI) in nuclear power plants while it makes a good beginning, the currently available research data are not sufficient to characterize the EMI/RFI environment of the typical nuclear plant. Data collected over several weeks at each of several observation points are required to meet this need. To collect the required data, several approaches are examined, the most promising of which is the relatively new technology of application specific spectral receivers. While several spectral receiver designs have been described in the literature, none is well suited for nuclear power plant EMI/RFI surveys. This paper describes the development of two receivers specifically designed for nuclear power plant EMI/RFI surveys. One receiver surveys electric fields between 5 MHz and 8 GHz, while the other surveys magnetic fields between 305 Hz and 5 MHz. The results of field tests at TVA`s Bull Run Fossil Plant are reported.

Kercel, S.W.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants. Volume 5  

SciTech Connect

This is the fifth volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose reduction research and health physics technology or nuclear power plants. The information is taken from two of several databases maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory`s ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The research section of the report covers dose reduction projects that are in the experimental or developmental phase. It includes topics such as steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvements in reactor materials, and inspection techniques. The section on health physics technology discusses dose reduction efforts that are in place or in the process of being implemented at nuclear power plants. A total of 105 new or updated projects are described. All project abstracts from this report are available to nuclear industry professionals with access to a fax machine through the ACEFAX system or a computer with a modem and the proper communications software through the ACE system. Detailed descriptions of how to access all the databases electronically are in the appendices of the report.

Khan, T.A.; Yu, C.K.; Roecklein, A.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report  

SciTech Connect

Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form.

Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Nuclear safeguards research and development. Program status report, October 1980-January 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the status of the Nuclear Safeguards Research and Development Program pursued by the Energy, Chemistry-Materials Science, and Operational Security/Safeguards Divisions of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics include nondestructive assay technology development and applications, international safeguards systems. Also discussed are training courses, technology transfer, analytical chemistry methods for fissionable materials safeguards, the Department of Energy Computer Security Technical Center, and operational security.

Henry, C.N. (comp.)

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

ENTERPRISE SRS: LEVERAGING ONGOING OPERATIONS TO ADVANCE NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLES RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is repurposing its vast array of assets to solve future national issues regarding environmental stewardship, national security, and clean energy. The vehicle for this transformation is Enterprise SRS which presents a new, radical view of SRS as a united endeavor for ?all things nuclear? as opposed to a group of distinct and separate entities with individual missions and organizations. Key among the Enterprise SRS strategic initiatives is the integration of research into facilities in conjunction with on-going missions to provide researchers from other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities the opportunity to demonstrate their technologies in a relevant environment and scale prior to deployment. To manage that integration of research demonstrations into site facilities, The Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have established a center for applied nuclear materials processing and engineering research (hereafter referred to as the Center). The key proposition of this initiative is to bridge the gap between promising transformational nuclear fuel cycle processing discoveries and large commercial-scaletechnology deployment by leveraging SRS assets as facilities for those critical engineering-scale demonstrations necessary to assure the successful deployment of new technologies. The Center will coordinate the demonstration of R&D technologies and serve as the interface between the engineering-scale demonstration and the R&D programs, essentially providing cradle-to-grave support to the research team during the demonstration. While the initial focus of the Center will be on the effective use of SRS assets for these demonstrations, the Center also will work with research teams to identify opportunities to perform research demonstrations at other facilities. Unique to this approach is the fact that these SRS assets will continue to accomplish DOE?s critical nuclear material missions (e.g., processing in H-Canyon and plutonium storage in K-Area). Thus, the demonstration can be accomplished by leveraging the incremental cost of performing demonstrations without needing to cover the full operational cost of the facility. Current Center activities have been focused on integrating advanced safeguards monitoring technologies demonstrations into the SRS H-Canyon and advanced location technologies demonstrations into K-Area Materials Storage. These demonstrations are providing valuable information to researchers and customers as well as providing the Center with an improved protocol for demonstration management that can be exercised across the entire SRS (as well as to offsite venues) so that future demonstrations can be done more efficiently and provide an opportunity to utilize these unique assets for multiple purposes involving national laboratories, academia, and commercial entities. Key among the envisioned future demonstrations is the use of H-Canyon to demonstrate new nuclear materials separations technologies critical for advancing the mission needs DOE-Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) to advance the research for next generation fuel cycle technologies. The concept is to install processing equipment on frames. The frames are then positioned into an H-Canyon cell and testing in a relevant radiological environment involving prototypic radioactive materials can be performed.

Murray, A.; Marra, J.; Wilmarth, B.; Mcguire, P.; Wheeler, V.

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

253

International Conference on Fully 3D Reconstruction in Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Linau, Germany, July 9-13, 2007 Abstract--Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a breathing cycle. Thus the radiation exposure during the data acquisition is at least 10 times higher than. This will result in unacceptable radiation to the patient. Lower the radiation exposure will sacrifice the imageInternational Conference on Fully 3D Reconstruction in Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Linau

254

Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices > Office of Nonproliferation Research & Development > Nuclear Detonation Detection Nuclear Detonation Detection Develop, Demonstrate, and...

255

RESEARCH TITLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Wilmington 35 Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Switzerland 36 Emory University School of Medicine 37 ExxonMobil Research and ...

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

256

Audit Report - Cooperative Research and Development Agreements at National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories, OAS-M-13-02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooperative Research and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements at National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories OAS-M-13-02 March 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 March 15, 2013 MEMO MEMORANDUM FOR THE ACTING ADMINISTRATOR, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Cooperative Research and Development Agreements at National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories" BACKGROUND The dissemination of technology developed by the Department of Energy's national laboratories to the general science community and the public, is one of the Department's top priorities. In

257

FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume I  

SciTech Connect

The following chapters are included in this study: (1) fusion nuclear issues, (2) survey of experimental needs, (3) requirements of the experiments, (4) non-fusion facilities, (5) fusion facilities for nuclear experiments, and (6) fusion research and development scenarios. (MOW)

Abdou, M.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials with Particles and Components Testing (IMPACT) facility and the Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) Radiochemistry Processing Laboratory (RPL) and PIE facilities were added. The ATR NSUF annually hosts a weeklong event called User’s Week in which students and faculty from universities as well as other interested parties from regulatory agencies or industry convene in Idaho Falls, Idaho to see presentations from ATR NSUF staff as well as select researchers from the materials research field. User’s week provides an overview of current materials research topics of interest and an opportunity for young researchers to understand the process of performing work through ATR NSUF. Additionally, to increase the number of researchers engaged in LWR materials issues, a series of workshops are in progress to introduce research staff to stress corrosion cracking, zirconium alloy degradation, and uranium dioxide degradation during in-reactor use.

John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Energy Frontier Research Center, Center for Materials Science of Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, has funded the INL as one of the Energy Frontier Research Centers in the area of material science of nuclear fuels. This document is the required annual report to the Office of Science that outlines the accomplishments for the period of May 2010 through April 2011. The aim of the Center for Material Science of Nuclear Fuels (CMSNF) is to establish the foundation for predictive understanding of the effects of irradiation-induced defects on thermal transport in oxide nuclear fuels. The science driver of the center’s investigation is to understand how complex defect and microstructures affect phonon mediated thermal transport in UO2, and achieve this understanding for the particular case of irradiation-induced defects and microstructures. The center’s research thus includes modeling and measurement of thermal transport in oxide fuels with different levels of impurities, lattice disorder and irradiation-induced microstructure, as well as theoretical and experimental investigation of the evolution of disorder, stoichiometry and microstructure in nuclear fuel under irradiation. With the premise that thermal transport in irradiated UO2 is a phonon-mediated energy transport process in a crystalline material with defects and microstructure, a step-by-step approach will be utilized to understand the effects of types of defects and microstructures on the collective phonon dynamics in irradiated UO2. Our efforts under the thermal transport thrust involved both measurement of diffusive phonon transport (an approach that integrates over the entire phonon spectrum) and spectroscopic measurements of phonon attenuation/lifetime and phonon dispersion. Our distinct experimental efforts dovetail with our modeling effort involving atomistic simulation of phonon transport and prediction of lattice thermal conductivity using the Boltzmann transport framework.

Todd R. Allen, Director

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Nuclear Science and Technology Division - Home page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

image image image - mural in bldg 5200 image image Fuels, Isotopes, and Nuclear Materials image Fuels, Isotopes, and Nuclear Materials Nuclear System Analysis, Design, and Safety image Nuclear System Analysis, Design, and Safety WELCOME Performing basic and applied R&D for the Department of Energy, the National Nuclear Security Administration, and other government agencies, as well as supporting and leveraging industrial partnerships Mission Statement The Nuclear Science and Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will provide leading-edge science, technology, and engineering research that support our Nation's nuclear science and technology enterprise across a broad spectrum of applications including but not limited to advanced nuclear power systems, nuclear medicine,and nuclear

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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261

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices  

SciTech Connect

Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data.

Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Foreign research reactor irradiated nuclear fuel inventories containing HEU and LEU of United States origin  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of foreign research reactor inventories of aluminum-based and TRIGA irradiated nuclear fuel elements containing highly enriched and low enriched uranium of United States origin that are anticipated in January 1996, January 2001, and January 2006. These fuels from 104 research reactors in 41 countries are the same aluminum-based and TRIGA fuels that were eligible for receipt under the Department of Energy`s Offsite Fuels Policy that was in effect in 1988. All fuel inventory and reactor data that were available as of December 1, 1994, have been included in the estimates of approximately 14,300 irradiated fuel elements in January 1996, 18,800 in January 2001, and 22,700 in January 2006.

Matos, J.E.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Nuclear physics research at the University of Richmond. Progress report, November 1, 1994--October 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Summarized in this report is the progress achieved during the period from November 1, 1994 to October 31, 1995. The experimental work described in this report is in electromagnetic and heavy-ion nuclear physics. The effort in electromagnetic nuclear physics is in preparation for the research program at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and is focused on the construction and use of the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The heavy-ion experiments were performed at the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility and SUNY, Stony Brook. The physics interests driving these efforts at CEBAF are in the study of the structure, interactions, and nuclear-medium modifications of mesons and baryons. This year, an extension of the experiment to measure the magnetic form factor of the neutron was approved by the CEBAF Program Advisory Committee Nine (PAC9) for beam at 6 GeV. The authors also submitted updates to PAC9 on the experiments to measure inclusive {eta} photoproduction in nuclei and electroproduction of the {Lambda}, {Lambda}*(1520), and f{sub 0}(975). In addition to these experiments, the authors collaborated on a proposal to measure rare radiative decays of the {phi} meson which was also approved by PAC9. Their contributions to the construction of the CLAS include the development of the drift-chamber gas system, drift-chamber software, and controls software. Major has been leading the effort in the construction of the gas system. In the last year, the Hall B gas shed was constructed and the installation of the gas system components built at the University of Richmond has begun. Over the last six years, the efforts in low-energy heavy-ion physics have decreased due to the change in focus to electromagnetic nuclear physics at CEBAF. Most of the heavy-ion work is completed and there are now new experiments planned. Included in this report are two papers resulting from collaborations on heavy-ion experiments.

Vineyard, M.F.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Major, R.W.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Research in theoretical nuclear physics. Progress report, November 1, 1989--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses topics in the following areas: Low energy nuclear reactions induced by light and heavy ions; medium energy physics; and nuclear structure. (LSP)

Udagawa, T.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Proceedings of the 21st Seismic Research Symposium: Technologies for Monitoring The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 21st Seismic Research Symposium: Technologies for Monitoring The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, held 21-24 September 1999 in Las Vegas, Nevada. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Department of Defense (DoD), the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Warren, N. Jill [Editor

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

266

Planning and Response to the Detonation of an Improvised Nuclear Device: Past, Present, and Future Research  

SciTech Connect

While the reality of an improvised nuclear device (IND) being detonated in an American city is unlikely, its destructive power is such that the scenario must be planned for. Upon reviewing the academic literature on the effects of and response to IND events, this report looks to actual responders from around the country. The results from the meetings of public officials in the cities show where gaps exist between theoretical knowledge and actual practice. In addition to the literature, the meetings reveal areas where future research needs to be conducted. This paper recommends that local response planners: meet to discuss the challenges of IND events; offer education to officials, the public, and responders on IND events; incorporate 'shelter-first' into response plans; provide information to the public and responders using the 3 Cs; and engage the private sector (including media) in response plans. In addition to these recommendations for the response planners, the paper provides research questions that once answered will improve response plans around the country. By following the recommendations, both groups, response planners and researchers, can help the country better prepare for and mitigate the effects of an IND detonation.

Bentz, A

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect

This document has been prepared to assist research reactor operators possessing spent fuel containing enriched uranium of United States origin to prepare part of the documentation necessary to ship this fuel to the United States. Data are included on the nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate, and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies. Isotopic masses of U, Np, Pu and Am that are present in spent research reactor fuel are estimated for MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assembly types. The isotopic masses of each fuel assembly type are given as functions of U-235 burnup in the spent fuel, and of initial U-235 enrichment and U-235 mass in the fuel assembly. Photon dose rates of spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are estimated for fuel assemblies with up to 80% U-235 burnup and specific power densities between 0.089 and 2.857 MW/kg[sup 235]U, and for fission product decay times of up to 20 years. Thermal decay heat loads are estimated for spent fuel based upon the fuel assembly irradiation history (average assembly power vs. elapsed time) and the spent fuel cooling time.

Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production, with an outlet gas temperature in the range of 750°C, and a design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. This technology development plan details the additional research and development (R&D) required to design and license the NGNP RPV, assuming that A 508/A 533 is the material of construction. The majority of additional information that is required is related to long-term aging behavior at NGNP vessel temperatures, which are somewhat above those commonly encountered in the existing database from LWR experience. Additional data are also required for the anticipated NGNP environment. An assessment of required R&D for a Grade 91 vessel has been retained from the first revision of the R&D plan in Appendix B in somewhat less detail. Considerably more development is required for this steel compared to A 508/A 533 including additional irradiation testing for expected NGNP operating temperatures, high-temperature mechanical properties, and extensive studies of long-term microstructural stability.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Department of Energy Issues Request for Pre-Applications to U.S. Universities for Nuclear Energy - Related Research and Development Proposals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP) is now accepting pre-applications from universities interested in conducting nuclear energy- related research and development (R&D) projects.

270

Department of Energy Issues Call for Proposals to U.S. Universities for Nuclear Energy-Related Integrated Research Project Proposals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Nuclear Energy University Programs is now accepting applications from universities interested in conducting nuclear energy-related Integrated Research Projects.

271

Research and Development Technology Development Roadmaps for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for process heat, hydrogen and electricity production. The reactor will be graphite moderated with helium as the primary coolant and may be either prismatic or pebble-bed. Although, final design features have not yet been determined. Research and Development (R&D) activities are proceeding on those known plant systems to mature the technology, codify the materials for specific applications, and demonstrate the component and system viability in NGNP relevant and integrated environments. Collectively these R&D activities serve to reduce the project risk and enhance the probability of on-budget, on-schedule completion and NRC licensing. As the design progresses, in more detail, toward final design and approval for construction, selected components, which have not been used in a similar application, in a relevant environment nor integrated with other components and systems, must be tested to demonstrate viability at reduced scales and simulations prior to full scale operation. This report and its R&D TDRMs present the path forward and its significance in assuring technical readiness to perform the desired function by: Choreographing the integration between design and R&D activities; and proving selected design components in relevant applications.

Ian McKirdy

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Low Prevalence of Chronic Beryllium Disease among Workers at a Nuclear Weapons Research and Development Facility  

SciTech Connect

To study the prevalence of beryllium sensitization (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) in a cohort of workers from a nuclear weapons research and development facility. We evaluated 50 workers with BeS with medical and occupational histories, physical examination, chest imaging with HRCT (N=49), and pulmonary function testing. Forty of these workers also underwent bronchoscopy for bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and transbronchial biopsies. The mean duration of employment at the facility was 18 yrs and the mean latency (from first possible exposure) to time of evaluation was 32 yrs. Five of the workers had CBD at the time of evaluation (based on histology or HRCT); three others had evidence of probable CBD. These workers with BeS, characterized by a long duration of potential Be exposure and a long latency, had a low prevalence of CBD.

Arjomandi, M; Seward, J P; Gotway, M B; Nishimura, S; Fulton, G P; Thundiyil, J; King, T E; Harber, P; Balmes, J R

2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

273

EXPERIMENTAL AND CALCULATED RESEARCHES OF NUCLEAR-PHYSICS CHARACTERISTICS OF ASSEMBLIES CONTAINING [237Np + 239Pu(98%)] IN TH  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

And Calculated Researches of Nuclear-Physics Characteristics And Calculated Researches of Nuclear-Physics Characteristics Of Assemblies Containing [ 237 Np + 239 Pu(98%)] in The Core and Reflector of Natural Uranium V.I.Gavrilov, I.Yu.Drozdov, N.V.Zavialov, V.I.Il'in, A.A.Kajgorodov, M.I.Kuvshinov, A.V.Panin Russian Federal Nuclear Center All-Russia Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics Neptunium 237 seems to be a promising material as a core component of such systems as pulsed reactors [2] and cascade blankets for electronuclear facilities [1]. To realize calculated simulation of such facilities it is required to know neutron-physics data for the materials included. In this respect 237 Np is a little-studied material. Thus, the rated values of critical mass for a "bare" sphere of

274

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have concluded, however, that with adequate engineered cooling of the vessel, the A508/533 steels are also acceptable.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

A Review of the Research on Response to Improvised Nuclear Device Events  

SciTech Connect

Following the events of September 11, a litany of imaginable horribles was trotted out before an anxious and concerned public. To date, government agencies and academics are still grappling with how to best respond to such catastrophes, and as Senator Lieberman's quote says above, now is the time to plan and prepare for such events. One of the nation's worst fears is that terrorists might detonate an improvised nuclear device (IND) in an American city. With 9/11 serving as the catalyst, the government and many NGOs have invested money into research and development of response capabilities throughout the country. Yet, there is still much to learn about how to best respond to an IND event. Understanding the state of knowledge, identifying gaps, and making recommendations for how to fill those gaps, this paper will provide a framework under which past findings can be understood and future research can fit. The risk of an improvised nuclear device (IND) detonation may seem unlikely; and while this is hopefully true, due to its destructive capability, IND events must be prepared for. Many people still live under the Cold War mentality that if a city is attacked with a nuclear weapon, there is little chance of survival. This assumption, while perhaps true in the case of multiple, thermonuclear weapons exchanges, does not hold for the current threat. If a single IND were detonated in the United States, there would be many casualties at the point of impact; however, there would also be many survivors and the initial response by two major groups will mean the difference between life and death for many people. These groups are the first responders and the public. Understanding how these two groups prepare, react and interact will improve response to nuclear terrorism. Figure 1 provides a visualization of the response timeline of an IND event. For the purposes of this assessment, it is assumed that to accurately inform the public, three functions need to be fulfilled by response personnel, namely planning, developing situational awareness, and developing a public message. Planning varies widely from city to city, and to date no comprehensive study has been completed to assess how individual cities are progressing with preparation plans. Developing situational awareness about an IND detonation has been well researched over the years, yet it is far from fully understood. While messaging is an integral component to response, it is one that suffers from a dearth of knowledge. The public will have a certain level of education and preparation. After the detonation the public will respond naturally and upon receiving the responders message will react to the message and may modify their behavior accordingly. Reviewing the nodes under both headings, responders and public will help better prepare the country to meet the challenges of an IND attack.

Bentz, A; Buddemeier, B; Dombroski, M

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Whole-Organism Concentration Ratios for Plutonium in Wildlife from Past US Nuclear Research Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whole-organism concentration ratios (CR{sub wo-media}) for plutonium (Pu) in wildlife were calculated using data from the broad range of organism types and environmental settings of the US nuclear research program. Original sources included site-specific reports and scientific journal articles typically from 1960s to 80s research. Most of the calculated CR{sub wo-media} values are new to existing data sets, and, for some wildlife categories, serve to fill gaps or add to sparse data including those for terrestrial reptile; freshwater bird, crustacean and zooplankton; and marine crustacean and zooplankton. Ratios of Pu concentration in the whole-organism to that in specific tissues and organs are provided here for a range of freshwater and marine fish. The CR{sub wo-media} values in fish living in liquid discharge ponds were two orders of magnitude higher than those for similar species living in lakes receiving Pu from atmospheric fallout, suggesting the physico-chemical form of the source Pu can dominate over other factors related to transfer, such as organism size and feeding behavior. Small rodent data indicated one to two order of magnitude increases when carcass, pelt, and gastrointestinal tract were included together in the whole-organism calculation compared to that for carcass alone. Only 4% of Pu resided in the carcass of small rodents compared to 75% in the gastrointestinal tract and 21% in the pelt.

johansen, M.; Kamboj; Kuhne, W.

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

277

Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel acceptance criteria, the mass of uranium and transuranic elements in spent research reactor fuel must be specified. These data are, however, not always known or readily determined. It is the purpose of this report to provide estimates of these data for some of the more common research reactor fuel assembly types. The specific types considered here are MTR, TRIGA and DIDO fuel assemblies. The degree of physical protection given to spent fuel assemblies is largely dependent upon the photon dose rate of the spent fuel material. These data also, are not always known or readily determined. Because of a self-protecting dose rate level of radiation (dose rate greater than 100 ren-x/h at I m in air), it is important to know the dose rate of spent fuel assemblies at all time. Estimates of the photon dose rate for spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are given in this report.

Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Quarterly progress report, October 1-December 31, 1983. Volume 3, No. 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects reported are the following: High Temperature Reactor Research, SSC Development, Validation and Application, CRBR Balance of Plant Modeling, Thermal-Hydraulic Reactor Safety Experiments, Development of Plant Analyzer, Code Assessment and Application (Transient and LOCA Analyses), Thermal Reactor Code Development (RAMONA-3B), Calculational Quality Assurance in Support of PTS; Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing, Bolting Failure Analysis, Probability Based Load Combinations for Design of Category I Structures, Mechanical Piping Benchmark Problems, Identification of Age-Related Failure Modes; Analysis of Human Error Data for Nuclear Power Plant Safety-Related Events, Human Factors in Nuclear Power Plant Safeguards, Emergency Action Levels, and Protective Action Decision Making.

Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Nuclear fuels technologies fiscal year 1998 research and development test plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of research and development (R and D) activities are planned at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in FY98 in support of the Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). During the past few years, the ability to fabricate mixed oxide (MOX) nuclear fuel using surplus-weapons plutonium has been researched, and various experiments have been performed. This research effort will be continued in FY98 to support further development of the technology required for MOX fuel fabrication for reactor-based plutonium disposition. R and D activities for FY98 have been divided into four major areas: (1) feed qualification/supply, (2) fuel fabrication development, (3) analytical methods development, and (4) gallium removal. Feed qualification and supply activities encompass those associated with the production of both PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} feed materials. Fuel fabrication development efforts include studies with a new UO{sub 2} feed material, alternate sources of PuO{sub 2}, and determining the effects of gallium on the sintering process. The intent of analytical methods development is to upgrade and improve several analytical measurement techniques in support of other R and D and test fuel fabrication tasks. Finally, the purpose of the gallium removal system activity is to develop and integrate a gallium removal system into the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) design and the Phase 2 Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) demonstration line. These four activities will be coordinated and integrated appropriately so that they benefit the Fissile Materials Disposition Program. This plan describes the activities that will occur in FY98 and presents the schedule and milestones for these activities.

Alberstein, D.; Blair, H.T.; Buksa, J.J. [and others

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement Project, April 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement Project May 2011 April 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement Project Table of Contents 1. Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 1 2. Scope and Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Seminar on Uncertainty & Decision Making Ghent University and Belgian Nuclear Research Centre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Matemáticas, UCM "Soft Computing and Nuclear Reactor Control" ABSTRACT: The need for on-line reactor operator, as a means of expressing linguistic expressions mathematically, has been recently applied to nuclear reactor) for controlling the power level of a nuclear reactor, the study was intended to assess the applicability of fuzzy

Tradacete, Pedro

282

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 564 (2006) 400404 Cross-section measurements for 239  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 564 (2006) 400­404 Cross-section measurements the feasibility of measuring neutron-induced fission cross-section on samples with 10 ng of fissile actinides that are available on ultra-small quantities. Furthermore, results on neutron-induced alpha emission show

Danon, Yaron

283

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 554 (2005) 494499 Micro-pocket fission detectors (MPFD) for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 554 (2005) 494­499 Micro-pocket fission detectors (MPFD) for in-core neutron flux monitoring Douglas S. McGregor�, Martin F. Ohmes, Rylan E. Ortiz. The prototype devices have been coated with a natural uranyl- nitrate to provide a neutron reactive coating

Shultis, J. Kenneth

284

Safety-research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Quarterly progress report, October 1-December 31, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects reported are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Development, Validation and Application, CRBR Balance of Plant Modeling, Thermal-Hydraulic Reactor Safety Experiments, LWR Plant Analyzer Development LWR Code Assessment and Application; Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing, Bolting Failure Analysis, Probability Based Load Combinations for Design of Category I Structures, Mechanical Piping Benchmark Problems, Soil Structure Interaction; Human Error Data for Nuclear Power Plant Safety Related Events, Criteria for Human Engineering Regulatory Guides and Human Factors in Nuclear Power Plant Safeguards.

Bari, R.A.; Cerbone, R.J.; Ginsberg, T.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Medicinal chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medicinal chemistry Name: Jason A Stamm Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I am a senior chemistry major interested in going to grad school, specifically for...

286

Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highlights on the recent research activity, carried out by the Italian Community involved in the "Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics" field, will be presented.

M Colonna

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

287

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 513 (2003) 585595 The RPI multiplicity detector response to g-ray cascades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 513 (2003) 585­595 The RPI multiplicity's Republic of China b Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselear Polytechnic and the decay properties of the compound nuclear levels at excitations near the threshold for neutron emission

Danon, Yaron

288

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 15, PAGES 2245-2248, AUGUST 1, 2000 Sub-surface nuclear tests monitoring through the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) which should detect nuclear tests down to 1 kiloton (kt) TNT equivalent anywhere on the planet. The IMS), hydroacoustic and infrasound waves will help check for underground, under-water and atmospheric nuclear testsGEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 15, PAGES 2245-2248, AUGUST 1, 2000 Sub-surface nuclear

Hourdin, Chez Frédéric

289

Summary engineering description of underwater fuel storage facility for foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

This document is a summary description for an Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) for foreign research reactor (FRR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A FRR SNF environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared and will include both wet and dry storage facilities as storage alternatives. For the UFSF presented in this document, a specific site is not chosen. This facility can be sited at any one of the five locations under consideration in the EIS. These locations are the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. Generic facility environmental impacts and emissions are provided in this report. A baseline fuel element is defined in Section 2.2, and the results of a fission product analysis are presented. Requirements for a storage facility have been researched and are summarized in Section 3. Section 4 describes three facility options: (1) the Centralized-UFSF, which would store the entire fuel element quantity in a single facility at a single location, (2) the Regionalized Large-UFSF, which would store 75% of the fuel element quantity in some region of the country, and (3) the Regionalized Small-UFSF, which would store 25% of the fuel element quantity, with the possibility of a number of these facilities in various regions throughout the country. The operational philosophy is presented in Section 5, and Section 6 contains a description of the equipment. Section 7 defines the utilities required for the facility. Cost estimates are discussed in Section 8, and detailed cost estimates are included. Impacts to worker safety, public safety, and the environment are discussed in Section 9. Accidental releases are presented in Section 10. Standard Environmental Impact Forms are included in Section 11.

Dahlke, H.J.; Johnson, D.A.; Rawlins, J.K.; Searle, D.K.; Wachs, G.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2804)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for application in heat exchangers and core internals for the NGNP. The primary candidates are Inconel 617, Haynes 230, Incoloy 800H and Hastelloy XR. Based on the technical maturity, availability in required product forms, experience base, and high temperature mechanical properties all of the vendor pre-conceptual design studies have specified Alloy 617 as the material of choice for heat exchangers. Also a draft code case for Alloy 617 was developed previously. Although action was suspended before the code case was accepted by ASME, this draft code case provides a significant head start for achieving codification of the material. Similarly, Alloy 800H is the material of choice for control rod sleeves. In addition to the above listed considerations, Alloy 800H is already listed in the nuclear section of the ASME Code; although the maximum use temperature and time need to be increased.

J. K. Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Graduate Research Assistant Program for Professional Development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Nuclear Security Technology Division (GNSTD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The southeast is a highly suitable environment for establishing a series of nuclear safety, security and safeguards 'professional development' courses. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides expertise in the research component of these subjects while the Y-12 Nuclear Security Complex handles safeguards/security and safety applications. Several universities (i.e., University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), North Carolina State University, University of Michigan, and Georgia Technology Institute) in the region, which offer nuclear engineering and public policy administration programs, and the Howard Baker Center for Public Policy make this an ideal environment for learning. More recently, the Institute for Nuclear Security (INS) was established between ORNL, Y-12, UTK and Oak Ridge Associate Universities (ORAU), with a focus on five principal areas. These areas include policy, law, and diplomacy; education and training; science and technology; operational and intelligence capability building; and real-world missions and applications. This is a new approach that includes professional development within the graduate research assistant program addressing global needs in nuclear security, safety and safeguards.

Eipeldauer, Mary D [ORNL; Shelander Jr, Bruce R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

A dose point kernel database using GATE Monte Carlo simulation toolkit for nuclear medicine applications: Comparison with other Monte Carlo codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: GATE is a Monte Carlo simulation toolkit based on the Geant4 package, widely used for many medical physics applications, including SPECT and PET image simulation and more recently CT image simulation and patient dosimetry. The purpose of the current study was to calculate dose point kernels (DPKs) using GATE, compare them against reference data, and finally produce a complete dataset of the total DPKs for the most commonly used radionuclides in nuclear medicine. Methods: Patient-specific absorbed dose calculations can be carried out using Monte Carlo simulations. The latest version of GATE extends its applications to Radiotherapy and Dosimetry. Comparison of the proposed method for the generation of DPKs was performed for (a) monoenergetic electron sources, with energies ranging from 10 keV to 10 MeV, (b) beta emitting isotopes, e.g., {sup 177}Lu, {sup 90}Y, and {sup 32}P, and (c) gamma emitting isotopes, e.g., {sup 111}In, {sup 131}I, {sup 125}I, and {sup 99m}Tc. Point isotropic sources were simulated at the center of a sphere phantom, and the absorbed dose was stored in concentric spherical shells around the source. Evaluation was performed with already published studies for different Monte Carlo codes namely MCNP, EGS, FLUKA, ETRAN, GEPTS, and PENELOPE. A complete dataset of total DPKs was generated for water (equivalent to soft tissue), bone, and lung. This dataset takes into account all the major components of radiation interactions for the selected isotopes, including the absorbed dose from emitted electrons, photons, and all secondary particles generated from the electromagnetic interactions. Results: GATE comparison provided reliable results in all cases (monoenergetic electrons, beta emitting isotopes, and photon emitting isotopes). The observed differences between GATE and other codes are less than 10% and comparable to the discrepancies observed among other packages. The produced DPKs are in very good agreement with the already published data, which allowed us to produce a unique DPKs dataset using GATE. The dataset contains the total DPKs for {sup 67}Ga, {sup 68}Ga, {sup 90}Y, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I, {sup 124}I, {sup 125}I, {sup 131}I, {sup 153}Sm, {sup 177}Lu {sup 186}Re, and {sup 188}Re generated in water, bone, and lung. Conclusions: In this study, the authors have checked GATE's reliability for absorbed dose calculation when transporting different kind of particles, which indicates its robustness for dosimetry applications. A novel dataset of DPKs is provided, which can be applied in patient-specific dosimetry using analytical point kernel convolution algorithms.

Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis; Loudos, George; Nikiforidis, George C.; Kagadis, George C. [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Rion, GR 265 04 (Greece) and Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational institute of Athens, Ag. Spyridonos Street, Egaleo GR 122 10, Athens (Greece); Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational institute of Athens, Ag. Spyridonos Street, Egaleo GR 122 10, Athens (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Rion, GR 265 04 (Greece)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1978-1979  

SciTech Connect

Summaries of research projects conducted during 1978 and 1979 are presented. Subject areas include research medicine, cancer research, environmental physiology, radiation biophysics, and structural biophysics. (ACR)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Capabilities - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Systems Technologies Nuclear Criticality Safety Research Reactor Analysis System Process Monitoring,...

295

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation | Nuclear Science...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation...

296

Tracking Phonons in a Nuclear Fuel to 900°C - Research Highlights...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracking Phonons at ARCS Tracking Phonons in a Nuclear Fuel to 900C Scientific Contact: Judy Pang Technical Contact: Doug Abernathy March 2011, Written by Agatha Bardoel...

297

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center - WEB ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 25, 2007 ... The NRC regulates commercial nuclear power plants and other uses of nuclear materials, such as in nuclear medicine, through licensing, ...

298

Occupational Medicine Clinic | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupational Medicine Clinic Occupational Medicine Clinic Promoting optimal physical and emotional health through quality care that is convenient, confidential & individualized. Home Health Promotion Program Employee Assistance Program Contact Hours Monday-Friday 8:15am-5pm. Emergency coverage during the lunchtime hour (12-1pm) is available. The clinic is closed after 5pm and on weekends & holidays. Resources DOE Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICPA) Laser History and Eye Exam Form (doc) Location The Occupational Medicine Clinic is located in Building 490, 30 Bell Avenue. location map Get Maps and Directions One of ten national laboratories overseen and primarily funded by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts research in the physical, biomedical, and

299

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Research and Development Technical Program Plan -- PLN-2498  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

BMC Medicine BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Gender perspective in medicine: a vital part of medical scientific rationality. A useful model for comprehending structures and hierarchies within medical science

Gunilla Risberg; Katarina Hamberg; Eva E Johansson; Eva E Johansson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

M. Uesaka, H. Iijima, Y. Muroya, T. Ueda, A. Sakumi, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

width measurement and control width measurement and control M. Uesaka, H. Iijima, Y. Muroya, T. Ueda, A. Sakumi, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo H. Tomizawa, N. Kumagai SPring-8, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Institute June 26, 2004 International Symposium on Ultrafast Accelerators for Pulse Radiolysis Femtosecond Electron Bunch Diagnostics Incoherent Radiation Coherent Radiation Streak Camera or Single-shot Acquisition of Spectrum Bunch Form Factor Bunch Shape Fluctuation Method 2nd Order Correlation Bunch Form Factor

302

Medicinal Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medicinal Plants Medicinal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 187 April 11, 1981 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation MEDICINAL PLANTS In springtime, many years ago, grandma made her family drink gallons of tea made by boiling roots of the sassafras. That was supposed to thin and purify the blood. Children were sent out to gather dandelion, curly dock, wild mustard, pokeberry and other greens as soon as they appeared -- not only because they added welcome variety to the diet of bread, meat, potatoes and gravy, but because some of them were also laxatives. For a bad "cold on the lungs," she slapped a mustard plaster on the patient's back, and on his chest she put a square of red flannel soaked in goose grease. For whooping cough she used a syrup of red clover blossoms. She made cough medicine from the bloodroot plant, and a tea from the compass plant of the prairies was also used for fevers and coughs. She made a pleasant tea from the blossoms of the linden or basswood tree. For stomach aches she used tea from any of several aromatic herbs such as catnip, fennel, yarrow, peppermint, spearmint, sweetflag, wild ginger, bergamot and splice bush.

303

Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Planning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Planning Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Planning Isotopes, including both radioactive and stable isotopes, make important contributions to research, medicine, and industry in the United States and throughout the world. For nearly fifty years, the Department of Energy (DOE) has actively promoted the use of isotopes by funding (a) production of isotopes at a number of national laboratories with unique nuclear reactors or particle accelerators, (b) nuclear medicine research at the laboratories and in academia, (c) research into industrial applications of isotopes, and (d) research into isotope production and processing methods. The radio- pharmaceutical and radiopharmacy industries have their origin in

304

Support of nuclear engineering education and research at the University of Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes progress on four different projects in the fission reactor area that have been supported by the grant during the past year. These projects are: Accelerator transmutation of nuclear waste (Steve Pearson); neutronic analysis of the Ford Nuclear Reactor (Brent Renkema); developing Monte Carlo benchmarks for commercial LWR configurations (Jie Du); Monte Carlo depletion capability for massively parallel processors (Amit Majumdar); these tasks are briefly described and progress to date is presented.

Martin, W.R.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1984. Volume 4, No. 2  

SciTech Connect

The projects reported are the following: High Temperature Reactor Research, SSC Development, Validation and Application, CRBR Balance of Plant Modeling, Thermal-Hydraulic Reactor Safety Experiments, Development of Plant Analyzer, Code Assessment and Application (Transient and LOCA Analyses), Thermal Reactor Code Development (RAMONA-3B), Calculational Quality Assurance in Support of PTS; Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing, Probability Based Load Combinations for Design of Category I Structures, Mechanical Piping Benchmark Problems, Identification of Age Related Failure Modes; Analysis of Human Error Data for Nuclear Power Plant Safety Related Events, Human Factors Aspects of Safety/Safeguards Interactions, Emergency Action Levels, and Protective Action Decisionmaking.

Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

ANS Nuclear Historic Landmark  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NCNR declared a Nuclear Historic Landmark by the American Nuclear Society. The NIST Center for Neutron Research ...

307

Nuclear Analytical Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nuclear Analytical Methods. Research activities in the Nuclear Analytical Methods Group are focused on the science that ...

308

Nuclear Data | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data SHARE Nuclear Data Nuclear Data ORNL is a recognized, international leader in nuclear data research and development (R&D) to support nuclear applications analyses. For more...

309

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The decision to implement the Innovation in Nuclear Infrastructure and Engineering Program (INIE) was an important first step towards ensuring that the United States preserves its worldwide leadership role in the field of nuclear science and engineering. Prior to INIE, university nuclear science and engineering programs were waning, undergraduate student enrollment was down, university research reactors were being shut down, while others faced the real possibility of closure. For too long, cutting edge research in the areas of nuclear medicine, neutron scattering, radiochemistry, and advanced materials was undervalued and therefore underfunded. The INIE program corrected this lapse in focus and direction and started the process of drawing a new blueprint with positive goals and objectives that supports existing as well the next generation of educators, students and researchers.

John Bernard

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

310

Remote medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The international oil industry, catalyzed by a surge in exploration and production projects in remote regions, is giving health care for its travelers and expatriates a high priority. L.R. Aalund, the Journal`s Managing Editor--Technology, reports on why and how this is happening now. He covers this in articles on: health care in Russia, air ambulance evacuations, and the deployment of remote paramedics. Aalund gathered the information during trips to Finland and Russia and interviews with oil industry personnel, physicians, and other medical professionals in North America, Europe, and Siberia. Titles of the four topics presented in this special section on remote medicine are as follows: Oil companies focus on emergency care for expats in Russia; Air ambulance plan can be critical; Remote paramedics have high level of training; and Other facets of remote medicine.

NONE

1996-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

311

Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting March 30-31, 1999, Marriott Crystal City, Arlington, Virginia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 30-31, 1999, Marriott Crystal City, Arlington, Virginia March 30-31, 1999, Marriott Crystal City, Arlington, Virginia NERAC members present: John Ahearne Robert Long Thomas Boulette Sekazi Mtingwa Thomas Cochran Richard Reba Joseph Comfort Joy Rempe Jose Luis Cortez Miguel Rios Maureen S. Crandall C. Paul Robinson (Tuesday only) Allen Croff Allen Sessoms (Wednesday only) James Duderstadt (Chair) Daniel C. Sullivan Marvin Fertel (Wednesday only) John Taylor Dale Klein Charles E. Till Linda Knight Neil Todreas NERAC members absent: Beverly Hartline Warren Miller J. Bennett Johnston Robert Socolow William Kastenberg Bruce Tarter Also present: Norton Haberman, Senior Technical Advisor, Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology (NE), DOE John Herczeg, Lead Nuclear Engineer, Office of Technology, DOE William Magwood, Director, Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology (NE), DOE

312

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 562 (2006) 771773 Measurements of (n,a) cross-section of small samples using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 562 (2006) 771­773 Measurements of (n National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC), Upton, NY 11973-5000, USA d CEA-DAM, BP 12, 91680 Bruye(n,a)3 H cross-section as a feasibility test for further work. The LSDS consists of a 1.2 m cube of lead

Danon, Yaron

313

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 566 (2006) 598608 The number distribution of neutrons and gamma photons generated in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that are based on nuclear physics constants (fission neutron and gamma photon multi- plicities), weighted by nonNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 566 (2006) 598­608 The number distribution of neutrons and gamma photons generated in a multiplying sample Andreas Enqvista,�, Imre Pa´ zsita , Sara

Pázsit, Imre

314

Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting November 17-18, 1998, Hyatt Regency Crystal City, Arlington, Virginia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1- 1- Minutes for the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting November 17-18, 1998, Hyatt Regency Crystal City, Arlington, Virginia NERAC members present: John Ahearne (Tuesday only) Linda Knight Thomas Boulette Thomas Cochran Robert Long Joseph Comfort Warren Miller Jose Luis Cortez Sekazi Mtingwa Maureen S. Crandall (Tuesday only) Richard Reba Allen Croff Joy Rempe James Duderstadt (Chair) Robert Socolow (Tuesday only) Marvin Fertel Daniel C. Sullivan Beverly Hartline Bruce Tarter (Tuesday only) William Kastenberg Charles E. Till Dale Klein Neil Todreas NERAC members absent: J. Bennett Johnston Glenn Seaborg C. Paul Robinson Allen Sessoms Miguel Rios John Taylor Also present: Norton Haberman, Senior Technical Advisor, Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology, NE, DOE

315

Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2010, Prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, May 2012  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2010 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no NRC-licensed low-level waste disposal facilities currently in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Annual reports for 2010 were received from a total of 190 NRC licensees. The summation of reports submitted by the 190 licensees indicated that 192,424 individuals were monitored, 81,961 of whom received a measurable dose. When adjusted for transient workers who worked at more than one licensee during the year, there were actually 142,471 monitored individuals and 62,782 who received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 10,617 person-rem, which represents a 12% decrease from the 2009 value. This decrease was primarily due to the decrease in collective dose at commercial nuclear power reactors, as well as a decrease in the collective dose for most of the other categories of NRC licensees. The number of individuals receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in an average measurable dose of 0.13 rem for 2010. The average measurable dose is defined as the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) divided by the number of individuals receiving a measurable dose. In calendar year 2010, the average annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor (LWR) licensees was 83 person-rem. This represents a 14% decrease from the value reported for 2009 (96 person-rem). The decrease in collective dose for commercial nuclear power reactors was due to an 11% decrease in total outage hours in 2010. During outages, activities involving increased radiation exposure such as refueling and maintenance are performed while the reactor is not in operation. The average annual collective dose per reactor for boiling water reactors (BWRs) was 137 personrem for 35 BWRs, and 55 person-rem for 69 pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Analyses of transient individual data indicate that 29,333 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient individuals by multiple licensees. The adjustment to account for transient individuals has been specifically noted in footnotes in the figures and tables for commercial nuclear power reactors. In 2010, the average measurable dose per individual for all licensees calculated from reported data was 0.13 rem. Although the average measurable dose per individual from data submitted by licensees was 0.13 rem, a corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose per individual of 0.17 rem.

D. E. Lewis D. A. Hagemeyer Y. U. McCormick

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

316

A Review of the Costs of Nuclear Power Michael T. Hogue, Research Analyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

long-term option for the future of the College's Reactor. 10. The College runs a small CONSORT nuclear reactor at Silwood Park. Ultimate responsibility for funding its end of life decommissioning currently of the liability, or postponing decommissioning by extending the life of the Reactor. The Paper proposed a method

Provancher, William

317

Energy Frontier Research Center, Center for Materials Science of Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect

This is a document required by Basic Energy Sciences as part of a mid-term review, in the third year of the five-year award period and is intended to provide a critical assessment of the Center for Materials Science of Nuclear Fuels (strategic vision, scientific plans and progress, and technical accomplishments).

Todd R. Allen

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission twentieth water reactor safety information meeting; Volume 2, Severe accident research, Thermal hydraulics  

SciTech Connect

This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twentieth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 21--23, 1992. The papers describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 10 different papers presented by researchersfrom CEC, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Spain and Taiwan. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Weiss, A.J. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB mediates survival advantage by Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB mediates survival advantage by Telomerase Activation. Authors: Natarajan M.,1 Mohan S.,2 Pandeswara, S.L.,1 and Herman T.S.1 Institutions: Departments of 1Radiation Oncology and 2Pathology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas Activation of NF-kB in response to low doses of ionizing radiation was first shown in our laboratory. Although studies have shown that NF-kB plays an important role in anti-apoptotic function, little has been done to understand the molecular link between the activation of NF-kB and cellular outcome such as enhanced cell survival after low dose low-linear transfer (LET) radiation. Because upregulation of telomerase activity is associated with longevity and allows cells to escape from senescence, we hypothesize

320

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 368 (1996) 492-497 INSTRUMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, University of Salford, Salford, UK. Nigel Langford is in the BNFL Corporate Communication Research Unit, University of Salford, Salford, UK. Richard J. Varey is in the BNFL Corporate Communication Research Unit University Press . ISSN 1356-3289 #12;As organizations grow and segment through specialization, so do zones

Bergen, Universitetet i

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1984. Volume 4, No. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects reported are the following: High Temperature Reactor Research, SSC Development, Validation and Application, CRBR Balance of Plant Modeling, Thermal-Hydraulic Reactor Safety Experiments, Development of Plant Analyzer, Code Assessment and Application (Transient and LOCA Analyses), Thermal Reactor Code Development (RAMONA-3B), Calculational Quality Assurance in Support of PTS; Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing, Bolting Failure Analysis, Probability Based Load Combinations for Design of Category I Structures, Mechanical Piping Benchmark Problems, Identification of Age-Related Failure Modes; Analysis of Human Error Data for Nuclear Power Plant Safety-Related Events, Human Factors Aspects of Safety/Safeguards Interactions During Routine Reactor Operations and Off-Normal Conditions, Emergency Action Levels, and Protective Action Decision Making.

Bari, R.A.; Cerbone, R.J.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Ginsberg, T.; Greene, G.A.; Guppy, J.G.; Hall, R.E.; Luckas, W.J. Jr.; O'Brien, J.N.; Pratt, W.T.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Successful Completion of the Largest Shipment of Russian Research Reactor High-Enriched Uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel from Czech Republic to Russian Federation  

SciTech Connect

On December 8, 2007, the largest shipment of high-enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel was successfully made from a Russian-designed nuclear research reactor in the Czech Republic to the Russian Federation. This accomplishment is the culmination of years of planning, negotiations, and hard work. The United States, Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency have been working together on the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Program in support of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative. In February 2003, RRRFR Program representatives met with the Nuclear Research Institute in Rež, Czech Republic, and discussed the return of their high-enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel to the Russian Federation for reprocessing. Nearly 5 years later, the shipment was made. This paper discusses the planning, preparations, coordination, and cooperation required to make this important international shipment.

Michael Tyacke; Dr. Igor Bolshinsky; Jeff Chamberlin

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 517 (2004) 180188 Spectral identification of thin-film-coated and solid-form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Physics Research A 517 (2004) 180­188 185 #12;of both neutron beam attenuation and reaction product selfNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 517 (2004) 180­188 Spectral identification of thin-film-coated and solid-form semiconductor neutron detectors Douglas S. McGregor*, J. Kenneth

Shultis, J. Kenneth

324

Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY 1986, October 1985-September 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1986 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. The report includes articles on radiochemical diagnostics and weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production and separation; chemical biology and nuclear medicine; element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced concepts and technology; and atmospheric chemistry.

Heiken, J.H. (ed.)

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

YALINA facility a sub-critical Accelerator- Driven System (ADS) for nuclear energy research facility description and an overview of the research program (1997-2008).  

SciTech Connect

The YALINA facility is a zero-power, sub-critical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was conceived, constructed, and put into operation at the Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus located in Minsk-Sosny, Belarus. This facility was conceived for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems, and to serve as a neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinide nuclei. This report provides a detailed description of this facility and documents the progress of research carried out there during a period of approximately a decade since the facility was conceived and built until the end of 2008. During its history of development and operation to date (1997-2008), the YALINA facility has hosted several foreign groups that worked with the resident staff as collaborators. The participation of Argonne National Laboratory in the YALINA research programs commenced in 2005. For obvious reasons, special emphasis is placed in this report on the work at YALINA facility that has involved Argonne's participation. Attention is given here to the experimental program at YALINA facility as well as to analytical investigations aimed at validating codes and computational procedures and at providing a better understanding of the physics and operational behavior of the YALINA facility in particular, and ADS systems in general, during the period 1997-2008.

Gohar, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

326

Joint EPRI-CEA Research on Small Punch Testing for Nuclear Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A joint research project between EPRI and the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) has been under way since 1998 to compare the fracture behavior of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) materials in the transition region as tested by a subsize impact test (Charpy) and subsize specimen techniques. This report summarizes the progress made under this joint effort.

2001-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

327

6 Nuclear Fuel Designs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Message from the Director Message from the Director 2 Nuclear Power & Researrh Reactors 3 Discovery of Promethium 4 Nuclear Isotopes 4 Nuclear Medicine 5 Nuclear Fuel Processes & Software 6 Nuclear Fuel Designs 6 Nuclear Safety 7 Nuclear Desalination 7 Nuclear Nonproliferation 8 Neutron Scattering 9 Semiconductors & Superconductors 10 lon-Implanted Joints 10 Environmental Impact Analyses 11 Environmental Quality 12 Space Exploration 12 Graphite & Carbon Products 13 Advanced Materials: Alloys 14 Advanced Materials: Ceramics 15 Biological Systems 16 Biological Systems 17 Computational Biology 18 Biomedical Technologies 19 Intelligent Machines 20 Health Physics & Radiation Dosimetry 21 Radiation Shielding 21 Information Centers 22 Energy Efficiency: Cooling & Heating

328

EA-0965: Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine, Argonne, Illinois EA-0965: Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine, Argonne, Illinois SUMMARY...

329

Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Research and Development > Nuclear Detonation Detection Nuclear Detonation Detection NNSA builds the nation's operational sensors that monitor the entire planet from space to...

330

Budget projections 1989, 1990, and 1991 for research in high energy nuclear physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research programs in experimental high energy physics are carried out at Harvard under the general supervision of a departmental faculty committee on high energy physics. The committee members are: G.W. Brandenburg, S. Geer, R.J. Glauber, K. Kinoshita, R. Nickerson, F.M. Pipkin, R.F. Schwitters, M. Shapiro, K. Strauch, R. Vanelli, and R. Wilson. Of these individuals, Professors R.J. Glauber, F.M. Pipkin, R.F. Schwitters, K. Strauch, and R. Wilson are the principal investigators with whom a number of junior faculty members and post-doctoral research fellows are associated. Dr. Brandenburg is the Director of the High Energy Physics Laboratory and administers the DOE high energy physics contract. Professor Schwitters is currently on leave of absence as Director of the Superconducting Super Collider project. In the fall of 1990 Professor G. Feldman, who is currently at SLAC, will join the Harvard faculty and become a principal investigator. Harvard is planning to make one or two additional senior faculty appointments in experimental high energy physics over the next two years. The principal goals of the work described here are to carry out forefront programs in high energy physics research and to provide first rate educational opportunities for students. The experimental program supported through HEPL is carried out at the major accelerator centers in the world. Harvard`s educational efforts are concentrated in graduate education, where they are currently supporting 15 research students. These budget projections cover all of the Harvard based high energy physics experimental activities. The {open_quotes}umbrella{close_quotes} nature of this contract greatly simplifies support of essential central technical and computer services and helps the group to take advantage of new physics opportunities and to respond to unexpected needs. The funding for the operation of the HEPL facility is shared equally by the experimental groups.

Not Available

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Budget projections 1988, 1989, and 1990 for research in high energy nuclear physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research programs in experimental high energy physics are carried out at Harvard under the general supervision of a departmental faculty committee on high energy physics. Professor R.F. Schwitters is currently chairman of this committee. The committee members are: G.W. Brandenburg, S. Geer, R.J. Glauber, K. Kinoshita, R. Nickerson, F.M. Pipkin, J. Rohlf, C. Rubbia, R.F. Schwitters, M. Shapiro, K. Strauch, R. Vanelli, and R. Wilson. Of these individuals, Professors R.J. Glauber, F.M. Pipkin, C. Rubbia, R.F. Schwitters, K. Strauch, and R. Wilson are the principal investigators with whom a number of junior faculty members and post-doctoral research fellows are associated. Dr. Brandenburg (Associate Director, High Energy Physics Laboratory) administers the High Energy Physics Laboratory and is in charge of the Computer Facility. Professor Rubbia is currently on leave of absence and will leave Harvard on December 31, 1988 to become the Director General of CERN. A reduced UA1 effort will remain at Harvard after Professor Rubbia`s departure. Harvard is planning to make one or two senior faculty appointments in experimental high energy physics sometime in 1988-89. The principal goals of the work described here are to carry out forefront programs in high energy physics research and to provide first rate educational opportunities for students. The experimental program supported through HEPL is carried out at the major accelerator centers in the world and addresses some of the most important questions in high energy physics. Harvard`s educational efforts are concentrated in graduate education, where they are currently supporting 15 research students. In addition, undergraduate students work in projects at HEPL during the academic year and over summers. Many of these students have gone on to graduate school studying physics at Harvard and elsewhere.

Not Available

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

A simple setup for neutron tomography at the Portuguese Nuclear Research Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple setup for neutron radiography and tomography was recently installed at the Portuguese Research Reactor. The objective of this work was to determine the operational characteristics of the installed setup, namely the irradiation time to obtain the best dynamic range for individual images and the spatial resolution. The performance of the equipment was demonstrated by imaging a fragment of a 17th century decorative tile.

M. A. Stanojev Pereira; J. G. Marques; R. Pugliesi

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act  

SciTech Connect

Chapter six describes the basis for facility design, the completed facility conceptual design, the completed analytical work relating to the resolution of design issues, and future design-related work. The basis for design and the conceptual design information presented in this chapter meet the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, for a conceptual repository design that takes into account site-specific requirements. This information is presented to permit a critical evaluation of planned site characterization activities. Chapter seven describes waste package components, emplacement environment, design, and status of research and development that support the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project. The site characterization plan (SCP) discussion of waste package components is contained entirely within this chapter. The discussion of emplacement environment in this chapter is limited to considerations of the environment that influence, or which may influence, if perturbed, the waste packages and their performance (particularly hydrogeology, geochemistry, and borehole stability). The basis for conceptual waste package design as well as a description of the design is included in this chapter. The complete design will be reported in the advanced conceptual design (ACD) report and is not duplicated in the SCP. 367 refs., 173 figs., 68 tabs.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

M. Uesaka, H. Iijima, Y. Muroya, T. Ueda, A. Sakumi, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

status of status of photocathodes in Japan M. Uesaka, H. Iijima, Y. Muroya, T. Ueda, A. Sakumi, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo H. Tomizawa, N. Kumagai SPring-8, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Institute June 26, 2004 International Symposium on Ultrafast Accelerators for Pulse Radiolysis Network and Collaboration under National Project on Advanced Compact Accelerator for Medical Use hosted by National Institute for Radiological Science 1. Mg (QE~10 -3 ) photoinjector : U.Tokyo/SPring8 2. Cs 2 Te(QE~10 -2 ) load-lock-type photoinjector : KEK/Nagoya Univ.. 3. Cs2Te/Diamond (QE~10 -1 ) cartridge-type photoinjector : SPring8/U.Tokyo/Hamamatsu Photonics Cathode Surface CCD Image of the cathode surface 8 mm 6 mm Apr. 2003 2cm Aug. 2002 Craters due to the RF discharge on the cathode surface

335

M. Uesaka, H. Iijima, Y. Muroya, T. Ueda, A. Sakumi, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature control for systems Temperature control for systems M. Uesaka, H. Iijima, Y. Muroya, T. Ueda, A. Sakumi, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo H. Tomizawa, N. Kumagai SPring-8, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Institute June 26, 2004 International Symposium on Ultrafast Accelerators for Pulse Radiolysis Requirement of stable synchronization 0.4 psec (FWHM) 0.8 psec (FWHM) Profile of electron Profile of laser Time Difference "Synchronization" Typical Femtosecond Streak Camera Image of Synchronization * The S-band linac with Mg photocathode RF injector has been developed for radiation chemistry. * The radiation chemistry experiment requires a time resolution in a range of sub-picosecond. * The time resolution is defined by... pulse duration of pump-beam, and probe-laser, synchronization between

336

Developing and Qualifying Parameters for Closure Welding Overpacks Containing Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

Fluor engineers developed a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) technique and parameters, demonstrated requisite weld quality, and successfully closure-welded packaged spent nuclear fuel (SNF) overpacks at the Hanford Site. This paper reviews weld development and qualification activities associated with the overpack closure-welding and provides a summary of the production campaign. The primary requirement of the closure weld is to provide leak-tight confinement of the packaged material against release to the environment during interim storage (40-year design term). Required weld quality, in this case, was established through up-front development and qualification, and then verification of parameter compliance during production welding. This approach was implemented to allow for a simpler overpack design and more efficient production operations than possible with approaches using routine post-weld testing and nondestructive examination (NDE). A series of welding trials were conducted to establish the desired welding technique and parameters. Qualification of the process included statistical evaluation and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section IX testing. In addition, pull testing with a weighted mockup, and thermal calculation/physical testing to identify the maximum temperature the packaged contents would be subject to during welding, was performed. Thirteen overpacks were successfully packaged and placed into interim storage. The closure-welding development activities (including pull testing and thermal analysis) provided the needed confidence that the packaged SNF overpacks could be safely handled and placed into interim storage, and remain leak-tight for the duration of the storage term. (author)

Cannell, G.R.; Goldmann, L.H.; McCormack, R.L. [Hanford Site, Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

DEVELOPING AND QUANTIFYING PARAMETERS FOR CLOSURE WELDING OVERPACKS CONTAINING RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

Fluor engineers developed a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) technique and parameters, demonstrated requisite weld quality and successfully closure-welded packaged spent nuclear fuel (SNF) overpacks at the Hanford Site. This paper reviews weld development and qualification activities associated with the overpack closure-welding and provides a summary of the production campaign. The primary requirement of the closure weld is to provide leaktight confinement of the packaged material against release to the environment during interim storage (40-year design term). Required weld quality, in this case, was established through up-front development and qualification, and then verification of parameter compliance during production welding. This approach was implemented to allow for a simpler overpack design and more efficient production operations than possible with approaches using routine post-weld testing and nondestructive examination (NDE). . A series of welding trials were conducted to establish the desired welding technique and parameters. Qualification of the process included statistical evaluation and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section IX testing. In addition, pull testing with a weighted mockup, and thermal calculation/physical testing to identify the maximum temperature the packaged contents would be subject to during welding, was performed. Thirteen overpacks were successfully packaged and placed into interim storage. The closure-welding development activities (including pull testing and thermal analysis) provided the needed confidence that the packaged SNF overpacks could be safely handled and placed into interim storage, and remain leaktight for the duration of the storage term.

CANNELL GR

2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

338

The Center for Material Science of Nuclear Fuel (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

'The Center for Material Science of Nuclear Fuel (CMSNF)' was submitted by the CMSNF to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CMSNF, an EFRC directed by Todd Allen at the Idaho National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from six institutions: INL (lead), Colorado School of Mines, University of Florida, Florida State University, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the University of Wisconsin at Madison. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Materials Science of Nuclear Fuels is 'to achieve a first-principles based understanding of the effect of irradiation-induced defects and microstructures on thermal transport in oxide nuclear fuels.' Research topics are: phonons, thermal conductivity, nuclear, extreme environment, radiation effects, defects, and matter by design.

Allen, Todd (Director, Center for Material Science of Nuclear Fuel); CMSNF Staff

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing:A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues,recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, anddescriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.  

SciTech Connect

The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing:A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues,recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, anddescriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Budget projections 1990, 1991, and 1992 for research in high energy nuclear physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research programs in experimental high energy physics are carried out at Harvard under the general supervision of a departmental faculty committee on high energy physics. The committee members are: G.W. Brandenburg, M. Franklin, S. Geer, R. J. Glauber, K. Kinoshita, F. M. Pipkin, R. F. Schwitters, K. Strauch, M. E. Law, and R. Wilson. Of these individuals, Professors R.J. Glauber, F.M. Pipkin, R.F.Schwitters, K. Strauch, and R. Wilson are the principal investigators with whom a number of junior faculty members and post-doctoral research fellows are associated. Dr. Brandenburg is the Director of the High Energy Physics Laboratory and administers the DOE high energy physics contract. Professor Schwitters is currently on leave of absence as Director of the Superconducting Super Collider project. In the fall of 1990 Professor G. Feldman, who is currently at SLAC, will join the Harvard faculty and become a principal investigator. Harvard is planning to make one or two additional senior faculty appointments in experimental high energy physics over the next two years. The principal goals of the work described here are to carry out forefront programs in high energy physics research and to provide first rate educational opportunities for students. The experimental program supported through HEPL is carried out at the major accelerator centers in the world and addresses some of the most important questions in high energy physics. Harvard`s educational efforts are concentrated in graduate education. These budget projections cover all of the Harvard based high energy physics experimental activities. The {open_quotes}umbrella{close_quotes} nature of this contract greatly simplifies support of essential central technical and computer services and helps the group to take advantage of new physics opportunities and to respond to unexpected needs. The funding for the operation of the HEPL facility is shared equally by the experimental groups.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

DEVELOPMENT, INSTALLATION AND OPERATION OF THE MPC&A OPERATIONS MONITORING (MOM) SYSTEM AT THE JOINT INSTITUTE FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH (JINR) DUBNA, RUSSIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Operations Monitoring (MOM) systems handling at the International Intergovernmental Organization - Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) is described in this paper. Category I nuclear material (plutonium and uranium) is used in JINR research reactors, facilities and for scientific and research activities. A monitoring system (MOM) was installed at JINR in April 2003. The system design was based on a vulnerability analysis, which took into account the specifics of the Institute. The design and installation of the MOM system was a collaborative effort between JINR, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Financial support was provided by DOE through BNL. The installed MOM system provides facility management with additional assurance that operations involving nuclear material (NM) are correctly followed by the facility personnel. The MOM system also provides additional confidence that the MPC&A systems continue to perform effectively.

Kartashov,V.V.; Pratt,W.; Romanov, Y.A.; Samoilov, V.N.; Shestakov, B.A.; Duncan, C.; Brownell, L.; Carbonaro, J.; White, R.M.; Coffing, J.A.

2009-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

343

Catalog of research projects at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Catalog has been created to aid in the transfer of technology from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to potential users in industry, government, universities, and the public. The projects are listed for the following LBL groups: Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Applied Science Division, Biology and Medicine Division, Center for Advanced Materials, Chemical Biodynamics Division, Computing Division, Earth Sciences Division, Engineering and Technical Services Division, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Nuclear Science Division, and Physics Division.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Medicine and Medical Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) #12;370 Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) Graduate Catalogue 2013­14 Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) Officers Vice President for Medical Affairs and the Raja N. Khuri Dean of the Faculty of Medicine Ziyad Ghazzal

345

Engineering Development & Applications - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies (FCT) Generation IV (Gen IV) Nuclear Energy Program Decontamination and Decommissioning Nuclear Regulatory Research Facilities Environmentally Assisted Cracking...

346

Internal Medicine,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing evidence supports a crucial role for glial metabolism in maintaining proper synaptic function and in the etiology of neurological disease. However, the study of glial metabolism in humans has been hampered by the lack of noninvasive methods. To specifically measure the contribution of astroglia to brain energy metabolism in humans, we used a novel noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic approach. We measured carbon 13 incorporation into brain glutamate and glutamine in eight volunteers during an intravenous infusion of [2- 13 C] acetate, which has been shown in animal models to be metabolized specifically in astroglia. Mathematical modeling of the three established pathways for neurotransmitter glutamate repletion indicates that the glutamate/glutamine neurotransmitter cycle between astroglia and neurons (0.32 ? 0.07 ?mol ? gm ?1 ? min ?1) is the major pathway for neuronal glutamate

Vincent Lebon; Kitt F. Petersen; Gary W. Cline; Jun Shen; Graeme F. Mason; Sylvie Dufour; Kevin L. Behar; Gerald I. Shulman; Douglas L. Rothman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Reactor Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation...

348

High integrity software for nuclear power plants: Candidate guidelines, technical basis and research needs. Main report, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work documented in this report was performed in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to examine the technical basis for candidate guidelines that could be considered in reviewing and evaluating high integrity computer e following software development and assurance activities: Requirements specification; design; coding; verification and validation, inclukding static analysis and dynamic testing; safety analysis; operation and maintenance; configuration management; quality assurance; and planning and management. Each activity (framework element) was subdivided into technical areas (framework subelements). The report describes the development of approximately 200 candidate guidelines that span the entire ran e identification, categorization and prioritization of technical basis for those candidate guidelines; and the identification, categorization and prioritization of research needs for improving the technical basis. The report has two volumes: Volume 1, Executive Summary includes an overview of the framwork and of each framework element, the complete set of candidate guidelines, the results of the assessment of the technical basis for each candidate guideline, and a discussion of research needs that support the regulatory function; this document, Volume 2, is the main report.

Seth, S.; Bail, W.; Cleaves, D.; Cohen, H.; Hybertson, D.; Schaefer, C.; Stark, G.; Ta, A.; Ulery, B. [Mitre Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

History of Research Reactors at Brookhaven  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History of Research Reactors at Brookhaven History of Research Reactors at Brookhaven Brookhaven National Laboratory has three nuclear reactors on its site that were used for scientific research. The reactors are all shut down, and the Laboratory is addressing environmental issues associated with their operations. photo of BGRR Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor - Beginning operations in 1950, the graphite reactor was used for research in medicine, biology, chemistry, physics and nuclear engineering. One of the most significant achievements at this facility was the development of technetium-99m, a radiopharmaceutical widely used to image almost any organ in the body. The graphite reactor was shut down in 1969. Parts of it have been decommissioned, with the remainder to be addressed by 2011. More history

350

Proceedings of the 22nd Annual DoD/DOE Seismic Research Symposium: Planning for Verification of and Compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT)  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 22nd Annual DoD/DOE Seismic Research Symposium: Planning for Verification of and Compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), held 13-15 September 2000 in New Orleans, Louisiana. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Department of Defense (DoD), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Nichols, James W., LTC [Editor

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Exploratory Research and Development Fund, FY 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Exploratory R D Fund FY 1990 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of an Exploratory R D Fund (ERF) planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The research areas covered in this report are: Accelerator and fusion research; applied science; cell and molecular biology; chemical biodynamics; chemical sciences; earth sciences; engineering; information and computing sciences; materials sciences; nuclear science; physics and research medicine and radiation biophysics.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Geosciences research at Los Alamos related to non-nuclear energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief description is given of the LASL hot-dry-rock (HDR) geothermal energy project. Geoscience activities in support of HDR-GTE include: (1) geochemical and petrological investigation of drill cores; (2) physical and mechanical properties of the cores, in situ and in the laboratory; (3) seismology; (4) experimental and numerical investigations of the chemical interaction of granite and hot aqueous solutions; (5) field and laboratory investigations of heat flow and thermal properties of the cores; (6) characterization and selection of future HDR sites; and (7) investigation of igneous and volcanic systems. Basic geosciences research activities at LASL include geophysical hydrodynamics, thermochemistry of minerals, aqueous phases and rock-fluid systems, the application of shock-wave and other high-pressure techniques to investigations of the equation-of-state of rocks and minerals and to questions regarding the physics and chemistry of the earth's interior, and preparation of high priority crystals for experimental studies. Brief sketches of these activities are presented. (LBS)

McGetchin, T.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Nuclear Science & Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. /No/ Nuclear Science & Technology Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Databases Organizations Journals Key Resources International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA scientific and technical publications cover areas of nuclear power, radiation therapy, nuclear security, nuclear law, and emergency repose. Search under Publications/Books and Reports for scientific books, standards, technical guides and reports National Nuclear Data Center Nuclear physics data for basic nuclear research and for applied nuclear technologies, operated by Brookhaven.

354

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 564 (2006) 319323 Passive monitoring of the equilibrium factor inside a radon exposure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-lived radon progeny contributes about half of the total exposure of human beings to ionizing radiationNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 564 (2006) 319­323 Passive monitoring for passive monitoring of the equilibrium factor F inside a radon exposure chamber. The method is based

Yu, K.N.

355

Nuclear Sites Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reactor operations, nuclear research, weapons disassembly, maintenance and testing, hot cell operations, nuclear material storage and processing and waste disposal. Each...

356

Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and development to 'boots-on-the-ground' implementation. This work ranges from uranium fuel cycle research to detection technologies and nuclear forensics. The nuclear...

357

Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Nuclear Research Advanced Nuclear Research Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology FY 2003 Programmatic Overview Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Henderson/2003 Hydrogen Initiative.ppt 2 Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Program Goal * Demonstrate the economic commercial-scale production of hydrogen using nuclear energy by 2015 Need for Nuclear Hydrogen * Hydrogen offers significant promise for reduced environmental impact of energy use, specifically in the transportation sector * The use of domestic energy sources to produce hydrogen reduces U.S. dependence on foreign oil and enhances national security * Existing hydrogen production methods are either inefficient or produce

358

Nuclear Systems Technologies - Nuclear Engineering Division ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Departments involved: Research & Test Reactor | Engineering Development and Applications "Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities" training courses Argonne Decommissioning Training...

359

Nuclear fuels technologies: Thermally induced gallium removal system (TIGRS), fiscal year 1998 research and development test plan  

SciTech Connect

This document details the research and development (R and D) activities that will be conducted in Fiscal Year 1998 (FY98) by the Thermally Induced Gallium Removal System (TIGRS) team for the Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition. This work is a continuation and extension of experimental activities that have been conducted in support of using weapons-derived plutonium in the fabrication of mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear fuel for reactor-based plutonium disposition. The ultimate purpose of this work is to demonstrate adequate Thermally Induced Gallium Removal with a prototypic system. This Test Plan presents more than the FY98 R and D efforts in order to frame the Task in its entirety. To achieve the TIGRS Program objectives, R and D activities during the next two years will be focused on (1) process development leading to a prototypic TIGRS design, and (2) prototypic TIGRS design and testing leading to and including a prototypic demonstration of TIGRS operation. Both the process development and system testing efforts will consist of a series of surrogate-based cold tests and plutonium-based hot tests. Some of this testing has already occurred and will continue into FY99.

Buksa, J.J.; Butt, D.P.; Chidester, K.; DeMuth, S.F.; Havrilla, G.J.; James, C.A.; Kolman, D.G.

1997-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

360

NUCLEAR CHEMICAL RESEARCH RADIOCHEMICAL SEPARATIONS AND ACTIVATION ANALYSIS. Progress Report No. 6 for November 1956-October 1957. Dept. of Chemistry  

SciTech Connect

The present facilities at the University of Michigan for research in nuclear chemistry are described. The determination of the cross sections of various (d, alpha ) reactions induced by thc 7.78 plus or minus 0.05 Mev deuterons from the Unlversity of Michigan cyclotron is presented. The work on the absolute (d, alpha ) reaction cross sections has been simed at surveying the reaction yields as a function of atomic number with the hope of establishlng the presence or absence of closed shell effects in these values. Methods are presented for the separation of carrier free P, Se, Mn, Co, Y, and Nb. Work continued on the development and evaluation of radiochemical separatlon procedures for Ba, Sr, Ca, Ag. and In. A series of small-scale laboratory tests was conducted to determine the feasibility of the decontamination of I/sup 131/ from air by means of adsorption on a highly efflcient solid adsorber molecular sieve. Graphs are presented of atomic cross sections for thermal neutron activation of isotopes not found in nature vs. half life of daughter radioisotopes produced. (For preceding period see AECU-5575.) (W.L.H.)

1957-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

UNIRIB: Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mission focus of the University Radioactive Ion Beam (UNIRIB) consortium is to perform nuclear physics research, and provide training and education. UNIRIB member universities...

362

Evidence-based medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whether for the generation or application of evidence to guide healthcare decisions, the success of evidence-based medicine is grounded in principles common to engineering. In the Learning Healthcare System envisioned by the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) ...

J. Michael Mcginnis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Nuclear Systems Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Criticality Safety Irradiation Experiment Development and Execution Robotics & Remote Systems Engineering and Applications Thermal & Hydraulic Experiments & Analysis Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and Disposal Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research Areas | Nuclear Systems Technology SHARE Nuclear Systems Technology Nuclear Systems Technology Image 2 ORNL has had historic involvement in a broad set of nuclear research areas: irradiated materials and isotopes R&D, fission and fusion reactors development, neutron scattering, fuel enrichment, used fuel recycling and disposal, etc. The skills and knowledge required to succeed in these research areas often cultivated core areas of expertise in which ORNL is

364

Civilian Nuclear Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Los Alamos is committed to using its advanced nuclear expertise and unique facilities to meet the civilian nuclear national security demands of the future. CONTACT US Program Director Bruce Robinson (505) 667-1910 Email Los Alamos partners extensively with other laboratories, universities, industry, and the international nuclear community to address real-world technical challenges The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office is the focal point for nuclear energy research and development and next-generation repository science at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office manages projects funded by the Department of Energy's offices of Nuclear Energy Environmental Management Nuclear Regulatory Commission

365

Global Security, Medical Isotopes, and Nuclear Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past century basic nuclear science research has led to the use of radioactive isotopes into a wide variety of applications that touch our lives everyday. Some are obvious, such as isotopes for medical diagnostics and treatment. Others are less so, such as National/Global security issues. And some we take for granted, like the small amount of 241Am that is in every smoke detector. At the beginning of this century, we are in a position where the prevalence and importance of some applications of nuclear science are pushing the basic nuclear science community for improved models and nuclear data. Yet, at the same time, the push by the basic nuclear science community to study nuclei that are farther and farther away from stability also offer new opportunities for many applications. This talk will look at several global security applications of nuclear science, summarizing current R&D and need for improved nuclear data It will also look at how applications of nuclear science, such as to medicine, will benefit from the push for more and more powerful radioactive ion beam facilities.

Ahle, L E

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

366

Nuclear Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Editor and Founder John Gilligan Professor of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Version 5.13 Welcome to the 2013 Edition of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Education (NS&EE) Sourcebook. We have evolved and improved! The core mission of the Sourcebook has not changed, however. Our purpose is to facilitate interaction among faculty, students, industry, and government agencies to accomplish nuclear research, teaching and service activities. Since 1986 we have compiled critical information on nuclear

367

Interim Management of Nuclear Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary-1995.html[6/27/2011 12:50:20 PM] Summary-1995.html[6/27/2011 12:50:20 PM] SUMMARY The Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the Department of Energy (DOE), established the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the early 1950s for the production of special radioactive isotopes. The primary SRS mission was to produce strategic isotopes (plutonium-239 and tritium) used in the development and production of nuclear weapons for national defense. The Site produced other special isotopes (californium-252, plutonium-238, americium-241, etc.) to support research in nuclear medicine, space exploration, and commercial applications. The historic production cycle at the SRS involved the fabrication of metal fuel and target assemblies for irradiation in the Site reactors, followed by chemical dissolution, separation, and conversion of the radioisotopes into solid forms for use

368

Nuclear Science Division annual report for 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses research being conducted under the following programs: Low energy research program; bevalac research program; ultrarelativistic research program; nuclear theory program; nuclear theory program; nuclear data evaluation program; and 88-inch cyclotron operations.

Myers, W.D. (ed.)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Foreign Research Reactor/Domestic Research Reactor Receipt Coordinator...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Research ReactorDomestic Research Reactor Receipt Coordinator, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile...

370

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Presented to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Crystal City, Virginia John Gutteridge Director, University Programs Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology September 30 - October 1, 2002 Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Gutteridge/Sep-Oct_02 INIE-NERAC.ppt (2) INIE The Stimuli .... INIE The Stimuli .... 6 Declining number of operating university research/training reactors 6 Dwindling student population in nuclear engineering 6 Closing or loss of identity of university nuclear engineering programs 6 Looming shortage of nuclear engineering graduates 6 Threat of additional reactor closures -- Cornell, Michigan, MIT

371

Compelling Research Opportunities using Isotopes  

SciTech Connect

Isotopes are vital to the science and technology base of the US economy. Isotopes, both stable and radioactive, are essential tools in the growing science, technology, engineering, and health enterprises of the 21st century. The scientific discoveries and associated advances made as a result of the availability of isotopes today span widely from medicine to biology, physics, chemistry, and a broad range of applications in environmental and material sciences. Isotope issues have become crucial aspects of homeland security. Isotopes are utilized in new resource development, in energy from bio-fuels, petrochemical and nuclear fuels, in drug discovery, health care therapies and diagnostics, in nutrition, in agriculture, and in many other areas. The development and production of isotope products unavailable or difficult to get commercially have been most recently the responsibility of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy program. The President's FY09 Budget request proposed the transfer of the Isotope Production program to the Department of Energy's Office of Science in Nuclear Physics and to rename it the National Isotope Production and Application program (NIPA). The transfer has now taken place with the signing of the 2009 appropriations bill. In preparation for this, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) was requested to establish a standing subcommittee, the NSAC Isotope Subcommittee (NSACI), to advise the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics. The request came in the form of two charges: one, on setting research priorities in the short term for the most compelling opportunities from the vast array of disciplines that develop and use isotopes and two, on making a long term strategic plan for the NIPA program. This is the final report to address charge 1. NSACI membership is comprised of experts from the diverse research communities, industry, production, and homeland security. NSACI discussed research opportunities divided into three areas: (1) medicine, pharmaceuticals, and biology, (2) physical sciences and engineering, and (3) national security and other applications. In each area, compelling research opportunities were considered and the subcommittee as a whole determined the final priorities for research opportunities as the foundations for the recommendations. While it was challenging to prioritize across disciplines, our order of recommendations reflect the compelling research prioritization along with consideration of time urgency for action as well as various geopolitical market issues. Common observations to all areas of research include the needs for domestic availability of crucial stable and radioactive isotopes and the education of the skilled workforce that will develop new advances using isotopes in the future. The six recommendations of NSACI reflect these concerns and the compelling research opportunities for potential new discoveries. The science case for each of the recommendations is elaborated in the respective chapters.

None

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

372

Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Program Data Program Nuclear Data Program Overview Current Projects & Recent Activities Collaborating Organizations Publications Nuclear Data Measurements (NDM) Reports Experimental Nuclear Data Resources Contact ND Program Related Resources Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Data Program We contribute to the development of comprehensive nuclear reactions and nuclear structure databases, including nuclear data measurement, analysis, modeling and evaluation methodologies, that are implemented in basic science research and advanced nuclear technologies. Bookmark and Share Recent Events Nuclear Structure 2012 Conference Argonne National Laboratory hosted the

373

Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Quarterly progress report, July 1-September 30, 1983. Volume 3, No. 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects reported are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Development, Validation and Application, CRBR Balance of Plant Modeling, Thermal-Hydraulic Reactor Safety Experiments, LWR Plant Analyzer Development, LWR Code Assessment and Application, Thermal Reactor Code Development (RAMONA-3B); Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing, Bolting Failure Analysis, Probability Based Load Combinations for Design of Category I Structures, Mechanical Piping Benchmark Problems; Human Error Data for Nuclear Power Plant Safety-Related Events, and Human Factors in Nuclear Power Plant Safeguards.

Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1983. Volume 3, No. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects reported are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Development, Validation and Application, CRBR Balance of Plant Modeling, Thermal-Hydraulic Reactor Safety Experiments, LWR Plant Analyzer Development, LWR Code Assessment and Application; Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing, Bolting Failure Analysis, Probability Based Load Combinations for Design of Category I Structures, Mechanical Piping Benchmark Problems, Soil Structure Interaction; Human Error Data for Nuclear Power Plant Safety Related Events, Criteria for Human Engineering Regulatory Guides and Human Factors in Nuclear Power Plant Safeguards.

Bari, R.A.; Cerbone, R.J.; Ginsberg, T.; Greene, G.A.; Guppy, J.G.; Hall, R.E.; Luckas, W.J. Jr.; Reich, M.; Saha, P.; Sastre, C.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Volume 3. No. 2. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects reported are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC development, Validation and Application, CRBR balance of plant modeling, thermal-hydraulic reactor safety experiments, LWR plant analyzer development, LWR code assessment and application, thermal reactor code development (RAMONA-3B); stress corrosion cracking of PWR steam generator tubing, bolting failure analysis, probability based load combinations for design of category I structures, mechanical piping benchmark problems; human error data for nuclear power plant safety related events, criteria for human engineering regulatory guides and human factors in nuclear power plant safeguards.

Bari, R.A.; Cerbone, R.J.; Ginsberg, T.; Greene, G.A.; Guppy, J.G.; Hall, R.E.; Luckas, W.J. Jr.; Reich, M.; Saha, P.; Sastre, C.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Emergency Physicians Research Common Problems in Proportion to their Frequency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

funding in the four major emergency medicine journals. Am Jof original research by emergency medicine investigatorsMedical Care Survey: 1996 emergency department summary. Adv

Wilson, Michael P; Vilke, Gary M; Govindarajan, Prasanthi; Itagaki, Michael W

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI): On-Line Intelligent Self-Diagnostic Monitoring for Next Generation Nuclear Plants - Phase I Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK-B135 This OSTI ID belongs to an IWO and is being released out of the system. The Program Manager Rebecca Richardson has confirmed that all reports have been received. The objective of this project is to design and demonstrate the operation of the real-time intelligent self-diagnostic and prognostic system for next generation nuclear power plant systems. This new self-diagnostic technology is titled, ''On-Line Intelligent Self-Diagnostic Monitoring System'' (SDMS). This project provides a proof-of-principle technology demonstration for SDMS on a pilot plant scale service water system, where a distributed array of sensors is integrated with active components and passive structures typical of next generation nuclear power reactor and plant systems. This project employs state-of-the-art sensors, instrumentation, and computer processing to improve the monitoring and assessment of the power reactor system and to provide diagnostic and automated prognostics capabilities.

L. J. Bond; S. R. Doctor; R. W. Gilbert; D. B. Jarrell; F. L. Greitzer; R. J. Meador

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1982-1983  

SciTech Connect

This annual report presents brief summaries of research activities during 1982 to 1983. Program activities have been individually entered into EDB. They include research medicine, radiosurgery, environmental physiology, radiation biophysics, and structural biophysics. (ACR)

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

(New imaging systems in nuclear medicine)  

SciTech Connect

Further progress has been made on improving the uniformity and stability of PCR-I, the single ring analog coded tomograph. This camera has been employed in a wide range of animal studies described below. Data from PCR-I have been used in various image processing procedures. These include motion pictures of dog heart, comparison of PET and MRI image in dog heart and rat brain and quantitation of tumor metabolism in the nude mouse using blood data from heart images. A SUN workstation with TAAC board has been used to produce gated three-dimensional images of the dog heart. The ANALYZE program from the Mayo Clinic has also been mounted on a SUN workstation for comparison of images and image processing. 15 refs., 6 figs.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Diagnostic and Advisory Systems - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diagnostic and Advisory Systems Capabilities Nuclear Systems Technologies Nuclear Criticality Safety Research Reactor Analysis Decontamination and Decommissioning SystemsProcess...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Artificial Intelligence / Expert Systems Expertise - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intelligence Expert Systems Expertise Capabilities Nuclear Systems Technologies Nuclear Criticality Safety Research Reactor Analysis Decontamination and Decommissioning...

382

Process Monitoring & Signal Validation - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process Monitoring & Signal Validation Capabilities Nuclear Systems Technologies Nuclear Criticality Safety Research Reactor Analysis Decontamination and Decommissioning Systems...

383

[Nuclear News -- Isotopes and Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The topics discussed in this section are: (1) FDG--a significant development in nuclear medicine; (2) Contamination at Paducah plant prompts actions and reactions; and (3) Drug relieves side effects of cancer therapies in mice.

Sinco, P.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Civilian Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste (HLW) and Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Management of Nuclear Materials and Non-HLW Nuclear Fuel Cycle Energy Research and Development Non-Proliferation Nuclear Regulatory...

385

A Technical Review of Non-Destructive Assay Research for the Characterization of Spent Nuclear Fuel Assemblies Being Conducted Under the US DOE NGSI - 11544  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

03715, Institute of Nuclear Materials Management 50th Annual04602, Institute of Nuclear Materials Management 51st AnnualInstitute of Nuclear Materials Management 51st Annual

Croft, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

A Technical Review of Non-Destructive Assay Research for the Characterization of Spent Nuclear Fuel Assemblies Being Conducted Under the US DOE NGSI - 11544  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Characterization of Spent Nuclear Fuel Assemblies BeingSociety’s Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management IV, HiltonPlutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel,” 2010 ANS Annual

Croft, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Diagnostic Imaging Emergency Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UC Davis Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging Symposium Emergency Medicine May 15, 2011 Gladys Valley Hall devoted to triage, assessment, and imaging diagnostics in emergency medicine. Speakers in this year's symposium include specialists in diagnostic imaging, and emergency and critical care. Sunday May 15, 2011 8

Hammock, Bruce D.

388

A statistical relational learning approach to identifying evidence based medicine categories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence-based medicine is an approach whereby clinical decisions are supported by the best available findings gained from scientific research. This requires efficient access to such evidence. To this end, abstracts in evidence-based medicine ...

Mathias Verbeke; Vincent Van Asch; Roser Morante; Paolo Frasconi; Walter Daelemans; Luc De Raedt

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 574 (2007) 98109 Gamma-ray energy-imaging integrated spectral deconvolution$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

possible. This research was supported by the US Department of Energy/NNSA NA-22 office under Grant DE-FG03

He, Zhong

390

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors: sensitivity of decommissioning radiation exposure and costs to selected parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Additional analyses of decommissioning at the reference research and test (R and T) reactors and analyses of five recent reactor decommissionings are made that examine some parameters not covered in the initial study report (NUREG/CR-1756). The parameters examined for decommissioning are: (1) the effect on costs and radiation exposure of plant size and/or type; (2) the effects on costs of increasing disposal charges and of unavailability of waste disposal capacity at licensed waste disposal facilities; and (3) the costs of and the available alternatives for the disposal of nuclear R and T reactor fuel assemblies.

Konzek, G.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Biology & Medicine Highlights | Neutron Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology & Medicine Biology & Medicine SHARE Biology and Medicine Highlights 1-8 of 8 Results SNS researchers overcome the freezing sample problem in biostudies October 01, 2012 - Studying biosamples at supercold temperatures, such as 200 Kelvin (-73.15°C), has been impossible in the past, as the water in such solutions inevitably freezes, and with it, the biosample's dynamic interactions. How to keep biosamples from freezing at very low temperatures has been an ongoing research problem-until now. Martha "cow-laborates" to help unravel protein structure in milk March 01, 2012 - Casein micelles, a family of related phosphorus-containing proteins, make up 80% of the protein in cow milk. They are the building blocks of dairy products such as yogurt and cheese, supplying amino acids, calcium, and phosphorus to the body. More important,

392

Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2006-2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

migration. • Nuclear Waste and Energy—theoretical,Berkeley Lab Nuclear Energy and Waste Program ResearchBerkeley Lab Nuclear Energy and Waste Program Research

DePaolo, Donald

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration More Documents & Publications TRAIN-PIA.pdf Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Manchester...

394

Research departments Materials Research Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research reactor and X- radiation from the synchrotron facilities in Hamburg and Grenoble. In this con- nection, work is carried out on develop- ing advanced methods, as well as theory and computer simulation numerical simulation. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department The department carries out research

395

Medium energy nuclear physics research. Progress report for the period June 1, 1992 through May 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The University of Massachusetts (UMass) Nuclear Physics Program continues to concentrate upon the use of the electromagnetic interaction in a joint experimental and theoretical approach to the study of nucleon and nuclear properties. During the past year the activities of the group involved data analysis, design and construction of equipment, planning for new experiments, completion of papers and review articles for publication, writing of proposals for experiments, but very little actual data acquisition. Section II.A. described experiments at Bates Linear Accelerator Center. They include the following: electrodisintegration of deuteron; measurement of the elastic magnetic form factor of {sup 3}He; coincidence measurement of the D(e,e{prime}p) cross section; transverse form factors of {sup 117}Sn; ground state magnetization density of {sup 89}Y; and measurement of the 5th structure function in deuterium and {sup 12}C. Section II.B. includes the following experiments at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center: deuteron threshold electrodisintegration; separation of charge and magnetic form factors of the neutron and proton; measurement of the X-, Q{sup 2}, and A-dependence of R = {sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T}; and analysis of 14.5 GeV electrons and positions scattered from gases in the PEP Storage Ring. Section III.C. includes the following experiments at NIKHEF and Lund: complementary studies of single-nucleon knockout and single-nucleon wave functions using electromagnetic interactions and single-particle densities of sd-shell nuclei. Section II.D. discusses preparations for future work at CEBAF: electronics for the CLAS region 1 drift chamber Section III. includes theoretical work on parity-violating electron scattering and nuclear structure.

Peterson, G.A.; Dubach, J.F.; Hicks, R.S.; Miskimen, R.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1990--September 30, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a brief progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology including Measurement Applications and Development, Pollutant Assessments, Measurement Systems Research, Dosimetry Applications Research, Metabolism and Dosimetry Research and Nuclear Medicine. Biological and Radiation Physics including Atomic, Molecular, and High Voltage Physics, Physics of Solids and Macromolecules, Liquid and Submicron Physics, Analytic Dosimetry and Surface Physics and Health Effects. Chemical Physics including Molecular Physics, Photophysics and Advanced Monitoring Development. Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis including Human Genome and Toxicology, Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication, Environmental Regulations and Remediation and Information Management Technology. Risk Analysis including Hazardous Waste.

Kaye, S.V.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. Chapter 3 summarizes present knowledge of the regional and site hydrologic systems. The purpose of the information presented is to (1) describe the hydrology based on available literature and preliminary site-exploration activities that have been or are being performed and (2) provide information to be used to develop the hydrologic aspects of the planned site characterization program. Chapter 4 contains geochemical information about the Yucca Mountain site. The chapter references plan for continued collection of geochemical data as a part of the site characterization program. Chapter 4 describes and evaluates data on the existing climate and site meterology, and outlines the suggested procedures to be used in developing and validating methods to predict future climatic variation. 534 refs., 100 figs., 72 tabs.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Basic research for assessment of geologic nuclear waste repositories: What solubility and speciation studies of transuranium elements can tell us  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solubility and speciation data are important in understanding aqueous radionuclide transport through the geosphere. They define the source term for transport retardation processes such as sorption and colloid formation. Solubility and speciation data are useful in verifying the validity of geochemical codes that are part of predictive transport models. Results from solubility and speciation experiments of {sup 237}NpO{sub 2} {sup +}, {sup 239}Pu{sup 4+}, and {sup 241}Am{sup 3+}/Nd{sup 3+} in J-13 groundwater (from the Yucca Mountain region, Nevada, which is being investigated as a candidate high-level nuclear waste disposal site) at three different temperatures (25{degrees}, 60{degrees}, and 90{degrees}C) and pH values (6, 7, and 8.5) are presented and compared with published modeling calculations. The comparison results indicate that there is a great need for experimental data on the solubility and speciation of transuranium elements under a wide range of conditions, for example, pH, Eh, temperature, and composition of groundwaters. Additionally, the influence of alpha radiation and the radiolysis of the secondary transuranium solids on solubility and speciation should be studies. Solubility studies and model calculations should be extended to other important long-lived nuclear waste radionuclides such as nickel, zirconium, cadmium, radium, and thorium. 14 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

Nitsche, H.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in acordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and eveloping a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing prinicples, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed. 880 refs., 130 figs., 25 tabs.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain site in Neavada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining hte geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare and environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Biology and Medicine Division: Annual report 1986  

SciTech Connect

The Biology and Medicine Division continues to make important contributions in scientific areas in which it has a long-established leadership role. For 50 years the Division has pioneered in the application of radioisotopes and charged particles to biology and medicine. There is a growing emphasis on cellular and molecular applications in the work of all the Division's research groups. The powerful tools of genetic engineering, the use of recombinant products, the analytical application of DNA probes, and the use of restriction fragment length polymorphic DNA are described and proposed for increasing use in the future.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Biology and Medicine Division: Annual report 1986  

SciTech Connect

The Biology and Medicine Division continues to make important contributions in scientific areas in which it has a long-established leadership role. For 50 years the Division has pioneered in the application of radioisotopes and charged particles to biology and medicine. There is a growing emphasis on cellular and molecular applications in the work of all the Division's research groups. The powerful tools of genetic engineering, the use of recombinant products, the analytical application of DNA probes, and the use of restriction fragment length polymorphic DNA are described and proposed for increasing use in the future.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting April 15-16, 2002, Marriott Crystal City Hotel, Arlington, Virginia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15-16, 2002, Marriott Crystal City Hotel, Arlington, Virginia 15-16, 2002, Marriott Crystal City Hotel, Arlington, Virginia NERAC members present: John Ahearne (Monday only) Robert Long Thomas Cochran Warren F. Miller, Jr. Joseph Comfort Benjamin F. Montoya Michael L. Corradini Sekazi Mtingwa Jose Luis Cortez Lura Powell Maureen S. Crandall Richard Reba (Tuesday only) Allen Croff Joy Rempe James Duderstadt (Chair) Daniel C. Sullivan (Monday morning only) Steve Fetter John Taylor Beverly Hartline Ashok Thadani (ad hoc; Monday only) Leslie Hartz Charles E. Till Andrew Klein Neil Todreas (Tuesday only) Dale Klein (Monday only) NERAC members absent: Marvin Fertel Allen Sessoms J. Bennett Johnston C. Bruce Tarter Linda C. Knight Joan Woodard Also present: Ralph Bennett, Director for Advanced Nuclear Energy, Idaho National Engineering and

405

Combining relevancy and methodological quality into a single ranking for evidence-based medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence-based medicine has recently received a large amount of attention in medical research. To help clinical practices use evidence-based medicine, it should be easy to find the best current evidence that is relevant to the clinical question and has ... Keywords: Classification, Document quality, Evidence-based medicine, Ranking

Sungbin Choi; Borim Ryu; Sooyoung Yoo; Jinwook Choi

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Uranium recovery research sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Quarterly progress report, June-September 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents progress for the following major research projects: stabilization, engineering, and monitoring alternatives assessment for improving regulation of uranium recovery operations and waste management; attenuation of radon emission from uranium tailings; assessment of leachate movement from uranium mill tailings; and methods of minimizing ground-water contaminants from in-situ leach uranium mining.

Foley, M.G.; Deutsch, W.J.; Gee, G.W.; Hartley, J.N.; Kalkwarf, D.R.; Mayer, D.W.; Nelson, R.W.; Opitz, B.E.; Peterson, S.R.; Serne, R.J.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

A Technical Review of Non-Destructive Assay Research for the Characterization of Spent Nuclear Fuel Assemblies Being Conducted Under the US DOE NGSI - 11544  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NA-24), National Nuclear Security Administration, U.S.nuclear energy together with the emergence of alternative fuel cycles. Introduction Energy security

Croft, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Sister Lab Program Prospective Partner Nuclear Profile: Malaysia  

SciTech Connect

The Malaysian Deputy Prime Minister Tun Dr Ismail Abdul Rahman suggested in the early 1970s that Malaysia should have a role in the development of nuclear science and technology for peaceful purposes. Accordingly, the Center for the Application of Nuclear Energy (CRANE) was established, with a focus on the development of a scientific and technical pool critical to a national nuclear power program. The Malaysian Cabinet next established the Tun Ismail Atomic Research Center (TIARC) under the Ministry of Science, Technology and the Environment on 19 September 1972, at a site in Bangi, about 35 km south of Kuala Lampur. On 28 June 1982, the PUSPATI reactor, a 1-MW TRIGA MK-II research reactor, first reached criticality. On 10 August 1994, TIARC was officially renamed as the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT). In addition to radioisotope production and neutron radiography conducted at the PUSPATI research reactor, MINT also supports numerous programs employing nuclear technology for medicine, agriculture and industry, and has been involved in both bilateral and multilateral technical cooperation to extend its capabilities. As an energy exporting country, Malaysia has felt little incentive to develop a nuclear energy program, and high level opposition within the government discouraged it further. A recent statement by Malaysia's Science, Technology and Innovation Minister supported this view, indicating that only a near-catastrophic jump in world oil prices might change the government's view. However, the rate at which Malaysia is using its natural gas and oil reserves is expected to force it to reassess the role of nuclear energy in the near future. In addition, the government does intend to construct a radioactive waste repository to dispose of naturally occurring radioactive materials (extracted during tin mining, in particular). Also, Malaysia's growing economy could encourage expansion in Malaysia's existing nuclear-applications programs supporting the medical, agricultural, industrial and environmental fields.

Bissani, M; Tyson, S

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

409

Conceptual Nuclear Decommissioning Knowledge Management System Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Taiwan Research Reactor (TRR) was shut down in January 1988, along with the termination of a few nuclear facilities within Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER). In the past few years, INER has continually dismantled its related nuclear facilities. ...

I-Hsin Chou; Chin-Feng Fan; Yen-Chang Tzeng

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Office of Nuclear Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Nuclear Safety (HS-30) Office of Nuclear Safety (HS-30) Office of Nuclear Safety Home » Directives » Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Rules » Nuclear Safety Workshops Technical Standards Program » Search » Approved Standards » Recently Approved » RevCom for TSP » Monthly Status Reports » Archive » Feedback DOE Nuclear Safety Research & Development Program Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design (HS-31) Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design - About Us » Nuclear Policy Technical Positions/Interpretations » Risk Assessment Working Group » Criticality Safety » DOE O 420.1C Facility Safety » Beyond Design Basis Events Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs (HS-32) Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs - About Us

411

McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center (MNRC) TRIGA reactor: The national organization of test research and training reactors  

SciTech Connect

This year's TRTR conference is being hosted by the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center. The conference will be held at the Red Lion Hotel in Sacramento, CA. The conference dates are scheduled for October 11-14, 1994. Deadlines for sponsorship commitment and papers have not been set, but are forthcoming. The newly remodeled Red Lion Hotel provides up-to-date conference facilities and one of the most desirable locations for dining, shopping and entertainment in the Sacramento area. While attendees are busy with the conference activities, a spouses program will be available. Although the agenda has not been set, the Sacramento area offers outings to San Francisco, Pier 39, Ghirardelli Square (famous for their chocolate), and a chance to discover 'El Dorado' in the gold country. Not to forget our own bit of history with visits to 'Old Sacramento and Old Folsom', where antiquities abound, to the world renown train museum and incredible eating establishments. (author)

Kiger, Kevin M. [SWI-ALC/TIR, 5335 Price Ave., McClellan Air Force Base Sacramento, CA 95652-2504 (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended by the Secretary of Energy and approved by the President for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the requirements of the Nulcear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of the site characterization plan are oulined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Nuclear Analytical Chemistry News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a Nuclear Spotlight on Illegal Weapons Material Release Date: 10/26/2006 Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology ( ...

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

414

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Research and Development FY-2002 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is considering several optional processes for disposal of liquid sodium-bearing waste. During fiscal year 2002, immobilization-related research included of grout formulation development for sodium-bearing waste, absorption of the waste on silica gel, and off-gas system mercury collection and breakthrough using activated carbon. Experimental results indicate that sodium-bearing waste can be immobilized in grout at 70 weight percent and onto silica gel at 74 weight percent. Furthermore, a loading of 11 weight percent mercury in sulfur-impregnated activated carbon was achieved with 99.8% off-gas mercury removal efficiency.

Herbst, Alan Keith; Deldebbio, John Anthony; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Olson, Lonnie Gene; Scholes, Bradley Adams

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Supplement Analysis for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, (DOE/EIS-0310-SA-01) (08/05/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0-SA-01 0-SA-01 Supplement Analysis for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility Introduction and Background The Department of Energy (DOE), pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), issued the Final PEIS for Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility (Nuclear Infrastructure (NI) PEIS, DOE/EIS-0310) in December 2000. Under the Authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, the DOE's missions include: (1) producing isotopes for research and applications

416

Educational Outreach | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science Research Areas Research Highlights Facilities and Capabilities Educational Outreach University Engagement STEM Outreach Publications and Reports News and Awards...

417

Research on jet mixing of settled sludges in nuclear waste tanks at Hanford and other DOE sites: A historical perspective  

SciTech Connect

Jet mixer pumps will be used in the Hanford Site double-shell tanks to mobilize and mix the settled solids layer (sludge) with the tank supernatant liquid. Predicting the performance of the jet mixer pumps has been the subject of analysis and testing at Hanford and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. One important aspect of mixer pump performance is sludge mobilization. The research that correlates mixer pump design and operation with the extent of sludge mobilization is the subject of this report. Sludge mobilization tests have been conducted in tanks ranging from 1/25-scale (3 ft-diameter) to full scale have been conducted at Hanford and other DOE sites over the past 20 years. These tests are described in Sections 3.0 and 4.0 of this report. The computational modeling of sludge mobilization and mixing that has been performed at Hanford is discussed in Section 5.0.

Powell, M.R.; Onishi, Y.; Shekarriz, R.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Exploratory Research and Development Fund, FY 1990. Report on Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Exploratory R&D Fund FY 1990 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of an Exploratory R&D Fund (ERF) planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The research areas covered in this report are: Accelerator and fusion research; applied science; cell and molecular biology; chemical biodynamics; chemical sciences; earth sciences; engineering; information and computing sciences; materials sciences; nuclear science; physics and research medicine and radiation biophysics.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Medicine | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medicine Medicine High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Medicine Homeland Security Industry Computing Sciences Workforce Development A Growing List Accelerators for Americas Future External link Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Benefits of HEP Medicine Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Medicine: magnetic resonance imaging Magnetic resonance imaging, a fundamental technology of medical diagnosis, uses superconducting magnet technology that originated as a tool for

420

BOOK: Safety Related Issues of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 26, 2007... Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Nuclear Science ... Fifteen papers cover aluminum-clad fuel discharged from research ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

18: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0218: Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning...

422

Report on Department of Homeland Security Sponsored Research Project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on Preparation for an Improvised Nuclear Device Event  

SciTech Connect

Following the events of September 11th, a litany of imaginable horribles was trotted out before an anxious and concerned public. To date, government agencies and academics are still grappling with how to best respond to such catastrophes, and as Senator Lieberman's quote says above, now is the time to plan and prepare for such events. One of the nation's worst fears is that terrorists might detonate an improvised nuclear device (IND) in an American city. With 9/11 serving as the catalyst, the government and many NGOs have invested money into research and development of response capabilities throughout the country. Yet, there is still much to learn about how to best respond to an IND event. My summer 2008 internship at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory afforded me the opportunity to look in depth at the preparedness process and the research that has been conducted on this issue. While at the laboratory I was tasked to collect, combine, and process research on how cities and the federal government can best prepare for the horrific prospect of an IND event. Specific projects that I was involved with were meeting reports, research reviews, and a full project report. Working directly with Brooke Buddemeier and his support team at the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center, I was able to witness first hand, preparation for meetings with response planners to inform them of the challenges that an IND event would pose to the affected communities. In addition, I supported the Homeland Security Institute team (HSI), which was looking at IND preparation and preparing a Congressional report. I participated in meetings at which local responders expressed their concerns and contributed valuable information to the response plan. I specialized in the psycho-social aspects of an IND event and served as a technical advisor to some of the research groups. Alongside attending and supporting these meetings, I worked on an independent research project which collected information from across disciplines to outline where the state of knowledge on IND response is. In addition, the report looked at meetings that were held over the summer in various cities. The meetings were attended by both federal responders and local responders. The meetings explored issues regarding IND preparation and how to mitigate the effects of an IND detonation. Looking at the research and current preparation activity the report found that the state of knowledge in responding and communicating is a mixed bag. Some aspects of an IND attack are well understood, some are not, but much is left to synthesize. The effects of an IND would be devastating, yet much can be done to mitigate those effects through education, preparation, and research. A major gap in current knowledge is how to effectively communicate with the public before an attack. Little research on the effectiveness of public education has been done, but it is likely that educating the public about the effects of an IND and how to best protect oneself could save many lives.

A., B

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

EIS-0350-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Nuclear Facility Portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Supplemental EIS evaluates the completion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement (CMRR) Project, which consists of constructing the nuclear facility portion (CMRR-NF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The CMRR Project provides the analytical chemistry and materials characterization capabilities currently or previously performed in the existing Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building. Because of recent detailed site geotechnical investigations, certain aspects of the CMRR-NR project have changed resulting in change to the environmental impacts.

424

Contact Info | Occupational Medicine Clinic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupational Medicine Clinic Occupational Medicine Clinic Promoting optimal physical and emotional health through quality care that is convenient, confidential & individualized. Home Health Promotion Program Employee Assistance Program Contact Contact Info Occupational Medicine Joseph Falco, M.D. 344-3666 OMC Manager/Supervising Physician Staff Physicians Carol Davis, D.O. 344-3667 Board Certified - Occupational Medicine Eva Erens, M.D. 344-3668 Board Certified - Internal Medicine Jaishree Subramani, M.D. MPH 344-3669 Board Certified - Internal Medicine Health Promotion Program Michael Thorn, RN, MBA 344-8612 Health Promotion/Disease Prevention Program Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Nancy Losinno, LCSW, CEAP 344-4567 EAP Manager Linda DiPierro 344-2733 Senior Occupational Medicine Assistant

425

Nuclear Science at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerator Science Accelerator Science Astrophysics Biological Sciences Chemistry & Materials Science Climate & Earth Science Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Science Highlights NERSC Citations HPC Requirements Reviews Home » Science at NERSC » Nuclear Science Nuclear Science Experimental and theoretical nuclear research carried out at NERSC is driven by the quest for improving our understanding of the building blocks of matter. This includes discovering the origins of nuclei and identifying the forces that transform matter. Specific topics include: Nuclear astrophysics and the synthesis of nuclei in stars and elsewhere in the cosmos; Nuclear forces and quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the quantum field

426

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 452 (2000) 256}265 On the signi"cance of the energy correlations of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the energy correlations, i.e. the 260 I. Pa& zsit et al. / Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics neutrons with source energy E, i.e. (E)" # # l l Q 3 dE E . (34) 262 I. Pa& zsit et al. / Nuclear determination of the two-point energy distribution with coincidence 264 I. Pa& zsit et al. / Nuclear Instruments

Pázsit, Imre

427

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 562 (2006) 401406 Generating a multi-line neutron beam using an electron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Glasstone, Nuclear Reactor Theory, Robert E. Krieger Publishing Company (1970). [17] W.E. Lamb, Phys. Rev with the steady-state filtered neutron beams obtained using nuclear reactors [1­4]. The filter materials used in conjuc- tion with nuclear reactors are scandium (producing 2.03 keV neutron beams with a width DE$1:3 ke

Danon, Yaron

428

LANL, LLNL researchers among Early Career Research Program award...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Follow this link to skip to the main content Facebook Flickr RSS Twitter YouTube LANL, LLNL researchers among Early Career Research Program award recipients | National Nuclear...

429

Research Facilities | BNL Technology Commercialization and ...  

One of the world’s most widely used scientific light source facilities for research in diverse fields such as biology and medicine, chemistry and ...

430

doe seeks early career researchers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Basic Energy Sciences: Fusion Energy Sciences; High Energy Physics; Nuclear Physics. Proposed research topics must fall within the programmatic priorities ...

431

Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1981-1982. [Lead abstract  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts were prepared for the 61 research reports in the 1981-1982 annual report for the Biology and Medicine Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Programs reviewed include research medicine, Donner Pavilion, environmental physiology, radiation biophysics and structural biophysics. (KRM)

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Department of Energy Awards $15 Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15 Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Research and Development Department of Energy Awards 15 Million for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Research and Development August 1,...

433

Researching DOE Records  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) welcomes researchers interested in documenting the Department's history. Significant portions of DOE's records, including declassified materials on the nuclear...

434

Nuclear Forensics | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science and Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Advanced Materials Clean Energy Materials Theory and Simulation Neutron Science Nuclear Forensics Nuclear Science Supercomputing Theory, Modeling and Simulation More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Materials Science and Engineering | Nuclear Forensics SHARE Nuclear Forensics image Tools, techniques, and expertise in nuclear fuel cycle research gained over seven decades help ORNL scientists control and track nuclear bomb-grade materials to be sure they don't fall into the wrong hands. Among the leading-edge technologies used by researchers are high-resolution techniques that allow analysis of radiation detector data in stunning detail. Researchers are also developing aerosol sampling systems to collect

435

Research Highlights | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology & Medicine Archive Biology & Medicine Archive Research Highlights Biology & Medicine Archive Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Team Finds Structural Differences in Sindbis Virus Particles from Different Host Species (2010) Published Work: "The Structure of Sindbis Virus Produced from Vertebrate and Invertebrate Hosts as Determined by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering" Contact: Flora Meilleur Targeted Drug Delivery Systems Studies of the unique structure of synthetic molecules will help in the development of drugs that can target diseased areas of the body. This researched on dendrimers revealed how molecules function within solutions at different pH levels. (2008) Research in progress. Contact: Wei-Ren Chen "Intelligent" Polymers for Biomedical Technologies

436

Research in Theoretical Nuclear Physics  

SciTech Connect

A theoretical study of problems relevant to the hadron physics program at Jefferson Laboratory and at other laboratories around the world.

Capstick, Simon; Robson, Don

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

437

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Annular Core...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annular Core Research Reactor facility Nuclear science photo At the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) facility, Sandia researchers can subject various test objects to a mixed...

438

SC e-journals, Medicine  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Medicine Medicine ACM Transactions on Applied Perception (TAP) ACS Synthetic Biology Acta Biotheoretica Acta Neurochirurgica Acta Neuropathologica Administration and Policy in Mental Health American Journal of Hematology American Journal of Industrial Medicine American Journal of Infection Control American Journal of Medical Genetics Amino Acids Anatomical Record, The Angiogenesis Annals of Biomedical Engineering Annals of Hematology Annual Review of Biomedical Engineering Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology Annual Review of Clinical Psychology Annual Review of Genetics Annual Review of Immunology Annual Review of Medicine Annual Review of Microbiology Annual Review of Neuroscience Annual Review of Nutrition Annual Review of Pathology: Mechanisms of Disease Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology

439

Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1987--September 30, 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) is to provide a sound scientific basis for the measurement and assessment of human health impacts of radiological and chemical substances. Our approach to fulfilling this mission is to conduct a broad program of experimental, theoretical, and field research based on a strong foundation of fundamental physical studies that blend into well-established programs in life sciences. Topics include biomedical screening techniques, biological and chemical sensors, risk assessment, health hazards, dosimetry, nuclear medicine, environmental pollution monitoring, electron-molecule interactions, interphase physics, surface physics, data base management, environmental mutagens, carcinogens, and tetratogens.

Kaye, S.V.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Nuclear data for nuclear transmutation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current status on nuclear data for the study of nuclear transmutation of radioactive wastes is reviewed

Hideo Harada

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear medicine research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

NUCLEAR PROPULSION--AN EMERGING TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

The use of nuclear energy in the space programs is discussed. Nuclear rocket development is reviewed, and the Nevada rocket development station, nuclear electric propulsion and power generation, and advanced research projects are discussed. (J.R.D.)

Finger, H.B.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The Phenomenology of Nuclear Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

most widely used nuclear fuel is in the form of Uranium Oxide. It is used in hundreds of nuclear power reactors, naval reactors and research reactors. This ceramic fuel form has...

443

NUCLEAR THEORY WHITE PAPER 1995  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the accomplishments of nuclear theory during the past five years and identify the future challenges and research opportunities. [Final, substantially revised version of the nuclear theory white paper

G. Bertsch; B. Mueller; J. Negele; J. Friar; V. Pandharipande

1995-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 93, NO. D5, PAGES 5319-5332, MAY 20, 1988 Effectsof Dirty Snow in Nuclear Winter Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Snow in Nuclear Winter Simulations A.M. VOGELMANN,1A. ROBOCK,ANDR. G. ELLINGSON Department the atmospherefrom burning forests,cities,and industriesin targeted areas. This smokecouldfall out onto snowand ice simulations which span severalyears. These effectsare investigatedfor different nuclear winter scenarios

Robock, Alan

445

Politics and Emergency Medicine - An Essential Lesson for Every Resident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and guide the future of emergency medicine. Volume XII, no .s S ection Politics and Emergency Medicine - An EssentialMedicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Orange, CA Every

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Pulse - Accelerator Science in Medicine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

t he future of accelerator physics isn’t just for physicists. As in the past, tomorrow’s discoveries in particle accelerator science may lead to unexpected applications for medical diagnosis, healing and the understanding of human biology. t he future of accelerator physics isn’t just for physicists. As in the past, tomorrow’s discoveries in particle accelerator science may lead to unexpected applications for medical diagnosis, healing and the understanding of human biology. Breakthroughs in the technology of superconducting magnets, nanometer beams, laser instrumentation and information technology will give high-energy physicists new accelerators to explore the deepest secrets of the universe: the ultimate structure of matter and the nature of space and time. But breakthroughs in accelerator science may do more than advance the exploration of particles and forces. No field of science is an island. Physics, astronomy, chemistry, biology, medicine— all interact in the continuing human endeavor to explore and understand our world and ourselves. Research at high-energy physics laboratories will lead to the next generation of particle accelerators—and perhaps to new tools for medical science.

447

HEARING ON NUCLEAR ENERGY RISK MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

am pleased to discuss the possible health implications of radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan. Just a few days before the natural disasters struck on March 11, 2011, I was in Hiroshima, Japan as a member of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation's Science Council, reviewing the study of atomic bomb survivors. I would like to begin by expressing my heartfelt sympathy for the families of the tens of thousands who lost their lives as a result of the tsunami and earthquake and for the hundreds of thousands who have been displaced from their homes and livelihoods. The health consequences associated with the radiation exposures emanating from the Fukushima Daiichi plant pale in comparison. As background, I am a radiation epidemiologist and Professor in the Department of Medicine at Vanderbilt University and Scientific Director of the International Epidemiology Institute. I have spent my career studying human populations exposed to radiation, including Chernobyl clean-up workers, patients receiving diagnostic and therapeutic radiation, underground miners exposed to radon, nuclear energy workers, atomic veterans, persons living in areas of high background radiation and U.S. populations living near nuclear power plants and other facilities. I am also a commissioner of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, an emeritus member of the National Council on Radiation Protection and

John D. Boice; Sc. D; Good Morning; Mr. Chairmen; Ranking Members

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

SC e-journals, Nuclear  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Nuclear Nuclear Annals of Nuclear Energy Annual Review of Nuclear and Particle Science Atomic Data & Nuclear Data Tables Atomic Energy BMC Medical Physics - OAJ Cancer Prevention Journals Portal Cancer Prevention Research Cancer Reviews Online Dose Response Energy & Environmental Science Energy Policy EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing - OAJ EURASIP Journal on Bioinformatics and Systems Biology - OAJ EURASIP Journal on Embedded Systems (2006 forward) - OAJ Fuel Fusion Engineering and Design Fusion Nuclear Society Health Physics IETE Journal of Research - OAJ International Journal of Cancer International Journal of Low Radiation International Journal of Microwave Science and Technology - OAJ International Journal of Radiation Biology Journal of Cancer Eqidemiology - OAJ

449

Western Region American Nuclear Society regional student conference, April 12-14, 1985  

SciTech Connect

Abstracts of papers presented at the conference are contained in this proceedings. Topics of technical sessions included fusion and space reactors, numerical and computer modeling, nuclear medicine and radiation effects, and general nuclear technology. (GHT)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Feedback in the Emergency Medicine Clerkships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

526. Western Journal of Emergency Medicine Volume XII, NO .year medical student emergency medicine curriculum Med.Med. 2006;47:E1–E7. emergency medicine resident interaction

Bernard, Aaron W; Kman, Nicholas E; Khandelwal, Sorabh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis > Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Overview Current Projects Software Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Bookmark and Share Activities in Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety research and development fulfill a primary goal of the Nuclear Engineering (NE) Division to promote improvements in safe and reliable operation of present and future

452

Nuclear Forensics | National Security | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Initiatives Initiatives Cyber Security Nuclear Forensics Bioinformatics National Security Home | Science & Discovery | National Security | Initiatives | Nuclear Forensics SHARE Nuclear Forensics image Tools, techniques, and expertise in nuclear fuel cycle research gained over seven decades help ORNL scientists control and track nuclear bomb-grade materials to be sure they don't fall into the wrong hands. Among the leading-edge technologies used by researchers are high-resolution techniques that allow analysis of radiation detector data in stunning detail. Researchers are also developing aerosol sampling systems to collect airborne particulates and instantly send an alert if radiation is detected. For more information, please contact: nuclearforensicsinitiative

453

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center -- The Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

REPORT: Technology and Applied R&D Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems A resource document for the Workshop on Basic Research Needs for ...

454

Errvironmentaf Research  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

online at www.sciencedirect.com online at www.sciencedirect.com Environmental Research 10 1 (2006) 3 4 4 1 Errvironmentaf Research Do scientists and fishermen collect the same size fish? Possible implications for exposure assessment Joanna urger^^^^', Michael ~ o c h f e l d ~ ~ ~ , Sean Christian W. ~ e i t n e r ~ . ~ , Stephen ~ e w e t t ~ , Daniel SnigarofP, Ronald snigarofff, Tim Starnrng, Shawn ~ a r ~ e f , Max ~ o b e r ~ * , Heloise chenelotd, Robert patrickh, Conrad D. volzi, James ~ e s t o d 'Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082, USA b~onsortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), and Environmental and Occupational Healrh Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Piscataway, NJ, USA CEnvironmental and Community Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA

455

Nuclear Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Chemistry Advanced Materials Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Biology and Soft Matter Chemical and Engineering Materials Quantum Condensed Matter Computational Chemistry Nuclear Sciences More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Chemistry | Nuclear Sciences SHARE Nuclear Sciences In World War II's Manhattan Project, ORNL helped usher in the nuclear age. Today, laboratory scientists are leaders in using nuclear technologies and systems to improve human health; explore safer, more environmentally friendly power; and better understand the structure of matter. Thanks to its nuclear heritage, ORNL is a world leader in the production of isotopes for medical purposes and research. The lab's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC)

456

Basic Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 II Basic Research The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) office within the DOE Office of Science supports the DOE Hydrogen Program by providing basic, fundamental research in those technically challenging areas facing the Program, complementing the applied research and demonstration projects conducted by the Offices of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Fossil Energy; and Nuclear Engineering, Science and Technology. In May 2005 Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced the selection of over $64 million in BES research and development projects aimed at making hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and refueling stations available, practical and affordable for American consumers by 2020. A total of 70 hydrogen research projects were selected to focus on fundamental science and enable

457

Argonne Historical News Releases about Nuclear Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Releases Releases About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

458

Contact Us | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

National Laboratories Press Release 62912). Institutional Research & Development National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and...

459