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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Advanced research workshop: nuclear materials safety  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) on Nuclear Materials Safety held June 8-10, 1998, in St. Petersburg, Russia, was attended by 27 Russian experts from 14 different Russian organizations, seven European experts from six different organizations, and 14 U.S. experts from seven different organizations. The ARW was conducted at the State Education Center (SEC), a former Minatom nuclear training center in St. Petersburg. Thirty-three technical presentations were made using simultaneous translations. These presentations are reprinted in this volume as a formal ARW Proceedings in the NATO Science Series. The representative technical papers contained here cover nuclear material safety topics on the storage and disposition of excess plutonium and high enriched uranium (HEU) fissile materials, including vitrification, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication, plutonium ceramics, reprocessing, geologic disposal, transportation, and Russian regulatory processes. This ARW completed discussions by experts of the nuclear materials safety topics that were not covered in the previous, companion ARW on Nuclear Materials Safety held in Amarillo, Texas, in March 1997. These two workshops, when viewed together as a set, have addressed most nuclear material aspects of the storage and disposition operations required for excess HEU and plutonium. As a result, specific experts in nuclear materials safety have been identified, know each other from their participation in t he two ARW interactions, and have developed a partial consensus and dialogue on the most urgent nuclear materials safety topics to be addressed in a formal bilateral program on t he subject. A strong basis now exists for maintaining and developing a continuing dialogue between Russian, European, and U.S. experts in nuclear materials safety that will improve the safety of future nuclear materials operations in all the countries involved because of t he positive synergistic effects of focusing these diverse backgrounds of nuclear experience on a common objectiveÑthe safe and secure storage and disposition of excess fissile nuclear materials.

Jardine, L J; Moshkov, M M

1999-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

2

Nuclear Criticality Safety: Current Activities - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

3

Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

4

Nuclear Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Nuclear Safety information site that provides assistance and resources to field elements in implementation of requirements and resolving nuclear safety, facility safety, and quality assurance issues.

5

RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS LABORATORY SAFETY REPORT, MARTIN NUCLEAR FACILITY, QUEHANNA SITE  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of the safety features and the major alterations to be performed prior to occupancy. The evaluation was made in support of fubrication work on the production of safe isotopic power sources from Cm/sup 242/ and Sr/sup 90/. The chemical, nuclear, and radiobiological properties of Cm/sup 242/ and Sr/sup 90/ are outlined. The projected physical fiow of materials for production of the isotopic power souroes is schematically given. An evaluation of the malfunctions, operational hazards, and remedial health physics procedures is presented. The analysis and evaluation of postulated maximum credible incidents are demonstrated. (B.O.G.)

1960-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

International Safety Projects - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

7

Facility Safety Assessment - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

8

Safety - Vulnerability Assessment Team - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

9

International Cooperation on Safety of Nuclear Plants - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

10

Current R&D Activities in Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

11

Analysis Tools for Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

12

Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

13

Risk and Safety Assessments - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

14

Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors III ... response of oxide ceramics for nuclear applications through experiment, theory, and ...

15

Office of Nuclear Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Nuclear Safety (HS-30) Office of Nuclear Safety (HS-30) Office of Nuclear Safety Home » Directives » Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Rules » Nuclear Safety Workshops Technical Standards Program » Search » Approved Standards » Recently Approved » RevCom for TSP » Monthly Status Reports » Archive » Feedback DOE Nuclear Safety Research & Development Program Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design (HS-31) Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design - About Us » Nuclear Policy Technical Positions/Interpretations » Risk Assessment Working Group » Criticality Safety » DOE O 420.1C Facility Safety » Beyond Design Basis Events Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs (HS-32) Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs - About Us

16

Nuclear Safety Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Directives Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Rules Nuclear Safety Workshops Technical Standards Program Search Approved Standards Recently Approved RevCom...

17

Nuclear criticality safety guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C. [eds.] [eds.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Safety Board Recommendation 94-1, Remediation ofNuclear Materials in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1998. Revision 2 describes the current status ofand changes to the Department's plans for stabilizing the nuclear materials. We plan to further revise this document over the next several months to reflect new plans at several sites, and the recently-issued Recommendation 2000-1, which also addresses our nuclear materials stabilization activities. The enclosed revision updates commitments for materials stabilization at the

The Honorable; John T. Conway

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework DOE's Nuclear Safety Enabling Legislation Regulatory Enforcement & Oversight Regulatory Governance Atomic Energy Act 1946 Atomic Energy Act 1954 Energy Reorganization Act 1974 DOE Act 1977 Authority and responsibility to regulate nuclear safety at DOE facilities 10 CFR 830 10 CFR 835 10 CFR 820 Regulatory Implementation Nuclear Safety Radiological Safety Procedural Rules ISMS-QA; Operating Experience; Metrics and Analysis Cross Cutting DOE Directives & Manuals DOE Standards Central Technical Authorities (CTA) Office of Health, Safety, and Security (HSS) Line Management SSO/ FAC Reps 48 CFR 970 48 CFR 952 Federal Acquisition Regulations External Oversight *Defense Nuclear Facility

20

Nuclear reactor safety device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A safety device is disclosed for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of an upward thermal excursion. Such safety device comprises a laminated helical ribbon configured as a tube-like helical coil having contiguous helical turns with slidably abutting edges. The helical coil is disclosed as a portion of a drive member connected axially to the control rod. The laminated ribbon is formed of outer and inner laminae. The material of the outer lamina has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material of the inner lamina. In the event of an upward thermal excursion, the laminated helical coil curls inwardly to a smaller diameter. Such inward curling causes the total length of the helical coil to increase by a substantial increment, so that the control rod is axially repositioned by a corresponding amount to reduce the power output of the reactor.

Hutter, Ernest (Wilmette, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Thermodynamic Database for Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 8, 2007 ... This resource features an interactive index to thermodynamic properties included on the International Nuclear Safety Center Material Properties ...

22

AIRCRAFT NUCLEAR PROPULSION DEPARTMENT NUCLEAR SAFETY GUIDE  

SciTech Connect

The limitations and operating techniques which were in effect at ANPD for the prevention of criticality accidents are summarized. The standards followed by the atomic industry were followed; however, the safe mass of U/sup 235/ moderated with beryllium oxide and hydrogeneous materials was based upon criticality experiments conducted at ANPD. Although the guide was primarily for the use of the ANPD nuclear safety control organization, it may also be of assistance to designers and operating management in maintaining nuclear safety. (auth)

Pryor, W.A.

1961-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Nuclear criticality safety  

SciTech Connect

Important facts of the nuclear criticality safety field are covered in this volume. Both theoretical and practical aspects of the subject are included, based on insights provided by criticality experts and published information from many sources. An overview of nuclear criticality safety theory and a variety of practical in-plant operation applications are presented. Underlying principles of nuclear criticality safety are introduced and the state of the art of this technical discipline is reviewed. Criticality safety theoretical concepts, accident experience, standards, experiments computer calculations, integration of safety methods into individual practices, and overall facility operations are all included.

Knief, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

provides a new user interface to the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) to easily identify, organize, and analyze nuclear safety-related events reported into...

25

Nuclear Safety (Pennsylvania) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Safety (Pennsylvania) Nuclear Safety (Pennsylvania) Nuclear Safety (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection The Nuclear Safety Division conducts a comprehensive nuclear power plant oversight review program of the nine reactors at the five nuclear power sites in Pennsylvania. It also monitors the activities associated with management and disposal of a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in Pennsylvania and provides planning and support for Bureau response to incidents involving nuclear power plants and/or radioactive material in

26

Nuclear reactor safety device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A safety device is described for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of a thermal excursion. It comprises a laminated strip helically configured to form a tube, said tube being in operative relation to said control rod. The laminated strip is formed of at least two materials having different thermal coefficients of expansion, and is helically configured such that the material forming the outer lamina of the tube has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material forming the inner lamina of said tube. In the event of a thermal excursion the laminated strip will tend to curl inwardly so that said tube will increase in length, whereby as said tube increases in length it exerts a force on said control rod to axially reposition said control rod with respect to said core.

Hutter, E.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Nuclear Criticality Safety | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Criticality Safety Criticality Safety SHARE Criticality Safety Nuclear Criticality Safety ORNL is the lead national laboratory responsible for supporting the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in managing the US Nuclear Criticality Safety Program. NCSP is chartered to maintain the technical infrastructure (integral experiments, computational tools, training, data, etc.) needed to support safe, efficient fissionable material operations. ORNL has extensive expertise in the area of nuclear criticality safety (NCS) based upon years of experience in the following areas: Operations Support: providing fissionable material operations support for enrichment, fabrication, production, and research; Critical Experiments: performing experiments at the Y-12 Critical Experiment Facility;

28

Nuclear Facility Safety Basis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Basis Safety Basis FUNCTIONAL AREA GOAL: A fully compliant Nuclear Facility Safety Basis. Program is implemented and maintained across the site. REQUIREMENTS: ï‚· 10 CFR 830 Subpart B Guidance: ï‚· DOE STD 3009 ï‚· DOE STD 1104 ï‚· DOE STD ï‚· DOE G 421.1-2 Implementation Guide For Use in Developing Documented Safety Analyses To Meet Subpart B Of 10 CFR 830 ï‚· DOE G 423.1-1 Implementation Guide For Use In Developing Technical Safety Requirements ï‚· DOE G 424.1-1 Implementation Guide For Use In Addressing Unreviewed Safety Question Requirements Performance Objective 1: Contractor Program Documentation The site contractor has developed an up-to-date, comprehensive, compliant, documented nuclear facility safety basis and associated implementing mechanisms and procedures for all required nuclear facilities and activities (10 CFR

29

Office of Nuclear Safety | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Office of Nuclear Safety Mission The Office of Nuclear Safety establishes nuclear safety requirements and expectations for the Department to ensure protection of...

30

Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Rules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety (HS-30) Office of Nuclear Safety Home Directives Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Rules Nuclear Safety Workshops Technical Standards Program Search ...

31

Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Criticality Safety Nuclear Criticality Safety Overview Experience Analysis Tools Current NCS Activities Current R&D Activities DOE Criticality Safety Support Group (CSSG) Other...

32

Nuclear regulation and safety  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear regulation and safety are discussed from the standpoint of a hypothetical country that is in the process of introducing a nuclear power industry and setting up a regulatory system. The national policy is assumed to be in favor of nuclear power. The regulators will have responsibility for economic, reliable electric production as well as for safety. Reactor safety is divided into three parts: shut it down, keep it covered, take out the afterheat. Emergency plans also have to be provided. Ways of keeping the core covered with water are discussed. (DLC)

Hendrie, J.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Material Safety Data Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS of LITHIUM POLYMER battery (total 3pages) 1. Product and Company Identification Product 1.1 Product Name: LITHIUM- POLYMER Battery 1.2 System:...

34

Nuclear Safety Workshop Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workshop Summary Workshop Summary September 19-20, 2012 1 Nuclear Safety Workshop Summary On September 19-20, 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held a second Nuclear Safety Workshop covering the results of the Department's actions to improve its posture for analyzing and responding to severe accidents in light of lessons learned from the March 2011 nuclear accident in Japan. Sponsored by DOE and championed by Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman, the two-day workshop discussed the lessons learned in a national and international context. The workshop's theme

35

Nuclear Safety Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

[6450-01-P] [6450-01-P] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 830 Nuclear Safety Management AGENCY: Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Final Rule. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) is issuing a final rule regarding Nuclear Safety Management. This Part establishes requirements for the safe management of DOE contractor and subcontractor work at the Department's nuclear facilities. Today's rule adopts the sections that will make up the generally applicable provisions for Part 830. It also adopts the specific section on provisions for developing and implementing a formalized quality assurance program. EFFECTIVE DATE: This regulation becomes effective [insert 30 days after publication in the Federal Register.] FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Frank Hawkins, U.S. Department of Energy, Nuclear Safety

36

Nuclear Safety: Software Quality Assurance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety: Software Quality Assurance Nuclear Safety: Software Quality Assurance cd Welcome to the Department of Energy's Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Software Quality Assurance (SQA) homepage. The purpose of this Web site is to promote continuous improvement and the sharing of knowledge of safety software quality assurance among interested parties across the DOE complex. It consolidates information and contains links to subject matter experts, procedures, training material, program descriptions, good practices, lessons learned and the Central Registry Toolbox Codes. The Portal also provides capabilities for member collaboration in product development and threaded discussions. Central Registry: The Central Registry provides a library of DOE "Toolbox" Codes covering site boundary accident dose consequences, fire accident source terms, leakpath factors, chemical release/dispersion and consequence, and radiological dispersion and consequence.

37

Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing the Thermal Stability of Bulk Metallic Glasses for Nuclear Waste Applications by K. Hildal, J.H. Perepezko, and L. Kaufman, $10.00 ($10.00), $25.00.

38

Office of Nuclear Safety | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Safety Office of Nuclear Safety Organization Office of Health and Safety Office of Environmental Protection, Sustainability Support & Corporate Safety Analysis Office of...

39

DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Nuclear Criticality Safety Overview Experience Analysis Tools Current NCS Activities Current R&D Activities DOE Criticality Safety Support Group (CSSG) Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr The DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Bookmark and Share J. Morman and R. Bucher load J. Morman and R. Bucher load samples into the ZPR-6 critical assembly for material worth measurements. Click on image to view larger image. The DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) is focused on maintaining fundamental infrastructure that enables retention of DOE capabilities and expertise in nuclear criticality safety necessary to support line

40

National Nuclear SecurityAdministration's Nuclear ExplosiveSafety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Nuclear SecurityAdministration's Nuclear ExplosiveSafety Study Program, IG-0581 National Nuclear SecurityAdministration's Nuclear ExplosiveSafety Study Program, IG-0581 To...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Nuclear Materials Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Materials Committee is part of the Structural Materials Division. Our Mission: Includes the scientific and technical aspects of materials which are ...

42

Nuclear Safety and Global Cooperation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The thesis of is to strengthen the capacity building of nuclear safety and disaster prevention all over the world from a preventive perspective, and to… (more)

Chang, Yu-shan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Office of Nuclear Safety - Directives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear and Facility Safety Directives Nuclear and Facility Safety Directives The HSS Office of Nuclear Safety is the responsible office for the development, interpretation, and revision of the following Department of Energy (DOE) directives. Go to DOE's Directives Web Page to view these directives. DOE Order (O) 252.1A, Technical Standards Program DOE O 252.1A promotes DOE's use of Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCS) as the primary method for application of technical standards and establishes and manages the DOE Technical Standards Program (TSP) including technical standards development, information, activities, issues, and interactions. HS-30 Contact: Jeff Feit DOE Policy (P) 420.1, Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy DOE P 420.1, documents the Department's nuclear safety policy to design, construct, operate, and decommission its nuclear facilities in a manner that ensures adequate protection of workers, the public, and the environment.

44

Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety (HS-30) Office of Nuclear Safety Home Directives Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Rules Nuclear Safety Workshops Technical Standards Program Search ...

45

2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services Nuclear Safety 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop 1 of 5 Podonsky This is the Title 2 of 5 This is the Title DOE Deputy Secretary Daniel...

46

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Management & Safeguards System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials...

47

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Nuclear Materials Management &...

48

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System...

49

Comprehensive Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book encompasses a rich seam of current information on the vast and multidisciplinary field of nuclear materials employed in fission and prototype fusion systems. Discussion includes both historical and contemporary international research in nuclear materials, from Actinides to Zirconium alloys, from the worlds leading scientists and engineers. Synthesizes pertinent current science to support the selection, assessment, validation and engineering of materials in extreme nuclear environments. The work discusses the major classes of materials suitable for usage in nuclear fission, fusion reactors and high power accelerators, and for diverse functions in fuels, cladding, moderator and control materials, structural, functional, and waste materials.

Konings, Dr. Rudy J. M. [European Commission Joint Research Centre; Allen, Todd R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Yamanaka, Prof. Shinsuke [Osaka University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Nuclear Safety Research and Development Committee Charter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research and Development Committee Charter I. Purpose The intent of the Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Committee is to identify nuclear safety research needs and...

51

Nuclear Criticality Safety Application Guide: Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES) is committed to performing and documenting safety analyses for facilities it manages for the Department of Energy (DOE). Safety analyses are performed to identify hazards and potential accidents; to analyze the adequacy of measures taken to eliminate, control, or mitigate hazards; and to evaluate potential accidents and determine associated risks. Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) are prepared to document the safety analysis to ensure facilities can be operated safely and in accordance with regulations. Many of the facilities requiring a SAR process fissionable material creating the potential for a nuclear criticality accident. MMES has long had a nuclear criticality safety program that provides the technical support to fissionable material operations to ensure the safe processing and storage of fissionable materials. The guiding philosophy of the program has always been the application of the double-contingency principle, which states: {open_quotes}process designs shall incorporate sufficient factors of safety to require at least two unlikely, independent, and concurrent changes in process conditions before a criticality accident is possible.{close_quotes} At Energy Systems analyses have generally been maintained to document that no single normal or abnormal operating conditions that could reasonably be expected to occur can cause a nuclear criticality accident. This application guide provides a summary description of the MMES Nuclear Criticality Safety Program and the MMES Criticality Accident Alarm System requirements for inclusion in facility SARs. The guide also suggests a way to incorporate the analyses conducted pursuant to the double-contingency principle into the SAR. The prime objective is to minimize duplicative effort between the NCSA process and the SAR process and yet adequately describe the methodology utilized to prevent a nuclear criticality accident.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Programs establishes requirements related to safety management programs that are essential to the safety of DOE nuclear facilities. In addition, establishes requirements...

53

Helpful links for materials transport, safety, etc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Helpful links for materials transport, safety, etc. relating to experiment safety at the APS. Internal Reference Material: Transporting Hazardous Materials "Natural" radioactivity...

54

CRAD, Facility Safety - Nuclear Facility Safety Basis | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRAD, Facility Safety - Nuclear Facility Safety Basis CRAD, Facility Safety - Nuclear Facility Safety Basis CRAD, Facility Safety - Nuclear Facility Safety Basis A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used for assessment of a contractor's Nuclear Facility Safety Basis. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Facility Safety - Nuclear Facility Safety Basis More Documents & Publications CRAD, Facility Safety - Unreviewed Safety Question Requirements Site Visit Report, Livermore Site Office - February 2011 FAQS Job Task Analyses - Nuclear Safety Specialist

55

Nuclear Security & Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department is working to enhance nuclear security through defense, nonproliferation, and environmental efforts.

56

NUCLEAR MATERIALS ACCOUNTING SYSTEMSMODERNIZATION INITIATIVE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NUCLEAR MATERIALS ACCOUNTING SYSTEMSMODERNIZATION INITIATIVE, IG-0556 NUCLEAR MATERIALS ACCOUNTING SYSTEMSMODERNIZATION INITIATIVE, IG-0556 The Department of Energy (Department),...

57

Absolute nuclear material assay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

58

Absolute nuclear material assay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Joint nuclear safety research projects between the US and Russian Federation International Nuclear Safety Centers  

SciTech Connect

The Russian Federation Ministry for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and the US Department of Energy (USDOE) formed international Nuclear Safety Centers in October 1995 and July 1996, respectively, to collaborate on nuclear safety research. Since January 1997, the two centers have initiated the following nine joint research projects: (1) INSC web servers and databases; (2) Material properties measurement and assessment; (3) Coupled codes: Neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, mechanical and other; (4) Severe accident management for Soviet-designed reactors; (5) Transient management and advanced control; (6) Survey of relevant nuclear safety research facilities in the Russian Federation; (8) Advanced structural analysis; and (9) Development of a nuclear safety research and development plan for MINATOM. The joint projects were selected on the basis of recommendations from two groups of experts convened by NEA and from evaluations of safety impact, cost, and deployment potential. The paper summarizes the projects, including the long-term goals, the implementing strategy and some recent accomplishments for each project.

Bougaenko, S.E.; Kraev, A.E. [International Nuclear Safety Center of the Russian MINATOM, Moscow (Russian Federation); Hill, D.L.; Braun, J.C.; Klickman, A.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). International Nuclear Safety Center

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Nuclear data for criticality safety - current issues  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, nuclear data evaluations have been performed in support of the analysis and design of thermal and fast reactors. In general, the neutron spectra characteristic of the thermal and fast systems used for data testing are predominantly in the low- and high-energy range with a relatively small influence from the intermediate-energy range. In the area of nuclear criticality safety, nuclear systems arising from applications involving fissionable materials outside reactors can lead to situations very different from those most commonly found in reactor analysis and design. These systems are not limited to thermal or fast and may have significant influence from the intermediate energy range. The extension of the range of applicability of the nuclear data evaluation beyond thermal and fast systems is therefore needed to cover problems found in nuclear criticality safety. Before criticality safety calculations are performed, the bias and uncertainties of the codes and cross sections that are used must be determined. The most common sources of uncertainties, in general, are the calculational methodologies and the uncertainties related to the nuclear data, such as the microscopic cross sections, entering into the calculational procedure. The aim here is to focus on the evaluated nuclear data pertaining to applications in nuclear criticality safety.

Leal, L.C.; Jordan, W.C.; Wright, R.Q.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CHSP: Material Safety Data Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYGIENE HYGIENE AND SAFETY PLAN CHSP SITE MAP WHO TO CALL MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES arrow image CHEMICAL PROCUREMENT, TRANSPORTATION AND INVENTORY arrow image CHEMICAL HAZARD: DEFINITION arrow image CHEMICAL HAZARD ASSESSMENTS arrow image HAZARD CONTROLS arrow image TRAINING AND HAZARD INFORMATION arrow image EXPOSURE MONITORING & MEDICAL CONSULTATION arrow image APPENDICES arrow image FAQs QUESTIONS Search the CHSP: > Go spacer image EH&S Home PUB 3000 LBNL Home LBNL A-Z Index LBNL Search LBNL Phone Book Privacy & Security Notice spacer spacer image spacer image Material Safety Data Sheets and Chemical Information Resources A Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is a manufacturer/importer's informational document of a hazardous chemical that describes its physical and chemical properties, hazards, and recommended precautions for handling, storage and disposal. How to Read an MSDS

62

Nuclear Power - Operation, Safety and Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today's nuclear reactors are safe and highly efficient energy systems that offer electricity and a multitude of co-generation energy products ranging from potable water to heat for industrial applications. At the same time, catastrophic earthquake and tsunami events in Japan resulted in the nuclear accident that forced us to rethink our approach to nuclear safety, design requirements and facilitated growing interests in advanced nuclear energy systems, next generation nuclear reactors, which are inherently capable to withstand natural disasters and avoid catastrophic consequences without any environmental impact. This book is one in a series of books on nuclear power published by InTech. Under the single-volume cover, we put together such topics as operation, safety, environment and radiation effects. The book is not offering a comprehensive coverage of the material in each area. Instead, selected themes are highlighted by authors of individual chapters representing contemporary interests worldwide. With all diversity of topics in 16 chapters, the integrated system analysis approach of nuclear power operation, safety and environment is the common thread. The goal of the book is to bring nuclear power to our readers as one of the promising energy sources that has a unique potential to meet energy demands with minimized environmental impact, near-zero carbon footprint, and competitive economics via robust potential applications. The book targets everyone as its potential readership groups - students, researchers and practitioners - who are interested to learn about nuclear power.

Tsvetkov, Pavel

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs: Nuclear Facility Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety (HS-30) Safety (HS-30) Office of Nuclear Safety Home » Directives » Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Rules » Nuclear Safety Workshops Technical Standards Program » Search » Approved Standards » Recently Approved » RevCom for TSP » Monthly Status Reports » Archive » Feedback DOE Nuclear Safety Research & Development Program Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design (HS-31) Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design - About Us » Nuclear Policy Technical Positions/Interpretations » Risk Assessment Working Group » Criticality Safety » DOE O 420.1C Facility Safety » Beyond Design Basis Events Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs (HS-32) Office of Nuclear Facility Safety Programs - About Us » Facility Representative Program

64

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are the requirements? What are the requirements? Safety Record Radioactive material has been shipped in the U. S. for more than 50 years with no occurrences of death or serious injury from exposure of the contents of these shipments. Hazardous Material Shipments for 1 Year Internationally 300 million United States 3 million DOE <1% or 5,000 (out of 3 million) [U.S. DOE NTP, 1999, Transporting Radioactive Materials] All radioactive shipments are regulated by the Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Since transport accidents cannot be prevented, the regulations are primarily designed to: Insure safety in routine handling situations for minimally hazardous material Insure integrity under all circumstances for highly dangerous materials

65

Nuclear Material Management Abstract  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nevada Test Site (NTS) has transitioned from its historical and critical role of weapons testing to another critical role for the nation. This new role focuses on being a integral element in solving the multiple challenges facing the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) with nuclear material management. NTS is positioned to be a solution for other NNSA sites challenged with safe nuclear materials storage and disposition. NNSA, with site involvement, is currently transforming the nuclear stockpile and supporting infrastructure to meet the 2030 vision. Efforts are under way to consolidate and modernize the production complex . With respect to the nuclear material stockpile, the NNSA sites are currently reducing the complex nuclear material inventory through disposition and consolidation. This includes moving material from other sites to NTS. State of the art nuclear material management and control practices at NTS are essential for NTS to ensure that assigned activities are accomplished in a safe, secure, efficient, and environmentally responsible manner. NTS activities and challenges will be addressed.

Jesse C. Schreiber

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

66

New Beryllium Reference Material for Occupational Safety ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The US National Nuclear Security Administration sponsored the development of ... Mich.; and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

67

Related Resources - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

68

Publications: Other Resources - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

69

Publications 2005 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

70

Publications 2003 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

71

Contacts - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

72

Publications 2001 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

73

Publications 2004 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

74

Publications 2009 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

75

Nuclear Systems Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

76

Publications 2011 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

77

Nuclear safety guide TID-7016 Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The present revision of TID-7016 Nuclear Safety Guide is discussed. This Guide differs significantly from its predecessor in that the latter was intentionally conservative in its recommendations. Firmly based on experimental evidence of criticality, the original Guide and the first revision were considered to be of most value to organizations whose activities with fissionable materials were not extensive and, secondarily, that it would serve as a point of departure for members of established nuclear safety teams, experienced in the field. The reader will find a significant change in the character of information presented in this version. Nuclear Criticality Safety has matured in the past twelve years. The advance of calculational capability has permitted validated calculations to extend and substitute for experimental data. The broadened data base has enabled better interpolation, extension, and understanding of available, information, especially in areas previously addressed by undefined but adequate factors of safety. The content has been thereby enriched in qualitative guidance. The information inherently contains, and the user can recapture, the quantitative guidance characteristic of the former Guides by employing appropriate safety factors. In fact, it becomes incumbent on the Criticality Safety Specialist to necessarily impose safety factors consistent with the possible normal and abnormal credible contingencies of an operation as revealed by his evaluation. In its present form the Guide easily becomes a suitable module in any compendium or handbook tailored for internal use by organizations. It is hoped the Guide will continue to serve immediate needs and will encourage continuing and more comprehensive efforts toward organizing nuclear criticality safety information.

Thomas, J.T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record USERS OF PACKAGINGS CARRIER PACKAGE TYPE Hospitals and their suppliers common carrier Type A Industrial radiography companies private carrier Type B Soil testing laboratories private carrier Type B Food irradiators contract carrier Type B Medical supply sterilizers contract carrier Type B Academic research institutes common & contract carrier all types Nuclear energy fuel cycle facilities common & contract carrier all types Nuclear weapons complex contract & government carrier all types An agency or company that wants to ship RAM (shipper) often makes arrangements with a common or contract carrier or (where appropriate) a private carrier may transport the material. Packagings may be procured or

79

Nuclear data for criticality safety  

SciTech Connect

A brief overview is presented on emerging requirements for new criticality safety analyses arising from applications involving nuclear waste management, facility remediation, and the storage of nuclear weapons components. A derivation of criticality analyses from the specifications of national consensus standards is given. These analyses, both static and dynamic, define the needs for nuclear data. Integral data, used primarily for analytical validation, and differential data, used in performing the analyses, are listed, along with desirable margins of uncertainty. Examples are given of needs for additional data to address systems having intermediate neutron energy spectra and/or containing nuclides of intermediate mass number.

Westfall, R.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

data and reports on accountable nuclear material to NMMSS and Nuclear Materials Inventory Assessments.", to "The accounting system provides data for reporting on accountable...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Nuclear safety research collaborations between the U.S. and Russian Federation International Nuclear Safety Centers  

SciTech Connect

The Russian Federation Ministry for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and the US Department of Energy (USDOE) have formed International Nuclear Safety Centers to collaborate on nuclear safety research. USDOE established the US Center (ISINSC) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in October 1995. MINATOM established the Russian Center (RINSC) at the Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (RDIPE) in Moscow in July 1996. In April 1998 the Russian center became a semi-independent, autonomous organization under MINATOM. The goals of the center are to: Cooperate in the development of technologies associated with nuclear safety in nuclear power engineering; Be international centers for the collection of information important for safety and technical improvements in nuclear power engineering; and Maintain a base for fundamental knowledge needed to design nuclear reactors. The strategic approach is being used to accomplish these goals is for the two centers to work together to use the resources and the talents of the scientists associated with the US Center and the Russian Center to do collaborative research to improve the safety of Russian-designed nuclear reactors. The two centers started conducting joint research and development projects in January 1997. Since that time the following ten joint projects have been initiated: INSC databases--web server and computing center; Coupled codes--Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic; Severe accident management for Soviet-designed reactors; Transient management and advanced control; Survey of relevant nuclear safety research facilities in the Russian Federation; Computer code validation for transient analysis of VVER and RBMK reactors; Advanced structural analysis; Development of a nuclear safety research and development plan for MINATOM; Properties and applications of heavy liquid metal coolants; and Material properties measurement and assessment. Currently, there is activity in eight of these projects. Details on each of these joint projects are given.

Hill, D. J.; Braun, J. C.; Klickman, A. E.; Bougaenko, S. E.; Kabonov, L. P.; Kraev, A. G.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

82

Hazardous Material Transportation Safety (South Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation authorizes the Division of Highway Safety, in the Department of Public Safety, to promulgate regulations pertaining to the safe transportation of hazardous materials by a motor...

83

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Rail Routing Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Presentation made by Kevin Blackwell for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16,...

84

2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Safety » 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Nuclear Safety » 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Glenn Podonsky 1 of 13 Glenn Podonsky Glenn Podonsky (DOE Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer) provides his welcoming remarks. Daniel Poneman 2 of 13 Daniel Poneman DOE Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman discusses maintaining our focus on nuclear safety. Akira Kawano 3 of 13 Akira Kawano Akira Kawano, Tokyo Electric Power Company, provides lessons learned from the Fukushima nuclear accident. Bill Ostendorff 4 of 13 Bill Ostendorff NRC Commissioner Bill Ostendorff gives his perspective on the NRC's response to the Fukushima nuclear accident. Miroslav Lipar 5 of 13 Miroslav Lipar Miroslav Lipar, IAEA, provides an international perspective on the Fukushima nuclear accident. Dr. Sonja Haber 6 of 13

85

Safety Related Applications (Sensors and Instrumentation and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

86

Materials Challenges in Nuclear Energy  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power currently provides about 13% of the worldwide electrical power, and has emerged as a reliable baseload source of electricity. A number of materials challenges must be successfully resolved for nuclear energy to continue to make further improvements in reliability, safety and economics. The operating environment for materials in current and proposed future nuclear energy systems is summarized, along with a description of materials used for the main operating components. Materials challenges associated with power uprates and extensions of the operating lifetimes of reactors are described. The three major materials challenges for the current and next generation of water-cooled fission reactors are centered on two structural materials aging degradation issues (corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials and neutron-induced embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels), along with improved fuel system reliability and accident tolerance issues. The major corrosion and stress corrosion cracking degradation mechanisms for light water reactors are reviewed. The materials degradation issues for the Zr alloy clad UO2 fuel system currently utilized in the majority of commercial nuclear power plants is discussed for normal and off-normal operating conditions. Looking to proposed future (Generation IV) fission and fusion energy systems, there are 5 key bulk radiation degradation effects (low temperature radiation hardening and embrittlement, radiation-induced and modified solute segregation and phase stability, irradiation creep, void swelling, and high temperature helium embrittlement) and a multitude of corrosion and stress corrosion cracking effects (including irradiation-assisted phenomena) that can have a major impact on the performance of structural materials.

Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL; Was, Gary [University of Michigan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reporting » Analytical Dashboards » Nuclear Safety Reporting » Analytical Dashboards » Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard The Nuclear Safety Information (NSI) Dashboard provides a new user interface to the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) to easily identify, organize, and analyze nuclear safety-related events reported into ORPS. The NSI Dashboard displays information developed from occurrence information reported into DOE's ORPS database. Events or conditions associated with nuclear safety are reported into ORPS, assigned unique ORPS reporting criteria and used for trending. ORPS reporting criteria are assigned a weighted value to indicate their relative importance to nuclear safety; associated ORPS reporting criteria are combined in key groups and charted over time to index trends in nuclear

88

Environmental safety evaluations for nuclear installations  

SciTech Connect

Environmental safety has been an important consideration in the siting, design, and operation of nuclear installations. As a result there have been very few cases in which the releases of radioactive materials from these installations have posed a dosimetrically significant environmental risk, and almost all of these have been connected with accidents or other unintentional situations. In no situation do the intentional releases from nuclear installations appear to have posed significant environmental risks, and with adequate planning and design a high degree of environmental safety may be assured. Many disciplines are involved in the evaluation of safety for nuclear installations. These include such fundamental ones as physics, chemistry, and biology, and more specialized ones such as meteorology, engineering, ecology, medicine, and electronics. A comprehensive review of environmental surveillance data and estimates of dose commitments from nuclear installations suggests that compared to the doses from background and from fallout, those attributable to the effluents from nuclear facilities have been small and for the most part quite local. it is concluded that, the upper limit of the risk associated with exposure of up to a few millirems per year is indeed small compared to many other commonly accepted risks of living in present day society. (72 refurences) (CH)

Hull, A.P.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The Office of Nuclear Energy Announces Central Europe Nuclear Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Office of Nuclear Energy Announces Central Europe Nuclear The Office of Nuclear Energy Announces Central Europe Nuclear Safety Workshop in Prague The Office of Nuclear Energy Announces Central Europe Nuclear Safety Workshop in Prague October 3, 2011 - 2:04pm Addthis The Office of Nuclear Energy, in partnership with Czech Republic Ministry of Industry and Trade, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the State Agency for Nuclear Safety of the Czech Republic, and Argonne National Laboratory, is conducting a regional Nuclear Safety Workshop on Trends in Nuclear Power Plant Safety for Robust Civil Nuclear Programs on Oct. 10-13, 2011 in Prague. U.S. Ambassador Norman Eisen and Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Dr. Pete Lyons will deliver speeches welcoming participants. Representatives from the Czech Republic, Bulgaria, Lithuania,

90

NUCLEAR FUEL MATERIAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method is given for making the carbides of nuclear fuel material. The metal of the fuel material, which may be a fissile and/or fertile material, is transformed into a silicide, after which the silicide is comminuted to the desired particle size. This silicide is then carburized at an elevated temperature, either above or below the melting point of the silicide, to produce an intimate mixture of the carbide of the fuel material and the carbide of silicon. This mixture of the fuel material carbide and the silicon carbide is relatively stable in the presence of moisture and does not exhibit the highly reactive surface condition which is observed with fuel material carbides made by most other known methods. (AEC)

Goeddel, W.V.

1962-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

91

Safety of Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Full text of publication follows: ensuring safety during all stages of facility life cycle is a widely recognised responsibility of the operators, implemented under the supervision of the regulatory body and other competent authorities. As the majority of the facilities worldwide are still in operation or shutdown, there is no substantial experience in decommissioning and evaluation of safety during decommissioning in majority of Member States. The need for cooperation and exchange of experience and good practices on ensuring and evaluating safety of decommissioning was one of the outcomes of the Berlin conference in 2002. On this basis during the last three years IAEA initiated a number of international projects that can assist countries, in particular small countries with limited resources. The main IAEA international projects addressing safety during decommissioning are: (i) DeSa Project on Evaluation and Demonstration of Safety during Decommissioning; (ii) R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P project on Research Reactors Decommissioning Demonstration Project; and (iii) Project on Evaluation and Decommissioning of Former Facilities that used Radioactive Material in Iraq. This paper focuses on the DeSa Project activities on (i) development of a harmonised methodology for safety assessment for decommissioning; (ii) development of a procedure for review of safety assessments; (iii) development of recommendations on application of the graded approach to the performance and review of safety assessments; and (iv) application of the methodology and procedure to the selected real facilities with different complexities and hazard potentials (a nuclear power plant, a research reactor and a nuclear laboratory). The paper also outlines the DeSa Project outcomes and planned follow-up activities. It also summarises the main objectives and activities of the Iraq Project and introduces the R{sup 2}D{sup 2} Project, which is a subject of a complementary paper.

Batandjieva, B.; Warnecke, E.; Coates, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Development of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Web Site for the Nuclear Criticality Safety Professional  

SciTech Connect

Development of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) web site is the result of the efforts of marry members of the Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) community and is maintained by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under the direction of the NCSP Management Team. This World Wide Web (WWW) resource was developed as part of the DOE response to the DNFSB Recommendation 97-2, which reflected the need to make criticality safety information available to a wide audience. The NCSP web site provides information of interest to NCS professionals and includes links to other sites actively involved in the collection and dissemination of criticality safety information. To the extent possible, the hyperlinks on this web site direct the user to the original source of the referenced material in order to ensure access to the latest, most accurate version.

Lee, C.K.; Huang, S.; Morman, J.A.; Garcia, A.S.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How are they moved? What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record Packagings are used to safely transport radioactive materials across the United States in over 1.6 million shipments per year. [Weiner et. al., 1991, Risk Analysis, Vol. 11, No. 4, p. 663] Most shipments are destined for hospitals and medical facilities. Other destinations include industrial, research and manufacturing plants, nuclear power plants and national defense facilities. The last comprehensive survey showed that less than 1 percent of these shipments involve high-level radioactive material. [Javitz et. al., 1985, SAND84-7174, Tables 4 and 8] The types of materials transported include: Surface Contaminated Object (SCO) Low Specific Activity (LSA) materials, Low-Level Waste (LLW),

94

NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS 161-180 - Nuclear Data...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

95

Nuclear criticality safety: 2-day training course  

SciTech Connect

This compilation of notes is presented as a source reference for the criticality safety course. At the completion of this training course, the attendee will: be able to define terms commonly used in nuclear criticality safety; be able to appreciate the fundamentals of nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify factors which affect nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify examples of criticality controls as used as Los Alamos; be able to identify examples of circumstances present during criticality accidents; have participated in conducting two critical experiments; be asked to complete a critique of the nuclear criticality safety training course.

Schlesser, J.A. [ed.] [comp.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Organization - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

97

Achievements: Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

98

Special Topics: Nuclear Materials: Videos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Living Textbook of Nuclear Chemistry, ACS. ... Webcast on response of structural materials in nuclear power systems to irradiation, 0, 761, Cathy Rohrer  ...

99

Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement - The Operator Viewpoints Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement - The Operator Viewpoints September 19, 2012 Presenter: Akira Kawano, General Manager, Nuclear International Relations and Strategy Group, Nuclear Power and Plant Siting Administrative Department, Tokyo Electric Power Company Topics Covered: How Tsunami Struck Fukushima Sites Tsunami Height Estimation How we responded in the Recovery Process Safety Improvement and Further Enhancement of Nuclear Safety Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement - The Operator Viewpoints More Documents & Publications January2005 NNSANews Meeting Materials: June 15, 2011

100

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials for Nuclear Power ... Nuclear Power Background, Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

NUCLEAR MATERIAL PACKAGING MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The enclosed copy ofdraft DOE Manual M44I.I, Nuclear Material Packaging Manual, is forwarded for your review and comment. This satisfies commitment 5.1-3 in Appendix o ofthe implementation plan (IP) for recommendation 2005-1, Nuclear Material Packaging. The next milestone in Section 5.1 ofthe 2005-1 IP is forwarding the manual to the DOE 2005-1 Technical Review Board (TRB) by April 30, 2006 to begin the final TRB review. Therefore, your comments are requested by April 21, 2006, in order to allow one week for resolution and updating the manual before it is sent to the TRB. Please contact me at 301-903-4407 ifyou have any questions. t

The Honorable; A. J. Eggenberger; M. Whitaker Dr-i

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Western University Nuclear Radiation Safety Inspection Checklist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with unsealed nuclear substances. Print out of wipe test kept in the logbook . For safety work practices, rightMay 2012 Western University Nuclear Radiation Safety Inspection Checklist Permit Holder to nuclear substances or radiation devices is restricted to authorized radiation users listed on the permit

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

103

Integrated Computational Modeling of Materials for Nuclear Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel and primary cooling system structural components are exposed to elevated ... models for safety and performance evaluation of nuclear reactors but also for the ... Continuum Theory of Defects and Materials Response to Irradiation

104

Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis > Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Overview Current Projects Software Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Bookmark and Share Activities in Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety research and development fulfill a primary goal of the Nuclear Engineering (NE) Division to promote improvements in safe and reliable operation of present and future

105

Work for NASA, Safety Related Applications (Sensors and Instrumentatio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

106

FAQS Reference Guide – Nuclear Safety Specialist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the November 2007 edition of DOE-STD-1183-2007, Nuclear Safety Specialist Functional Area Qualification Standard.

107

Nuclear Safety Technical Positions/Interpretations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(OPI) responsible for the development, interpretation, and revision of a number of DOE directives. Technical Positions to directives issued by Nuclear and Facility Safety...

108

Facility Representative Program: Nuclear Safety Basis Fundamentals...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Qualification Information Qualification Standards DOE Order Self-Study Modules DOE Fundamentals Handbooks Nuclear Safety Basis Self-Study Guide Energy Online Courses Available...

109

NUCLEAR SAFETY SPECIALIST QUALIFICATION STANDARD REFERENCE GUIDE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Nuclear Safety Specialist Qualification Standard Reference Guide AUGUST 2008 This page is intentionally blank. i Table of Contents LIST OF FIGURES ..................................................................................................................... iv LIST OF TABLES ........................................................................................................................ v ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................ vi PURPOSE...................................................................................................................................... 1 SCOPE ...........................................................................................................................................

110

Interim Management of Nuclear Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1995/01_eis0220_for.html[6/27/2011 12:53:53 PM] 1995/01_eis0220_for.html[6/27/2011 12:53:53 PM] FOREWORD The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a major Department of Energy (DOE) installation. The past mission of the SRS was to produce nuclear materials that supported the defense, research, and medical programs of the United States. In 1992 the Secretary of Energy directed the SRS to phase out defense-related chemical separations activities. As a result of shutdowns and reduced demand for nuclear materials, the SRS presently has a large inventory of in-process solutions, reactor fuel assemblies, and reactor targets. These materials, due to their form or to the condition in which they are maintained, could represent a concern for the public, worker health and safety, and the environment. DOE published a Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare this environmental impact statement (EIS) on March 17, 1994 (59

111

Interim Management of Nuclear Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1995/01_eis0220_for.html[6/27/2011 12:53:53 PM] 1995/01_eis0220_for.html[6/27/2011 12:53:53 PM] FOREWORD The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a major Department of Energy (DOE) installation. The past mission of the SRS was to produce nuclear materials that supported the defense, research, and medical programs of the United States. In 1992 the Secretary of Energy directed the SRS to phase out defense-related chemical separations activities. As a result of shutdowns and reduced demand for nuclear materials, the SRS presently has a large inventory of in-process solutions, reactor fuel assemblies, and reactor targets. These materials, due to their form or to the condition in which they are maintained, could represent a concern for the public, worker health and safety, and the environment. DOE published a Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare this environmental impact statement (EIS) on March 17, 1994 (59

112

Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3015-2001 3015-2001 February 2001 Superseding DOE-STD-3015-97 January 1997 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY STUDY PROCESS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-3015-2001 iii CONTENTS FOREWORD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v 1. PURPOSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. SCOPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

113

A Safer Nuclear Enterprise - Application to Nuclear Explosive Safety (NES)(U)  

SciTech Connect

Activities and infrastructure that support nuclear weapons are facing significant challenges. Despite an admirable record and firm commitment to make safety a primary criterion in weapons design, production, handling, and deployment - there is growing apprehension about terrorist acquiring weapons or nuclear material. At the NES Workshop in May 2012, Scott Sagan, who is a proponent of the normal accident cycle, presented. Whether a proponent of the normal accident cycle or High Reliability Organizations - we have to be diligent about our safety record. Constant vigilance is necessary to maintain our admirable safety record and commitment to Nuclear Explosive Safety.

Morris, Tommy J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

114

Major Programs - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assistance Program International Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form...

115

Executive Bios: Christopher Grandy - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

116

Nuclear Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

117

Fuel Cycle Technologies Program - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

118

The Dawn of the Nuclear Age  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

119

Computer Facilities - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

120

Advanced Computation & Visualization - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Steam Generator Tube Integrity Facilities - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

122

The history of nuclear weapon safety devices  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents the history of safety devices used in nuclear weapons from the early days of separables to the latest advancements in MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). Although the paper focuses on devices, the principles of Enhanced Nuclear Detonation Safety implementation will also be presented.

Plummer, D.W.; Greenwood, W.H.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William [Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, 625 Indiana Ave., NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20004-2901 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Y-12 PLANT NUCLEAR SAFETY HANDBOOK  

SciTech Connect

Information needed to solve nuclear safety problems is condensed into a reference book for use by persons familiar with the field. Included are a glossary of terms; useful tables; nuclear constants; criticality calculations; basic nuclear safety limits; solution geometries and critical values; metal critical values; criticality values for intermediate, heterogeneous, and interacting systems; miscellaneous and related information; and report number, author, and subject indexes. (C.H.)

Wachter, J.W. ed.; Bailey, M.L.; Cagle, T.J.; Mee, W.T.; Pletz, R.H.; Welfare, F.G.; Youngblood, B.J. comps

1963-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

125

NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS 61-80 - Nuclear Data Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

126

NUCLEAR DATA AND MEASUREMENTS REPORTS 81-100 - Nuclear Data Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

127

SRS - Programs - Nuclear Materials Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

built in the mid-1950s, housed various Special Nuclear Materials missions including plutonium storage, shipping and handling; billet production for reactor target fabrication...

128

WEB RESOURCE: Nuclear Materials Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Mechanical properties data for stainless steels and superalloys; mechanical properties data for nuclear materials as a database for research ...

129

WSRC Nuclear Materials Cost Module  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Office (GAO) WSRC NM Cost Module Generates WSRC monthly and fiscal year to date Inventory and Manufacturing Statement for government owned accountable nuclear materials....

130

Independent Oversight Assessment of the Nuclear Safety Culture...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Security HSS Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization...

131

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation examines the measurement of nuclear resonance fluorescence gamma-rays as a technique to non-destructively determine isotopic compositions of target materials that are of interest… (more)

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

WEB RESOURCE: Nuclear Materials and Nuclear Fuel/Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials for Nuclear ... Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Nuclear Science ...

133

WEB RESOURCE: Transport Properties (Nuclear Materials)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials for Nuclear ... Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Nuclear Science ...

134

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of radioactive material are determined by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Department of Transportation (DOT), Department of Energy (DOE), and U.S. Postal...

135

Nuclear Safety Workshop Summary | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workshop Summary Workshop Summary Nuclear Safety Workshop Summary September 19-20, 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Summary On September 19-20, 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held a second Nuclear Safety Workshop covering the results of the Department's actions to improve its posture for analyzing and responding to severe accidents in light of lessons learned from the March 2011 nuclear accident in Japan. Sponsored by DOE and championed by Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman, the two-day workshop discussed the lessons learned in a national and international context. The workshop's theme was Post Fukushima Initiatives and Results, and included technical breakout sessions focused on beyond design basis events (BDBEs) analysis and response, safety culture, and risk assessment and management.

136

Nuclear criticality safety department training implementation  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Criticality Safety Department (NCSD) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The NCSD Qualification Program is described in Y/DD-694, Qualification Program, Nuclear Criticality Safety Department This document provides a listing of the roles and responsibilities of NCSD personnel with respect to training and details of the Training Management System (TMS) programs, Mentoring Checklists and Checksheets, as well as other documentation utilized to implement the program. This document supersedes Y/DD-696, Revision 2, dated 3/27/96, Training Implementation, Nuclear Criticality Safety Department. There are no backfit requirements associated with revisions to this document.

Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

1996-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

137

Executive Bios: Dr. Robert N. Hill - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

138

Related Sites, Experimental Resources for Nuclear Data Studies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

139

Executive Bios: Dr. David C. Wade - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

140

ANS President interviewed at the Argonne Booth during the Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Executive Bios: Jerome L. Gaston - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

142

Executive Bios: A. C. (Paul) Raptis - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

143

Executive Bios: Dr. Hussein S. Khalil - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

144

Argonne's role in DOE/NNSA International Nuclear Safeguards and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

145

Argonne staff members elected to American Nuclear Society governance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

146

Executive Bios: Dr. Temitope Taiwo - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

147

Sloshing response of module-type worm tank - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

148

Executive Bios: Dr. Thomas F. Ewing - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

149

Waste Form Performance Modeling [Nuclear Waste Management using...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

150

Executive Bios: Dr. John G. Stevens - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

151

Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) in the News - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

152

Executive Bios: Dr. Pete Heine - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

153

Executive Bios: Dr. Tanju Sofu - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

154

Executive Bios: Dr. Ken Natesan - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

155

Unit Process Modeling [Nuclear Waste Management using Electrometallurg...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

156

Nuclear data needs for application in nuclear criticality safety programs  

SciTech Connect

In nuclear criticality safety applications, a number of important uncertainties have to be addressed to establish the required criticality safety margin of a nuclear system. One source of these uncertainties is the basic nuclear data used to calculate the effective multiplication factor of the system. Before criticality safety calculations are performed, the bias and uncertainties of the codes and cross sections that are used must be determined. Cross-section data are measured, evaluated, and tested prior to their inclusion in nuclear data libraries. Traditionally, nuclear data evaluations are performed to support the analysis and design of thermal and fast reactors. The neutron spectra characteristic of the thermal and fast systems used for data testing are predominantly in the low- and high-energy ranges, with a relatively minor influence from the intermediate-energy range. In the area of nuclear criticality safety, nuclear systems involving spent fuel elements from reactors can lead to situations very different from those most commonly found in reactor analysis and design. These systems are not limited to thermal or fast neutron spectra and may have their most significant influence from the intermediate energy range. This requires extending the range of applicability of the nuclear data evaluation beyond thermal and fast systems. The aim here is to focus on the evaluated nuclear data pertaining to applications in nuclear criticality safety.

Leal, L.C.; Westfall, R.M.; Jordan, W.C.; Wright, R.Q. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computational Physics and Engineering Div.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Nuclear Safety Enforcement Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14, 2002 14, 2002 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Fluor Hanford, Incorporated - EA-2002-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Fluor Hanford, Incorporated, related to Quality Assurance issues at the Hanford Site. June 19, 2002 Enforcement Letter, Kaiser-Hill Company, L.L.C. - June 19, 2002 Enforcement Letter issued to Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC related to Unplanned Radioactive Material Uptakes at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site October 22, 2001 Special Report Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - October 22, 2001 Special Report Order issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Multiple Nuclear Safety Issues at the Hanford Site October 9, 2001 Enforcement Letter, LANL - October 9, 2001 Enforcement Letter issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory related to

158

Sharing of Nuclear Safety Information through Distributed Database Systems  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses the sharing of nuclear safety information through distributed database systems.

Ley, H.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

159

Material Safety Data Sheet Isopropyl  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Safety Data Sheet Isopropyl alcohol MSDS Section 1: Chemical Product and Company Identification Product Name: Isopropyl alcohol Catalog Codes: SLI1153, SLI1579, SLI1906, SLI1246, SLI1432 CAS#: 67-63-0 RTECS: NT8050000 TSCA: TSCA 8(b) inventory: Isopropyl alcohol CI#: Not available. Synonym: 2-Propanol Chemical Name: isopropanol Chemical Formula: C3-H8-O Contact Information: Sciencelab.com, Inc. 14025 Smith Rd. Houston, Texas 77396 US Sales: 1-800-901-7247 International Sales: 1-281-441-4400 Order Online: ScienceLab.com CHEMTREC (24HR Emergency Telephone), call: 1-800-424-9300 International CHEMTREC, call: 1-703-527-3887 For non-emergency assistance, call: 1-281-441-4400 Section 2: Composition and Information on Ingredients Composition: Name CAS # % by Weight Isopropyl alcohol 67-63-0 100 Toxicological Data on Ingredients: Isopropyl alcohol: ORAL

160

FAQS Qualification Card - Nuclear Safety Specialist | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Safety Specialist Nuclear Safety Specialist FAQS Qualification Card - Nuclear Safety Specialist A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-NuclearSafetySpecialist-2007.docx Description Nuclear Safety Specialist Qualification Card - 2007 FAQC-NuclearSafetySpecialist-2004.docx

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Special Topics: Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

COURSE NOTES: Nuclear Science and Technology Part I/II (Chm466/566/ Phy446/546) W. Udo Schröder, University of Rochester. PPT, PDF, and audio lectures ...

162

Aerospace nuclear safety: An introduction and historical overview  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an introduction and overview on the topical area of aerospace nuclear safety. Emphasis is on the history of the use of nuclear power sources in space, operational experience with these nuclear sources, a review of previous accidents associated with both U.S. and Russian launches, and the safety issues associated with the entire life cycle of space reactors. There are several potential missions to include near earth orbit, orbit-raising, lunar bases, and propulsion to such solar system locations as Mars, which are suitable for the use of space reactors. The process by which approval is obtained to launch these nuclear materials to space is also presented as well as the role of nuclear safety policy and requirements in a space program using nuclear power sources. Important differences in safety concerns for the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) now used, and space reactors are presented. The role and purpose of independent safety evaluation and assessment in ensuring safe launch and operation is also discussed. In summary, this paper provides the requisite framework in this topical area for the remaining papers of this session.

Lee, J.H.; Buden, D.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Nuclear Safety Enforcement Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enforcement » Nuclear Safety Enforcement Documents Enforcement » Nuclear Safety Enforcement Documents Nuclear Safety Enforcement Documents Documents Available for Download July 22, 2013 Enforcement Letter, NEL-2013-03 Issued to Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC related to Programmatic Deficiencies in the Software Quality Assurance Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory February 12, 2013 Enforcement Letter, NEL-2013-02 Issued to Los Alamos National Security, LLC related to a Radiological Contamination Event at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory January 7, 2013 Enforcement Letter, NEL-2013-01 Issued to B&W Pantex, LLC related to the Conduct of Nuclear Explosive Operations at the Pantex Plant October 23, 2012 Enforcement Letter, Controlled Power Company - WEL-2012-02

164

Office of Nuclear Safety Enforcement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Logo Department of Energy Seal Left Tab SEARCH Right Tab TOOLS Right Tab Left Tab HOME Right Tab Left Tab ABOUT US Right Tab Left Tab...

165

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

screening of cargo for nuclear weapons materials [2],[3].peaceful nuclear activities are not diverted to weapons

Quiter, Brian J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

167

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Fusion reactor breeder material safety compatibility studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium breeder material selection for fusion reactors is strongly influenced by the desire to minimize safety and environmental concerns. Breeder material safety compatibility studies are being conducted to identify and characterize breeder-coolant-material interactions under postulated reactor accident conditions. Recently completed scoping compatibility tests indicate the following. 1. Ternary oxides (LiAlO/sub 2/, Li/sub 2/ZrO/sub 3/, Li/sub 2/SiO/sub 3/, Li/sub 4/SiO/sub 4/, and LiTiO/sub 3/) at postulated blanket operating temperatures are chemically compatible with water coolant, while liquid lithium and Li/sub 7/Pb/sub 2/ reactions with water generate heat, aerosol, and hydrogen. 2. Lithium oxide and 17Li-83Pb alloy react mildly with water requiring special precautions to control hydrogen release. 3. Liquid lithium reacts substantially, while 17Li83Pb alloy reacts mildly with concrete to produce hydrogen. 4. Liquid lithium-air reactions may present some major safety concerns. Additional scoping tests are needed, but the ternary oxides, lithium oxide, and 17Li-83Pb have definite safety advantages over liquid lithium and Li/sub 7/Pb/sub 2/. The ternary oxides present minimal safetyrelated problems when used with water as coolant, air or concrete; but they do require neutron multipliers, which may have safety compatibility concerns with surrounding materials. The combined favorable neutronics and minor safety compatibility concerns of lithium oxide and 17Li-83Pb make them prime candidates as breeder materials. Current safety efforts are directed toward assessing the compatibility of lithium oxide and the lithium-lead alloy with coolants and other materials.

Jeppson, D.W.; Cohen, S.; Muhlestein, L.D.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

clandestine material with nuclear resonance fluorescence”.E. Norman, UC Berkeley Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, privatepp. 349. G. Warren et al. “Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence of

Quiter, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Feb 1, 2011 The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), which has unique expertise in nuclear weapons and nuclear material, plays a key role in the...

171

Web-based nuclear criticality safety bibliographic database  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has prepared a Nuclear Criticality Safety Bibliographic Database that is now available via the Internet. This database is a component of the U.S. DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) Web site. This WWW resource was developed as part of the DOE response to the DNFSB Recommendation 97-2, which reflected the need to make criticality safety information available to a wide audience. To the extent possible, the hyperlinks on the Web pages direct the user to original source of the reference material in order to ensure accuracy and access to the latest versions. A master index is in place for simple navigation through the site. A search capability is available to assist in locating the on-line reference materials. Among the features included are: A user-friendly site map for ease of use; A personnel registry; Links to all major laboratories and organizations involved in the many aspects of criticality safety; General help for new criticality safety practitioners, including basic technical references and training modules; A discussion of computational methods; An interactive question and answer forum for the criticality safety community; and Collections of bibliographic references mdvahdation experiments. This paper will focus on the bibliographic database. This database evolved from earlier work done by the DOE's Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) maintained at LLNL during the 1980s. The bibliographic database at the time of the termination of NCIS were composed principally of three parts: (1) A critical experiment bibliography of 1067 citations (reported in UCRL-52769); (2) A compilation of criticality safety papers from Volumes 1 through 41 of the Transactions of the American Nuclear Society (reported in UCRL-53369); and (3) A general criticality bibliography of several thousand citations (unpublished). When the NCIS project was terminated the database was nearly lost but, fortunately, several years later most of the data were restored from backup tapes that had been archived by LLNL's ICNC conferences and American Nuclear Society publications, Nuclear Science and Engineering and Nuclear Technology. Since the Rocky Flats facility is heading for closure maintenance of the database was again threatened. This has now been avoided since LLNL was selected in 1999 to fulfill part of the ''Information Preservation and Dissemination'' task of the DOE's Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Five-Year Plan. This effort will ''collect, preserve and make readily available criticality safety information'' and make the information available via the Internet.

Koponen, B L; Huang, S T

2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

172

Khalil named co-director of the Center for Advanced Nuclear Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

173

Experimental Resources for Nuclear Data Studies in the U.S. ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

174

Peters and Fanning appear on NBC-5 report on Illinois nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

175

Transportation of Nuclear Materials | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation of Nuclear Materials Transportation of Nuclear Materials GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE on legal and regulatory requirements and standards for transportation of...

176

WEB RESOURCE: TMS Nuclear Materials Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 19, 2007 ... The mission of the TMS Nuclear Materials Committee encompasses the ... of nuclear energy technology and related areas of materials science ...

177

2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Presentations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Presentations 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Presentations 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Presentations Wednesday, September 19 - Plenary Session September 19, 2012 Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement - The Operator Viewpoints Presenter: Akira Kawano, General Manager, Nuclear International Relations and Strategy Group, Nuclear Power and Plant Siting Administrative Department, Tokyo Electric Power Company September 19, 2012 A Commissioner's Perspective on USNRC Actions in Response to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Presenter: Honorable William C. Ostendorff, Commissioner US Nuclear Regulatory Commission September 19, 2012 International Perspective on Fukushima Accident Presenter: Miroslav Lipár, Head, Operational Safety Section, Department of

178

FAQS Qualification Card - Nuclear Explosive Safety Study | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Nuclear Explosive Safety Study FAQS Qualification Card - Nuclear Explosive Safety Study A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-NuclearExplosiveSafetyStudy.docx Description Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Qualification Card More Documents & Publications

179

Nuclear safety surveillance and control of National Nuclear Safety Administration of PRC during commissioning and operation of nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the method of nuclear safety surveillance and control of National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) of PRC during commissioning and operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs) and the practice for Qinshan NPP and for Guangdong Daya Bay NPP (GNPS). The results of the practice show that the surveillance models set up for Qinshan NPP and for GNPS commissioning were effective and the surveillance has played an important role for ensuring the quality and safety of the commissioning testing and consequently the nuclear safety of these two plants.

Feng, W.; Zhang, C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project May 2011 November 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Microsoft Word - Nuclear Safety Reporting Criteria.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of other TSROSR requirement (3) Violation of DSA hazard control B. Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) Inadequacies (1) Positive unreviewed safety question C. Nuclear Criticality...

182

Defense Nuclear Facilitiets Safety Board Visit and Site Lead...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Visit and Site Lead Planning Activities at the Los Alamos...

183

Nuclear Materials Disposition | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Materials Disposition Nuclear Materials Disposition Nuclear Materials Disposition Nuclear Materials Disposition In fulfilling its mission, EM frequently manages and completes disposition of surplus nuclear materials and spent nuclear fuel. These are not waste. They are nuclear materials no longer needed for national security or other purposes, including spent nuclear fuel, special nuclear materials (as defined by the Atomic Energy Act) and other Nuclear Materials. Spent Nuclear Fuel Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is fuel that has been withdrawn from a nuclear reactor following irradiation, the constituent elements of which have not been separated by reprocessing. SNF may include: (1) intact, non-defective fuel assemblies or fuel rods; (2) failed fuel assemblies or fuel rods; (3) segments of fuel rods or pieces of fuel derived from spent fuel rods; and

184

Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear reactors present a complex, challenging environment where innovations in materials ... Materials design for fast burner reactors and fusion research

185

June 2010, Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance Nuclear Safety, Quality Assurance and Environment Information Notice June 2010 1 BACKGROUND & PURPOSE: On August 12, 2009, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 2009-1, Risk Assessment Methodologies at Defense Nuclear Facilities. This recommendation focused on the need for clear direction on use of quantitative risk assessments in nuclear safety applications at defense nuclear facilities. The Department of Energy (DOE) is presently analyzing directives, standards, training, and other tools that may support more effective development and use of

186

Nuclear Safeguards Infrastructure Development and Integration with Safety and Security  

SciTech Connect

Faced with increasing global energy demands, many developing countries are considering building their first nuclear power plant. As a country embarks upon or expands its nuclear power program, it should consider how it will address the 19 issues laid out in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) document Milestones in Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power. One of those issues specifically addresses the international nonproliferation treaties and commitments and the implementation of safeguards to prevent diversion of nuclear material from peaceful purposes to nuclear weapons. Given the many legislative, economic, financial, environmental, operational, and other considerations preoccupying their planners, it is often difficult for countries to focus on developing the core strengths needed for effective safeguards implementation. Typically, these countries either have no nuclear experience or it is limited to the operation of research reactors used for radioisotope development and scientific research. As a result, their capacity to apply safeguards and manage fuel operations for a nuclear power program is limited. This paper argues that to address the safeguards issue effectively, a holistic approach must be taken to integrate safeguards with the other IAEA issues including safety and security - sometimes referred to as the '3S' concept. Taking a holistic approach means that a country must consider safeguards within the context of its entire nuclear power program, including operations best practices, safety, and security as well as integration with its larger nonproliferation commitments. The Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration's International Nuclear Safeguards and Engagement Program (INSEP) has been involved in bilateral technical cooperation programs for over 20 years to promote nonproliferation and the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. INSEP is currently spearheading efforts to promote the development of nuclear safeguards infrastructure in countries with credible plans for nuclear energy as part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative. Developing an adequate safeguards infrastructure is critical to becoming a responsible 'owner' of nuclear power. The 3S concept is the optimal path forward to achieving this goal.

Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL; Raffo-Caiado, Ana Claudia [ORNL; McClelland-Kerr, John [U.S. Department of Energy; Van sickle, Matthew [U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration; Bissani, Mo [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Safety at the Center for Nanoscale Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

case of emergency or if you need help or assistance case of emergency or if you need help or assistance dial Argonne's Protective Force: 911 (from Argonne phones) or (630) 252-1911 (from cell phones) Safety at Work As a staff member or user at the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), you need to be aware of safety regulations at Argonne National Laboratory. You are also required to have taken any safety, orientation, and training classes or courses specified by your User Work Authorization(s) and/or work planning and control documents prior to beginning your work. For safety and security reasons, it is necessary to know of all facility users present in the CNM (Buildings 440 and 441). Users are required to sign in and out in the visitors logbook located in Room A119. Some detailed emergency information is provided on the Argonne National

188

Siting of nuclear facilities. Selections from Nuclear Safety  

SciTech Connect

The report presented siting policy and practice for nuclear power plants as developed in the U.S. and abroad. Twenty-two articles from Nuclear Safety on this general topic are reprinted since they provide a valuable reference source. The appendices also include reprints of some relevant regulatory rules and guides on siting. Advantages and disadvantages of novel siting concepts such as underground containment, offshore siting, and nuclear energy parks are addressed. Other topics include site criteria, risk criteria, and nuclear ship criteria.

Buchanan, J.R.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Nuclear Safety Research and Development Committee Charter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research and Development Committee Charter Research and Development Committee Charter I. Purpose The intent of the Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Committee is to identify nuclear safety research needs and opportunities within the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and their program offices. The Committee promotes communication and coordination among DOE and NNSA program offices to enhance synergy on NSR&D efforts that can benefit the Department. The Committee will foster and facilitate networking and information exchange on NSR&D needs and activities across DOE/NNSA programs and with external national and international organizations. The Committee should not be construed to have any authority to direct DOE and/or NNSA program

190

Management of National Nuclear Power Programs for assured safety  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed in this report include: nuclear utility organization; before the Florida Public Service Commission in re: St. Lucie Unit No. 2 cost recovery; nuclear reliability improvement and safety operations; nuclear utility management; training of nuclear facility personnel; US experience in key areas of nuclear safety; the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission - function and process; regulatory considerations of the risk of nuclear power plants; overview of the processes of reliability and risk management; management significance of risk analysis; international and domestic institutional issues for peaceful nuclear uses; the role of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO); and nuclear safety activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Connolly, T.J. (ed.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

NNSA, Tajikistan Nuclear and Radiation Safety Agency Sign MOU...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Tajikistan Nuclear and Radiation Safety Agency Sign MOU to Combat Illicit Trafficking | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

192

Code of Federal Regulations NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of DOE nuclear facilities. Code of Federal Regulations NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT More Documents & Publications Code of Federal Regulations TRESPASSING ON DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

193

FTCP Site Specific Information - Chief of Nuclear Safety | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Nuclear Safety FTCP Site Specific Information - Chief of Nuclear Safety FTCP Agent Organization Name Phone E-Mail CNS Richard Lagdon 202586-9471 chip.lagdon@hq.doe.gov...

194

Nuclear Safety Research and Development Status Workshop Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NSR&D STATUS WORKSHOP SUMMARIES Caroline Garzon Chief of Nuclear Safety Staff NUCLEAR SAFETY R&D Perform a peer review of Risk Assessment Corporation WTP analysis by a team...

195

Technical Basis for U. S. Department of Energy Nuclear Safety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Basis for U. S. Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy, DOE Policy 420.1, 711 Technical Basis for U. S. Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy, DOE Policy 420.1,...

196

Responsible stewardship of nuclear materials  

SciTech Connect

The ability to tap the massive energy potential of nuclear fission was first developed as a weapon to end a terrible world war. Nuclear fission is also a virtually inexhaustible energy resource, and is the only energy supply in certain areas in Russia, Kazakhstan and elsewhere. The potential link between civilian and military applications has been and continues to be a source of concern. With the end of the Cold War, this issue has taken a dramatic turn. The U.S. and Russia have agreed to reduce their nuclear weapons stockpiles by as much as two-thirds. This will make some 100 tonnes of separated plutonium and 500 tonnes of highly enriched uranium available, in a form that is obviously directly usable for weapons. The total world inventory of plutonium is now around 1000 tonnes and is increasing at 60-70 tonnes per year. There is even more highly enriched uranium. Fortunately the correct answer to what to do with excess weapons material is also the most attractive. It should be used and reused as fuel for fast reactors. Material in use (particularly nuclear material) is very easy to monitor and control, and is quite unattractive for diversion. Active management of fissile materials not only makes a major contribution to economic stability and well-being, but also simplifies accountability, inspection and other safeguards processes; provides a revenue stream to pay for the necessary safeguards; and, most importantly, limits the prospective world inventory of plutonium to only that which is used and useful.

Hannum, W.H.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Nuclear and hazardous material perspective  

SciTech Connect

The reemerging nuclear enterprise in the 21. century empowering the power industry and nuclear technology is still viewed with fear and concern by many of the public and many political leaders. Nuclear phobia is also exhibited by many nuclear professionals. The fears and concerns of these groups are complex and varied, but focus primarily on (1) management and disposal of radioactive waste [especially spent nuclear fuel and low level radioactive waste], (2) radiation exposures at any level, and (3) the threat nuclear terrorism. The root cause of all these concerns is the exaggerated risk perceived to human health from radiation exposure. These risks from radiation exposure are compounded by the universal threat of nuclear weapons and the disastrous consequences if these weapons or materials become available to terrorists or rogue nations. This paper addresses the bases and rationality for these fears and considers methods and options for mitigating these fears. Scientific evidence and actual data are provided. Radiation risks are compared to similar risks from common chemicals and familiar human activities that are routinely accepted. (authors)

Sandquist, Gary M. [Applied Science Professionals, PO Box 9052 Salt Lake City, UT 84109 (United States); Kunze, Jay F. [Idaho State University PO Box 8060 Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States); Rogers, Vern C. [University of Utah PO Box 510087 Salt Lake City, UT 84151 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Response Effects of Radiation History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Agencies U. S. Department of Transportation (DOT), U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Postal Services (USPS) U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Conference of State Legislatures - Environment, Energy and Transportation Program, Hazardous and Radioactive Materials International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulations Code of Federal Regulations: Title 10 - Energy Code of Federal Regulations: Title 10, PART 71 - Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material Code of Federal Regulations: Title 49 - Transportation Code of Federal Regulations: Title 49, PART 173 - Shippers - General

199

Nuclear Material Control and Accountability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1194-2011 JUNE 2011 ──────────────── CHANGE NOTICE NO.2 DECEMBER 2012 ──────────────── CHANGE NOTICE NO.3 OCTOBER 2013 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR MATERIALS CONTROL AND ACCOUNTABILITY U.S. Department of Energy AREA SANS Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ATTACHMENT 1 Change Notice No. 3 DOE -STD-1194-2011 October 2013 Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability Table of Changes Page/Section Change Page 57/Section 6.4.4.1. Change from, - Accounting records and source documents shall include item identification, material type, form, quantity, location, gross

200

Materials Science Division Project Safety Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Miller, Electron Microscopes Miller, Electron Microscopes Project No. 20006.3 Materials Science Division Project Safety Review Safety Analysis Form (03/08) Date of Submission March 12, 2010 FWP No.: 58405 Project Title User Experimental Work with Electron Microscopes in the Electron Microscopy Center This Safety Analysis Form (SAF) supersedes previous versions of 20006 and its modifications. Is this a (check one) new submission renewal supplemental modification X Principal Investigator(s) Dean Miller Other Participants (excluding administrative support personnel) EMC staff and EMC users (Attach participant signature sheet) Project dates: Start: March 2010 End: Open-ended This form is to be completed for all new investigations or experimental projects that are conducted in MSD laboratories, and for all ongoing such projects that undergo significant change from their original

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transmission say for Nuclear Fuel Assemblies 4.1Facilities Spent nuclear fuel is another example wherein intact spent nuclear fuel would be a technological

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Diablo Canyon 2 nuclear reactors. Data were taken fromCapacity Operation of nuclear reactors for power generationby the operation of nuclear reactors. Therefore, ap-

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that are of interest for nuclear security applications. Theof interest to nuclear security. To either make theseother targets of nuclear security interest, such kilogram-

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Railroad Hazardous g Railroad Hazardous g Materials Transportation Safety Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Radioactive Materials Program Manager Radioactive Materials Program Manager H d M t i l Di i i H d M t i l Di i i Hazmat Hazardous Materials Division Hazardous Materials Division Federal Railroad Administration Federal Railroad Administration Presentation for the Presentation for the DOE NTSF Meeting DOE NTSF Meeting May 10 May 10- -12, 2011 12, 2011 Our Regulated Community * More than 550 l d railroads * 170,000 miles of track * 220,000 employees * 1.3 million railcars * 20,000 locomotives Hazmat * 3,500 chemical shippers * Roughly 2 Million Roughly 2 Million annual HM shipments HM-232E Introduction * Notice of Proposed Rulemaking d b * Issued December 21, 2006 * Interim Final Rule

205

Nuclear and Facility Safety Directives | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Safety » Nuclear and Facility Safety Nuclear Safety » Nuclear and Facility Safety Directives Nuclear and Facility Safety Directives DOE Order (O) 252.1A, Technical Standards Program DOE O 252.1A promotes DOE's use of Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCS) as the primary method for application of technical standards and establishes and manages the DOE Technical Standards Program (TSP) including technical standards development, information, activities, issues, and interactions. HS-30 Contact: Jeff Feit DOE Policy (P) 420.1, Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy DOE P 420.1, documents the Department's nuclear safety policy to design, construct, operate, and decommission its nuclear facilities in a manner that ensures adequate protection of workers, the public, and the environment. HS-30 Contact: James O'Brien

206

Nuclear Safety Specialist Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83-2007 83-2007 November 2007 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR SAFETY SPECIALIST FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1183-2007 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-STD-1183-2007 iv INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1183-2007 v TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT ................................................................................................................ vii PURPOSE ....................................................................................................................................9

207

Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services Audit Report Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories DOE/IG-0788 February 2008 Department of Energy Washington, DC 2 0 5 8 5 February 28, 2008 MEMORANDUM FOR FROM: Inspector General SUBJECT: IhTFORMATION: Audit Report on "Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories" BACKGROUND The National Nanotechnology Initiative was established as a multi-agency research and development program in 200 1. As a part of the Initiative, the Department of Energy (Energy) is in the process of constructing Nanoscale Science Research Centers at six national laboratories. In addition to funding the construction and operation of these

208

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Foreign Material Exclusion Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Foreign material exclusion (FME) is vital to the safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. The entry of foreign material (FM) into primary or secondary plant systems, equipment, and components can cause equipment degradation or inoperability, lost generation, fuel cladding damage, high radiation, and contamination levels that could spread throughout plant systems; it can also increase operations and maintenance (O&M) costs and adversely impact nuclear safety. The FME program is a plantwide ini...

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agency regulating commercial nuclear power plants and other uses of nuclear materials, 0, 720, Lynne Robinson, 6/25/2007 9:29 AM by Lynne Robinson.

210

Double-clad nuclear fuel safety rod  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for shutting down a nuclear reactor during an undercooling or overpower event, whether or not the reactor's scram system operates properly. This is accomplished by double-clad fuel safety rods positioned at various locations throughout the reactor core, wherein melting of a secondary internal cladding of the rod allows the fuel column therein to shift from the reactor core to place the reactor in a subcritical condition.

McCarthy, William H. (Los Altos, CA); Atcheson, Donald B. (Cupertino, CA); Vaidyanathan, Swaminathan (San Jose, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are the requirements? Safety Record The Agencies that Generate Rules that Promulgate the Transport of Radioactive Materials: Regulations to control the transport of radioactive material were initiated about 1935 by the Postal Service. Over the years, the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) became involved and in 1948 promulgated regulations as Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations. In 1966, DOT received hazardous materials regulatory authority that had been exercised by the ICC, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and United States Costal Guard (USCG). Currently, five groups generate rules governing the transport of radioactive material -- the DOT, NRC, USPS, DOE, and various State agencies. Among these, DOT and NRC are the primary agencies issuing regulations based on the model regulations developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

212

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When are they used? How are they moved? What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record A radioactive material (RAM) packaging is a container that is used to safely transport radioactive material from one location to another. In RAM transportation the container alone is called the Packaging. The packaging together with its contents is called the Package. Basic types of radioactive material packagings are: Excepted Packaging Industrial Packaging Type A Packaging Type B Packaging [EXCEPTED] Click to view picture [IP] Click to view picture [TYPE A] Click to view picture [TYPE B] Click to view picture Excepted Packagings are designed to survive normal conditions of transport. Excepted packagings are used for transportation of materials that are either Low Specific Activity (LSA) or Surface Contaminated Objects (SCO) and that are limited quantity shipments, instruments or articles, articles manufactured from natural or depleted uranium or natural thorium; empty packagings are also excepted (49CFR 173.421-428).

213

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record Radioactive materials are carried by road, rail, water, and air. There are strict regulations that originate from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) which cover the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials. Road Rail Water Air [Road transport] Click to view picture [Rail transport] Click to view picture [Sea transport] Click to view picture [Air transport] Click to view picture 1998 DOE Radioactive Shipments in the United States Out of the 3 million hazardous material shipments are made each year, DOE accounts for less than 1% of all radioactive materials shipments and 75% of the total curies shipped in the United States Ship 0 Train 308

214

Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JUNE 2011 JUNE 2011 ──────────────── CHANGE NOTICE NO.1 AUGUST 2011 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR MATERIALS CONTROL AND ACCOUNTABILITY U.S. Department of Energy AREA SANS Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ATTACHMENT 1 Change Notice No. 1 DOE -STD-1194-2011 August 2011 Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability Table of Changes Page/Section Change Title Page Formatting and font size adjusted. Page 2/Section 4.h. Reference to document was updated from DOE M 470.4-1 Chg 2, Safeguards and Security Program Planning and Management, dated 10-2-10 to DOE O 470.4B, Safeguards and Security Program, dated 7-21-11. Page 2/Section 4.i. Reference to document was updated from DOE M

215

DOE Cites Safety and Ecology Corp. for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety and Ecology Corp. for Violating Nuclear Safety Safety and Ecology Corp. for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules DOE Cites Safety and Ecology Corp. for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules June 14, 2005 - 4:53pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today notified Safety and Ecology Corporation, the contractor responsible for radiological safety at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Project in Portsmouth, Ohio, that it will fine the company $55,000 for violating the department's regulations prohibiting retaliation against employees who raise nuclear safety concerns. "We take safety very seriously at the Department of Energy," said Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health John Shaw. "Today's action illustrates the department's commitment to ensuring that any and all valid

216

Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process September 19, 2012 Presenter: Undine Shoop, Chief, Health Physics and Human Performance Branch, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Topics covered: Purpose of the Reactor Oversight Process (ROP) ROP Framework Safety Culture within the ROP Safety Culture Assessments Safety Culture in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Oversight Process More Documents & Publications A Commissioner's Perspective on USNRC Actions in Response to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Comparison of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for Fuel Cycle Facilities, 2/17/11

217

Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 2011 June 2011 DOE STANDARD Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability U.S. Department of Energy AREA SANS Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1194-2011 i This page is intentionally left blank. DOE-STD-1194-2011 ii TABLE OF CONTENTS FOREWORD ..................................................................................................................................................................................... iii 1 . S C O P E ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 1 2

218

NUCLEAR REACTOR COMPENENT CLADDING MATERIAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fuel elements and coolant tubes used in nuclear reactors of the heterogeneous, water-cooled type are described, wherein the coolant tubes extend through the moderator and are adapted to contain the fuel elements. The invention comprises forming the coolant tubes and the fuel element cladding material from an alloy of aluminum and nickel, or an alloy of aluminum, nickel, alloys are selected to prevent intergranular corrosion of these components by water at temperatures up to 35O deg C.

Draley, J.E.; Ruther, W.E.

1959-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

219

Role of criticality models in ANSI standards for nuclear criticality safety  

SciTech Connect

Two methods used in nuclear criticality safety evaluations in the area of neutron interaction among subcritical components of fissile materials are the solid angle and surface density techniques. The accuracy and use of these models are briefly discussed. (TFD)

Thomas, J.T.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGE TO DOE O 474.2, NUCLEAR MATERIAL CONTROL...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Chg 1: 8-3-2011 NUCLEAR MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTABILITY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Health, Safety and Security DOE O 474.2 DOE O 474.2 1 6-27-2011 NUCLEAR...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Clearance Levels For Redundant Material From Decommissioning Of Nuclear Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, a great deal is happening in the regulatory field regarding the release of radiologically contaminated material: . The IAEA is working on the revision of Safety Series 89 (governing the principles of exemption and clearance) and of the TECDOC 855 on clearance levels. . The European Commission Directive on basic safety standards for protection against ionizing radiation in both nuclear and non-nuclear industries will become effective in May 2000. . The U.S. NRC has issued its draft on clearance of material from nuclear facilities (NUREG 1640), as well as an "issues" paper on the release of solid materials. The U.S. State Department has launched an International Radioactive Source Management Initiative, one of the objectives being to "develop international standards and guidelines and `harmonize' U.S. and IAEA radioactive clearance levels." Of great significance to the implementor of clearance regulations in the nuclear industry is the emergence of the NORM issue durin...

Shankar Menon Program; Shankar Menon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Nuclear Safety. Technical Progress Journal, October--December 1991: Volume 32, No. 4  

SciTech Connect

This document is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center -- Articles and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Nuclear Science, Nuclear Engineering ... BOOK: Safety Related Issues of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage ... A compilation of reports prepared by the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory ...

224

Structural Materials in Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 28, 2008 ... Structural Materials in Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems: The Need for ... of functionalized interfaces for optimization of materials properties.

225

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOT/PHMSA DOT/PHMSA A ti iti Activities Michael Conroy U S Department of Transportation - 1 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Radioactive Materials U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Overview * Harmonization with International Regulations * Update on Revisions to International Regulations * Recent Letters of Interpretation * Update on Rulemakings * PHMSA Information Resources - 2 - * PHMSA Information Resources 2 U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration HM-230 Harmonized with 2000 Version of IAEA's 1996 Edition - 3 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

226

License Application Chapter 5 Nuclear Criticality Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uranium or other fissile material outside of check-sources and various standards for radiological measurement calibration. As such, no criticality safety programs or procedures are maintained or implemented at the facility; however, the IIFP Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA), as documented in the ISA Summary, did evaluate the potential for a criticality accident at the IIFP Site. The only potential method of having a criticality accident at the facility involves the inadvertent receipt and processing of fissile materials, which is addressed in the ISA. Controls are established to verify that no enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF6) is received and processed at the facility. The cylinders processed at the IIFP Facility are the large, 14-ton or 10-ton UF6 tails cylinders, not the 2 -ton enriched product cylinders. Processing equipment at the plant, namely the autoclaves, is not sized to handle these smaller cylinders, so there is no method to feed enriched material into the processing plants. Additionally, each cylinder will be scanned with a detector to verify that the incoming cylinders do not contain fissile materials. The scan does not determine the shipper’s assay exactness for the cylinder contents, but does provide a reasonable indication if the cylinder is depleted or enriched. Both the receipt inspection and the scan for the assay at the Facility Site are maintained as Items Relied on for Safety (IROFS) controls. Also, feed suppliers (UF6 enrichment plants) have redundant and

Uranium De-conversion; Revision B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PRESENTATONS: Reawakening of United States Nuclear Energy: Materials Challenges for a New Generation of Power Plants Presentations by Harold ...

228

WEB RESOURCE: Nuclear Engineering Materials - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... "Nuclear Engineering Materials." Engineering Physics Department, College of Engineering. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Fall 2006.

229

Accelerated Materials Evaluation for Nuclear Application Utilizing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 15, 2013... of accelerated nuclear materials testing for fission and fusion reactors. Presentations combining experiment with theory, modeling and ...

230

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAFE are radioactive material transportations packages? SAFE are radioactive material transportations packages? RAM PACKAGES TESTING & CERTIFICATION REGULATIONS & GUIDANCE SITE MAP This graphic was generated from a computer analysis and shows the results from a regulatory puncture test of a stainless steel packaging dropping 40 inches (10 MPH) onto a 6 inch diameter steel spike. U.S. DOE | Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Sandia National Laboratories | Nuclear Energy & Fuel Cucle Programs © Sandia Corporation | Site Contact | Sandia Site Map | Privacy and Security An internationally recognized web-site from PATRAM 2001 - the 13th International Symposium on the Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material. Recipient of the AOKI AWARD. PATRAM, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency brings government and industry leaders together to share information on innovations, developments, and lessons learned about radioactive materials packaging and transportation.

231

Enforcement Regulations and Directives - Nuclear Safety | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Safety Nuclear Safety Enforcement Regulations and Directives - Nuclear Safety 10 C.F.R. Part 820 and Amendments 10 C.F.R. Part 820 - Procedural Rules for DOE Nuclear Activities 10 C.F.R. Part 820 - Procedural Rules for DOE Nuclear Activities; General Statement of Enforcement Policy; Final rule; amendment of enforcement policy statement and confirmation of interim rule 10 C.F.R. Part 830 10 C.F.R. Part 830 - Nuclear Safety Management; Final Rule Office of General Counsel Interpretation regarding the Application of DOE Technical Standard 1027-92 under 10 C.F.R. Part 830 Office of General Counsel Interpretation regarding Noncompliant Documented Safety Analyses and Exemption Relief (9/28/2011) Related Guidance DOE-STD-1083-2009, Processing Exemptions to Nuclear Safety Rules and

232

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Nuclear safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

safety Actions taken to safety Actions taken to prevent nuclear and radiation accidents or to limit their consequences. en Celebrating the 20th anniversary of the tritium shot heard around the world http://www.pppl.gov/news/2013/12/celebrating-20th-anniversary-tritium-shot-heard-around-world-2

Tensions rose in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) as the seconds counted down. At stake was the first crucial test of a high-powered mixture of fuel for producing fusion energy. As the control-room clock reached "zero," a flash of light on a closed-circuit television monitor marked a historic achievement:

233

Fieldable Nuclear Material Identification System  

SciTech Connect

The Fieldable Nuclear Material Identification System (FNMIS), funded by the NA-241 Office of Dismantlement and Transparency, provides information to determine the material attributes and identity of heavily shielded nuclear objects. This information will provide future treaty participants with verifiable information required by the treaty regime. The neutron interrogation technology uses a combination of information from induced fission neutron radiation and transmitted neutron imaging information to provide high confidence that the shielded item is consistent with the host's declaration. The combination of material identification information and the shape and configuration of the item are very difficult to spoof. When used at various points in the warhead dismantlement sequence, the information complimented by tags and seals can be used to track subassembly and piece part information as the disassembly occurs. The neutron transmission imaging has been developed during the last seven years and the signature analysis over the last several decades. The FNMIS is the culmination of the effort to put the technology in a usable configuration for potential treaty verification purposes.

Radle, James E [ORNL; Archer, Daniel E [ORNL; Carter, Robert J [ORNL; Mullens, James Allen [ORNL; Mihalczo, John T [ORNL; Britton Jr, Charles L [ORNL; Lind, Randall F [ORNL; Wright, Michael C [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protection | National Nuclear Protection | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Global Threat Reduction Initiative > GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection

235

HANFORD NUCLEAR CRITICALITY SAFETY PROGRAM DATABASE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Database is a useful information retrieval tool for a criticality safety practitioner. The database contains nuclear criticality literature screened for parameter studies. The entries, characterized with a value index, are segregated into 16 major and six minor categories. A majority of the screened entries have abstracts and a limited number are connected to the Office of Scientific and Technology Information (OSTI) database of full-size documents. Simple and complex searches of the data can be accomplished very rapidly and the end-product of the searches could be a full-size document. The paper contains a description of the database, user instructions, and a number of examples.

TOFFER, H.

2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

236

Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 October 2012 Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on the Status of Integration of Safety Into the Design of the Uranium Processing Facility [HIAR-Y-12-2012-10-02] The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) observed the public hearing of the DNFSB review of the UPF project status for integrating safety into design. The meeting was broken into three parts: a panel discussion and questioning of National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) oversight and execution; a panel discussion and questioning of the B&W Y-12 Technical Services, LLC (B&W Y-12) design project team leadership; and an open public

237

Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 October 2012 Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on the Status of Integration of Safety Into the Design of the Uranium Processing Facility [HIAR-Y-12-2012-10-02] The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) observed the public hearing of the DNFSB review of the UPF project status for integrating safety into design. The meeting was broken into three parts: a panel discussion and questioning of National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) oversight and execution; a panel discussion and questioning of the B&W Y-12 Technical Services, LLC (B&W Y-12) design project team leadership; and an open public

238

Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 October 2012 Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on the Status of Integration of Safety Into the Design of the Uranium Processing Facility [HIAR-Y-12-2012-10-02] The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) observed the public hearing of the DNFSB review of the UPF project status for integrating safety into design. The meeting was broken into three parts: a panel discussion and questioning of National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) oversight and execution; a panel discussion and questioning of the B&W Y-12 Technical Services, LLC (B&W Y-12) design project team leadership; and an open public

239

Microsoft Word - Nuclear Safety Pamphlet Final September 1 2010...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Basic Overview of NUCLEAR SAFETY AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Outreach & Awareness Series Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) U.S. Department of Energy September 2010...

240

A Look Back at the Nuclear Safety Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hear from Glenn Podonsky -- the Energy Department’s Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer -- about how we're continuing to improve the safety of our nuclear facilities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Other Effects History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Dose Rate Calculator Click to use calculator. This tool calculates a dose rate (DR) at 2 meters (about 6 ft) from the surface of a package containing radioactive material IF you know the dose rate at 1 meter (about 3 ft). It will also calculate the reverse; DR at 1 meter if you know the DR at 2 meters. These two distances are used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to define acceptable dose rates for packages. Dose (Rad) Biological Effect < 5 rad No immediate observable effects 5 - 50 rad Slight blood changes may be detected by medical evaluation 50 - 150 rad Slight blood changes will be noted and likely symptoms of nausea, fatigue, vomiting, etc.

242

PRELIMINARY NUCLEAR CRITICALITY NUCLEAR SAFETY EVLAUATION FOR THE CONTAINER SURVEILLANCE AND STORAGE CAPABILITY PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

Washington Safety Management Solutions (WSMS) provides criticality safety services to Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) at the Savannah River Site. One activity at SRS is the Container Surveillance and Storage Capability (CSSC) Project, which will perform surveillances on 3013 containers (hereafter referred to as 3013s) to verify that they meet the Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD) 3013 for plutonium storage. The project will handle quantities of material that are greater than ANS/ANSI-8.1 single parameter mass limits, and thus required a Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation (NCSE). The WSMS methodology for conducting an NCSE is outlined in the WSMS methods manual. The WSMS methods manual currently follows the requirements of DOE-O-420.1B, DOE-STD-3007-2007, and the Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) SCD-3 manual. DOE-STD-3007-2007 describes how a NCSE should be performed, while DOE-O-420.1B outlines the requirements for a Criticality Safety Program (CSP). The WSRC SCD-3 manual implements DOE requirements and ANS standards. NCSEs do not address the Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) of non-reactor nuclear facilities that may be affected by overt or covert activities of sabotage, espionage, terrorism or other security malevolence. Events which are beyond the Design Basis Accidents (DBAs) are outside the scope of a double contingency analysis.

Low, M; Matthew02 Miller, M; Thomas Reilly, T

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Applicability of trends in nuclear safety analysis to space nuclear power systems  

SciTech Connect

A survey is presented of some current trends in nuclear safety analysis that may be relevant to space nuclear power systems. This includes: lessons learned from operating power reactor safety and licensing; approaches to the safety design of advanced and novel reactors and facilities; the roles of risk assessment, extremely unlikely accidents, safety goals/targets; and risk-benefit analysis and communication.

Bari, R.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Tutorial on nuclear thermal propulsion safety for Mars  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Safety is the prime design requirement for nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP). It must be built in at the initiation of the design process. An understanding of safety concerns is fundamental to the development of nuclear rockets for manned missions to Mars and many other applications that will be enabled or greatly enhanced by the use of nuclear propulsion. To provide an understanding of the basic issues, a tutorial has been prepared. This tutorial covers a range of topics including safety requirements and approaches to meet these requirements, risk and safety analysis methodology, NERVA reliability and safety approach, and life cycle risk assessments.

Buden, D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Tutorial on nuclear thermal propulsion safety for Mars  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Safety is the prime design requirement for nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP). It must be built in at the initiation of the design process. An understanding of safety concerns is fundamental to the development of nuclear rockets for manned missions to Mars and many other applications that will be enabled or greatly enhanced by the use of nuclear propulsion. To provide an understanding of the basic issues, a tutorial has been prepared. This tutorial covers a range of topics including safety requirements and approaches to meet these requirements, risk and safety analysis methodology, NERVA reliability and safety approach, and life cycle risk assessments.

Buden, D.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Spent Nuclear Fuel project integrated safety management plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is being revised in its entirety and the document title is being revised to ``Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Integrated Safety Management Plan.

Daschke, K.D.

1996-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

247

Nuclear Safety Component and Services Procurement, June 29, 2011...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Enforcement and Oversight Criteria Review and Approach Document Subject: Nuclear Safety Component and Services Procurement Inspection Criteria, Inspection Activities,...

248

DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex: Challenges to Safety, Security...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Investigations Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives "DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex: Challenges to Safety, Security, and Taxpayer Stewardship" FOR...

249

NNSA and Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board certifications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

allocated funding NNSA and Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board certifications free up 47 million in previously allocated funding The DNFSB and NNSA required the CMRR...

250

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BARS Behavioral Anchored Rating Scales DNFSB Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board DOE U.S. Department of Energy DPO Differing Professional Opinion ECP Employee Concern...

251

Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations [Nuclear Waste Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Analysis, Hazard Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Overview Modeling and analysis Unit Process Modeling Mass Tracking System Software Waste Form Performance Modeling Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Development, Design, Operation Overview Systems and Components Development Expertise System Engineering Design Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Waste Management using Electrometallurgical Technology Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Bookmark and Share NE Division personnel had a key role in the creation of the FCF Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), FCF Technical Safety Requirements (TSR)

252

Recent Progress in U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Progress in U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Safety Speaker(s): Robert Budnitz Date: April 15, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The U.S. commercial nuclear-power industry consists...

253

Nuclear and Radiological Material Security | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

to intensive site security efforts, NNSA is also working to build international standards and criteria for nuclear and radiological security. This includes NNSA's work to...

254

Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard QuickStart Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard QuickStart Guide September 2012 Office of Analysis (HS-24) Office of Environmental Protection, Sustainability Support and Corporate Safety Analysis Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Purpose of Nuclear Safety Information (NSI) Dashboard * The NSI Dashboard provides a new user interface to the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) to easily identify, organize, and analyze nuclear safety-related events reported into ORPS. * ORPS reporting criteria associated with events at nuclear facilities have pre-assigned weighting factors according to their relative importance and are placed into groups. * This information can be evaluated to identify trends and, using insights from current events and nature of operations, enable

255

Fissile Materials Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Fissile Materials Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration Fissile Materials Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Fissile Materials Disposition Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Fissile Materials Disposition Fissile Materials Disposition Since the end of the Cold War, significant quantities of plutonium and

256

International Materials Protection and Cooperation | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Materials Protection and Cooperation | National Nuclear Materials Protection and Cooperation | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog International Materials Protection and Cooperation Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > International Materials Protection and Cooperation International Materials Protection and Cooperation

257

Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department`s spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities. Volume 2, Working Group Assessment Team reports; Vulnerability development forms; Working group documents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Secretary of Energy`s memorandum of August 19, 1993, established an initiative for a Department-wide assessment of the vulnerabilities of stored spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials. A Project Plan to accomplish this study was issued on September 20, 1993 by US Department of Energy, Office of Environment, Health and Safety (EH) which established responsibilities for personnel essential to the study. The DOE Spent Fuel Working Group, which was formed for this purpose and produced the Project Plan, will manage the assessment and produce a report for the Secretary by November 20, 1993. This report was prepared by the Working Group Assessment Team assigned to the Hanford Site facilities. Results contained in this report will be reviewed, along with similar reports from all other selected DOE storage sites, by a working group review panel which will assemble the final summary report to the Secretary on spent nuclear fuel storage inventory and vulnerability.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Nuclear Safety Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

259

Application of Risk Assessment and Management to Nuclear Safety |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Application of Risk Assessment and Management to Nuclear Safety Application of Risk Assessment and Management to Nuclear Safety Application of Risk Assessment and Management to Nuclear Safety September 20, 2012 Presenter: Commissioner George Apostolakis US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Topics covered: Management of (unquantified at the time) uncertainty was always a concern. Defense-in-depth and safety margins became embedded in the regulations. "Defense-in-Depth is an element of the NRC's safety philosophy that employs successive compensatory measures to prevent accidents or mitigate damage if a malfunction, accident, or naturally caused event occurs at a nuclear facility." [Commission's White Paper, February 1999] Design Basis Accidents are postulated accidents that a nuclear facility must be designed and built to withstand without loss to the

260

Experience with performance based training of nuclear criticality safety engineers  

SciTech Connect

For non-reactor nuclear facilities, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) does not require that nuclear criticality safety engineers demonstrate qualification for their job. It is likely, however, that more formalism will be required in the future. Current DOE requirements for those positions which do have to demonstrate qualification indicate that qualification should be achieved by using a systematic approach such as performance based training (PBT). Assuming that PBT would be an acceptable mechanism for nuclear criticality safety engineer training in a more formal environment, a site-specific analysis of the nuclear criticality safety engineer job was performed. Based on this analysis, classes are being developed and delivered to a target audience of newer nuclear criticality safety engineers. Because current interest is in developing training for selected aspects of the nuclear criticality safety engineer job, the analysis is incompletely developed in some areas.

Taylor, R.G.

1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department`s spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities. Volume 3, Site team reports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A self assessment was conducted of those Hanford facilities that are utilized to store Reactor Irradiated Nuclear Material, (RINM). The objective of the assessment is to identify the Hanford inventories of RINM and the ES & H concerns associated with such storage. The assessment was performed as proscribed by the Project Plan issued by the DOE Spent Fuel Working Group. The Project Plan is the plan of execution intended to complete the Secretary`s request for information relevant to the inventories and vulnerabilities of DOE storage of spent nuclear fuel. The Hanford RINM inventory, the facilities involved and the nature of the fuel stored are summarized. This table succinctly reveals the variety of the Hanford facilities involved, the variety of the types of RINM involved, and the wide range of the quantities of material involved in Hanford`s RINM storage circumstances. ES & H concerns are defined as those circumstances that have the potential, now or in the future, to lead to a criticality event, to a worker radiation exposure event, to an environmental release event, or to public announcements of such circumstances and the sensationalized reporting of the inherent risks.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Materials Development and Degradation Management for Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials Development and Degradation Management for Nuclear ... of zirconium alloys in reactor can lead to the presence of hydride precipitates, and can ... for the U.S. Department ofEnergy's National Nuclear Security Administration under ...

263

Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) Senior Technical Safety Manager (STSM) Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - August 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) Self-Assessment Report Senior Technical Safety Manager Qualification Program CONTENTS Background ................................................................................................................................ 1 Results ....................................................................................................................................... 1 Assessment Criteria ................................................................................................................... 1 Finding ....................................................................................................................................... 2 Observation ............................................................................................................................... 2

264

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board's enabling legislation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENABLING STATUTE OF THE ENABLING STATUTE OF THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD 42 U.S.C. § 2286 et seq. NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT, FISCAL YEAR 1989 (Pub. L. No. 100-456, September 29, 1988), AS AMENDED BY NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT, FISCAL YEAR 1991 (Pub. L. No. 101-510, November 5, 1990), NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FISCAL YEARS 1992 AND 1993 (Pub. L. No. 102-190, December 5, 1991), ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 1992 (Pub. L. No. 102-486, October 24, 1992), NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FISCAL YEAR 1994 (Pub. L. No. 103-160, November 30, 1993), FEDERAL REPORTS ELIMINATION ACT OF 1998 (Pub. L. No. 105-362, November 10, 1998), NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FISCAL YEAR 2001 (Pub. L. No. 106-398, October 30, 2000), AND

265

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Nuclear Safety Specialist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JOB / TASK ANALYSIS for JOB / TASK ANALYSIS for Nuclear Safety Specialist (NSS) Functional Area Qualification Standard (FAQS) DOE-STD-1183-2007 Instructions for Step 1: Step 1 Identify and evaluate tasks - Develop a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job. o A great starting point is the list of Duties and Responsibilities from the FAQS. o Give careful thought to additional tasks that could be considered. o Don't worry about deleting tasks at this point - that is a part of the process further down. - List the tasks (and their sources, e.g., Duties and Responsibilities #1) in the chart below. - Discuss each task as a group and come to a consensus pertaining to Importance and Frequency of the task (i.e., each team member can consent to the assigned value, even

266

Techniques and methods in nuclear materials traceability  

SciTech Connect

The nonproliferation community is currently addressing concerns that the access to special nuclear materials may increase the illicit trafficking in weapons-usable materials from civil and/or weapons material stores and/or fuel cycles systems. Illicit nuclear traffic usually involves reduced quantities of nuclear materials perhaps as samplings of a potential protracted diversionary flow from sources to users. To counter illicit nuclear transactions requires the development of techniques and methods in nuclear material traceability as an important phase of a broad forensic analysis capability. This report discusses how isotopic signatures and correlation methods were applied to determine the origins of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and Plutonium samples reported as illicit trafficking in nuclear materials.

Persiani, P.J.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Material Control & Accountability | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control & Accountability | National Nuclear Security Control & Accountability | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Material Control & Accountability Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Material Control & Accountability Material Control & Accountability Safeguards First Principles Initiative

268

Material Control & Accountability | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Control & Accountability | National Nuclear Security Control & Accountability | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Material Control & Accountability Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Material Control & Accountability Material Control & Accountability Safeguards First Principles Initiative

269

Nuclear and Radiological Material Security | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

17, 2013 NNSA, Republic of Korea Ministry Agree to Minimize Use of HEU in Nuclear Reactors Sep 3, 2013 NNSA Conducts Two Emergency Response Training Courses in Armenia Aug 29, 2013...

270

Nuclear & Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

17, 2013 NNSA, Republic of Korea Ministry Agree to Minimize Use of HEU in Nuclear Reactors Sep 3, 2013 NNSA Conducts Two Emergency Response Training Courses in Armenia Aug 29, 2013...

271

Review and Approval of Nuclear Facility Safety Basis Documents (Documented Safety Analyses and Technical Safety Requirements)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 1996 February 1996 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 2 Date November 2005 DOE STANDARD REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF NUCLEAR FACILITY SAFETY BASIS DOCUMENTS (DOCUMENTED SAFETY ANALYSES AND TECHNICAL SAFETY REQUIREMENTS) U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, DC 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, Fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Adminis tration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000.

272

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System CONTACT INFORMATION...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System CONTACT INFORMATION UPDATE REPORTING IDENTIFICATION SYMBOL (RIS) RIS: Address: Facility Name: CONTACTS Business Name PhoneFax...

273

Materials in Nuclear Power Plant Construction - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

139th Annual Meeting & Exhibition. February 14 - 18, 2010, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, Washington USA. Materials in Nuclear Power. Plant  ...

274

COURSE NOTES: Nuclear Engineering Materials (NEEP 423)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... "Nuclear Engineering Materials (NEEP 423)." Department of Engineering Physics . Fall 2006. University of Wisconsin-Madison. Launch Site

275

COURSE NOTES: Nuclear Materials (NE120)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 10, 2007 ... This resource provides PDF lecture notes and readings for an undergraduate course covering materials issues in nuclear power systems.

276

Materials Science of Nuclear Waste Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent is to provide a forum for researchers from national laboratories, universities, and nuclear industry to discuss current understanding of materials ...

277

Materials for Nuclear Power – A Brief Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 10, 2007 ... A brief introduction to the effects of irradiation on materials for the nuclear power industry. PDF article includes figures and useful links.

278

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 25, 2007 ... The United States Nuclear Power Industry is “reawakening”. ... for a New Generation of Power Plants", Materials Technology@TMS, May 2007.

279

NUCLEAR SAFETY WORKSHOP AGENDA Post Fukushima Initiatives and Results  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NUCLEAR SAFETY WORKSHOP AGENDA NUCLEAR SAFETY WORKSHOP AGENDA Post Fukushima Initiatives and Results September 19-20, 2012 - Bethesda North Marriott TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 - Grand Ballroom, Salons F/G/H 1 9/14/12 6:00 - 8:00 pm Registration WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 - Grand Ballroom, Salons F/G/H 7:00 - 8:00 am Registration 8:00 - 8:05 am Logistics Stephen A. Kirchhoff, Office of Health, Safety and Security US Department of Energy 8:05 - 8:15 am Welcoming Remarks and Workshop Objectives Glenn S. Podonsky, Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer US Department of Energy 8:15 - 8:45 am Maintaining Our Focus on Nuclear Safety Daniel B. Poneman, Deputy Secretary US Department of Energy 8:45 - 9:30 am Facts and Lessons of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and Safety Improvement - the

280

DOE Cites Bechtel Jacobs Company for Nuclear Safety Violations | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jacobs Company for Nuclear Safety Violations Jacobs Company for Nuclear Safety Violations DOE Cites Bechtel Jacobs Company for Nuclear Safety Violations August 4, 2005 - 2:36pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy (DOE) today notified the Bechtel Jacobs Company (BJC) that it will fine the company $247,500 for violations of the department's nuclear safety requirements. The company is the department's contractor responsible for environmental cleanup and waste management at its Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. "One of our top safety priorities is to improve the performance of subcontractors, and to do that we need to hold prime contractors responsible," said John Shaw, Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health. "Our goal is to have work conducted in a manner that protects

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The Department of Energy nuclear criticality safety program.  

SciTech Connect

This paper broadly covers key events and activities from which the Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) evolved. The NCSP maintains fundamental infrastructure that supports operational criticality safety programs. This infrastructure includes continued development and maintenance of key calculational tools, differential and integral data measurements, benchmark compilation, development of training resources, hands-on training, and web-based systems to enhance information preservation and dissemination. The NCSP was initiated in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety, and evolved from a predecessor program, the Nuclear Criticality Predictability Program, that was initiated in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-2, The Need for Critical Experiment Capability. This paper also discusses the role Dr. Sol Pearlstein played in helping the Department of Energy lay the foundation for a robust and enduring criticality safety infrastructure.

Felty, J. R. (James R.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sources of Radiation Biological Responses Other Effects History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Radiation is all around us, occurring naturally in the environment. We are always exposed to radiation from: radon in the air uranium, radium and thorium in the earth cosmic rays from outer space and the sun radioactive potassium in our food and water naturally occuring radioactive material within our own bodies. This is commonly called "naturally-occurring background radiation." TYPES OF IONIZING RADIATION Alpha Alpha particles can be shielded by a sheet of paper or by human skin. If alpha emitters are inhaled, ingested, or enter the body through a cut, they can cause cancer. Beta Beta radiation can be stopped by a shield like aluminum foil or wood. If beta emitters are inhaled, ingested, or enter the body through a cut, they can cause cancer.

283

Accurate fission data for nuclear safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Accurate fission data for nuclear safety (AlFONS) project aims at high precision measurements of fission yields, using the renewed IGISOL mass separator facility in combination with a new high current light ion cyclotron at the University of Jyvaskyla. The 30 MeV proton beam will be used to create fast and thermal neutron spectra for the study of neutron induced fission yields. Thanks to a series of mass separating elements, culminating with the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, it is possible to achieve a mass resolving power in the order of a few hundred thousands. In this paper we present the experimental setup and the design of a neutron converter target for IGISOL. The goal is to have a flexible design. For studies of exotic nuclei far from stability a high neutron flux (10^12 neutrons/s) at energies 1 - 30 MeV is desired while for reactor applications neutron spectra that resembles those of thermal and fast nuclear reactors are preferred. It is also desirable to be able to produce (semi-)monoenergetic neutrons for benchmarking and to study the energy dependence of fission yields. The scientific program is extensive and is planed to start in 2013 with a measurement of isomeric yield ratios of proton induced fission in uranium. This will be followed by studies of independent yields of thermal and fast neutron induced fission of various actinides.

A. Solders; D. Gorelov; A. Jokinen; V. S. Kolhinen; M. Lantz; A. Mattera; H. Penttila; S. Pomp; V. Rakopoulos; S. Rinta-Antila

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

284

Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; David W. Nigg

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; David W. Nigg

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Nuclear Plant/Hydrogen Plant Safety: Issues and Approaches  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, through its agents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, is working on developing the technologies to enable the large scale production of hydrogen using nuclear power. A very important consideration in the design of a co-located and connected nuclear plant/hydrogen plant facility is safety. This study provides an overview of the safety issues associated with a combined plant and discusses approaches for categorizing, quantifying, and addressing the safety risks.

Steven R. Sherman

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Status and Value of International Standards for Nuclear Criticality Safety  

SciTech Connect

This presentation provides an update to the author's standards report provided at the ICNC-2007 meeting. It includes a discussion about the difference between, and the value of participating in, the development of international 'consensus' standards as opposed to nonconsensus standards. Standards are developed for a myriad of reasons. Generally, standards represent an agreed upon, repeatable way of doing something as defined by an individual or group of people. They come in various types. Examples include personal, family, business, industrial, commercial, and regulatory such as military, community, state, federal, and international standards. Typically, national and international 'consensus' standards are developed by individuals and organizations of diverse backgrounds representing the subject matter users and developers of a service or product and other interested parties or organizations. Within the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), Technical Committee 85 (TC85) on nuclear energy, Subcommittee 5 (SC5) on nuclear fuel technology, there is a Working Group 8 (WG8) on standardization of calculations, procedures, and practices related to criticality safety. WG8 has developed, and is developing, ISO standards within the category of nuclear criticality safety of fissionable materials outside of reactors (i.e., nonreactor fissionable material nuclear fuel cycle facilities). Since the presentation of the ICNC-2007 report, WG8 has issued three new finalized international standards and is developing two more new standards. Nearly all elements of the published WG8 ISO standards have been incorporated into IAEA nonconsensus guides and standards. The progression of consensus standards development among international partners in a collegial environment establishes a synergy of different concepts that broadens the perspectives of the members. This breadth of perspectives benefits the working group members in their considerations of consensus standards developments in their own countries. A testament to the value of the international standards efforts is that nearly all elements of the published WG8 ISO standards have been incorporated into IAEA nonconsensus guides and standards and are mainly consistent with international ISO member domestic standards.

Hopper, Calvin Mitchell [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Photos | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Photos 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Photos Addthis Glenn Podonsky 1 of 13 Glenn Podonsky Glenn Podonsky (DOE Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer) provides his welcoming remarks. Daniel Poneman 2 of 13 Daniel Poneman DOE Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman discusses maintaining our focus on nuclear safety. Akira Kawano 3 of 13 Akira Kawano Akira Kawano, Tokyo Electric Power Company, provides lessons learned from the Fukushima nuclear accident. Bill Ostendorff 4 of 13 Bill Ostendorff NRC Commissioner Bill Ostendorff gives his perspective on the NRC's response to the Fukushima nuclear accident. Miroslav Lipar 5 of 13 Miroslav Lipar Miroslav Lipar, IAEA, provides an international perspective on the Fukushima nuclear accident.

289

Microsoft Word - Nuclear Safety Reporting Criteria.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Noncompliance Reporting Criteria (as of January 1, 2012) Safety Noncompliance Reporting Criteria (as of January 1, 2012) Nuclear Safety Noncompliances Associated With Occurrences (DOE Order 232.2) Consult the DOE Order for the full text of each occurrence criterion 1 Reporting Criteria Group Subgroup Occurrence Category and Summary Description 2 1. Operational Emergencies 3 N/A (1) Operational Emergency (2) Alert (3) Site Area Emergency (4) General Emergency 2. Personnel Safety and Health C. Fires (1) Fire within primary confinement/containment (2d) Self-extinguishing fires D. Explosions (1) Unplanned explosion within primary confinement/containment 3. Nuclear Safety Basis A. Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) Violations (1) Violation of TSR/Operational Safety Requirement (OSR) Safety Limit (2) Violation of other TSR/OSR requirement

290

An Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology for Generation IV Nuclear Systems  

SciTech Connect

The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Early work of the RSWG focused on defining a safety philosophy founded on lessons learned from current and prior generations of nuclear technologies, and on identifying technology characteristics that may help achieve Generation IV safety goals. More recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. The methodology, tentatively called ISAM, is an integrated “toolkit” consisting of analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time.

Timothy J. Leahy

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

purposes. Presently, uranium enrichments are measured by oneweapons annually. Enrichment of uranium is necessary to makeof uranium isotopes in materials at enrichment facilities is

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Nuclear Materials Management Program at the NNSS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site, was established in 1951 mainly for weapons testing; because special nuclear materials (SNM) were expended during the tests, a nuclear material management program was not required. That changed in December 2004 with the receipt of Category I SNM for purposes other than weapons testing. At that time, Material Control and Accountability and Nuclear Material Management were a joint laboratory (Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore) effort with nuclear material management being performed at the laboratories. That changed in March 2006 when the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office appointed sole responsibility to the Management and Operations (M&O) contractor, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). Since 2006 the basic nuclear material management work was completed by a combination of M&O employees and subcontractors, but a true Nuclear Material Management (NMM) Program was not determined to be necessary until recently. With expanding missions and more nuclear material (NM) coming to the NNSS, it became imperative to have an organization to manage these materials; therefore, an NMM Manager was officially appointed by NSTec in 2012. In June 2011 a Gap Analysis and white paper was completed by a subcontractor; this presentation will include highlights from those documents along with our plans to resolve the “gaps” and stand up a functional and compliant NMM Program at the NNSS.

,

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

293

Implementation of an Enhanced Measurement Control Program for handling nuclear safety samples at WSRC  

SciTech Connect

In the separation and purification of nuclear material, nuclear criticality safety (NCS) is of primary concern. The primary nuclear criticality safety controls utilized by the Savannah River Site (SRS) Separations Facilities involve administrative and process equipment controls. Additional assurance of NCS is obtained by identifying key process hold points where sampling is used to independently verify the effectiveness of production control. Nuclear safety measurements of samples from these key process locations provide a high degree of assurance that processing conditions are within administrative and procedural nuclear safety controls. An enhanced procedure management system aimed at making improvements in the quality, safety, and conduct of operation was implemented for Nuclear Safety Sample (NSS) receipt, analysis, and reporting. All procedures with nuclear safety implications were reviewed for accuracy and adequate detail to perform the analytical measurements safely, efficiently, and with the utmost quality. Laboratory personnel worked in a ``Deliberate Operating`` mode (a systematic process requiring continuous expert oversight during all phases of training, testing, and implementation) to initiate the upgrades. Thus, the effort to revise and review nuclear safety sample procedures involved a team comprised of a supervisor, chemist, and two technicians for each procedure. Each NSS procedure was upgraded to a ``Use Every Time`` (UET) procedure with sign-off steps to ensure compliance with each step for every nuclear safety sample analyzed. The upgrade program met and exceeded both the long and short term customer needs by improving measurement reliability, providing objective evidence of rigid adherence to program principles and requirements, and enhancing the system for independent verification of representative sampling from designated NCS points.

Boler-Melton, C.; Holland, M.K.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Implementation of an Enhanced Measurement Control Program for handling nuclear safety samples at WSRC  

SciTech Connect

In the separation and purification of nuclear material, nuclear criticality safety (NCS) is of primary concern. The primary nuclear criticality safety controls utilized by the Savannah River Site (SRS) Separations Facilities involve administrative and process equipment controls. Additional assurance of NCS is obtained by identifying key process hold points where sampling is used to independently verify the effectiveness of production control. Nuclear safety measurements of samples from these key process locations provide a high degree of assurance that processing conditions are within administrative and procedural nuclear safety controls. An enhanced procedure management system aimed at making improvements in the quality, safety, and conduct of operation was implemented for Nuclear Safety Sample (NSS) receipt, analysis, and reporting. All procedures with nuclear safety implications were reviewed for accuracy and adequate detail to perform the analytical measurements safely, efficiently, and with the utmost quality. Laboratory personnel worked in a Deliberate Operating'' mode (a systematic process requiring continuous expert oversight during all phases of training, testing, and implementation) to initiate the upgrades. Thus, the effort to revise and review nuclear safety sample procedures involved a team comprised of a supervisor, chemist, and two technicians for each procedure. Each NSS procedure was upgraded to a Use Every Time'' (UET) procedure with sign-off steps to ensure compliance with each step for every nuclear safety sample analyzed. The upgrade program met and exceeded both the long and short term customer needs by improving measurement reliability, providing objective evidence of rigid adherence to program principles and requirements, and enhancing the system for independent verification of representative sampling from designated NCS points.

Boler-Melton, C.; Holland, M.K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Nuclear Safety Reserch and Development Program Operating Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Research and Development Safety Research and Development Program Operating Plan Office of Nuclear Safety Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy June 2012 INTENTIONALLY BLANK NSR&D Program Operating Plan June 2012 Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 BACKGROUND ................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 OBJECTIVES ....................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 NSR&D PROGRAM PROCESSES .................................................................................... 3

296

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center - WEBCAST ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 25, 2007 ... Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials for Nuclear ... Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Nuclear Science ...

297

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center - WEB ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials for Nuclear ... Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Nuclear Science ...

298

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center - JOM Article ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2009 ... Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials for Nuclear ... Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Nuclear Science ...

299

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center - BOOK ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials for Nuclear ... Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Nuclear Science ...

300

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center - What long ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 4, 2008 ... Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials for Nuclear ... Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Nuclear Science ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Nuclear safety as applied to space power reactor systems  

SciTech Connect

Current space nuclear power reactor safety issues are discussed with respect to the unique characteristics of these reactors. An approach to achieving adequate safety and a perception of safety is outlined. This approach calls for a carefully conceived safety program which makes uses of lessons learned from previous terrestrial power reactor development programs. This approach includes use of risk analyses, passive safety design features, and analyses/experiments to understand and control off-design conditions. The point is made that some recent accidents concerning terrestrial power reactors do not imply that space power reactors cannot be operated safety.

Cummings, G.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The nuclear materials control technology briefing book  

SciTech Connect

As national and international interests in nuclear arms control and non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, intensify, it becomes ever more important that contributors be aware of the technologies available for the measurement and control of the nuclear materials important to nuclear weapons development. This briefing book presents concise, nontechnical summaries of various special nuclear material (SNM) and tritium production monitoring technologies applicable to the control of nuclear materials and their production. Since the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) operates a multinational, on-site-inspector-based safeguards program in support of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), many (but not all) of the technologies reported in this document are in routine use or under development for IAEA safeguards.

Hartwell, J.K.; Fernandez, S.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Metabonomics for detection of nuclear materials processing.  

SciTech Connect

Tracking nuclear materials production and processing, particularly covert operations, is a key national security concern, given that nuclear materials processing can be a signature of nuclear weapons activities by US adversaries. Covert trafficking can also result in homeland security threats, most notably allowing terrorists to assemble devices such as dirty bombs. Existing methods depend on isotope analysis and do not necessarily detect chronic low-level exposure. In this project, indigenous organisms such as plants, small mammals, and bacteria are utilized as living sensors for the presence of chemicals used in nuclear materials processing. Such 'metabolic fingerprinting' (or 'metabonomics') employs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to assess alterations in organismal metabolism provoked by the environmental presence of nuclear materials processing, for example the tributyl phosphate employed in the processing of spent reactor fuel rods to extract and purify uranium and plutonium for weaponization.

Alam, Todd Michael; Luxon, Bruce A. (University Texas Medical Branch); Neerathilingam, Muniasamy (University Texas Medical Branch); Ansari, S. (University Texas Medical Branch); Volk, David (University Texas Medical Branch); Sarkar, S. (University Texas Medical Branch); Alam, Mary Kathleen

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC): A Resource for Nuclear Science Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) has been in existence since 1963. RSICC collects, organizes, evaluates and disseminates technical information (software and nuclear data) involving the transport of neutral and charged particle radiation, and shielding and protection from the radiation associated with: nuclear weapons and materials, fission and fusion reactors, outer space, accelerators, medical facilities, and nuclear waste management. RSICC serves over 12,000 scientists and engineers from about 100 countries.

Kirk, Bernadette Lugue [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Work for Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Safety Related Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Regulatory Nuclear Regulatory Commission Capabilities Sensors and Instrumentation and Nondestructive Evaluation Overview Energy System Applications Safety-Related Applications Overview DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Homeland Security Applications Biomedical Applications Millimiter Wave Group Papers Other NPNS Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Sensors and Instrumentation and Nondestructive Evaluation Safety Related Applications Bookmark and Share Nuclear Regulatory Commission International Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program Key objectives of the International Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program

306

Safety Related Applications (Sensors and Instrumentation and NDE) - Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Office of DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology Capabilities Sensors and Instrumentation and Nondestructive Evaluation Overview Energy System Applications Safety-Related Applications Overview DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Homeland Security Applications Biomedical Applications Millimiter Wave Group Papers Other NPNS Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Sensors and Instrumentation and Nondestructive Evaluation Safety Related Applications Bookmark and Share DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology The objective of this Nuclear Energy Plant Optimization Project is to

307

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center -- Articles and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BOOK: Safety Related Issues of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage ... ARTICLES: High- Radiation Nuclear Waste Disposal ... S. Zhu, et. al., Applied Physics Letters.

308

Pantex sets safety record | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

sets safety record | National Nuclear Security Administration sets safety record | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex sets safety record Pantex sets safety record Posted By Office of Public Affairs Pantex has set a new safety record with the lowest recordable case rate in the plant's history. The record total recordable case rate of 0.26 is a fitting end to an

309

Pantex receives two safety awards | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

two safety awards | National Nuclear Security two safety awards | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex receives two safety awards Pantex receives two safety awards Posted By Office of Public Affairs B&W Pantex was honored last week with a pair of awards for its exemplary safety record. The President's Award for Best Performing Business Unit and the Target

310

DOE Cites University of Chicago for Nuclear Safety Violations | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

University of Chicago for Nuclear Safety Violations University of Chicago for Nuclear Safety Violations DOE Cites University of Chicago for Nuclear Safety Violations March 7, 2006 - 11:42am Addthis WASHINGTON , DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to the University of Chicago (University), the Management and Operating contractor for DOE's Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), for nuclear safety violations identified through several safety reviews and inspections conducted by DOE. A series of reviews and inspections, the most recent of which occurred in 2005, identified breakdowns in the contractor's quality improvement, radiation protection, work process, and independent and management assessment programs. Prior to 2005, senior contractor management at ANL

311

Nuclear Forensic Reference Materials (RM) for Attribution of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nuclear Materials • Fuel cycles • Limit fissile material production • Reactor conversion Securing SNM • Reliable inventories • Physical Security • ...

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

312

Nuclear nonproliferation and safety: Challenges facing the International Atomic Energy Agency  

SciTech Connect

The Chairman of the Senate Committee on Govermental Affairs asked the United States General Accounting Office (GAO) to review the safeguards and nuclear power plant safety programs of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report examines (1) the effectiveness of IAEA`s safeguards program and the adequacy of program funding, (2) the management of U.S. technical assistance to the IAEA`s safeguards program, and (3) the effectiveness of IAEA`s program for advising United Nations (UN) member states about nuclear power plant safety and the adequacy of program funding. Under its statute and the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, IAEA is mandated to administer safeguards to detect diversions of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful uses. Because of limits on budget growth and unpaid contributions, IAEA has had difficulty funding the safeguards program. IAEA also conducts inspections of facilities or locations containing declared nuclear material, and manages a program for reviewing the operational safety of designated nuclear power plants. The U.S. technical assistance program for IAEA safeguards, overseen by an interagency coordinating committee, has enhanced the agency`s inspection capabilities, however, some weaknesses still exist. Despite financial limitations, IAEA is meeting its basic safety advisory responsibilities for advising UN member states on nuclear safety and providing requested safety services. However, IAEA`s program for reviewing the operational safety of nuclear power plants has not been fully effective because the program is voluntary and UN member states have not requested IAEA`s review of all nuclear reactors with serious problems. GAO believes that IAEA should have more discretion in selecting reactors for review.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Deputy Secretary Poneman Discusses Nuclear Safety at the IAEA | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Discusses Nuclear Safety at the IAEA Discusses Nuclear Safety at the IAEA Deputy Secretary Poneman Discusses Nuclear Safety at the IAEA June 20, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman today addressed the plenary session at the International Atomic Energy Agency's Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety. Deputy Secretary Poneman emphasized the importance of international cooperation and information sharing for developing lessons learned from the Fukushima accident. The IAEA is leading the process to develop these international best practices, which will help strengthen the international nuclear regulatory regime. Remarks as prepared for delivery are below. Thank you, Mr. Ambassador, for your work in organizing this important Conference and to Director General Amano and his staff for convening it.

314

Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Operating Plan | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Operating Plan Program Operating Plan Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Operating Plan July 5, 2012 Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Operating Plan This operating plan outlines the mission, goals, and processes for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Safety Research & Development (NSR&D) Program. This first version of the operating plan also discusses the startup phase of the program. NSR&D involves a systematic search for knowledge to advance the fundamental understanding of nuclear safety science and technology through scientific study, analysis, modeling, and experiments. Maintaining an effective NSR&D program will support DOE and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in standards development, validation of analytical models and

315

Nuclear Safety Research and Development Committee Charter | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research and Development Committee Charter Research and Development Committee Charter Nuclear Safety Research and Development Committee Charter July 5, 2012 Nuclear Safety Research and Development Committee Charter The intent of the Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Committee is to identify nuclear safety research needs and opportunities within the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and their program offices. The Committee promotes communication and coordination among DOE and NNSA program offices to enhance synergy on NSR&D efforts that can benefit the Department. The Committee will foster and facilitate networking and information exchange on NSR&D needs and activities across DOE/NNSA programs and with external national and international organizations. The Committee should not be construed to have

316

DOE O 410.1, Central Technical Authority Responsibilities Regarding Nuclear Safety Requirements  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes Central Technical Authority and Chief of Nuclear Safety/Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety responsibilities and requirements directed by the ...

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

317

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center - WEB ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 7, 2007 ... Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials for Nuclear Power ... Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Nuclear Science, Nuclear ... This 'thermodynamic database for advanced nuclear fuels' was ...

318

Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors  

SciTech Connect

This document is a compilation and source list of nuclear safety criteria that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) applies to licensed reactors; it can be used by DOE and DOE contractors to identify NRC criteria to be evaluated for application to the DOE reactors under their cognizance. The criteria listed are those that are applied to the areas of nuclear safety addressed in the safety analysis report of a licensed reactor. They are derived from federal regulations, USNRC regulatory guides, Standard Review Plan (SRP) branch technical positions and appendices, and industry codes and standards.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System CHANGE OF PROJECT NUMBER UPDATE PROJECT Project Number: Title: Date Valid: Date Deactivated: Classification Codes: Project Number: Project Title: Associated Materials: Programmatic RIS Previous Project Number(s) Status Code Allotment Code (S=Supplier, U=User) I authorize that the information listed above is for the NMMSS Program to use as part of the project number conversion process for this facility.

320

Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors, establishes reactor safety requirements to assure that reactors are sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that adequately protects health and safety and is in accordance with uniform standards, guides, and codes which are consistent with those applied to comparable licensed reactors. This document identifies nuclear safety criteria applied to NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) licensed reactors. The titles of the chapters and sections of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.70, Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Rev. 3, are used as the format for compiling the NRC criteria applied to the various areas of nuclear safety addressed in a safety analysis report for a nuclear reactor. In each section the criteria are compiled in four groups: (1) Code of Federal Regulations, (2) US NRC Regulatory Guides, SRP Branch Technical Positions and Appendices, (3) Codes and Standards, and (4) Supplemental Information. The degree of application of these criteria to a DOE-owned reactor, consistent with their application to comparable licensed reactors, must be determined by the DOE and DOE contractor.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliance The NRC certifies packages as being Type A or Type B on the basis of Safety Analysis Reports submitted by the package designer that demonstrate the package can withstand...

322

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record Spent fuel casks are constructed with thick walls of various metals. This cask is approximately 18-feet...

323

Resolution of the nuclear criticality safety issue for the Hanford site high-level waste tanks  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the approach used to resolve the Nuclear Criticality Safety Issue for the Hanford Site high-level waste tanks. Although operational controls have been in place at the Hanford Site throughout its operating life to minimize the amount of fissile material discarded as waste, estimates of the total amount of plutonium that entered the waste tanks range from 500 to 1,000 kg. Nuclear criticality safety concerns were heightened in 1991 based on a review of waste analysis results and a subsequent U.S. Department of Energy 1399 review of the nuclear criticality program. Although the DOE review team concluded that there was no imminent risk of a criticality at the Hanford Site tank farms, the team also stated its concern regarding the lack of definitive knowledge of the fissile material inventory and distribution within the waste tanks and the lack of sufficient management support for the overall criticality safety program. An in-depth technical review of the nuclear criticality safety of the waste tanks was conducted to develop a defensible technical basis to ensure that waste tanks are subcritical. The review covered all relevant aspects of nuclear criticality safety including neutronics and chemical and physical phenomena of the waste form under aging waste conditions as well as during routine waste management operations. This paper provides a review of the technical basis to support the conclusion that given current plutonium inventories and operating conditions, a nuclear criticality is incredible. The DOE has been requested to close the Nuclear Criticality Safety Issue. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board is currently reviewing the technicalbasis.

Bratzel, D.R.

1997-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

324

Nuclear Materials Science:Materials Science Technology:MST-16...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Materials Science (MST-16) Home About Us MST Related Links Research Highlights Focus on Facilities MST e-News Experimental Physical Sciences Vistas MaRIE: Matter-Radiation...

325

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Other Effects History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms Majority from NRC Contacts Comments & Questions It is difficult to understand why some people die while others survive...

326

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effects of Radiation History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms Majority from NRC Contacts Comments & Questions Emergency Planning, Preparedness, and Response DOE Transportation...

327

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements Regulatory Framework Site Characterization Activities Current Status of DOE Program Current Status of NRC Program A Short History of Nuclear Regulation published...

328

Criticality Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Left Tab EVENTS Office of Nuclear Safety (HS-30) Office of Nuclear Safety Home Directives Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Rules Nuclear Safety Workshops Technical...

329

Supplemnental Volume - Independent Oversight Assessment of the Nuclear Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, January 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Volume Volume Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant January 2012 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS i Independent Oversight Assessment of Safety Culture and Management of Nuclear Safety Concerns at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Supplemental Volume Table of Contents Foreword ...................................................................................................................................................... iii Acronyms ...................................................................................................................................................... v

330

10 CFR Part 830, Nuclear Safety Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

construction such as environmental restoration activities, decontamination and decommissioning activities, specific nuclear explosives operations, or transition...

331

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Nuclear Explosive Safety Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Explosive Safety Study FAQS Nuclear Explosive Safety Study FAQS STEP 1: Job Task Analysis for Tasks Task (and Number) Source Importance Frequency (1) Serves as a member or chair of the NESSG. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities Paragraph A 5 3 (2) Provides guidance on and interpretation of nuclear explosive safety (NES) requirements and policy. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities Paragraph B 5 4 (3) Drafts policy directives for the DOE/NNSA, Nuclear Explosive Safety Operations Branch (NESB) and reviews DOE/NNSA policies on NES. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities Paragraph D 5 3 (4) Provides instruction and guidance regarding NES to individuals assigned NES responsibilities. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities Paragraph E 5 3-4 (5) Monitors ongoing NEOs to ensure compliance with NES standards and

332

DOE Cites Washington TRU Solutions for Nuclear Safety Violations |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington TRU Solutions for Nuclear Safety Violations Washington TRU Solutions for Nuclear Safety Violations DOE Cites Washington TRU Solutions for Nuclear Safety Violations December 22, 2005 - 4:53pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today notified Washington TRU Solutions (WTS) that it will fine the company $192,500 for violations of the department's nuclear safety requirements. The Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) issued today cites a number of deficiencies that led to a series of low-level plutonium uptakes by workers at a WTS mobile facility (MOVER) stationed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, Calif. The violations reflected WTS' limited understanding of the design and operational limitations of the MOVER facility, a portable waste processing facility designed to be

333

Reliability quantification of nuclear safety-related software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to improve quality and reliability of safety-critical software in the nuclear industry. It is accomplished by focusing on the following two areas: Formulation of a standard extensive integrated ...

Zhang, Yi, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

DOE Cites Fluor Fernald Inc. for Nuclear Safety Violations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Washington, D.C. - The Department of Energy (DOE) today notified Fluor Fernald, Inc. (Fluor Fernald) that it will fine the company $33,000 for violations of the department's nuclear safety...

335

Exelon Statement Regarding Nuclear Safety and 10 CFR 810  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Exelon respectfully submits that the existing 810 rule, as currently interpreted, and the proposed revised rule, both work as deterrents to improving safety in nuclear operations around the world.

336

Development of the Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard - September 2012 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development of the Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard - September Development of the Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard - September 2012 Development of the Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard - September 2012 September 2012 A working group with nuclear safety expertise used paired pairing computer software to develop first, a severity-weighted factor for the 17 Groups of ORPS Reporting Criteria and then, a severity-weighted factor for the sixty-five ORPS reporting criteria. The sum of the severity-weighted factors for the sixty-five ORPS Reporting Criteria equals 100%. Paired pairing is an analytical tool used to determine weighted factors. A team evaluated pairs of ORPS reporting criteria and concurred on the relative importance of each pair. Each ORPS reporting criterion in a group was compared with one other ORPS reporting

337

Development of the Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard - September 2012 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development of the Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard - September Development of the Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard - September 2012 Development of the Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard - September 2012 September 2012 A working group with nuclear safety expertise used paired pairing computer software to develop first, a severity-weighted factor for the 17 Groups of ORPS Reporting Criteria and then, a severity-weighted factor for the sixty-five ORPS reporting criteria. The sum of the severity-weighted factors for the sixty-five ORPS Reporting Criteria equals 100%. Paired pairing is an analytical tool used to determine weighted factors. A team evaluated pairs of ORPS reporting criteria and concurred on the relative importance of each pair. Each ORPS reporting criterion in a group was compared with one other ORPS reporting

338

Nuclear Concrete Materials Database Phase I Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FY 2011 accomplishments in Phase I development of the Nuclear Concrete Materials Database to support the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program are summarized. The database has been developed using the ORNL materials database infrastructure established for the Gen IV Materials Handbook to achieve cost reduction and development efficiency. In this Phase I development, the database has been successfully designed and constructed to manage documents in the Portable Document Format generated from the Structural Materials Handbook that contains nuclear concrete materials data and related information. The completion of the Phase I database has established a solid foundation for Phase II development, in which a digital database will be designed and constructed to manage nuclear concrete materials data in various digitized formats to facilitate electronic and mathematical processing for analysis, modeling, and design applications.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Tank waste remediation system nuclear criticality safety program management review  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the results of an internal management review of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) criticality safety program, performed in advance of the DOE/RL assessment for closure of the TWRS Nuclear Criticality Safety Issue, March 1994. Resolution of the safety issue was identified as Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-40-12, due September 1999.

BRADY RAAP, M.C.

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

340

Martin Marietta Energy Systems Nuclear Criticality Safety Improvement Program  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses questions raised by criticality safety violation at several DOE plants. Two charts are included that define the severity and reporting requirements for the six levels of accidents. A summary is given of all reported criticality incident at the DOE plants involved. The report concludes with Martin Marietta's Nuclear Criticality Safety Policy Statement. (JDH)

Speas, I.G.

1987-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Nuclear Safety Regulatory Assistance Reviews | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 14, 2002 August 14, 2002 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Fluor Hanford, Incorporated - EA-2002-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Fluor Hanford, Incorporated, related to Quality Assurance issues at the Hanford Site. June 19, 2002 Enforcement Letter, Kaiser-Hill Company, L.L.C. - June 19, 2002 Enforcement Letter issued to Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC related to Unplanned Radioactive Material Uptakes at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site October 22, 2001 Special Report Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - October 22, 2001 Special Report Order issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Multiple Nuclear Safety Issues at the Hanford Site October 9, 2001 Enforcement Letter, LANL - October 9, 2001 Enforcement Letter issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory related to

342

Experience with performance based training of nuclear criticality safety engineers  

SciTech Connect

Historically, new entrants to the practice of nuclear criticality safety have learned their job primarily by on-the-job training (OJT) often by association with an experienced nuclear criticality safety engineer who probably also learned their job by OJT. Typically, the new entrant learned what he/she needed to know to solve a particular problem and accumulated experience as more problems were solved. It is likely that more formalism will be required in the future. Current US Department of Energy requirements for those positions which have to demonstrate qualification indicate that it should be achieved by using a systematic approach such as performance based training (PBT). Assuming that PBT would be an acceptable mechanism for nuclear criticality safety engineer training in a more formal environment, a site-specific analysis of the nuclear criticality safety engineer job was performed. Based on this analysis, classes are being developed and delivered to a target audience of newer nuclear criticality safety engineers. Because current interest is in developing training for selected aspects of the nuclear criticality safety engineer job, the analysis i`s incompletely developed in some areas. Details of this analysis are provided in this report.

Taylor, R.G.

1993-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

343

Safety and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Security Technologies for and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments Safety & Security Technologies Study Started in 2005 with OCRWM Funding. OCRWM funding ended in 2009. EM gave CVSA funding to finish the report. CVSA Ad Hoc RAM/Security/ITS Committee Examined current and emerging technologies for safety and security of radioactive material shipments Site visits Product reviews HMCRP HM-04 report on emerging technologies Safety & Security Technologies Study Completed several site visits to look at current technologies being used. Technologies were broken down into five categories. 1. Inspection Technologies 2. Security Technologies 3. Radioactive Material Dose Rate Measurement and

344

Nuclear Safety News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliance, LLC. News & Blog Blog Archive News Archive Program Highlights Enforcement News Organizational Chart Office of Health and Safety Office of Environmental Protection,...

345

Special Topics: Nuclear Materials: Books/Articles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PDF article introducing the effects of irradiation on materials for the nuclear power industry, 0, 588, Cathy Rohrer, 2/10/2007 5:16 PM by Cathy Rohrer. FORUMS ...

346

THE IMPACT OF THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR SAFETY REGIME IN BRAZIL  

SciTech Connect

A turning point of the world nuclear industry with respect to safety occurred due to the accident at Chernobyl, in 1986. A side from the tragic personal losses and the enormous financial damage, the Chernobyl accident has literally demonstrated that ''a nuclear accident anywhere is an accident everywhere''. The impact was felt immediately by the nuclear industry, with plant cancellations (e.g. Austria), elimination of national programs (e.g. Italy) and general construction delays. However, the reaction of the nuclear industry was equally immediate, which led to the proposal and establishment of a Global Nuclear Safety Regime. This regime is composed of biding international safety conventions, globally accepted safety standard, and a voluntary peer review system. In a previous work, the author has presented in detail the components of this Regime, and briefly discussed its impact in the Brazilian nuclear power organizations, including the Regulatory Body. This work, on the opposite, briefly reviews the Global Nuclear Safety Regime, and concentrates in detail in the discussion of its impact in Brazil, showing how it has produced some changes, and where the peer pressure regime has failed to produce real results.

Almeida, C.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

347

Office of Fissile Materials Disposition | National Nuclear Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fissile Materials Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

348

Environment, Safety & Health | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering...

349

A Web-Based Nuclear Criticality Safety Bibliographic Database  

SciTech Connect

A bibliographic criticality safety database of over 13,000 records is available on the Internet as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) website. This database is easy to access via the Internet and gets substantial daily usage. This database and other criticality safety resources are available at ncsp.llnl.gov. The web database has evolved from more than thirty years of effort at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), beginning with compilations of critical experiment reports and American Nuclear Society Transactions.

Koponen, B L; Huang, S

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

350

Status and Value of International Standards for Nuclear Criticality Safety  

SciTech Connect

This presentation provides an update to the author's standards report provided at the ICNC-2007 meeting. It includes a discussion about the difference between, and the value of participating in, the development of international 'consensus' standards as opposed to nonconsensus standards. Standards are developed for a myriad of reasons. Generally, standards represent an agreed upon, repeatable way of doing something as defined by an individual or group of people. They come in various types. Examples include personal, family, business, industrial, commercial, and regulatory such as military, community, state, federal, and international standards. Typically, national and international 'consensus' standards are developed by individuals and organizations of diverse backgrounds representing the subject matter users and developers of a service or product and other interested parties or organizations. Within the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), Technical Committee 85 (TC85) on nuclear energy, Subcommittee 5 (SC5) on nuclear fuel technology, there is a Working Group 8 (WG8) on standardization of calculations, procedures, and practices related to criticality safety. WG8 has developed, and is developing, ISO standards within the category of nuclear criticality safety of fissionable materials outside of reactors (i.e., nonreactor fissionable material nuclear fuel cycle facilities). Since the presentation of the ICNC-2007 report, WG8 has issued three new finalized international standards and is developing two more new standards. Nearly all elements of the published WG8 ISO standards have been incorporated into IAEA nonconsensus guides and standards. The progression of consensus standards development among international partners in a collegial environment establishes a synergy of different concepts that broadens the perspectives of the members. This breadth of perspectives benefits the working group members in their considerations of consensus standards developments in their own countries. A testament to the value of the international standards efforts is that nearly all elements of the published WG8 ISO standards have been incorporated into IAEA nonconsensus guides and standards and are mainly consistent with international ISO member domestic standards.

Hopper, Calvin Mitchell [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Interim Management of Nuclear Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary-1995.html[6/27/2011 12:50:20 PM] Summary-1995.html[6/27/2011 12:50:20 PM] SUMMARY The Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the Department of Energy (DOE), established the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the early 1950s for the production of special radioactive isotopes. The primary SRS mission was to produce strategic isotopes (plutonium-239 and tritium) used in the development and production of nuclear weapons for national defense. The Site produced other special isotopes (californium-252, plutonium-238, americium-241, etc.) to support research in nuclear medicine, space exploration, and commercial applications. The historic production cycle at the SRS involved the fabrication of metal fuel and target assemblies for irradiation in the Site reactors, followed by chemical dissolution, separation, and conversion of the radioisotopes into solid forms for use

352

A Look Back at the Nuclear Safety Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

nuclear facilities. That is why, in response to the March accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear complex, the Department hosted a Nuclear Safety Workshop to bring...

353

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specific Activity Specific Activity Low Specific Activity (LSA) material means Class 7 (radioactive) material with limited specific activity which satisfies the descriptions and limits set forth below. Shielding materials surrounding the LSA material may not be considered in determining the estimated average specific activity of the package contents. LSA material must be in one of three groups: LSA-I (i) Ores containing only naturally occurring radionuclides (e.g., uranium, thorium) and uranium or thorium concentrates of such ores; or (ii) Solid unirradiated natural uranium or depleted uranium or natural thorium or their solid or liquid compounds or mixtures; or (iii) Class 7 (radioactive) material, other than fissile material, for which the A2 value is unlimited; or

354

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center - WEB ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 25, 2007 ... The NRC regulates commercial nuclear power plants and other uses of nuclear materials, such as in nuclear medicine, through licensing, ...

355

THE RADIATION SAFETY INFORMATION COMPUTATIONAL CENTER (RSICC) - A RESOURCE FOR COMPUTATIONAL TOOLS FOR NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC), which has been in existence since 1963, is the principal source and repository in the United States for computational tools for nuclear applications. RSICC collects, organizes, evaluates and distributes nuclear software and data involving the transport of neutral and charged particle radiation, and shielding and protection from radiation associated with: nuclear weapons and materials, fission and fusion reactors, outer space, accelerators, medical facilities, and nuclear waste. RSICC serves over 12,000 scientists and engineers from 94 countries. RSICC software provides in-depth coverage of radiation related topics: the physics of the interaction of radiation with matter, radiation production and sources, criticality safety, radiation protection and shielding, radiation detectors and measurements, shielding materials properties, radiation waste management, atmospheric dispersion and environmental dose, medical applications, macro- and micro-dosimetry calculations.

Kirk, Bernadette Lugue [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Attachment, Integrated Safety Analysis |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Attachment, Integrated Safety Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Attachment, Integrated Safety Analysis Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Attachment, Integrated Safety Analysis This paper addresses why the use of an Integrated Safety Analysis ("ISA") is appropriate for fuel recycling facilities1 which would be licensed under new regulations currently being considered by NRC. The use of the ISA for fuel facilities under Part 70 is described and compared to the use of a Probabilistic Risk Assessment ("PRA") for reactor facilities. A basis is provided for concluding that future recycling facilities - which will possess characteristics similar to today's fuel cycle facilities and distinct from reactors - can best be assessed using established qualitative or semi-quantitative ISA techniques to achieve and

357

Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Policy Technical Position NSEP-TP-2007- 1, Technical Position on the Requirement in DOE 0 420.1B to Use National Consensus Industry Standards and the Model Building CodesTechnical Position NS Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Policy Technical Position NSEP-TP-2007- 1, Technical Position on the Requirement in DOE 0 420.1B to Use National Consensus Industry Standards and the Model Building CodesTechnical Position NS All new construction required to follow the provisions of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 420. lB, Facility Safety, must comply with national consensus industry standards and the model building codes applicable for the state or region in which the facility is located. Certain individuals in the fire community requested

358

Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project parameter study database  

SciTech Connect

A computerized, knowledge-screened, comprehensive database of the nuclear criticality safety documentation has been assembled as part of the Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety (NCTS) Project. The database is focused on nuclear criticality parameter studies. The database has been computerized using dBASE III Plus and can be used on a personal computer or a workstation. More than 1300 documents have been reviewed by nuclear criticality specialists over the last 5 years to produce over 800 database entries. Nuclear criticality specialists will be able to access the database and retrieve information about topical parameter studies, authors, and chronology. The database places the accumulated knowledge in the nuclear criticality area over the last 50 years at the fingertips of a criticality analyst.

Toffer, H.; Erickson, D.G.; Samuel, T.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Pearson, J.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

International safeguards: Accounting for nuclear materials  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear safeguards applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are one element of the non-proliferation regime'', the collection of measures whose aim is to forestall the spread of nuclear weapons to countries that do not already possess them. Safeguards verifications provide evidence that nuclear materials in peaceful use for nuclear-power production are properly accounted for. Though carried out in cooperation with nuclear facility operators, the verifications can provide assurance because they are designed with the capability to detect diversion, should it occur. Traditional safeguards verification measures conducted by inspectors of the IAEA include book auditing; counting and identifying containers of nuclear material; measuring nuclear material; photographic and video surveillance; and sealing. Novel approaches to achieve greater efficiency and effectiveness in safeguards verifications are under investigation as the number and complexity of nuclear facilities grow. These include the zone approach, which entails carrying out verifications for groups of facilities collectively, and randomization approach, which entails carrying out entire inspection visits some fraction of the time on a random basis. Both approaches show promise in particular situations, but, like traditional measures, must be tested to ensure their practical utility. These approaches are covered on this report. 15 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

Fishbone, L.G.

1988-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

360

Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Safety » Nuclear Safety Research and Nuclear Safety » Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program In 2011, the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) created the Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program within the Office of Nuclear Safety to provide corporate-level leadership supporting nuclear safety research and development throughout the Department of Energy (DOE). The NSR&D Program solicits input from the Nuclear Safety Council which includes membership of senior management from each program office. NSR&D Program Objectives: To establish an enduring Departmental commitment and capability to utilize NSR&D in preventing and reducing the hazards and risks posed by DOE/NNSA nuclear facilities;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Responses Other Effects History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions [RAD Pie Chart] Exposure Source Average annual dose to an individual in the United States (millirem) Natural sources (including radon) - Ground, cosmic, and terrestrial - Internal radiation 200 mrem 100 mrem Occupational 0.9 mrem Nuclear Fuel Cycle 0.05 mrem Consumer Products - Tobacco - Other (i.e., smoke detectors, exit signs, luminous watch dials) Dose to lungs ~16,000 mrem 5 - 13 mrem Environmental Sources 0.06 mrem Medical - Diagnostic X-rays - Nuclear Medicine 39 mrem 14 mrem Approximate Annual Total 360 mrem [Radiation] Everyone in the world is continuously exposed to naturally-occuring background radiation. The average radiation dose received by the United

362

Safety - Vulnerability Assessment Team - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Safety VAT Projects Introducing the VAT Adversarial Vulnerability Assessments Safety Tags & Product Counterfeiting Election Security Spoofing GPS Defeating Existing Tamper-Indicating Seals Specialty Field Tools & Sampling Tools Insider Threat Mitigation Drug Testing Security Microprocessor Prototypes The Journal of Physical Security Vulnerability Assessments Vulnerability Assessments Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Insanely Fast µProcessor Shop Seals About Seals Applications of Seals Common Myths about Tamper Indicating Seals Definitions Findings and Lessons Learned New Seals Types of Seals Seals References Selected VAT Papers Selected VAT Papers Selected Invited Talks Self-Assessment Survey Security Maxims Devil's Dictionary of Security Terms Argonne's VAT (brochure)

363

Proceedings of the Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Workshop  

SciTech Connect

This document contains summaries of most of the papers presented at the 1995 Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Project (NCTSP) meeting, which was held May 16 and 17 at San Diego, Ca. The meeting was broken up into seven sessions, which covered the following topics: (1) Criticality Safety of Project Sapphire; (2) Relevant Experiments For Criticality Safety; (3) Interactions with the Former Soviet Union; (4) Misapplications and Limitations of Monte Carlo Methods Directed Toward Criticality Safety Analyses; (5) Monte Carlo Vulnerabilities of Execution and Interpretation; (6) Monte Carlo Vulnerabilities of Representation; and (7) Benchmark Comparisons.

Rene G. Sanchez

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

A sensor-based automation system for handling nuclear materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated system is being developed for handling large payloads of radioactive nuclear materials in an analytical laboratory. The automation system performs unpacking and repacking of payloads from shipping and storage containers, and delivery of the payloads to the stations in the laboratory. The system uses machine vision and force/torque sensing to provide sensor-based control of the automation system in order to enhance system safety, flexibility, and robustness, and achieve easy remote operation. The automation system also controls the operation of the laboratory measurement systems and the coordination of them with the robotic system. Particular attention has been given to system design features and analytical methods that provide an enhanced level of operational safety. Independent mechanical gripper interlock and tool release mechanisms were designed to prevent payload mishandling. An extensive Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the automation system was developed as a safety design analysis tool.

Drotning, W.; Kimberly, H.; Wapman, W.; Darras, D. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Introduction to Nuclear Reactors, Fuels, and Materials: Heather ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 27, 2012 ... What goes on in a nuclear power plant. • Challenges in nuclear fuels and materials. Key lessons: • Fuels and materials change during ...

366

Nuclear Material Recovery | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Securing nuclear material domestically and internationally is one part of Y-12's nuclear nonproliferation business. Miscellaneous scrap material is a diverse group of...

367

bylaws of the nuclear materials committee of the minerals, metals ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The name of this technical committee shall be the Nuclear Materials. Committee ... aspects of materials, which are utilized in all areas of nuclear energy.

368

Nuclear Fuels and Materials: Jon Carmack, Idaho National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 28, 2012 ... w w w .in. l.g o v. Nuclear Fuels and Materials. Jon Carmack. Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division. Idaho National Laboratory. February 28 ...

369

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

part. It may consist of one or more receptacles, absorbent materials, spacing structures, thermal insulation, radiation shielding, and devices for cooling or absorbing mechanical...

370

Energy Department and Catholic University Improve Safety of Nuclear Waste |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Catholic University Improve Safety of Nuclear Catholic University Improve Safety of Nuclear Waste Energy Department and Catholic University Improve Safety of Nuclear Waste January 30, 2013 - 12:51pm Addthis Secretary of Energy Steven Chu participates in a tour of Catholic University's Vitreous State Laboratory. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Environmental Management. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu participates in a tour of Catholic University's Vitreous State Laboratory. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Environmental Management. David Sheeley David Sheeley Editor/Writer What does this project do? Hanford treats and immobilizes significant quantities of legacy nuclear waste left from the manufacture of plutonium during World War II and the Cold War. Secretary Steven Chu recently visited Catholic University's Vitreous

371

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response Effects of Radiation History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms Majority from NRC Contacts Comments & Questions A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z...

372

Assessment of nuclear safety and nuclear criticality potential in the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

A panel of experts in the fields of process engineering, process chemistry, and safety analysis met together on January 26, 1993, and February 19, 1993, to discuss nuclear safety and nuclear criticality potential in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processes. Nuclear safety issues and possibilities of nuclear criticality incidents in the DWPF were examined in depth. The discussion started at the receipt of slurry feeds: The Low Point Pump Pit Precipitate Tank (LPPPPT) and the Low Point Pump Pit Sludge Tank (LPPPST), and went into detail the whole DWPF processes. This report provides discussion of each of the areas and processes of the DWPF in terms of potential nuclear safety issues and nuclear criticality concerns.

Ha, B.C.

1993-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

373

Nuclear safety | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to prevent nuclear and radiation accidents or to limit their consequences. PPPL and ITER: Lab teams support the world's largest fusion experiment with leading-edge ideas and...

374

Security of Nuclear Reactors and Special Nuclear Materials This revisiono  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Provides requirements for the recovery of lost, seized, or stolen special nuclear material (para 2-1b). o Prescribes that unclassified information pertaining to plans, procedures, and equipment for the physical protection of nuclear reactors and special nuclear material will be safeguarded as DoD Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (para 2-1f). o Requires the conduct of a vulnerability assessment at each facility where special nuclear material is used or stored (para 2-2a). o Provides that Headquarters, U. S. Army Materiel Command will develop the postulated threat as the basis for the vulnerability assessment (para 2-2b), as well as the standardized format for documenting the results of the assessment and for the after action reports (para 2-2h). o Designates special nuclear material as inherently dangerous to others for use of force purposes (para 2-4a). o Prescribes minimum storage standards for special nuclear material (para 3-1). o Provides for the protection of vital equipment (para 3-3). o Explains the concept of the required security system for nuclear reactors and special nuclear material (para 4-2). o Establishes specific physical security standards for the protection of nuclear reactors and special nuclear material (para 4-4), to include required access controls (para 4-5). o Prohibits the locksmith from being designated as the key control officer or lock custodian (para 4-5g(25)). o Provides guidance on meeting requirement to continuously man two alarm monitoring facilities (para 4-6b). o Allows continued use of monitoring console systems installed prior to publication of this regulation that do not meet the map or video display requirement (para 4-6g(1)). o Provides guidance for testing the perimeter intrusion detection system (para 4-6n(2)). o Requires appropriate security personnel be trained to manually start the standby generator if the automatic starter fails to function properly (para 4-9b(4)). o Provides that the size, composition, and response time of the response force will be set by the major subordinate commander and approved by the Commanding

unknown authors

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Western University Nuclear Radiation Safety Inspection Checklist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Understanding (MOU) between USACE and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) dated July 5, 2001, and subject for interagency consultation if the decommissioning criteria at 10 CFR Section 20.1402 are determined, resulting from the disposal of radiologically contaminated waste from the nearby Apollo Nuclear Fuel

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

376

Safety/safeguards interactions during safety-related emergencies at Nuclear Power Reactor Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains an analysis of the safety/safeguards interactions that could occur during safety-related emergencies at licensed nuclear power reactors, and the extent to which these interactions are addressed in existing or proposed NRC guidance. The safety/safeguards interaction during a series of postulated emergencies was systematically examined to identify any potential performance deficiencies or conflicts between the Operations (safety) and Security (safeguards) organizations. This examination included the impacts of coordination with off-site emergency response personnel. Duties, responsibilities, optimal methods, and procedural actions inherent in these interactions were explored.

Moul, D.A.; Pilgrim, M.K.; Schweizer, R.L.; McEwen, J.E. Jr.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Nuclear safety criteria and specifications for space nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to define safety criteria which must be met to implement US safety policy for space fission reactors. These criteria provide the bases for decisions on the acceptability of specific mission and reactor design proposals. (JDH)

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Nuclear criticality safety staff training and qualifications at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Operations involving significant quantities of fissile material have been conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory continuously since 1943. Until the advent of the Laboratory`s Nuclear Criticality Safety Committee (NCSC) in 1957, line management had sole responsibility for controlling criticality risks. From 1957 until 1961, the NCSC was the Laboratory body which promulgated policy guidance as well as some technical guidance for specific operations. In 1961 the Laboratory created the position of Nuclear Criticality Safety Office (in addition to the NCSC). In 1980, Laboratory management moved the Criticality Safety Officer (and one other LACEF staff member who, by that time, was also working nearly full-time on criticality safety issues) into the Health Division office. Later that same year the Criticality Safety Group, H-6 (at that time) was created within H-Division, and staffed by these two individuals. The training and education of these individuals in the art of criticality safety was almost entirely self-regulated, depending heavily on technical interactions between each other, as well as NCSC, LACEF, operations, other facility, and broader criticality safety community personnel. Although the Los Alamos criticality safety group has grown both in size and formality of operations since 1980, the basic philosophy that a criticality specialist must be developed through mentoring and self motivation remains the same. Formally, this philosophy has been captured in an internal policy, document ``Conduct of Business in the Nuclear Criticality Safety Group.`` There are no short cuts or substitutes in the development of a criticality safety specialist. A person must have a self-motivated personality, excellent communications skills, a thorough understanding of the principals of neutron physics, a safety-conscious and helpful attitude, a good perspective of real risk, as well as a detailed understanding of process operations and credible upsets.

Monahan, S.P.; McLaughlin, T.P.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

ADVANCED CERAMIC MATERIALS FOR NEXT-GENERATION NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Rising global energy demands coupled with increased environmental concerns point to one solution; they must reduce their dependence on fossil fuels that emit greenhouse gases. As the global community faces the challenge of maintaining sovereign nation security, reducing greenhouse gases, and addressing climate change nuclear power will play a significant and likely growing role. In the US, nuclear energy already provides approximately one-fifth of the electricity used to power factories, offices, homes, and schools with 104 operating nuclear power plants, located at 65 sites in 31 states. Additionally, 19 utilities have applied to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for construction and operating licenses for 26 new reactors at 17 sites. This planned growth of nuclear power is occurring worldwide and has been termed the 'nuclear renaissance.' As major industrial nations craft their energy future, there are several important factors that must be considered about nuclear energy: (1) it has been proven over the last 40 years to be safe, reliable and affordable (good for Economic Security); (2) its technology and fuel can be domestically produced or obtained from allied nations (good for Energy Security); and (3) it is nearly free of greenhouse gas emissions (good for Environmental Security). Already an important part of worldwide energy security via electricity generation, nuclear energy can also potentially play an important role in industrial processes and supporting the nation's transportation sector. Coal-to-liquid processes, the generation of hydrogen and supporting the growing potential for a greatly increased electric transportation system (i.e. cars and trains) mean that nuclear energy could see dramatic growth in the near future as we seek to meet our growing demand for energy in cleaner, more secure ways. In order to address some of the prominent issues associated with nuclear power generation (i.e., high capital costs, waste management, and proliferation), the worldwide community is working to develop and deploy new nuclear energy systems and advanced fuel cycles. These new nuclear systems address the key challenges and include: (1) extracting the full energy value of the nuclear fuel; (2) creating waste solutions with improved long term safety; (3) minimizing the potential for the misuse of the technology and materials for weapons; (4) continually improving the safety of nuclear energy systems; and (5) keeping the cost of energy affordable.

Marra, J.

2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

380

Interface Affected Cascading In Nuclear Materials and Its Correlation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2012. Symposium, Materials Development for Nuclear Applications and Extreme Environments.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Aerospace nuclear safety report for August 1967  

SciTech Connect

The AEC Safety Branch advised that the present outlook for a potential mission using four modified SNAP-3 type generators is rather negative. Drop tests of four SNAP-19 intact reentry heat source capsules were conducted at the Tonopah Test Range. A preliminary GE SNAP-27 safety analysis was reviewed. Three arc tunnel tests were conducted at low heat fluxes. Debris were collected on downrange impactors from all tests. The rapid helium depressurization test on fuel microspheres was conducted by Battelle; preliminary examination of the fuel revealed no obvious change in microsphere characteristics.

Illing, R.G. (comp.)

1967-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is computer analysis? What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. Accurate determination of package behavior for impact and puncture accidents can be obtained by testing sub-scale models. This technique is frequently used in conjunction with full-scale tests and computer analyses. Full-scale spent fuel packages can weigh 250,000 pounds (three fully loaded semi-trucks) or more, therefore the ability to determine the behavior with scale-models improves testing safety and reduces testing costs. *** 1/4 Scale Free Drop Test 1/4 Scale Component Free Drop Test 1/3 Scale Puncture Test 1/2 Scale Puncture Test 1/8 Scale Rail Crush Test [scale model DROP test] Click to view picture [scale model component test]

383

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REGULATIONS & GUIDANCE SEARCH SITE MAP SITE MAP SAFE HOME Search Site RAM PACKAGES What are they? When are they used? How are they moved? What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record TESTING & CERTIFICATION How are packages certified? What are full-scale tests? What are scale-model tests? What is computer analysis? Package Certification Using Computer Analysis Engineering Principles Established by Three Early Scientists Engineering Principles Applied to Ancient Structures Description of Computer Model in Computer Analysis Engineered Structures Built WITHOUT the Use of Computer Analysis Structures Analyzed WITH the Use of Computer Analysis What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents?

384

Guidance for identifying, reporting and tracking nuclear safety noncompliances  

SciTech Connect

This document provides Department of Energy (DOE) contractors, subcontractors and suppliers with guidance in the effective use of DOE`s Price-Anderson nuclear safety Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS). Prompt contractor identification, reporting to DOE, and correction of nuclear safety noncompliances provides DOE with a basis to exercise enforcement discretion to mitigate civil penalties, and suspend the issuance of Notices of Violation for certain violations. Use of this reporting methodology is elective by contractors; however, this methodology is intended to reflect DOE`s philosophy on effective identification and reporting of nuclear safety noncompliances. To the extent that these expectations are met for particular noncompliances, DOE intends to appropriately exercise its enforcement discretion in considering whether, and to what extent, to undertake enforcement action.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with skin and if swallowed. Irritating to eyes, respiratory system and skin. May cause sensitization by skin-lime, sand, or soda ash. Place in covered containers using non-sparking tools and transport outdoors. Ventilate area and wash spill site after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling and Storage

Choi, Kyu Yong

386

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, in contact with skin and if swallowed. Irritating to respiratory system and skin. Risk of serious damage - 319953 www.sigma-aldrich.com Page 2 #12;METHODS FOR CLEANING UP Cover with dry-lime, sand, or soda ash spill site after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling and Storage HANDLING User Exposure

Choi, Kyu Yong

387

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Irritating to eyes, respiratory system and skin. Very toxic to aquatic organisms, may cause long-term adverse FOR CLEANING UP Cover with dry-lime, sand, or soda ash. Place in covered containers using non-sparking tools after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling and Storage HANDLING User Exposure: Do

Choi, Kyu Yong

388

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Harmful by inhalation. Risk of serious damage to eyes. Target organ(s): Central nervous system. Blood, or soda ash. Place in covered containers using non-sparking tools and transport outdoors. Ventilate area and wash spill site after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling and Storage ALDRICH - E12508

Choi, Kyu Yong

389

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Irritating to eyes, respiratory system and skin. For additional information on toxicity, please refer or soda ash, pick up, keep in a closed container, and hold for waste disposal. Ventilate area and wash spill site after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling and Storage HANDLING User Exposure

Choi, Kyu Yong

390

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Target organ(s): Central nervous system. Kidneys. HMIS RATING HEALTH: 3* FLAMMABILITY: 2 REACTIVITY: 1 material pickup is complete. Cover with dry-lime, sand, or soda ash. Place in covered containers using non-sparking tools and transport outdoors. Section 7 - Handling and Storage HANDLING User Exposure: Do not breathe

Choi, Kyu Yong

391

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(s): Teeth. Cardiovascular system. HMIS RATING HEALTH: 3* FLAMMABILITY: 0 REACTIVITY: 2 SPECIAL HAZARD or soda ash, pick up, keep in a closed container, and hold for waste disposal. Ventilate area and wash spill site after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling and Storage HANDLING ALDRICH - 435589

Lin, Anna L.

392

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the environment. Harmful by inhalation and if swallowed. Irritating to eyes, respiratory system and skin. Toxic with dry-lime, sand, or soda ash. Place in covered containers using non-sparking tools and transport outdoors. Ventilate area and wash spill site after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling

Choi, Kyu Yong

393

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Section 3 - Hazards Identification EMERGENCY OVERVIEW Irritant. Irritating to eyes, respiratory system FOR CLEANING UP Cover with dry lime or soda ash, pick up, keep in a closed container, and hold for waste disposal. Ventilate area and wash spill site after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling

Choi, Kyu Yong

394

Nuclear criticality safety program for environmental restoration projects  

SciTech Connect

The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), formerly known as the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC), is located on a 1050 acre site approximately twenty miles northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. The production area of the site covers approximately 136 acres in the central portion of the site. Surrounding the core production area is a buffer consisting of leased grazing land, reforested land, and unused areas. The uranium processing facility was designed and constructed in the early 1950s. During the period from 1952 to 1989 the site produced uranium feed material and uranium products used in the United States weapons complex. Production at the site ended in 1989, when the site was shut down for what was expected to be a short period of time. However, the FUTC was permanently shut down in 1991, and the site`s mission was changed from production to environmental restoration. The objective of this paper is to give an update on activities at the Fernald Site and to describe the Nuclear Criticality Safety issues that are currently being addressed.

Marble, R.C.; Brown, T.D.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Nuclear fuel elements made from nanophase materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor core fuel element is composed of nanophase high temperature materials. An array of the fuel elements in rod form are joined in an open geometry fuel cell that preferably also uses such nanophase materials for the cell structures. The particular high temperature nanophase fuel element material must have the appropriate mechanical characteristics to avoid strain-related failure even at high temperatures, in the order of about 3,000 F. Preferably, the reactor type is a pressurized or boiling water reactor and the nanophase material is a high temperature ceramic or ceramic composite. Nanophase metals, or nanophase metals with nanophase ceramics in a composite mixture, also have desirable characteristics, although their temperature capability is not as great as with all ceramic nanophase material. Combinations of conventional or nanophase metals and conventional or nanophase ceramics can be employed as long as there is at least one nanophase material in the composite. The nuclear reactor so constructed has a number of high strength fuel particles, a nanophase structural material for supporting a fuel rod at high temperature, a configuration to allow passive cooling in the event of a primary cooling system failure, an ability to retain a coolable geometry even at high temperatures, an ability to resist generation of hydrogen gas, and a configuration having good nuclear, corrosion and mechanical characteristics.

Heubeck, Norman B.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Nuclear fuel elements made from nanophase materials  

SciTech Connect

A nuclear reactor core fuel element is composed of nanophase high temperature materials. An array of the fuel elements in rod form are joined in an open geometry fuel cell that preferably also uses such nanophase materials for the cell structures. The particular high temperature nanophase fuel element material must have the appropriate mechanical characteristics to avoid strain related failure even at high temperatures, in the order of about 3000.degree. F. Preferably, the reactor type is a pressurized or boiling water reactor and the nanophase material is a high temperature ceramic or ceramic composite. Nanophase metals, or nanophase metals with nanophase ceramics in a composite mixture, also have desirable characteristics, although their temperature capability is not as great as with all-ceramic nanophase material. Combinations of conventional or nanophase metals and conventional or nanophase ceramics can be employed as long as there is at least one nanophase material in the composite. The nuclear reactor so constructed has a number of high strength fuel particles, a nanophase structural material for supporting a fuel rod at high temperature, a configuration to allow passive cooling in the event of a primary cooling system failure, an ability to retain a coolable geometry even at high temperatures, an ability to resist generation of hydrogen gas, and a configuration having good nuclear, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics.

Heubeck, Norman B. (Schenectady, NY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Nuclear fuel elements made from nanophase materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor core fuel element is composed of nanophase high temperature materials. An array of the fuel elements in rod form are joined in an open geometry fuel cell that preferably also uses such nanophase materials for the cell structures. The particular high temperature nanophase fuel element material must have the appropriate mechanical characteristics to avoid strain related failure even at high temperatures, in the order of about 3000 F. Preferably, the reactor type is a pressurized or boiling water reactor and the nanophase material is a high temperature ceramic or ceramic composite. Nanophase metals, or nanophase metals with nanophase ceramics in a composite mixture, also have desirable characteristics, although their temperature capability is not as great as with all-ceramic nanophase material. Combinations of conventional or nanophase metals and conventional or nanophase ceramics can be employed as long as there is at least one nanophase material in the composite. The nuclear reactor so constructed has a number of high strength fuel particles, a nanophase structural material for supporting a fuel rod at high temperature, a configuration to allow passive cooling in the event of a primary cooling system failure, an ability to retain a coolable geometry even at high temperatures, an ability to resist generation of hydrogen gas, and a configuration having good nuclear, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics. 5 figs.

Heubeck, N.B.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

398

Materials Research Needs for Near-Term Nuclear Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / NSF Workshop on the Research Needs of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Technology / Material

John R. Weeks

399

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Photos 30-Foot Free Drop Test jpeg, 788K [photo] Click to view picture 1100-Pound Crush Test jpeg, 448K [photo] Click to view picture 40-Inch Puncture Test jpeg, 912K [photo] Click to view picture 30-Minute Pool Fire Test jpeg, 88K [photo] Click to view picture 8-Hour Immersion Test jpeg, 416K [photo] Click to view picture Graphics Unyielding Target jpeg, 144K [graphic] Click to view graphic title jpeg, 000K [graphic] Click to view graphic title jpeg, 000K [graphic] Click to view graphic title jpeg, 000K [graphic] Click to view graphic title jpeg, 000K [graphic] Click to view graphic Movies 30-Foot Free Drop Test AVI, 4.5 MB [movie] Click to view movie 1/3-Scale Puncture Test AVI, 3.3 MB [movie] Click to view movie 30-Minute

400

Nuclear criticality safety training: guidelines for DOE contractors  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Order 5480.1A, Chapter V, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, establishes safety procedures and requirements for DOE nuclear facilities. This guide has been developed as an aid to implementing the Chapter V requirements pertaining to nuclear criticality safety training. The guide outlines relevant conceptual knowledge and demonstrated good practices in job performance. It addresses training program operations requirements in the areas of employee evaluations, employee training records, training program evaluations, and training program records. It also suggests appropriate feedback mechanisms for criticality safety training program improvement. The emphasis is on academic rather than hands-on training. This allows a decoupling of these guidelines from specific facilities. It would be unrealistic to dictate a universal program of training because of the wide variation of operations, levels of experience, and work environments among DOE contractors and facilities. Hence, these guidelines do not address the actual implementation of a nuclear criticality safety training program, but rather they outline the general characteristics that should be included.

Crowell, M.R.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Russia-U.S. joint program on the safe management of nuclear materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Russia-US joint program on the safe management of nuclear materials was initiated to address common technical issues confronting the US and Russia in the management of excess weapons grade nuclear materials. The program was initiated after the 1993 Tomsk-7 accident. This paper provides an update on program activities since 1996. The Fourth US Russia Nuclear Materials Safety Management Workshop was conducted in March 1997. In addition, a number of contracts with Russian Institutes have been placed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). These contracts support research related to the safe disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) and highly enriched uranium (HEU). Topics investigated by Russian scientists under contracts with SNL and LLNL include accident consequence studies, the safety of anion exchange processes, underground isolation of nuclear materials, and the development of materials for the immobilization of excess weapons Pu.

Witmer, F.E.; Krumpe, P.F. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Carlson, D.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Charges Relating to Nuclear Reactor Safety," 1976, availableissues impor tant to nuclear reactor safety. This report wasstudies of overall nuclear reactor safety have been

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Processing Exemptions to Nuclear Safety Rules and Approval of Alternative Methods for Documented Safety Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STD-1083-2009 STD-1083-2009 June 2009 DOE STANDARD PROCESSING EXEMPTIONS TO NUCLEAR SAFETY RULES AND APPROVAL OF ALTERNATIVE METHODS FOR DOCUMENTED SAFETY ANALYSES U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Page at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds DOE-STD-1083-2009 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) Standard has been prepared by the Office of Quality Assurance Policy and Assistance to provide acceptable processes for: a. requesting and granting exemptions to DOE nuclear safety rules and b. requesting and approving alternate methodologies for documented safety analyses

404

Space Nuclear Safety Program. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical monthly report covers studies related to the use of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in radioisotope power systems carried out for the Office of Special Nuclear Projects of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Most of the studies discussed here are ongoing. Results and conclusions described may change as the work continues.

Bronisz, S.E. (comp.)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are full-scale tests? What are scale-model tests? What is computer analysis? What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. A packaging is certified when it can survive a sequence of impact, crush, puncture, fire, and immersion tests designed to replicate transport accident conditions. Type B Packages must meet the testing requirements of: Compliance Testing, as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.85 and 10 CFR Part 71.87 Normal Conditions of Transport, Ten tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.71 Hypothetical Accident Conditions, Six tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.73 The ability of radioactive material packages to withstand testing environments can be demonstrated by full-scale testing, scale-model

406

Measurement control administration for nuclear materials accountability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1986 a measurement control program was instituted at Mound to ensure that measurement performance used for nuclear material accountability was properly monitored and documented. The organization and management of various aspects of the program are discussed. Accurate measurements are the basis of nuclear material accountability. The validity of the accountability values depends on the measurement results that are used to determine inventories, receipts, and shipments. With this measurement information, material balances are calculated to determine losses and gains of materials during a specific time period. Calculation of Inventory Differences (ID) are based on chemical or physical measurements of many items. The validity of each term is dependent on the component measurements. Thus, in Figure 1, the measured element weight of 17 g is dependent on the performance of the particular measurement system that was used. In this case, the measurement is performed using a passive gamma ray method with a calibration curve determined by measuring representative standards containing a range of special nuclear materials (Figure 2). One objective of a measurement control program is to monitor and verify the validity of the calibration curve (Figure 3). In 1986 Mound's Nuclear Materials Accountability (NMA) group instituted a formal measurement control program to ensure the validity of the numbers that comprise this equation and provide a measure of how well bulk materials can be controlled. Most measurements used for accountability are production measurements with their own quality assurance programs. In many cases a measurement control system is planned and maintained by the developers and operators of the particular measurement system with oversight by the management responsible for the results. 4 refs., 7 figs.

Rudy, C.R.

1991-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

A COMPUTER-ASSIST MATERIAL TRACKING SYSTEM AS A CRITICALITY SAFETY AID TO OPERATORS  

SciTech Connect

In today's compliant-driven environment, fissionable material handlers are inundated with work control rules and procedures in carrying out nuclear operations. Historically, human errors are one of the key contributors of various criticality accidents. Since moving and handling fissionable materials are key components of their job functions, any means that can be provided to assist operators in facilitating fissionable material moves will help improve operational efficiency and enhance criticality safety implementation. From the criticality safety perspective, operational issues have been encountered in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) plutonium operations. Those issues included lack of adequate historical record keeping for the fissionable material stored in containers, a need for a better way of accommodating operations in a research and development setting, and better means of helping material handlers in carrying out various criticality safety controls. Through the years, effective means were implemented including better work control process, standardized criticality control conditions (SCCC) and relocation of criticality safety engineers to the plutonium facility. Another important measure taken was to develop a computer data acquisition system for criticality safety assessment, which is the subject of this paper. The purpose of the Criticality Special Support System (CSSS) is to integrate many of the proven operational support protocols into a software system to assist operators with assessing compliance to procedures during the handling and movement of fissionable materials. Many nuclear facilities utilize mass cards or a computer program to track fissionable material mass data in operations. Additional item specific data such as, the presence of moderators or close fitting reflectors, could be helpful to fissionable material handlers in assessing compliance to SCCC's. Computer-assist checking of a workstation material inventory against the designated SCCC to enhance the material movement was also recognized. The following three additional functions of the CSSS were requested by operational personnel: additional record keeping, assisting room inventory Material at Risk (MAR) calculations and generating the material label to be placed on a storage can. In 1998, a preliminary CSSS concept was presented to all key stakeholders for the feasibility of such an application. Subsequently, the CSSS was developed with full participation of all stakeholders including fissionable material handlers. In 2003, five CSSS workstations were deployed in the plutonium facility for beta testing and resolving any issues from the field uses. Currently, the CSSS is deployed in all laboratories in the LLNL Plutonium Facility. Initial deployment consists of only a few of the full system functions described in this paper. Final deployment of all functions will take a few more years to assure the system meets quality assurance requirements of a safety significant system.

Claybourn, R V; Huang, S T

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

Engineering Fundamentals - Nuclear Power Plant Materials, Version 2.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Engineering Fundamentals - Nuclear Power Plant Materials (EF-Materials) Version 2.0 computer-based training module provides new-hire engineering personnel with an overview of the basic concepts of nuclear power plant materials. Graphics and interactive features are used to enhance learning.EF-Materials covers the basic terms and concepts related to nuclear power plant materials and provides information about the significance of material degradation issues in nuclear power plants. ...

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

409

Proceedings of the Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the proceedings of the annual Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project (NCTSP) Workshop held in Monterey, California, on April 16--28, 1993. The NCTSP was sponsored by the Department of Energy and organized by the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. The report is divided into six sections reflecting the sessions outlined on the workshop agenda.

Sanchez, R.G. [comp.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Method for quantitative assessment of nuclear safety computer codes. [PWR  

SciTech Connect

A procedure has been developed for the quantitative assessment of nuclear safety computer codes and tested by comparison of RELAP4/MOD6 predictions with results from two Semiscale tests. This paper describes the developed procedure, the application of the procedure to the Semiscale tests, and the results obtained from the comparison.

Dearien, J.A.; Davis, C.B.; Matthews, L.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Beryllium - A Unique Material in Nuclear Applications  

SciTech Connect

Beryllium, due to its unique combination of structural, chemical, atomic number, and neutron absorption cross section characteristics, has been used successfully as a neutron reflector for three generations of nuclear test reactors at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), the largest test reactor in the world, has utilized five successive beryllium neutron reflectors and is scheduled for continued operation with a sixth beryllium reflector. A high radiation environment in a test reactor produces radiation damage and other changes in beryllium. These changes necessitate safety analysis of the beryllium, methods to predict performance, and appropriate surveillances. Other nuclear applications also utilize beryllium. Beryllium, given its unique atomic, physical, and chemical characteristics, is widely used as a “window” for x-rays and gamma rays. Beryllium, intimately mixed with high-energy alpha radiation emitters has been successfully used to produce neutron sources. This paper addresses operational experience and methodologies associated with the use of beryllium in nuclear test reactors and in “windows” for x-rays and gamma rays. Other nuclear applications utilizing beryllium are also discussed.

T., A. Tomberlin

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Software reliability and safety in nuclear reactor protection systems  

SciTech Connect

Planning the development, use and regulation of computer systems in nuclear reactor protection systems in such a way as to enhance reliability and safety is a complex issue. This report is one of a series of reports from the Computer Safety and Reliability Group, Lawrence Livermore that investigates different aspects of computer software in reactor National Laboratory, that investigates different aspects of computer software in reactor protection systems. There are two central themes in the report, First, software considerations cannot be fully understood in isolation from computer hardware and application considerations. Second, the process of engineering reliability and safety into a computer system requires activities to be carried out throughout the software life cycle. The report discusses the many activities that can be carried out during the software life cycle to improve the safety and reliability of the resulting product. The viewpoint is primarily that of the assessor, or auditor.

Lawrence, J.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Proceedings of the nuclear criticality technology safety project  

SciTech Connect

This document contains summaries of the most of the papers presented at the 1994 Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Project (NCTSP) meeting, which was held May 10 and 11 at Williamsburg, Va. The meeting was broken up into seven sessions, which covered the following topics: (1) Validation and Application of Calculations; (2) Relevant Experiments for Criticality Safety; (3) Experimental Facilities and Capabilities; (4) Rad-Waste and Weapons Disassembly; (5) Criticality Safety Software and Development; (6) Criticality Safety Studies at Universities; and (7) Training. The minutes and list of participants of the Critical Experiment Needs Identification Workgroup meeting, which was held on May 9 at the same venue, has been included as an appendix. A second appendix contains the names and addresses of all NCTSP meeting participants. Separate abstracts have been indexed to the database for contributions to this proceedings.

Sanchez, R.G. [comp.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

DOE O 452.2D Admin Chg 1, Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and ...

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

415

Integrated Global Nuclear Materials Management - Preliminary Concepts -  

SciTech Connect

Approach to Connect Global Objectives and Local Actions: (1) Articulate global objectives into a hierarchy of subsystem requirements and local attributes and measures; (2) Establish a baseline system and viable alternatives through the interactions and relationships (e.g., networks) of local system elements and their options; (3) Evaluate performance of system alternatives and develop improved nuclear material management strategies and technologies; and (4) The need to address greatest concerns first (prioritized or graded approach) and to make tradeoffs among implementation options and competing objectives entails a risk-based approach. IGNMM could provide a systematic understanding of global nuclear materials management and evolutionarily improve and integrate the management through an active architecture, using for example, situation awareness, system models, methods, technologies, and international cooperation. Different tools would be used within the overall framework to address individual issues on the desired geographic scale that could be easily linked to broader analyses. Life-cycle system analyses would allow for evaluating material path alternatives on an integrated global scale. Disconnects, overlaps, technical options, and alternatives for optimizing nuclear materials processes could be evaluated in an integrated manner.

Dreicer, M; Jones, E; Richardson, J

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

416

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials for Nuclear Power, 0, 2175, Maureen Byko, 3/15/2009 8:21 PM ... A comprehensive introductory educational site about all forms of nuclear power, 0 ...

417

Materials Physics and Applications Division Lead | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Materials Physics and Applications Division Lead | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

418

Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

419

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials for Nuclear Power, 0, 2161, Maureen Byko, 3/15/2009 8:21 PM ... A comprehensive introductory educational site about all forms of nuclear power, 0 ...

420

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center - ARTICLES ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 4, 2008 ... The January 2008 JOM offers the following articles covering disposition of nuclear waste: Material Corrosion Issues for Nuclear Waste ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Microsoft Word - Final Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and Safeguards System (NMMSS) Users Guide-Rev. 2.0 Prepared by: Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Materials Integration - NA-73 April...

422

Neutron Detectors for Detection of Nuclear Materials at LANL...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Neutron Detectors for Detection of Nuclear Materials at LANL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff...

423

DOE P 420.1 Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

POLICY Washington, D.C. Approved: 2-08-2011 SUBJECT: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY POLICY PURPOSE: To document the Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear safety policy. SCOPE:...

424

Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Notice,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Notice, June 2010 Risk Assessment in Support of DOE Nuclear Safety, Risk Information Notice, June 2010 On August 12, 2009, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 2009-1, Risk Assessment Methodologies at Defense Nuclear Facilities. This recommendation focused on the need for clear direction on use of quantitative risk assessments in nuclear safety applications at defense nuclear facilities. The Department of Energy (DOE) is presently analyzing directives, standards, training, and other tools that may support more effective development and use of risk assessment. Working with the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety and the Chief of Nuclear Safety, staff from the Office of Health,

425

N reactor individual risk comparison to quantitative nuclear safety goals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A full-scope level III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been completed for N reactor, a US Department of Energy (DOE) production reactor located on the Hanford Reservation in the state of Washington. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) provided the technical leadership for this work, using the state-of-the-art NUREG-1150 methodology developed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The main objectives of this effort were to assess the risks to the public and to the on-site workers posed by the operation of N reactor, to identify changes to the plant that could reduce the overall risk, and to compare those risks to the proposed NRC and DOE quantitative safety goals. This paper presents the methodology adopted by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and SNL for individual health risk evaluation, its results, and a comparison to the NRC safety objectives and the DOE nuclear safety guidelines. The N reactor results, are also compared with the five NUREG-1150 nuclear plants. Only internal events are compared here because external events are not yet reported in the current draft NUREG-1150. This is the first full-scope level III PRA study with a detailed quantitative safety goal comparison performed for DOE production reactors.

Wang, O.S.; Rainey, T.E.; Zentner, M.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oversight Assessment of Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project

427

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oversight Assessment of Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project

428

Letter from Nuclear Energy Institute regarding Integrated Safety Analysis: Why it is Appropropriate for Fuel Recycling Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

082 l F: 202.533.0166 l rxm@nei.org l www.nei.org 082 l F: 202.533.0166 l rxm@nei.org l www.nei.org Rod McCullum DIRECTOR FUEL CYCLE PROJECTS NUCLEAR GENERATION DIVISION September 10, 2010 Ms. Catherine Haney Director Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Washington, DC 20555-0001 Subject: Integrated Safety Analysis: Why It Is Appropriate for Fuel Recycling Facilities Project Number: 689 Dear Ms. Haney: Enclosed for your review is a Nuclear Energy Institute white paper on the use of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) at U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission-licensed recycling facilities. This paper is intended as an information source for the NRC and should serve as a foundation for discussion with industry representatives on the issue.

429

Recovery of fissile materials from nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering fissile materials such as uranium, and plutonium, and rare earth elements, from complex waste feed material, and converting the remaining wastes into a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. The waste feed is mixed with a dissolution glass formed of lead oxide and boron oxide resulting in oxidation, dehalogenation, and dissolution of metal oxides. Carbon is added to remove lead oxide, and a boron oxide fusion melt is produced. The fusion melt is essentially devoid of organic materials and halogens, and is easily and rapidly dissolved in nitric acid. After dissolution, uranium, plutonium, and rare earth elements are separated from the acid and recovered by processes such as PUREX or ion exchange. The remaining acid waste stream is vitrified to produce a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. Potential waste feed materials include plutonium scrap and residue, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, organic material and other carbon-containing material.

Forsberg, Charles W.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Recovery of fissile materials from nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for recovering fissile materials such as uranium, and plutonium, and rare earth elements, from complex waste feed material, and converting the remaining wastes into a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. The waste feed is mixed with a dissolution glass formed of lead oxide and boron oxide resulting in oxidation, dehalogenation, and dissolution of metal oxides. Carbon is added to remove lead oxide, and a boron oxide fusion melt is produced. The fusion melt is essentially devoid of organic materials and halogens, and is easily and rapidly dissolved in nitric acid. After dissolution, uranium, plutonium and rare earth elements are separated from the acid and recovered by processes such as PUREX or ion exchange. The remaining acid waste stream is vitrified to produce a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. Potential waste feed materials include plutonium scrap and residue, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, organic material and other carbon-containing material.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

432

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

433

Radiation imaging technology for nuclear materials safeguards  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-ray and neutron imaging technology is emerging as a useful tool for nuclear materials safeguards. Principal applications include improvement in accuracy for nondestructive assay of heterogeneous material (e.g., residues) and wide-area imaging of nuclear material in facilities (e.g., holdup). Portable gamma cameras with gamma-ray spectroscopy are available commercially and are being applied to holdup measurements. The technology has the potential to significantly reduce effort and exposure in holdup campaigns; and, with imaging, some of the limiting assumptions required for conventional holdup analysis can be relaxed, resulting in a more general analysis. Methods to analyze spectroscopic-imaging data to assay plutonium and uranium in processing equipment are being development. Results of holdup measurements using a commercial, portable gamma-cameras are presented. The authors are also developing fast neutron imaging techniques for NDA, search, and holdup. Fast neutron imaging provides a direct measurement of the source of neutrons and is relatively insensitive to surroundings when compared to thermal or epithermal neutron imaging. The technology is well-suited for in-process inventory measurements and verification of materials in interim storage, for which gamma-ray measurements may be inadequate due to self-shielding. Results of numerical simulations to predict the performance of fast-neutron telescopes for safeguards applications are presented.

Prettyman, T.H.; Russo, P.A.; Cheung, C.C.; Christianson, A.D.; Feldman, W.C.; Gavron, A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Nuclear Explosives Safety Study Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

85-2007 85-2007 September 2007 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY STUDY FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DRAFT DOE-STD-1185-2007 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DRAFT DOE-STD-1185-2007 iv INTENTIONALLY BLANK DRAFT DOE-STD-1185-2007 v TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT ................................................................................................................ vii PURPOSE ....................................................................................................................................1

435

Nuclear reactor safety. Progress report, January 1-March 31, 1982  

SciTech Connect

The work that is highlighted here represents accomplishments for the period January 1-March 31, 1982 by the groups at Los Alamos involved in reactor safety research for the Division of Accident Evaluation, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Presented are brief overviews compiled by project, along with a bibliography of Technical Notes and publications written during this quarter. Information is presented concerning the TRAC code development; thermal-hydraulic analysis for PWR after ECCS operation; failure criteria for graphites used in HTGR type reactors; upper structure dynamics experiments; CRBR loss-of-flow accident analysis; and LWR severe accident analysis.

Stevenson, M.G. (comp.)

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Some political issues related to future special nuclear materials production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal Government must take action to assure the future adequate supply of special nuclear materials for nuclear weapons. Existing statutes permit the construction of advanced defense production reactors and the reprocessing of commercial spent fuel for the production of special materials. Such actions would not only benefit the US nuclear reactor manufacturers, but also the US electric utilities that use nuclear reactors.

Peaslee, A.T. Jr.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Turning a Nuclear Spotlight on Illegal Weapons Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... research neutron source, which bathes material samples with low-energy neutrons. ... count acts as a unique signature of special nuclear material. ...

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

438

The Nuclear Renaissance: A Challenge for the Materials Community  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This program was developed by the Generation IV project management board on materials and ... Materials are the enablers for future nuclear technologies.

439

Materials for Nuclear Power: A Brief Introduction - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... CITATION: Osman, T. M., "Materials for Nuclear Power: A Brief Introduction", Materials Technology@TMS, February 2007. Last Updated: ...

440

Nuclear safety as applied to space power reactor systems  

SciTech Connect

To develop a strategy for incorporating and demonstrating safety, it is necessary to enumerate the unique aspects of space power reactor systems from a safety standpoint. These features must be differentiated from terrestrial nuclear power plants so that our experience can be applied properly. Some ideas can then be developed on how safe designs can be achieved so that they are safe and perceived to be safe by the public. These ideas include operating only after achieving a stable orbit, developing an inherently safe design, ''designing'' in safety from the start and managing the system development (design) so that it is perceived safe. These and other ideas are explored further in this paper.

Cummings, G.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with  ...

442

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center - WEB ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials for Nuclear ... and fission products relevant for radioactive waste disposal projects.

443

Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recapping the Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power ... The conference hosted utility engineers, reactor vendor engineers, plant architect ...

444

Multiscale Modeling of Defect Mechanics in Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The key to developing advanced materials for nuclear applications is ... Physics-Based Homogenization of Random Continuum Microstructures.

445

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center - WEB ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 25, 2007 ... Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials for Nuclear ... The Information Bridge contains documents and citations in physics, ...

446

Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear reactors present a complex, challenging environment where innovations in materials science can provide for improved performance, efficiency and ...

447

Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems—Water ... problems associated with spent fuel storage and radioactive waste disposal.

448

Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with  ...

449

Implantation and Characterization of Helium in Nuclear Materials at ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Accelerated Materials Evaluation for Nuclear Application Utilizing Test Reactors, Ion Beam Facilities and Modeling. Presentation Title, Implantation

450

Materials for Nuclear Waste Disposal and Environmental Cleanup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials for Nuclear Waste Disposal and Environmental Cleanup ... Secure and Certify Studies to Work on Production of Spiked Plutonium.

451

DOE M 441.1-1, Nuclear Material Packaging Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The manual provides detailed packaging requirements for protecting workers from exposure to nuclear materials stored outside of an approved engineered ...

2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

452

Double-clad nuclear-fuel safety rod  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for shutting down a nuclear reactor during an undercooling or overpower event, whether or not the reactor's scram system operates properly. This is accomplished by double-clad fuel safety rods positioned at various locations throughout the reactor core, wherein melting of a secondary internal cladding of the rod allows the fuel column therein to shift from the reactor core to place the reactor in a subcritical condition.

McCarthy, W.H.; Atcheson, D.B.

1981-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

453

Nuclear Criticality Safety Requirements Implementation Matrix for Tank Farms  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a detailed matrix of specific Tank Farms nuclear criticality safety program elements indexed to primary requirements documents. These requirements are collected at a higher level in HNF-SO-MP-SRID-001, ''Tank Waste Remediation System Standards/Requirements Identification Document.'' The intended use of this document is to provide a roadmap for implementing procedures and assessments.

WEISS, E.V.

2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

454

Merger of Nuclear Data with Criticality Safety Calculations  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we report on current activities related to the merger of differential/integral data (especially in the resolved-resonance region) with nuclear criticality safety computations. Techniques are outlined for closer coupling of many processes ? measurement, data reduction, differential-data analysis, integral-data analysis, generating multigroup cross sections, data-testing, criticality computations ? which in the past have been treated independently.

Derrien, H.; Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.

1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

455

Space Nuclear Safety Program. Progress report, November 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical monthly report covers studies related to the use of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in radioisotope power systems carried out for the Office of Special Nuclear Projects of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics discussed include: safety-verification impact tests; explosion test; fragment test; leaking fueled clads; effects of fresh water and seawater or PuO/sub 2/ pellets; and impact tests of 5 watt radioisotope thermoelectric generator.

Bronisz, S.E. (comp.)

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

United States Department of Energy Nuclear Materials Stewardship  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy launched the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in January 2000 to accelerate the work of achieving integration and cutting long-term costs associated with the management of the Department's nuclear materials, with the principal focus on excess materials. Management of nuclear materials is a fundamental and enduring responsibility that is essential to meeting the Department's national security, nonproliferation, energy, science, and environmental missions into the distant future. The effective management of nuclear materials is important for a set of reasons: (1) some materials are vital to our national defense; (2) the materials pose physical and security risks; (3) managing them is costly; and (4) costs are likely to extend well into the future. The Department currently manages nuclear materials under eight programs, with offices in 36 different locations. Through the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative, progress was during calendar year 20 00 in achieving better coordination and integration of nuclear materials management responsibilities and in evaluating opportunities to further coordinate and integrate cross-program responsibilities for the treatment, storage, and disposition of excess nuclear materials. During CY 2001 the Departmental approach to nuclear materials stewardship changed consistent with the business processes followed by the new administration. This paper reports on the progress of the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in evaluating and implementing these opportunities, and the remaining challenges in integrating the long-term management of nuclear materials.

Newton, J. W.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

457

Review and Approval of Nuclear Facility Safety Basis and Safety Design Basis Documents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1104-2009 May 2009 Superseding DOE-STD-1104-96 DOE STANDARD REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF NUCLEAR FACILITY SAFETY BASIS AND SAFETY DESIGN BASIS DOCUMENTS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, DC 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1104-2009 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards web page at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1104-2009 iii CONTENTS FOREWORD .................................................................................................................................. v INTRODUCTION ..........................................................................................................................

458

Implementation Plan and Initial Development of Nuclear Concrete Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation Plan and Initial Development of Nuclear Concrete Implementation Plan and Initial Development of Nuclear Concrete Materials Database for Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Implementation Plan and Initial Development of Nuclear Concrete Materials Database for Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program The FY10 activities for development of a nuclear concrete materials database to support the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program are summarized. The database will be designed and constructed using the ORNL materials database infrastructure established for the Gen IV Materials Handbook to achieve cost reduction and development efficiency. In Phase I, a static database will be developed to manage searchable documents from the Structural Materials Handbook that contains information on nuclear concrete

459

Implementation Plan and Initial Development of Nuclear Concrete Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation Plan and Initial Development of Nuclear Concrete Implementation Plan and Initial Development of Nuclear Concrete Materials Database for Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Implementation Plan and Initial Development of Nuclear Concrete Materials Database for Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program The FY10 activities for development of a nuclear concrete materials database to support the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program are summarized. The database will be designed and constructed using the ORNL materials database infrastructure established for the Gen IV Materials Handbook to achieve cost reduction and development efficiency. In Phase I, a static database will be developed to manage searchable documents from the Structural Materials Handbook that contains information on nuclear concrete

460

Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS ID NO.: 0137SPE012  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Material Safety Data Sheet Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS ID NO.: 0137SPE012 Revision date: 05/25/2011 1. CHEMICAL PRODUCT AND COMPANY INFORMATION Product name: Speedway E85 Synonym: Speedway ED75/ED85; E-75; E75; E-85; E85; Ethanol/Gasoline Fuel Blend; Fuel Ethanol ED75/ED85 Chemical Family: Gasoline/Ethanol Formula: Mixture Manufacturer: Speedway LLC P.O. Box 1500 Enon, OH 45501 Other information: 419-421-3070 Emergency telephone number: 877-627-5463 2. COMPOSITION/INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS E85 is a mixture of ethyl alcohol and gasoline that is approved for use in an automobile spark ignition engine. Can contain small amounts of dye and other additives (>0.02%) which are not considered hazardous at the concentrations used. Product information: Name CAS Number

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

SRS - Programs - H Area Nuclear Materials Disposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H Area Nuclear Materials Disposition H Area Nuclear Materials Disposition The primary mission of the H-Canyon Complex is to dissolve, purify and blend-down surplus highly enriched uranium (HEU) and aluminum-clad foreign and domestic research reactor fuel to produce a low enriched uranium (LEU) solution suitable for conversion to commercial reactor fuel. A secondary mission for H-Canyon is to dissolve excess plutonium (Pu) not suitable for MOX and transfer it for vitrification in the Defense Waste Processing Facility at SRS. H Canyon was constructed in the early 1950s and began operations in 1955. The building is called a canyon because of its long rectangular shape and two continuous trenches that contains the process vessels. It is approximately 1,000 feet long with several levels to accommodate the various stages of material stabilization, including control rooms to monitor overall equipment and operating processes, equipment and piping gallery for solution transport, storage, and disposition, and unique overhead bridge cranes to support overall process operations. All work is remotely controlled, and employees are further protected from radiation by thick concrete walls.

462

DOE nuclear material packaging manual: storage container requirements for plutonium oxide materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Loss of containment of nuclear material stored in containers such as food-pack cans, paint cans, or taped slip lid cans has generated concern about packaging requirements for interim storage of nuclear materials in working facilities such as the plutonium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In response, DOE has recently issued DOE M 441.1 'Nuclear Material Packaging Manual' with encouragement from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. A unique feature compared to transportation containers is the allowance of filters to vent flammable gases during storage. Defining commonly used concepts such as maximum allowable working pressure and He leak rate criteria become problematic when considering vented containers. Los Alamos has developed a set of container requirements that are in compliance with 441.1 based upon the activity of heat-source plutonium (90% Pu-238) oxide, which bounds the requirements for weapons-grade plutonium oxide. The pre and post drop-test He leak rates depend upon container size as well as the material contents. For containers that are routinely handled, ease of handling and weight are a major consideration. Relatively thin-walled containers with flat bottoms are desired yet they cannot be He leak tested at a differential pressure of one atmosphere due to the potential for plastic deformation of the flat bottom during testing. The He leak rates and He leak testing configuration for containers designed for plutonium bearing materials will be presented. The approach to meeting the other manual requirements such as corrosion and thermal degradation resistance will be addressed. The information presented can be used by other sites to evaluate if their conditions are bounded by LANL requirements when considering procurement of 441.1 compliant containers.

Veirs, D Kirk [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. “Investigation of Nuclear Structure by Resonance1996, pp. G. Warren et al. “Nuclear Resonance Fluorescenceof 235U” IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium 2006, pp. 914. W.

Quiter, Brian J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Materials Development for Nuclear Applications and Extreme ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aladar A Csontos, Nuclear Regulatory Commission ... on lifetime extension of existing nuclear reactors and meeting the challenges of future nuclear endeavors

465

Fusion-reactor blanket-material safety-compatibility studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blanket material selection for fusion reactors is strongly influenced by the desire to minimize safety and environmental concerns. Blanket material safety compatibility studies are being conducted to identify and characterize blanket-coolant-material interactions under postulated reactor accident conditions. Recently completed scoping compatibility tests indicate that : (1) ternary oxides (LiAlO/sub 2/, Li/sub 2/ZrO/sub 3/, Li/sub 2/SiO/sub 3/, Li/sub 4/SiO/sub 4/ and LiTiO/sub 3/) at postulated blanket operating temperatures are compatible with water coolant, while liquid lithium and Li/sub 7/Pb/sub 2/ alloy reactions with water generate heat, aerosol and hydrogen; (2) lithium oxide and Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/ alloy react mildly with water requiring special precautions to control hydrogen release; (3) liquid lithium reacts substantially, while Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/ alloy reacts mildly with concrete to produce hydrogen; and (4) liquid lithium-air reactions present some major safety concerns.

Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.; Keough, R.F.; Cohen, S.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Probabilistic cost-benefit analysis of enhanced safety features for strategic nuclear weapons at a representative location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We carried out a demonstration analysis of the value of developing and implementing enhanced safety features for nuclear weapons in the US stockpile. We modified an approach that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) developed in response to a congressional directive that NRC assess the ``value-impact`` of regulatory actions for commercial nuclear power plants. Because improving weapon safety shares some basic objectives with NRC regulations, i.e., protecting public health and safety from the effects of accidents involving radioactive materials, we believe the NRC approach to be appropriate for evaluating weapons-safety cost-benefit issues. Impact analysis includes not only direct costs associated with retrofitting the weapon system, but also the expected costs (or economic risks) that are avoided by the action, i.e., the benefits.

Stephens, D.R.; Hall, C.H.; Holman, G.S.; Graham, K.F.; Harvey, T.F.; Serduke, F.J.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Annual report to Congress. Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Annual Report to the Congress describes the Department of Energy's activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. During 2000, the Department completed its implementation and proposed closure of one Board recommendation and completed all implementation plan milestones associated with two additional Board recommendations. Also in 2000, the Department formally accepted two new Board recommendations and developed implementation plans in response to those recommendations. The Department also made significant progress with a number of broad-based safety initiatives. These include initial implementation of integrated safety management at field sites and within headquarters program offices, issuance of a nuclear safety rule, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

None

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC): A Resource for Nuclear Science Applications  

SciTech Connect

The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) has been in existence since 1963. RSICC collects, organizes, evaluates and disseminates technical information (software and nuclear data) involving the transport of neutral and charged particle radiation, and shielding and protection from the radiation associated with: nuclear weapons and materials, fission and fusion reactors, outer space, accelerators, medical facilities, and nuclear waste management. RSICC serves over 12,000 scientists and engineers from about 100 countries. An important activity of RSICC is its participation in international efforts on computational and experimental benchmarks. An example is the Shielding Integral Benchmarks Archival Database (SINBAD), which includes shielding benchmarks for fission, fusion and accelerators. RSICC is funded by the United States Department of Energy, Department of Homeland Security and Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Kirk, Bernadette Lugue [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Worker Safety and Health and Nuclear Safety Quarterly Performance Analysis (January - March 2008)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE Office of Enforcement expects LLNL to 'implement comprehensive management and independent assessments that are effective in identifying deficiencies and broader problems in safety and security programs, as well as opportunities for continuous improvement within the organization' and to 'regularly perform assessments to evaluate implementation of the contractor's processes for screening and internal reporting.' LLNL has a self-assessment program, described in ES&H Manual Document 4.1, that includes line, management and independent assessments. LLNL also has in place a process to identify and report deficiencies of nuclear, worker safety and health and security requirements. In addition, the DOE Office of Enforcement expects LLNL to evaluate 'issues management databases to identify adverse trends, dominant problem areas, and potential repetitive events or conditions' (page 14, DOE Enforcement Process Overview, December 2007). LLNL requires that all worker safety and health and nuclear safety noncompliances be tracked as 'deficiencies' in the LLNL Issues Tracking System (ITS). Data from the ITS are analyzed for worker safety and health (WSH) and nuclear safety noncompliances that may meet the threshold for reporting to the DOE Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS). This report meets the expectations defined by the DOE Office of Enforcement to review the assessments conducted by LLNL, analyze the issues and noncompliances found in these assessments, and evaluate the data in the ITS database to identify adverse trends, dominant problem areas, and potential repetitive events or conditions. The report attempts to answer three questions: (1) Is LLNL evaluating its programs and state of compliance? (2) What is LLNL finding? (3) Is LLNL appropriately managing what it finds? The analysis in this report focuses on data from the first quarter of 2008 (January through March). This quarter is analyzed within the context of information identified in previous quarters to include April 2007 through March 2008. The results from analyzing the deficiencies are presented in accordance with the two primary NTS reporting thresholds for WSH and nuclear safety noncompliances: (1) those related to certain events or conditions and (2) those that are management issues. In addition, WSH noncompliances were also analyzed to determine if any fell under the 'other significant condition' threshold. This report also identifies noncompliance topical areas that may have issues that do not meet the NTS reporting threshold but should remain under observation. These are placed on the 'watch list' for continued analysis.

Kerr, C E

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

470

Development of the RFID System for nuclear materials management.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radio frequency identification (RFID) is one of today's most rapidly growing technologies in the automatic data collection industry. Although commercial applications are already widespread, the use of this technology for managing nuclear materials is only in its infancy. Employing an RFID system has the potential to offer an immense payback: enhanced safety and security, reduced need for manned surveillance, real-time access to status and event history data, and overall cost-effectiveness. The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Packaging and Transportation (EM-63), is developing an RFID system for nuclear materials management. The system consists of battery-powered RFID tags with onboard sensors and memories, a reader network, application software, a database server and web pages. The tags monitor and record critical parameters, including the status of seals, movement of objects, and environmental conditions of the nuclear material packages in real time. They also provide instant warnings or alarms when preset thresholds for the sensors are exceeded. The information collected by the readers is transmitted to a dedicated central database server that can be accessed by authorized users across the DOE complex via a secured network. The onboard memory of the tags allows the materials manifest and event history data to reside with the packages throughout their life cycles in storage, transportation, and disposal. Data security is currently based on Advanced Encryption Standard-256. The software provides easy-to-use graphical interfaces that allow access to all vital information once the security and privilege requirements are met. An innovative scheme has been developed for managing batteries in service for more than 10 years without needing to be changed. A miniature onboard dosimeter is being developed for applications that require radiation surveillance. A field demonstration of the RFID system was recently conducted to assess its performance. The preliminary results of the demonstration are reported in this paper.

Chen, K.; Tsai, H.; Liu, Y. Y. (Decision and Information Sciences)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

472

Material Protection, Control, & Accounting | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs...

473

Material Removal and Disposition | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal and Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

474

Molecular forensic science of nuclear materials  

SciTech Connect

We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxides materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, process history, or transport of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science required to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensics science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

Wilkerson, Marianne Perry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Nuclear criticality safety experiments, calculations, and analyses - 1958 to 1982. Volume 2. Summaries. Complilation of papers from the Transactions of the American Nuclear Society  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This compilation contains 688 complete summaries of papers on nuclear criticality safety as presented at meetings of the American Nuclear Society (ANS). The selected papers contain criticality parameters for fissile materials derived from experiments and calculations, as well as criticality safety analyses for fissile material processing, transport, and storage. The compilation was developed as a component of the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) now under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The compilation is presented in two volumes: Volume 1 contains a directory to the ANS Transaction volume and page number where each summary was originally published, the author concordance, and the subject concordance derived from the keyphrases in titles. Volume 2 contains-in chronological order-the full-text summaries, reproduced here by permission of the American Nuclear Society from their Transactions, volumes 1-41.

Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

476

Heat resistant materials and their feasibility issues for a space nuclear transportation system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of nuclear propulsion concepts based on solid-core nuclear propulsion are being evaluated for a nuclear propulsion transportation system to support the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) involving the reestablishment of a manned lunar base and the subsequent exploration of Mars. These systems will require high-temperature materials to meet the operating conditions with appropriate reliability and safety built into these systems through the selection and testing of appropriate materials. The application of materials for nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) and nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems and the feasibility issues identified for their use will be discussed. Some mechanical property measurements have been obtained, and compatibility tests were conducted to help identify feasibility issues. 3 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Olsen, C.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Nuclear Facility Safety Basis Fundamentals Self-Study Guide - November 2002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge Operations Office Oak Ridge Operations Office Nuclear Facility Safety Basis Fundamentals Self-Study Guide [Fulfills ORO Safety Basis Competency 1, 2 (Part 1), or 7 (Part 1)] November 2002 Nuclear Facility Safety Basis Fundamentals Self-Study Guide TABLE OF CONTENTS Acronyms and Abbreviations ......................................................................................... iii List of Figures ....................................................................................................................iv List of Tables......................................................................................................................iv INTRODUCTION..............................................................................................................1

478

NUCLEAR SUBSTANCE LABORATORY SELF-AUDIT CHECKLIST Office of Environmental Health and Safety Title: Radiation Safety Self-Audit Checklist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUCLEAR SUBSTANCE LABORATORY SELF-AUDIT CHECKLIST Office of Environmental Health and Safety Title for Handling Packages Containing Nuclear Substances" posters posted. Storage area signed, included 24 hour contact information Nuclear Substance Permit and all attachments posted (eg. Conditions ­ general, special

Beaumont, Christopher

479

Los Alamos National Laboratory standard nuclear material container  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shut down of United States (U.S.) nuclear-weapons production activities in the early 1990s left large quantities of nuclear materials throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex in forms not intended for long-term storage. In May 1994, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 94-1, which called for the stabilization and disposition of 'thousands of containers of plutonium-bearing liquids and solids' in the DOE complex, including LANL in the nuclear-weapons-manufacturing pipeline when manufacturing ended. This resulted in the development of the 3013 standard with container requirements for long term storage (up to 50 years). A follow on was the Criteria For Interim Storage of Plutonium Bearing Materials, Charles B. Curtis, in 1996 to address storage other than the 3013 standard for shorter time frames. In January 2000, the DNFSB issued Recommendation 2000-1, which stated the need for LANL to repackage 'about one ton of plutonium metal and oxide,' declared excess to Defense Program (DP) needs. The DNFSB recommended that LANL 'stabilize and seal within welded containers with an inert atmosphere the plutonium oxides ... which are not yet in states conforming to the long-term storage envisaged by DOE-STD-3013,' and that they '... enclose existing and newly-generated legacy plutonium metal in sealed containers with an inert atmosphere,' and 'remediate and/or safely store the various residues.' Recommendation 2000-1, while adding to the number of items needing remediation, also reiterated the need to address remaining items from 1994-1 in a timely fashion. Since timetables slipped, the DNFSB recommended that the Complex 'prioritize and schedule tasks according to the consideration of risks.' In March 2005, the DNFSB issued Recommendation 2005-1. This recommendation addresses the need for a consistent set of criteria across the DOE complex for the interim storage of nuclear material packaged outside an engineered barrier. The Department of Energy (DOE) approved and issued on March 7, 2008, DOE M 441.1-1, Nuclear Material Packaging Manual [hereafter referred to as Manual] to address this recommendation, and a Prioritization Methodology as a complex-wide requirement for the packaging of nuclear material outside an engineered barrier. The Manual establishes 'technically justified criteria' for packages in order to ensure safe interim storage and handling outside an engineered barrier. The Prioritization Methodology establishes a risk-based procedure for identifying the order to repackage that would most efficiently reduce the overall risk. It is a logical extension of the work performed to meet the two earlier DNFSB recommendations to include all materials stored outside of engineered barriers, i.e., not just excess materials. LANL will continue to work all aspects of a comprehensive Implementation Plan to d monstrate all aspects of compliance with the Manual. Assessment of materials in nonstandard containers utilizing a risk based approach, repackaging up to 400 containers/year; activities include reprocessing of items to allow container consolidation and subsequent increase in vault capacity. Continued efforts in establishing and implementing a Surveillance and Maintenance Program for current Hagans and for the NG SNMCSs supported by a database for packaging and surveillance. Elastomer aging studies for the NG SNMCs will continue to justify extending the design life well beyond the currently specified five years. First production with containers available for use anticipated in June 2010. LANL will continue to define schedule and resources to meet these objectives.

Stone, Timothy A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Nuclear criticality safety evaluation -- DWPF Late Wash Facility, Salt Process Cell and Chemical Process Cell  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Nuclear Waste will be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for long term storage and disposal. This is a nuclear criticality safety evaluation for the Late Wash Facility (LWF), the Salt Processing Cell (SPC) and the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC). of the DWPF. Waste salt solution is processed in the Tank Farm In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process and is then further washed in the DWPF Late Wash Facility (LWF) before it is fed to the DWPF Salt Processing Cell. In the Salt Processing Cell the precipitate slurry is processed in the Precipitate Reactor (PR) and the resultant Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) produce is combined with the sludge feed and frit in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell to produce a melter feed. The waste is finally immobilized in the Melt Cell. Material in the Tank Farm and the ITP and Extended Sludge processes have been shown to be safe against a nuclear criticality by others. The precipitate slurry feed from ITP and the first six batches of sludge feed are safe against a nuclear criticality and this evaluation demonstrates that the processes in the LWF, the SPC and the CPC do not alter the characteristics of the materials to compromise safety.

Williamson, T.G.

1994-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Foundational development of an advanced nuclear reactor integrated safety code.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the activities and results of a Sandia LDRD project whose objective was to develop