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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Nuclear Material Control and Accountability  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Order establishes performance objectives, metrics, and requirements for developing, implementing, and maintaining a nuclear material control and accountability program within DOE/NNSA and for DOE-owned materials at other facilities that are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Cancels DOE M 470.4-6. Admin Chg 1, 8-3-11.

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

2

Nuclear Material Control and Accountability  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The manual establishes a program for the control and accountability of nuclear materials within the Department of Energy. Cancels: DOE M 474.1-1B DOE M 474.1-2A

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

3

Nuclear Material Control and Accountability  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The manual establishes a program for the control and accountability of nuclear materials within the Department of Energy. Chg 1, dated 8-14-06. Canceled by DOE O 474.2.

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

4

Nuclear Material Control and Accountability  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Order establishes performance objectives, metrics, and requirements for developing, implementing, and maintaining a nuclear material control and accountability program within DOE/NNSA and for DOE-owned materials at other facilities that are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Cancels DOE M 470.4-6, Admin Chg 1, 8-26-05. Admin Chg 2, dated 11-19-12, cancels DOE M 474.2 Admin Chg 1.

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

5

Nuclear Material Control and Accountability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1194-2011 JUNE 2011 ──────────────── CHANGE NOTICE NO.2 DECEMBER 2012 ──────────────── CHANGE NOTICE NO.3 OCTOBER 2013 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR MATERIALS CONTROL AND ACCOUNTABILITY U.S. Department of Energy AREA SANS Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ATTACHMENT 1 Change Notice No. 3 DOE -STD-1194-2011 October 2013 Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability Table of Changes Page/Section Change Page 57/Section 6.4.4.1. Change from, - Accounting records and source documents shall include item identification, material type, form, quantity, location, gross

6

Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JUNE 2011 JUNE 2011 ──────────────── CHANGE NOTICE NO.1 AUGUST 2011 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR MATERIALS CONTROL AND ACCOUNTABILITY U.S. Department of Energy AREA SANS Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ATTACHMENT 1 Change Notice No. 1 DOE -STD-1194-2011 August 2011 Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability Table of Changes Page/Section Change Title Page Formatting and font size adjusted. Page 2/Section 4.h. Reference to document was updated from DOE M 470.4-1 Chg 2, Safeguards and Security Program Planning and Management, dated 10-2-10 to DOE O 470.4B, Safeguards and Security Program, dated 7-21-11. Page 2/Section 4.i. Reference to document was updated from DOE M

7

Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 2011 June 2011 DOE STANDARD Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability U.S. Department of Energy AREA SANS Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1194-2011 i This page is intentionally left blank. DOE-STD-1194-2011 ii TABLE OF CONTENTS FOREWORD ..................................................................................................................................................................................... iii 1 . S C O P E ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 1 2

8

Material Control & Accountability | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control & Accountability | National Nuclear Security Control & Accountability | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Material Control & Accountability Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Material Control & Accountability Material Control & Accountability Safeguards First Principles Initiative

9

Material Control & Accountability | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Control & Accountability | National Nuclear Security Control & Accountability | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Material Control & Accountability Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Material Control & Accountability Material Control & Accountability Safeguards First Principles Initiative

10

Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order prescribes DOE minimum requirements and procedures for control and accountability of nuclear materials at DOE-owned and -leased facilities and DOE-owned nuclear materials at other facilities which are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission {NRC). Cancels DOE O 5633.3. Canceled by DOE O 5633.3B.

1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

11

Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

DOE O 474.1 prescribes Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A) for DOE-owned and -leased facilities and DOE-owned nuclear materials at other facilities which are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Cancels DOE 5633.3B

1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

12

Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To prescribe Department of Energy (DOE) requirements, including those for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), for nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A) for DOE-owned and -leased facilities and DOE-owned nuclear materials at other facilities that are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). DOE N 251.60, dated 11-19-04, extends this directive until 11-19-05. Cancels DOE O 474.1.

2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

13

Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To prescribe the Department of Energy (DOE) minimum requirements and procedures for control and accountability of nuclear materials at DOE-owned and -leased facilities and DOE-owned nuclear materials at other facilities which are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Cancels DOE O 5633.2A and DOE O 5633.3A. Canceled by DOE O 474.1

1994-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

14

Global nuclear material flow/control model  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The nuclear danger can be reduced by a system for global management, protection, control, and accounting as part of an international regime for nuclear materials. The development of an international fissile material management and control regime requires conceptual research supported by an analytical and modeling tool which treats the nuclear fuel cycle as a complete system. The prototype model developed visually represents the fundamental data, information, and capabilities related to the nuclear fuel cycle in a framework supportive of national or an international perspective. This includes an assessment of the global distribution of military and civilian fissile material inventories, a representation of the proliferation pertinent physical processes, facility specific geographic identification, and the capability to estimate resource requirements for the management and control of nuclear material. The model establishes the foundation for evaluating the global production, disposition, and safeguards and security requirements for fissile nuclear material and supports the development of other pertinent algorithmic capabilities necessary to undertake further global nuclear material related studies.

Dreicer, J.S.; Rutherford, D.S.; Fasel, P.K.; Riese, J.M.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Manual for Control And Accountability of Nuclear Materials  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

DOE M 474.1-1 prescribes Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and procedures for nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A). This Manual supplements DOE O 474.1, Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials.

1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

16

Manual for Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The manual prescribes requirements and procedures for nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A). Cancels DOE M 474.1-1. Canceled by DOE M 474.1-1B.

2000-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

17

Manual for Control and Accountability of Nuclear Materials  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The manual prescribes requirements and assign responsibilities for nuclear material control and accountability. Cancels DOE M 474.1-1A. Canceled by DOE M 470.4-6.

2003-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

18

Nuclear materials control and accountability criteria for upgrades measures  

SciTech Connect

As a result of major political and societal changes in the past several years, methods of nuclear material control may no longer be as effective as in the past in Russia, the Newly Independent States (NIS), and the Baltic States (BS). The objective of the Department of Energy (DOE) Material Protection, Control, and Accounting Program (MPC and A) is to reduce the threat of nuclear proliferation by collaborating with Russia, NIS, and BS governments to promote western-style MPC and A. This cooperation will improve the MPC and A on all weapons useable nuclear materials and will establish a sustainable infrastructure to provide future support and maintenance for these technology-based improvements. Nuclear materials of proliferation concern include materials of the types and quantities that can be most easily and directly used in a nuclear weapon. Sabotage of nuclear material is an event of great concern and potentially disastrous consequences to both the US and the host country. However, sabotage is currently beyond the scope of program direction and cannot be used to justify US-funded MPC and A upgrades. Judicious MPC and A upgrades designed to protect against insider and outsider theft scenarios would also provide addition, although not comprehensive, protection against saboteurs. This paper provides some suggestions to establish consistency in prioritizing system-enhancement efforts at nuclear material facilities. The suggestions in this paper are consistent with DOE policy and directions and should be used as a supplement to any policy directives issued by NN-40, DOE Russia/NIS Task Force.

Erkkila, B.H.; Hatcher, C.R.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Methods of Verification, Accountability and Control of Special Nuclear Material  

SciTech Connect

This session demonstrates nondestructive assay (NDA) measurement, surveillance and analysis technology required to protect, control and account (MPC and A) for special nuclear materials (SNM) in sealed containers. These measurements, observations and analyses comprise state-of-the art, strengthened, SNM safeguards systems. Staff member specialists, actively involved in research, development, training and implementation worldwide, will present six NDA verification systems and two software tools for integration and analysis of facility MPC and A data.

Stewart, J.E.

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

20

Robotic control architecture development for automated nuclear material handling systems  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is engaged in developing automated systems for handling materials for mixed waste treatment, nuclear pyrochemical processing, and weapon components disassembly. In support of these application areas there is an extensive robotic development program. This paper will describe the portion of this effort at LLNL devoted to control system architecture development, and review two applications currently being implemented which incorporate these technologies.

Merrill, R.D.; Hurd, R.; Couture, S.; Wilhelmsen, K.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Use of Imaging for Nuclear Material Control and Accountability  

SciTech Connect

The recent addition of imaging to the Nuclear Materials and Identification System (NMIS) using a small portable DT neutron generator with an embedded alpha detector to time and directionally tag neutrons from the DT reaction is discussed. The generator weighs {approx}35 lbs including power supplies (5 x 10{sup 7} n/sec) and operates on 50 watts power. Thus, the source can be easily moved to a variety of locations within an operational facility with minimum impact on operations or can be used at a fixed location for example to monitor receipts. Imaging NMIS (INMIS) not only characterizes the detailed shape of a containerized object by transmission tomography but determines the presence of fissile material by measuring the emitted radiation from induced fission. Previous work has shown that this type of imaging has a variety of applications other than nuclear material control and accountability (NMC&A). These include nonproliferation applications such as verification of configuration of nuclear weapons/components shipped or received, warhead authentication behind an information barrier, and traceability of weapons components both fissile and non fissile in dismantlement and counter terrorism. This paper concentrates on the use for NMC&A. Some of the NMC&A applications discussed are: verifying inventory and receipts, making more accurate holdup measurements especially where thicknesses of materials affect gamma ray spectrometry , determining the shape of unknown configurations of fissile materials where the material type may be known but not the form, determining the oxidation of fissile metal in storage cans, fingerprinting the content of storage containers going into a storage facility, and determining unknown configurations for criticality safety.

Mullens, James Allen [ORNL] [ORNL; Hausladen, Paul [ORNL] [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL] [ORNL; Archer, Daniel E [ORNL] [ORNL; Grogan, Brandon R [ORNL] [ORNL; Mihalczo, John T [ORNL] [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Comprehensive Nuclear Materials  

SciTech Connect

This book encompasses a rich seam of current information on the vast and multidisciplinary field of nuclear materials employed in fission and prototype fusion systems. Discussion includes both historical and contemporary international research in nuclear materials, from Actinides to Zirconium alloys, from the worlds leading scientists and engineers. Synthesizes pertinent current science to support the selection, assessment, validation and engineering of materials in extreme nuclear environments. The work discusses the major classes of materials suitable for usage in nuclear fission, fusion reactors and high power accelerators, and for diverse functions in fuels, cladding, moderator and control materials, structural, functional, and waste materials.

Konings, Dr. Rudy J. M. [European Commission Joint Research Centre; Allen, Todd R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Yamanaka, Prof. Shinsuke [Osaka University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Tags and seals for controling nuclear materials, Arms control and nonproliferation technologies. Second quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect

This issue of Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies summarizes demonstrations and addresses related topics. The first article, ``Basic Nuclear Material Control and Accountability Concepts as Might be Applied to the Uranium from the US-Russian HEU Purchase,`` describes safeguards sybsystems necessary for effective nuclear material safeguards. It also presents a general discussion on HEU-to-low-enrichment uranium (LEU) commingling processes and suggests applicable key measurement points. The second article, ``A Framework for Evaluating Tamper-Indicating-Device Technologies (TIDs),`` describes their uses, proper selection, and evaluation. The final three articles discuss the tags and seals applications and general characteristics of several nuclear material containers: the Type 30B uranium hexafluoride container, the AT-400R container, and the DOT Specification 6M container for SNM. Finally, the Appendix displays short descriptions and illustrations of seven tags and seals, including: the E-cup and wire seal, the python seal, the secure loop inspectable tag/seal (SLITS), bolt-and-loop type electronic identification devices, and the shrink-wrap seal.

Staehle, G; Talaber, C; Stull, S; Moulthrop, P [eds.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

A treaty to ban nuclear smuggling: The next step in nuclear material control?  

SciTech Connect

Since the demise of the Soviet Union, reports have continued to surface that weapons-usable nuclear material has been smuggled out of former Soviet territory into the hands of proliferant states. So far, few examples of nuclear smuggling have involved serious quantities of weapons-usable material, and much purported smuggling has involved attempted fraud rather than an effort to transfer fissile material. In no instance has an actual transfer to a potential proliferant state been verified.

Carnahan, B.M. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States); Smith, J.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Nuclear Reactor Materials and Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor materials and fuels can be classified into six categories: Nuclear fuel materials Nuclear clad materials Nuclear coolant materials Nuclear poison materials Nuclear moderator materials

Dr. James S. Tulenko

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards...

27

Application of Wald's sequential probability ratio test to nuclear materials control  

SciTech Connect

We have replaced traditional analysis methods for nuclear material control monitoring with hypothesis testing, specifically with Wald's sequential-probability-ratio test. Our evaluation of Walds'd method, applied in both vehicle and pedestrian SNM monitors, is by Monte Carlo calculation to determine the alarm probability and average monitoring times of the monitors. The vehicle monitor with Wald's test has a much shorter monitoring delay than with traditional methods, without serious compensating changes in operating characteristics. The pedestrian monitor with Wald's method also has advantages over traditional single-interval test, in that the Wald method duplicates the advantages of a moving-average technique. We verified the Monte Carlo calculations for the pedestrian monitor by means of a special program for the monitor's microprocessor controller. The observations of false-alarm probability and average monitoring time for over 500,000 tests verified the Monte Carlo results.

Fehlau, P.E.; Coop, K.L.; Markin, J.T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

material consolidation | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

of Material Consolidation and Civilian Sites (MCCS) is responsible for three key nuclear nonproliferation initiatives.Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A) Upgrades:...

29

Absolute nuclear material assay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Material control evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Changes in the Department of Energy`s (DOE) scope of work have stimulated several laboratories and commercial companies to develop and apply technology to enhance nuclear material control. Accountability, inventory, radiation exposure, and insider protection concerns increase as many DOE facilities require increased storage. This paper summarizes a study of the existing material control technologies. The goal of the study is to identify, characterize, and quantify the trade-offs associated with using these technologies to provide real-time information on stored nuclear material that in turn supports decreasing the frequency of inventories conducted by site personnel.

Waddoups, I.G.; Anspach, D.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Abbott, J.A. [EG& G Kirtland Operations, Albuquerque, NM (US)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Management of Nuclear Materials  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 5660.1B.

2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

32

Standard guide for application of radiation monitors to the control and physical security of special nuclear material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide briefly describes the state-of-the-art of radiation monitors for detecting special nuclear material (SNM) (see 3.1.11) in order to establish the context in which to write performance standards for the monitors. This guide extracts information from technical documentation to provide information for selecting, calibrating, testing, and operating such radiation monitors when they are used for the control and protection of SNM. This guide offers an unobtrusive means of searching pedestrians, packages, and motor vehicles for concealed SNM as one part of a nuclear material control or security plan for nuclear materials. The radiation monitors can provide an efficient, sensitive, and reliable means of detecting the theft of small quantities of SNM while maintaining a low likelihood of nuisance alarms. 1.2 Dependable operation of SNM radiation monitors rests on selecting appropriate monitors for the task, operating them in a hospitable environment, and conducting an effective program to test, calibrat...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Novel Problems Associated with Accounting and Control of Nuclear Material from Decontamination and Decommissioning and in Waste  

SciTech Connect

Abstract The reduction in nuclear arms and the production facilities that supported the weapons programs have produced some unique problems for nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A). Many of these problems are not limited to the weapons complex, but have the potential to appear in many legacy facilities as they undergo dismantlement and disposal. Closing facilities find that what was previously defined as product has become a waste stream bringing regulatory, human, and technological conflict. The sometimes unique compositions of these materials produce both storage and measurement problems. The nuclear material accounting and control programs have had to become very adaptive and preemptive to ensure control and protection is maintained. This paper examines some of the challenges to Safeguards generated by deinventory, decontamination decommissioning, dismantlement, demolition, and waste site remediation from predictable sources and some from unpredictable sources. 1.0 Introduction The United States is eliminating many facilities that support the nuclear weapons program. With the changing political conditions around the world and changes in military capabilities, the decreased emphasis on nuclear weapons has eliminated the need for many of the aging facilities. Additionally, the recovery of plutonium from dismantled weapons and reuse of components has eliminated the need to produce more plutonium for the near future. Because the nuclear weapons program and commercial applications generally do not mix in the United States, the facilities in the DOE complex that no longer have a weapon mission are being deinventoried, decontaminated, decommissioned, and dismantled/demolished. The materials from these activities are then disposed of in various ways but usually in select waste burial sites. Additionally, the waste in many historical burial sites associated with the weapons complex are being recovered, repackaged if necessary, and disposed of in either geological sites or low-level waste sites. The type of waste from the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities varies from uncontaminated construction materials to nuclear weapon components. This variety of forms, types, and composition of nuclear material presents many challenges to MC&A. It requires the creative application of regulations, but current regulations are adequate to ensure the security and control of the nuclear material. This paper examines some of the approaches used to meet regulatory requirements and problems that occurred during D&D. Experiences are drawn for the Hanford site and elsewhere in the DOE complex.

Schlegel, Steven C.

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

34

Nuclear materials control and accountability (NMC and A) auditors in the 90's  

SciTech Connect

The increase in emphasis on the adequacy of the NMC and A internal control systems requires that management define what type of training and experience is needed by NMC and A Internal Audit Program. At Martin Marietta Energy Systems, inc. (the prime contractor for the Department of Energy at Oak Ridge, Tenn.), the Central NMC and A Manager has developed a comprehensive set of NMC and A Internal Audit policies that defines performance standards, methods of conducting audits, mechanisms for ensuring appropriate independence for NMC and A auditors, structure for standardized audit reports and working papers, and a section that addresses the development of training plans for individual NMC and A auditors. The training requirements reflect the unique combination of skills necessary to be an effective NMC and A Internal Auditor- a combination of the operational auditing skills of a Certified Internal Auditor, the accounting auditing capabilities of a Certified Public Accountant, and the specific technical knowledge base associated with nuclear materials. This paper presents a mechanism for identifying an individual training program for NMC and A auditors that considers the above requirements and the individual's long-range career goals.

Barham, M.A.; Abbott, R.R. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Management of Nuclear Materials  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish requirements and procedures for the management of nuclear materials within the Department of Energy (DOE). Cancels DOE 5660.1A. Canceled by DOE O 410.2.

1994-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

36

Management of Nuclear Materials  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 410.2. Admin Chg 1 dated 4-10-2014, cancels DOE O 410.2.

2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

37

Nuclear Material Packaging Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The manual provides detailed packaging requirements for protecting workers from exposure to nuclear materials stored outside of an approved engineered contamination barrier. No cancellation. Certified 11-18-10.

2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

38

International training course on implementation of state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials: proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the International Training Course on Implementation of State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials held October 17 through November 4, 1983, at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico and Richland, Washington, USA. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a State system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards requirements. Major emphasis for the 1983 course was placed on safeguards methods used at bulk-handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory and Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the Exxon Nuclear fuel fabrication plant, the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Westinghouse Fast Flux Test Facility Visitor Center, and Washington Public Power System nuclear reactor facilities in Richland, Washington. Individual presentations were indexed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Material control and accountability alternatives  

SciTech Connect

Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations governing material control and accountability in nuclear facilities have become more restrictive in the past decade, especially in areas that address the insider threat. As the insider threat receives greater credibility, regulations have been strengthened to increase the probability of detecting insider activity and to prevent removal of a significant quantity of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) from areas under control of the protective force.

NONE

1991-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

40

The Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant Process for Managing Equipment Intended for Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting System Upgrades  

SciTech Connect

Since 1996, the Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) located in the town of Novouralsk, Russia, (previously known as Sverdlovsk-44) and the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) have been cooperating under the Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program. Because UEIP is involved in the processing of highly enriched uranium (HEU) into low enriched uranium (LEU), and there are highly enriched nuclear materials on its territory, the main goal of the MPC&A cooperation is to upgrade those systems that ensure secure storage, processing and transportation of nuclear materials at the plant. UEIP has completed key upgrades (equipment procurement and installation) aimed at improving MPC&A systems through significant investments made by both the U.S. DOE and UEIP. These joint cooperative efforts resulted in bringing MPC&A systems into compliance with current regulations, which led to nuclear material (NM) theft risk reduction and prevention from other unlawful actions with respect to them. Upon the U.S. MPC&A project teams suggestion, UEIP has developed an equipment inventory control process to track all the property provided through the MPC&A Program. The UEIP process and system for managing equipment provides many benefits including: greater ease and efficiency in determining the quantities, location, maintenance and repair schedule for equipment; greater assurance that MPC&A equipment is in continued satisfactory operation; and improved control in the development of a site sustainability program. While emphasizing UEIPs equipment inventory control processes, this paper will present process requirements and a methodology that may have practical and helpful applications at other sites.

Yuldashev, Rashid; Nosov, Andrei; Carroll, Michael F.; Garrett, Albert G.; Dabbs, Richard D.; Ku, Esther M.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Trial operation of material protection, control, and accountability systems at two active nuclear material handling sites within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF)  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses Russian Federal Nuclear Center (RFNC)-VNIIEF activities in the area of nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) procedures enhancement. The goal of such activities is the development of an automated systems for MPC and A at two of the active VNIIEF research sites: a research (reactor) site and a nuclear material production facility. The activities for MPC and A system enhancement at both sites are performed in the framework of a VNIIEF-Los Alamos National Laboratory contract with participation from Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and PANTEX Plant in accordance with Russian programs supported by MinAtom. The American specialists took part in searching for possible improvement of technical solutions, ordering equipment, and delivering and testing the equipment that was provided by the Americans.

Skripka, G.; Vatulin, V.; Yuferev, V. [VNIIEF, Sarov (Russian Federation)] [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Perimeter radiation monitors for the control and physical security of special nuclear materials  

SciTech Connect

Perimeter radiation monitors are gamma-ray and neutron measurement systems that can provide timely notice of theft or diversion of special nuclear material (SNM). The monitors may be hand-held instruments operated by security inspectors or automatic pedestrian or vehicle monitors located in exit pathways. A monitor's performance depends on its design, the characteristics of SNM and the operating environment, and proper monitor calibration and maintenance. Goals of ASTM Subcommittee C26.12 are to describe monitoring technology, how to apply it, and how to test its performance. 3 refs., 6 figs.

Fehlau, P.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

US/Russian cooperative efforts in nuclear material protection, control, and accounting at the Siberian Chemical Combine  

SciTech Connect

The Siberian Chemical Combine (SKhK) is the largest multifunction nuclear production facility in the Russian nuclear complex. Until recently, it produced and processed special nuclear material for the Russian Defense Ministry. SKhK and its US partners in the Department of Energy (DOE) US/Russian Materials Protection, Control, and Accountability (MPC and A) Program are nearing completion of the initial MPC and A upgrades at the six SKhK plant sites that were begun three years ago. Comprehensive enhancements to the physical protection and access control systems are progressing on a site-wide basis while a comprehensive MC and A system is being implemented at the Radiochemical Plant site. SKhK now produces thermal and electrical power, enriches uranium for commercial reactor fuel, reprocesses irradiated fuel, converts high-enriched uranium metal into high-enriched oxide for blending into reactor-grade, low-enriched uranium, and manufactures civilian products. The authors review the progress to date and outline plans for continuing the work in 1999.

Goloskokov, I.; Yarygin, A.; Petrushev, V. [Siberian Chemical Combine, Seversk (Russian Federation); Morgado, R.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Responsible stewardship of nuclear materials  

SciTech Connect

The ability to tap the massive energy potential of nuclear fission was first developed as a weapon to end a terrible world war. Nuclear fission is also a virtually inexhaustible energy resource, and is the only energy supply in certain areas in Russia, Kazakhstan and elsewhere. The potential link between civilian and military applications has been and continues to be a source of concern. With the end of the Cold War, this issue has taken a dramatic turn. The U.S. and Russia have agreed to reduce their nuclear weapons stockpiles by as much as two-thirds. This will make some 100 tonnes of separated plutonium and 500 tonnes of highly enriched uranium available, in a form that is obviously directly usable for weapons. The total world inventory of plutonium is now around 1000 tonnes and is increasing at 60-70 tonnes per year. There is even more highly enriched uranium. Fortunately the correct answer to what to do with excess weapons material is also the most attractive. It should be used and reused as fuel for fast reactors. Material in use (particularly nuclear material) is very easy to monitor and control, and is quite unattractive for diversion. Active management of fissile materials not only makes a major contribution to economic stability and well-being, but also simplifies accountability, inspection and other safeguards processes; provides a revenue stream to pay for the necessary safeguards; and, most importantly, limits the prospective world inventory of plutonium to only that which is used and useful.

Hannum, W.H.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS)  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS) which is sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The system serves national security and program management interests, and international interests in the programs for the peaceful application of nuclear energy and non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. Within the scope of the NMMSS are found all nuclear materials applied and controlled under United States law and related international agreements, including U.S. nuclear materials production programs and US private nuclear industrial activities. In addition, its national and international scope enables it to provide services to other organizations such as the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, the Department of State, and the US Congress.

Jacobsen, S.E.; Matthews, W.B. III; McKamy, E.D.; Pedigo, R.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Development of a system for academic training of the personnel engaged in nuclear material protection, control and accounting in Russia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main attention in the present paper is focused on discussing the educational problems in the area of nuclear materials physical protection, control and accountability (MPC&A) in Russia. Currently, only the Master of Science Graduate Program has been completely developed for students training. This is taking place at Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University, MEPhI), where the sixth generation of Masters has graduated in May 2004. The MPC&A Engineer Degree Program, currently under development at MEPhI, is considered in the paper. This paper discusses specific features of the Engineer Degree training required by the Russian educational legislation and the Russian quality control system as applied to the training process. The paper summarises the main joint actions undertaken during the past three years by MEPhI in collaboration with the US Department of Energy and US National Laboratories for developing the MPC&A Engineer Degree Program in Russia.

Boris N. Onykiy; Eduard F. Kryuchkov

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Nuclear Materials Management Program at the NNSS  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site, was established in 1951 mainly for weapons testing; because special nuclear materials (SNM) were expended during the tests, a nuclear material management program was not required. That changed in December 2004 with the receipt of Category I SNM for purposes other than weapons testing. At that time, Material Control and Accountability and Nuclear Material Management were a joint laboratory (Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore) effort with nuclear material management being performed at the laboratories. That changed in March 2006 when the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office appointed sole responsibility to the Management and Operations (M&O) contractor, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). Since 2006 the basic nuclear material management work was completed by a combination of M&O employees and subcontractors, but a true Nuclear Material Management (NMM) Program was not determined to be necessary until recently. With expanding missions and more nuclear material (NM) coming to the NNSS, it became imperative to have an organization to manage these materials; therefore, an NMM Manager was officially appointed by NSTec in 2012. In June 2011 a Gap Analysis and white paper was completed by a subcontractor; this presentation will include highlights from those documents along with our plans to resolve the gaps and stand up a functional and compliant NMM Program at the NNSS.

,

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

48

GKTC ACTIVITIES TO PROVIDE NUCLEAR MATERIAL PHYSICAL PROTECTION, CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING TRAINING FOR 2011-2012  

SciTech Connect

The GKTC was created at the Kyiv Institute of Nuclear Research as a result of collaborative efforts between the United States and Ukraine. The GKTC has been designated by the Ukrainian Government to provide the MPC&A training and methodological assistance to nuclear facilities and nuclear specialists. In 2010 the GKTC has conducted the planned assessment of training needs of Ukrainian MPC&A specialists. The objective of this work is to acquire the detailed information about the number of MPC&A specialists and guard personnel, who in the coming years should receive the further advanced training. As a result of the performed training needs evaluation the GKTC has determined that in the coming years a number of new training courses need to be developed. Some training courses are already in the process of development. Also taking into account the specific of activity on the guarding of nuclear facilities, GKTC has begun to develop the specialized training courses for the guarding unit personnel. The evaluation of needs of training of Ukrainian specialists on the physical protection shows that without the technical base of learning is not possible to satisfy the needs of Ukrainian facilities, in particular, the need for further training of specialists who maintains physical protection technical means, provides vulnerability assessment and testing of technical means. To increase the training effectiveness and create the basis for specialized training courses holding the GKTC is now working on the construction of an Interior (non-classified) Physical Protection Training Site. The objective of this site is to simulate the actual conditions of the nuclear facility PP system including the complex of engineering and technical means that will help the GKTC training course participants to consolidate the knowledge and gain the practical skills in the work with PP system engineering and technical means for more effective performance of their official duties. This paper briefly describes the practical efforts applied to the provision of physical protection specialists advanced training in Ukraine and real results on the way to implement such efforts in 2011-2012.

Romanova, Olena; Gavrilyuk, Victor I.; Kirischuk, Volodymyr; Gavrilyuk-Burakova, Anna; Diakov, Oleksii; Drapey, Sergiy; Proskurin, Dmitry; Dickman, Deborah A.; Ferguson, Ken

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Controlled Nuclear Fusion Reactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE presentation of full and authoritative accounts of research on controlled nuclear fusion reactions was a major feature of the second Geneva Conference on the Peaceful Uses of ...

R. S. PEASE

1958-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

50

Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To prevent unauthorized dissemination of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI). Cancels DOE 5635.4 and DOE 5650.3A

1995-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

51

Nuclear materials management storage study  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Weapons and Materials Planning (DP-27) requested the Planning Support Group (PSG) at the Savannah River Site to help coordinate a Departmental complex-wide nuclear materials storage study. This study will support the development of management strategies and plans until Defense Programs` Complex 21 is operational by DOE organizations that have direct interest/concerns about or responsibilities for nuclear material storage. They include the Materials Planning Division (DP-273) of DP-27, the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Facilities (DP-60), the Office of Weapons Complex Reconfiguration (DP-40), and other program areas, including Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). To facilitate data collection, a questionnaire was developed and issued to nuclear materials custodian sites soliciting information on nuclear materials characteristics, storage plans, issues, etc. Sites were asked to functionally group materials identified in DOE Order 5660.1A (Management of Nuclear Materials) based on common physical and chemical characteristics and common material management strategies and to relate these groupings to Nuclear Materials Management Safeguards and Security (NMMSS) records. A database was constructed using 843 storage records from 70 responding sites. The database and an initial report summarizing storage issues were issued to participating Field Offices and DP-27 for comment. This report presents the background for the Storage Study and an initial, unclassified summary of storage issues and concerns identified by the sites.

Becker, G.W. Jr.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Cooperation between the Russian Federation and the United States to enhance the existing nuclear-material protection, control, and accounting systems at Mayak Production Association  

SciTech Connect

The Ministry of the Russian Federation for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) are engaged in joint, cooperative efforts to reduce the likelihood of nuclear proliferation by enhancing Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) systems in both countries. Mayak Production Association (MPA) is a major Russian nuclear enterprise within the nuclear complex that is operated by MINATOM. This paper describes the nature, scope, and status of the joint, cooperative efforts to enhance existing MPC&A systems at MPA. Current cooperative efforts are focused on enhancements to the existing MPC&A systems at four plants that are operated by MPA and that produce, process, handle and/or store proliferation-sensitive nuclear materials.

Starodubtsev, G.S.; Prishchepov, A.I.; Zatorsky, Y.M.; James, L.T. [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Cooperation between the Russian Federation and the United States to enhance the existing nuclear-material protection, control, and accounting systems at Mayak Production Association  

SciTech Connect

The Ministry of the Russian Federation for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) are engaged in joint, cooperative efforts to reduce the likelihood of nuclear proliferation by enhancing Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC and A) systems in both countries. Mayak Production Association (Mayak) is a major Russian nuclear enterprise within the nuclear complex that is operated by MINATOM. This paper describes the nature, scope, and status of the joint, cooperative efforts to enhance existing MPC and A systems at Mayak. Current cooperative efforts are focused on enhancements to the existing MPC and A systems at two plants that are operated by Mayak and that produce, process, handle and/or store proliferation-sensitive nuclear materials.

Prishchepov, A.I.; Starodubtsev, G.S.; Zatorsky, Y.M. [Mayak Production Association, Ozersk City (Russian Federation); James, L.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ehinger, M.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Manatt, D.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Voss, S.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Lundgren, R.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Suda, S.C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Cooperation Between the Russia Federation and the United States to Enhance the Existing Nuclear-Material Protection, Control, and Accounting Systems at Mayak Production Association  

SciTech Connect

The Ministry of the Russian Federation for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) are engaged in joint, cooperative efforts to reduce the likelihood of nuclear proliferation by enhancing Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) systems in both countries. Mayak Production Association (Mayak) is a major Russian nuclear enterprise within the nuclear complex that is operated by lylINATOM. This paper describes the nature, scope, and status of the joint, cooperative efforts to enhance existing MPC&A systems at Mayak. Current cooperative efforts are focused on enhancements to the existing MPC&A systems at two of the plants operated by Mayak that work with proliferation-sensitive nuclear materials.

Cahalane, P.T.; Ehinger, M.H.; James, L.T.; Jarrett, J.H.; Lundgren, R.A.; Manatt, D.R.; Niederauer, G.F.; Olivos, J.D.; Prishchepov, A.I.; Starodubtsev, G.S.; Suda, S.C.; Tittemore, G.W.; Zatorsky, Y.M.

1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

55

Cooperative efforts to improve nuclear materials accounting, control and physical protection at the National Science Center, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ukrainian Government are engaged in a program of cooperation to enhance the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons by developing a strong national system of nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A). This paper describes the capabilities and work of the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) and cooperative efforts to improve MPC and A at this facility. It describes how these cooperative efforts grew out of Ukraine`s decision to become a non-nuclear weapon state and the shortcomings in MPC and A that developed at KIPT after the disintegration of the former Soviet Union. It also envisions expanded future cooperation in other areas of nuclear materials management.

Zelensky, V.F.; Mikhailov, V.A. [Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology (Ukraine). National Science Center

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

clandestine material with nuclear resonance fluorescence.E. Norman, UC Berkeley Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, privatepp. 349. G. Warren et al. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence of

Quiter, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Cleanup Contractor Achieves 'Elite' Nuclear Material Accountability...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Cleanup Contractor Achieves 'Elite' Nuclear Material Accountability Status Cleanup Contractor Achieves 'Elite' Nuclear Material Accountability Status September 30, 2014 - 12:00pm...

59

Transportation of Nuclear Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Transportation of Nuclear Materials Transportation of Nuclear Materials GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE on legal and regulatory requirements and standards for transportation of...

60

Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) Welcome to the Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) webpage....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Training | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Training Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Training Training Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information for persons with...

62

Nuclear materials stewardship: Our enduring mission  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have handled a remarkably wide variety of nuclear materials over the past 50 yr. Two fundamental changes have occurred that shape the current landscape regarding nuclear materials. If one recognizes the implications and opportunities, one sees that the stewardship of nuclear materials will be a fundamental and important job of the DOE for the foreseeable future. The first change--the breakup of the Soviet Union and the resulting end to the nuclear arms race--altered US objectives. Previously, the focus was on materials production, weapon design, nuclear testing, and stockpile enhancements. Now the attention is on dismantlement of weapons, excess special nuclear material inventories, accompanying increased concern over the protection afforded to such materials; new arms control measures; and importantly, maintenance of the safety and reliability of the remaining arsenal without testing. The second change was the raised consciousness and sense of responsibility for dealing with the environmental legacies of past nuclear arms programs. Recognition of the need to clean up radioactive contamination, manage the wastes, conduct current operations responsibly, and restore the environment have led to the establishment of what is now the largest program in the DOE. Two additional features add to the challenge and drive the need for recognition of nuclear materials stewardship as a fundamental, enduring, and compelling mission of the DOE. The first is the extraordinary time frames. No matter what the future of nuclear weapons and no matter what the future of nuclear power, the DOE will be responsible for most of the country`s nuclear materials and wastes for generations. Even if the Yucca Mountain program is successful and on schedule, it will last more than 100 yr. Second, the use, management, and disposition of nuclear materials and wastes affect a variety of nationally important and diverse objectives, from national security to the future of nuclear power in this country and abroad, to the care of the environment. Sometimes these objectives are in concert, but often they are seen as competing or being in conflict. By recognizing the corporate responsibility for these materials and the accompanying programs, national decision making will be improved.

Isaacs, T.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

Controlled Nuclear Fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... papers have an English abstract. Translations of the Russian papers have already been published in Nuclear Fusion. It is a great pity, for Western readers at least, that the Russian ... two volumes are obviously going to be standard reference books for those interested in controlled nuclear fusion. They also contain a large amount of information, particularly on the theoretical side, ...

GEORGE ROWLANDS

1970-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Nuclear Materials Disposition | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Materials Disposition Nuclear Materials Disposition Nuclear Materials Disposition Nuclear Materials Disposition In fulfilling its mission, EM frequently manages and completes disposition of surplus nuclear materials and spent nuclear fuel. These are not waste. They are nuclear materials no longer needed for national security or other purposes, including spent nuclear fuel, special nuclear materials (as defined by the Atomic Energy Act) and other Nuclear Materials. Spent Nuclear Fuel Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is fuel that has been withdrawn from a nuclear reactor following irradiation, the constituent elements of which have not been separated by reprocessing. SNF may include: (1) intact, non-defective fuel assemblies or fuel rods; (2) failed fuel assemblies or fuel rods; (3) segments of fuel rods or pieces of fuel derived from spent fuel rods; and

65

Nuclear reactor control apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor core safety rod release apparatus comprises a control rod having a detent notch in the form of an annular peripheral recess at its upper end, a control rod support tube for raising and lowering the control rod under normal conditions, latches pivotally mounted on the control support tube with free ends thereof normally disposed in the recess in the control rod, and cam means for pivoting the latches out of the recess in the control rod when a scram condition occurs. One embodiment of the invention comprises an additional magnetically-operated latch for releasing the control rod under two different conditions, one involving seismic shock.

Sridhar, Bettadapur N. (Cupertino, CA)

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Materials Challenges in Nuclear Energy  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power currently provides about 13% of the worldwide electrical power, and has emerged as a reliable baseload source of electricity. A number of materials challenges must be successfully resolved for nuclear energy to continue to make further improvements in reliability, safety and economics. The operating environment for materials in current and proposed future nuclear energy systems is summarized, along with a description of materials used for the main operating components. Materials challenges associated with power uprates and extensions of the operating lifetimes of reactors are described. The three major materials challenges for the current and next generation of water-cooled fission reactors are centered on two structural materials aging degradation issues (corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials and neutron-induced embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels), along with improved fuel system reliability and accident tolerance issues. The major corrosion and stress corrosion cracking degradation mechanisms for light water reactors are reviewed. The materials degradation issues for the Zr alloy clad UO2 fuel system currently utilized in the majority of commercial nuclear power plants is discussed for normal and off-normal operating conditions. Looking to proposed future (Generation IV) fission and fusion energy systems, there are 5 key bulk radiation degradation effects (low temperature radiation hardening and embrittlement, radiation-induced and modified solute segregation and phase stability, irradiation creep, void swelling, and high temperature helium embrittlement) and a multitude of corrosion and stress corrosion cracking effects (including irradiation-assisted phenomena) that can have a major impact on the performance of structural materials.

Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL] [ORNL; Was, Gary [University of Michigan] [University of Michigan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Recommendations to the NRC on acceptable standard format and content for the Fundamental Nuclear Material Control (FNMC) Plan required for low-enriched uranium enrichment facilities  

SciTech Connect

A new section, 10 CFR 74.33, has been added to the material control and accounting (MC A) requirements of 10 CFR Part 74. This new section pertains to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed uranium enrichment facilities that are authorized to produce and to possess more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material (SNM) of low strategic significance. The new section is patterned after 10 CFR 74.31, which pertains to NRC licensees (other than production or utilization facilities licensed pursuant to 10 CFR Part 50 and 70 and waste disposal facilities) that are authorized to possess and use more than one effective kilogram of unencapsulated SNM of low strategic significance. Because enrichment facilities have the potential capability of producing SNM of moderate strategic significance and also strategic SNM, certain performance objectives and MC A system capabilities are required in 10 CFR 74.33 that are not contained in 10 CFR 74.31. This document recommends to the NRC information that the licensee or applicant should provide in the fundamental nuclear material control (FNMC) plan. This document also describes methods that should be acceptable for compliance with the general performance objectives. While this document is intended to cover various uranium enrichment technologies, the primary focus at this time is gas centrifuge and gaseous diffusion.

Moran, B.W.; Belew, W.L. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)); Hammond, G.A.; Brenner, L.M. (21st Century Industries, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Preventing Proliferation of Nuclear Materials and Technology...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Preventing Proliferation of Nuclear Materials and Technology | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

69

Technologies for detection of nuclear materials  

SciTech Connect

Detection of smuggled nuclear materials at transit points requires monitoring unknown samples in large closed packages. This review contends that high-confidence nuclear-material detection requires induced fission as the primary mechanism, with passive radiation screening in a complementary role. With the right equipment, even small quantities of nuclear materials are detectable with a high probability at transit points. The equipment could also be linked synergistically with detectors of other contrabond. For screening postal mail and packages, passive monitors are probably more cost-effective. When a suspicious item is detected, a single active probe could then be used. Until active systems become mass produced, this two-stage screening/interrogation role for active/passive equipment is more economic for cargo at border crossings. For widespread monitoring of nuclear smuggling, it will probably be necessary to develop a system for simultaneously detecting most categories of contraband, including explosives and illicit drugs. With control of nuclear materials at known storage sites being the first line of defense, detection capabilities at international borders could establish a viable second line of defense against smuggling.

DeVolpi, A.

1996-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

70

Special nuclear material simulation device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for simulating special nuclear material is provided. The apparatus typically contains a small quantity of special nuclear material (SNM) in a configuration that simulates a much larger quantity of SNM. Generally the apparatus includes a spherical shell that is formed from an alloy containing a small quantity of highly enriched uranium. Also typically provided is a core of depleted uranium. A spacer, typically aluminum, may be used to separate the depleted uranium from the shell of uranium alloy. A cladding, typically made of titanium, is provided to seal the source. Methods are provided to simulate SNM for testing radiation monitoring portals. Typically the methods use at least one primary SNM spectral line and exclude at least one secondary SNM spectral line.

Leckey, John H.; DeMint, Amy; Gooch, Jack; Hawk, Todd; Pickett, Chris A.; Blessinger, Chris; York, Robbie L.

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

71

weapons material protection | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

weapons material protection | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

72

UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System CONTACT INFORMATION UPDATE REPORTING IDENTIFICATION SYMBOL (RIS) RIS: Address: Facility Name: CONTACTS Name Email:...

73

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to learn MCNPX and nuclear safeguards, Bill B. , Steve K. ,Introduction 1.1 Nuclear Safeguards . . . . . . . . . . . .Programme to IAEA Safeguards. STUK-YTO-TR 170. Helsinki

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Nuclear reactor control column  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Plum Borough, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protection | National Nuclear Protection | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Global Threat Reduction Initiative > GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection

76

US-Russian collaboration for enhancing nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting at the Elektrostal uranium fuel-fabrication plant  

SciTech Connect

In September 1993, an implementing agreement was signed that authorized collaborative projects to enhance Russian national materials control and accounting, physical protection, and regulatory activities, with US assistance funded by the Nunn-Lugar Act. At the first US-Russian technical working group meeting in Moscow in February 1994, it was decided to identify a model facility where materials protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) and regulatory projects could be carried out using proven technologies and approaches. The low-enriched uranium (LEU or RBMK and VVER) fuel-fabrication process at Elektrostal was selected, and collaborative work began in June 1994. Based on many factors, including initial successes at Elektrostal, the Russians expanded the cooperation by proposing five additional sites for MPC and A development: the Elektrostal medium-enriched uranium (MEU or BN) fuel-fabrication process and additional facilities at Podolsk, Dmitrovgrad, Obninsk, and Mayak. Since that time, multilaboratory teams have been formed to develop and implement MPC and A upgrades at the additional sites, and much new work is underway. This paper summarizes the current status of MPC and A enhancement projects in the LEU fuel-fabrication process and discusses the status of work that addresses similar enhancements in the MEU (BN) fuel processes at Elektrostal, under the recently expanded US-Russian MPC and A cooperation.

Smith, H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Allentuck, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Barham, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bishop, M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wentz, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Steele, B.; Bricker, K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Cherry, R. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Snegosky, T. [Dept. of Defense, Washington, DC (United States). Defense Nuclear Agency

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Interim Management of Nuclear Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1995/01_eis0220_for.html[6/27/2011 12:53:53 PM] 1995/01_eis0220_for.html[6/27/2011 12:53:53 PM] FOREWORD The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a major Department of Energy (DOE) installation. The past mission of the SRS was to produce nuclear materials that supported the defense, research, and medical programs of the United States. In 1992 the Secretary of Energy directed the SRS to phase out defense-related chemical separations activities. As a result of shutdowns and reduced demand for nuclear materials, the SRS presently has a large inventory of in-process solutions, reactor fuel assemblies, and reactor targets. These materials, due to their form or to the condition in which they are maintained, could represent a concern for the public, worker health and safety, and the environment. DOE published a Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare this environmental impact statement (EIS) on March 17, 1994 (59

78

Interim Management of Nuclear Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1995/01_eis0220_for.html[6/27/2011 12:53:53 PM] 1995/01_eis0220_for.html[6/27/2011 12:53:53 PM] FOREWORD The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a major Department of Energy (DOE) installation. The past mission of the SRS was to produce nuclear materials that supported the defense, research, and medical programs of the United States. In 1992 the Secretary of Energy directed the SRS to phase out defense-related chemical separations activities. As a result of shutdowns and reduced demand for nuclear materials, the SRS presently has a large inventory of in-process solutions, reactor fuel assemblies, and reactor targets. These materials, due to their form or to the condition in which they are maintained, could represent a concern for the public, worker health and safety, and the environment. DOE published a Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare this environmental impact statement (EIS) on March 17, 1994 (59

79

Evaluation of special nuclear material monitoring instruments  

SciTech Connect

A statistical method to protect against the loss of strategic special nuclear material (SSNM) is presented. A simplified step by step approach to the test procedure is described. Strategic special nuclear material (SSNM) is protected using several layers of physical and administrative controls. In a facility having both enriched and depleted uranium, extensive control is exercised to prevent a diversion of the SSNM, but assurance must also be provided that depleted material is not being removed inasmuch as its low would indicate the possible loss of SSNM through surreptitious substitution. One option for identifying loss of material is to place walkthrough monitors at the pedestrian exits leaving the perimeter of the security boundary enclosing the uranium processing area. Within this security perimeter are the SSNM areas having tight control and restricted access. The monitors for the SSNM are within buildings and are in the benign environment of a working area. Perimeter monitors on the other hand are located at the boundary rotogates and are subject to the ambient conditions varying with the seasons.

Bowman, K.O. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA). Mathematical Sciences Section); Wallace, S.A. (Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Creating a Comprehensive, Efficient, and Sustainable Nuclear Regulatory Structure: A Process Report from the U.S. Department of Energy's Material Protection, Control and Accounting Program  

SciTech Connect

With the congressionally mandated January 1, 2013 deadline for the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) program to complete its transition of MPC&A responsibility to the Russian Federation, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) management directed its MPC&A program managers and team leaders to demonstrate that work in ongoing programs would lead to successful and timely achievement of these milestones. In the spirit of planning for successful project completion, the NNSA review of the Russian regulatory development process confirmed the critical importance of an effective regulatory system to a sustainable nuclear protection regime and called for an analysis of the existing Russian regulatory structure and the identification of a plan to ensure a complete MPC&A regulatory foundation. This paper describes the systematic process used by DOEs MPC&A Regulatory Development Project (RDP) to develop an effective and sustainable MPC&A regulatory structure in the Russian Federation. This nuclear regulatory system will address all non-military Category I and II nuclear materials at State Corporation for Atomic Energy Rosatom, the Federal Service for Ecological, Technological, and Nuclear Oversight (Rostechnadzor), the Federal Agency for Marine and River Transport (FAMRT, within the Ministry of Transportation), and the Ministry of Industry and Trade (Minpromtorg). The approach to ensuring a complete and comprehensive nuclear regulatory structure includes five sequential steps. The approach was adopted from DOEs project management guidelines and was adapted to the regulatory development task by the RDP. The five steps in the Regulatory Development Process are: 1) Define MPC&A Structural Elements; 2) Analyze the existing regulatory documents using the identified Structural Elements; 3) Validate the analysis with Russian colleagues and define the list of documents to be developed; 4) Prioritize and schedule the development of documents; 5) Identify and develop processes to measure effectiveness of regulations. Utilizing this process is resulting in an effective regulatory process that is understood and is being adopted by the four RF organizations. It is anticipated that the current regulatory development process will continue after U.S. support ends. Utilization of the systematic methodology will ensure regulatory development is based on required MPC&A structural elements and will support the continued maintenance and development of an effective regulatory base.

Wright, Troy L.; O'Brien, Patricia E.; Hazel, Michael J.; Tuttle, John D.; Cunningham, Mitchel E.; Schlegel, Steven C.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Nuclear Engineering Division Irradiated Materials Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Engineering Division Irradiated Materials Laboratory The Irradiated Materials Laboratory (IML) in Argonne's Nuclear Engineering Division is used to conduct research on the behavior. #12;C O N TA C T > Dr. Michael C. Billone | 630-252-7146 | billone@anl.gov | Nuclear Engineering

Kemner, Ken

82

Fissile Materials Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Fissile Materials Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration Fissile Materials Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Fissile Materials Disposition Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Fissile Materials Disposition Fissile Materials Disposition Since the end of the Cold War, significant quantities of plutonium and

83

International Materials Protection and Cooperation | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Materials Protection and Cooperation | National Nuclear Materials Protection and Cooperation | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog International Materials Protection and Cooperation Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > International Materials Protection and Cooperation International Materials Protection and Cooperation

84

Safeguards for nuclear material transparency monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The US and the Russian Federation are currently engaged in negotiating or implementing several nuclear arms and nuclear material control agreements. These involve placing nuclear material in specially designed containers within controlled facilities. Some of the agreements require the removal of nuclear components from stockpile weapons. These components are placed in steel containers that are then sealed and tagged. Current strategies for monitoring the agreements involve taking neutron and gamma radiation measurements of components in their containers to monitor the presence, mass, and composition of plutonium or highly enriched uranium, as well as other attributes that indicate the use of the material in a weapon. If accurate enough to be useful, these measurements will yield data containing information about the design of the weapon being monitored. In each case, the design data are considered sensitive by one or both parties to the agreement. To prevent the disclosure of this information in a bilateral or trilateral inspection scenario, so-called information barriers have evolved. These barriers combine hardware, software, and procedural safeguards to contain the sensitive data within a protected volume, presenting to the inspector only the processed results needed for verification. Interlocks and volatile memory guard against disclosure in case of failure. Implementing these safeguards requires innovation in radiation measurement instruments and data security. Demonstrating their reliability requires independent testing to uncover any flaws in design. This study discusses the general problem and gives a proposed solution for a high resolution gamma ray detection system. It uses historical examples to illustrate the evolution of other successful systems.

MacArthur, D A; Wolford, J K

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

85

SRS - Programs - H Area Nuclear Materials Disposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H Area Nuclear Materials Disposition H Area Nuclear Materials Disposition The primary mission of the H-Canyon Complex is to dissolve, purify and blend-down surplus highly enriched uranium (HEU) and aluminum-clad foreign and domestic research reactor fuel to produce a low enriched uranium (LEU) solution suitable for conversion to commercial reactor fuel. A secondary mission for H-Canyon is to dissolve excess plutonium (Pu) not suitable for MOX and transfer it for vitrification in the Defense Waste Processing Facility at SRS. H Canyon was constructed in the early 1950s and began operations in 1955. The building is called a canyon because of its long rectangular shape and two continuous trenches that contains the process vessels. It is approximately 1,000 feet long with several levels to accommodate the various stages of material stabilization, including control rooms to monitor overall equipment and operating processes, equipment and piping gallery for solution transport, storage, and disposition, and unique overhead bridge cranes to support overall process operations. All work is remotely controlled, and employees are further protected from radiation by thick concrete walls.

86

UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System CHANGE OF PROJECT NUMBER UPDATE PROJECT Project Number: Title: Date Valid: Date Deactivated: Classification Codes: Project Number:...

87

NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2011 In April 2009, President Obama outlined an ambitious agenda to secure vulnerable nuclear material around the world within four years, calling the danger of a terrorist...

88

Implementing New Methods of Laser Marking of Items in the Nuclear Material Control and Accountability System at SSC RF-IPPE: An Automated Laser Marking System  

SciTech Connect

For over ten years SSC RF-IPPE, together with the US DOE National Laboratories, has been working on implementing automated control and accountability methods for nuclear materials and other items. Initial efforts to use adhesive bar codes or ones printed (painted) onto metal revealed that these methods were inconvenient and lacked durability under operational conditions. For NM disk applications in critical stands, there is the additional requirement that labels not affect the neutron characteristics of the critical assembly. This is particularly true for the many stainless-steel clad disks containing highly enriched uranium (HEU) and plutonium that are used at SSC RF-IPPE for modeling nuclear power reactors. In search of an alternate method for labeling these disks, we tested several technological options, including laser marking and two-dimensional codes. As a result, the method of laser coloring was chosen in combination with Data Matrix ECC200 symbology. To implement laser marking procedures for the HEU disks and meet all the nuclear material (NM) handling standards and rules, IPPE staff, with U.S. technical and financial support, implemented an automated laser marking system; there are also specially developed procedures for NM movements during laser marking. For the laser marking station, a Zenith 10F system by Telesis Technologies (10 watt Ytterbium Fiber Laser and Merlin software) is used. The presentation includes a flowchart for the automated system and a list of specially developed procedures with comments. Among other things, approaches are discussed for human-factor considerations. To date, markings have been applied to numerous steel-clad HEU disks, and the work continues. In the future this method is expected to be applied to other MC&A items.

Regoushevsky, V I; Tambovtsev, S D; Dvukhsherstnov, V G; Efimenko, V F; Ilyantsev, A I; Russ III, G P

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

89

Y-12 Removes Nuclear Materials from Two Facilities to Reduce...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removes Nuclear Materials from Two Facilities to Reduce Site's Nuclear Footprint (Alpha 5 and 9720-38 No Longer Designated as Nuclear Facilities) | National Nuclear Security...

90

NUCLEAR PLANT AND CONTROL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the digital protection systems of a nuclear power plant. When spec- ifying requirements for software and CRSA processes are described using shutdown system 2 of the Wolsong nuclear power plants as the digital, the missiles, and the digital protection systems embed- ded in nuclear power plants. Obviously, safety

91

Nuclear Material Recovery | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear material domestically and internationally is one part of Y-12's nuclear nonproliferation business. Miscellaneous scrap material is a diverse group of scrap materials...

92

Regulatory Guide 5.29, Revision 2, "Special Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants".  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION June 2013 U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION June 2013 Revision 2 REGULATORY GUIDE OFFICE OF NUCLEAR REGULATORY RESEARCH Written suggestions regarding this guide or development of new guides may be submitted through the NRC's public Web site under the Regulatory Guides document collection of the NRC Library at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/reg-guides/contactus.html. Electronic copies of this regulatory guide, previous versions of this guide, and other recently issued guides are available through the NRC's public Web site under the Regulatory Guides document collection of the NRC Library at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/. The regulatory guide is also available through the NRC's Agencywide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS) at

93

UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System CHANGE OF PROJECT NUMBER UPDATE PROJECT Project Number: Title: Date Valid: Date Deactivated: Classification Codes: Project Number: Project Title: Associated Materials: Programmatic RIS Previous Project Number(s) Status Code Allotment Code (S=Supplier, U=User) I authorize that the information listed above is for the NMMSS Program to use as part of the project number conversion process for this facility.

94

Materials in space nuclear power systems  

SciTech Connect

Man's presence in space has been limited by the availability of reliable lightweight sources of power. Over the course of the last 30 years, a variety of space nuclear power systems have been designed and, in some cases, built and flown. Although a number of technology issues effect the overall performance of these systems, technical issues associated with the materials of construction have most often been a major limitation in obtaining the desired system performance goals. This paper will review selected materials limitations associated with the three major nuclear power systems being considered at this time: radioisotope power, nuclear power, and nuclear propulsion systems.

Cooper, R.H.; Moore, J.P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention, which resulted from a contact with the United States Department of Energy, relates to a control mechanism for a nuclear reactor and, more particularly, to an assembly for selectively shifting different numbers of reactivity modifying rods into and out of the core of a nuclear reactor. It has been proposed heretofore to control the reactivity of a breeder reactor by varying the depth of insertion of control rods (e.g., rods containing a fertile material such as ThO/sub 2/) in the core of the reactor, thereby varying the amount of neutron-thermalizing coolant and the amount of neutron-capturing material in the core. This invention relates to a mechanism which can advantageously be used in this type of reactor control system.

Bollinger, L.R.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

96

Nuclear Concrete Materials Database Phase I Development  

SciTech Connect

The FY 2011 accomplishments in Phase I development of the Nuclear Concrete Materials Database to support the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program are summarized. The database has been developed using the ORNL materials database infrastructure established for the Gen IV Materials Handbook to achieve cost reduction and development efficiency. In this Phase I development, the database has been successfully designed and constructed to manage documents in the Portable Document Format generated from the Structural Materials Handbook that contains nuclear concrete materials data and related information. The completion of the Phase I database has established a solid foundation for Phase II development, in which a digital database will be designed and constructed to manage nuclear concrete materials data in various digitized formats to facilitate electronic and mathematical processing for analysis, modeling, and design applications.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Fundamentals of materials accounting for nuclear safeguards  

SciTech Connect

Materials accounting is essential to providing the necessary assurance for verifying the effectiveness of a safeguards system. The use of measurements, analyses, records, and reports to maintain knowledge of the quantities of nuclear material present in a defined area of a facility and the use of physical inventories and materials balances to verify the presence of special nuclear materials are collectively known as materials accounting for nuclear safeguards. This manual, prepared as part of the resource materials for the Safeguards Technology Training Program of the US Department of Energy, addresses fundamental aspects of materials accounting, enriching and complementing them with the first-hand experiences of authors from varied disciplines. The topics range from highly technical subjects to site-specific system designs and policy discussions. This collection of papers is prepared by more than 25 professionals from the nuclear safeguards field. Representing research institutions, industries, and regulatory agencies, the authors create a unique resource for the annual course titled ''Materials Accounting for Nuclear Safeguards,'' which is offered at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Pillay, K.K.S. (comp.)

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Potential applications of nanostructured materials in nuclear waste management.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results obtained from a Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) project entitled 'Investigation of Potential Applications of Self-Assembled Nanostructured Materials in Nuclear Waste Management'. The objectives of this project are to (1) provide a mechanistic understanding of the control of nanometer-scale structures on the ion sorption capability of materials and (2) develop appropriate engineering approaches to improving material properties based on such an understanding.

Braterman, Paul S. (The University of North Texas, Denton, TX); Phol, Phillip Isabio; Xu, Zhi-Ping (The University of North Texas, Denton, TX); Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Yang, Yi (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Bryan, Charles R.; Yu, Kui; Xu, Huifang (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Wang, Yifeng; Gao, Huizhen

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Status of nuclear weapons material disposition in Russia  

SciTech Connect

The security of nuclear weapons and fissile material in Russia, the disposition of weapons-usable fissile material in Russia, the Clinton administration`s policies and programs for assisting Russia in improving its security over nuclear weapons and fissile material, and the disposal of Russian weapons-usable fissile materials are discussed in this paper. There are {approximately}30,000 nuclear warheads in the former Soviet Union, {approximately}1000 t of weapon-usable high-enriched uranium (HEU), {approximately} 160 t of separated plutonium in weapons or available for weapons, and {approximately}30 t of separated civil plutonium stored in Russia. Most, if not all, of these inventories are stored under inadequate conditions of physical security and of material control and accounting.

Cochran, T.B.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Counterproliferation of nuclear raw materials. Study project  

SciTech Connect

In light of the ongoing INF and START I agreements and the pending ratification of the START II agreement, the quantities of nuclear-weapon-usable `fissile` materials from the former USSR will expand drastically. Some newly rich rogue oil states and terrorist groups with anti-U.S. sentiments may attempt to procure fissile materials in order to manufacture nuclear weapons. This project will explore the scope of the fissile material proliferation problem, describe a number of recent cases where fissile material was illegally diverted, and discuss the U.S. policies, methods and means available to halt or reduce the spread of weapons-usable nuclear material. Finally, it provides recommendations for improvements in the U.S. program and for areas meriting further study.

Sanders, R.L.

1996-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Division | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems SHARE Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Division Fusion holds the promise of significant power with no carbon emissions and minimal...

102

Interim Management of Nuclear Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary-1995.html[6/27/2011 12:50:20 PM] Summary-1995.html[6/27/2011 12:50:20 PM] SUMMARY The Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the Department of Energy (DOE), established the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the early 1950s for the production of special radioactive isotopes. The primary SRS mission was to produce strategic isotopes (plutonium-239 and tritium) used in the development and production of nuclear weapons for national defense. The Site produced other special isotopes (californium-252, plutonium-238, americium-241, etc.) to support research in nuclear medicine, space exploration, and commercial applications. The historic production cycle at the SRS involved the fabrication of metal fuel and target assemblies for irradiation in the Site reactors, followed by chemical dissolution, separation, and conversion of the radioisotopes into solid forms for use

103

Nuclear Material Control and Accountability  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

... 72 DOE-STD-1194-2011 iii FOREWORD This Department of Energy Standard is for use by all DOE elements. Beneficial comments (recommendations,...

104

Materials Research Needs for Near-Term Nuclear Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / NSF Workshop on the Research Needs of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Technology / Material

John R. Weeks

105

Materials control and accounting (MC and A): the evolutionary pressures  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear materials control and accounting systems are subject to pressures of both regulatory and institutional natures. This fact, coupled with the emergence of new technology, is causing evolutionary changes in materials control and accounting systems. These changes are the subject of this paper.

Shipley, J.P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Nuclear reactor control room construction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control room for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects labelled 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 in the drawing are no less than four inches from walls labelled 10.2. A ceiling contains cooling fins that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates. A concrete slab is poured over the plates. Studs are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete. 6 figures.

Lamuro, R.C.; Orr, R.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

107

Nuclear reactor control room construction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control room 10 for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 are no less than four inches from walls 10.2. A ceiling 32 contains cooling fins 35 that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates 34. A concrete slab 33 is poured over the plates. Studs 36 are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete.

Lamuro, Robert C. (Pittsburgh, PA); Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Nuclear fuel elements made from nanophase materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor core fuel element is composed of nanophase high temperature materials. An array of the fuel elements in rod form are joined in an open geometry fuel cell that preferably also uses such nanophase materials for the cell structures. The particular high temperature nanophase fuel element material must have the appropriate mechanical characteristics to avoid strain related failure even at high temperatures, in the order of about 3000 F. Preferably, the reactor type is a pressurized or boiling water reactor and the nanophase material is a high temperature ceramic or ceramic composite. Nanophase metals, or nanophase metals with nanophase ceramics in a composite mixture, also have desirable characteristics, although their temperature capability is not as great as with all-ceramic nanophase material. Combinations of conventional or nanophase metals and conventional or nanophase ceramics can be employed as long as there is at least one nanophase material in the composite. The nuclear reactor so constructed has a number of high strength fuel particles, a nanophase structural material for supporting a fuel rod at high temperature, a configuration to allow passive cooling in the event of a primary cooling system failure, an ability to retain a coolable geometry even at high temperatures, an ability to resist generation of hydrogen gas, and a configuration having good nuclear, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics. 5 figs.

Heubeck, N.B.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

109

Control of Nuclear Weapon Data  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The directive establishes the policy, process and procedures for control of nuclear weapon data to ensure that dissemination of the information is restricted to individuals with appropriate clearances, approved authorization and valid need-to-know in keeping with the Atomic Energy Act (as amended) stipulation of ensuring common defense and security. Cancels DOE O 5610.2.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

110

Advanced nuclear plant control complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

National and international nuclear material monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The status of nuclear materials in both the U.S. and Former Soviet Union is changing based upon the execution of agreements relative to weapons materials production and weapon dismantlement. The result of these activities is that a considerably different emphasis is being placed on how nuclear materials are viewed and utilized. Even though much effort is being expended on the final disposition of these materials, the interim need for storage and security of the material is increasing. Both safety and security requirements exist to govern activities when these materials are placed in storage. These requirements are intended to provide confidence that the material is not being misused and that the storage operations are conducted safely. Both of these goals can be significantly enhanced if technological monitoring of the material is performed. This paper will briefly discuss the traditional manual methods of U.S. and international material monitoring and then present approaches and technology that are available to achieve the same goals under the evolving environment.

Waddoups, I.G.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Climate Control Using Nuclear Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine implications of anthropogenic low pressure regions, - created by injecting heat from nuclear reactors, into atmosphere. We suggest the possibility that such artificially generated low pressure regions, near hurricanes could disrupt their growth, path, and intensity. This method can also create controlled tropical stroms, which lead to substantial rainfall in arid areas, such as - (1)Sahara desert, (2) Australian interior desert, and (3) Indian Thar desert. A simple vortex suction model is developed to study, effect on atmospheric dynamics, by such a nuclear heat injection system.

Moninder Singh Modgil

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Termination of Safeguards for Accountable Nuclear Materials at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Termination of safeguards ends requirements of Nuclear Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) and thereby removes the safeguards basis for applying physical protection requirements for theft and diversion of nuclear material, providing termination requirements are met as described. Department of Energy (DOE) M 470.4 6 (Nuclear Material Control and Accountability [8/26/05]) stipulates: 1. Section A, Chapter I (1)( q) (1): Safeguards can be terminated on nuclear materials provided the following conditions are met: (a) 'If the material is special nuclear material (SNM) or protected as SNM, it must be attractiveness level E and have a measured value.' (b) 'The material has been determined by DOE line management to be of no programmatic value to DOE.' (c) 'The material is transferred to the control of a waste management organization where the material is accounted for and protected in accordance with waste management regulations. The material must not be collocated with other accountable nuclear materials.' Requirements for safeguards termination depend on the safeguards attractiveness levels of the material. For attractiveness level E, approval has been granted from the DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE ID) to Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) Safeguards and Security (S&S). In some cases, it may be necessary to dispose of nuclear materials of attractiveness level D or higher. Termination of safeguards for such materials must be approved by the Departmental Element (this is the DOE Headquarters Office of Nuclear Energy) after consultation with the Office of Security.

Michael Holzemer; Alan Carvo

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Muon Tracking to Detect Special Nuclear Materials  

SciTech Connect

Previous experiments have proven that nuclear assemblies can be imaged and identified inside of shipping containers using vertical trajectory cosmic-ray muons with two-sided imaging. These experiments have further demonstrated that nuclear assemblies can be identified by detecting fission products in coincidence with tracked muons. By developing these technologies, advanced sensors can be designed for a variety of warhead monitoring and detection applications. The focus of this project is to develop tomographic-mode imaging using near-horizontal trajectory muons in conjunction with secondary particle detectors. This will allow imaging in-situ without the need to relocate the objects and will enable differentiation of special nuclear material (SNM) from other high-Z materials.

Schwellenbach, D. [NSTec; Dreesen, W. [NSTec; Green, J. A. [NSTec; Tibbitts, A. [NSTec; Schotik, G. [NSTec; Borozdin, K. [LANL; Bacon, J. [LANL; Midera, H. [LANL; Milner, C. [LANL; Morris, C. [LANL; Perry, J. [LANL; Barrett, S. [UW; Perry, K. [UW; Scott, A. [UW; Wright, C. [UW; Aberle, D. [NSTec

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

115

Materials control and accountability auditor training  

SciTech Connect

As the Department of Energy (DOE) works to standardize the training for individuals performing materials control and accountability (MC and A) functions, the need for a definition of the appropriate training for MC and A auditors has become apparent. In order to meet the DOE requirement for individual training plans for all staff performing MC and A functions, the following set of guidelines was developed for consideration as applicable to MC and A auditors. The application of these guidelines to specific operating environments at individual DOE sites may require modification to some of the tables. The paper presents one method of developing individual training programs for an MC and A auditor or for an MC and A audit group based on the requirements for internal audits and assessments included in DOE Order 5633.3, Control and Accountability for Nuclear Materials.

Barham, M.A. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Nuclear Materials: Reconsidering Wastes and Assets - 13193  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear industry, both in the commercial and the government sectors, has generated large quantities of material that span the spectrum of usefulness, from highly valuable ('assets') to worthless ('wastes'). In many cases, the decision parameters are clear. Transuranic waste and high level waste, for example, have no value, and is either in a final disposition path today, or - in the case of high level waste - awaiting a policy decision about final disposition. Other materials, though discardable, have intrinsic scientific or market value that may be hidden by the complexity, hazard, or cost of recovery. An informed decision process should acknowledge the asset value, or lack of value, of the complete inventory of materials, and the structure necessary to implement the range of possible options. It is important that informed decisions are made about the asset value for the variety of nuclear materials available. For example, there is a significant quantity of spent fuel available for recycle (an estimated $4 billion value in the Savannah River Site's (SRS) L area alone); in fact, SRS has already blended down more than 300 metric tons of uranium for commercial reactor use. Over 34 metric tons of surplus plutonium is also on a path to be used as commercial fuel. There are other radiological materials that are routinely handled at the site in large quantities that should be viewed as strategically important and / or commercially viable. In some cases, these materials are irreplaceable domestically, and failure to consider their recovery could jeopardize our technological leadership or national defense. The inventories of nuclear materials at SRS that have been characterized as 'waste' include isotopes of plutonium, uranium, americium, and helium. Although planning has been performed to establish the technical and regulatory bases for their discard and disposal, recovery of these materials is both economically attractive and in the national interest. (authors)

Michalske, T.A. [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the use of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) techniques for the isotopic and quantitative assaying of radioactive material. Potential applications include age-dating of an unknown radioactive source, pre- and post-detonation nuclear forensics, and safeguards for nuclear fuel cycles Examples of age-dating a strong radioactive source and assaying a spent fuel pin are discussed. The modeling work has ben performed with the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNPX, and the capability to simulate NRF has bee added to the code. Discussed are the limitations in MCNPX?s photon transport physics for accurately describing photon scattering processes that are important contributions to the background and impact the applicability of the NRF assay technique.

Quiter, Brian J.; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Prussin, Stanley

2009-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

118

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the use of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) techniques for the isotopic and quantitative assaying of radioactive material. Potential applications include age-dating of an unknown radioactive source, pre- and post-detonation nuclear forensics, and safeguards for nuclear fuel cycles Examples of age-dating a strong radioactive source and assaying a spent fuel pin are discussed. The modeling work has ben performed with the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNPX, and the capability to simulate NRF has bee added to the code. Discussed are the limitations in MCNPX's photon transport physics for accurately describing photon scattering processes that are important contributions to the background and impact the applicability of the NRF assay technique.

Quiter, Brian; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Prussin, Stanley

2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

119

The Office of Nuclear Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration Controls | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The Office of Nuclear Controls Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nonproliferation & International Security > The Office of Nuclear Controls The Office of Nuclear Controls Certain terrorist groups and states are attempting to acquire WMD dual-use

120

NUCLEAR MATERIALTRANSACTION REPORT | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

NUCLEAR MATERIALTRANSACTION REPORT NUCLEAR MATERIALTRANSACTION REPORT Form used to support nuclear materials accountability and control. NUCLEAR MATERIALTRANSACTION REPORT More...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nuclear forensics, and safeguards for nuclear fuel cyclesIndex TermsNuclear Safeguards, non-destructive analysis,radiological source, nuclear safeguards including measuring

Quiter, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Assessment tool for nuclear material acquisition pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be obtained. The two types of material used in nuclear weapons are Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and Plutonium (Pu). Uranium is an element found in nature and is contained in the soil all over the world. However, certain geological formations contain a... (LEU) portion of the network ..................................... 22 Figure 11 Last seciton of the Pu (LEU) portion of the network...................................... 23 Figure 12 Plutonium Section of the Network produced via Natural Uranium...

Ford, David Grant

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

124

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

125

Nuclear Fuels & Materials Spotlight Volume 4  

SciTech Connect

As the nation's nuclear energy laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory brings together talented people and specialized nuclear research capability to accomplish our mission. This edition of the Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division Spotlight provides an overview of some of our recent accomplishments in research and capability development. These accomplishments include: The first identification of silver and palladium migrating through the SiC layer in TRISO fuel A description of irradiation assisted stress corrosion testing capabilities that support commercial light water reactor life extension Results of high-temperature safety testing on coated particle fuels irradiated in the ATR New methods for testing the integrity of irradiated plate-type reactor fuel Description of a 'Smart Fuel' concept that wirelessly provides real time information about changes in nuclear fuel properties and operating conditions Development and testing of ultrasonic transducers and real-time flux sensors for use inside reactor cores, and An example of a capsule irradiation test. Throughout Spotlight, you'll find examples of productive partnerships with academia, industry, and government agencies that deliver high-impact outcomes. The work conducted at Idaho National Laboratory helps to spur innovation in nuclear energy applications that drive economic growth and energy security. We appreciate your interest in our work here at INL, and hope that you find this issue informative.

I. J. van Rooyen,; T. M. Lillo; Y. Q. WU; P.A. Demkowicz; L. Scott; D.M. Scates; E. L. Reber; J. H. Jackson; J. A. Smith; D.L. Cottle; B.H. Rabin; M.R. Tonks; S.B. Biner; Y. Zhang; R.L. Williamson; S.R. Novascone; B.W. Spencer; J.D. Hales; D.R. Gaston; C.J. Permann; D. Anders; S.L. Hayes; P.C. Millett; D. Andersson; C. Stanek; R. Ali; S.L. Garrett; J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; J. Palmer; B. Tittmann; B. Reinhardt; G. Kohse; P. Ramuhali; H.T. Chien; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; D.W. Nigg; G. Imel; J. T. Harris

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Large Scale Weather Control Using Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is pointed out that controlled release of thermal energy from fission type nuclear reactors can be used to alter weather patterns over significantly large geographical regions. (1) Nuclear heat creates a low pressure region, which can be used to draw moist air from oceans, onto deserts. (2) Creation of low pressure zones over oceans using Nuclear heat can lead to Controlled Cyclone Creation (CCC).(3) Nuclear heat can also be used to melt glaciers and control water flow in rivers.

Moninder Singh Modgil

2002-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

127

United States Department of Energy Nuclear Materials Stewardship  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy launched the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in January 2000 to accelerate the work of achieving integration and cutting long-term costs associated with the management of the Department's nuclear materials, with the principal focus on excess materials. Management of nuclear materials is a fundamental and enduring responsibility that is essential to meeting the Department's national security, nonproliferation, energy, science, and environmental missions into the distant future. The effective management of nuclear materials is important for a set of reasons: (1) some materials are vital to our national defense; (2) the materials pose physical and security risks; (3) managing them is costly; and (4) costs are likely to extend well into the future. The Department currently manages nuclear materials under eight programs, with offices in 36 different locations. Through the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative, progress was during calendar year 20 00 in achieving better coordination and integration of nuclear materials management responsibilities and in evaluating opportunities to further coordinate and integrate cross-program responsibilities for the treatment, storage, and disposition of excess nuclear materials. During CY 2001 the Departmental approach to nuclear materials stewardship changed consistent with the business processes followed by the new administration. This paper reports on the progress of the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative in evaluating and implementing these opportunities, and the remaining challenges in integrating the long-term management of nuclear materials.

Newton, J. W.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

128

Implementation Plan and Initial Development of Nuclear Concrete Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation Plan and Initial Development of Nuclear Concrete Implementation Plan and Initial Development of Nuclear Concrete Materials Database for Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Implementation Plan and Initial Development of Nuclear Concrete Materials Database for Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program The FY10 activities for development of a nuclear concrete materials database to support the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program are summarized. The database will be designed and constructed using the ORNL materials database infrastructure established for the Gen IV Materials Handbook to achieve cost reduction and development efficiency. In Phase I, a static database will be developed to manage searchable documents from the Structural Materials Handbook that contains information on nuclear concrete

129

Implementation Plan and Initial Development of Nuclear Concrete Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation Plan and Initial Development of Nuclear Concrete Implementation Plan and Initial Development of Nuclear Concrete Materials Database for Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Implementation Plan and Initial Development of Nuclear Concrete Materials Database for Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program The FY10 activities for development of a nuclear concrete materials database to support the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program are summarized. The database will be designed and constructed using the ORNL materials database infrastructure established for the Gen IV Materials Handbook to achieve cost reduction and development efficiency. In Phase I, a static database will be developed to manage searchable documents from the Structural Materials Handbook that contains information on nuclear concrete

130

Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Document Markings: A Brief Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) Document Markings: A Brief Summary U.S. Department of Energy Classification Training Institute Office of Quality Management Office of Classification Office of Health, Safety and Security November 2011 Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) Document Markings: A Brief Summary Prepared by: Office of Quality Management Office of Classification U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW. Washington, D.C. 20585-1290 U C N I This document contains UCNI. How do I mark it? Do I need additional markings if it contains OUO? Table of Contents Marking UCNI Documents and Material .................................................... 1

131

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. Investigation of Nuclear Structure by Resonance1996, pp. G. Warren et al. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescenceof 235U IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium 2006, pp. 914. W.

Quiter, Brian J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

SECURITY AND CONTROL OF NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVES AND NUCLEAR WEAPONS  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

http://www.nnsa.energy.gov Office of Nuclear Weapon Surety and Quality http://www.nnsa.energy.gov Office of Nuclear Weapon Surety and Quality SUPPLEMENTAL DIRECTIVE Approved: 7-7-11 IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLS TO PREVENT DELIBERATE UNAUTHORIZED USE NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Office of Defense Programs NA SD 452.4 NA SD 452.4 1 7-7-11 IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLS TO PREVENT DELIBERATE UNAUTHORIZED USE 1. PURPOSE. This NNSA Supplemental Directive (SD) supports the requirements of DOE O 452.4B, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons. Specifically, this SD supports the Order's requirements to implement deliberate unauthorized use (DUU) preventive measures for nuclear explosive operations (NEO) and associated activities and to perform independent evaluations to determine if NEOs

133

Office of Material Consolidation & Civilian Sites | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Material Consolidation & Civilian Sites | National Nuclear Material Consolidation & Civilian Sites | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Office of Material Consolidation & Civilian Sites Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices > Office of International Material

134

Loose Nukes: Nuclear Material Security in G.P.Gilfoyle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-standing policy of nuclear nonproliferation. · A nuclear blast would have horrific consequences; loss of lifeLoose Nukes: Nuclear Material Security in Russia G.P.Gilfoyle Physics Department, University of Richmond, Virginia Outline: 1. Nuclear Weapons 101 2. What are loose nukes and why should you care? 3. What

Gilfoyle, Jerry

135

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor comprises supports stacked above reactor core for holding control rods. Couplers associated with the supports and a vertically movable drive shaft have lugs at their lower ends for engagement with the supports.

Bollinger, Lawrence R. (Schenectady, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Nuclear Forensic Reference Materials (RM) for Attribution of Urban Nuclear Terrorism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Debris from a nuclear explosion · Debris from a radiological dispersal device Nuclear Forensic GoalsNuclear Forensic Reference Materials (RM) for Attribution of Urban Nuclear Terrorism Kenneth G relationships Nuclear Forensics require high-level expertise, undisputed signatures & extremely high fidelity

Perkins, Richard A.

137

Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System Reporting and Data Submission  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The manual provides clear and detailed instructions and procedures for documenting and reporting data submissions for nuclear materials transactions, inventories, and material balances to the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS). Cancels DOE 5633.3B. Canceled by DOE M 474.1-2A.

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

138

Special Nuclear Material Portal Monitoring at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Prior to April 2007, acceptance and performance testing of the various Special Nuclear Material (SNM) monitoring devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed by the Radiological Health Instrumentation department. Calibration and performance testing on the PM-700 personnel portal monitor was performed, but there was no test program for the VM-250 vehicle portal monitor. The handheld SNM monitors, the TSA model 470B, were being calibrated annually, but there was no performance test program. In April of 2007, the Material Control and Accountability Manager volunteered to take over performance testing of all SNM portal monitors at NTS in order to strengthen the program and meet U.S. Department of Energy Order requirements. This paper will discuss the following activities associated with developing a performance testing program: changing the culture, learning the systems, developing and implementing procedures, troubleshooting and repair, validating the process, physical control of equipment, acquisition of new systems, and implementing the performance test program.

DeAnn Long; Michael Murphy

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

material protection | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

protection | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

140

Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts/deliberate unauthorized use. Cancels DOE O 452.4A.

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts (DUAs), deliberate unauthorized use (DUU), and denial of authorized use (DAU).

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

142

U.S. Works With Kazakhstan to Stop Nuclear and Radioactive Material  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Works With Kazakhstan to Stop Nuclear and Radioactive Material Works With Kazakhstan to Stop Nuclear and Radioactive Material Smuggling U.S. Works With Kazakhstan to Stop Nuclear and Radioactive Material Smuggling May 6, 2006 - 10:34am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - As part of the overall U.S. strategy to prevent nuclear and dangerous radiological materials from falling into the hands of terrorists, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) announced today that an agreement with the government of Kazakhstan had been signed to create a partnership under the Second Line of Defense program. U.S. Ambassador Ordway joined Kazakhstan Customs Control Committee Chairman Askar Shakirov in signing the accord. The agreement will pave the way for NNSA to work collaboratively with the Kazakhstan Customs Control Committee

143

Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority,...

144

Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

145

Distributional properties of stochastic shortest paths for smuggled nuclear material  

SciTech Connect

The shortest path problem on a network with fixed weights is a well studied problem with applications to many diverse areas such as transportation and telecommunications. We are particularly interested in the scenario where a nuclear material smuggler tries to succesfully reach herlhis target by identifying the most likely path to the target. The identification of the path relies on reliabilities (weights) associated with each link and node in a multi-modal transportation network. In order to account for the adversary's uncertainty and to perform sensitivity analysis we introduce random reliabilities. We perform some controlled experiments on the grid and present the distributional properties of the resulting stochastic shortest paths.

Cuellar, Leticia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pan, Feng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roach, Fred [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saeger, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

146

Cleanup Contractor Achieves Elite Nuclear Material Accountability Status  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

PADUCAH, Ky. EMs cleanup contractor at the Paducah site has received national acclaim for timeliness of reporting and promptness in reconciling nuclear material inventories.

147

Commission. The Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Revision 7, ''Instructions for Completing Nuclear Material Transaction Reports (DOENRC Forms 741 and 740M).'' Page 3 April 2014 April 2014 Topics Needed for the Industry...

148

Work of the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Automatics with the U.S. laboratory-to-laboratory program for cooperation on nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting  

SciTech Connect

The All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Automatics (VNIIA) is one of the scientific research institutes participating in the US/Russian Laboratory-to-Laboratory Program in Nuclear Materials Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A). The Institute has provided instrumentation and measurement techniques to the Russian defense program and to the medical, gas and oil, and manufacturing industries. VNIIA is improving MPC and A in Russia by providing support to the Russian institutes and enterprises in the Ministry of Atomic Energy. VNIIA has a primary role in determining the requirements and specifications and developing procedures for testing and certification of MPC and A equipment, and is instrumental in strengthening the Russian infrastructure for supplying MPC and A equipment. Contracts have been placed with VNIIA by Russian suppliers to test, certify, and prepare for manufacturing hand-held special nuclear material detection equipment they have developed. A contract also is in place with VNIIA to test and evaluate a US-manufactured pedestrian portal monitor. Work for 1996 includes certifying these portal monitors and portable radiation detection equipment for use in Russian facilities, testing and evaluating a US active well coincidence counter and gamma-ray isotopic measurement methods, and developing guidelines for statistical evaluation methods used in MPC and A. This paper reviews the status of this effort and describes the plans for continuing this work in 1996.

Griggs, J.R.; Smoot, J.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hoida, Hiroshi [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet | National Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: ... Fact Sheet Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet

150

Tiny device can detect hidden nuclear weapons, materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tiny Tiny device can detect hidden nuclear weapons, materials Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share Tiny device can detect hidden nuclear weapons, materials This tiny wafer can detect hidden nuclear weapons and materials NUCLEAR DETECTOR -- This small wafer could become the key component in

151

Vapor etching of nuclear tracks in dielectric materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process involving vapor etching of nuclear tracks in dielectric materials for creating high aspect ratio (i.e., length much greater than diameter), isolated cylindrical holes in dielectric materials that have been exposed to high-energy atomic particles. The process includes cleaning the surface of the tracked material and exposing the cleaned surface to a vapor of a suitable etchant. Independent control of the temperatures of the vapor and the tracked materials provide the means to vary separately the etch rates for the latent track region and the non-tracked material. As a rule, the tracked regions etch at a greater rate than the non-tracked regions. In addition, the vapor-etched holes can be enlarged and smoothed by subsequent dipping in a liquid etchant. The 20-1000 nm diameter holes resulting from the vapor etching process can be useful as molds for electroplating nanometer-sized filaments, etching gate cavities for deposition of nano-cones, developing high-aspect ratio holes in trackable resists, and as filters for a variety of molecular-sized particles in virtually any liquid or gas by selecting the dielectric material that is compatible with the liquid or gas of interest.

Musket, Ronald G. (Danville, CA); Porter, John D. (Berkeley, CA); Yoshiyama, James M. (Fremont, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Lake Oswego, OR)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Tagging and fissile material verification concepts for nuclear warhead dismantlement  

SciTech Connect

Arms control treaties that reduce the number of deployable nuclear-warhead delivery systems might also lead to provisions for the verified dismantlement of nuclear weapons. Based on public information and very simple conceptual models of nuclear warheads, one can visualize a set of procedural and technological requirements to account for warheads removed from deployed sites and ultimately dismantled. To accomplish the accounting function, verification-quality tags and/or seals might be needed in order that the warheads taken out of storage can be tracked to the dismantlement site. These tags/seals would represent an overlay on the existing chain of custody. The verified dismantlement of the warheads poses special problems in confirming their identity and in avoiding the loss of sensitive information. A central factor is the publicly recognized need for some minimum quantity of fissile material to constitute a nuclear warhead. A measurement system that could make such a determination without giving away unnecessary information would be desired. Some approaches based on existing fissile assay methods are discussed. 1 ref., 2 figs.

DeVolpi, A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Advanced ceramic materials for next-generation nuclear applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nuclear industry is at the eye of a 'perfect storm' with fuel oil and natural gas prices near record highs, worldwide energy demands increasing at an alarming rate, and increased concerns about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that have caused many to look negatively at long-term use of fossil fuels. This convergence of factors has led to a growing interest in revitalization of the nuclear power industry within the United States and across the globe. Many are surprised to learn that nuclear power provides approximately 20% of the electrical power in the US and approximately 16% of the world-wide electric power. With the above factors in mind, world-wide over 130 new reactor projects are being considered with approximately 25 new permit applications in the US. Materials have long played a very important role in the nuclear industry with applications throughout the entire fuel cycle; from fuel fabrication to waste stabilization. As the international community begins to look at advanced reactor systems and fuel cycles that minimize waste and increase proliferation resistance, materials will play an even larger role. Many of the advanced reactor concepts being evaluated operate at high-temperature requiring the use of durable, heat-resistant materials. Advanced metallic and ceramic fuels are being investigated for a variety of Generation IV reactor concepts. These include the traditional TRISO-coated particles, advanced alloy fuels for 'deep-burn' applications, as well as advanced inert-matrix fuels. In order to minimize wastes and legacy materials, a number of fuel reprocessing operations are being investigated. Advanced materials continue to provide a vital contribution in 'closing the fuel cycle' by stabilization of associated low-level and high-level wastes in highly durable cements, ceramics, and glasses. Beyond this fission energy application, fusion energy will demand advanced materials capable of withstanding the extreme environments of high-temperature plasma systems. Fusion reactors will likely depend on lithium-based ceramics to produce tritium that fuels the fusion plasma, while high-temperature alloys or ceramics will contain and control the hot plasma. All the while, alloys, ceramics, and ceramic-related processes continue to find applications in the management of wastes and byproducts produced by these processes.

John Marra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

BSc in Nuclear Science and Materials H821 MEng in Nuclear Engineering H822  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BSc in Nuclear Science and Materials H821 MEng in Nuclear Engineering H822 Research and education in nuclear engineering, waste management and decommissioning holds the key to sustainable energy production on an ambitious programme of commissioning nuclear energy, creating opportunities for graduates from plant design

Miall, Chris

155

Material Control and Accountability Experience at the Fuel Conditioning Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) treats spent nuclear fuel using an electrometallurgical process that separates the uranium from the fission products, sodium thermal bond, and cladding materials. Material accountancy is necessary at FCF for two reasons: 1) it provides a mechanism for detecting a potential loss of nuclear material for safeguards and security, and 2) it provides a periodic check of inventories to ensure that processes and materials are within control limits. Material Control and Accountability is also a Department of Energy (DOE) requirement (DOE Order 474.1). The FCF employs a computer based Mass Tracking (MTG) System to collect, store, retrieve, and process data on all operations that directly affect the flow of materials through the FCF. The MTG System is important for the operations of the FCF because it supports activities such as material control and accountability, criticality safety, and process modeling. To conduct material control and accountability checks and to monitor process performance, mass balances are routinely performed around the process equipment. The equipment used in FCF for pyro-processing consists of two mechanical choppers and two electro-refiners (the Mark-IV with the accompanying element chopper and Mark-V with the accompanying blanket chopper for processing driver fuel and blanket, respectively), and a cathode processor (used for processing both driver fuel and blanket) and casting furnace (mostly used for processing driver fuel). Performing mass balances requires the measurement of the masses and compositions of several process streams and equipment inventories. The masses of process streams are obtained via in-cell balances (i.e., load cells) that weigh containers entering and leaving the process equipment. Samples taken at key locations are analyzed to determine the composition of process streams and equipment inventories. In cases where equipment or containers cannot be placed on a balance, others methods (e.g., level measurements, volume calibration equations, calculated density via additive volumes) are utilized to measure the inventory mass. This paper will discuss the material control and accountability experience at the FCF after ten-plus years of processing spent nuclear fuel. A particular area of discussion is the calculated electrolyte density via additive volumes and its importance in determining the mass and composition in the FCF electro-refiners for material control and accountability of special nuclear material. (authors)

Vaden, D.; Fredrickson, G.L. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls ID 83415 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Meeting Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Meeting Materials Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Meeting Materials Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Meeting Materials November 26, 2013 MEETING MATERIALS: DECEMBER 19, 2013 Washington Marriott at Metro Center Ballroom A 775 12th Street, NW Washington, DC 20005 June 13, 2013 MEETING MATERIALS: JUNE 13, 2013 L'Enfant Plaza Hotel Ballroom D, (Main Floor) Washington, D.C. 20024 December 6, 2012 Meeting Materials: December 6, 2012 L'Enfant Plaza Hotel Quorum Room, (Main Floor) Washington, D.C. 20024 June 12, 2012 Meeting Materials: June 12, 2012 L'Enfant Plaza Hotel Monet Ballroom, (2nd Floor), Washington, D.C. 20024 December 13, 2011 Meetings Materials: December 13, 2011 L'Enfant Plaza Hotel Ballroom A - 1st Floor Washington, D.C. 20024 June 15, 2011 Meeting Materials: June 15, 2011 L'Enfant Plaza Hotel

157

Science Museum Exhibition on Controlled Nuclear Fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... 18 until the end of March 1959, illustrates British research in the field of controlled nuclear fusion. The centre-piece of the exhibition is a one-third scale model of Zeta, ...

1958-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

158

Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lister, Tedd E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pinhero, Patrick J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

159

Special Nuclear Materials: EM Manages Plutonium, Highly Enriched Uranium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Materials & Waste » Nuclear Materials & Waste » Special Nuclear Materials: EM Manages Plutonium, Highly Enriched Uranium and Uranium-233 Special Nuclear Materials: EM Manages Plutonium, Highly Enriched Uranium and Uranium-233 105-K building houses the K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) facility, designated for the consolidated storage of surplus plutonium at Savannah River Site pending disposition. The plutonium shipped to KAMS is sealed inside a welded 3013 containers that are nested in 9975 shipping containers. 105-K building houses the K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) facility, designated for the consolidated storage of surplus plutonium at Savannah River Site pending disposition. The plutonium shipped to KAMS is sealed inside a welded 3013 containers that are nested in 9975 shipping

160

NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

established the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) in the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation to, as quickly as possible, identify, secure, remove andor...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and Activity Monitoring Technologies | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as ... Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and

162

Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and Activity Monitoring Technologies | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as ... Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and

163

Los Alamos identifies internal material control issue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internal material control issue Internal material control issue Los Alamos identifies internal material control issue The error relates to internal inventory and accounting that documents movement of sensitive materials within a small portion of Technical Area 55. February 26, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

164

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Press Release High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Nov 15, 2013 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

165

Atomic Energy and Nuclear Materials Program (Tennessee) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Materials Program (Tennessee) Nuclear Materials Program (Tennessee) Atomic Energy and Nuclear Materials Program (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer General Public/Consumer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Utility Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Atomic Energy and Nuclear Materials section of the Tennessee Code covers all of the regulations, licenses, permits, siting requirements, and practices relevant to a nuclear energy development. In addition to the Tennessee Code the Department of Environment and Conservation has a rule pertaining to the licensing and registration of sources of radiation. The Department's rules state that any contractor or subcontractor of the U.S.

166

NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear Security NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material Fact Sheet NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material Apr 12, 2013 The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA),

167

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Press Release High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Nov 15, 2013 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

168

Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast-acting nuclear reactor control device for moving and positioning a fety control rod to desired positions within the core of the reactor between a run position in which the safety control rod is outside the reactor core, and a shutdown position in which the rod is fully inserted in the reactor core. The device employs a hydraulic pump/motor, an electric gear motor, and solenoid valve to drive the safety control rod into the reactor core through the entire stroke of the safety control rod. An overrunning clutch allows the safety control rod to freely travel toward a safe position in the event of a partial drive system failure.

Kotlyar, Oleg M. (Idaho Falls, ID); West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Audit Report on "The Department's Management of Nuclear Materials Provided to Domestic Licensees"  

SciTech Connect

The objective if to determine whether the Department of Energy (Department) was adequately managing its nuclear materials provided to domestic licensees. The audit was performed from February 2007 to September 2008 at Department Headquarters in Washington, DC, and Germantown, MD; the Oak Ridge Office and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, TN. In addition, we visited or obtained data from 40 different non-Departmental facilities in various states. To accomplish the audit objective, we: (1) Reviewed Departmental and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements for the control and accountability of nuclear materials; (2) Analyzed a Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS) report with ending inventory balances for Department-owned nuclear materials dated September 30, 2007, to determine the amount and types of nuclear materials located at non-Department domestic facilities; (3) Held discussions with Department and NRC personnel that used NMMSS information to determine their roles and responsibilities related to the control and accountability over nuclear materials; (4) Selected a judgmental sample of 40 non-Department domestic facilities; (5) Met with licensee officials and sent confirmations to determine whether their actual inventories of Department-owned nuclear materials were consistent with inventories reported in the NMMSS; and, (6) Analyzed historical information related to the 2004 NMMSS inventory rebaselining initiative to determine the quantity of Department-owned nuclear materials that were written off from the domestic licensees inventory balances. This performance audit was conducted in accordance with generally accepted Government auditing standards. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain sufficient, appropriate evidence to provide a reasonable basis for our findings and conclusions based on our audit objective. We believe that the evidence obtained provides a reasonable basis for our findings and conclusions based on our audit objectives. The audit included tests of controls and compliance with laws and regulations related to managing the Department-owned nuclear materials provided to non-Departmental domestic licensees. Because our review was limited it would not necessarily have disclosed all internal control deficiencies that may have existed at the time of our audit. We examined the establishment of performance measures in accordance with Government Performance and Results Act of 1993, as they related to the audit objective. We found that the Department had established performance measures related to removing or disposing of nuclear materials and radiological sources around the world. We utilized computer generated data during our audit and performed procedures to validate the reliability of the information as necessary to satisfy our audit objective. As noted in the report, we questioned the reliability of the NMMSS data.

None

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Defense Nuclear Material Stewardship Integrated Inventory Information Management System (IIIMS).  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories was tasked with developing the Defense Nuclear Material Stewardship Integrated Inventory Information Management System (IIIMS) with the sponsorship of NA-125.3 and the concurrence of DOE/NNSA field and area offices. The purpose of IIIMS was to modernize nuclear materials management information systems at the enterprise level. Projects over the course of several years attempted to spearhead this modernization. The scope of IIIMS was broken into broad enterprise-oriented materials management and materials forecasting. The IIIMS prototype was developed to allow multiple participating user groups to explore nuclear material requirements and needs in detail. The purpose of material forecasting was to determine nuclear material availability over a 10 to 15 year period in light of the dynamic nature of nuclear materials management. Formal DOE Directives (requirements) were needed to direct IIIMS efforts but were never issued and the project has been halted. When restarted, duplicating or re-engineering the activities from 1999 to 2003 is unnecessary, and in fact future initiatives can build on previous work. IIIMS requirements should be structured to provide high confidence that discrepancies are detected, and classified information is not divulged. Enterprise-wide materials management systems maintained by the military can be used as overall models to base IIIMS implementation concepts upon.

Aas, Christopher A.; Lenhart, James E.; Bray, Olin H.; Witcher, Christina Jenkin

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

In-field analysis and assessment of nuclear material  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory has actively developed and implemented a number of instruments to monitor, detect, and analyze nuclear materials in the field. Many of these technologies, developed under existing US Department of Energy programs, can also be used to effectively interdict nuclear materials smuggled across or within national borders. In particular, two instruments are suitable for immediate implementation: the NAVI-2, a hand-held gamma-ray and neutron system for the detection and rapid identification of radioactive materials, and the portable mass spectrometer for the rapid analysis of minute quantities of radioactive materials. Both instruments provide not only critical information about the characteristics of the nuclear material for law-enforcement agencies and national authorities but also supply health and safety information for personnel handling the suspect materials.

Morgado, R.E.; Myers, W.S.; Olivares, J.A.; Phillips, J.R.; York, R.L.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

NUCLEAR MATERIALS RESEARCH PROGRESS REPORTS FROM 1977  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Effects of Thermonuclear Plasma Interactions Withfor Controlled Thermonuclear Reactor (CTR), USAEC Report LA-

Olander, D.R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

TAMCN: a tool for aggregate modeling of civil nuclear materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

involved in the creation, storage, and utilization of potentially destructive nuclear material. Western Europe and Japan, namely France, Belgium, the United Kingdom, Germany, Switzerland, and Japan, were chosen as a starting point because the issues...

Watson, Aaron Michael

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) Welcome to the Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI) webpage. This page is designed to provide information, answer questions, and provide a point of contact for UCNI inquiries. UCNI is certain unclassified information about nuclear facilities and nuclear weapons that must be controlled because its unauthorized release could have a significant adverse effect on the national security or public health and safety. The Director, Office of Classification (OC), decides what specific information is UCNI. For information under the cognizance of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), the decisions are made in coordination with the Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear

175

Limits on Nuclear Materials for Arms Reduction: Complexities and Uncerainties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...there is little risk because the United...would ignore the nuclear materials production...capability ofthe Soviet power reactors and the...Savannah River Plant (SRP) reactors...U.S. would risk its national security...reactors at full power is not attractive...concomitant ban on nuclear tests would perpetuate...

W. G. SUTCLIFFE

1988-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

176

Limits on Nuclear Materials for Arms Reduction: Complexities and Uncerainties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...is little risk because the...ignore the nuclear materials...ofthe Soviet power reactors...Savannah River Plant (SRP) reactors...S. would risk its national security in this way...reactors at full power is not attractive...concomitant ban on nuclear tests would...

W. G. SUTCLIFFE

1988-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

177

Downhole material injector for lost circulation control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method are disclosed for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drill string in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drill string at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone. 6 figs.

Glowka, D.A.

1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

178

Downhole material injector for lost circulation control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an apparatus and method for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drillstring in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drillstring at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone.

Glowka, D.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Special nuclear material inventory sampling plans  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents improved procedures for obtaining statistically valid sampling plans for nuclear facilities. The double sampling concept and methods for developing optimal double sampling plans are described. An algorithm is described that is satisfactory for finding optimal double sampling plans and choosing appropriate detection and false alarm probabilities. (ACR)

Vaccaro, H.S.; Goldman, A.S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A Uniform Framework of Global Nuclear Materials Management  

SciTech Connect

Global Nuclear Materials Management (GNMM) anticipates and supports a growing international recognition of the importance of uniform, effective management of civilian, excess defense, and nuclear weapons materials. We expect thereto be a continuing increase in both the number of international agreements and conventions on safety, security, and transparency of nuclear materials, and the number of U.S.-Russian agreements for the safety, protection, and transparency of weapons and excess defense materials. This inventory of agreements and conventions may soon expand into broad, mandatory, international programs that will include provisions for inspection, verification, and transparency, To meet such demand the community must build on the resources we have, including State agencies, the IAEA and regional organizations. By these measures we will meet the future expectations for monitoring and inspection of materials, maintenance of safety and security, and implementation of transparency measures.

Dupree, S.A.; Mangan, D.L.; Sanders, T.L; Sellers, T.A.

1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

NUCLEAR REACTORS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nuclear reactors are devices containing fissionable material in sufficient quantity and so arranged as to be capable of maintaining a controlled, self-sustaining NUCLEAR FISSION chain (more)

Belachew, Dessalegn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - accountability nuclear materials Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear materials Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: accountability nuclear materials Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Los Alamos National...

183

NUCLEAR MATERIALS RESEARCH PROGRESS REPORTS FOR 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical E f f e c t s of Thermonuclear Plasma I n t e r a cfor Controlled Thermonuclear Reactor (CTR), USAEC Report LA

Olander, D.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The U.S. national nuclear forensics library, nuclear materials information program, and data dictionary  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear forensics assessments to determine material process history requires careful comparison of sample data to both measured and modeled nuclear material characteristics. Developing centralized databases, or nuclear forensics libraries, to house this information is an important step to ensure all relevant data will be available for comparison during a nuclear forensics analysis and help expedite the assessment of material history. The approach most widely accepted by the international community at this time is the implementation of National Nuclear Forensics libraries, which would be developed and maintained by individual nations. This is an attractive alternative toan international database since it provides an understanding that each country has data on materials produced and stored within their borders, but eliminates the need to reveal any proprietary or sensitive information to other nations. To support the concept of National Nuclear Forensics libraries, the United States Department of Energy has developed a model library, based on a data dictionary, or set of parameters designed to capture all nuclear forensic relevant information about a nuclear material. Specifically, information includes material identification, collection background and current location, analytical laboratories where measurements were made, material packaging and container descriptions, physical characteristics including mass and dimensions, chemical and isotopic characteristics, particle morphology or metallurgical properties, process history including facilities, and measurement quality assurance information. While not necessarily required, it may also be valuable to store modeled data sets including reactor burn-up or enrichment cascade data for comparison. It is fully expected that only a subset of this information is available or relevant to many materials, and much of the data populating a National Nuclear Forensics library would be process analytical or material accountability measurement data as opposed to a complete forensic analysis of each material in the library.

Lamont, Stephen Philip [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brisson, Marcia [DOE-IN; Curry, Michael [DEPT. OF STATE

2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

185

Nuclear forensics of special nuclear material at Los Alamos: three recent studies  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear forensics of special nuclear materials is a highly specialized field because there are few analytical laboratories in the world that can safely handle nuclear materials, perform high accuracy and precision analysis using validated analytical methods. The goal of nuclear forensics is to establish an unambiguous link between illicitly trafficked nuclear material and its origin. The Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Materials Signatures Program has implemented a graded 'conduct of operations' type approach for determining the unique nuclear, chemical, and physical signatures needed to identify the manufacturing process, intended use, and origin of interdicted nuclear material. In our approach an analysis flow path was developed for determining key signatures necessary for attributing unknown materials to a source. This analysis flow path included both destructive (i.e., alpha spectrometry, ICP-MS, ICP-AES, TIMS, particle size distribution, density and particle fractionation) and non-destructive (i.e., gamma-ray spectrometry, optical microscopy, SEM, XRD, and x-ray fluorescence) characterization techniques. Analytical techniques and results from three recent cases characterized by this analysis flow path along with an evaluation of the usefulness of this approach will be discussed in this paper.

Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gallimore, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garduon, Katherine [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keller, Russell C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kuhn, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lujan, Elmer J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Myers, Steven C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, Steve S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Porterfield, Donivan R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schwartz, Daniel S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spencer, Khalil J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Townsend, Lisa E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Xu, Ning [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Alarm system for a nuclear control complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Advanced nuclear plant control room complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Console for a nuclear control complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

An overview of measurement methods for special nuclear material in spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

Summary results from a survey of nondestructive assay measurement methods applicable to the measurement of the special nuclear material content of spent nuclear fuel are described. The role of nuclear materials measurements in the domestic and international safeguarding of spent nuclear fuel in the United States' federal waste management system has yet to be determined. An understanding of the characteristics and capabilities of the potentially applicable measurement systems should provide valuable information to the developers of the safeguards approaches for the monitored retrievable storage and final disposal systems. The discussion focuses on the general characteristics of the identified direct and indirect measurement methods. 3 refs., 1 tab.

Moran, B.W.; Reich, W.J.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Detecting fission from special nuclear material sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source. The system includes a graphing component that displays the plot of the neutron distribution from the unknown source over a Poisson distribution and a plot of neutrons due to background or environmental sources. The system further includes a known neutron source placed in proximity to the unknown source to actively interrogate the unknown source in order to accentuate differences in neutron emission from the unknown source from Poisson distributions and/or environmental sources.

Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

191

Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials Award Recipient Estimated Award Amount* Award Location Supporting Organizations Project Description University of Nebraska $979,978 Lincoln, NE Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA), Texas A&M (College Station, TX) Project will explore the development of advanced metal/ceramic composites. These improvements could lead to more efficient production of electricity in advanced reactors. Oak Ridge National Laboratory $849,000 Oak Ridge, TN University of Wisconsin-Madison (Madison, WI) Project will develop novel high-temperature high-strength steels with the help of computational modeling, which could lead to increased efficiency in advanced reactors. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

192

Fluorescence Imaging for Nuclear Arms Control Verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

grade Pu typically contains more than 90% 239Pu.10 Additionally, the fissile material must be in metallic form. There are many different nuclear warhead designs, but there are three general warhead types: gun-type, implosion and thermonuclear. In a... into a supercritical configuration. A thermonuclear device combines an implosion device, known as the primary, with a secondary fusion device composed of uranium and lithium deuteride. Most modern weapons contain a thermonuclear warhead. Gun...

Feener, Jessica S

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

193

Materials Modeling and Simulation for Nuclear Fuels (MMSNF) Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerial photo of Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory University of Chicago Chicago Photography courtesy Thomas F Ewing Privacy and Security Notice The MMSNF Workshops The goal of the Materials Modeling and Simulation for Nuclear Fuels (MMSNF) workshops is to stimulate research and discussions on modeling and simulations of nuclear fuels, to assist the design of improved fuels and the evaluation of fuel performance. In addition to research focused on existing or improved types of LWR reactors, recent modeling programs, networks, and links have been created to develop innovative nuclear fuels and materials for future generations of nuclear reactors. Examples can be found in Europe (e.g. F-BRIDGE project and ACTINET network and SAMANTHA cooperative network), in the USA (e.g. CASL, NEAMS, CESAR and CMSN network

194

(Nuclear power plant control and instrumentation technology)  

SciTech Connect

While on vacation, the traveler attended the European Nuclear Conference in Lyon, France. This trip was part of an outside activity approved by DOE. The traveler is a consultant to Loyola College, serving as chairman of a panel to assess the state of the art in the controls and instrumentation technology in the European nuclear community. This study is being conducted by Loyola College under subcontract to the National Science Foundation. The traveler was surprised by the level of automation claimed (by the company Siemens AG KWU) to be present in the German Konvoi nuclear power plants. The claim was that this was done to improve the safety of the plant by keeping the operator out of the loop'' for the first 30 minutes of some transients or accidents.

White, J.D.

1990-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

195

MIT Department of Nuclear Engineering 1 Digital Instrumentation and Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 MIT Department of Nuclear Engineering 1 Digital Instrumentation and Control Issues in Nuclear Engineering 2 Nuclear Power Plant #12;2 MIT Department of Nuclear Engineering 3 Major Protection Functions Engineering 4 Background · Analog electro-mechanical systems in existing nuclear power plants are aging

Schweik, Charles M.

196

Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos A consortium led by the University of Michigan that includes LANL as...

197

Survey of hazardous materials used in nuclear testing  

SciTech Connect

The use of hazardous'' materials in routine underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site has been reviewed. In addition the inventory of test yields, originally reported in 1976 has been updated. A trail down-hole inventory'' has been conducted for a selected test. The inorganic hazardous materials introduced during testing (with the exception of lead and the fissionable materials) produce an incremental change in the quantity of such materials already present in the geologic media surrounding the test points. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

Bryant, E.A.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities > Nuclear Systems Capabilities > Nuclear Systems Technologies > Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control Capabilities Nuclear Systems Technologies Nuclear Criticality Safety Research Reactor Analysis Decontamination and Decommissioning Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control Overview Process Monitoring & Signal Validation Diagnostic & Advisory Systems Advanced (AI-based) Nonlinear Controllers for Industrial Processes Artificial intelligence Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control Bookmark and Share Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control. Click on image to view larger image. The goal of the Nuclear Engineering Division's research on advanced

199

IMPACT OF NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISSOLUTION ON VESSEL CORROSION  

SciTech Connect

Different nuclear materials require different processing conditions. In order to maximize the dissolver vessel lifetime, corrosion testing was conducted for a range of chemistries and temperature used in fuel dissolution. Compositional ranges of elements regularly in the dissolver were evaluated for corrosion of 304L, the material of construction. Corrosion rates of AISI Type 304 stainless steel coupons, both welded and non-welded coupons, were calculated from measured weight losses and post-test concentrations of soluble Fe, Cr and Ni.

Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.; Clifton, B.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Nuclear Resonant Scattering on Earth Materials using Synchrotron Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NRS2005 Home NRS2005 Home Agenda Organizing Committee Nuclear Resonant Scattering on Earth Materials using Synchrotron Radiation February 12-13, 2005 Advanced Photon Source Argonne National Laboratory - Argonne, Illinois, USA Nuclear Resonant Scattering (NRS) techniques provide the Earth and planetary science community with opportunities for new and exciting results on the properties of materials at high pressure and temperature conditions. Such NRS experiments have become possible due to the extreme brightness of third-generation synchrotron radiation sources. NRS techniques fall into two broad areas, which are in many ways ideally or even uniquely suited for addressing a number of important geophysical questions: Nuclear Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (NRIXS) provides information on

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Adhesion layer for etching of tracks in nuclear trackable materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for forming nuclear tracks having a width on the order of 100-200 nm in nuclear trackable materials, such as polycarbonate (LEXAN) without causing delamination of the LEXAN. The method utilizes an adhesion film having a inert oxide which allows the track to be sufficiently widened to >200 nm without delamination of the nuclear trackable materials. The adhesion film may be composed of a metal such as Cr, Ni, Au, Pt, or Ti, or composed of a dielectric having a stable surface, such as silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), silicon nitride (SiN.sub.x), and aluminum oxide (AlO). The adhesion film can either be deposited on top of the gate metal layer, or if the properties of the adhesion film are adequate, it can be used as the gate layer. Deposition of the adhesion film is achieved by standard techniques, such as sputtering or evaporation.

Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Lake Oswego, OR)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Storage of nuclear materials by encapsulation in fullerenes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of encapsulating radioactive materials inside fullerenes for stable long-term storage. Fullerenes provide a safe and efficient means of disposing of nuclear waste which is extremely stable with respect to the environment. After encapsulation, a radioactive ion is essentially chemically isolated from its external environment.

Coppa, Nicholas V. (Los Alamos, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

IMPROVED TECHNNOLOGY TO PREVENT ILLICIT TRAFFICKING IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

The proliferation of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons (collectively known as weapons of mass destruction, or WMD) and the potential acquisition and use of WMD against the world by terrorists are extremely serious threats to international security. These threats are complex and interrelated. There are myriad routes to weapons of mass destruction--many different starting materials, material sources, and production processes. There are many possible proliferators--threshold countries, rogue states, state-sponsored or transnational terrorists groups, domestic terrorists, and even international crime organizations. Motives for acquiring and using WMD are similarly wide ranging--from a desire to change the regional power balance, deny access to a strategic area, or alter international policy to extortion, revenge, or hate. Because of the complexity of this threat landscape, no single program, technology, or capability--no silver bullet--can solve the WMD proliferation and terrorism problem. An integrated program is needed that addresses the WMD proliferation and terrorism problem from end to end, from prevention to detection, reversal, and response, while avoiding surprise at all stages, with different activities directed specifically at different types of WMD and proliferators. Radiation detection technologies are an important tool in the prevention of proliferation. A variety of new developments have enabled enhanced performance in terms of energy resolution, spatial resolution, predictive modeling and simulation, active interrogation, and ease of operation and deployment in the field. The radiation properties of nuclear materials, particularly highly enriched uranium (HEU), make the detection of smuggled nuclear materials technically difficult. A number of efforts are under way to devise improved detector materials and instruments and to identify novel signatures that could be detected. Key applications of this work include monitoring for radioactive materials at choke points, searching for nuclear materials, and developing instruments for response personnel.

Richardson, J H

2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

204

Technology Readiness Levels for Advanced Nuclear Fuels and Materials Development  

SciTech Connect

The Technology Readiness Level (TRL) process is used to quantitatively assess the maturity of a given technology. The TRL process has been developed and successfully used by the Department of Defense (DOD) for development and deployment of new technology and systems for defense applications. In addition, NASA has also successfully used the TRL process to develop and deploy new systems for space applications. Advanced nuclear fuels and materials development is a critical technology needed for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Because the deployment of a new nuclear fuel forms requires a lengthy and expensive research, development, and demonstration program, applying the TRL concept to the advanced fuel development program is very useful as a management and tracking tool. This report provides definition of the technology readiness level assessment process as defined for use in assessing nuclear fuel technology development for the Advanced Fuel Campaign (AFC).

Jon Carmack

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

ACCELERATED TESTING OF NEUTRON-ABSORBING ALLOYS FOR NUCLEAR CRITICALITY CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy requires nuclear criticality control materials be used for storage of highly enriched spent nuclear fuel used in government programs and the storage of commercial spent nuclear fuel at the proposed High-Level Nuclear Waste Geological Repository located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Two different metallic alloys (Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd and borated stainless steel) have been chosen for this service. An accelerated corrosion test program to validate these materials for this application is described and a performance comparison is made.

Ronald E. Mizia

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A temperature responsive, self-actuated nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly 10. The upper end 18 of a lower drive line 17 fits within the lower end of an upper drive line 12. The lower end (not shown) of the lower drive line 17 is connected to a neutron absorber. During normal temperature conditions the lower drive line 17 is supported by detent means 22,26. When an overtemperature condition occurs thermal actuation means 34 urges ring 26 upwardly sufficiently to allow balls 22 to move radially outwardly thereby allowing lower drive line 17 to move downwardly toward the core of the nuclear reactor resulting in automatic reduction of the reactor powder.

Bilibin, Konstantin (North Hollywood, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

USED NUCLEAR MATERIALS AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE: ASSET OR WASTE?  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear industry, both in the commercial and the government sectors, has generated large quantities of material that span the spectrum of usefulness, from highly valuable (assets) to worthless (wastes). In many cases, the decision parameters are clear. Transuranic waste and high level waste, for example, have no value, and is either in a final disposition path today, or in the case of high level waste awaiting a policy decision about final disposition. Other materials, though discardable, have intrinsic scientific or market value that may be hidden by the complexity, hazard, or cost of recovery. An informed decision process should acknowledge the asset value, or lack of value, of the complete inventory of materials, and the structure necessary to implement the range of possible options. It is important that informed decisions are made about the asset value for the variety of nuclear materials available. For example, there is a significant quantity of spent fuel available for recycle (an estimated $4 billion value in the Savannah River Sites (SRS) L area alone); in fact, SRS has already blended down more than 300 metric tons of uranium for commercial reactor use. Over 34 metric tons of surplus plutonium is also on a path to be used as commercial fuel. There are other radiological materials that are routinely handled at the site in large quantities that should be viewed as strategically important and / or commercially viable. In some cases, these materials are irreplaceable domestically, and failure to consider their recovery could jeopardize our technological leadership or national defense. The inventories of nuclear materials at SRS that have been characterized as waste include isotopes of plutonium, uranium, americium, and helium. Although planning has been performed to establish the technical and regulatory bases for their discard and disposal, recovery of these materials is both economically attractive and in the national interest.

Magoulas, V.

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

208

Material Protection, Control and Accounting program (MPC&A) | National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protection, Control and Accounting program (MPC&A) | National Protection, Control and Accounting program (MPC&A) | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Material Protection, Control and Accounting program (MPC&A) Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > International Materials Protection and Cooperation > Material Protection, Control and Accounting

209

Nuclear materials 1993 annual report. Volume 8, No. 2  

SciTech Connect

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) describes activities conducted during 1993. The report is published in two parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 8, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports, diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC`s Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol. 8, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns during 1993 associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Note that the subtitle of No. 2 has been changed from ``Nonreactors`` to ``Nuclear Materials.`` Both reports also contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize both the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued from 1980 through 1993.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced nuclear materials Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced nuclear materials Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Enabling a Sustainable Nuclear Energy Future...

211

Management of nuclear materials and non-HLW | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the consolidation and disposition of nuclear materials, including plutonium, uranium, and nuclear waste in accordance with applicable statutes, DOE Orders and international...

212

Electromagnetic Signature Technique as a Promising Tool to Verify Nuclear Weapons Storage and Dismantlement under a Nuclear Arms Control Regime  

SciTech Connect

The 2010 ratification of the New START Treaty has been widely regarded as a noteworthy national security achievement for both the Obama administration and the Medvedev-Putin regime, but deeper cuts are envisioned under future arms control regimes. Future verification needs will include monitoring the storage of warhead components and fissile materials and verifying dismantlement of warheads, pits, secondaries, and other materials. From both the diplomatic and technical perspectives, verification under future arms control regimes will pose new challenges. Since acceptable verification technology must protect sensitive design information and attributes, non-nuclear non-sensitive signatures may provide a significant verification tool without the use of additional information barriers. The use of electromagnetic signatures to monitor nuclear material storage containers is a promising technology with the potential to fulfill these challenging requirements. Research performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has demonstrated that low frequency electromagnetic signatures of sealed metallic containers can be used to confirm the presence of specific components on a yes/no basis without revealing classified information. Arms control inspectors might use this technique to verify the presence or absence of monitored items, including both nuclear and non-nuclear materials. Although additional research is needed to study signature aspects such as uniqueness and investigate container-specific scenarios, the technique potentially offers a rapid and cost-effective tool to verify reduction and dismantlement of U.S. and Russian nuclear weapons.

Bunch, Kyle J.; Williams, Laura S.; Jones, Anthony M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Security and Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This directive establishes requirements and responsibilities to prevent the deliberate unauthorized use of U.S. nuclear explosives and U.S. nuclear weapons. Cancels DOE O 452.4.

2001-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

214

Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

Thiel, E.C.; Fuhrman, P.W.

2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

215

Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

Thiel, Elizabeth Chilcote

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Piezoelectric material for use in a nuclear reactor core  

SciTech Connect

In radiation environments ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation has great potential for improving reactor safety and furthering the understanding of radiation effects and materials. In both nuclear power plants and materials test reactors, elevated temperatures and high levels of radiation present challenges to ultrasonic NDE methodologies. The challenges are primarily due to the degradation of the ultrasonic sensors utilized. We present results from the operation of a ultrasonic piezoelectric transducer, composed of bulk single crystal AlN, in a nuclear reactor core for over 120 MWHrs. The transducer was coupled to an aluminum cylinder and operated in pulse echo mode throughout the irradiation. In addition to the pulse echo testing impedance data were obtained. Further, the piezoelectric coefficient d{sub 33} was measured prior to irradiation and found to be 5.5 pC/N which is unchanged from as-grown samples, and in fact higher than the measured d{sub 33} for many as-grown samples.

Parks, D. A.; Reinhardt, Brian; Tittmann, B. R. [EES Department, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

217

Publications [Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials] - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications Capabilities Materials Testing Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) of Reactor Materials Corrosion Performance/Metal Dusting Overview Light Water Reactors Fossil Energy Fusion Energy Metal Dusting Publications List Irradiated Materials Steam Generator Tube Integrity Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials Selection of Publications Bookmark and Share Journal Articles Manufacturing of representative axial stress corrosion cracks in tube specimens for eddy current testing C.B. Bahn, S. Bakhtiari, J.Y. Park, S. Majumdar Nuclear Engineering and Design, Volume 256, March 2013, Pages 38-44 Leak behavior of steam generator tube-to-tubesheet joints under

218

Gamma-ray identification of nuclear weapon materials  

SciTech Connect

There has been an accelerating national interest in countering nuclear smuggling. This has caused a corresponding expansion of interest in the use of gamma-ray spectrometers for checkpoint monitoring, nuclear search, and within networks of nuclear and collateral sensors. All of these are fieldable instruments--ranging from large, fixed portal monitors to hand-held and remote monitoring equipment. For operational reasons, detectors with widely varying energy resolution and detection efficiency will be employed. In many instances, such instruments must be sensitive to weak signals, always capable of recognizing the gamma-ray signatures from nuclear weapons materials (NWM), often largely insensitive to spectral alteration by radiation transport through intervening materials, capable of real-time implementation, and able to discriminate against signals from commonly encountered legitimate gamma-ray sources, such as radiopharmaceuticals. Several decades of experience in classified programs have shown that all of these properties are not easily achieved and successful approaches were of limited scope--such as the detection of plutonium only. This project was originally planned as a two-year LDRD-ER. Since funding for 1997 was not sustained, this is a report of the first year's progress.

Gosnell, T. B., LLNL; Hall, J. M.; Jam, C. L.; Knapp, D. A.; Koenig, Z. M.; Luke, S. J.; Pohl, B. A.; Schach von Wittenau, A.; Wolford, J. K.

1997-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

219

X-ray backscatter imaging of nuclear materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The energy of an X-ray beam and critical depth are selected to detect structural discontinuities in a material having an atomic number Z of 57 or greater. The critical depth is selected by adjusting the geometry of a collimator that blocks backscattered radiation so that backscattered X-ray originating from a depth less than the critical depth is not detected. Structures of Lanthanides and Actinides, including nuclear fuel rod materials, can be inspected for structural discontinuities such as gaps, cracks, and chipping employing the backscattered X-ray.

Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Gunning, John E; Hollenbach, Daniel F; Ott, Larry J; Shedlock, Daniel

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

220

Vulnerability Analysis Considerations for the Transportation of Special Nuclear Material  

SciTech Connect

The vulnerability analysis methodology developed for fixed nuclear material sites has proven to be extremely effective in assessing associated transportation issues. The basic methods and techniques used are directly applicable to conducting a transportation vulnerability analysis. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate that the same physical protection elements (detection, delay, and response) are present, although the response force plays a dominant role in preventing the theft or sabotage of material. Transportation systems are continuously exposed to the general public whereas the fixed site location by its very nature restricts general public access.

Nicholson, Lary G.; Purvis, James W.

1999-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Journal of Nuclear Materials 196-198 (1992) 680-685 North-Holland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Nuclear Materials 196-198 (1992) 680-685 North-Holland jnurnalef nuclear materials. Ehst Argonne National Laboratory, Fusion PowerProgram, 9700 South CassAvenue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA

Harilal, S. S.

222

The Road to Controlled Nuclear Fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... is one atom of deuterium for every 7,000 atoms of ordinary hydrogen. Second, nuclear fusion does not generate as much radioactive waste as nuclear fission, so storage-a serious ... plants-does not constitute such a serious problem. By contrast with nuclear fission, however, nuclear fusion reactions cannot be sustained by themselves in matter which is in its normal state. ...

L. ARTSIMOVICH

1972-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Louisiana Nuclear Energy and Radiation Control Law (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality is responsible for the regulation of nuclear energy safety, permitting and radiation safety and control in Louisiana. The Department operates...

224

CORROSION OF LEAD SHIELDING IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS PACKAGES  

SciTech Connect

Inspection of United States-Department of Energy (US-DOE) model 9975 nuclear materials shipping package revealed corrosion of the lead shielding induced by off-gas constituents from organic components in the package. Experiments were performed to determine the corrosion rate of lead when exposed to off-gas or degradation products of these organic materials. The results showed that the room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) sealant was the most corrosive organic species followed by the polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) glue. The fiberboard material induced corrosion to a much lesser extent than the PVAc glue and RTV, and only in the presence of condensed water. The results indicated faster corrosion at temperatures higher than ambient and with condensed water as expected. A corrosion rate of 0.05 mm/year measured for coupons exposed to the most aggressive conditions was recommended as a conservative estimate for use in package performance calculations.

Subramanian, K; Kerry Dunn, K

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

225

Neutron interrogation system using high gamma ray signature to detect contraband special nuclear materials in cargo  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for inspecting cargo for the presence of special nuclear material. The cargo is irradiated with neutrons. The neutrons produce fission products in the special nuclear material which generate gamma rays. The gamma rays are detecting indicating the presence of the special nuclear material.

Slaughter, Dennis R. (Oakland, CA); Pohl, Bertram A. (Berkeley, CA); Dougan, Arden D. (San Ramon, CA); Bernstein, Adam (Palo Alto, CA); Prussin, Stanley G. (Kensington, CA); Norman, Eric B. (Oakland, CA)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Review of selected dynamic material control functions for international safeguards  

SciTech Connect

With the development of Dynamic Special Nuclear Material Accounting and Control systems used in nuclear manufacturing and reprocessing plants, there arises the question as to how these systems affect the IAEA inspection capabilities. The systems in being and under development provide information and control for a variety of purposes important to the plant operator, the safeguards purpose being one of them. This report attempts to judge the usefulness of these dynamic systems to the IAEA and have defined 12 functions that provide essential information to it. If the information acquired by these dynamic systems is to be useful to the IAEA, the inspectors must be able to independently verify it. Some suggestions are made as to how this might be done. But, even if it should not be possible to verify all the data, the availability to the IAEA of detailed, simultaneous, and plant-wide information would tend to inhibit a plant operator from attempting to generate a floating or fictitious inventory. Suggestions are made that might be helpful in the design of future software systems, an area which has proved to be fatally deficient in some systems and difficult in all.

Lowry, L.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

NUCLEAR MATERIAL ATTRACTIVENESS: AN ASSESSMENT OF MATERIAL ASSOCIATED WITH A CLOSED FUEL CYCLE  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the attractiveness of materials mixtures containing special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with the various processing steps required for a closed fuel cycle. This paper combines the results from earlier studies that examined the attractiveness of SNM associated with the processing of spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel by various reprocessing schemes and the recycle of plutonium as a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in LWR with new results for the final, repeated burning of SNM in fast-spectrum reactors: fast reactors and accelerator driven systems (ADS). The results of this paper suggest that all reprocessing products evaluated so far need to be rigorously safeguarded and provided moderate to high levels of physical protection. These studies were performed at the request of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), and are based on the calculation of "attractiveness levels" that has been couched in terms chosen for consistency with those normally used for nuclear materials in DOE nuclear facilities. The methodology and key findings will be presented. Additionally, how these attractiveness levels relate to proliferation resistance (e.g. by increasing impediments to the diversion, theft, or undeclared production of SNM for the purpose of acquiring a nuclear weapon), and how they could be used to help inform policy makers, will be discussed.

Bathke, C. G.; Ebbinghaus, B.; Sleaford, Brad W.; Wallace, R. K.; Collins, Brian A.; Hase, Kevin R.; Robel, Martin; Jarvinen, G. D.; Bradley, Keith S.; Ireland, J. R.; Johnson, M. W.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Smith, Brian W.

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

228

Test and valuation of portal monitors of nuclear material with the use of plastic scintillators and hand-held radiation detectors. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is the final part of work fulfilled under the contract with LANL in the cooperative program of American and Russian nuclear laboratories, aimed at strengthening the system of protection, control, and accountability of nuclear materials. Purpose of this work was to test portal and handheld monitors made by TSA Co. (USA) in order to upgrade the control of unauthorized passout of nuclear and radioactive materials from controlled territory and evaluation of possible application at Russian nuclear facility. Results of tests of PM-700SP pedestrian portal monitors and PRM-470A handheld monitors are given.

Savin, N.I. [Moskovskij Fiziko-Tekhnicheskij Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Nuclear fusion control-oriented plasma current linear models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The control of plasma in nuclear fusion has been revealed as a promising application of Control Engineering, with increasing interest in the control community during last years. In this paper it is developed a control-oriented linear model for the control ...

Aitor J. Garrido; Izaskun Garrido; M. Goretti Sevillano; Mikel Alberdi; Modesto Amundarain; Oscar Barambones; Manuel De La Sen

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Novel Approach to Plasma Facing Materials in Nuclear Fusion Reactors  

SciTech Connect

A novel material design in nuclear fusion reactors is proposed based on W-nDiamond nanostructured composites. Generally, a microstructure refined to the nanometer scale improves the mechanical strength due to modification of plasticity mechanisms. Moreover, highly specific grain-boundary area raises the number of sites for annihilation of radiation induced defects. However, the low thermal stability of fine-grained and nanostructured materials demands the presence of particles at the grain boundaries that can delay coarsening by a pinning effect. As a result, the concept of a composite is promising in the field of nanostructured materials. The hardness of diamond renders nanodiamond dispersions excellent reinforcing and stabilization candidates and, in addition, diamond has extremely high thermal conductivity. Consequently, W-nDiamond nanocomposites are promising candidates for thermally stable first-wall materials. The proposed design involves the production of W/W-nDiamond/W-Cu/Cu layered castellations. The W, W-nDiamond and W-Cu layers are produced by mechanical alloying followed by a consolidation route that combines hot rolling with spark plasma sintering (SPS). Layer welding is achieved by spark plasma sintering. The present work describes the mechanical alloying processsing and consolidation route used to produce W-nDiamond composites, as well as microstructural features and mechanical properties of the material produced Long term plasma exposure experiments are planned at ISTTOK and at FTU (Frascati)

Livramento, V.; Correia, J. B.; Shohoji, N.; Osawa, E. [INETI, Departamento de Materiais e Tecnologias de Producao, Estrada do Pacco do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Nunes, D. [Associacao Euratom/IST, Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Carvalho, P. A.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C. [Associacao Euratom/IST, Centro de Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Hanada, K. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-2-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8564 (Japan)

2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

231

Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System Working Group Charter  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

DRAFT 2011 DRAFT 2011 DRAFT 2011 Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System Working Group Charter VERSION: 0 REVISION DATE: May 2011 Approver Name Title Signature Date DRAFT 2011 DRAFT 2011 NMMSS Working Group Charter PURPOSE The NMMSS Working Group (NWG) serves as an open forum for discussion of issues and concerns from the NMMSS User community. The Committee will provide an interface between NMMSS users, NMMSS sponsors and the NMMSS project staff. Activities may include: Identifying user needs Identifying deficiencies in reporting capabilities Recommending upgrades to software capabilities Recommending priorities for modifications Recommending enhancements to data Minimizing the reporting burden on the reporting community

232

Safety assessment of a robotic system handling nuclear material  

SciTech Connect

This paper outlines the use of a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis for the safety assessment of a robotic system being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The robotic system, The Weigh and Leak Check System, is to replace a manual process at the Department of Energy facility at Pantex by which nuclear material is inspected for weight and leakage. Failure Modes and Effects Analyses were completed for the robotics process to ensure that safety goals for the system had been meet. These analyses showed that the risks to people and the internal and external environment were acceptable.

Atcitty, C.B.; Robinson, D.G.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 471.1A, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information. Change 1, dated 10/23/01, was added to the Manual to clarify when and how encryption requirements for Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information may be waived. Canceled by DOE O 471.1B.

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

Nuclear Materials Management U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO)  

SciTech Connect

In light of the changing Defense Complex mission, the high cost to storing and protecting nuclear materials, and in consideration of scarcity of resources, it is imperative that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owned nuclear materials are managed effectively. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Strategic Action Plan outlines the strategy for continuing to meet Americas nuclear security goals, meeting the overall mission challenges of DOE and NNSA as well as giving focus to local missions. The mission of the NNSA/NSO Nuclear Materials Management (NMM) Program is to ensure that nuclear material inventories are accurately assessed and reported, future material needs are adequately planned, and that existing Nevada Test Site (NTS) inventories are efficiently utilized, staged, or dispositioned. The NNSA/NSO understands that the NTS has unique characteristics to serve and benefit the nation with innovative solutions to the complex problems involving Special Nuclear Materials, hazardous materials, and multi-agency, integrated operations. The NNSA/NSO is defining infrastructure requirements for known future missions, developing footprint consolidation strategic action plans, and continuing in the path of facility modernization improvements. The NNSA/NSO is striving for the NTS to be acknowledged as an ideal location towards mission expansion and growth. The NTS has the capability of providing isolated, large scale construction and development locations for nuclear power or alternate energy source facilities, expanded nuclear material storage sites, and for new development in green technology.

Jesse Schreiber

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 1, Design concept. Part 2, Project management  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This document provides Part I - Design Concept which describes the selected solution, and Part II - Project Management which describes the management system organization, the elements that make up the system, and the control and reporting system.

NONE

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

236

Nuclear knowledge portal for supporting licensing and controlling nuclear activities in the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The knowledge economy is pivotal for moving the wealth and development of traditional industrial sectors ?? abundant in manual labour, raw materials and capital ?? to areas whose products, processes and services are rich in technology and knowledge. Even in research areas such as nuclear energy, where goods are based on high technology, the ability to transform information into knowledge, and knowledge into decisions and actions, is extremely important. Therefore, the value of products from these areas depends more and more on the degree of innovation, technology and intelligence incorporated by them. Thus, it has become increasingly important and relevant to acquire strategic knowledge and make it available to the organisation. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to present the construction of a Nuclear Knowledge Portal for aiding and streamlining the Licensing and Management activities of the CNEN.

E. Gomes; F. Braga

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

R&D for Better Nuclear Security: Radiation Detector Materials  

SciTech Connect

I am going to talk about the need for better materials for radiation detectors. I believe that government investment in this area can enable transformational technology change that could impact domestic nuclear security and also national nuclear security in some very positive and powerful ways. I'm not going to give you a lecture on how radiation detectors work, but I am going to tell you a bit about today's off-the-shelf technology and why it is not sufficient, what we need, and what security benefit you could get from improvements. I think we're at a critical point in time for some very impactful investments. In particular I'm going to focus on the use of gamma-ray radiation detectors at ports of entry. Not long before DHS was formed, Congress decreed that counter measures against the delivery of radiological and nuclear threats would be put in place at US ports of entry, under the authority of US Customs (later Customs and Border Protection in DHS). This included the screening of all cars and trucks passing through a port of entry. Existing off-the-shelf radiation detectors had to be selected for this purpose. Plans were made to make the most of the available technologies, but there are some inherent limitations of these detectors, plus the operational setting can bring out other limitations.

Kammeraad, J E

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

238

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Material Verification in Dismantlement  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) is a well-established physical process that provides an isotope-specific signature that can be exploited for isotopic detection and characterization of samples. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been investigating possible applications of NRF for national security. Of the investigated applications, the verification of material in the dismantlement process is the most promising. Through a combination of benchmarking measurements and radiation transport modeling, we have shown that NRF techniques with existing bremsstrahlung photon sources and a modest detection system can be used to detect highly enriched uranium in the quantities and time limits relevant to the dismantlement process. Issues such as orientation, placement and material geometry do not significantly impact the sensitivity of the technique. We have also investigated how shielding of the uranium would be observed through non-NRF processes to enable the accurate assay of the material. This paper will discuss our findings on how NRF and photon-interrogation techniques may be applied to the material verification in the dismantlement process.

Warren, Glen A.; Detwiler, Rebecca S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory as a partner has been awarded a 25 million grant by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The consortium of 13 universities and 8 national...

240

Journal of Nuclear Materials 207 (1993) 116-122 North-Holland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Nuclear Materials 207 (1993) 116-122 North-Holland jomalof nuclear materials Impurity 90024, USA J.N. Brooks and A. Hassanein Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA R.B. Turkot, Jr. Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Illinois, 103 South Goodwin

Harilal, S. S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

International control of tritium to prevent horizontal proliferation and to foster nuclear disarmament  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, an approach to control tritium systematically on the international level is proposed. The first goal is to prevent the military use of tritium in states other than the five recognized nuclear weapons states. An {open_quotes}International Tritium Control System{close_quotes} (ITCS) would control all civilian facilities producing or handling tritium. The second goal is to restrict the availability of fresh tritium supplies for nuclear weapons programs as a means to avoid vertical proliferation in states that possess nuclear weapons, and as a step towards complete nuclear disarmament. This can be achieved by including tritium in a future weapons-usable materials production cutoff agreement and the approach proposed here is called an {open_quotes}Integrated Cutoff{close_quotes} (ICO). The simultaneous implementation of the ITCS and ICO aims at avoiding any new discrimination against non-nuclear weapon states. This paper will discuss the possible political and technical modalities to achieve both goals. The rules and decision making procedures are outlined for both control approaches and the implications for the nuclear non-proliferation regime are shown. Various control tasks are derived from a comprehensive analysis covering all diversion paths which can yield more than one gram of tritium within one year. In the appendix to this paper, the impact of a tritium shortage on the U.S. nuclear arsenal is illuminated. The extreme case of complete elimination of all tritium would result in a large yield reductions of the arsenal.

Kalinowski, M.B.; Colschen, L.C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

S&TR | January/February 2007: Identifying the Source of Nuclear Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January/February 2007 January/February 2007 The Laboratory in the News Commentary by George H. Miller Titan Leads the Way in Laser-Matter Science Identifying the Source of Stolen Nuclear Materials Tiny Tubes Make the Flow Go Acidic Microbe Community Fosters the Unique Patents and Awards S&TR Staff Article title: Identifying the Source of Stolen Nuclear Materials; article blurb: Livermore scientists are analyzing interdicted illicit nuclear and radioactive materials for clues to the materials' origins and routes of transit. NUCLEAR forensics and attribution are becoming increasingly important tools in the fight against illegal smuggling and trafficking of radiological and nuclear materials. These include materials intended for industrial and medical use (radiological), nuclear materials such as those produced in the

243

Nuclear Waste Storage in Gel-Derived Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For long life nuclear wastes (essentially actinides) research is in progress ... a process to prepare silica glass embedding the nuclear waste. Porous silica (gel) is used as a host matrix for nuclear waste. Neod...

T. Woignier; J. Reynes; J. Phalippou

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Advances in the Hopkinson bar testing of irradiated/non-irradiated nuclear materials and large specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the twentieth century, research activity in the nuclear field of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) was concentrated on problems of nuclear reactor safety, especially...dynamic material testing programme for the high ductility...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Imparting functionality to a metalorganic framework material by controlled nanoparticle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Imparting functionality to a metal�organic framework material by controlled nanoparticle by encapsulating various functional species (for example, nanoparticles) within the frameworks. However, despite increasing numbers of reports of nanoparticle/MOF composites, simultaneously to control the size, composition

246

Journal of Nuclear Materials 191-194 (1992) 503-507 NorthHolland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory, Fusion Power Program, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA journal of nuclear materialsJournal of Nuclear Materials 191-194 (1992) 503-507 North·Holland Thermal response of substrate structural materials during a plasma disruption * Ahmed Hassanein and Dale L. Smith Argonne National

Harilal, S. S.

247

Journal of Nuclear Materials 191-194 (1992) 499-502 North-Holland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Nuclear Materials 191-194 (1992) 499-502 North-Holland journal of nuclear materials Analysis of sweeping heat loads on divertor plate materials * Ahmed Hassanein Argonne Nation.al Laboratory, Fusion Power Program, 9700 South Cass Anenue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA The heat flux on the divertor plate

Harilal, S. S.

248

Manual for Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System Reporting and Data Submission  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The manual provides detailed instructions for documenting and reporting data submissions for nuclear materials transactions, inventories, and material balances to the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS). Cancels DOE M 474.1-2. Canceled by DOE M 470.4-6.

2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

249

The Use of Smart Materials Technologies in Radiation Environment and Nuclear Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The Use of Smart Materials Technologies in Radiation Environment and Nuclear Industry Victor ABSTRACT Application of smart materials technology in nuclear industry offer new opportunities a unique challenge to the testing, qualification and use of smart materials. The present study assesses

Giurgiutiu, Victor

250

Special nuclear material radiation monitors for the 1980's  

SciTech Connect

During the two decades that automatic gamma-radiation monitors have been applied to detecting special nuclear material (SNM), little attention has been devoted to how well the monitors perform in plant environments. Visits to 11 DOE facilities revealed poor information flow between developers, manufacturers, and maintainers of SNM radiation monitors. To help users achieve best performance from their monitors or select new ones, Los Alamos National Laboratory developed a hand-held monitor user's guide, calibration manuals for some commercial SNM pedestrian monitors, and an application guide for SNM pedestrian monitors. In addition, Los Alamos evaluated new commercial SNM monitors, considered whether to apply neutron detection to SNM monitoring, and investigated the problem of operating gamma-ray SNM monitors in variable plutonium gamma-radiation fields. As a result, the performance of existing SNM monitors will improve and alternative monitoring methods will become commerciallly available during the 1980s. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Fehlau, P.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Neutron Detectors for Detection of Nuclear Materials at LANL...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26Germantown Building 1000 Independence...

252

Radiation effects in nuclear materials: Role of nuclear and electronic energy losses and their synergy  

SciTech Connect

Ceramic oxides and carbides are promising matrices for the immobilization and/or transmutation of nuclear wastes, cladding materials for gas-cooled fission reactors and structural components for fusion reactors. For these applications there is a need of fundamental data concerning the behavior of nuclear ceramics upon irradiation. This article is focused on the presentation of a few remarkable examples regarding ion-beam modifications of nuclear ceramics with an emphasis on the mechanisms leading to damage creation and phase transformations. Results obtained by combining advanced techniques (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and channeling, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy) concern irradiations in a broad energy range (from keV to GeV) with the aim of exploring both nuclear collision (Sn) and electronic excitation (Se) regimes. Finally, the daunting challenge of the demonstration of the existence of synergistic effects between Sn and Se is tackled by discussing the healing due to intense electronic energy deposition (SHIBIEC) and by reporting results recently obtained in dual-beam irradiation (DBI) experiments.

Thom, Lionel [Centre de Spectromtrie Nuclaire et de Spectromtrie de Masse, CNRS-IN2P3-Universit Paris-Sud; Debelle, Aurelien [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France; Garrido, Frederico [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France; Mylonas, Stamatis [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France; Dcamps, B. [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France; Bachelet, C. [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France; Sattonnay, G. [LEMHE/ICMMO, Universit Paris-Sud, Bt. Orsay, France; Moll, Sandra [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette; Pellegrino, S. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Miro, S. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Trocellier, P. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Serruys, Y. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Velisa, G. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Grygiel, C. [CNRS, France; Monnet, I. [CIMAP, CEA-CNRS-Universit de Caen, France; Toulemonde, Marcel [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS)-ENSICAE; Simon, P. [CEMHTI, CNRS, France; Jagielski, Jacek [Institute for Electronic Materials Technology; Jozwik-Biala, Iwona [Institute for Electronic Materials Technology; Nowicki, Lech [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk, Poland; Behar, M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre,; Weber, William J [ORNL; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Backman, Marie [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nordlund, Kai [University of Helsinki; Djurabekova, Flyura [University of Helsinki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Hazardous Materials and Controlled Hazardous Substances (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A permit is required to own, establish, operate, or maintain a facility in the state of Maryland that transfers quantities of a single hazardous material in excess of 100,000 pounds at any time...

254

Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order provides requirements and responsibilities for identifying and protecting the unauthorized dissemination of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information. Cancels DOE O 471.1A and DOE M 471.1-1.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Material protection, control, and accounting enhancements through the Russian/US cooperative MPC & A program  

SciTech Connect

The cooperative Russian/US Mining and Chemical Combine (Gorno-Khimichesky Kombinat, GKhK, also referred to as Krasnoyarsk-26) Materials Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC & A) project was initiated in June 1996. Since then, the GKhK has collaborated with Brookhaven, Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, and Sandia National Laboratories to test, evaluate, and implement MPC & A elements including bar codes, computerized nuclear material accounting software, nondestructive assay technologies, bulk measurement systems, seals, video surveillance systems, radio communication systems, metal detectors, vulnerability assessment tools, personnel access control systems, and pedestrian nuclear material portal monitors. This paper describes the strategy for implementation of these elements at the GKhK and the status of the collaborative efforts. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Scott, S.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Sude, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Buckley, W.M. [Lawrence Livremore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

E-Print Network 3.0 - active nuclear material Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: active nuclear material Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Contact Info: Pavel Oblozinsky Summary: physics...

257

Signatures of special nuclear material: High-energy gamma rays followi ng fission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Special Nuclear Material: High-Energy ? Rays Followingmaterials tested showed much longer decay times. These two features large numbers of high-energy

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Generic planning and control of automated material handling systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the problem to design a generic planning and control architecture for automated material handling systems (AMHSs). We illustrate the relevance of this research direction, and then address three different market sectors where AMHSs ... Keywords: Automated material handling systems, Generic control architecture, Real-time scheduling

S. W. A. Haneyah; J. M. J. Schutten; P. C. Schuur; W. H. M. Zijm

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A comparison of nuclear reactor control room display panels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

complex and time consuming task. It is expected that the control room of future commercial nuclear reactor power plants will change considerably as a result of these studies. Currently there are literally hundreds of displays and controls...: Dr. Rodger S. Koppa A study was conducted to investigate the use of computer generated displays to operate nuclear reactor power plants. The AGN-201 reactor at Texas A&M university was the reactor studied. After observing several licensed reactor...

Bowers, Frances Renae

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

260

Liquefied Noble Gas (LNG) detectors for detection of nuclear materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquefied-noble-gas (LNG) detectors offer, in principle, very good energy resolution for both neutrons and gamma rays, fast response time (hence high-count-rate capabilities), excellent discrimination between neutrons and gamma rays, and scalability to large volumes. They do, however, need cryogenics. LNG detectors in sizes of interest for fissionable material detection in cargo are reaching a certain level of maturity because of the ongoing extensive R&}D effort in high-energy physics regarding their use in the search for dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. The unique properties of LNG detectors, especially those using Liquid Argon (LAr) and Liquid Xenon (LXe), call for a study to determine their suitability for Non-Intrusive Inspection (NII) for Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) and possibly for other threats in cargo. Rapiscan Systems Laboratory, Yale University Physics Department, and Adelphi Technology are collaborating in the investigation of the suitability of LAr as a scintillation material for large size inspection systems for air and maritime containers and trucks. This program studies their suitability for NII, determines their potential uses, determines what improvements in performance they offer and recommends changes to their design to further enhance their suitability. An existing 3.1 liter LAr detector (microCLEAN) at Yale University, developed for R&}D on the detection of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) was employed for testing. A larger version of this detector (15 liters), more suitable for the detection of higher energy gamma rays and neutrons is being built for experimental evaluation. Results of measurements and simulations of gamma ray and neutron detection in microCLEAN and a larger detector (326 liter CL38) are presented.

J A Nikkel; T Gozani; C Brown; J Kwong; D N McKinsey; Y Shin; S Kane; C Gary; M Firestone

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried ... 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL Posted By Office of Public Affairs

262

Superradiant control of ?-ray propagation by vibrating nuclear arrays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The collective nature of light interactions with atomic and nuclear ensembles yields the fascinating phenomena of superradiance and radiation trapping. We study the interaction of ? rays with a coherently vibrating periodic array of two-level nuclei. Such nuclear motion can be generated, e.g., in ionic crystals illuminated by a strong driving optical laser field. We find that deflection of the incident ? beam into the Bragg angle can be switched on and off by nuclear vibrations on a superradiant time scale determined by the collective nuclear frequency ?a, which is of the order of terahertz. Namely, if the incident ? wave is detuned from the nuclear transition by frequency ???a it passes through the static nuclear array. However, if the nuclei vibrate with frequency ? then parametric resonance can yield energy transfer into the Bragg deflected beam on the superradiant time scale, which can be used for fast control of ? rays.

Xiwen Zhang and Anatoly A. Svidzinsky

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

Status of radioiodine control for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the status of radioiodine control in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant with respect to capture, fixation, and disposal. Where possible, we refer the reader to a number of survey documents which have been published in the last four years. We provide updates where necessary. Also discussed are factors which must be considered in developing criteria for iodine control. For capture from gas streams, silver mordenite and a silver nitrate impregnated silica (AC-6120) are considered state-of-the-art and are recommended. Three aqueous scrubbing processes have been demonstrated: Caustic scrubbing is simple but probably will not give an adequate iodine retention by itself. Mercurex (mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrubbing) has a number of disadvantages including the use of toxic mercury. Iodox (hyperazeotropic nitric acid scrubbing) is effective but employs a very corrosive and hazardous material. Other technologies have been tested but require extensive development. The waste forms recommended for long-term storage or disposal are silver iodide, the iodates of barium, strontium, or calcium, and silver loaded sorbents, all fixed in cement. Copper iodide in bitumen (asphalt) is a possibility but requires testing. The selection of a specific form will be influenced by the capture process used.

Burger, L.L.; Scheele, R.D.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

ARIES NDA Suite: Fully-integrated and automated nuclear material assay system for measurement of special nuclear materials  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Retirement and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) mission the demonstration of advanced technologies for the integrated dismantlement of surplus nuclear weapon components (pits) and the packaging of the recovered plutonium into long-term storage containers. The unclassified plutonium product is suitable for traditional international safeguards, as well as other potential inspection regimes. As indicated in the recent Secretary of Energy`s Record of Decision (ROD), this unclassified excess material is anticipated to be offered for international safeguards under the US Voluntary Offer (INFCIRC/288) performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (TAEA). The ARIES nondestructive assay (NDA) suite offers state-of-the-art capabilities that provide highly accurate, precise material assay meeting IAEA bias defect measurement levels. Because of these levels of performance, the requirement of destructive analysis is largely removed. The unique combination of automation and high accuracy suggests the possibility of dual-use operator-owned IAEA authenticated instrumentation. Finally, the concept of continuous unattended monitoring for international safeguards applications with the ARIES NDA suite is intriguing and may encourage additional deployments of similar NDA systems internationally or elsewhere within the DOE complex.

Fearey, B.L.; Sampson, T.E.; Cremers, T.L.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Nuclear Waste Disposal and Strategies for Predicting Long-Term Performance of Material  

SciTech Connect

Ceramics have been an important part of the nuclear community for many years. On December 2, 1942, an historic event occurred under the West Stands of Stagg Field, at the University of Chicago. Man initiated his first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction and controlled it. The impact of this event on civilization is considered by many as monumental and compared by some to other significant events in history, such as the invention of the steam engine and the manufacturing of the first automobile. Making this event possible and the successful operation of this first man-made nuclear reactor, was the use of forty tons of UO2. The use of natural or enriched UO2 is still used today as a nuclear fuel in many nuclear power plants operating world-wide. Other ceramic materials, such as 238Pu, are used for other important purposes, such as ceramic fuels for space exploration to provide electrical power to operate instruments on board spacecrafts. Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) are used to supply electrical power and consist of a nuclear heat source and converter to transform heat energy from radioactive decay into electrical power, thus providing reliable and relatively uniform power over the very long lifetime of a mission. These sources have been used in the Galileo spacecraft orbiting Jupiter and for scientific investigations of Saturn with the Cassini spacecraft. Still another very important series of applications using the unique properties of ceramics in the nuclear field, are as immobilization matrices for management of some of the most hazardous wastes known to man. For example, in long-term management of radioactive and hazardous wastes, glass matrices are currently in production immobilizing high-level radioactive materials, and cementious forms have also been produced to incorporate low level wastes. Also, as part of nuclear disarmament activities, assemblages of crystalline phases are being developed for immobilizing weapons grade plutonium, to not only produce environmentally friendly products, but also forms that are proliferation resistant. All of these waste forms as well as others, are designed to take advantage of the unique properties of the ceramic systems.

Wicks, G.G.

2001-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

266

Test and evaluation of computerized nuclear material accounting methods. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the definition of a Material Balance Area (MBA) as a well-defined geographical area involving an Integral operation, the building housing the BFS-1 and BFS-1 critical facilities is considered to consist of one MBA. The BFS materials are in the form of small disks clad in stainless steel and each disk with nuclear material has its own serial number. Fissile material disks in the BFS MBA can be located at three key monitoring points: BFS-1 facility, BFS-2 facility and main storage of BFS fissile materials (storage 1). When used in the BFS-1 or BFS-2 critical facilities, the fissile material disks are loaded in tubes (fuel rods) forming critical assembly cores. The following specific features of the BFS MBA should be taken into account for the purpose of computerized accounting of nuclear material: (1) very large number of nuclear material items (about 70,000 fissile material items); and (2) periodically very intensive shuffling of nuclear material items. Requirements for the computerized system are determined by basic objectives of nuclear material accounting: (1) providing accurate information on the identity and location of all items in the BFS material balance area; (2) providing accurate information on location and identity of tamper-indicating devices; (3) tracking nuclear material inventories; (4) issuing periodic reports; (5) assisting with the detection of material gains or losses; (6) providing a history of nuclear material transactions; (7) preventing unauthorized access to the system and data falsification. In August 1995, the prototype computerized accounting system was installed on the BFS facility for trial operation. Information on two nuclear material types was entered into the data base: weapon-grade plutonium metal and 36% enriched uranium dioxide. The total number of the weapon-grade plutonium disks is 12,690 and the total number of the uranium dioxide disks is 1,700.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 57, NO. 2, APRIL 2010 807 Integrated Robust and Resilient Control of Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Resilient Control of Nuclear Power Plants for Operational Safety and High Performance Xin Jin, Student & Secure (IRIS) simulator of nuclear power plants. Index Terms--Emergency operation, nuclear power plant Lyapunov equation. Reference Signals. Temperatures of the nuclear power plant. Sampling time. Controller

Ray, Asok

268

Design of Nanosensors for Fissile Materials in Nuclear Waste Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium and plutonium ions and their complexes play an important role in nuclear fuel reprocessing, and their trace characterization is important in nuclear forensics. In this work, we perform ab initio density functional theory calculations of U and Pu ...

Narendra Kumar; Jorge M. Seminario

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

269

NNSAs Management of the $245 million Nuclear Materials Safeguards and Security Upgrades Project Phase II at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NNSA's Management of the $245 NNSA's Management of the $245 Million Nuclear Materials Safeguards and Security Upgrades Project Phase II DOE/IG-0901 January 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 January 2, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Special Report on "NNSA's Management of the $245 million Nuclear Materials Safeguards and Security Upgrades Project Phase II at Los Alamos National Laboratory" BACKGROUND The National Nuclear Security Administration's Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is responsible for the protection and control of a significant portion of the Nation's special nuclear

270

Nuclear Materials Safeguards and Security Upgrade Project Completed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safeguards and Security Upgrade Project Completed Under Budget | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

271

Microsoft Word - Final Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System Users Guide 2 4-3-13.docx  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Materials Management and Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards Users Guide National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Nuclear Materials Integration Office of Nuclear Materials Integration Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS) Users Guide-Rev. 2.0 Prepared by: Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Materials Integration - NA-73 April 2013 Xavier Ascanio Office of Nuclear Materials Integration Nuclear Materials Management and 73 NMMSS User Guide 2.0 April 1, 2013 Revision History Date Revision Description October 2008 1.0 Initial release April 2013 2.0 New release NMMSS User Guide 2.0 i April 1, 2013 Table of Contents Section 1 Introduction ...................................................................................................................... 1-1

272

1Nuclear Materials Technology Division/Los Alamos National Laboratory Publications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the United States had no easy way of recover- ing plutonium from its nuclear weapons with- out generating1Nuclear Materials Technology Division/Los Alamos National Laboratory 0 Publications Nuclear Fuels-Dehydride Recycle Process for Plutonium Recovery 4-5 Electrolytic Decontamination of Oralloy 6 Applied Weapons

273

Special Nuclear Material Detection with a Water Cherenkov based Detector  

SciTech Connect

Fission events from Special Nuclear Material (SNM), such as highly enriched uranium or plutonium, produce a number of neutrons and high energy gamma-rays. Assuming the neutron multiplicity is approximately Poissonian with an average of 2 to 3, the observation of time correlations between these particles from a cargo container would constitute a robust signature of the presence of SNM inside. However, in order to be sensitive to the multiplicity, one would require a high total efficiency. There are two approaches to maximize the total efficiency; maximizing the detector efficiency or maximizing the detector solid angle coverage. The advanced detector group at LLNL is investigating one way to maximize the detector size. We are designing and building a water Cerenkov based gamma and neutron detector for the purpose of developing an efficient and cost effective way to deploy a large solid angle car wash style detector. We report on our progress in constructing a larger detector and also present preliminary results from our prototype detector that indicates detection of neutrons.

Sweany, M; Bernstein, A; Bowden, N; Dazeley, S; Svoboda, R

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

274

Summary of "Materials Modeling and Simulations for Nuclear Fuels"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary of "Materials Modeling and Simulations for Nuclear Fuels" Summary of "Materials Modeling and Simulations for Nuclear Fuels" (MMSNF 2013) workshop Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share "Materials Modeling and Simulations for Nuclear Fuels" (MMSNF 2013) workshop Workshop Summary Presentation during MMSNF Workshop in Chicago

275

Implementation of an Enhanced Measurement Control Program for handling nuclear safety samples at WSRC  

SciTech Connect

In the separation and purification of nuclear material, nuclear criticality safety (NCS) is of primary concern. The primary nuclear criticality safety controls utilized by the Savannah River Site (SRS) Separations Facilities involve administrative and process equipment controls. Additional assurance of NCS is obtained by identifying key process hold points where sampling is used to independently verify the effectiveness of production control. Nuclear safety measurements of samples from these key process locations provide a high degree of assurance that processing conditions are within administrative and procedural nuclear safety controls. An enhanced procedure management system aimed at making improvements in the quality, safety, and conduct of operation was implemented for Nuclear Safety Sample (NSS) receipt, analysis, and reporting. All procedures with nuclear safety implications were reviewed for accuracy and adequate detail to perform the analytical measurements safely, efficiently, and with the utmost quality. Laboratory personnel worked in a Deliberate Operating'' mode (a systematic process requiring continuous expert oversight during all phases of training, testing, and implementation) to initiate the upgrades. Thus, the effort to revise and review nuclear safety sample procedures involved a team comprised of a supervisor, chemist, and two technicians for each procedure. Each NSS procedure was upgraded to a Use Every Time'' (UET) procedure with sign-off steps to ensure compliance with each step for every nuclear safety sample analyzed. The upgrade program met and exceeded both the long and short term customer needs by improving measurement reliability, providing objective evidence of rigid adherence to program principles and requirements, and enhancing the system for independent verification of representative sampling from designated NCS points.

Boler-Melton, C.; Holland, M.K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Developing standard performance testing procedures for material control and accounting components at a site  

SciTech Connect

The condition of a nuclear material control and accountability system (MC&A) and its individual components, as with any system combining technical elements and documentation, may be characterized through an aggregate of values for the various parameters that determine the system's ability to perform. The MC&A system's status may be functioning effectively, marginally or not functioning based on a summary of the values of the individual parameters. This work included a review of the following subsystems, MC&A and Detecting Material Losses, and their respective elements for the material control and accountability system: (a) Elements of the MC&A Subsystem - Information subsystem (Accountancy/Inventory), Measurement subsystem, Nuclear Material Access subsystem, including tamper-indicating device (TID) program, and Automated Information-gathering subsystem; (b) Elements for Detecting Nuclear Material Loses Subsystem - Inventory Differences, Shipper/receiver Differences, Confirmatory Measurements and differences with accounting data, and TID or Seal Violations. In order to detect the absence or loss of nuclear material there must be appropriate interactions among the elements and their respective subsystems from the list above. Additionally this work includes a review of regulatory requirements for the MC&A system component characteristics and criteria that support the evaluation of the performance of the listed components. The listed components had performance testing algorithms and procedures developed that took into consideration the regulatory criteria. The developed MC&A performance-testing procedures were the basis for a Guide for MC&A Performance Testing at the material balance areas (MBAs) of State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation - Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (SSC RF-IPPE).

Scherer, Carolynn P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bushlya, Anatoly V [ROSATOM, RUSSIA; Efimenko, Vladimir F [IPPE, RUSSIA; Ilyanstev, Anatoly [IPPE, RUSSIA; Regoushevsky, Victor I [IPPE, RUSSIA

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Nuclear Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The core of a nuclear reactor is composed of a controlled critical configuration of a fissile material, which in strict a sense is the fuel. This fissile material is contained in a matrix, normally a ceramic c...

Rudy J. M. Konings; Thierry Wiss

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Nuclear fusion control-oriented plasma physics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of control techniques for the efficient and reliable operation of a fusion reactor is one of the most challenging issues nowadays and it would provide great advantages over existing energy sources: Unlimited fuel availability, no greenhouse ... Keywords: fusion control, plasma physics, tokamak modeling and simulation

Aitor J. Garrido; Izaskun Garrido; M. Goretti Sevillano-Berasategui; Mikel Alberdi; Modesto Amundarain; Oscar Barambones; Itziar Martija

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Production and Characterization of Plutonium Dioxide Particles as a Quality Control Material for Safeguards Purposes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production and Characterization of Plutonium Dioxide Particles as a Quality Control Material for Safeguards Purposes ... Although U particles are of major interest in swipe samples from enrichment facilities, Pu particles are of high interest for safeguarding reactors with hot cells, reprocessing, and research and development facilities. ... The environmental sampling for safeguard (ESS) system is presented, that was useful to monitor trace radioactive pollution in the environment and to detect nuclear activities. ...

Taeko Shinonaga; David Donohue; Helmut Aigner; Stefan Brger; Dilani Klose; Teemu Krkel; Riitta Zilliacus; Ari Auvinen; Olivier Marie; Fabien Pointurier

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

280

A Safeguards Design Strategy for Domestic Nuclear Materials Processing Facilities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The outdated and oversized nuclear manufacturing complex within the United States requires its transformation into a smaller, safe, and secure enterprise. Health and safety (more)

Long, Jonathan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Terminating Safeguards on Excess Special Nuclear Material: Defense TRU Waste Clean-up and Nonproliferation - 12426  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) manages defense nuclear material that has been determined to be excess to programmatic needs and declared waste. When these wastes contain plutonium, they almost always meet the definition of defense transuranic (TRU) waste and are thus eligible for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The DOE operates the WIPP in a manner that physical protections for attractiveness level D or higher special nuclear material (SNM) are not the normal operating condition. Therefore, there is currently a requirement to terminate safeguards before disposal of these wastes at the WIPP. Presented are the processes used to terminate safeguards, lessons learned during the termination process, and how these approaches might be useful for future defense TRU waste needing safeguards termination prior to shipment and disposal at the WIPP. Also described is a new criticality control container, which will increase the amount of fissile material that can be loaded per container, and how it will save significant taxpayer dollars. Retrieval, compliant packaging and shipment of retrievably stored legacy TRU waste has dominated disposal operations at WIPP since it began operations 12 years ago. But because most of this legacy waste has successfully been emplaced in WIPP, the TRU waste clean-up focus is turning to newly-generated TRU materials. A major component will be transuranic SNM, currently managed in safeguards-protected vaults around the weapons complex. As DOE and NNSA continue to consolidate and shrink the weapons complex footprint, it is expected that significant quantities of transuranic SNM will be declared surplus to the nation's needs. Safeguards termination of SNM varies due to the wide range of attractiveness level of the potential material that may be directly discarded as waste. To enhance the efficiency of shipping waste with high TRU fissile content to WIPP, DOE designed an over-pack container, similar to the pipe component, called the criticality control over-pack, which will significantly enhance the efficiency of disposal. Hundreds of shipments of transuranic SNM, suitably packaged to meet WIPP waste acceptance criteria and with safeguards terminated have been successfully emplaced at WIPP (primarily from the Rocky Flats site clean-up) since WIPP opened. DOE expects that thousands more may eventually result from SNM consolidation efforts throughout the weapons complex. (authors)

Hayes, Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Carlsbad Operations Group (United States); Nelson, Roger [Department Of Energy, Carlsbad Operations Office (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Office of Weapons Material Protection | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

that gradually transfers responsibility for maintaining the security systems to Russia. Related Topics material protection MPC&A SLD second line of defense weapons material...

283

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue Universitys Interaction of Materials with Particles and Components Testing (IMPACT) facility and the Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) Radiochemistry Processing Laboratory (RPL) and PIE facilities were added. The ATR NSUF annually hosts a weeklong event called Users Week in which students and faculty from universities as well as other interested parties from regulatory agencies or industry convene in Idaho Falls, Idaho to see presentations from ATR NSUF staff as well as select researchers from the materials research field. Users week provides an overview of current materials research topics of interest and an opportunity for young researchers to understand the process of performing work through ATR NSUF. Additionally, to increase the number of researchers engaged in LWR materials issues, a series of workshops are in progress to introduce research staff to stress corrosion cracking, zirconium alloy degradation, and uranium dioxide degradation during in-reactor use.

John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

E/Z MAS: An easy-to-use computerized materials control and accountability system  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear facilities that handle and process nuclear materials are required to track their nuclear holdings and to keep adequate records that manage and control the inventory of those holdings. The complexity of a system that does this job is directly proportional to the complexity of the facility`s operations. This paper describes an approach to computerized materials protection, control, and accountability (MPC and A) that was introduced by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in the fall of 1997. This new system, E/Z MAS, is the latest addition to the LANL suite of computerized MPC and A tools, which also includes the CoreMAS system. E/Z MAS was initially designed to address the needs of those facilities that have small to modest MPC and A needs but has been expanded to provide full functionality for any facility. The system name, E/Z MAS, reflects the system`s easy-to-use characteristics, which include ease of installation and ease of software maintenance. Both CoreMAS and E/Z MAS have been provided to facilities in the Former Soviet Union to assist them in implementing a computerized MPC and A system that meets their needs. In this paper the authors will address the functionality of CoreMAS and E/Z MAS, and an argument in favor of intranet-based material control and accountability will be advanced.

Anderson, L.K.; Boor, M.G.; Hurford, J.M.; Landry, R.P.; Martinez, B.J.; Solem, A.M.; Whiteson, R.; Zardecki, A.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Nuclear reactor flow control method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for improving coolant flow in a nuclear reactor during accident as well as nominal conditions. The reactor has a plurality of fuel elements in sleeves and a plenum above the fuel and through which the sleeves penetrate. Holes are provided in the sleeve so that coolant from the plenum can enter the sleeve and cool the fuel. The number and size of the holes are varied from sleeve to sleeve with the number and size of holes being greater for sleeves toward the center of the core and less for sleeves toward the periphery of the core. Preferably the holes are all the same diameter and arranged in rows and columns, the rows starting from the bottom of every sleeve and fewer rows in peripheral sleeves and more rows in the central sleeves.

Church, John P. (1204 Woodbine Rd., Aiken, SC 29803)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Material-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact vacuum insulation panel is described comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning ``on`` and ``off`` the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls. 25 figs.

Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

287

Material-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact vacuum insulation panel comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning "on" and "off" the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls.

Benson, David K. (14154 W. First Dr., Golden, CO 80401); Potter, Thomas F. (515 S. Magnolia La., Denver, CO 80224)

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

288

Dual annular rotating "windowed" nuclear reflector reactor control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core.

Jacox, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Drexler, Robert L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hunt, Robert N. M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lake, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

A Busy Year Securing Vulnerable Nuclear Material and Making the World Safer  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Busy Year Securing Vulnerable Nuclear Material and Making the A Busy Year Securing Vulnerable Nuclear Material and Making the World Safer A Busy Year Securing Vulnerable Nuclear Material and Making the World Safer January 7, 2011 - 6:22pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs This holiday season was certainly a busy one for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). While many Americans were off completing last minute Christmas shopping and spending time with loved ones, the team at NNSA was working around the clock to secure over 50 kilograms of highly enriched uranium from three sites in the Ukraine. As part of President Obama's ambitious plan to secure all vulnerable nuclear material around the world in four years, NNSA assisted in repatriating the dangerous

290

EA-1954: Resumption of Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Resumption of Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and 4: Resumption of Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho EA-1954: Resumption of Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho SUMMARY This Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluates U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities associated with its proposal to resume testing of nuclear fuels and materials under transient high-power test conditions at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. The State of Idaho and Shoshone-Bannock Tribes are cooperating agencies. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES DOE invites the public to read and comment on a draft environmental assessment it has prepared for a proposal to resume transient testing of nuclear fuels and materials at either Idaho National Laboratory or Sandia

291

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

Lynne M. Stevens

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

1990 update for the applications guide to pedestrian SNM (special nuclear material) monitors  

SciTech Connect

The physical principles of special nuclear material (SNM) monitoring have not changed in the five years since the writing of the Los Alamos report, An Applications Guide to Pedestrian SNM Monitors (AL-10633-MS).'' However, during those years, there has been evidence for the start of significant change in the practice of SNM monitoring. Recently revised Department of Energy orders allow flexibility in selecting material-control measures by addressing both abrupt and protracted theft or diversion of SNM and by grading the material according to its attractiveness. Other new guideline on how to apply, test, and maintain SNM monitors and metal detectors are becoming available from the American Society for Testing and Materials. But perhaps the most noticeable change to the Applications Guide is in Part 3, the catalog of commercial pedestrian SNM monitors, where many obsolete entries have been replaced by new monitors. This update for the Applications Guide catalogs new pedestrian SNM monitors and discusses what is new and what is changing in the practice of SNM monitoring. 31 refs., 11 figs.

Fehlau, P.E.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

LYNX: An unattended sensor system for detection of gamma-ray and neutron emissions from special nuclear materials  

SciTech Connect

This manuscript profiles an unattended and fully autonomous detection system sensitive to gamma-ray and neutron emissions from special nuclear material. The LYNX design specifically targets applications that require radiation detection capabilities but possess little or no infrastructure. In these settings, users need the capability to deploy sensors for extended periods of time that analyze whatever signal-starved data can be captured, since little or no control may be exerted over measurement conditions. The fundamental sensing elements of the LYNX system are traditional NaI(Tl) and 3He detectors. The new developments reported here center on two themes: low-power electronics and computationally simple analysis algorithms capable of discriminating gamma-ray signatures indicative of special nuclear materials from those of naturally occurring radioactive material. Incorporating tripwire-detection algorithms based on gamma-ray spectral signatures into a low-power electronics package significantly improves performance in environments where sensors encounter nuisance sources.

Runkle, Robert C.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Kiff, Scott D.; Sidor, Daniel E.; Morris, Scott J.; Rohrer, John S.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Pfund, David M.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Bowler, Ryan S.; Mullen, Crystal A.

2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

294

Detecting special nuclear materials in containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a container. The system and its method include irradiating the container with an energetic beam, so as to induce a fission in the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

Norman, Eric B. (Oakland, CA); Prussin, Stanley G. (Kensington, CA)

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

295

RELIABLE CONTROL AND ONLINE MONITORING DESIGN FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT WITH IRIS DEMONSTRATION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Development and deployment of small-scale nuclear power reactors and their autonomous control and monitoring is part of the mission under the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (more)

Guo, Yin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Human error contribution to nuclear materials-handling events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis analyzes a sample of 15 fuel-handling events from the past ten years at commercial nuclear reactors with significant human error contributions in order to detail the contribution of human error to fuel-handling ...

Sutton, Bradley (Bradley Jordan)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Automatic coolant flow control device for a nuclear reactor assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device which controls coolant flow through a nuclear reactor assembly comprises a baffle means at the exit end of said assembly having a plurality of orifices, and a bimetallic member in operative relation to the baffle means such that at increased temperatures said bimetallic member deforms to unblock some of said orifices and allow increased coolant flow therethrough.

Hutter, Ernest (Wilmette, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order provides requirements and responsibilities for identifying and protecting the unauthorized dissemination of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information. Extended until 7-7-06 by DOE N 251.64, dated 7-7-05. Cancels DOE O 471.1. Canceled by DOE O 471.1B dated 3-1-10.

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Method of controlling crystallite size in nuclear-reactor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved spherules for making enhanced forms of nuclear-reactor fuels are prepared by internal gelation procedures within a sol-gel operation and are accomplished by first boiling the concentrated HMTA-urea feed solution before engaging in the spherule-forming operation thereby effectively controlling crystallite size in the product spherules.

Lloyd, Milton H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Collins, Jack L. (Knoxville, TN); Shell, Sam E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Automatic coolant flow control device for a nuclear reactor assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device which controls coolant flow through a nuclear reactor assembly comprises a baffle means at the exit end of said assembly having a plurality of orifices, and a bimetallic member in operative relation to the baffle means such that at increased temperatures said bimetallic member deforms to unblock some of said orifices and allow increased coolant flow therethrough.

Hutter, E.

1984-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Indicator system for advanced nuclear plant control complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Neutron Detectors for Detection of Nuclear Materials at LANL| U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Neutron Detectors for Detection of Neutron Detectors for Detection of Nuclear Materials at LANL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Neutron Detectors for Detection of Nuclear Materials at LANL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Very Large Array Neutron Detector (VLAND); Development of large volume efficient neutron detectors for use in detection of small amounts (~ 1 gm)

303

First time nuclear material detection by one short-pulse-laser-driven  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Articles » Articles » First time nuclear material detection by one short-pulse-laser-driven neutron source First time nuclear material detection by one short-pulse-laser-driven neutron source The results obtained are the first experimental demonstration of active interrogation of nuclear material by a short pulse laser driven neutron source. April 3, 2013 TRIDENT pulse The results obtained are the first experimental demonstration of active interrogation of nuclear material by a short pulse laser driven neutron source. Contact James Rickman Communications Specialist (505) 665-9203 Email A single shot interrogation of the depleted uranium sample, showed a clear signal from the delayed neutrons in the detector with uranium, compared with the background, and with the typical time behavior of delayed

304

Determination of boron in nuclear materials by isotope dilution technique. Part I  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The application of the mass-spectrometric stable-isotope dilution technique for the determination of microgram and submicrogram quantities of boron in nuclear materials is described. An adequate...10B) is added t...

J. Marsel; D. Milivojevi?

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Detecting nuclear materials smuggling: using radiography to improve container inspection policies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes a layered container inspection system for detecting illicit nuclear materials using radiography information. We argue that the current inspection system, relying heavily on the Automated Ta...

Gary M. Gaukler; Chenhua Li; Rory Cannaday

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Journal of Nuclear Materials 122 & 123 (1984) 1459-1465 North-Holland. Amsterdam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Nuclear Materials 122 & 123 (1984) 1459-1465 North-Holland. Amsterdam 1459 THERMAL Argonne National Laboratory, Fusion Power Program, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439

Harilal, S. S.

307

A system for the detection of concealed nuclear weapons and fissile material aboard cargo cotainerships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new approach to the detection of concealed nuclear weapons and fissile material aboard cargo containerships is proposed. The ship-based approach removes the constraints of current thinking by addressing the threat of ...

Gallagher, Shawn P., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

E-Print Network 3.0 - alamos nuclear materials Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alamos nuclear materials Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project We are working...

309

SRS Completes Annual Examinations to Verify Safe Storage of Nuclear Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

AIKEN, S.C. The EM program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) recently completed an annual process in K Area that validates the sites ongoing commitment to maintaining the safety and security of nuclear materials stored there.

310

Journal of Nuclear Materials 205 (1993) 258-266 North-Holland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Nuclear Materials 205 (1993) 258-266 North-Holland Amorphization kinetics of Zr,Fe under, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA Previous investigations using 40Ar-ion bombardments alloys) of water-cooled nuclear reactors. For example, an irradia- tion-induced crystal

Motta, Arthur T.

311

Journal of Nuclear Materials 141-143 (1986) 221-225 North-Holland, Amsterdam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NationalLaboratory, Argonne, IL 60439-4837, USA H.M. ATTAYA, and G.L. KULCINSKI Nuclear EngineeringJournal of Nuclear Materials 141-143 (1986) 221-225 North-Holland, Amsterdam ION DEBRIS AND X-RAY ENERGY DEPOSITION AND RESPONSE OF FUSION REACTOR FIRST WALLS* A.M. HASSANEIN Fusion PowerProgram,Argonne

Harilal, S. S.

312

Journal of Nuclear Materials 195 (1992) 221-227 North-Holland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Nuclear Materials 195 (1992) 221-227 North-Holland Letter to the Editors Amorphization at Department of Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsyl- vania State University, 231 Sackett Building, University Park dispersive X-ray spectroscopy with a spot size of 6 nm. 3. Results It has been verified by TEM that under

Motta, Arthur T.

313

CONSTRUCTION OF WEB-ACCESSIBLE MATERIALS HANDBOOK FORGENERATION IV NUCLEAR REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

The development of a web-accessible materials handbook in support of the materials selection and structural design for the Generation IV nuclear reactors is being planned. Background of the reactor program is briefly introduced. Evolution of materials handbooks for nuclear reactors over years is reviewed in light of the trends brought forth by the rapid advancement in information technologies. The framework, major features, contents, and construction considerations of the web-accessible Gen IV Materials Handbook are discussed. Potential further developments and applications of the handbook are also elucidated.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A nuclear data acquisition system flow control model  

SciTech Connect

A general Petri Net representation of a nuclear data acquisition system model is presented. This model provides for the unique requirements of a nuclear data acquisition system including the capabilities of concurrently acquiring asynchronous and synchronous data, of providing multiple priority levels of flow control arbitration, and of permitting multiple input sources to reside at the same priority without the problem of channel lockout caused by a high rate data source. Finally, a previously implemented gamma camera/physiological signal data acquisition system is described using the models presented.

Hack, S.N.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Progress toward mutual reciprocal inspections of fissile materials from dismantled nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect

In March 1994, the United States and the Russian Federation announced their intention to conduct mutual reciprocal inspections (MRI) to confirm inventories of fissile materials from dismantled nuclear weapons. Subsequent interactions between the two countries have established the basis for an MRI regime, covering instrumentation, candidate sites for MRI, and protection of information deemed sensitive by the countries. This paper discusses progress made toward MRI, stressing measurement technologies and observables, as well as prospects for MRI implementation. An analysis is presented of observables that might be exploited to provide assurance that the material being measured could have come from a dismantled weapon rather than other sources. Instrumentation to exploit these observables will also be discussed, as will joint US/Russian efforts to demonstrate such instrumentation. Progress toward a so-called ``program of cooperation`` between the two countries in protecting each other`s sensitive information will be reviewed. All of these steps are essential components of an eventual comprehensive regime for controlling fissile materials from weapons.

Johnson, M.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Gosnell, T.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

General Heat Transfer Characterization and Empirical Models of Material Storage Temperatures for the Los Alamos Nuclear Materials Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory's Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) is being renovated for long-term storage of canisters designed to hold heat-generating nuclear materials. A fully passive cooling scheme, relying on the transfer of heat by conduction, free convection, and radiation has been proposed as a reliable means of maintaining material at acceptable storage temperatures. The storage concept involves placing radioactive materials, with a net heat-generation rate of 10 W to 20 W, inside a set of nested steel canisters. The canisters are, in placed in holding fixtures and positioned vertically within a steel storage pipe. Several hundred drywells are arranged in a linear array within a large bay and dissipate the waste heat to the surrounding air, thus creating a buoyancy driven airflow pattern that draws cool air into the storage facility and exhausts heated air through an outlet stack. In this study, an experimental apparatus was designed to investigate the thermal characteristics of simulated nuclear materials placed inside two nested steel canisters positioned vertically on an aluminum fixture plate and placed inside a section of steel pipe. The heat-generating nuclear materials were simulated with a solid aluminum cylinder containing .an embedded electrical resistance heater. Calibrated type T thermocouples (accurate to ~ O.1 C) were used to monitor temperatures at 20 different locations within the apparatus. The purposes of this study were to observe the heat dissipation characteristics of the proposed `canister/fixture plate storage configuration, to investigate how the storage system responds to changes in various parameters, and to develop and validate empirical correlations to predict material temperatures under various operating conditions

J. D. Bernardin; W. S. Gregory

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Fossil Energy [Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials] - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy Fossil Energy Capabilities Materials Testing Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) of Reactor Materials Corrosion Performance/Metal Dusting Overview Light Water Reactors Fossil Energy Fusion Energy Metal Dusting Publications List Irradiated Materials Steam Generator Tube Integrity Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials Fossil Energy Bookmark and Share Conceptual designs of advanced coal-fired combustion systems require furnaces and heat transfer surfaces that operate at much higher temperatures than those in current coal-fired power plants. The combination of elevated temperatures and hostile combustion environments necessitates the development and application of ceramic materials in these designs.

319

State-of-the-art review of materials properties of nuclear waste forms.  

SciTech Connect

The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) was established at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to assemble a standardized nuclear waste materials data base for use in research, systems and facility design, safety analyses, and waste management decisions. This centralized data base will be provided through the means of a Nuclear Waste Materials Handbook. The first issue of the Handbook will be published in the fall of 1981 in looseleaf format so that it can be updated as additional information becomes available. To ensure utmost reliability, all materials data appearing in the Handbook will be obtained by standard procedures defined in the Handbook and approved by an independent Materials Review Board (MRB) comprised of materials experts from Department of Energy laboratories and from universities and industry. In the interim before publication of the Handbook there is need for a report summarizing the existing materials data on nuclear waste forms. This review summarizes materials property data for the nuclear waste forms that are being developed for immobilization of high-level radioactive waste. It is intended to be a good representation of the knowledge concerning the properties of HLW forms as of March 1981. The table of contents lists the following topics: introduction which covers waste-form categories, and important waste-form materials properties; physical properties; mechanical properties; chemical durability; vaporization; radiation effects; and thermal phase stability.

Mendel, J. E.; Nelson, R. D.; Turcotte, R. P.; Gray, W. J.; Merz, M. D.; Roberts, F. P.; Weber, W. J.; Westsik, Jr., J. H.; Clark, D. E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Management of nuclear materials in an R D environment at the Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory is a multidisciplinary R D organization and, as such, its nuclear materials inventory is diverse. Accordingly, major inventories of isotopes such as Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-242, U-235, Th, tritium, and deuterium, and lesser amounts of isotopes of Am, Cm, Np and exotic isotopes such as berkelium must be managed in accordance with Department of Energy Orders and Laboratory policies. Los Alamos also acts as a national resource for many one-of-a-kind materials which are supplied to universities, industry, and other government agencies within the US and throughout the world. Management of these materials requires effective interaction and communication with many nuclear materials custodians residing in over forty technical groups as well as effective interaction with numerous outside organizations. This paper discusses the role, philosophy, and organizational structure of Nuclear Materials Management at Los Alamos and also briefly presents results of two special nuclear materials management projects: 1- Revision of Item Description Codes for use in the Los Alamos nuclear material data base and 2- The recommendation of new economic discard limits for Pu-239. 2 refs., 1 fig.

Behrens, R.G.; Roth, S.B.; Jones, S.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Carbon Nanotube Materials for Substrate Enhanced Control of Catalytic Activity  

SciTech Connect

Carbon SWNTs are attractive materials for supporting electrocatalysts. The properties of SWNTs are highly tunable and controlled by the nanotube's circumferential periodicity and their surface chemistry. These unique characteristics suggest that architectures constructed from these types of carbon support materials would exhibit interesting and useful properties. Here, we expect that the structure of the carbon nanotube support will play a major role in stabilizing metal electrocatalysts under extreme operating conditions and suppress both catalyst and support degradation. Furthermore, the chemical modification of the carbon nanotube surfaces can be expected to alter the interface between the catalyst and support, thus, enhancing the activity and utilization of the electrocatalysts. We plan to incorporate discrete reaction sites into the carbon nanotube lattice to create intimate electrical contacts with the catalyst particles to increase the metal catalyst activity and utilization. The work involves materials synthesis, design of electrode architectures on the nanoscale, control of the electronic, ionic, and mass fluxes, and use of advanced optical spectroscopy techniques.

Heben, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Lee, S.-H.; Kelley, R. D.; Kini, A. M.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Light Water Reactors [Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials] - Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactors Light Water Reactors Capabilities Materials Testing Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) of Reactor Materials Corrosion Performance/Metal Dusting Overview Light Water Reactors Fatigue Testing of Carbon Steels and Low-Alloy Steels Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Ni-Base Alloys Irradiation-Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program Air Oxidation Kinetics for Zr-based Alloys Fossil Energy Fusion Energy Metal Dusting Publications List Irradiated Materials Steam Generator Tube Integrity Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials Light Water Reactors Bookmark and Share To continue safe operation of current LWRs, the aging degradation of the

323

Fusion Energy [Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials] - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Energy Fusion Energy Capabilities Materials Testing Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) of Reactor Materials Corrosion Performance/Metal Dusting Overview Light Water Reactors Fossil Energy Fusion Energy Metal Dusting Publications List Irradiated Materials Steam Generator Tube Integrity Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials Fusion Energy Bookmark and Share Since 1995, Argonne has had primary responsibility for the development of new design rules regarding various components in a fusion reactor, particularly those subject to irradiation embrittlement. During 1998, Argonne issued the final draft of the structural design criteria for in-vessel components in the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER).

324

Nuclear Forensics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear forensics Nuclear Forensics AMS is a Powerful Tool for Nuclear Forensics Nuclear forensics, which can be applied to both interdicted materials and debris from a nuclear...

325

Physics in nuclear safeguards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

International agreements demand that rigorous control procedures are applied to nuclear material. Containment and surveillance techniques are used to monitor the security aspects of dealing with the material whilst accountancy provides quantitative information. The author shows that the methods used to control nuclear material can be conveniently broken down into these two parts

B.W. Hooton

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Direct conversion of surplus fissile materials, spent nuclear fuel, and other materials to high-level-waste glass  

SciTech Connect

With the end of the cold war the United States, Russia, and other countries have excess plutonium and other materials from the reductions in inventories of nuclear weapons. The United States Academy of Sciences (NAS) has recommended that these surplus fissile materials (SFMs) be processed so they are no more accessible than plutonium in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This spent fuel standard, if adopted worldwide, would prevent rapid recovery of SFMs for the manufacture of nuclear weapons. The NAS recommended investigation of three sets of options for disposition of SFMs while meeting the spent fuel standard: (1) incorporate SFMs with highly radioactive materials and dispose of as waste, (2) partly burn the SFMs in reactors with conversion of the SFMs to SNF for disposal, and (3) dispose of the SFMs in deep boreholes. The US Government is investigating these options for SFM disposition. A new method for the disposition of SFMs is described herein: the simultaneous conversion of SFMs, SNF, and other highly radioactive materials into high-level-waste (HLW) glass. The SFMs include plutonium, neptinium, americium, and {sup 233}U. The primary SFM is plutonium. The preferred SNF is degraded SNF, which may require processing before it can be accepted by a geological repository for disposal.

Forsberg, C.W.; Elam, K.R.

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Illicit trafficking of radiological & nuclear materials : modeling and analysis of trafficking trends and risks.  

SciTech Connect

Concerns over the illicit trafficking of radiological and nuclear materials were focused originally on the lack of security and accountability of such material throughout the former Soviet states. This is primarily attributed to the frequency of events that have occurred involving the theft and trafficking of critical material components that could be used to construct a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) or even a rudimentary nuclear device. However, with the continued expansion of nuclear technology and the deployment of a global nuclear fuel cycle these materials have become increasingly prevalent, affording a more diverse inventory of dangerous materials and dual-use items. To further complicate the matter, the list of nuclear consumers has grown to include: (1) Nation-states that have gone beyond the IAEA agreed framework and additional protocols concerning multiple nuclear fuel cycles and processes that reuse the fuel through reprocessing to exploit technologies previously confined to the more industrialized world; (2) Terrorist organizations seeking to acquire nuclear and radiological material due to the potential devastation and psychological effect of their use; (3) Organized crime, which has discovered a lucrative market in trafficking of illicit material to international actors and/or countries; and (4) Amateur smugglers trying to feed their families in a post-Soviet era. An initial look at trafficking trends of this type seems scattered and erratic, localized primarily to a select group of countries. This is not necessarily the case. The success with which other contraband has been smuggled throughout the world suggests that nuclear trafficking may be carried out with relative ease along the same routes by the same criminals or criminal organizations. Because of the inordinately high threat posed by terrorist or extremist groups acquiring the ingredients for unconventional weapons, it is necessary that illicit trafficking of these materials be better understood as to prepare for the sustained global development of the nuclear fuel cycle. Conversely, modeling and analyses of this activity must not be limited in their scope to loosely organized criminal smuggling, but address the problem as a commercial, industrial project for the covert development of nuclear technologies and unconventional weapon development.

York, David L.; Love, Tracia L.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Passive neutron techniques for the nondestructive assay of nuclear material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the drums contained transuranic material. These results were based solely on the number of time-correlated neutron events. The gamma spectra for all three drums were inspected and no gamma ray lines corresponding to transuranic nuclides were found. Further...

Mapili, Gabriel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

329

Controlling Beryllium Contaminated Material And Equipment For The Building 9201-5 Legacy Material Disposition Project  

SciTech Connect

This position paper addresses the management of beryllium contamination on legacy waste. The goal of the beryllium management program is to protect human health and the environment by preventing the release of beryllium through controlling surface contamination. Studies have shown by controlling beryllium surface contamination, potential airborne contamination is reduced or eliminated. Although there are areas in Building 9201-5 that are contaminated with radioactive materials and mercury, only beryllium contamination is addressed in this management plan. The overall goal of this initiative is the compliant packaging and disposal of beryllium waste from the 9201-5 Legacy Material Removal (LMR) Project to ensure that beryllium surface contamination and any potential airborne release of beryllium is controlled to levels as low as practicable in accordance with 10 CFR 850.25.

Reynolds, T. D.; Easterling, S. D.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Lessons from UNSCOM/IAEA applicable to nuclear arms control  

SciTech Connect

In early 1991, the Security Council of the United Nations tasked the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, with the assistance and cooperation of the United Nations Special Commission, to oversee the destruction, removal or rendering harmless of nuclear weapons material and capabilities in Iraq. The conduct of the nuclear inspections, and the subsequent activities (identification, destruction, removal rendering harmless), have provided a wealth of experience and insight into the inspection and monitoring process as well as into the political realities of such an operation. The early inspections were conducted in an atmosphere of discovery and inexperience on both the part of the Iraqis and the IAEA and UNSCOM. As time went on, the Iraqis became more adept at hiding and obscuring relevant documents and equipment, and the inspection teams became more knowledgeable about inspection and investigative techniques, and the pre-existing Iraqi programs. A continuous monitoring presence in Iraq has now been established and an import/export monitoring regime is being developed. While steps taken to date have proven effective in inhibiting resumption of nuclear weaponization activities, it remains to be seen how effective these measures will be in the future. The external and internal conditions which led the Iraqi leadership to undertake a nuclear weaponization program have not changed, and the prognosis for the long term is uncertain. The entire process in Iraq has shown how fragile are the tools available to the international community, and how a determined proliferator can evade inspection and monitoring measures. Such measures cannot prevent nuclear proliferation, they can only hope to deter it, or, failing in that, detect it.

Dorn, D.W.

1995-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

331

Invited Paper Shape Control of Composite Material Plates Using Piezoelectric Actuators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of smart structures. These material include piezoelectric polymers and ceramics, shape memory alloysInvited Paper Shape Control of Composite Material Plates Using Piezoelectric Actuators Brij N control of composite material plates using piezoelectric actuators. A finite element formulation

332

Follow-up Inspection on Material Control and Accountability at Los Alamos National Laboratory, INS-O-13-04  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Follow-up Inspection on Material Follow-up Inspection on Material Control and Accountability at Los Alamos National Laboratory INS-O-13-04 July 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 July 18, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ACTING MANAGER, LOS ALAMOS FIELD OFFICE, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FROM: Sandra D. Bruce Assistant Inspector General for Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Follow-up Inspection on Material Control and Accountability at Los Alamos National Laboratory" INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department) Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) is managed and operated under contract by Los Alamos National Security, LLC, for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The Los Alamos Field Office is the Federal entity

333

INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY: QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS RELEVANT TO NUCLEAR FACILITIES, SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY  

SciTech Connect

Typical questions surrounding industrial control system (ICS) cyber security always lead back to: What could a cyber attack do to my system(s) and; how much should I worry about it? These two leading questions represent only a fraction of questions asked when discussing cyber security as it applies to any program, company, business, or organization. The intent of this paper is to open a dialog of important pertinent questions and answers that managers of nuclear facilities engaged in nuclear facility security and safeguards should examine, i.e., what questions should be asked; and how do the answers affect an organization's ability to effectively safeguard and secure nuclear material. When a cyber intrusion is reported, what does that mean? Can an intrusion be detected or go un-noticed? Are nuclear security or safeguards systems potentially vulnerable? What about the digital systems employed in process monitoring, and international safeguards? Organizations expend considerable efforts to ensure that their facilities can maintain continuity of operations against physical threats. However, cyber threats particularly on ICSs may not be well known or understood, and often do not receive adequate attention. With the disclosure of the Stuxnet virus that has recently attacked nuclear infrastructure, many organizations have recognized the need for an urgent interest in cyber attacks and defenses against them. Several questions arise including discussions about the insider threat, adequate cyber protections, program readiness, encryption, and many more. These questions, among others, are discussed so as to raise the awareness and shed light on ways to protect nuclear facilities and materials against such attacks.

Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Supporting the President's Arms Control and Nonproliferation Agenda: Transparency and Verification for Nuclear Arms Reductions  

SciTech Connect

The President's arms control and nonproliferation agenda is still evolving and the details of initiatives supporting it remain undefined. This means that DOE, NNSA, NA-20, NA-24 and the national laboratories can help define the agenda, and the policies and the initiatives to support it. This will require effective internal and interagency coordination. The arms control and nonproliferation agenda is broad and includes the path-breaking goal of creating conditions for the elimination of nuclear weapons. Responsibility for various elements of the agenda will be widely scattered across the interagency. Therefore an interagency mapping exercise should be performed to identify the key points of engagement within NNSA and other agencies for creating effective policy coordination mechanisms. These can include informal networks, working groups, coordinating committees, interagency task forces, etc. It will be important for NA-20 and NA-24 to get a seat at the table and a functional role in many of these coordinating bodies. The arms control and nonproliferation agenda comprises both mature and developing policy initiatives. The more mature elements such as CTBT ratification and a follow-on strategic nuclear arms treaty with Russia have defined milestones. However, recent press reports indicate that even the START follow-on strategic arms pact that is planned to be complete by the end of 2009 may take significantly longer and be more expansive in scope. The Russians called for proposals to count non-deployed as well as deployed warheads. Other elements of the agenda such as FMCT, future bilateral nuclear arms reductions following a START follow-on treaty, nuclear posture changes, preparations for an international nuclear security summit, strengthened international safeguards and multilateral verification are in much earlier stages of development. For this reason any survey of arms control capabilities within the USG should be structured to address potential needs across the near-term (1-4) years and longer-term (5-10) years planning horizons. Some final observations include acknowledging the enduring nature of several key objectives on the Obama Administration's arms control and nonproliferation agenda. The CTBT, FMCT, bilateral nuclear arms reductions and strengthening the NPT have been sought by successive U.S. Administrations for nearly thirty years. Efforts towards negotiated arms control, although de-emphasized by the G.W. Bush Administration, have remained a pillar of U.S. national security strategy for decades and are likely to be of enduring if not increasing importance for decades to come. Therefore revitalization and expansion of USG capabilities in this area can be a positive legacy no matter what near-term arms control goals are achieved over the next four years. This is why it is important to reconstruct integrated bureaucratic, legislative, budgetary and diplomatic strategies to sustain the arms control and nonproliferation agenda. In this endeavor some past lessons must be taken to heart to avoid bureaucratic overkill and keep interagency policy-making and implementation structures lean and effective. On the Technical side a serious, sustained multilateral program to develop, down select and performance test nuclear weapons dismantlement verification technologies and procedures should be immediately initiated. In order to make this happen the United States and Russia should join with the UK and other interested states in creating a sustained, full-scale research and development program for verification at their respective nuc1ear weapons and defense establishments. The goals include development of effective technologies and procedures for: (1) Attribute measurement systems to certify nuclear warheads and military fissile materials; (2) Chain-of-custody methods to track items after they are authenticated and enter accountability; (3) Transportation monitoring; (4) Storage monitoring; (5) Fissile materials conversion verification. The remainder of this paper focuses on transparency and verification for nuclear arms a

Doyle, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meek, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

A Preliminary Evaluation of Using Fill Materials to Stabilize Used Nuclear Fuel During Storage and Transportation  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a preliminary evaluation of potential fill materials that could be used to fill void spaces in and around used nuclear fuel contained in dry storage canisters in order to stabilize the geometry and mechanical structure of the used nuclear fuel during extended storage and transportation after extended storage. Previous work is summarized, conceptual descriptions of how canisters might be filled were developed, and requirements for potential fill materials were developed. Elements of the requirements included criticality avoidance, heat transfer or thermodynamic properties, homogeneity and rheological properties, retrievability, material availability and cost, weight and radiation shielding, and operational considerations. Potential fill materials were grouped into 5 categories and their properties, advantages, disadvantages, and requirements for future testing were discussed. The categories were molten materials, which included molten metals and paraffin; particulates and beads; resins; foams; and grout. Based on this analysis, further development of fill materials to stabilize used nuclear fuel during storage and transportation is not recommended unless options such as showing that the fuel remains intact or canning of used nuclear fuel do not prove to be feasible.

Maheras, Steven J.; Best, Ralph; Ross, Steven B.; Lahti, Erik A.; Richmond, David J.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

US/Russian program in materials protection, control and accounting at the RRC Kurchatov Institute: 1997--1998  

SciTech Connect

Six US Department of Energy Laboratories are carrying out a program of cooperation with the Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute to improve nuclear material protection, control and accounting (MPC and A) at Kurchatov. In 1997--1998 the primary thrust of this program has been directed to Building 106, which houses a number of test reactors and critical facilities. Substantial improvements in physical protection, upgrades in the physical inventory taking procedures, installation of equipment for the computerized materials accounting system, and installation of nuclear material portal monitors and neutron-based measurement equipment are being carried out at this facility. Software for the computerized accounting system, named KI-MACS, has been developed at Kurchatov and the system has been fully integrated with the bar code printing and reading equipment, electronic scales, and nondestructive assay equipment provided under this program. Additional 1997--1998 activities at Kurchatov include continuation of a tamper indicating device program, vulnerability assessments of several facilities, hosting of a Russian-American Workshop on Fissile Material Control and Accountability at Critical Facilities, and the development of accounting procedures for transfers of nuclear materials between material balance areas.

Sukhoruchkin, V.; Rumyantsev, A.; Shmelev, V. [RRC Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Some Possible Methods for Detection of Clandestin Production of Nuclear Materials  

SciTech Connect

When one considers the possibility of clandestine production of nuclear materials, one must consider the nature of the state. A Nuclear Weapon State (NWS) already has production facilities, and even though these might be safeguarded, the NWS could more easily hide the activities than could a Non-Nuclear Weapon State (NNWS). In this paper, some of the properties of production facilities are discussed in relation to how this would relate to vulnerability to detection. The observable and methods of detection are discussed, as well as the possibility that significant help by another country could totally eliminate one or more of the steps needed for a complete production cycle.

Marlow, Keith W.

1999-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

338

Nuclear-Fuel-Cycle Research Program: availability of geotoxic material  

SciTech Connect

This report represents an analog approach to the characterization of the environmental behavior of geotoxic waste materials (toxic material emplaced in the earth's crust) as drawn from literature on the Oklo natural fission reactors and uranium ore deposits relative to radioactive wastes, and hydrothermal metal ore deposits relative to stable toxic wastes. The natural analog data were examined in terms of mobility and immobility of selected radioactive or stable waste elements and are presented in matrix relationship with their prime geochemical variables. A numerical system of ranking those relationships for purposes of hazard-indexing is proposed. Geochemical parameters (especially oxidation/reduction potential) are apparently more potent mobilizers/immobilizers than geological or hydrological conditions in many, if not most, geologic environments for most radioactive waste elements. Heavy metal wastes, by analogy to hydrothermal ore systems and geothermal systems, are less clear in their behavior but similar geochemical patterns do apply. Depth relationships between geochemical variables and waste element behavior show some surprises. It is significantly indicated that for waste isolation, deeper is not necessarily better geochemically. Relatively shallow isolation in host rocks such as shale could offer maximum immobility. This paper provides a geochemical outline for examining analog models as well as a departure point for improved quantification of geological and geochemical indexing of toxic waste hazards.

Wachter, B.G.; Kresan, P.L.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Enhancing the Material Control & Accounting Measurement System at the State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation - Institute for Physics and Power Engineering named after A.I. Leypunsky  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear material control and accounting (NMCA) system is improving under cooperation with USA national laboratories. Standard reference materials (RMs) and measurement techniques certified at IPPE level are required for: instrument calibration, verification measurements of parameters of items and materials, measurement error estimation, and quality control measurements. We present the main results for development of nuclear RMs for two uranium strata and the results for certification of three measurement techniques (MT) for U-235 mass fraction in uranium and U-235 mass in items. We present the results for developing measurement techniques for Pu-239 in PuO{sub 2}.

Scherer, Carolynn P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bezhunov, Gennady M. [IPPE; Bogdanov, Sergey A. [IPPE; Gorbachev, Vyacheslav M. [IPPE; Ryazanov, Boris G. [IPPE; Talanov, Vladimir V. [IPPE

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

340

Managing nuclear materials from retired weapons: An overview of U.S. plans, programs and goals  

SciTech Connect

In September 1993, the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) published a report entitled ``Dismantling the Bomb and Managing the Nuclear Materials``. That study evaluated the current activities as well as the future challenges inherent in retiring many thousands of nuclear weapons in the US and Russia; dismantling the warheads; and safely and securely disposing of the constituent materials.The warhead dismantlement process has been underway for a few years in both nations but long-range plans and policies are still in the early stages of development. At present both the plutonium and highly-enriched uranium removed from retired weapons is stored temporarily awaiting decisions about its ultimate fate.

Johnson, P.A. [Office of Technology Assessment, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Material Protection, Control and Accounting program (MPC&A) ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Civilian Sites conducts upgrades at civilian nuclear facilities throughout Russia and works with other key partner countries on nuclear security best practices. The...

342

An adaptive simulation model for analysis of nuclear material shipping operations  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos has developed an advanced simulation environment designed specifically for nuclear materials operations. This process-level simulation package, the Process Modeling System (ProMoS), is based on high-fidelity material balance criteria and contains intrinsic mechanisms for waste and recycle flows, contaminant estimation and tracking, and material-constrained operations. Recent development efforts have focused on coupling complex personnel interactions, personnel exposure calculations, and stochastic process-personnel performance criteria to the material-balance simulation. This combination of capabilities allows for more realistic simulation of nuclear material handling operations where complex personnel interactions are required. They have used ProMoS to assess fissile material shipping performance characteristics at the Los Alamos National Laboratory plutonium facility (TA-55). Nuclear material shipping operations are ubiquitous in the DOE complex and require the largest suite of varied personnel interacting in a well-timed manner to accomplish the task. They have developed a baseline simulation of the present operations and have estimated the operational impacts and requirement of the pit production mission at TA-55 as a result of the SSM-PEIS. Potential bottlenecks have been explored and mechanisms for increasing operational efficiency are identified.

Boerigter, S.T.; Sena, D.J.; Fasel, J.H.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

Report on Follow-up Inspection of the Double Funding of Security for Special Nuclear Material at Richland Operations, IG-0378  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 INFORMATION: Report on "Follow-up Inspection of the Double Funding of Security for Special Nuclear Material at the Richland Operations Office" The Secretary BACKGROUND: On June 3, 1993, the Deputy Assistant Inspector General for Inspections issued a Letter Report to the Department's Acting Chief Financial Officer which stated that during Fiscal Year 1993 the Department had requested and received $60 million, double the funding needed, for the safeguard and security of special nuclear material at the Richland Operations Office. In response to that Report, the Acting Chief Financial Officer took control of the funds and placed them into a management reserve account. A follow-up inspection was initiated to:

344

The Attractiveness of Materials in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles for Various Proliferation and Theft Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an extension to earlier studies1,2 that examined the attractiveness of materials mixtures containing special nuclear materials (SNM) and alternate nuclear materials (ANM) associated with the PUREX, UREX, COEX, THOREX, and PYROX reprocessing schemes. This study extends the figure of merit (FOM) for evaluating attractiveness to cover a broad range of proliferant state and sub-national group capabilities. The primary conclusion of this study is that all fissile material needs to be rigorously safeguarded to detect diversion by a state and provided the highest levels of physical protection to prevent theft by sub-national groups; no silver bullet has been found that will permit the relaxation of current international safeguards or national physical security protection levels. This series of studies has been performed at the request of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and is based on the calculation of "attractiveness levels" that are expressed in terms consistent with, but normally reserved for nuclear materials in DOE nuclear facilities.3 The expanded methodology and updated findings are presented. Additionally, how these attractiveness levels relate to proliferation resistance and physical security are discussed.

Bathke, C. G.; Wallace, R. K.; Ireland, J. R.; Johnson, M. W.; Hase, Kevin R.; Jarvinen, G. D.; Ebbinghaus, B. B.; Sleaford, Brad W.; Bradley, Keith S.; Collins, Brian A.; Smith, Brian W.; Prichard, Andrew W.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Nuclear Forensics | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science and Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Advanced Materials Clean Energy Materials Theory and Simulation Neutron Science Nuclear Forensics Nuclear Science Supercomputing Theory, Modeling and Simulation More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Materials Science and Engineering | Nuclear Forensics SHARE Nuclear Forensics image Tools, techniques, and expertise in nuclear fuel cycle research gained over seven decades help ORNL scientists control and track nuclear bomb-grade materials to be sure they don't fall into the wrong hands. Among the leading-edge technologies used by researchers are high-resolution techniques that allow analysis of radiation detector data in stunning detail. Researchers are also developing aerosol sampling systems to collect

346

Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall  

SciTech Connect

Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

Michael Kruzic

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Heterogeneous nuclear reactor models for optimal xenon control  

SciTech Connect

In this study a thermal nuclear reactor is modeled as a two-dimensional lattice of fuel and control rods placed in an infinite-moderator in plane geometry. The two-group diffusion theory approximation is used for neutron transport. Space-time neutron balance equations are written for two groups and reduced to one space-time algebraic equation by using the two-dimensional Fourier transform. This equation is written at all fuel and control rod locations. Iodine-xenon and promethium-samarium dynamic equations are also written at fuel rod locations only. These equations are then linearized about an equilibrium point which is determined from the steady-state form of the original nonlinear system equations. After studying poisonless criticality, with and without control, and the stability of the open-loop system and after checking its controllability, a performance criterion is defined for the xenon-induced spatial flux oscillation problem in the form of a functional to be minimized. Linear-quadratic optimal control theory is then applied to solve the problem.

Gondal, I.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

An expert display system and nuclear power plant control rooms  

SciTech Connect

An expert display system controls automatically the display of segments on a cathode ray tube's screen to form an image of plant operations. The image consists of an icon of: 1) the process (heat engine cycle), 2) plant control systems, and 3) safety systems. A set of data-driven, forward-chaining computer stored rules control the display of segments. As plant operation changes, measured plant data are processed through the rules, and the results control the deletion and addition of segments to the display format. The icon contains information needed by control rooms operators to monitor plant operations. One example of an expert display is illustrated for the operator's task of monitoring leakage from a safety valve in a steam line of a boiling water reactor (BWR). In another example, the use of an expert display to monitor plant operations during pre-trip, trip, and post-trip operations is discussed as a universal display. The viewpoints and opinions expressed herein are the author's personal ones, and they are not to be interpreted as Nuclear Regulatory Commission criteria, requirements, or guidelines.

Beltracchi, L.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

The History and Future of NDE in the Management of Nuclear Power Plant Materials Degradation  

SciTech Connect

The author has spent more than 25 years conducting engineering and research studies to quantify the performance of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) in nuclear power plant (NPP) applications and identifying improvements to codes and standards for NDE to manage materials degradation. This paper will review this fundamental NDE engineering/research work and then look to the future on how NDE can be optimized for proactively managing materials degradation in NPP components.

Doctor, Steven R.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

EIS-0220: Interim Management of Nuclear Materials at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This environmental impact statement assesses the potential environmental impacts of actions necessary to manage nuclear materials at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina, until decisions on their ultimate disposition are made and implemented. The Department of Energy has decided to initiate actions which will stabilize certain of the SRS materials that represent environment, safety and health vulnerabilities in their current storage condition or which may represent a vulnerability within the next 10 years.

351

Using Single-Camera 3-D Imaging to Guide Material Handling Robots in a Nuclear Waste Package Closure System  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear reactors for generating energy and conducting research have been in operation for more than 50 years, and spent nuclear fuel and associated high-level waste have accumulated in temporary storage. Preparing this spent fuel and nuclear waste for safe and permanent storage in a geological repository involves developing a robotic packaging systema system that can accommodate waste packages of various sizes and high levels of nuclear radiation. During repository operation, commercial and government-owned spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste will be loaded into casks and shipped to the repository, where these materials will be transferred from the casks into a waste package, sealed, and placed into an underground facility. The waste packages range from 12 to 20 feet in height and four and a half to seven feet in diameter. Closure operations include sealing the waste package and all its associated functions, such as welding lids onto the container, filling the inner container with an inert gas, performing nondestructive examinations on welds, and conducting stress mitigation. The Idaho National Laboratory is designing and constructing a prototype Waste Package Closure System (WPCS). Control of the automated material handling is an important part of the overall design. Waste package lids, welding equipment, and other tools must be moved in and around the closure cell during the closure process. These objects are typically moved from tool racks to a specific position on the waste package to perform a specific function. Periodically, these objects are moved from a tool rack or the waste package to the adjacent glovebox for repair or maintenance. Locating and attaching to these objects with the remote handling system, a gantry robot, in a loosely fixtured environment is necessary for the operation of the closure cell. Reliably directing the remote handling system to pick and place the closure cell equipment within the cell is the major challenge.

Rodney M. Shurtliff

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

March 10, 2005, Board letter forwarding Recommendation 2005-1, Nuclear Material Packaging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FACLLTIlEs FACLLTIlEs SAFETYBOARD John T. Conway, Chairman A.J. Eggenberger, Vice Chairman Joseph F. Bader John E. Mansfield R. Bruce Matthews 625 Indiana Avenue, NW, Suite 700, Wa5hington. D.C. 20004-2901 (202) 694-7000 March 10, 2005 The Honorable Samuel W. Bodman Secretary of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-1000 Dear Secretary Bodman: On March 10,2005, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board), in accordance with 42 U.S.C. 9 2286a(a)(5), unanimously approved Recommendation 2005- 1, Nuclear Material Packaging, which is enclosed for your consideration. This recommendation addresses issuance of a requirement that nuclear material packaging meet technically justified criteria for safe storage and handling outside of engineered contamination barriers.

353

1263Journal of Nuclear Materials 155-157 (1988) 1263-1267 North-Holland, Amsterdam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1263Journal of Nuclear Materials 155-157 (1988) 1263-1267 North-Holland, Amsterdam BINARY COLLISION&h-energy collision-cascade creation in SPINEL (MgA1204}. The study focuses on two aspects of cascade generation of applications in fusion reactors (e.g., wave- guides and dielectric windows). They must be used to insulate

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

354

Materials characterization capabilities at DOE Nuclear Weapons Laboratories and Production Plants  

SciTech Connect

The materials characterization and analytical chemistry capabilities at the 11 DOE Nuclear Weapons Laboratories or Production Plants have been surveyed and compared. In general, all laboratories have similar capabilities and equipment. Facilities or capabilities that are unique or that exist at only a few laboratories are described in detail.

Pyper, J.W.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

FURTHER ASSESSMENTS OF THE ATTRACTIVENESS OF MATERIALS IN ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLES FROM A SAFEGUARDS PERSPECTIVE  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the results of an extension to an earlier study [ ] that examined the attractiveness of materials mixtures containing special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with the PUREX, UREX+, and COEX reprocessing schemes. This study focuses on the materials associated with the UREX, COEX, THOREX, and PYROX reprocessing schemes. This study also examines what is required to render plutonium as unattractive. Furthermore, combining the results of this study with those from the earlier study permits a comparison of the uranium and thorium based fuel cycles on the basis of the attractiveness of the SNM associated with each fuel cycle. Both studies were performed at the request of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), and are based on the calculation of attractiveness levels that has been couched in terms chosen for consistency with those normally used for nuclear materials in DOE nuclear facilities [ ]. The methodology and key findings will be presented. Additionally, how these attractiveness levels relate to proliferation resistance (e.g. by increasing impediments to the diversion, theft, undeclared production of SNM for the purpose of acquiring a nuclear weapon), and how they could be used to help inform policy makers, will be discussed.

Bathke, C. G.; Jarvinen, G. D.; Wallace, R. K.; Ireland, J. R.; Johnson, M. W.; Sleaford, Brad W.; Ebbinghaus, B. B.; Bradley, Keith S.; Collins, Brian A.; Smith, Brian W.; Prichard, Andrew W.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Hexapartite safeguards project team 3: material accounting and control questionnaire  

SciTech Connect

Information provided in this report reflects the current design and operating procedures for the GCEP. However, since the installation is currently under construction, facility design and operating procedures discussed in this report are subject to change. Where applicable, the responses are based on material control and accounting practices of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant's (GDP) operating contractor (Goodyear Atomic Corporation). These practices meet US Department of Energy (DOE) standards and are assumed to be the reference practices for the GCEP. This report covers data collection and record keeping actions of the operator.

Swindle, D.W. Jr.

1981-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

357

Composite Materials under Extreme Radiation and Temperature Environments of the Next Generation Nuclear Reactors  

SciTech Connect

In the nuclear energy renaissance, driven by fission reactor concepts utilizing very high temperatures and fast neutron spectra, materials with enhanced performance that exceeds are expected to play a central role. With the operating temperatures of the Generation III reactors bringing the classical reactor materials close to their performance limits there is an urgent need to develop and qualify new alloys and composites. Efforts have been focused on the intricate relations and the high demands placed on materials at the anticipated extreme states within the next generation fusion and fission reactors which combine high radiation fluxes, elevated temperatures and aggressive environments. While nuclear reactors have been in operation for several decades, the structural materials associated with the next generation options need to endure much higher temperatures (1200 C), higher neutron doses (tens of displacements per atom, dpa), and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience on materials accumulated to-date. The most important consideration is the performance and reliability of structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core functions. While there exists a great body of nuclear materials research and operating experience/performance from fission reactors where epithermal and thermal neutrons interact with materials and alter their physio-mechanical properties, a process that is well understood by now, there are no operating or even experimental facilities that will facilitate the extreme conditions of flux and temperature anticipated and thus provide insights into the behaviour of these well understood materials. Materials, however, still need to be developed and their interaction and damage potential or lifetime to be quantified for the next generation nuclear energy. Based on material development advances, composites, and in particular ceramic composites, seem to inherently possess properties suitable for key functions within the operating envelope of both fission and fusion reactors. In advanced fission reactors composite materials are being designed in an effort to extend the life and improve the reliability of fuel rod cladding as well as structural materials. Composites are being considered for use as core internals in the next generation of gas-cooled reactors. Further, next-generation plasma-fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will rely on the capabilities of advanced composites to safely withstand extremely high neutron fluxes while providing superior thermal shock resistance.

Simos, N.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms  

SciTech Connect

Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI.

Goodson, Boyd M.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Nuclear Safety Information Agreement Between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On December 15, Matt Moury, Associate Under Secretary, Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (EHSS DOE) and EHSS Office of Nuclear Safety staff met with the NRC Executive Director for Operations, the Deputy Executive Director for Operations, and the Director, Office of Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards to sign a nuclear safety information exchange agreement between NRC Office of Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards and the Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security.

360

A Perspective on Coupled Multiscale Simulation and Validation in Nuclear Materials  

SciTech Connect

The field of nuclear materials encompasses numerous opportunities to address and ultimately solve longstanding industrial problems by improving the fundamental understanding of materials through the integration of experiments with multiscale modeling and high-performance simulation. A particularly noteworthy example is an ongoing study of axial power distortions in a nuclear reactor induced by corrosion deposits, known as CRUD (Chalk River unidentified deposits). We describe how progress is being made toward achieving scientific advances and technological solutions on two fronts. Specifically, the study of thermal conductivity of CRUD phases has augmented missing data as well as revealed new mechanisms. Additionally, the development of a multiscale simulation framework shows potential for the validation of a new capability to predict the power distribution of a reactor, in effect direct evidence of technological impact. The material- and system-level challenges identified in the study of CRUD are similar to other well-known vexing problems in nuclear materials, such as irradiation accelerated corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and void swelling; they all involve connecting materials science fundamentals at the atomistic- and mesoscales to technology challenges at the macroscale.

M. P. Short; D. Gaston; C. R. Stanek; S. Yip

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

DRAFT - DOE O 452.2C, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts (DUAs), deliberate unauthorized use (DUU), and denial of authorized use (DAU).

362

Framework for a flexible, real-time controller for automated material transport systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. V MATERIAL TRANSPORT CONTROLLER: FUNCTIONS 2b SPECIFICATIONS . . 5. 1 Startup Routine 5 2 External Commands. 5. 3 Internal Commands. . 5. 4 Message Sequence. . Page 10 13 15 21 21 23 23 25 27 28 34 34 35 39 40 CHAPTER 5. 5... decomposition for the AGV controller. RapidCIM shop floor controller structure Material transport controller structure. Material transport controller architecture. Control configurations. Physical layout of a conveyor network Conventional representation...

Edlabadkar, Abhay

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

363

Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 7, Estimate data  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This report is organized according to the sections and subsections outlined by Attachment III-2 of DOE Document AL 4700.1, Project Management System. It is organized into seven parts. This document, Part VII - Estimate Data, contains the project cost estimate information.

NONE

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

364

Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System Developed at: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF)

365

Material Control and Accounting Design Considerations for High-Temperature Gas Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The subject of this report is domestic safeguards and security by design (2SBD) for high-temperature gas reactors, focusing on material control and accountability (MC&A). The motivation for the report is to provide 2SBD support to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, which was launched by Congress in 2005. This introductory section will provide some background on the NGNP project and an overview of the 2SBD concept. The remaining chapters focus specifically on design aspects of the candidate high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs) relevant to MC&A, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements, and proposed MC&A approaches for the two major HTGR reactor types: pebble bed and prismatic. Of the prismatic type, two candidates are under consideration: (1) GA's GT-MHR (Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor), and (2) the Modular High-Temperature Reactor (M-HTR), a derivative of Areva's Antares reactor. The future of the pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) for NGNP is uncertain, as the PBMR consortium partners (Westinghouse, PBMR [Pty] and The Shaw Group) were unable to agree on the path forward for NGNP during 2010. However, during the technology assessment of the conceptual design phase (Phase 1) of the NGNP project, AREVA provided design information and technology assessment of their pebble bed fueled plant design called the HTR-Module concept. AREVA does not intend to pursue this design for NGNP, preferring instead a modular reactor based on the prismatic Antares concept. Since MC&A relevant design information is available for both pebble concepts, the pebble-bed HTGRs considered in this report are: (1) Westinghouse PBMR; and (2) AREVA HTR-Module. The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) sponsors the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program (FCR&D), which contains an element specifically focused on the domestic (or state) aspects of SBD. This Material Protection, Control and Accountancy Technology (MPACT) program supports the present work summarized in this report, namely the development of guidance to support the consideration of MC&A in the design of both pebble-bed and prismatic-fueled HTGRs. The objective is to identify and incorporate design features into the facility design that will cost effectively aid in making MC&A more effective and efficient, with minimum impact on operations. The theft of nuclear material is addressed through both MC&A and physical protection, while the threat of sabotage is addressed principally through physical protection.

Trond Bjornard; John Hockert

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Reactive materials can quickly form plugs for blowout control  

SciTech Connect

Various types of reactive materials, or gunk, can react directly with produced fluids (oil, condensate, or brine) or with an additionally injected fluid to form a plug to kill blowout wells or shut off large flow paths. Several recent blowouts were successfully controlled with reactive plugs; other conventional methods would have been more difficult operationally and cost more. Several plug mixtures are available on the market and can be made to suit the type of application and any particular environmental concerns. With proper planning and application, reactive plugs should be considered as a prime well control method when injection into the blowout flow path is available. This method of blowout control can save significant time and expense. The paper discusses the two basic methods of using reactive fluids depending on the flow path available, the use of cements, application steps, environmental concerns, and three case histories: a horizontal well in Texas, a high pressure, high temperature well offshore Louisiana, and a gas blowout in Argentina.

Flak, L.H. [Wright Boots and Coots, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

367

Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

instrumentation: Improved Design of Nuclear Reactor Control System Developed at: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) Developed...

368

10 CFR Part 1017- Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

10 CFR Part 1017, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information - Establishes the Government-wide policies and procedures for implementing the requirements of section...

369

Nuclear Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using some analytical expressions. Then, the SPICE model parameters are extracted using Silvaco. The

Gihan T. Sayah; Mohamed Abouelatta; Abdelhalim Zekry

370

High Temperature Materials for Nuclear Fast Fission and Fusion Reactors and Advanced Fossil Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of materials plays a crucial role in the economic feasibility of fast nuclear fission and fusion power plant. In order to meet this objective, one of the methods is to extend the fuel burnup and decreasing doubling time. The burnup is largely limited by the void swelling and creep resistances of the fuel cladding and wrapping materials. India's 500 \\{MWe\\} Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is in advanced stage of construction. The major structural materials chosen for PFBR with MOX fuel are alloy D9 as fuel clad and wrapper material, 316LN austenitic stainless steel for reactor components and piping and modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for steam generator. In order to improve the burnup further, titanium, phosphorous and silicon contents in alloy D9 have been optimized for better swelling and creep resistances to develop modified version of alloy D9 as IFAC-1. Creep resistance of inherently void swelling resistance 9Cr-ferritic steel has been improved with the dispersion of nano-size yttria to develop oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel clad tube with long- term creep strength, similar to D9, for increasing the fuel burnup. Development of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel clad tube and 9Cr-1Mo steel wrapper for future metallic fuel reactors being developed for reducing the doubling time are in progress. Extensive studies on resistance of this new generation core materials to void swelling are also under progress along with material development. Improved versions of 316LN stainless steel with nitrogen content of about 0.14 wt.% having higher creep strength to increase the life of fast reactor and modified 9Cr-1Mo steel with reduced nitrogen content and controlled addition of boron to improve type IV cracking resistance for steam generator are other developments. India's participation in ITER programme necessitates the development of India-specific RAFM steel for Test Blanket Module (TBM). A comprehensive research programme is being carried out to develop India-specific 9Cr-W-Ta RAFM steel with the optimization of tungsten and tantalum contents for better combination of strength and toughness. Based of the extensive mechanical tests including impact, tensile, creep and fatigue on four heats of RAFM steels having tungsten in the range 1 2 wt. % and tantalum in the range 0.06 -.014 wt., the RAFM steel having 1.4 wt. % tungsten with 0.06 wt. % tantalum is found to possess better combination of strength and toughness. This steel is considered as India-specific RAFM steel and TBM is being manufactured by this RAFM steel. To limit the emission of green house gases, a research and development programme has been initiated to develop advanced ultra super critical fossil fuel fired thermal power plants working at temperature of around 973 K and pressure of 300 bar. High temperature creep strength super 304H austenitic steel and Inconel 617 superalloy tubes are indigenously developed for this purpose.

T. Jayakumar; M.D. Mathew; K. Laha

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Fall, ID); Lambert, John D. B. (Wheaton, IL); Herzog, James P. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Fixed denial system for access control of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect

The Fixed Denial System (FDS) is a simple, low cost, vertical, underground silo used to store individual nuclear weapons within secured areas of present storage sites. The normal storage position of each weapon is at or near the top of the shaft, allowing rapid operational weapon access and removal. In response to a threat, the weapon within a storage canister can be dropped to the bottom of the shaft where it is automatically locked in place. Once the alert condition is resolved and control of the site reestablished, the weapon canister is unlocked with a coded signal and retrieved. This system offers a high degree of hardening and access denial that is characteristic of Vertical Underground Storage (VUGS) systems. An aboveground test apparatus was constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of using a pneumatic air cushion, which is generated by the free-fall of the weapon container, to control impact velocity and descent time. Stockpile weapons that might be stored in the FDS include the W33, W48, W79, and the W54 ADM.

Willan, V.O.; Gustafson, E.C.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

INFCIRC/207 - Notification to the Agency of Exports and Imports of Nuclear Material  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

INF INF INFCIRC/207 26 July 1974 International Atomic Energy Agency INFORMATION CIRCULAR GENERAL Distr. Original: ENGLISH and RUSSIAN NOTIFICATION TO THE AGENCY OF EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF NUCLEAR MATERIAL On 11 July 1974 the Director General received letters dated 10 July from the Resident Representatives to the Agency of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the United States of America informing him that in the interest of assisting the Agency in its safeguards activities, the Governments of these three Members had decided to provide it henceforth with information on exports and imports of nuclear material. In the light of the wish expressed at the end of these letters their text is reproduced below.

374

UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL LlCENSE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' ,' ' .:,: ' ,' ,,.. : .-: .: .A,.. :. .:,: ' .' :l:. ,:.:,. ,. ."i i..' ./. ' . : :, *:..: ,.a~ :.. ,::;: ;#j ,,. .,.' ' : 8:;) ,,> ,' UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL LlCENSE pp.o-o\ 43 Licensee 1. Name spm%r ch+ti (hlqay 3. 2. Address i%si&t Building Kansas cay 5, ifissouri ~..--. 3. License No. .m4-329 I 4. Exp/rotion Date Sepikmber 30, I.962 -6. Special Nuclear:Material ~~~~SnrichedtoS~ I under this license ia the a-235 i.soto~p. one thoti (1ooo) kgs u-235 Contab$i in mani- etiched ta s$in ths U23.5 / isotope. -- 8. Authorized useFor i&e C' nwiC&. professing Of +ZXlXX enriohd IQ t0 s$-tifie u-235 isoi;ope bn, accordanoe 6th the procedures desczibed ii the, J.ic3x1m3~s ag@kations of Jme 22 andduly 28; 19%

375

Development of nuclear materials accounting for international safeguards: The past, the present, the future  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear materials accountancy was introduced as a primary safeguards measure in international safeguards from the inception of the EURATOM safeguards directorate in 1959 and IAEA safeguards in 1961 with the issuance of INFCIRC 26. As measurement technology evolved and safeguarded facilities increased in both number and size, measurement methodology requirements increased as reflected in INFCIRC 66 (Rev 2.) in 1968 and later in INFCIRC 153 in 1972. Early measurements relied heavily on chemical analysis, but in the 1960s it evolved more and more toward nondestructive assay. Future nuclear materials accountancy systems will increase in complexity, driven by larger and more complex facilities; more stringent health, safety, and environmental considerations; and unattended automation in facility operations. 15 refs.

Markin, J.T.; Augustson, R.H.; Eccleston, G.W.; Hakkila, E.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Novel Processing of Unique Ceramic-Based Nuclear Materials and Fuels  

SciTech Connect

Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These include refractory alloys base on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as those based on silicon carbide (SiCf-SiC); carbon-carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor componets is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the materials used in nuclear fuels and other temperature critical components can lower the center-line fuel temperature and thereby enhance durability and reduce the risk of premature failure.

Hui Zhang; Raman P. Singh

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

377

Monte Carlo Modeling of Photon Interrogation Methods for Characterization of Special Nuclear Material  

SciTech Connect

This work illustrates a methodology based on photon interrogation and coincidence counting for determining the characteristics of fissile material. The feasibility of the proposed methods was demonstrated using a Monte Carlo code system to simulate the full statistics of the neutron and photon field generated by the photon interrogation of fissile and non-fissile materials. Time correlation functions between detectors were simulated for photon beam-on and photon beam-off operation. In the latter case, the correlation signal is obtained via delayed neutrons from photofission, which induce further fission chains in the nuclear material. An analysis methodology was demonstrated based on features selected from the simulated correlation functions and on the use of artificial neural networks. We show that the methodology can reliably differentiate between highly enriched uranium and plutonium. Furthermore, the mass of the material can be determined with a relative error of about 12%. Keywords: MCNP, MCNP-PoliMi, Artificial neural network, Correlation measurement, Photofission

Pozzi, Sara A [ORNL; Downar, Thomas J [ORNL; Padovani, Enrico [Nuclear Engineering Department Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy; Clarke, Shaun D [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Applying radiological emergency planning experience to hazardous materials emergency planning within the nuclear industry  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear industry has extensive radiological emergency planning (REP) experience that is directly applicable to hazardous materials emergency planning. Recently, the Feed Materials Production Center near Cincinnati, Ohio, successfully demonstrated such application. The REP experience includes conceptual bases and standards for developing plans that have been tested in hundreds of full-scale exercises. The exercise program itself is also well developed. Systematic consideration of the differences between chemical and radiological hazards shows that relatively minor changes to the REP bases and standards are necessary. Conduct of full-scale, REP-type exercises serves to test the plans, provide training, and engender confidence and credibility.

Foltman, A.; Newsom, D.; Lerner, K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Leak-Path Factor Analysis for the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

Leak-path factors (LPFs) were calculated for the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) located in the Plutonium Facility, Building 41 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 55. In the unlikely event of an accidental fire powerful enough to fail a container holding actinides, the subsequent release of oxides, modeled as PuO{sub 2} aerosols, from the facility and into the surrounding environment was predicted. A 1-h nondestructive assay (NDA) laboratory fire accident was simulated with the MELCOR severe accident analysis code. Fire-driven air movement along with wind-driven air infiltration transported a portion of these actinides from the building. This fraction is referred to as the leak-path factor. The potential effect of smoke aerosol on the transport of the actinides was investigated to verify the validity of neglecting the smoke as conservative. The input model for the NMSF consisted of a system of control volumes, flow pathways, and surfaces sufficient to model the thermal-hydraulic conditions within the facility and the aerosol transport data necessary to simulate the transport of PuO{sub 2} particles. The thermal-hydraulic, heat-transfer, and aerosol-transport models are solved simultaneously with data being exchanged between models. A MELCOR input model was designed such that it would reproduce the salient features of the fire per the corresponding CFAST calculation. Air infiltration into and out of the facility would be affected strongly by wind-driven differential pressures across the building. Therefore, differential pressures were applied to each side of the building according to guidance found in the ASHRAE handbook using a standard-velocity head equation with a leading multiplier to account for the orientation of the wind with the building. The model for the transport of aerosols considered all applicable transport processes, but the deposition within the building clearly was dominated by gravitational settling.

Shaffer, C.; Leonard, M.

1999-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

380

Insiders and outsiders : nuclear arms control experts in Cold War America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation presents a history of the community of nuclear arms control experts in the United States during the middle and later years of the Cold War, the age of thermonuclear ballistic missiles. Arms control experts ...

Wilson, Benjamin Tyler

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants: Annual report, 1993. Volume 14  

SciTech Connect

Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1993 have been compiled and reported. The summary data for the years 1974 through 1992 are included for comparison. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1993 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized.

Tichler, J.; Doty, K.; Lucadamo, K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Los Alamos National Laboratory new generation standard nuclear material storage container - the SAVY4000 design  

SciTech Connect

Incidents involving release of nuclear materials stored in containers of convenience such as food pack cans, slip lid taped cans, paint cans, etc. has resulted in defense board concerns over the lack of prescriptive performance requirements for interim storage of nuclear materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has shared in these incidents and in response proactively moved into developing a performance based standard involving storage of nuclear material (RD003). This RD003 requirements document has sense been updated to reflect requirements as identified with recently issued DOE M 441.1-1 'Nuclear Material Packaging Manual'. The new packaging manual was issued at the encouragement of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board with a clear directive for protecting the worker from exposure due to loss of containment of stored materials. The Manual specifies a detailed and all inclusive approach to achieve a high level of protection; from package design & performance requirements, design life determinations of limited life components, authorized contents evaluations, and surveillance/maintenance to ensure in use package integrity over time. Materials in scope involve those stored outside an approved engineered-contamination barrier that would result in a worker exposure of in excess of 5 rem Committed Effective Does Equivalent (CEDE). Key aspects of meeting the challenge as developed around the SAVY-3000 vented storage container design will be discussed. Design performance and acceptance criteria against the manual, bounding conditions as established that the user must ensure are met to authorize contents in the package (based upon the activity of heat-source plutonium (90% Pu-238) oxide, which bounds the requirements for weapons-grade plutonium oxide), interface as a safety class system within the facility under the LANL plutonium facility DSA, design life determinations for limited life components, and a sense of design specific surveillance program implementation as LANL moves forward into production and use of the SAVY-3000 will all be addressed. The SAVY-3000 is intended as a work horse package for the DOE complex as a vented storage container primarily for plutonium in solid form.

Stone, Timothy Amos [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A generic material flow control model applied in two industrial sectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of generic planning and control of automated material handling systems (AMHSs). We build upon previous work to provide a proof of concept for generic control of AMHSs in different domains. We present a generic control ... Keywords: Automated material handling systems (AMHSs), Baggage Handling, Distribution, Generic control architecture, Real-time scheduling

S. W. A. Haneyah; P. C. Schuur; J. M. J. Schutten; W. H. M. Zijm

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Business Ymwet Centlsaem: Enclosed is AEC Special Nuclear Material License Yo. SW-551, as  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

c-ii 3-y c-ii 3-y !WL?DF!i 70.424 SW-551, 9s renewed AUG 9 196s cmhustian En&merin~, Inc. %.lelcar Division tYindter, Connecticut ,~ttentionr ?tr. 5. ff. Shfp,penbmg: Business Ymwet Centlsaem: Enclosed is AEC Special Nuclear Material License Yo. SW-551, as renewed. Very tTuly yours, fkmald A. Nusshauaer, Chief Saurce 4 Specfel Wcleer Yaterials Brmch Ofvision of Meterbls Licensing EnClOSUWl W W m , as renwed DISTRIBUTION: Ccaplianee, HQs 2 w/encl. H. j. McAlduff, OR00 w/encl. D. George, ?MM w/mcl. N. Dtilos, ML w/emCl, C. Luke, ML w/end. Br. RF w/encl. Div. RF w/o encl. UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL LICENSE Pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1, Part 70, "Special Nuclear Material Regulations," a license is hereby issued authorizing the licensee

385

Detecting special nuclear materials in suspect containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a suspect container. The system and its method include irradiating the suspect container with a beam of neutrons, so as to induce a thermal fission in a portion of the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the thermal fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

Norman, Eric B. (Oakland, CA); Prussin, Stanley G. (Kensington, CA)

2009-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

386

Detecting special nuclear materials in suspect containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a suspect container. The system and its method include irradiating the suspect container with a beam of neutrons, so as to induce a thermal fission in a portion of the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the thermal fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

Norman, Eric B. (Oakland, CA); Prussin, Stanley G. (Kensington, CA)

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

387

Detecting special nuclear materials in suspect containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a suspect container. The system and its method include irradiating the suspect container with a beam of neutrons, so as to induce a thermal fission in a portion of the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the thermal fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

Norman, Eric B [Oakland, CA; Prussin, Stanley G [Kensington, CA

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

388

Monitoring Thermal Fatigue Damage In Nuclear Power Plant Materials Using Acoustic Emission  

SciTech Connect

Proactive aging management of nuclear power plant passive components requires technologies to enable monitoring and accurate quantification of material condition at early stages of degradation (i.e., pre-macrocrack). Acoustic emission (AE) is well-suited to continuous monitoring of component degradation and is proposed as a method to monitor degradation during accelerated thermal fatigue tests. A key consideration is the ability to separate degradation responses from external sources such as water spray induced during thermal fatigue testing. Water spray provides a significant background of acoustic signals, which can overwhelm AE signals caused by degradation. Analysis of AE signal frequency and energy is proposed in this work as a means for separating degradation signals from background sources. Encouraging results were obtained by applying both frequency and energy filters to preliminary data. The analysis of signals filtered using frequency and energy provides signatures exhibiting several characteristics that are consistent with degradation accumulation in materials. Future work is planned to enable verification of the efficacy of AE for thermal fatigue crack initiation detection. While the emphasis has been placed on the use of AE for crack initiation detection during accelerated aging tests, this work also has implications with respect to the use of AE as a primary tool for early degradation monitoring in nuclear power plant materials. The development of NDE tools for characterization of aging in materials can also benefit from the use of a technology such as AE which can continuously monitor and detect crack initiation during accelerated aging tests.

Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Pitman, Stan G.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Bond, Leonard J.

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

389

Energy Frontier Research Center, Center for Materials Science of Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, has funded the INL as one of the Energy Frontier Research Centers in the area of material science of nuclear fuels. This document is the required annual report to the Office of Science that outlines the accomplishments for the period of May 2010 through April 2011. The aim of the Center for Material Science of Nuclear Fuels (CMSNF) is to establish the foundation for predictive understanding of the effects of irradiation-induced defects on thermal transport in oxide nuclear fuels. The science driver of the centers investigation is to understand how complex defect and microstructures affect phonon mediated thermal transport in UO2, and achieve this understanding for the particular case of irradiation-induced defects and microstructures. The centers research thus includes modeling and measurement of thermal transport in oxide fuels with different levels of impurities, lattice disorder and irradiation-induced microstructure, as well as theoretical and experimental investigation of the evolution of disorder, stoichiometry and microstructure in nuclear fuel under irradiation. With the premise that thermal transport in irradiated UO2 is a phonon-mediated energy transport process in a crystalline material with defects and microstructure, a step-by-step approach will be utilized to understand the effects of types of defects and microstructures on the collective phonon dynamics in irradiated UO2. Our efforts under the thermal transport thrust involved both measurement of diffusive phonon transport (an approach that integrates over the entire phonon spectrum) and spectroscopic measurements of phonon attenuation/lifetime and phonon dispersion. Our distinct experimental efforts dovetail with our modeling effort involving atomistic simulation of phonon transport and prediction of lattice thermal conductivity using the Boltzmann transport framework.

Todd R. Allen, Director

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Evaluating Safeguards Benefits of Process Monitoring as compared with Nuclear Material Accountancy  

SciTech Connect

This paper illustrates potential safeguards benefits that process monitoring (PM) may have as a diversion deterrent and as a complementary safeguards measure to nuclear material accountancy (NMA). This benefit is illustrated by quantifying the standard deviation associated with detecting a considered material diversion scenario using either an NMA-based method or a PM-based approach. To illustrate the benefits of PM for effective safeguards, we consider a reprocessing facility. We assume that the diversion of interest for detection manifests itself as a loss of Pu caused by abnormally operating a dissolver for an extended period to accomplish protracted diversion (or misdirection) of Pu to a retained (unconditioned) waste stream. For detecting the occurrence of this diversion (which involves anomalous operation of the dissolver), we consider two different data evaluation and integration (DEI) approaches, one based on NMA and the other based on PM. The approach based on PM does not directly do mass balance calculations, but rather monitors for the possible occurrence of anomaly patterns related to potential loss of nuclear material. It is thus assumed that the loss of a given mass amount of nuclear material can be directly associated with the execution of proliferation-driven activities that trigger the occurrence of an anomaly pattern consisting of series of events or signatures occurring at different unit operations and time instances. By effectively assessing these events over time and space, the PM-based DEI approach tries to infer whether this specific pattern of events has occurred and how many times within a given time period. To evaluate the goodness of PM, the 3 Sigma of the estimated mass loss is computed under both DEI approaches as function of the number of input batches processed. Simulation results are discussed.

Humberto Garcia; Wen-Chiao Lin; Reed Carlson

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

L1 Adaptive Control of Hysteresis in Smart Materials Xiang Fan and Ralph C. Smith  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L1 Adaptive Control of Hysteresis in Smart Materials Xiang Fan and Ralph C. Smith Center 27695 ABSTRACT Smart materials display coupling between electrical, magnetic, thermal and elastic inherent to smart materials presents a challenge in control of these actuators/sensors. Inverse

392

Compatibility of Space Nuclear Power Plant Materials in an Inert He/Xe Working Gas Containing Reactive Impurities  

SciTech Connect

A major materials selection and qualification issue identified in the Space Materials Plan is the potential for creating materials compatibility problems by combining dissimilar reactor core, Brayton Unit and other power conversion plant materials in a recirculating, inert He/Xe gas loop containing reactive impurity gases. Reported here are results of equilibrium thermochemical analyses that address the compatibility of space nuclear power plant (SNPP) materials in high temperature impure He gas environments. These studies provide early information regarding the constraints that exist for SNPP materials selection and provide guidance for establishing test objectives and environments for SNPP materials qualification testing.

MM Hall

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

A modeling and control approach to advanced nuclear power plants with gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Advanced nuclear power plants are currently being proposed with a number of various designs. However, there is a lack of modeling and control strategies to deal with load following operations. This research investigates a possible modeling approach and load following control strategy for gas turbine nuclear power plants in order to provide an assessment way to the concept designs. A load frequency control strategy and average temperature control mechanism are studied to get load following nuclear power plants. The suitability of the control strategies and concept designs are assessed through linear stability analysis methods. Numerical results are presented on an advanced molten salt reactor concept as an example nuclear power plant system to demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the proposed modeling and load following control strategies.

Gnyaz Ablay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Radiation Resistance of Structural Materials of Nuclear Reactors on Irradiation with High-Energy Hydrogen and Helium Ions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Basic principles of determination of the radiation resistance of structural materials of nuclear reactors with implantation of high-energy hydrogen and helium atoms have been presented. ... them with hydrogen and...

F. F. Komarov; A. F. Komarov; Vl. V. Pil?ko

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Audit Report - The Department of Energy's Management of Surplus Nuclear Materials, OAS-L-13-04  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Management of Surplus Nuclear Materials OAS-L-13-04 January 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE DIRECTOR INTEGRATION ADMINISTRATION FROM: Daniel M. Weeber Assistant Inspector General for Audits and Administration Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION Management of Surplus Nuclear Materials BACKGROUND A primary mission of the Department of Energy design, build and test the Nation' Department's complex was devoted to the production and fabrication of n components. With the end of the C suspended or shutdown. Because Department did not make long term plans for storage or permanent disposition of material, including material that In 2005, the Department chartered

396

Active vibration suppression of a exible structure using smart material and a modular control patch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active vibration suppression of a ¯exible structure using smart material and a modular control of vibration suppression of a ¯exible structure using smart materials and a miniaturized digital controller and was developed by TRW for the United States Air Force for future space vibration control. In this research

397

Implementation of focused ion beam (FIB) system in characterization of nuclear fuels and materials  

SciTech Connect

Beginning in 2007, a program was established at the Idaho National Laboratory to update key capabilities enabling microstructural and micro-chemical characterization of highly irradiated and/or radiologically contaminated nuclear fuels and materials at scales that previously had not been achieved for these types of materials. Such materials typically cannot be contact handled and pose unique hazards to instrument operators, facilities, and associated personnel. One of the first instruments to be acquired was a Dual Beam focused ion beam (FIB)-scanning electron microscope (SEM) to support preparation of transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography samples. Over the ensuing years, techniques have been developed and operational experience gained that has enabled significant advancement in the ability to characterize a variety of fuel types including metallic, ceramic, and coated particle fuels, obtaining insights into in-reactor degradation phenomena not obtainable by any other means. The following article describes insights gained, challenges encountered, and provides examples of unique results obtained in adapting Dual Beam FIB technology to nuclear fuels characterization.

A. Aitkaliyeva; J. W. Madden; B. D. Miller; J I Cole; T A Hyde

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

DOE/DHS INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY PROGRAMS: A MODEL FOR USE IN NUCLEAR FACILITY SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY  

SciTech Connect

Many critical infrastructure sectors have been investigating cyber security issues for several years especially with the help of two primary government programs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National SCADA Test Bed and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program have both implemented activities aimed at securing the industrial control systems that operate the North American electric grid along with several other critical infrastructure sectors (ICS). These programs have spent the last seven years working with industry including asset owners, educational institutions, standards and regulating bodies, and control system vendors. The programs common mission is to provide outreach, identification of cyber vulnerabilities to ICS and mitigation strategies to enhance security postures. The success of these programs indicates that a similar approach can be successfully translated into other sectors including nuclear operations, safeguards, and security. The industry regulating bodies have included cyber security requirements and in some cases, have incorporated sets of standards with penalties for non-compliance such as the North American Electric Reliability Corporation Critical Infrastructure Protection standards. These DOE and DHS programs that address security improvements by both suppliers and end users provide an excellent model for nuclear facility personnel concerned with safeguards and security cyber vulnerabilities and countermeasures. It is not a stretch to imagine complete surreptitious collapse of protection against the removal of nuclear material or even initiation of a criticality event as witnessed at Three Mile Island or Chernobyl in a nuclear ICS inadequately protected against the cyber threat.

Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Cost-Sensitive Classification Methods for the Detection of Smuggled Nuclear Material in Cargo Containers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the container, much like the radiation portal monitors currently in place [24]. For a localized source placed in the center of the cargo container, the near- est detector will be approximately 4 ft away and radiation may have to pass through a significant... with the cargo. This introduces a significant statistical variation to our measurement data, as will be shown in Ch. VI. 4 I.1.3 Current Detection Methods There are several detection systems currently in use to detect nuclear material ? fixed radiation portal...

Webster, Jennifer B

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

400

Trafficking of nuclear materials from the former Soviet Union news abstracts  

SciTech Connect

This report was generated to provide a background for understanding the type and variety of smuggling incidents that have been reported. As discussed in the Site Prioritization report, smuggling cases provide insight into the activities of what has been called ''amateur smuggling'', that is, smugglers who do not belong to a professional smuggling gang. In many instances, the law enforcement officials giving the press release are not familiar with nuclear materials, and give incorrect identification. The other portions of the information, such as number of individuals involved, places, and modes of operation are likely to be more correct.

Erickson, S A; Lawson, T M

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Sandia National Laboratories: control key solar cell material...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2014, in Energy, Materials Science, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Solar Sandia researchers have received a 1.2M award from...

402

Lithium-based surfaces controlling fusion plasma behavior at the plasma-material interface  

SciTech Connect

The plasma-material interface and its impact on the performance of magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas are considered to be one of the key scientific gaps in the realization of nuclear fusion power. At this interface, high particle and heat flux from the fusion plasma can limit the material's lifetime and reliability and therefore hinder operation of the fusion device. Lithium-based surfaces are now being used in major magnetic confinement fusion devices and have observed profound effects on plasma performance including enhanced confinement, suppression and control of edge localized modes (ELM), lower hydrogen recycling and impurity suppression. The critical spatial scale length of deuterium and helium particle interactions in lithium ranges between 5-100 nm depending on the incident particle energies at the edge and magnetic configuration. Lithium-based surfaces also range from liquid state to solid lithium coatings on a variety of substrates (e.g., graphite, stainless steel, refractory metal W/Mo/etc., or porous metal structures). Temperature-dependent effects from lithium-based surfaces as plasma facing components (PFC) include magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability issues related to liquid lithium, surface impurity, and deuterium retention issues, and anomalous physical sputtering increase at temperatures above lithium's melting point. The paper discusses the viability of lithium-based surfaces in future burning-plasma environments such as those found in ITER and DEMO-like fusion reactor devices.

Allain, Jean Paul; Taylor, Chase N. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Avenue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Materials Process Design and Control Laboratory Cornell University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

results Pose and solve questions that provide some insight Ground water remediation and contamination for the development and testing of stochastic multiscale methods Necessitates stochastic multiscaling Ground water remediation, nuclear contamination and enhanced oil recovery Availability of enough input data and comparative

Zabaras, Nicholas J.

404

Operating Experience Level 3, Losing Control: Material Handling Dangers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about the dangers inherent in material handling and the role hazard analysis, work planning, and walkdowns can play in preventing injuries during heavy equipment moves. More than 200 material handling events reported to the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) from January 1, 2010, through August 31, 2014.

405

Operating Experience Level 3, Losting Control: Material Handling Dangers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about the dangers inherent in material handling and the role hazard analysis, work planning, and walkdowns can play in preventing injuries during heavy equipment moves. More than 200 material handling events reported to the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) from January 1, 2010, through August 31, 2014.

406

Transactions of the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these papers include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, refractory alloys and high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D. (eds.)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Transactions of the fifth symposium on space nuclear power systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these paper include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D. (eds.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

A Continuous Automated Vault Inventory System (CAVIS) for accountability monitoring of stored nuclear materials  

SciTech Connect

Nearly all facilities that store hazardous (radioactive or non-radioactive) materials must comply with prevailing federal, state, and local laws. These laws usually have components that require periodic physical inspections to insure that all materials remain safely and securely stored. The inspections are generally labor intensive, slow, put personnel at risk, and only find anomalies after they have occurred. The system described in this paper was developed for monitoring stored nuclear materials resulting from weapons dismantlement, but its applications extend to any storage facility that meets the above criteria. The traditional special nuclear material (SNM) accountability programs, that are currently used within most of the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, require the physical entry of highly trained personnel into SNM storage vaults. This imposes the need for additional security measures, which typically mandate that extra security personnel be present while SNM inventories are performed. These requirements increase labor costs and put additional personnel at risk to radiation exposure. In some cases, individuals have received radiation exposure equivalent to the annual maximum during just one inventory verification. With increasing overhead costs, the current system is rapidly becoming too expensive to operate, the need for an automated method of inventory verification is evident. The Continuous Automated Vault Inventory System (CAVIS) described in this paper was designed and prototyped as a low cost, highly reliable, and user friendly system that is capable of providing, real-time weight, gamma. and neutron energy confirmation from each item stored in a SNM vault. This paper describes the sensor technologies, the CAVIS prototype system (built at Y- 12 for highly enriched uranium storage), the technical requirements that must be achieved to assure successful implementation, and descriptions of sensor technologies needed for a plutonium facility.

Pickett, C.A.; Barham, M.A.; Gafford, T.A.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Jordan, J.K.; Maxey, L.C.; Moran, B.W.; Muhs, J.; Nodine, R.; Simpson, M.L. [and others

1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

409

Nuclear Nonproliferation and Arms Control Primer Prepared for the Blue Ribbon Commission on Americas Nuclear Future  

SciTech Connect

To provide a brief overview of key arms control and nonproliferation arrangements for the layperson that may be relevant to the Commission's comprehensive review of policies for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Primer would be published by the Commission and made publicly available, probably as an appendix to a larger Commission report.

Williams, Laura S.

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

410

Trait, state or artefact? Assessing experts' regulatory focus in nuclear power plant control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We apply the theory of regulatory focus in the field of nuclear power plant (NPP) control. The first pilot study was conducted at the German simulator centre for NPPs. Here, we tested the influence of accident training lessons on the experts' regulatory ... Keywords: Experts, Human factors, Nuclear, Regulatory focus, Self-report measures

Johannes Beck, Armin Eichinger, Klaus Bengler

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Overview on backfill materials and permeable reactive barriers for nuclear waste disposal facilities.  

SciTech Connect

A great deal of money and effort has been spent on environmental restoration during the past several decades. Significant progress has been made on improving air quality, cleaning up and preventing leaching from dumps and landfills, and improving surface water quality. However, significant challenges still exist in all of these areas. Among the more difficult and expensive environmental problems, and often the primary factor limiting closure of contaminated sites following surface restoration, is contamination of ground water. The most common technology used for remediating ground water is surface treatment where the water is pumped to the surface, treated and pumped back into the ground or released at a nearby river or lake. Although still useful for certain remediation scenarios, the limitations of pump-and-treat technologies have recently been recognized, along with the need for innovative solutions to ground-water contamination. Even with the current challenges we face there is a strong need to create geological repository systems for dispose of radioactive wastes containing long-lived radionuclides. The potential contamination of groundwater is a major factor in selection of a radioactive waste disposal site, design of the facility, future scenarios such as human intrusion into the repository and possible need for retrieving the radioactive material, and the use of backfills designed to keep the radionuclides immobile. One of the most promising technologies for remediation of contaminated sites and design of radioactive waste repositories is the use of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). PRBs are constructed of reactive material(s) to intercept and remove the radionuclides from the water and decontaminate the plumes in situ. The concept of PRBs is relatively simple. The reactive material(s) is placed in the subsurface between the waste or contaminated area and the groundwater. Reactive materials used thus far in practice and research include zero valent iron, hydroxyapatite, magnesium oxide, and others. As the contaminant moves through the reactive material, the contaminant is either sorbed by the reactive material or chemically reacts with the material to form a less harmful substance. Because of the high risk associated with failure of a geological repository for nuclear waste, most nations favor a near-field multibarrier engineered system using backfill materials to prevent release of radionuclides into the surrounding groundwater.

Moore, Robert Charles; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Holt, Kathleen Caroline; Hasan, Mahmoud A. (Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, Egypt)

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Princeton and PPPL share in $25 million nuclear arms-control...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Princeton and PPPL share in 25 million nuclear arms-control project By John Greenwald April 10, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Physicists Alexander Glaser,...

413

Princeton and PPPL share in $25 million nuclear arms-control...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Princeton and PPPL share in 25 million nuclear arms-control project By John Greenwald April 10, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook (Photo by Elle StarkmanPPPL...

414

Selecting cases from nuclear families for case-control association analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine the efficiency of a number of schemes to select cases from nuclear families for case-control association analysis using the Genetic Analysis Workshop 14 simulated dataset. We show that with this simula...

Rachael M Moore; Tracy Pinel; Jing Hua Zhao; Ruth March; Ansar Jawaid

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Power System Frequency Control Characteristics as a Function of Nuclear Power Plant Participation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the participation of nuclear power plants in electric power system increases then they have to be ... take an increasing part in the frequency and power control of the power system. However there are specifi...

Z. Domachowski

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Fusion Nuclear Schience Facility-AT: A Material And Component Testing Device  

SciTech Connect

A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is a necessary complement to ITER, especially in the area of materials and components testing, needed for DEMO design development. FNSF-AT, which takes advantage of advanced tokamak (AT) physics should have neutron wall loading of 1-2 MW/m2, continuous operation for periods of up to two weeks, a duty factor goal of 0.3 per year and an accumulated fluence of 3-6 MW-yr/m2 (~30-60 dpa) in ten years to enable the qualification of structural, blanket and functional materials, components and corresponding ancillary equipment necessary for the design and licensing of a DEMO. Base blankets with a ferritic steel structure and selected tritium blanket materials will be tested and used for the demonstration of tritium sufficiency. Additional test ports at the outboard mid-plane will be reserved for test blankets with advanced designs or exotic materials, and electricity production for integrated high fluence testing in a DT fusion spectrum. FNSF-AT will be designed using conservative implementations of all elements of AT physics to produce 150-300 MW fusion power with modest energy gain (Q<7) in a modest sized normal conducting coil device. It will demonstrate and help to select the DEMO plasma facing, structural, tritium breeding, functional materials and ancillary equipment including diagnostics. It will also demonstrate the necessary tritium fuel cycle, design and cooling of the first wall chamber and divertor components. It will contribute to the knowledge on material qualification, licensing, operational safety and remote maintenance necessary for DEMO design

Wong, C. P.; Chan, V. S.; Garofalo, A. M.; Stambaugh, Ron; Sawan, M.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Merrill, Brad

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

New Functional Materials for Fluid Control and Sensing in Microfluidic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Ionic Liquids as Green Solvents: Progress and Prospects, American Chemical Soceity, 2003. N H H H + NO3* interactions (excellent solvents for a wide range of inorganic, organic, and polymeric materials) broad liquid

Lee, Hyowon

418

Controlling Performance of Laminated Composites Using Piezoelectric Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composite materials are increasingly used in aerospace, underwater, and automotive structures. Their use in structural applications is dictated by the outstanding strength and stiffness while being lightweight in addition to their flexibility...

Hasan, Zeaid

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

419

Astrophysicist and founder of controlled nuclear fusion research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... nurtured the construction of the Hubble Space Telescope. And he proposed a method to control thermonuclear ...

George B. Field; John N. Bahcall

1997-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have concluded, however, that with adequate engineered cooling of the vessel, the A508/533 steels are also acceptable.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

OVERVIEW OF A RECONFIGURABLE SIMULATOR FOR MAIN CONTROL ROOM UPGRADES IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides background on a reconfigurable control room simulator for nuclear power plants. The main control rooms in current nuclear power plants feature analog technology that is growing obsolete. The need to upgrade control rooms serves the practical need of maintainability as well as the opportunity to implement newer digital technologies with added functionality. There currently exists no dedicated research simulator for use in human factors design and evaluation activities for nuclear power plant modernization in the U.S. The new research simulator discussed in this paper provides a test bed in which operator performance on new control room concepts can be benchmarked against existing control rooms and in which new technologies can be validated for safety and usability prior to deployment.

Ronald L. Boring

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Transfer of excess nuclear material from Los Alamos to Savannah River site for long-term disposition  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory is preparing excess nuclear material for shipment to Savannah River Site (SRS) for final disposition. Prior to shipment the nuclear material will be stabilized and packaged to meet strict criteria. The criterion that must be met include: (1) the DOE stabilization, packaging and storage requirements for plutonium bearing materials, DOE-STD-3013, (2) shipping container packaging requirements, (3) SRS packaging and storage criteria, and (4) DOE Material Disposition criteria for either immobilization or MOX reactor fuel. Another issue in preparing for this transfer is the DOE certification of shipping containers and the availability of shipping containers. This transfer of the nuclear material is fully supported by the EM, DP and NN Sections of the DOE, as well as, by LANL and SRS, yet a strong collaboration is needed to meet all established requirements relating to stabilization, packaging, shipment, storage and final disposition. This paper will present the overall objectives, the issues and the planned strategy to accomplish this nuclear material transfer.

Hoth, C. W. (Carl W.); Yarbro, T. F. (Tresa F.); Foster, Lynn A.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Virtual real-time inspection of nuclear material via VRML and secure web pages  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories` Straight Line project is working to provide the right sensor information to the right user to enhance the safety, security, and international accountability of nuclear material. One of Straight Line`s efforts is to create a system to securely disseminate this data on the Internet`s World-Wide-Web. To make the user interface more intuitive, Sandia has generated a three dimensional VRML (virtual reality modeling language) interface for a secure web page. This paper will discuss the implementation of the Straight Line secure 3-D web page. A discussion of the ``pros and cons`` of a 3-D web page is also presented. The public VRML demonstration described in this paper can be found on the Internet at the following address: http://www.ca.sandia.gov/NMM/. A Netscape browser, version 3 is strongly recommended.

Nilsen, C.; Jortner, J.; Damico, J.; Friesen, J.; Schwegel, J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

FY05 LDRD Final Report Sensor Fusion for Regional Monitoring of Nuclear Materials with Ubiquitous Detection  

SciTech Connect

The detection of the unconventional delivery of a nuclear weapon or the illicit transport of fissile materials is one of the most crucial, and difficult, challenges facing us today in national security. A wide array of radiation detectors are now being deployed domestically and internationally to address this problem. This initial deployment will be followed by radiation detection systems, composed of intelligent, networked devices intended to supplement the choke-point perimeter systems with more comprehensive broad-area, or regional coverage. Cataloging and fusing the data from these new detection systems will clearly be one of the most significant challenges in radiation-based security systems. We present here our results from our first 6 months of effort on this project. We anticipate the work will continue as part of the Predictive Knowledge System Strategic Initiative.

Labov, S E; Craig, W W

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Modeling most likely pathways for smuggling radioactive and special nuclear materials on a worldwide multi-modal transportation network  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear weapons proliferation is an existing and growing worldwide problem. To help with devising strategies and supporting decisions to interdict the transport of nuclear material, we developed the Pathway Analysis, Threat Response and Interdiction Options Tool (PATRIOT) that provides an analytical approach for evaluating the probability that an adversary smuggling radioactive or special nuclear material will be detected during transit. We incorporate a global, multi-modal transportation network, explicit representation of designed and serendipitous detection opportunities, and multiple threat devices, material types, and shielding levels. This paper presents the general structure of PATRIOT, all focuses on the theoretical framework used to model the reliabilities of all network components that are used to predict the most likely pathways to the target.

Saeger, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cuellar, Leticia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

426

Modeling most likely pathways for smuggling radioactive and special nuclear materials on a worldwide multimodal transportation network  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear weapons proliferation is an existing and growing worldwide problem. To help with devising strategies and supporting decisions to interdict the transport of nuclear material, we developed the Pathway Analysis, Threat Response and Interdiction Options Tool (PATRIOT) that provides an analytical approach for evaluating the probability that an adversary smuggling radioactive or special nuclear material will be detected during transit. We incorporate a global, multi-modal transportation network, explicit representation of designed and serendipitous detection opportunities, and multiple threat devices, material types, and shielding levels. This paper presents the general structure of PATRIOT, and focuses on the theoretical framework used to model the reliabilities of all network components that are used to predict the most likely pathways to the target.

Saeger, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cuellar, Leticia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Barcode Automation (BCAuto) for Los Alamos Material Control and Accountability System  

SciTech Connect

The plutonium facility is actively processing material on a daily basis at LANL (4000-5000 transactions/month): (1) Physical operations, material transformations, material mixing, splitting, etc.; and (2) Electronic manipulations resulting primarily from updated NDA measurements. Improvements in efficiency and effectiveness are essential due to impacts of recent Voluntary Separation Program and the need to meet mission requirements with fewer personnel. New storage requirements (DOE M 441.1-1, Nuclear Material Packaging Manual) to protect worker safety require tracking of material and its corresponding container over long periods of time. Material at Risk tracking is essential to protect public safety and to ensure continuous operations to meet national security mission needs.

Martinez, Benny J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chang, Hee Jin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

428

A Comparison Between Model Reduction and Controller Reduction: Application to a PWR Nuclear Planty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Comparison Between Model Reduction and Controller Reduction: Application to a PWR Nuclear Planty@csam.ucl.ac.be, Gevers@csam.ucl.ac.be 2 Electricite de France, Direction des Etudes et Recherches, 6 Quai Watier, F-78041 of a controller for the secondary circuit of a nu- clear Pressurized Water Reactor, leading to the conclu- sions

Gevers, Michel

429

Selection of candidate canister materials for high-level nuclear waste containment in a tuff repository  

SciTech Connect

A repository located at Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site is a potential site for permanent geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The repository can be located in a horizon in welded tuff, a volcanic rock, which is above the static water level at this site. The environmental conditions in this unsaturated zone are expected to be air and water vapor dominated for much of the containment period. Type 304L stainless steel is the reference material for fabricating canisters to contain the solid high-level wastes. Alternative stainless alloys are considered because of possible susceptibility of 304L to localized and stress forms of corrosion. For the reprocessed glass wastes, the canisters serve as the recipient for pouring the glass with the result that a sensitized microstructure may develop because of the times at elevated temperatures. Corrosion testing of the reference and alternative materials has begun in tuff-conditioned water and steam environments. 21 references, 8 figures, 8 tables.

McCright, R.D.; Weiss, H.; Juhas, M.C.; Logan, R.W.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Epilayer control of photodeposited materials during UV photocatalysis  

SciTech Connect

Epilayer control of photoassisted oxidation and reduction on the ferroelectric PbTiO{sub 3} polar surface was investigated. Photo-oxidation of a AgNO{sub 3} electrolyte resulting in formation of Ag{sub 7}NO{sub 11} particles was observed on the PbTiO{sub 3}/Nb:SrTiO{sub 3} film surface; whereas PbTiO{sub 3}/SrRuO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} leads to AgNO{sub 3} reduction under UV illumination. The oxidation reaction resulting in the formation of Ag{sub 7}NO{sub 11} is explained in terms of a rectifying interface between PbTiO{sub 3} and Nb:SrTiO{sub 3}, controlling the charge transport during UV photocatalysis.

Takahashi, R.; Dahl, O.; Grepstad, J. K.; Tybell, T. [Department of Electronics and Telecommunications, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, OS Bragstads plass 2A, Trondheim 7491 (Norway); Katayama, M.; Matsumoto, Y. [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midoriku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

431

Office of Nuclear Warhead Protection | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Warhead Protection | National Nuclear Security Warhead Protection | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Office of Nuclear Warhead Protection Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices > Office of International Material Protection and Cooperation > Material Protection, Control and Accounting

432

Multidimensional effects in optimal control analysis for nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

Physically realistic step function control rod models are shown to be unsolvable under traditional formulations of distributed parameter optimal control theory. Extensions to the theory are proposed and derived to allow these systems to be analyzed using straightforward optimality conditions. The extended theory is then applied to a xenon-iodine oscillation problem in two dimensions. The conditions of optimality are found, and analytical insights concerning the importance of the control rod tip for the optimality condition are obtained. The flux influence function is found by solving an eigenvalue problem, and the required normalization condition is found in one of the optimality conditions. The optimality and normalization conditions are solved numerically for a severe xenon transient, and the transient is stabilized by the intervention of the optimal control.

Wyss, G.D.; Alford, R.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Remote controlled tool systems for nuclear sites have subsea applications  

SciTech Connect

Remotely operated underwater tool systems designed to operate in Nuclear Fuel Storage Basins can be applied to deep water, subsea oilfield applications. Spent nuclear fuel rods re stored underwater in large indoor swimming pool-like facilities where the water cover shields the workers from the radiation. This paper describes three specialized tooling systems that were designed and built by Sonsub for work at the Department of Energy`s Hanford site. The Door Seal Tool removed an existing seal system, cleaned a 20 ft. tall, carbon steel, underwater hatch and installed a new stainless steel gasket surface with underwater epoxy. The Concrete Sampling Tool was built to take core samples from the vertical, concrete walls of the basins. The tool has three hydraulic drills with proprietary hollow core drill bits to cut and retrieve the concrete samples. The Rack Saw remotely attached itself to a structure, cut a variety of steel shapes and pipes, and retained the cut pieces for retrieval. All of these systems are remotely operated with onboard video cameras and debris collection systems. The methods and equipment proven in this application are available to refurbish sealing surfaces and to drill or sample concrete in offshore oil field applications.

Bath, B.; Yemington, C. [Sonsub Environmental Services, Houston, TX (United States); Kuhta, B. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Understanding and controlling low-temperature aging of nanocrystalline materials.  

SciTech Connect

Nanocrystalline copper lms were created by both repetitive high-energy pulsed power, to produce material without internal nanotwins; and pulsed laser deposition, to produce nan- otwins. Samples of these lms were indented at ambient (298K) and cryogenic temperatures by immersion in liquid nitrogen (77K) and helium (4K). The indented samples were sectioned through the indented regions and imaged in a scanning electron microscope. Extensive grain growth was observed in the lms that contained nanotwins and were indented cryogenically. The lms that either lacked twins, or were indented under ambient conditions, were found to exhibit no substantial grain growth by visual inspection. Precession transmission elec- tron microscopy was used to con rm these ndings quantitatively, and show that 3 and 7 boundaries proliferate during grain growth, implying that these interface types play a key role in governing the extensive grain growth observed here. Molecular dynamics sim- ulations of the motion of individual grain boundaries demonstrate that speci c classes of boundaries - notably 3 and 7 - exhibit anti- or a-thermal migration, meaning that their mobilities either increase or do not change signi cantly with decreasing temperature. An in-situ cryogenic indentation capability was developed and implemented in a transmission electron microscope. Preliminary results do not show extensive cryogenic grain growth in indented copper lms. This discrepancy could arise from the signi cant di erences in con g- uration and loading of the specimen between the two approaches, and further research and development of this capability is needed.

Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Boyce, Brad Lee; Brons, Justin G.; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Holm, Elizabeth Ann; Padilla, Henry A.,; Sharon, John Anthony; Thompson, Gregory B.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Amended Record of Decision for the Interim Management of Nuclear Materials (DOE/EIS-0220) (1/26/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

88 88 Federal Register / Vol. 66, No. 18 / Friday, January 26, 2001 / Notices 1 A ''pit'' is a nuclear weapon component. 2 A physical blend of uranium oxide and plutonium oxide. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Interim Management of Nuclear Materials AGENCY: Department of Energy ACTION: Amended record of decision. SUMMARY: On December 12, 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Record of Decision (ROD) and Notice of Preferred Alternatives, 60 FR 65300 (December 19, 1995), for the final environmental impact statement, Interim Management of Nuclear Materials (IMNM EIS) (DOE/EIS-0220, October 20, 1995), at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. As part of its decision, DOE decided to construct a new facility, the Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility (APSF), to prepare, package, and store

436

Fundamental Processes of Coupled Radiation Damage and Mechanical Behavior in Nuclear Fuel Materials for High Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work has been to elucidate the relationship among microstructure, radiation damage and mechanical properties for nuclear fuel materials. As representative nuclear materials, we have taken an hcp metal (Mg as a generic metal, and Ti alloys for fast reactors) and UO2 (representing fuel). The degradation of the thermo-mechanical behavior of nuclear fuels under irradiation, both the fissionable material itself and its cladding, is a longstanding issue of critical importance to the nuclear industry. There are experimental indications that nanocrystalline metals and ceramics may be more resistant to radiation damage than their coarse-grained counterparts. The objective of this project look at the effect of microstructure on radiation damage and mechanical behavior in these materials. The approach to be taken was state-of-the-art, large-scale atomic-level simulation. This systematic simulation program of the effects of irradiation on the structure and mechanical properties of polycrystalline Ti and UO2 identified radiation damage mechanisms. Moreover, it will provided important insights into behavior that can be expected in nanocrystalline microstructures and, by extension, nanocomposites. The fundamental insights from this work can be expected to help in the design microstructures that are less susceptible to radiation damage and thermomechanical degradation.

Simon Phillpot; James Tulenko

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

437

ATTN: Document Control Desk U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station as indicated by Reference (1). In Reference (2), Entergy provided the analysis for the reactor pressure vessel feedwater nozzles. In Reference (3), the NRC, in License Condition 4, established the requirement for Entergy to submit the confirmatory analyses for the recirculation outlet nozzle and core spray nozzle at least two years prior to the period of extended operation. In Reference (4), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board (ASLB) ordered Entergy to submit the results of the analysis for the core spray and recirculation outlet nozzles prior to a final ruling of Contentions 2A and 2B. Confirmatory analysis for the recirculation outlet and core spray nozzles was submitted to the NRC and ASLB in Reference (5) on January 15, 2009. Based on recent revisions to the recirculation outlet and core spray nozzle confirmatory

Vermont Yankee

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Dual annular rotating [open quotes]windowed[close quotes] nuclear reflector reactor control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core. 4 figures.

Jacox, M.G.; Drexler, R.L.; Hunt, R.N.M.; Lake, J.A.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

439

Agent-based Control for Material Handling Systems in In-House Logistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agent-based Control for Material Handling Systems in In-House Logistics Towards Cyber-Physical Systems in In-House-Logistics Utilizing Realsize Evaluation of Agent-based Material Handling Technology Werthmann Intelligent Production and Logistics Systems BIBA ­ Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik

440

Estimation and Control Related Issues in Smart Material Structures and Fluids \\Lambda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimation and Control Related Issues in Smart Material Structures and Fluids \\Lambda H.T. Banks. These are in actuality smart material systems which involve combinations of advanced sensors, actuators arising in a class of magnetorheological­based smart elastomers. The dynamic models, intended for use

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nuclear material control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

RECENT ADVANCES IN SMART-MATERIAL ROTOR CONTROL ACTUATION. Victor Giurgiutiu*,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RECENT ADVANCES IN SMART-MATERIAL ROTOR CONTROL ACTUATION. Victor Giurgiutiu*, University of South achievements in the application of active-materials actuation to counteract aeroelastic and vibration effects and capabilities is done first. Attention is focused on the smart rotor-blade applications. The induced twist

Giurgiutiu, Victor

442

Workshop materials from the 2nd international training course on physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials, Module 13  

SciTech Connect

This course is intended for representatives of countries where nuclear power is being developed and whose responsibilities include the preparation of regulation and the design and evaluation of physical protection systems. This is the second of two volumes; the first volume is SAND-79-1090. (DLC)

Martin, F. P. [ed.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented of work performed on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Included are the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described, including screening creep results and metallographic analysis for materials thermally exposed or tested at 750, 850, and 950/sup 0/C.

Not Available

1980-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

444

Instrumentation and Controls evaluation for space nuclear power systems  

SciTech Connect

Design of control and protection systems should be coordinated with the design of the neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and mechanical aspects of the core and plant at the earliest possible stage of concept development. An integrated systematic design approach is necessary to prevent uncoordinated choices in one technology area from imposing impractical or impossible requirements in another. Significant development and qualification will be required for virtually every aspect of reactor control and instrumentation. In-core instrumentation widely used in commercial light water reactors will not likely be usable in the higher temperatures of a space power plant. Thermocouples for temperature measurement and gamma thermometers for flux measurement appear to be the only viable candidates. Recent developments in ex-core neutron detectors may provide achievable alternatives to in-core measurements. Reliable electronic equipment and high-temperature actuators will require major development efforts.

Anderson, J.L.; Oakes, L.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Passive Ozone Control Through Use of Reactive Indoor Wall and Ceiling Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passive Ozone Control Through Use of Reactive Indoor Wall and Ceiling Materials Paper # 715 Donna A and unpainted drywall as passive ozone control surfaces in a room-sized laboratory chamber. Mean deposition-50%, resulted in increased reactivity for activated carbon. In our model for a typical house, about 35

Siegel, Jeffrey

446

Self-actuating and locking control for nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-actuating, self-locking flow cutoff valve particularly suited for use in a nuclear reactor of the type which utilizes a plurality of fluid support neutron absorber elements to provide for the safe shutdown of the reactor. The valve comprises a substantially vertical elongated housing and an aperture plate located in the housing for the flow of fluid therethrough, a substantially vertical elongated nozzle member located in the housing and affixed to the housing with an opening in the bottom for receiving fluid and apertures adjacent a top end for discharging fluid. The nozzle further includes two sealing means, one located above and the other below the apertures. Also located in the housing and having walls surrounding the nozzle is a flow cutoff sleeve having a fluid opening adjacent an upper end of the sleeve, the sleeve being moveable between an upper open position wherein the nozzle apertures are substantially unobstructed and a closed position wherein the sleeve and nozzle sealing surfaces are mated such that the flow of fluid through the apertures is obstructed. It is a particular feature of the present invention that the valve further includes a means for utilizing any increase in fluid pressure to maintain the cutoff sleeve in a closed position. It is another feature of the invention that there is provided a means for automatically closing the valve whenever the flow of fluid drops below a predetermined level.

Chung, Dong K. (Chatsworth, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

DrControl --An Interactive Course Material for Teaching Control Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8th Modelica Conference, Dresden, Germany, March 20-22, 2011 801 #12;2.1 DrControl ApplicationControl for teaching control theory concepts mixed together with exercises and example models in Modelica. The active tool for teaching, experimentation, simulation, scripting, model documentation, storage, etc. Keywords

Zhao, Yuxiao

448

Method of installing a control room console in a nuclear power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Standard format and content acceptance criteria for the Material Control and Accounting (MC and A) Reform Amendment: 10 CFR Part 74, Subpart E. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

In 1987 the NRC revised the material control and accounting requirements for NRC licensees authorized to possess and use a formula quantity (i.e., 5 formula kilograms or more) of strategic special nuclear material. Those revisions issued as 10 CFR 74.51-59 require timely monitoring of in-process inventory and discrete items to detect anomalies potentially indicative of material losses. Timely detection and enhanced loss localization capabilities are beneficial to alarm resolution and also for material recovery in the event of an actual loss. NUREG-1280 was issued in 1987 to present criteria that could be used by applicants, licensees, and NRC license reviewers in the initial preparation and subsequent review of fundamental nuclear material control (FNMC) plans submitted in response to the Reform Amendment. This document is also intended for both licensees and license reviewers with respect to FNMC plan revisions. General performance objectives, system capabilities, process monitoring, item monitoring, alarm resolution, quality assurance, and accounting are addressed. This revision to NUREG-1280 is an expansion of the initial edition, which clarifies and expands upon several topics and addresses issues identified under Reform Amendment implementation experience.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Analysis and section of processes for the disposition of excess fissile material from nuclear weapon dismantlement in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The end of the cold war and the acceleration of nuclear disarmament efforts by the United States (US) and Russia are generating large quantities of surplus fissile nuclear materials that are no longer needed for military purposes. The safe and secure disposition of this surplus material to prevent theft or reuse in weapons has become a high priority for the US Department of Energy (USDOE). Many options exist for storage and disposition (use or disposal) of these surplus materials. The criteria, which have been developed from the basis for a preliminary ``screening`` of options, to eliminate from further consideration those options that do not meet minimal requirements. Factors, or attributes, contained in the screening and selection criteria include: (1) resistance to theft and diversion by unauthorized parties, (2) resistance to retrieval, extraction, and reuse by the host nation, (3) technical viability, (4) environmental, safety, and health impacts, (5) cost effectiveness, (6) timeliness, (7) fostering of progress and cooperation with Russia and others, (8) public and institutional acceptance, and (9) additional benefits. The evaluation of environmental impacts, in accordance with the US National Environmental Policy Ac (NEPA) process, is an integral part of the overall evaluation process. Because of the variety of physical and chemical forms of the nuclear material inventory, and because of the large number of possible disposition technologies and final forms, several hundred possible pathways to disposition have been defined and have undergone a systematic selection process. Also, because nuclear material disposition will have far ranging impacts, extensive public, in the form of public and stakeholder, input was integral to the selection process.