National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for nuclear magnetic resonance

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-07-03

    A method of imaging a body by nuclear magnetic resonance wherein volume scanning of a region of the body is achieved by scanning a first planar slice of the region and at least one further slice of the region in the relaxation time for the scan of the first slice.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ordidge, R. J.; Mansfield, P.

    1985-04-02

    This invention provides methods of investigating a body by nuclear magnetic resonance. Nuclear magnetic resonance is preferentially excited in a slice of the body and the resulting free induction decay signals are detected in the presence of a magnetic field having first and second gradients (G /SUB y/ , G /SUB x/ ). In one proposed method two experiments are performed in which the phase of the first gradient (G /SUB y/ ) reversal is opposite, and the detected signals from the two experiments are edited to obtain a set of signals, for Fourier transformation, occurring when the first gradient has one sense. Two such sets may be obtained, one for each sense of the first gradient, and the data obtained after Fourier transformation re-ordered and added. In a second proposed method the second gradient (G /SUB x/ ) is applied only when the first gradient (G /SUB y/ ) has a given sense, and the free induction decay signals obtained when both gradients are present, and when only the first gradient is present, are separately processed. In a third proposed method, the first gradient (G /SUB y/ ) is temporarily removed before each reversal of its sense, and the second gradient (G /SUB x/ ) is reversed while the first gradient is removed, the magnitude of the second gradient being controlled so that the time integral of the second gradient at the beginning of each period when the first gradient has a given sense is the same as at the end of the preceding such period, the free induction decay signals occurring when the first gradient has said given sense only being used for data retrieval.

  3. Edward Purcell and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Purcell first observed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in 1945 while working at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Radiation Laboratory in an after-hours experiment. ...

  4. Edward Purcell and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Edward Mills Purcell and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Resources with Additional Information Edward M. Purcell was awarded the 1952 Nobel Prize in Physics for his "development...

  5. Edward Purcell and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edward Mills Purcell and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Resources with Additional Information Edward M. Purcell was awarded the 1952 Nobel Prize in Physics for his "development of new methods for nuclear magnetic precision measurements and discoveries in connection therewith". Purcell first observed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in 1945 while working at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Radiation Laboratory in an after-hours experiment. Edward M. Purcell Courtesy

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Paul H.; Brainard, James R.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1997-01-01

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC.sub.16 H.sub.14 N.sub.6. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of ammonia diffusion in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of ammonia diffusion in dense solid-liquid slurries. Revision 1 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear magnetic resonance ...

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance in Kondo lattice systems (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance in Kondo lattice systems This content will become publicly available on May 13, 2017 Prev Next Title: Nuclear magnetic resonance in Kondo lattice ...

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239 Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239 Fingerprint of element found by LANL/Japanese team. May 29, 2012 How would the detonation of a nuclear energy source afffect an incoming asteroid? Georgios Koutroulakis and H. Yasuoka in the condensed-matter NMR lab at Los Alamos National Laboratory after having observed the magnetic resonance signal of Pu 239 for the first time. Get Expertise Scientist Eric Bauer Condensed

  11. Selectivity in multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, W.S.

    1980-11-01

    The observation of multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance transitions in isotropic or anisotropic liquids is shown to give readily interpretable information on molecular configurations, rates of motional processes, and intramolecular interactions. However, the observed intensity of high multiple-quantum transitions falls off dramatically as the number of coupled spins increases. The theory of multiple-quantum NMR is developed through the density matrix formalism, and exact intensities are derived for several cases (isotropic first-order systems and anisotropic systems with high symmetry) to shown that this intensity decrease is expected if standard multiple-quantum pulse sequences are used. New pulse sequences are developed which excite coherences and produce population inversions only between selected states, even though other transitions are simultaneously resonant. One type of selective excitation presented only allows molecules to absorb and emit photons in groups of n. Coherent averaging theory is extended to describe these selective sequences, and to design sequences which are selective to arbitrarily high order in the Magnus expansion. This theory and computer calculations both show that extremely good selectivity and large signal enhancements are possible.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance implementation of a quantum clock synchronization algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Jingfu; Long, G.C; Liu Wenzhang; Deng Zhiwei; Lu Zhiheng

    2004-12-01

    The quantum clock synchronization (QCS) algorithm proposed by Chuang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2006 (2000)] has been implemented in a three qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum system. The time difference between two separated clocks can be determined by measuring the output states. The experimental realization of the QCS algorithm also demonstrates an application of the quantum phase estimation.

  13. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  14. I. I. Rabi, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), and Radar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I. I. Rabi, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), and Radar Resources with Additional Information I.I. Rabi Courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory 'Isidor Isaac Rabi [was] a pioneer in exploring the atom and a major force in 20th-century physics.'1 He won the 1944 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his resonance method for recording the magnetic properties of atomic nuclei". 'His work in turn made possible the precise measurements necessary for the development of the atomic clock, the laser

  15. Natural Abundance 17O Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Computational Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Studies of Lithium Based Liquid Electrolytes - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research March 14, 2015, Research Highlights Natural Abundance 17O Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Computational Modeling Studies of Lithium Based Liquid Electrolytes (Top) Example of natural abundance 17O NMR spectra of LiTFSI in mixture of EC, PC and EMC (4:1:5 by weight). (Bottom) The solvation structure of LiTFSI derived from the results obtained by both NMR and quantum chemistry calculations Scientific

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with hyper-polarized noble gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, D.M.; George, J.S.; Penttila, S.I.; Caprihan, A.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a six-month, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The nuclei of noble gases can be hyper polarized through a laser-driven spin exchange to a degree many orders of magnitude larger than that attainable by thermal polarization without requiring a strong magnetic field. The increased polarization from the laser pumping enables a good nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal from a gas. The main goal of this project was to demonstrate diffusion-weighted imaging of such hyper-polarized noble gas with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Possible applications include characterizing porosity of materials and dynamically imaging pressure distributions in biological or acoustical systems.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heaney, M.B. . Dept. of Physics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 {times} 10{sup 17} in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO{sub 3} crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  18. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, Non Q.; Clarke, John

    1993-01-01

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced.

  19. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, N.Q.; Clarke, J.

    1993-10-19

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced. 7 figures.

  20. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance of quadrupolar systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Shuanhu

    1997-09-17

    This dissertation describes two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance theory and experiments which have been developed to study quadruples in the solid state. The technique of multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) is extensively reviewed and expanded upon in this thesis. Specifically, MQMAS is first compared with another technique, dynamic-angle spinning (DAS). The similarity between the two techniques allows us to extend much of the DAS work to the MQMAS case. Application of MQMAS to a series of aluminum containing materials is then presented. The superior resolution enhancement through MQMAS is exploited to detect the five- and six-coordinated aluminum in many aluminosilicate glasses. Combining the MQMAS method with other experiments, such as HETCOR, greatly expands the possibility of the use of MQMAS to study a large range of problems and is demonstrated in Chapter 5. Finally, the technique switching-angle spinning (SAS) is applied to quadrupolar nuclei to fully characterize a quadrupolar spin system in which all of the 8 NMR parameters are accurately determined. This dissertation is meant to demonstrate that with the combination of two-dimensional NMR concepts and new advanced spinning technologies, a series of multiple-dimensional NMR techniques can be designed to allow a detailed study of quadrupolar nuclei in the solid state.

  1. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laws, David D.

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone ({phi}/{psi}) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined {sup 13}C{sub a}, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of {alpha}-helical and {beta}-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly {beta}-sheet.

  2. Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (NMR) Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Resources with Additional Information Computed Tomography (CT) Scanner CT Scanner - Courtesy Stanford University Department of Energy Resources Engineering Computed tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) have been used to resolve industrial problems, for materials characterizations, and to provide non-destructive evaluations for discovering flaws in parts before their use, resulting in

  3. Towards a beyond 1 GHz solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance: External lock operation in an external current mode for a 500 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Masato; Maeda, Hideaki; Ebisawa, Yusuke; Tennmei, Konosuke; Yanagisawa, Yoshinori; Nakagome, Hideki; Hosono, Masami; Takasugi, Kenji; Hase, Takashi; Miyazaki, Takayoshi; Fujito, Teruaki; Kiyoshi, Tsukasa; Yamazaki, Toshio

    2012-10-15

    Achieving a higher magnetic field is important for solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). But a conventional low temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet cannot exceed 1 GHz (23.5 T) due to the critical magnetic field. Thus, we started a project to replace the Nb{sub 3}Sn innermost coil of an existing 920 MHz NMR (21.6 T) with a Bi-2223 high temperature superconducting (HTS) innermost coil. Unfortunately, the HTS magnet cannot be operated in persistent current mode; an external dc power supply is required to operate the NMR magnet, causing magnetic field fluctuations. These fluctuations can be stabilized by a field-frequency lock system based on an external NMR detection coil. We demonstrate here such a field-frequency lock system in a 500 MHz LTS NMR magnet operated in an external current mode. The system uses a {sup 7}Li sample in a microcoil as external NMR detection system. The required field compensation is calculated from the frequency of the FID as measured with a frequency counter. The system detects the FID signal, determining the FID frequency, and calculates the required compensation coil current to stabilize the sample magnetic field. The magnetic field was stabilized at 0.05 ppm/3 h for magnetic field fluctuations of around 10 ppm. This method is especially effective for a magnet with large magnetic field fluctuations. The magnetic field of the compensation coil is relatively inhomogeneous in these cases and the inhomogeneity of the compensation coil can be taken into account.

  4. High temperature spin dynamics in linear magnetic chains, molecular rings, and segments by nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adelnia, Fatemeh; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Mariani, Manuel; Ammannato, Luca; Caneschi, Andrea; Rovai, Donella; Winpenny, Richard; Timco, Grigore; Corti, Maurizio Borsa, Ferdinando

    2015-05-07

    We present the room temperature proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) results in two 1D spin chains: the Heisenberg antiferromagnetic (AFM) Eu(hfac){sub 3}NITEt and the magnetically frustrated Gd(hfac){sub 3}NITEt. The NSLR as a function of external magnetic field can be interpreted very well in terms of high temperature spin dynamics dominated by a long time persistence of the decay of the two-spin correlation function due to the conservation of the total spin value for isotropic Heisenberg chains. The high temperature spin dynamics are also investigated in Heisenberg AFM molecular rings. In both Cr{sub 8} closed ring and in Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 8}Zn open rings, i.e., model systems for a finite spin segment, an enhancement of the low frequency spectral density is found consistent with spin diffusion but the high cut-off frequency due to intermolecular anisotropic interactions prevents a detailed analysis of the spin diffusion regime.

  5. Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keating, Kristina; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2015-02-24

    This documents contains the final report for the project "Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods" (DE-SC0007049) Executive Summary: Our research aimed to develop borehole measurement techniques capable of monitoring subsurface processes, such as changes in pore geometry and iron/sulfur geochemistry, associated with remediation of heavy metals and radionuclides. Previous work has demonstrated that geophysical method spectral induced polarization (SIP) can be used to assess subsurface contaminant remediation; however, SIP signals can be generated from multiple sources limiting their interpretation value. Integrating multiple geophysical methods, such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic susceptibility (MS), with SIP, could reduce the ambiguity of interpretation that might result from a single method. Our research efforts entails combining measurements from these methods, each sensitive to different mineral forms and/or mineral-fluid interfaces, providing better constraints on changes in subsurface biogeochemical processes and pore geometries significantly improving our understanding of processes impacting contaminant remediation. The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site was used as a test location for our measurements. The Rifle IFRC site is located at a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado. Leachate from spent mill tailings has resulted in residual uranium contamination of both groundwater and sediments within the local aquifer. Studies at the site include an ongoing acetate amendment strategy, native microbial populations are stimulated by introduction of carbon intended to alter redox conditions and immobilize uranium. To test the geophysical methods in the field, NMR and MS logging measurements were collected before, during, and after acetate amendment. Next, laboratory NMR, MS, and SIP measurements

  6. Ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate and identify materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kraus, Robert H.; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Espy, Michelle A.; Volegov, Petr L.

    2010-03-30

    An ultra-low magnetic field NMR system can non-invasively examine containers. Database matching techniques can then identify hazardous materials within the containers. Ultra-low field NMR systems are ideal for this purpose because they do not require large powerful magnets and because they can examine materials enclosed in conductive shells such as lead shells. The NMR examination technique can be combined with ultra-low field NMR imaging, where an NMR image is obtained and analyzed to identify target volumes. Spatial sensitivity encoding can also be used to identify target volumes. After the target volumes are identified the NMR measurement technique can be used to identify their contents.

  7. Nuclear spin conversion of water inside fullerene cages detected by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamone, Salvatore Concistr, Maria; Carignani, Elisa; Meier, Benno; Krachmalnicoff, Andrea; Johannessen, Ole G.; Denning, Mark; Carravetta, Marina; Whitby, Richard J.; Levitt, Malcolm H.; Lei, Xuegong; Li, Yongjun; Goh, Kelvin; Horsewill, Anthony J.

    2014-05-21

    The water-endofullerene H{sub 2}O@C{sub 60} provides a unique chemical system in which freely rotating water molecules are confined inside homogeneous and symmetrical carbon cages. The spin conversion between the ortho and para species of the endohedral H{sub 2}O was studied in the solid phase by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance. The experimental data are consistent with a second-order kinetics, indicating a bimolecular spin conversion process. Numerical simulations suggest the simultaneous presence of a spin diffusion process allowing neighbouring ortho and para molecules to exchange their angular momenta. Cross-polarization experiments found no evidence that the spin conversion of the endohedral H{sub 2}O molecules is catalysed by {sup 13}C nuclei present in the cages.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fukushima, Eiichi; Roeder, Stephen B. W.; Assink, Roger A.; Gibson, Atholl A. V.

    1986-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio-frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  9. Sealed magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe and process for spectroscopy of hazardous samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cho, Herman M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Townsend, Mark R.; Ewing, James R.

    2016-06-14

    A magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is described that includes double containment enclosures configured to seal and contain hazardous samples for analysis. The probe is of a modular design that ensures containment of hazardous samples during sample analysis while preserving spin speeds for superior NMR performance and convenience of operation.

  10. Pulsed Gradient Spin Echo Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Diffusion in Granular Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, Joseph D.; Caprihan, Arvind; Altobelli, Stephen A.; Fukushima, Eiichi

    2000-01-10

    We derive the formalism to obtain spatial distributions of collisional correlation times for macroscopic particles undergoing granular flow from pulsed gradient spin echo nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion data. This is demonstrated with an example of axial motion in the shear flow regime of a 3D granular flow in a horizontal rotating cylinder at one rotation rate. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of ammonia diffusion in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A. Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States) 40 CHEMISTRY; 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; LIQUID WASTES; AMMONIA; GAS ANALYSIS; HANFORD RESERVATION; RADIOACTIVE WASTE...

  12. Method of using a nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy standard

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spicer, Leonard D.; Bennett, Dennis W.; Davis, Jon F.

    1985-01-01

    (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO is produced by the reaction of ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 NH with SO.sub.2. Also produced in the reaction are ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 O and a new solid compound [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ]. Both (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO and [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ] have fluorescent properties. The reaction of the subject invention is used in a method of measuring the concentration of SO.sub.2 pollutants in gases. By the method, a sample of gas is bubbled through a solution of ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 NH, whereby any SO.sub.2 present in the gas will react to produce the two fluorescent products. The measured fluorescence of these products can then be used to calculate the concentration of SO.sub.2 in the original gas sample. The solid product [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ] may be used as a standard in solid state NMR spectroscopy, wherein the resonance peaks of either .sup.1 H, .sup.13 C, .sup.15 N, or .sup.29 Si may be used as a reference.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Magnetic Resonance Facility capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers as well as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

  14. Two Phase Flow Measurements by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altobelli, Stephen A; Fukushima, Eiichi

    2006-08-14

    different nuclei, protons and 19F. It also uses two different types of NMR image formation, a conventional spin-echo and a single-point method. The single-point method is notable for being useful for imaging materials which are much more rigid than can usually be studied by NMR imaging. We use it to image low density polyethylene (LDPE) plastic in this application. We have reduced the imaging time for this three-phase imaging method to less than 10 s per pair of profiles by using new hardware. Directly measuring the solid LDPE signal was a novel feature for multi-phase flow studies. We also used thermally polarized gas NMR (as opposed to hyper-polarized gas) which produces low signal to noise ratios because gas densities are on the order of 1000 times smaller than liquid densities. However since we used multi-atom molecules that have short T1's and operated at elevated pressures we could overcome some of the losses. Thermally polarized gases have advantages over hyperpolarized gases in the ease of preparation, and in maintaining a well-defined polarization. In these studies (Codd and Altobelli, 2003), we used stimulated echo sequences to successfully obtain propagators of gas in bead packs out to observation times of 300 ms. Zarraga, et al. (2000) used laser-sheet profilometry to investigate normal stress differences in concentrated suspensions. Recently we developed an NMR imaging analog for comparison with numerical work that is being performed by Rekha Rao at Sandia National Laboratories (Rao, Mondy, Sun, et al, 2002). A neutrally buoyant suspension of 100 mm PMMA spheres in a Newtonian liquid was sheared in a vertical Couette apparatus inside the magnet. The outer cylinder rotates and the inner cylinder is fixed. At these low rotation rates, the free-surface of the Newtonian liquid shows no measurable deformation, but the suspension clearly shows its non-Newtonian character.

  15. Superconducting quantum interference device microsusceptometer balanced over a wide bandwidth for nuclear magnetic resonance applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinante, A. Falferi, P.; Mezzena, R.

    2014-10-15

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometers have been widely used to study magnetic properties of materials at microscale. As intrinsically balanced devices, they could also be exploited for direct SQUID-detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from micron sized samples, or for SQUID readout of mechanically detected NMR from submicron sized samples. Here, we demonstrate a double balancing technique that enables achievement of very low residual imbalance of a SQUID microsusceptometer over a wide bandwidth. In particular, we can generate ac magnetic fields within the SQUID loop as large as 1 mT, for frequencies ranging from dc up to a few MHz. As an application, we demonstrate direct detection of NMR from {sup 1}H spins in a glycerol droplet placed directly on top of the 20 ?m SQUID loops.

  16. High-sensitivity cooled coil system for nuclear magnetic resonance in kHz range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Tingting; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Lee, Yong-Ho; Lin, Jun

    2014-11-15

    In several low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (LF-NMR) and surface nuclear magnetic resonance applications, i.e., in the frequency range of kHz, high sensitivity magnetic field detectors are needed. Usually, low-T{sub c} superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with a high field sensitivity of about 1 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} are employed as detectors. Considering the flux trapping and operational difficulties associated with low-T{sub c} SQUIDs, we designed and fabricated liquid-nitrogen-cooled Cu coils for NMR detection in the kHz range. A cooled coil system consisting of a 9-cm diameter Cu coil and a low noise preamplifier was systematically investigated and reached a sensitivity of 2 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} at 77 K, which is 3 times better compared to the sensitivity at 300 K. A Q-switch circuit as an essential element for damping the ringing effects of the pickup coil was developed to acquire free induction decay signals of a water sample with minimum loss of signal. Our studies demonstrate that cooled Cu coils, if designed properly, can provide a comparable sensitivity to low-T{sub c} SQUIDs.

  17. Development of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging/spectroscopy for improved petroleum recovery. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrufet, M.A.; Flumerfelt, F.W.; Walsh, M.P.; Watson, A.T.

    1994-04-01

    The overall objectives of this program are to develop and apply Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI) and CT X-Ray Scanning methods for determining rock, fluid, and petrophysical properties and for fundamental studies of multiphase flow behavior in porous media. Specific objectives are divided into four subtasks: (1) development of NMRI and CT scanning for the determination of rock-fluid and petrophysical properties; (2) development of NMRI and CT scanning for characterizing conventional multiphase displacement processes; (3) development of NMR and CT scanning for characterizing dispersed phase processes; and (4) miscible displacement studies.

  18. Molecular Structure Laboratory. Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FTNMR) Spectrometer and Ancillary Instrumentation at SUNY Geneseo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geiger, David K

    2015-12-31

    An Agilent 400-MR nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer and ancillary equipment were purchased, which are being used for molecular structure elucidation.  The instrumentation is housed in a pre-existing facility designed specifically for its use. This instrument package is being used to expand the research and educational efforts of the faculty and students at SUNY-Geneseo and is made available to neighboring educational institutions and business concerns.  Funds were also used for training of College personnel, maintenance of the instrumentation, and installation of the equipment.

  19. {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance study of hydrated water dynamics in perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer Nafion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Jun Hee; Lee, Kyu Won; Jeon, G. W.; Lee, Cheol Eui; Park, W. K.; Choi, E. H.

    2015-01-12

    We have studied the dynamics of hydrated water molecules in the proton exchange membrane of Nafion by means of high-resolution {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. “Bound” and “free” states of hydrated water clusters as well as the exchange protons were identified from the NMR chemical shift measurements, and their activation energies were obtained from the temperature-dependent laboratory- and rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation measurements. Besides, a peculiar motional transition in the ultralow frequency region was observed at 373 K for the “free” hydrated water from the rotating-frame NMR spin-lattice relaxation time measurements.

  20. Coaxial probe for nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation correlation experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Yiqiao; Hrlimann, Martin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-02-21

    A coaxial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is built to measure diffusion and relaxation properties of liquid samples. In particular, we demonstrate the acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) distribution functions (T{sub 1}-T{sub 2} and diffusionT{sub 2}), essential for fluids characterization. The compact design holds promise for miniaturization, thus enabling the measurement of molecular diffusion that is inaccessible to conventional micro-NMR setups. Potential applications range from crude oil characterization to biomolecular screening and detections.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urban, Jeffry Todd

    2004-12-21

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I = 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an

  2. Contributed Review: Nuclear magnetic resonance core analysis at 0.3 T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Jonathan Fordham, Edmund J.

    2014-11-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides a powerful toolbox for petrophysical characterization of reservoir core plugs and fluids in the laboratory. Previously, there has been considerable focus on low field magnet technology for well log calibration. Now there is renewed interest in the study of reservoir samples using stronger magnets to complement these standard NMR measurements. Here, the capabilities of an imaging magnet with a field strength of 0.3 T (corresponding to 12.9 MHz for proton) are reviewed in the context of reservoir core analysis. Quantitative estimates of porosity (saturation) and pore size distributions are obtained under favorable conditions (e.g., in carbonates), with the added advantage of multidimensional imaging, detection of lower gyromagnetic ratio nuclei, and short probe recovery times that make the system suitable for shale studies. Intermediate field instruments provide quantitative porosity maps of rock plugs that cannot be obtained using high field medical scanners due to the field-dependent susceptibility contrast in the porous medium. Example data are presented that highlight the potential applications of an intermediate field imaging instrument as a complement to low field instruments in core analysis and for materials science studies in general.

  3. Improved nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fukushima, E.; Roeder, S.B.W.; Assink, R.A.; Gibson, A.A.V.

    1984-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  4. A biofilm microreactor system for simultaneous electrochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Ewing, R. James; Ewing, Thomas; Mueller, Karl T.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-03-01

    In order to fully understand electrochemically active biofilms and the limitations to their scale-up in industrial biofilm reactors, a complete picture of the microenvironments inside the biofilm is needed. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are ideally suited for the study of biofilms and for probing their microenvironments because these techniques allow for non-invasive interrogation and in situ monitoring with high resolution. By combining NMR with simultaneous electrochemical techniques, it is possible to sustain and study live electrochemically active biofilms. Here, we introduce a novel biofilm microreactor system that allows for simultaneous electrochemical and NMR techniques (EC-NMR) at the microscale. Microreactors were designed with custom radiofrequency resonator coils, which allowed for NMR measurements of biofilms growing on polarized gold electrodes. For an example application of this system, we grew Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms. NMR was used to investigate growth media flow velocities, which were compared to simulated laminar flow, and electron donor concentrations inside the biofilms. We use Monte Carlo error analysis to estimate standard deviations of the electron donor concentration measurements within the biofilm. The EC-NMR biofilm microreactor system can ultimately be used to correlate extracellular electron transfer rates with metabolic reactions and explore extracellular electron transfer mechanisms.

  5. Characterization of proton exchange membrane materials for fuel cells by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Zueqian

    2010-03-15

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used to explore the nanometer-scale structure of Nafion, the widely used fuel cell membrane, and its composites. We have shown that solid-state NMR can characterize chemical structure and composition, domain size and morphology, internuclear distances, molecular dynamics, etc. The newly-developed water channel model of Nafion has been confirmed, and important characteristic length-scales established. Nafion-based organic and inorganic composites with special properties have also been characterized and their structures elucidated. The morphology of Nafion varies with hydration level, and is reflected in the changes in surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio of the polymer obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The S/V ratios of different Nafion models have been evaluated numerically. It has been found that only the water channel model gives the measured S/V ratios in the normal hydration range of a working fuel cell, while dispersed water molecules and polymer ribbons account for the structures at low and high hydration levels, respectively.

  6. H-1 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Metabolomics Analysis Identifies Novel Urinary Biomarkers for Lung Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCClay, Joseph L.; Adkins, Daniel E.; Isern, Nancy G.; O'Connell, Thomas M.; Wooten, Jan B.; Zedler, Barbara K.; Dasika, Madhukar S.; Webb, B. T.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Pounds, Joel G.; Murrelle, Edward L.; Leppert, Mark F.; van den Oord, Edwin J.

    2010-06-04

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by chronic airflow limitation, is a serious and growing public health concern. The major environmental risk factor for COPD is tobacco smoking, but the biological mechanisms underlying COPD are not well understood. In this study, we used proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy to identify and quantify metabolites associated with lung function in COPD. Plasma and urine were collected from 197 adults with COPD and from 195 adults without COPD. Samples were assayed using a 600 MHz NMR spectrometer, and the resulting spectra were analyzed against quantitative spirometric measures of lung function. After correcting for false discoveries and adjusting for covariates (sex, age, smoking) several spectral regions in urine were found to be significantly associated with baseline lung function. These regions correspond to the metabolites trigonelline, hippurate and formate. Concentrations of each metabolite, standardized to urinary creatinine, were associated with baseline lung function (minimum p-value = 0.0002 for trigonelline). No significant associations were found with plasma metabolites. Two of the three urinary metabolites positively associated with baseline lung function, i.e. hippurate and formate, are often related to gut microflora. This suggests that the microbiome composition is variable between individuals with different lung function. Alternatively, the nature and origins of all three associated metabolites may reflect lifestyle differences affecting overall health. Our results will require replication and validation, but demonstrate the utility of NMR metabolomics as a screening tool for identifying novel biomarkers of lung disease or disease risk.

  7. Dynamics of asymmetric binary glass formers. II. Results from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bock, D.; Kahlau, R.; Ptzschner, B.; Krber, T.; Wagner, E.; Rssler, E. A.

    2014-03-07

    Various {sup 2}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques are applied to probe the component dynamics of the binary glass former tripropyl phosphate (TPP)/polystyrene-d{sub 3} (PS) over the full concentration range. The results are quantitatively compared to those of a dielectric spectroscopy (DS) study on the same system previously published [R. Kahlau, D. Bock, B. Schmidtke, and E. A. Rssler, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044509 (2014)]. While the PS dynamics does not significantly change in the mixtures compared to that of neat PS, two fractions of TPP molecules are identified, one joining the glass transition of PS in the mixture (?{sub 1}-process), the second reorienting isotropically (?{sub 2}-process) even in the rigid matrix of PS, although at low concentration resembling a secondary process regarding its manifestation in the DS spectra. Pronounced dynamical heterogeneities are found for the TPP ?{sub 2}-process, showing up in extremely stretched, quasi-logarithmic stimulated echo decays. While the time window of NMR is insufficient for recording the full correlation functions, DS results, covering a larger dynamical range, provide a satisfactory interpolation of the NMR data. Two-dimensional {sup 31}P NMR spectra prove exchange within the broadly distributed ?{sub 2}-process. As demonstrated by {sup 2}H NMR, the PS matrix reflects the faster ?{sub 2}-process of TPP by performing a spatially highly hindered motion on the same timescale.

  8. A reactor for high-throughput high-pressure nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beach, N. J.; Knapp, S. M. M.; Landis, C. R.

    2015-10-15

    The design of a reactor for operando nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of high-pressure gas-liquid reactions is described. The Wisconsin High Pressure NMR Reactor (WiHP-NMRR) design comprises four modules: a sapphire NMR tube with titanium tube holder rated for pressures as high as 1000 psig (68 atm) and temperatures ranging from −90 to 90 °C, a gas circulation system that maintains equilibrium concentrations of dissolved gases during gas-consuming or gas-releasing reactions, a liquid injection apparatus that is capable of adding measured amounts of solutions to the reactor under high pressure conditions, and a rapid wash system that enables the reactor to be cleaned without removal from the NMR instrument. The WiHP-NMRR is compatible with commercial 10 mm NMR probes. Reactions performed in the WiHP-NMRR yield high quality, information-rich, and multinuclear NMR data over the entire reaction time course with rapid experimental turnaround.

  9. Elucidation of fundamental properties of helium in metals by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abell, G.C.

    1990-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties of very high density {sup 3}He in metals are discussed in the context of the corresponding properties in relatively high density bulk {sup 3}He. In particular, the effects of the {sup 3}He diffusion on the contribution of the {sup 3}He-{sup 3}He dipolar interaction to the lineshape and to the spin-lattice relaxation parameter (T{sub 1}) are described. It is shown that the temperature dependence of the lineshape and of T{sub 1} are independent sources of information about helium density and also about helium diffusivity. Moreover, T{sub 1} is shown to be a sensitive indicator of melting transitions in bulk {sup 3}He. Palladium tritide is presented as a model system for NMR studies of {sup 3}He in metals. Experimental NMR studies of this system reveal behavior analogous to what has been observed for bulk helium. Evidence for a {sup 3}He phase transition near 250 K is provided by the temperature dependence of T{sub 1}. Assuming this to be a melting transition, a density is obtained from the bulk helium EOS that is in good agreement with theory and with swelling measurements on related metal tritides. {sup 3}He NMR measurements have also provided information about the density distribution, helium diffusivity, and mean bubble size in palladium tritide. 22 refs., 8 figs.

  10. NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) studies of aging effects in palladium tritide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abell, G.C.; Attalla, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies of aging phenomena in palladium tritide. /sup 3/He NMR relaxation parameters have been measured as a function of temperature for 6-, 13-, and 22-month-old beta phase palladium tritide. The most significant result of this study is the observation of a solid/fluid phase transition near 250/degree/K of /sup 3/He that has accumulated in the PdT/sub x/ substrate via triton decay. Although the existence of solid helium at relatively high temperatures had been predicted for helium in metals, it had not previously been confirmed in any metal/helium system. The observed melting temperatures, together with the known equation of state for /sup 4/He, allow a determination of the helium density as a function of age. The atomic density obtained in this way is approximately 2.0 times that of palladium metal, agreeing with densities inferred from dilatometric measurements of other metal tritides and also with predictions based on the concept of dislocation loop punching by highly overpressurized He bubbles. The /sup 3/He signal in the 22-month-old sample was sufficiently strong to allow a detailed study of melting as a function of temperature, and provides information on the distribution of densities over the ensemble of bubbles.

  11. Homometallic and Heterometallic Antiferromagnetic Rings: Magnetic Properties Studied by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casadei, Cecilia

    2012-05-09

    The aim of the present thesis is to investigate the local magnetic properties of homometallic Cr{sub 8} antiferromagnetic (AFM) ring and the changes occurring by replacing one Cr{sup 3+} ion with diamagnetic Cd{sup 2+} (Cr{sub 7}Cd) and with Ni{sup 2+} (Cr{sub 7}Ni). In the heterometallic ring a redistribution of the local magnetic moment is expected in the low temperature ground state. We have investigated those changes by both {sup 53}Cr-NMR and {sup 19}F-NMR. We have determined the order of magnitude of the transferred hyperfine coupling constant {sup 19}F - M{sup +} where M{sup +} = Cr{sup 3+}, Ni{sup 2+} in the different rings. This latter result gives useful information about the overlapping of the electronic wavefunctions involved in the coordinative bond.

  12. The Effect of Electronic Paramagnetism on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Frequencies in Metals

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Townes, C. H.; Herring, C.; Knight, W. D.

    1950-09-22

    Observations on the shifts of nuclear resonances in metals ( Li{sup 7}, Na{sup 23}, Cu {sup 63}, Be{sup 9}, Pb{sup 207}, Al{sup 27}, and Ca{sup 69} ) due to free electron paramagnetism; comparison with theoretical values.

  13. Non-destructive Ripeness Sensing by Using Proton NMR [Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G. W.; Stroshine, R. L.; Bellon, V.

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz).

  14. Dynamics of asymmetric binary glass formers. I. A dielectric and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahlau, R.; Bock, D.; Schmidtke, B.; Rssler, E. A.

    2014-01-28

    Dielectric spectroscopy as well as {sup 2}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) are applied to probe the component dynamics of the binary glass former tripropyl phosphate (TPP)/polystyrene (PS/PS-d{sub 3}) in the full concentration (c{sub TPP}) range. In addition, depolarized light scattering and differential scanning calorimetry experiments are performed. Two glass transition temperatures are found: T{sub g1}(c{sub TPP}) reflects PS dynamics and shows a monotonic plasticizer effect, while the lower T{sub g2}(c{sub TPP}) exhibits a maximum and is attributed to (faster) TPP dynamics, occurring in a slowly moving or immobilized PS matrix. Dielectric spectroscopy probing solely TPP identifies two different time scales, which are attributed to two sub-ensembles. One of them, again, shows fast TPP dynamics (?{sub 2}-process), the other (?{sub 1}-process) displays time constants identical with those of the slow PS matrix. Upon heating the ?{sub 1}-fraction of TPP decreases until above some temperature T{sub c} only a single ?{sub 2}-population exists. Inversely, below T{sub c} a fraction of the TPP molecules is trapped by the PS matrix. At low c{sub TPP} the ?{sub 2}-relaxation does not follow frequency-temperature superposition (FTS), instead it is governed by a temperature independent distribution of activation energies leading to correlation times which follow Arrhenius laws, i.e., the ?{sub 2}-relaxation resembles a secondary process. Yet, {sup 31}P NMR demonstrates that it involves isotropic reorientations of TPP molecules within a slowly moving or rigid matrix of PS. At high c{sub TPP} the super-Arrhenius temperature dependence of ?{sub 2}(T), as well as FTS are recovered, known as typical of the glass transition in neat systems.

  15. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blank, Aharon; Shapiro, Guy; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Gershoni, David

    2015-01-19

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an 'optically detected magnetic resonance imaging' technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors.

  16. Resonant and non-resonant magnetic scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McWhan, D.B.; Hastings, J.B.; Kao, C.C.; Siddons, D.P.

    1991-12-31

    The tunability and the polarization of synchrotron radiation open upon new possibilities for the study of magnetism. Studies on magnetic materials performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source are reviewed, and thy fall into four areas: structure, evolution of magnetic order, separation of L and S, and resonance effects. In the vicinity of atomic absorption edges, the Faraday effect, magnetic circular dichroism, and resonant magnetic scattering are all related resonance effects which measure the spin polarized density of states. The production and analysis of polarized beams are discussed in the context of the study of magnetism with synchrotron radiation.

  17. Resonant and non-resonant magnetic scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McWhan, D.B.; Hastings, J.B.; Kao, C.C.; Siddons, D.P.

    1991-01-01

    The tunability and the polarization of synchrotron radiation open upon new possibilities for the study of magnetism. Studies on magnetic materials performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source are reviewed, and thy fall into four areas: structure, evolution of magnetic order, separation of L and S, and resonance effects. In the vicinity of atomic absorption edges, the Faraday effect, magnetic circular dichroism, and resonant magnetic scattering are all related resonance effects which measure the spin polarized density of states. The production and analysis of polarized beams are discussed in the context of the study of magnetism with synchrotron radiation.

  18. High field nuclear magnetic resonance in transition metal substituted BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garitezi, T. M. Lesseux, G. G.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Adriano, C.; Pagliuso, P. G.; Urbano, R. R.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P. L.

    2014-05-07

    We report high field {sup 75}As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on Co and Cu substituted BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} single crystals displaying same structural/magnetic transition T{sub 0}≃128  K. From our anisotropy studies in the paramagnetic state, we strikingly found virtually identical quadrupolar splitting and consequently the quadrupole frequency ν{sub Q}≃2.57(1)  MHz for both compounds, despite the claim that each Cu delivers 2 extra 3d electrons in BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} compared to Co substitution. These results allow us to conclude that a subtle change in the crystallographic structure, particularly in the Fe–As tetrahedra, must be the most probable tuning parameter to determine T{sub 0} in this class of superconductors rather than electronic doping. Furthermore, our NMR data around T{sub 0} suggest coexistence of tetragonal/paramagnetic and orthorhombic/antiferromagnetic phases between the structural and the spin density wave magnetic phase transitions, similarly to what was reported for K-doped BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} [Urbano et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 107001 (2010)].

  19. Resolving the Impact of Biological Processes on DNAPL Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media through Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxation Time Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hertzog, Russel; Geesey, Gill G.; White, Timothy A.; Ho, Clifford K.; Straley, Christian; Bryar, Traci R.; Seymour, Joseph; Codd, Sarah L.; Oram, Libbie

    2003-06-01

    This research leads to a better understanding of how physical and biological properties of porous media influence water and dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) distribution under saturated and unsaturated conditions. Knowing how environmental properties affect DNAPL solvent flow in the subsurface is essential for developing models of flow and transport that are needed for designing remediation and long-term stewardship strategies. This project investigates the capability and limitations of low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation decay-rate measurements for determining environmental properties affecting DNAPL solvent flow in the subsurface. For in-situ subsurface environmental applications, lowfield proton NMR measurements are preferred to the conventional high-field techniques commonly used to obtain chemical shift data, because the low field measurements are much less degraded by the magnetic susceptibility variations between the rock grains and the pore fluid s that significantly interfere with the high-field NMR measurements. Our research scope includes determining whether DNAPLs exist in water-wet or solvent-wet environments, the pore-size distribution of the soils containing DNAPLs, and the impact of biological processes on their transport mechanisms in porous media. Knowledge of the in situ flow properties and pore distributions of organic contaminants are critical to understanding where and when these fluids will enter subsurface aquifers.

  20. Comparison of glucose fermentation by suspended and gel-entrapped yeast cells: An in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taipa, M.A.; Cabral, J.M.S. Inst. Superior Tecnico, Lisboa ); Santos, H. U.N.L., Monte de Caparica )

    1993-03-15

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance ([sup 31]P NMR) was used to compare the anaerobic metabolism of glucose by suspended and gel-entrapped Saccaromyces bayanus cells. The fermentation of glucose was carried out in a reaction system with continuous circulation through the NMR sample tube. The intracellular pH and the levels of some phosphorylated compounds were noninvasively monitored by [sup 31]P NMR while glucose, fermentation products, and biomass were determined by analytical techniques. Qualitative comparisons showed that no significant differences are observed in the relative concentrations of the major phosphorylated metabolites in the spectra, but distinct profile for the variation of both intracellular and extracellular pH of immobilized cells is maintained at a constant value throughout the fermentation as opposed to freely suspended cells for which a steady decrease in the internal pH occurs. A faster and stronger acidification is also observed in the external medium of the assays with suspended cells. Furthermore, higher yields for ethanol and biomass production and lower yields of fermentation by-products are obtained with immobilized cells. It is concluded that the higher intracellular pH achieved in the presence of the gel matrix had a regulatory effect on the metabolism which favored the ethanol production pathway.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of dynamics in poly(ethylene oxide)-based lithium polyether-ester-sulfonate ionomers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Roach, David J.; Dou, Shichen; Colby, Ralph H.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2012-01-06

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the dynamics of poly(ethylene oxide)-based lithium sulfonate ionomer samples that have low glass transition temperatures. 1H and 7Li spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of the bulk polymer and lithium ions, respectively, were measured and analyzed in samples with a range of ion contents. The temperature dependence of T1 values along with the presence of minima in T1 as a function of temperature enabled correlation times and activation energies to be obtained for both the segmental motion of the polymer backbone and the hopping motion of lithium cations. Similar activation energies formore » motion of both the polymer and lithium ions in the samples with lower ion content indicate that the polymer segmental motion and lithium ion hopping motion are correlated in these samples, even though their respective correlation times differ significantly. A divergent trend is observed for correlation times and activation energies of the highest ion content sample with 100% lithium sulfonation due to the presence of ionic aggregation. Details of the polymer and cation dynamics on the nanosecond timescale are discussed and complement the findings of X-ray scattering and Quasi Elastic Neutron Scattering experiments.« less

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of dynamics in poly(ethylene oxide)-based lithium polyether-ester-sulfonate ionomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, David J.; Dou, Shichen; Colby, Ralph H.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2012-01-06

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the dynamics of poly(ethylene oxide)-based lithium sulfonate ionomer samples that have low glass transition temperatures. 1H and 7Li spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of the bulk polymer and lithium ions, respectively, were measured and analyzed in samples with a range of ion contents. The temperature dependence of T1 values along with the presence of minima in T1 as a function of temperature enabled correlation times and activation energies to be obtained for both the segmental motion of the polymer backbone and the hopping motion of lithium cations. Similar activation energies for motion of both the polymer and lithium ions in the samples with lower ion content indicate that the polymer segmental motion and lithium ion hopping motion are correlated in these samples, even though their respective correlation times differ significantly. A divergent trend is observed for correlation times and activation energies of the highest ion content sample with 100% lithium sulfonation due to the presence of ionic aggregation. Details of the polymer and cation dynamics on the nanosecond timescale are discussed and complement the findings of X-ray scattering and Quasi Elastic Neutron Scattering experiments.

  3. Solution-state structure and affinities of cyclodextrin: Fentanyl complexes by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mayer, Brian P.; Kennedy, Daniel J.; Lau, Edmond Y.; Valdez, Carlos A.

    2016-02-04

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are investigated for their ability to form inclusion complexes with the analgesic fentanyl and three similar molecules: acetylfentanyl, thiofentanyl, and acetylthiofentanyl. Stoichiometry, binding strength, and complex structure are revealed through nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques and discussed in terms of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. It was found that β-cyclodextrin is generally capable of forming the strongest complexes with the fentanyl panel. Two-dimensional NMR data and computational chemical calculations are used to derive solution-state structures of the complexes. Binding of the fentanyls to the CDs occurs at the amide phenyl ring, leaving the majority of the molecule solvated bymore » water, an observation common to all four fentanyls. This finding suggests a universal binding behavior, as the vast majority of previously synthesized fentanyl analogues contain this structural moiety. Furthermore, this baseline study serves as the most complete work on CD:fentanyl complexes to date and provides the insights into strategies for producing future generations of designer cyclodextrins capable of stronger and more selective complexation of fentanyl and its analogues.« less

  4. A new combined nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopic probe applied to in situ investigations of catalysts and catalytic processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camp, Jules C. J.; Mantle, Michael D.; York, Andrew P. E.; McGregor, James

    2014-06-15

    Both Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies are valuable analytical techniques capable of providing mechanistic information and thereby providing insights into chemical processes, including catalytic reactions. Since both techniques are chemically sensitive, they yield not only structural information but also quantitative analysis. In this work, for the first time, the combination of the two techniques in a single experimental apparatus is reported. This entailed the design of a new experimental probe capable of recording simultaneous measurements on the same sample and/or system of interest. The individual datasets acquired by each spectroscopic method are compared to their unmodified, stand-alone equivalents on a single sample as a means to benchmark this novel piece of equipment. The application towards monitoring reaction progress is demonstrated through the evolution of the homogeneous catalysed metathesis of 1‑hexene, with both experimental techniques able to detect reactant consumption and product evolution. This is extended by inclusion of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capabilities with a custom made MAS 7 mm rotor capable of spinning speeds up to 1600 Hz, quantified by analysis of the spinning sidebands of a sample of KBr. The value of this is demonstrated through an application involving heterogeneous catalysis, namely the metathesis of 2-pentene and ethene. This provides the added benefit of being able to monitor both the reaction progress (by NMR spectroscopy) and also the structure of the catalyst (by Raman spectroscopy) on the very same sample, facilitating the development of structure-performance relationships.

  5. The effect of diffusion in internal gradients on nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muncaci, S.; Ardelean, I.; Boboia, S.

    2013-11-13

    In the present work we study the internal gradient effects on diffusion attenuation of the echo train appearing in the well-known Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) technique, extensively used for transverse relaxation measurements. Our investigations are carried out on two porous ceramics, prepared with the same amount of magnetic impurities (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) but different pore sizes. It is shown that diffusion effects on the CPMG echo train attenuation are strongly influenced by the pore size for the same magnetic susceptibility of the two samples. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical model taking into account the limit of free or restricted diffusion on echo train attenuation. The NMR experiments were performed on water filled samples using a low-field NMR instrument. The porous ceramics were prepared using both the replica technique and the powder compression technique. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicated close values of the susceptibility constant for the two samples whereas the SEM images indicated different pore sizes. The results reported here may have impact in the interpretation of NMR relaxation measurements of water in soils or concrete samples.

  6. Perturbation approach for nuclear magnetic resonance solid-state quantum computation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Berman, G. P.; Kamenev, D. I.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2003-01-01

    A dynmore » amics of a nuclear-spin quantum computer with a large number ( L = 1000 ) of qubits is considered using a perturbation approach. Small parameters are introduced and used to compute the error in an implementation of an entanglement between remote qubits, using a sequence of radio-frequency pulses. The error is computed up to the different orders of the perturbation theory and tested using exact numerical solution.« less

  7. Asynchronous symmetry-based sequences for homonuclear dipolar recoupling in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Kong Ooi; Ernst, Matthias E-mail: maer@ethz.ch; Rajeswari, M.; Madhu, P. K. E-mail: maer@ethz.ch

    2015-02-14

    We show a theoretical framework, based on triple-mode Floquet theory, to analyze recoupling sequences derived from symmetry-based pulse sequences, which have a non-vanishing effective field and are not rotor synchronized. We analyze the properties of one such sequence, a homonuclear double-quantum recoupling sequence derived from the C7{sub 2}{sup 1} sequence. The new asynchronous sequence outperforms the rotor-synchronized version for spin pairs with small dipolar couplings in the presence of large chemical-shift anisotropy. The resonance condition of the new sequence is analyzed using triple-mode Floquet theory. Analytical calculations of second-order effective Hamiltonian are performed to compare the efficiency in suppressing second-order cross terms. Experiments and numerical simulations are shown to corroborate the results of the theoretical analysis.

  8. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed.

  9. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  10. Optical Magnetism from Dielectric Resonator Metamaterials. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optical Magnetism from Dielectric Resonator Metamaterials. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optical Magnetism from Dielectric Resonator Metamaterials. Abstract not ...

  11. Resolving the Impact of Biological Processes on Water Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media Through Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Micro-Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, Joseph D.

    2005-06-01

    The magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) work at Montana State University has extended the imaging of a single biofilm in a 1 mm capillary reactor to correlate T2 magnetic relaxation maps displaying biofilm structure with the corresponding velocity patterns in three dimensions in a Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm fouled square capillary. A square duct geometry is chosen to provide correlation with existing experiments and simulations, as research bioreactors tend to be of square or rectangular cross section for optical or microelectrode access. The spatially resolved velocity data provide details on the impact of biofilm induced advection on mass transport from the bulk fluid to the biofilm and through the capillary bioreactor.

  12. Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Pruski, Marek; Washton, Nancy M.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2013-03-07

    This report recaps the "Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance" workshop, held in late 2011. This exploratory workshop's goal was to discuss and address challenges for the next generation of magnetic resonance experimentation. During the workshop, participants from throughout the world outlined the science drivers and instrumentation demands for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and associated magnetic resonance techniques, discussed barriers to their advancement, and deliberated the path forward for significant and impactful advances in the field.

  13. Dynamics of asymmetric non-polymeric binary glass formers—A nuclear magnetic resonance and dielectric spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pötzschner, B.; Mohamed, F.; Lichtinger, A.; Bock, D.; Rössler, E. A.

    2015-10-21

    We study a dynamically asymmetric binary glass former with the low-T{sub g} component m-tri-cresyl phosphate (m-TCP: T{sub g} = 206 K) and a spirobichroman derivative as a non-polymeric high-T{sub g} component (T{sub g} = 382 K) by means of {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), {sup 31}P NMR, and dielectric spectroscopy which allow component-selectively probing the dynamics. The entire concentration range is covered, and two main relaxation processes with two T{sub g} are identified, T{sub g1} and T{sub g2}. The slower one is attributed to the high-T{sub g} component (α{sub 1}-process), and the faster one is related to the m-TCP molecules (α{sub 2}-process). Yet, there are indications that a small fraction of m-TCP is associated also with the α{sub 1}-process. While the α{sub 1}-relaxation only weakly broadens upon adding m-TCP, the α{sub 2}-relaxation becomes extremely stretched leading to quasi-logarithmic correlation functions at low m-TCP concentrations—as probed by {sup 31}P NMR stimulated echo experiments. Frequency-temperature superposition does not apply for the α{sub 2}-process and it reflects an isotropic, liquid-like motion which is observed even below T{sub g1}, i.e., in the matrix of the arrested high-T{sub g} molecules. As proven by 2D {sup 31}P NMR, the corresponding dynamic heterogeneities are of transient nature, i.e., exchange occurs within the distribution G(lnτ{sub α2}). At T{sub g1} a crossover is found for the temperature dependence of (mean) τ{sub α2}(T) from non-Arrhenius above to Arrhenius below T{sub g1} which is attributed to intrinsic confinement effects. This “fragile-to-strong” transition also leads to a re-decrease of T{sub g2}(c{sub m−TCP}) at low concentration c{sub m−TCP}, i.e., a maximum is observed in T{sub g2}(c{sub m−TCP}) while T{sub g1}(c{sub m−TCP}) displays the well-known plasticizer effect. Although only non-polymeric components are involved, we re-discover essentially all features previously

  14. Characterization of a novel weak interaction between MUC1 and Src-SH3 using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunasekara, Nirosha; Sykes, Brian; Hugh, Judith

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MUC1 binds the Src-SH3 domain potentially triggering Src dependent cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NMR Spectroscopy was used to monitor MUC1-CD and Src SH3 domain titrations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MUC1-CD peptides bind with a low affinity (K{sub d} of 2-3 mM) to a non-canonical site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Weak interactions may mediate dynamic processes like migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MUC1-CD and Src-SH3 interaction may be a prime target to inhibit cell migration. -- Abstract: Breast cancer causes death through cancer cell migration and subsequent metastasis to distant organs. In vitro, the MUC1 mucin can mediate breast cancer cell migration by binding to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). This migration is dependent on MUC1 cytoplasmic domain (MUC1-CD) activation of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase, Src, possibly through competitive displacement of an inhibitory Src intramolecular SH3 binding. Therefore, we characterized the binding site and affinity of the MUC1-CD for Src-SH3 using multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to monitor the titration of the {sup 15}N labeled Src-SH3 domain with synthetic native and mutant peptides of MUC1-CD. The results revealed that the dissociation constant (K{sub d}) for the interaction of the native MUC1-CD peptides and Src-SH3 domain was weak with a K{sub d} of 2-3 mM. Notably, the SH3 residues most perturbed upon peptide binding were located outside the usual hydrophobic binding cleft in a previously described alternate binding site on the Src-SH3, suggesting that MUC1-CD binds to a non-canonical site. The binding characteristics outlined here suggest that the interaction between Src-SH3 and MUC1-CD represents a novel weak electrostatic interaction of the type which is increasingly recognized as important in transient and dynamic protein complexes required for cell migration and signal transduction. As such, this

  15. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  16. Parity violation in nuclear magnetic resonance frequencies of chiral tetrahedral tungsten complexes NWXYZ (X, Y, Z = H, F, Cl, Br or I)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nahrwold, Sophie Berger, Robert; Clemens-Schöpf-Institute, Technical University Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 22, D-64287 Darmstadt ; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Fachbereich Chemie, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Str., D-35032 Marburg

    2014-01-14

    Density functional theory within the two-component quasi-relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) is used to predict parity violation shifts in {sup 183}W nuclear magnetic resonance shielding tensors of chiral, tetrahedrally bonded tungsten complexes of the form NWXYZ (X, Y, Z = H, F, Cl, Br or I), as well as for the heavier systems NWHAtF and NWH(117)F for comparison. The calculations reveal that sub-mHz accuracy is required to detect such tiny effects in this class of compounds, and that parity violation effects are very sensitive to the choice of ligands.

  17. Study of hydrogen in coals, polymers, oxides, and muscle water by nuclear magnetic resonance; extension of solid-state high-resolution techniques. [Hydrogen molybdenum bronze

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, L.M.

    1981-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been an important analytical and physical research tool for several decades. One area of NMR which has undergone considerable development in recent years is high resolution NMR of solids. In particular, high resolution solid state /sup 13/C NMR spectra exhibiting features similar to those observed in liquids are currently achievable using sophisticated pulse techniques. The work described in this thesis develops analogous methods for high resolution /sup 1/H NMR of rigid solids. Applications include characterization of hydrogen aromaticities in fossil fuels, and studies of hydrogen in oxides and bound water in muscle.

  18. Magnetic resonance apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Jasper A.; Cooper, Richard K.

    1982-01-01

    Means for producing a region of homogeneous magnetic field remote from the source of the field, wherein two equal field sources are arranged axially so their fields oppose, producing a region near the plane perpendicular to the axis midway between the sources where the radial component of the field goes through a maximum. Near the maximum, the field is homogeneous over prescribed regions.

  19. Magnetic resonance apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, J.A.; Cooper, R.K.

    1980-10-10

    The patent consists of means for producing a region of homogeneous magnetic field remote from the source of the field, wherein two equal field sources are arranged axially so their fields oppose, producing a region near the plane perpendicular to the axis midway between the sources where the radial correspondent of the field goes through a maximum. Near the maximum, the field is homogeneous over prescribed regions.

  20. Dielectric Resonator Metamasurfaces: Optical Magnetism Emission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optical Magnetism Emission and Optical Devices. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dielectric Resonator Metamasurfaces: Optical Magnetism Emission and Optical Devices. ...

  1. Antiferromagnetic spin correlations and pseudogaplike behavior in Ca(Fe1-xCox)2As2 studied by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance and anisotropic resistivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cui, J.; Roy, B.; Tanatar, M. A.; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Prozorov, R.; Canfield, P. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2015-11-06

    We report 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of single-crystalline Ca(Fe1–xCox)2As2 (x=0.023, 0.028, 0.033, and 0.059) annealed at 350°C for 7 days. From the observation of a characteristic shape of 75As NMR spectra in the stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, as in the case of x=0 (TN=170 K), clear evidence for the commensurate AFM phase transition with the concomitant structural phase transition is observed in x=0.023 (TN=106 K) and x=0.028 (TN=53 K). Through the temperature dependence of the Knight shifts and the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1), although stripe-type AFM spin fluctuations are realized in the paramagnetic state as inmore » the case of other iron pnictide superconductors, we found a gradual decrease of the AFM spin fluctuations below a crossover temperature T* that was nearly independent of Co-substitution concentration, and it is attributed to a pseudogaplike behavior in the spin excitation spectra of these systems. The T* feature finds correlation with features in the temperature-dependent interplane resistivity, ρc(T), but not with the in-plane resistivity ρa(T). The temperature evolution of anisotropic stripe-type AFM spin fluctuations is tracked in the paramagnetic and pseudogap phases by the 1/T1 data measured under magnetic fields parallel and perpendicular to the c axis. As a result, based on our NMR data, we have added a pseudogaplike phase to the magnetic and electronic phase diagram of Ca(Fe1–xCox)2As2.« less

  2. Antiferromagnetic spin correlations and pseudogaplike behavior in Ca(Fe1xCox)2As2 studied by ??As nuclear magnetic resonance and anisotropic resistivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cui, J.; Roy, B.; Tanatar, M. A.; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Prozorov, R.; Canfield, P. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2015-11-06

    We report 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of single-crystalline Ca(Fe1xCox)2As2 (x=0.023, 0.028, 0.033, and 0.059) annealed at 350C for 7 days. From the observation of a characteristic shape of 75As NMR spectra in the stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, as in the case of x=0 (TN=170 K), clear evidence for the commensurate AFM phase transition with the concomitant structural phase transition is observed in x=0.023 (TN=106 K) and x=0.028 (TN=53 K). Through the temperature dependence of the Knight shifts and the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1), although stripe-type AFM spin fluctuations are realized in the paramagnetic state as inmorethe case of other iron pnictide superconductors, we found a gradual decrease of the AFM spin fluctuations below a crossover temperature T* that was nearly independent of Co-substitution concentration, and it is attributed to a pseudogaplike behavior in the spin excitation spectra of these systems. The T* feature finds correlation with features in the temperature-dependent interplane resistivity, ?c(T), but not with the in-plane resistivity ?a(T). The temperature evolution of anisotropic stripe-type AFM spin fluctuations is tracked in the paramagnetic and pseudogap phases by the 1/T1 data measured under magnetic fields parallel and perpendicular to the c axis. As a result, based on our NMR data, we have added a pseudogaplike phase to the magnetic and electronic phase diagram of Ca(Fe1xCox)2As2.less

  3. Antiferromagnetic spin correlations and pseudogaplike behavior in Ca(Fe1xCox)2As2 studied by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance and anisotropic resistivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cui, J.; Roy, B.; Tanatar, M. A.; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Prozorov, R.; Canfield, P. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2015-11-06

    We report 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of single-crystalline Ca(Fe1xCox)2As2 (x=0.023, 0.028, 0.033, and 0.059) annealed at 350C for 7 days. From the observation of a characteristic shape of 75As NMR spectra in the stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, as in the case of x=0 (TN=170 K), clear evidence for the commensurate AFM phase transition with the concomitant structural phase transition is observed in x=0.023 (TN=106 K) and x=0.028 (TN=53 K). Through the temperature dependence of the Knight shifts and the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1), although stripe-type AFM spin fluctuations are realized in the paramagnetic state as inmorethe case of other iron pnictide superconductors, we found a gradual decrease of the AFM spin fluctuations below a crossover temperature T* that was nearly independent of Co-substitution concentration, and it is attributed to a pseudogaplike behavior in the spin excitation spectra of these systems. The T* feature finds correlation with features in the temperature-dependent interplane resistivity, ?c(T), but not with the in-plane resistivity ?a(T). The temperature evolution of anisotropic stripe-type AFM spin fluctuations is tracked in the paramagnetic and pseudogap phases by the 1/T1 data measured under magnetic fields parallel and perpendicular to the c axis. As a result, based on our NMR data, we have added a pseudogaplike phase to the magnetic and electronic phase diagram of Ca(Fe1xCox)2As2.less

  4. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2010-07-13

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  5. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2009-11-10

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of impaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  6. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2007-12-11

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  7. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2010-06-29

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  8. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2009-10-27

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  9. Time differentiated nuclear resonance spectroscopy coupled with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    heating in diamond anvil cells Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Time differentiated nuclear resonance spectroscopy coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil ...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging without field cycling at less than earth's magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Seong-Joo Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Hwang, Seong-min

    2015-03-09

    A strong pre-polarization field, usually tenths of a milli-tesla in magnitude, is used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in ordinary superconducting quantum interference device-based nuclear magnetic resonance/magnetic resonance imaging experiments. Here, we introduce an experimental approach using two techniques to remove the need for the pre-polarization field. A dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique enables us to measure an enhanced resonance signal. In combination with a π/2 pulse to avoid the Bloch-Siegert effect in a micro-tesla field, we obtained an enhanced magnetic resonance image by using DNP technique with a 34.5 μT static external magnetic field without field cycling. In this approach, the problems of eddy current and flux trapping in the superconducting pickup coil, both due to the strong pre-polarization field, become negligible.

  11. Ab Initio Calculation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Chemical Shift Anisotropy Tensors 1. Influence of Basis Set on the Calculation of 31P Chemical Shifts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, T.M.

    1998-09-01

    The influence of changes in the contracted Gaussian basis set used for ab initio calculations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) phosphorous chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors was investigated. The isotropic chemical shitl and chemical shift anisotropy were found to converge with increasing complexity of the basis set at the Hartree-Fock @IF) level. The addition of d polarization function on the phosphorous nucIei was found to have a major impact of the calculated chemical shi~ but diminished with increasing number of polarization fimctions. At least 2 d polarization fimctions are required for accurate calculations of the isotropic phosphorous chemical shift. The introduction of density fictional theory (DFT) techniques through tie use of hybrid B3LYP methods for the calculation of the phosphorous chemical shift tensor resulted in a poorer estimation of the NMR values, even though DFT techniques result in improved energy and force constant calculations. The convergence of the W parametem with increasing basis set complexity was also observed for the DFT calculations, but produced results with consistent large deviations from experiment. The use of a HF 6-31 l++G(242p) basis set represents a good compromise between accuracy of the simulation and the complexity of the calculation for future ab initio calculations of 31P NMR parameters in larger complexes.

  12. Applications of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Glen A.; Detwiler, Rebecca S.; Peplowski, Patrick N.

    2010-11-11

    Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) has the potential of addressing a wide variety of applications, which require isotopic and/or elemental information about a sample. We have investigated a variety of non-proliferation applications that may be addressed by NRF. From these applications, we have selected two, measuring uranium enrichment in UF6 cylinders and material verification in dismantlement, to investigate in more detail. Analytical models have been developed to evaluate these applications, and test measurements have been conducted to validate those models. We found that it is unlikely with current technology to address the requirements for UF6 cylinder enrichment measurements. In contrast, NRF is a very promising approach for material verification for dismantlement.

  13. Method of using a nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy standard. [SO/sub 2/ in gases by fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spicer, L.D.; Bennett, D.W.; Davis, J.F.

    1983-05-09

    (CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiNSO is produced by the reaction of ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SI)/sub 2/NH with SO/sub 2/. Also produced in the reaction are ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/Si)/sub 2/O and a new solid compound (NH/sub 4/)((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/). Both (CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiNSO and (NH/sub 4/)((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/) have fluorescent properties. The reaction of the subject invention is used in a method of measuring the concentration of SO/sub 2/ pollutants in gases. By the method, a sample of gas is bubbled through a solution of ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/Si)/sub 2/NH, whereby any SO/sub 2/ present in the gas will react to produce the two fluorescent products. The measured fluorescence of these products can then be used to calculate the concentration of SO/sub 2/ in the original gas sample. The solid product (NH/sub 4/)((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/) may be used as a standard in solid state NMR spectroscopy, wherein the resonance peaks of either /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N, or /sup 29/Si may be used as a reference.

  14. Reciprocity and gyrotropism in magnetic resonance transduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tropp, James

    2006-12-15

    We give formulas for transduction in magnetic resonance - i.e., the appearance of an emf due to Larmor precession of spins - based upon the modified Lorentz reciprocity principle for gyrotropic (also called 'nonreciprocal') media, i.e., in which a susceptibility tensor is carried to its transpose by reversal of an external static field [cf., R. F. Harrington and A. T. Villeneuve IRE Trans. Microwave Theory and Technique MTT6, 308 (1958)]. Prior applications of reciprocity to magnetic resonance, despite much success, have ignored the gyrotropism which necessarily arises due to nuclear and/or unpaired electronic spins. For detection with linearly polarized fields, oscillating at the Larmor frequency, the emf is written in terms of a volume integral containing a product of two factors which we define as the antenna patterns, i.e. (H{sub 1x}{+-}iH{sub 1y}), where, e.g., for a single transceive antenna, the H's are just the spatially dependent oscillatory magnetic field strengths, per the application of some reference current at the antenna terminals, with the negative sign obtaining for transmission, and the positive for reception. Similar expressions hold for separate transmit and receive antennas; expressions are also given for circular polarization of the fields. We then exhibit a receive-only array antenna of two elements for magnetic resonance imaging of protons, which, due an intensity artifact arising from stray reactive coupling of the elements, produces, despite its own bilateral symmetry, asymmetric proton NMR images of a symmetric cylindrical phantom containing aqueous saline solution [J. Tropp and T. Schirmer, J. Magn. Reson. 151, 146 (2001)]. Modification of this two-port antenna, to function in transmit-receive mode, allows us to demonstrate highly nonreciprocal behavior: that is, to record images (of cylindrical test phantoms containing aqueous saline solution) whose appearance dramatically changes, when the roles of transmission and reception are

  15. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) for stand-off detection of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) for stand-off detection of contraband Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) for stand-off detection of ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet), National Bioenergy Center Laboratory Capabilities (NBCLC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resonance Facility Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers. NREL's state-of-the-art Magnetic Resonance Facility provides: *

  17. Spectrally Resolved Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the XenonBiosensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilty, Christian; Lowery, Thomas; Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander

    2005-07-15

    Due to its ability to non-invasively record images, as well as elucidate molecular structure, nuclear magnetic resonance is the method of choice for applications as widespread as chemical analysis and medical diagnostics. Its detection threshold is, however, limited by the small polarization of nuclear spins in even the highest available magnetic fields. This limitation can, under certain circumstances, be alleviated by using hyper-polarized substances. Xenon biosensors make use of the sensitivity gain of hyperpolarized xenon to provide magnetic resonance detection capability for a specific low-concentration target. They consist of a cryptophane cage, which binds one xenon atom, and which has been connected via a linker to a targeting moiety such as a ligand or antibody. Recent work has shown the possibility of using the xenon biosensor to detect small amounts of a substance in a heterogeneous environment by NMR. Here, we demonstrate that magnetic resonance (MR) provides the capability to obtain spectrally and spatially resolved images of the distribution of immobilized biosensor, opening the possibility for using the xenon biosensor for targeted imaging.

  18. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Yumin

    2013-12-15

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging at Princeton, UofV, and UNH | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) Magnetic Resonance Imaging at Princeton, UofV, and UNH Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation Research / Small Business Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence

  20. Potential Antiferromagnetic Fluctuations in Hole-Doped Iron-Pnictide Superconductor Ba1-xKxFe2As2 Studied by 75As Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurement0.1143/JPSJ.81.054704

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirano, Masanori; Yamada, Yuji; Saito, Taku; Nagashima, Ryo; Konishi, Takehisa; Toriyama, Tatsuya; Ohta, Yukinori; Fukazawa, Hideto; Kohori, Yoh; Furukawa, Yuji; Kihou, Kunihiro; Lee, Chul-Ho; Eisaki, Hiroshi

    2012-04-12

    We have performed 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements on single-crystalline Ba1-xKxFe2As2 for x = 0.27–1. 75As nuclear quadruple resonance frequency (νQ) increases linearly with increasing x. The Knight shift K in the normal state shows Pauli paramagnetic behavior with a weak temperature T dependence. K increases gradually with increasing x. By contrast, the nuclear spin–lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 in the normal state has a strong T dependence, which indicates the existence of large antiferomagnetic (AF) spin fluctuations for all x's. The T dependence of 1/T1 shows a gaplike behavior below approximately 100 K for 0.6 < x < 0.9. This behaviors is well explained by the change in the band structure with the expansion of hole Fermi surfaces and the shrinkage and disappearance of electron Fermi surfaces at the Brillouin zone (BZ) with increasing x. The anisotropy of 1/T1, represented by the ratio of 1/T1ab to 1/T1c, is always larger than 1 for all x's, which indicates that stripe-type AF fluctuations are dominant in this system. The K in the superconducting (SC) state decreases, which corresponds to the appearance of spin-singlet superconductivity. The T dependence of 1/T1 in the SC state indicates a multiple-SC-gap feature. A simple two-gap model analysis shows that the larger superconducting gap gradually decreases with increasing x from 0.27 to 1 and a smaller gap decreases rapidly and nearly vanishes for x > 0.6 where electron pockets in BZ disappear.

  1. Inelastic X-ray and Nuclear Resonant Scattering | Advanced Photon...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    XSD-IXN XSD-IXN Home Staff Inelastic X-ray and Nuclear Resonant Scattering The Inelastic X-ray and Nuclear Resonant Scattering group operates beamlines at APS Sectors 3, 9 and 30....

  2. Antiferromagnetic resonance excitation by terahertz magnetic field resonantly enhanced with split ring resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukai, Y.; Hirori, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Kageyama, H.; Tanaka, K.

    2014-07-14

    Excitation of antiferromagnetic resonance (AFMR) in a HoFeO{sub 3} crystal combined with a split ring resonator (SRR) is studied using terahertz (THz) electromagnetic pulses. The magnetic field in the vicinity of the SRR is induced by the incident THz electric field component and excites spin oscillations that correspond to the AFMR, which are directly probed by the Faraday rotation of the polarization of a near-infrared probe pulse. The good agreement of the temperature-dependent magnetization dynamics with the calculation using the two-lattice Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation confirms that the AFMR is excited by the THz magnetic field, which is enhanced at the SRR resonance frequency by a factor of 20 compared to the incident magnetic field.

  3. Characterisation of amorphous silica in air-oxidised Ti3SiC2 at 500-1000 °C using secondary-ion mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance and transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang, W K; Low, I M; Hanna, J V

    2010-05-18

    In this paper we have described the use of secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), solid state {sup 29}Si magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to detect the existence of amorphous silica in Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} oxidised at 500-1000 C. The formation of amorphous SiO{sub 2} and growth of crystalline TiO{sub 2} with temperature was monitored using dynamic SIMS and synchrotron radiation diffraction. A duplex structure with an outer TiO{sub 2}-rich layer and an inner mixed layer of SiO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} was observed. Results of NMR and TEM verified for the first time the direct evidence of amorphous silica formation during the oxidation of Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} at the temperature range 500-1000 C.

  4. Effects of strain and quantum confinement in optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance in GaAs: Interpretation guided by spin-dependent band structure calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, R. M.; Saha, D.; McCarthy, L. A.; Tokarski, III, J. T.; Sanders, G. D.; Kuhns, P. L.; McGill, S. A.; Reyes, A. P.; Reno, J. L.; Stanton, C. J.; Bowers, C. R.

    2014-10-29

    A combined experimental-theoretical study of optically pumped NMR (OPNMR) has been performed in a GaAs/Al0.1Ga0.9As quantum well film with thermally induced biaxial strain. The photon energy dependence of the Ga-71 OPNMR signal was recorded at magnetic fields of 4.9 and 9.4 T at a temperature of 4.8-5.4 K. The data were compared to the nuclear spin polarization calculated from differential absorption to spin-up and spin-down states of the conduction band using a modified Pidgeon Brown model. Reasonable agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, facilitating assignment of features in the OPNMR energy dependence to specific interband transitions. Despite the approximations made in the quantum-mechanical model and the inexact correspondence between the experimental and calculated observables, the results provide insight into how effects of strain and quantum confinement are manifested in OPNMR signals

  5. Effects of strain and quantum confinement in optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance in GaAs: Interpretation guided by spin-dependent band structure calculations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wood, R. M.; Saha, D.; McCarthy, L. A.; Tokarski, III, J. T.; Sanders, G. D.; Kuhns, P. L.; McGill, S. A.; Reyes, A. P.; Reno, J. L.; Stanton, C. J.; et al

    2014-10-29

    A combined experimental-theoretical study of optically pumped NMR (OPNMR) has been performed in a GaAs/Al0.1Ga0.9As quantum well film with thermally induced biaxial strain. The photon energy dependence of the Ga-71 OPNMR signal was recorded at magnetic fields of 4.9 and 9.4 T at a temperature of 4.8-5.4 K. The data were compared to the nuclear spin polarization calculated from differential absorption to spin-up and spin-down states of the conduction band using a modified Pidgeon Brown model. Reasonable agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, facilitating assignment of features in the OPNMR energy dependence to specific interband transitions. Despite the approximationsmore » made in the quantum-mechanical model and the inexact correspondence between the experimental and calculated observables, the results provide insight into how effects of strain and quantum confinement are manifested in OPNMR signals« less

  6. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quiter, Brian J.; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Prussin, Stanley

    2009-06-29

    This paper discusses the use of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) techniques for the isotopic and quantitative assaying of radioactive material. Potential applications include age-dating of an unknown radioactive source, pre- and post-detonation nuclear forensics, and safeguards for nuclear fuel cycles Examples of age-dating a strong radioactive source and assaying a spent fuel pin are discussed. The modeling work has ben performed with the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNPX, and the capability to simulate NRF has bee added to the code. Discussed are the limitations in MCNPX?s photon transport physics for accurately describing photon scattering processes that are important contributions to the background and impact the applicability of the NRF assay technique.

  7. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quiter, Brian; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Prussin, Stanley

    2009-06-05

    This paper discusses the use of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) techniques for the isotopic and quantitative assaying of radioactive material. Potential applications include age-dating of an unknown radioactive source, pre- and post-detonation nuclear forensics, and safeguards for nuclear fuel cycles Examples of age-dating a strong radioactive source and assaying a spent fuel pin are discussed. The modeling work has ben performed with the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNPX, and the capability to simulate NRF has bee added to the code. Discussed are the limitations in MCNPX's photon transport physics for accurately describing photon scattering processes that are important contributions to the background and impact the applicability of the NRF assay technique.

  8. Method and apparatus for measuring nuclear magnetic properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weitekamp, D.P.; Bielecki, A.; Zax, D.B.; Zilm, K.W.; Pines, A.

    1987-12-01

    A method for studying the chemical and structural characteristics of materials is disclosed. The method includes placement of a sample material in a high strength polarizing magnetic field to order the sample nuclei. The condition used to order the sample is then removed abruptly and the ordering of the sample allowed to evolve for a time interval. At the end of the time interval, the ordering of the sample is measured by conventional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. 5 figs.

  9. Method and apparatus for measuring nuclear magnetic properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weitekamp, Daniel P.; Bielecki, Anthony; Zax, David B.; Zilm, Kurt W.; Pines, Alexander

    1987-01-01

    A method for studying the chemical and structural characteristics of materials is disclosed. The method includes placement of a sample material in a high strength polarizing magnetic field to order the sample nucleii. The condition used to order the sample is then removed abruptly and the ordering of the sample allowed to evolve for a time interval. At the end of the time interval, the ordering of the sample is measured by conventional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of self-assembled biomaterial scaffolds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bull, Steve R; Meade, Thomas J; Stupp, Samuel I

    2014-09-16

    Compositions and/or mixtures comprising peptide amphiphile compounds comprising one or more contrast agents, as can be used in a range of magnetic resonance imaging applications.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Flow Velocity and Temperature Mapping of a...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of a Shape Memory Polymer Foam Device Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic Resonance Flow Velocity and Temperature Mapping of a Shape Memory Polymer Foam ...

  12. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) for stand-off detection of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) for stand-off detection of contraband Authors: Espy, Michelle A. 1 ; Karaulanov, Todor 1 ; Kim, Young Jin 1 ; Urbaitis, Algis V. 1 ...

  13. Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quiter, Brian; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Ambers, Scott

    2011-06-30

    In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of gamma rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. NRF promises the unique capability of directly quantifying a specific isotope without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as is required in other measurement techniques. We have analyzed the potential of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique for quantitative measurements of Pu isotopes in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Given the low concentrations of 239Pu in SNF and its small integrated NRF cross sections, the main challenge in achieving precise and accurate measurements lies in accruing sufficient counting statistics in a reasonable measurement time. Using analytical modeling, and simulations with the radiation transport code MCNPX that has been experimentally tested recently, the backscatter and transmission methods were quantitatively studied for differing photon sources and radiation detector types. Resonant photon count rates and measurement times were estimated for a range of photon source and detection parameters, which were used to determine photon source and gamma-ray detector requirements. The results indicate that systems based on a bremsstrahlung source and present detector technology are not practical for high-precision measurements of 239Pu in SNF. Measurements that achieve the desired uncertainties within hour-long measurements will either require stronger resonances, which may be expressed by other Pu isotopes, or require quasi-monoenergetic photon sources with intensities that are approximately two orders of magnitude higher than those currently being designed or proposed.This work is part of a larger effort sponsored by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative to develop an integrated instrument, comprised of individual NDA techniques with complementary features, that is fully capable of

  14. Nuclear resonance tomography with a toroid cavity detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woelk, Klaus; Rathke, Jerome W.; Klingler, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    A toroid cavity detection system for determining the spectral properties and distance from a fixed point for a sample using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The detection system consists of a toroid with a central conductor oriented along the main axis of the toroidal cylinder and perpendicular to a static uniform magnetic field oriented along the main axis of the toroid. An rf signal is inputted to the central conductor to produce a magnetic field perpendicular to the central axis of the toroid and whose field strength varies as the inverse of the radius of the toroid. The toroid cavity detection system can be used to encapsulate a sample, or the detection system can be perforated to allow a sample to flow into the detection device or to place the samples in specified sample tubes. The central conductor can also be coated to determine the spectral property of the coating and the coating thickness. The sample is then subjected to the respective magnetic fields and the responses measured to determine the desired properties.

  15. Nuclear resonance tomography with a toroid cavity detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woelk, K.; Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

    1996-11-12

    A toroid cavity detection system is described for determining the spectral properties and distance from a fixed point for a sample using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The detection system consists of a toroid with a central conductor oriented along the main axis of the toroidal cylinder and perpendicular to a static uniform magnetic field oriented along the main axis of the toroid. An rf signal is input to the central conductor to produce a magnetic field perpendicular to the central axis of the toroid and whose field strength varies as the inverse of the radius of the toroid. The toroid cavity detection system can be used to encapsulate a sample, or the detection system can be perforated to allow a sample to flow into the detection device or to place the samples in specified sample tubes. The central conductor can also be coated to determine the spectral property of the coating and the coating thickness. The sample is then subjected to the respective magnetic fields and the responses measured to determine the desired properties. 4 figs.

  16. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J; Ambers, Scott D

    2011-02-04

    In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of {gamma} rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. The promise of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique (NDA) in safeguards applications lies in its potential to directly quantify a specific isotope in an assay target without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as often required by other NDA methods. The use of NRF for detection of sensitive nuclear materials and other contraband has been researched in the past. In the safeguards applications considered here one has to go beyond mere detection and precisely quantify the isotopic content, a challenge that is discussed throughout this report. Basic NRF measurement methods, instrumentation, and the analytical calculation of NRF signal strengths are described in Section 2. Well understood modeling and simulation tools are needed for assessing the potential of NRF for safeguards and for designing measurement systems. All our simulations were performed with the radiation transport code MCNPX, a code that is widely used in the safeguards community. Our initial studies showed that MCNPX grossly underestimated the elastically scattered background at backwards angles due to an incorrect treatment of Rayleigh scattering. While new, corrected calculations based on ENDF form factors showed much better agreement with experimental data for the elastic scattering of photons on an uranium target, the elastic backscatter is still not rigorously treated. Photonuclear scattering processes (nuclear Thomson, Delbruck and Giant Dipole Resonance scattering), which are expected to play an important role at higher energies, are not yet included. These missing elastic scattering contributions were studied and their importance evaluated evaluated against data found in the literature as discussed in Section 3. A transmission experiment

  17. Resonant x-ray magnetic scattering in holmium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, D.

    1991-01-01

    We review the results of resonant x-ray magnetic scattering experiments on the rare earth metal holmium. When the incident incident x-ray energy is tuned near the L{sub III} absorption edge, large resonant enhancements of the magnetic scattering and resonant integer harmonics are observed. These results are analyzed within the theory of x-ray resonance exchange scattering assuming electric dipole (2p {yields} 5d) and quadrupole (2p {yields} 4f) transitions among atomic orbitals. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Investigation of Mechanical Activation on Li-N-H Systems Using 6Li Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance at Ultra-High Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Kwak, Ja Hun; Yang, Zhenguo; Osborn, William; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Shaw, Leonard D.

    2008-07-15

    Abstract The significantly enhanced spectral resolution in the 6Li MAS NMR spectra of Li-N-H systems at ultra-high field of 21.1 tesla is exploited, for the first time, to study the detailed electronic and chemical environmental changes associated with mechanical activation of Li-N-H system using high energy balling milling. Complementary to ultra-high field studies, the hydrogen discharge dynamics are investigated using variable temperature in situ 1H MAS NMR at 7.05 tesla field. The significantly enhanced spectral resolution using ultra-high filed of 21.1 tesla was demonstrated along with several major findings related to mechanical activation, including the upfield shift of the resonances in 6Li MAS spectra induced by ball milling, more efficient mechanical activation with ball milling at liquid nitrogen temperature than with ball milling at room temperature, and greatly enhanced hydrogen discharge exhibited by the liquid nitrogen ball milled samples.

  19. Sensitive magnetic force detection with a carbon nanotube resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willick, Kyle; Haapamaki, Chris; Baugh, Jonathan

    2014-03-21

    We propose a technique for sensitive magnetic point force detection using a suspended carbon nanotube (CNT) mechanical resonator combined with a magnetic field gradient generated by a ferromagnetic gate electrode. Numerical calculations of the mechanical resonance frequency show that single Bohr magneton changes in the magnetic state of an individual magnetic molecule grafted to the CNT can translate to detectable frequency shifts, on the order of a few kHz. The dependences of the resonator response to device parameters such as length, tension, CNT diameter, and gate voltage are explored and optimal operating conditions are identified. A signal-to-noise analysis shows that, in principle, magnetic switching at the level of a single Bohr magneton can be read out in a single shot on timescales as short as 10??s. This force sensor should enable new studies of spin dynamics in isolated single molecule magnets, free from the crystalline or ensemble settings typically studied.

  20. magnets | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    magnets NNSA-lab-created new magnets will power renewable technology The Ion Beam Materials Laboratory at NNSA's Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) works to characterize and ...

  1. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Engelstad, B.L.; Raymond, K.N.; Huberty, J.P.; White, D.L.

    1991-04-23

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided. No Drawings

  2. Magnetic Resonance Flow Velocity and Temperature Mapping of a...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A laser-heated SMP foam device was deployed in a simplified in vitro vascular model. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques were used to assess the fluid dynamics and thermal ...

  3. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Engelstad, Barry L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Huberty, John P.; White, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided.

  4. X-ray imaging of Nonlinear Resonant Gyrotropic Magnetic Vortex...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-ray imaging of Nonlinear Resonant Gyrotropic Magnetic Vortex Core Motion in Circular Permalloy Disks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: X-ray imaging of Nonlinear ...

  5. Electron density distribution in BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} superconducting oxides studied by double nuclear magnetic resonance methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piskunov, Yu. V. Ogloblichev, V. V.; Arapova, I. Yu.; Sadykov, A. V.; Gerashchenko, A. P.; Verkhovskii, S. V.

    2011-11-15

    The effect of charge disorder on the formation of an inhomogeneous state of the electron system in the conduction band in BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} superconducting oxides is investigated experimentally by NMR methods. The NMR spectra of {sup 17}O are measured systematically, and the contributions from {sup 17}O atoms with different cation nearest surroundings are identified. It is found that microscopic regions with an elevated spin density of charge carriers are formed within two coordination spheres near antimony ions. Nuclei of the superconducting phase of the oxide (regions with an elevated antimony concentration) microscopically distributed over the sample are detected in compounds with x = 0.25 and 0.33. Experiments in which a double resonance signal of the spin echo of {sup 17}O-{sup 207}Pb and {sup 17}O-{sup 121}Sb are measured in the metal phase of BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} oxides are carried out for the first time. The constants of indirect heteronuclear spin-spin {sup 17}O-{sup 207}Pb interaction are determined as functions of the local Knight shift {sub 207}Ks. The estimates of the constants of the indirect interaction between the nuclei of the nearest neighbors (O-Pb and Pb-Pb atoms) and analysis of evolution of the NMR spectra of {sup 17}O upon a change in the antimony concentration are convincing evidence in favor of the development of a microscopically inhomogeneous state of the electron system in the metal phase of BaPb{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}O{sub 3} oxides.

  6. On the Coulomb shifts of nuclear resonances at low energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takibayev, N.

    2005-05-06

    The relationship between the shift of a resonance and the interacion potential is obtained in the frame of coupling constant evolution method. Analysis of the Coulomb shifts of resonance energies and widths has been carried out for nuclear cluster systems at low energies. The nature of these shifts is investigated in the examples of p, {alpha} and p,6Li scatterings. For simplicity a model using separable potentials describing two-body nuclear scattering resonances. The results of the calculation are in accordance with experimental data. In the case of the two {alpha}-particles system the relationship shows that the Coulomb shift of {alpha}, {alpha}-resonance remains small.

  7. Magnetism studies using resonant, coherent, x-ray scattering | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Magnetism studies using resonant, coherent, x-ray scattering Monday, September 10, 2012 - 10:00am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Keoki Seu Seminar: With the advent of free electron lasers there has been interest in using coherent x-rays to probe condensed matter systems. Resonant scattering with x-rays allow elemental specificity with magnetic contrast, and coherent light leads to speckle in the scattered pattern due to interference from waves exiting the sample.

  8. Probing the Oxygen Environment in UO22+ by Solid-State O-17 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Relativistic Density Functional Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Herman M.; De Jong, Wibe A.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.

    2010-02-28

    A combined theoretical and solid-state O-17 NMR study of the electronic structure of the uranyl ion UO22+ in (NH4)4UO2(CO3)3 and rutherfordine UO2CO3 is presented, the former representing a system with a hydrogen-bonding environment around the uranyl oxygens, and the latter exemplifying a uranyl environment without hydrogens. A fully relativistic ab initio treatment reveals unique features of the U-O covalent bond, including the finding of O-17 chemical shift anisotropies that are among the largest ever reported (>1200 ppm). Computational results for the oxygen electric field gradient tensor are found to be consistently larger in magnitude than experimental solid-state O-17 NMR measurements in a 7.05 T magnetic field indicate. A modified version of the Solomon theory of the two-spin echo amplitude for a spin-5/2 nucleus is developed and applied to the analysis of the O-17 echo signal of UO22+. The William R. Wiley environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory is a US Department of Energy national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington. PNNL is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  9. Contemporary research with nuclear resonance fluorescence at the S-DALINAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zweidinger, M.; Beck, T.; Beller, J.; Gayer, U.; Mertes, L.; Pai, H.; Pietralla, N.; Ries, P.; Romig, C.; Werner, V.

    2015-02-24

    In the last decades many nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments aiming for low-lying dipole excitations were performed at the Darmstadt High Intensity Photon Setup at S-DALINAC facility. On the electric dipole side, quadrupole-octupole coupled states and the Pygmy Dipole Resonance are of particular interest. On the magnetic dipole side, the so-called scissors mode is in the focus of interest. Furthermore, using the method of resonant self absorption, the decay behavior of J{sup π} = 1{sup −} states was investigated in {sup 140}Ce.

  10. Method for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kehayias, J.J.; Joel, D.D.; Adams, W.H.; Stein, H.L.

    1988-05-26

    A method for in vivo NMR imaging of the blood vessels and organs of a patient characterized by using a dark dye-like imaging substance consisting essentially of a stable, high-purity concentration of D/sub 2/O in a solution with water.

  11. Plutonium less mysterious with nuclear magnetic resonance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    revolutionized the practice of chemistry, physics, and medicine by providing a non-invasive method for the observation of matter at atomic scales. "Just as knowing the NMR...

  12. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence at MIT | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Resonance Fluorescence at MIT Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science ...

  13. Contraband Detection with Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence: Feasibility and Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruet, J; Lange, D

    2007-01-03

    In this report they show that cargo interrogation systems developed to thwart trafficking of illicit nuclear materials could also be powerful tools in the larger fight against contraband smuggling. In particular, in addition to detecting special nuclear materials, cargo scanning systems that exploit nuclear resonance fluorescence to detect specific isotopes can be used to help find: chemical weapons; some drugs as well as some chemicals regulated under the controlled substances act; precious metals; materials regulated under export control laws; and commonly trafficked fluorocarbons.

  14. Allan Cormack, Computerized Axial Tomography (CAT), and Magnetic Resonance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging (MRI) Allan M. Cormack, Computerized Axial Tomography (CAT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Resources with Additional Information magnetic resonance imaging system Computed axial tomography, commonly known as CAT scanning, was introduced in 1972. During a CAT scan, a large coil of x-ray tubes rotates around the patient's body, taking x-rays from all angles. A computer integrates all of these x-rays into a single, three-dimensional image on a television screen. The data can be

  15. On transition from Alfvn resonance to forced magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luan, Q. [MOE Key Lab of Materials Modification by Beams and School of Physics and Optoelectrical Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, X., E-mail: xgwang@hit.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2014-07-15

    We revisit the transition from Alfvn resonance to forced magnetic reconnection with a focus on the property of their singularities. As the driven frequency tends to zero, the logarithmic singularity of Alfvn resonance shifts to the power-law singularity of forced reconnection, due to merging of the two resonance layers. The transition criterion depends on either kinetic effects or dissipations that resolve the singularity. As an example, a small but finite resistivity ? is introduced to investigate the transition process. The transition threshold is then obtained as the driven frequency reaches a level of ?O((?/k){sup 1/3})

  16. Nature of Coulomb Shifts of Nuclear Scattering Resonances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takibayev, N.Zh.

    2005-07-01

    Relations determining the shift of energies and widths of scattering resonances are obtained within the method of evolution in the coupling constant. These relations generalize the well-known relations for the shift of levels in a discrete spectrum. The problem of determining the Coulomb shifts of low-energy resonances manifesting themselves in the cross section for the scattering of some light nuclei is solved. Examples that are of importance for nuclear astrophysics and examples of problems that are associated with the production of chemical elements are considered. The character of Coulomb shifts is studied within simple nuclear models. Respective numerical estimates are given, which agree satisfactorily with experimental data.

  17. Electromagnetically induced transparency resonances inverted in magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sargsyan, A.; Sarkisyan, D. E-mail: david@ipr.sci.am; Pashayan-Leroy, Y.; Leroy, C.; Cartaleva, S.; Wilson-Gordon, A. D.; Auzinsh, M.

    2015-12-15

    The phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is investigated in a Λ-system of the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 1} line in an external transverse magnetic field. Two spectroscopic cells having strongly different values of the relaxation rates γ{sub rel} are used: an Rb cell with antirelaxation coating (L ∼ 1 cm) and an Rb nanometric- thin cell (nanocell) with a thickness of the atomic vapor column L = 795 nm. For the EIT in the nanocell, we have the usual EIT resonances characterized by a reduction in the absorption (dark resonance (DR)), whereas for the EIT in the Rb cell with an antirelaxation coating, the resonances demonstrate an increase in the absorption (bright resonances (BR)). We suppose that such an unusual behavior of the EIT resonances (i.e., the reversal of the sign from DR to BR) is caused by the influence of an alignment process. The influence of alignment strongly depends on the configuration of the coupling and probe frequencies as well as on the configuration of the magnetic field.

  18. A 4 K cryogenic probe for use in magnetic resonance force microscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Doran D.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Garbini, Joseph L.

    2013-09-15

    The detailed design of a mechanically detected nuclear magnetic resonance probe using the SPAM (Springiness Preservation by Aligning Magnetization) geometry, operating at 4 K, in vacuum, and a several-Tesla magnetic field is described. The probe head is vibration-isolated well enough from the environment by a three-spring suspension system that the cantilever achieves thermal equilibrium with the environment without the aid of eddy current damping. The probe uses an ultra-soft Si cantilever with a Ni sphere attached to its tip, and magnetic resonance is registered as a change in the resonant frequency of the driven cantilever. The RF system uses frequency sweeps for adiabatic rapid passage using a 500 μm diameter RF coil wound around a sapphire rod. The RF coil and optical fiber of the interferometer used to sense the cantilever's position are both located with respect to the cantilever using a Garbini micropositioner, and the sample stage is mounted on an Attocube nanopositioner.

  19. Alkali-vapor magnetic resonance driven by fictitious radiofrequency fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhivun, Elena; Wickenbrock, Arne; Patton, Brian; Budker, Dmitry

    2014-11-10

    We demonstrate an all-optical {sup 133}Cs scalar magnetometer, operating in nonzero magnetic field, in which the magnetic resonance is driven by an effective oscillating magnetic field provided by the AC Stark shift of an intensity-modulated laser beam. We achieve a projected shot-noise-limited sensitivity of 1.7fT/√(Hz) and measure a technical noise floor of 40fT/√(Hz). These results are essentially identical to a coil-driven scalar magnetometer using the same setup. This all-optical scheme offers advantages over traditional coil-driven magnetometers for use in arrays and in magnetically sensitive fundamental physics experiments, e.g., searches for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  20. Nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at high pressure and low temperature

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bi, Wenli; Zhao, Jiyong; Lin, Jung -Fu; Jia, Quanjie; Hu, Michael Y.; Jin, Changqing; Ferry, Richard; Yang, Wenge; Struzhkin, Viktor; Alp, E. Ercan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new synchrotron radiation experimental capability of coupling nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering with the cryogenically cooled high-pressure diamond anvil cell technique is presented. The new technique permits measurements of phonon density of states at low temperature and high pressure simultaneously, and can be applied to studies of phonon contribution to pressure- and temperature-induced magnetic, superconducting and metal–insulator transitions in resonant isotope-bearing materials. In this report, a pnictide sample, EuFe2As2, is used as an example to demonstrate this new capability at beamline 3-ID of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. A detailed description of the technicalmore » development is given. The Fe-specific phonon density of states and magnetism from the Fe sublattice in Eu57Fe2As2 at high pressure and low temperature were derived by using this new capability.« less

  1. Magnetic nuclear core restraint and control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, Martin H.

    1978-01-01

    A lateral restraint and control system for a nuclear reactor core adaptable to provide an inherent decrease of core reactivity in response to abnormally high reactor coolant fluid temperatures. An electromagnet is associated with structure for radially compressing the core during normal reactor conditions. A portion of the structures forming a magnetic circuit are composed of ferromagnetic material having a curie temperature corresponding to a selected coolant fluid temperature. Upon a selected signal, or inherently upon a preselected rise in coolant temperature, the magnetic force is decreased a given amount sufficient to relieve the compression force so as to allow core radial expansion. The expanded core configuration provides a decreased reactivity, tending to shut down the nuclear reaction.

  2. Magnetic nuclear core restraint and control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, Martin H.

    1979-01-01

    A lateral restraint and control system for a nuclear reactor core adaptable to provide an inherent decrease of core reactivity in response to abnormally high reactor coolant fluid temperatures. An electromagnet is associated with structure for radially compressing the core during normal reactor conditions. A portion of the structures forming a magnetic circuit are composed of ferromagnetic material having a curie temperature corresponding to a selected coolant fluid temperature. Upon a selected signal, or inherently upon a preselected rise in coolant temperature, the magnetic force is decreased a given amount sufficient to relieve the compression force so as to allow core radial expansion. The expanded core configuration provides a decreased reactivity, tending to shut down the nuclear reaction.

  3. Ideal plasma response to vacuum magnetic fields with resonant magnetic perturbations in non-axisymmetric tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Kimin; Ahn, J. -W.; Scotti, F.; Park, J. -K.; Menard, J. E.

    2015-09-03

    Ideal plasma shielding and amplification of resonant magnetic perturbations in non-axisymmetric tokamak is presented by field line tracing simulation with full ideal plasma response, compared to measurements of divertor lobe structures. Magnetic field line tracing simulations in NSTX with toroidal non-axisymmetry indicate the ideal plasma response can significantly shield/amplify and phase shift the vacuum resonant magnetic perturbations. Ideal plasma shielding for n = 3 mode is found to prevent magnetic islands from opening as consistently shown in the field line connection length profile and magnetic footprints on the divertor target. It is also found that the ideal plasma shielding modifies the degree of stochasticity but does not change the overall helical lobe structures of the vacuum field for n = 3. Furthermore, amplification of vacuum fields by the ideal plasma response is predicted for low toroidal mode n = 1, better reproducing measurements of strong striation of the field lines on the divertor plate in NSTX.

  4. Magnetic nematicity: A debated origin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vaknin, David

    2016-01-22

    Different experimental studies based on nuclear magnetic resonance and inelastic neutron scattering reach opposing conclusions in regards to the origin of magnetic nematicity in iron chalcogenides.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of living systems by remote detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander; Bouchard, Louis; Xu, Shoujun; Harel, Elad; Budker, Dmitry; Lowery, Thomas; Ledbetter, Micah

    2013-10-29

    A novel approach to magnetic resonance imaging is disclosed. Blood flowing through a living system is prepolarized, and then encoded. The polarization can be achieved using permanent or superconducting magnets. The polarization may be carried out upstream of the region to be encoded or at the place of encoding. In the case of an MRI of a brain, polarization of flowing blood can be effected by placing a magnet over a section of the body such as the heart upstream of the head. Alternatively, polarization and encoding can be effected at the same location. Detection occurs at a remote location, using a separate detection device such as an optical atomic magnetometer, or an inductive Faraday coil. The detector may be placed on the surface of the skin next to a blood vessel such as a jugular vein carrying blood away from the encoded region.

  6. Methods for magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Wind, Robert A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Majors, Paul D.

    2011-11-22

    Methods of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object are disclosed that include placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. In particular embodiments the method includes pulsing the radio frequency to provide at least two of a spatially selective read pulse, a spatially selective phase pulse, and a spatially selective storage pulse. Further disclosed methods provide pulse sequences that provide extended imaging capabilities, such as chemical shift imaging or multiple-voxel data acquisition.

  7. Magnetic nanoparticle imaging using multiple electron paramagnetic resonance activation sequences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coene, A. Dupr, L.; Crevecoeur, G.

    2015-05-07

    Magnetic nanoparticles play an important role in several biomedical applications such as hyperthermia, drug targeting, and disease detection. To realize an effective working of these applications, the spatial distribution of the particles needs to be accurately known, in a non-invasive way. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is a promising and sensitive measurement technique for recovering these distributions. In the conventional approach, EPR is applied with a homogeneous magnetic field. In this paper, we employ different heterogeneous magnetic fields that allow to stabilize the solution of the associated inverse problem and to obtain localized spatial information. A comparison is made between the two approaches and our novel adaptation shows an average increase in reconstruction quality by 5% and is 12 times more robust towards noise. Furthermore, our approach allows to speed up the EPR measurements while still obtaining reconstructions with an improved accuracy and noise robustness compared to homogeneous EPR.

  8. Continuum resonance induced electromagnetic torque by a rotating plasma response to static resonant magnetic perturbation field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Yueqiang; Connor, J. W.; Cowley, S. C.; Ham, C. J.; Hastie, R. J.; Hender, T. C.

    2012-10-15

    A numerical study is carried out, based on a simple toroidal tokamak equilibrium, to demonstrate the radial re-distribution of the electromagnetic torque density, as a result of a rotating resistive plasma (linear) response to a static resonant magnetic perturbation field. The computed electromagnetic torque peaks at several radial locations even in the presence of a single rational surface, due to resonances between the rotating response, in the plasma frame, and both Alfven and sound continuum waves. These peaks tend to merge together to form a rather global torque distribution, when the plasma resistivity is large. The continuum resonance induced net electromagnetic torque remains finite even in the limit of an ideal plasma.

  9. Electromagnetically induced transparency with large delay-bandwidth product induced by magnetic resonance near field coupling to electric resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hai-ming; Liu, Shao-bin Liu, Si-yuan; Zhang, Hai-feng; Bian, Bo-rui; Kong, Xiang-kun; Wang, Shen-yun

    2015-03-16

    In this paper, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-like spectral response with magnetic resonance near field coupling to electric resonance. Six split-ring resonators and a cut wire are chosen as the bright and dark resonator, respectively. An EIT-like transmission peak located between two dips can be observed with incident magnetic field excitation. A large delay bandwidth product (0.39) is obtained, which has potential application in quantum optics and communications. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulated results.

  10. Resonances and spectral shift function for a magnetic Schroedinger operator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khochman, Abdallah

    2009-04-15

    We consider the three-dimensional Schroedinger operator H{sub 0} with a constant magnetic field and subject to an electric potential v{sub 0} depending only on the variable along the magnetic field x{sub 3}. The operator H{sub 0} has infinitely many eigenvalues of infinite multiplicity embedded in its continuous spectrum. We perturb H{sub 0} by smooth scalar potentials V=O(<(x{sub 1},x{sub 2})>{sup -{delta}{sub perpendicular}}{sup -{delta}{sub ||}}), {delta}{sub perpendicular}>2, {delta}{sub ||}>1. We assume also that V and v{sub 0} have an analytic continuation, in the magnetic field direction, in a complex sector outside a compact set. We define the resonances of H=H{sub 0}+V as the eigenvalues of the nonself-adjoint operator obtained from H by analytic distortions of R{sub x{sub 3}}. We study their distribution near any fixed real eigenvalue of H{sub 0}, 2bq+{lambda} for q is an element of N. In a ring centered at 2bq+{lambda} with radii (r,2r), we establish an upper bound, as r tends to 0, of the number of resonances. This upper bound depends on the decay of V at infinity only in the directions (x{sub 1},x{sub 2}). Finally, we deduce a representation of the derivative of the spectral shift function for the operator pair (H{sub 0},H) in terms of resonances. This representation justifies the Breit-Wigner approximation and implies a local trace formula.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Gel-cast Ceramic Composites

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Dieckman, S. L.; Balss, K. M.; Waterfield, L. G.; Jendrzejczyk, J. A.; Raptis, A. C.

    1997-01-16

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are being employed to aid in the development of advanced near-net-shape gel-cast ceramic composites. MRI is a unique nondestructive evaluation tool that provides information on both the chemical and physical properties of materials. In this effort, MRI imaging was performed to monitor the drying of porous green-state alumina - methacrylamide-N.N`-methylene bisacrylamide (MAM-MBAM) polymerized composite specimens. Studies were performed on several specimens as a function of humidity and time. The mass and shrinkage of the specimens were also monitored and correlated with the water content.

  12. Nuclear and magnetic supercells in the multiferroic candidate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear and magnetic supercells in the multiferroic candidate: Pb3TeMn3P2O14 Title: Nuclear and magnetic supercells in the multiferroic candidate: Pb3TeMn3P2O14 Here we report that ...

  13. Ideal plasma response to vacuum magnetic fields with resonant magnetic perturbations in non-axisymmetric tokamaks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Kimin; Ahn, J. -W.; Scotti, F.; Park, J. -K.; Menard, J. E.

    2015-09-03

    Ideal plasma shielding and amplification of resonant magnetic perturbations in non-axisymmetric tokamak is presented by field line tracing simulation with full ideal plasma response, compared to measurements of divertor lobe structures. Magnetic field line tracing simulations in NSTX with toroidal non-axisymmetry indicate the ideal plasma response can significantly shield/amplify and phase shift the vacuum resonant magnetic perturbations. Ideal plasma shielding for n = 3 mode is found to prevent magnetic islands from opening as consistently shown in the field line connection length profile and magnetic footprints on the divertor target. It is also found that the ideal plasma shielding modifiesmore » the degree of stochasticity but does not change the overall helical lobe structures of the vacuum field for n = 3. Furthermore, amplification of vacuum fields by the ideal plasma response is predicted for low toroidal mode n = 1, better reproducing measurements of strong striation of the field lines on the divertor plate in NSTX.« less

  14. Magnetic island and plasma rotation under external resonant magnetic perturbation in the T-10 tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliseev, L. G.; Ivanov, N. V. Kakurin, A. M.; Perfilov, S. V.; Melnikov, A. V.

    2015-05-15

    Experimental comparison of the m = 2, n = 1 mode and plasma rotation velocities at q = 2 magnetic surface in a wide range of the mode amplitudes is presented. Phase velocity of the mode rotation is measured with a set of poloidal magnetic field sensors located at the inner side of the vacuum vessel wall. Plasma rotation velocity at the q = 2 magnetic surface in the direction of the mode phase velocity is measured with the heavy ion beam probe diagnostics. In the presence of a static Resonant Magnetic Perturbation (RMP), the rotation is irregular that appears as cyclical variations of the mode and plasma instantaneous velocities. The period of these variations is equal to the period of the mode oscillations. In the case of high mode amplitude, the rotation irregularity of the mode is consistent with the rotation irregularity of the resonant plasma layer. On the contrary, the observed rise of the mode rotation irregularity in the case of low mode amplitude occurs without an increase of the rotation irregularity of the resonant plasma layer. The experimental results are simulated and analyzed with the TEAR code based on the two-fluid MHD approximation. Calculated irregularities of the mode and plasma rotation depend on the mode amplitude similar to the experimental data. For large islands, the rotation irregularity is attributed to oscillations of the electromagnetic torque applied to the resonant plasma layer. For small islands, the deviation of the mode rotation velocity from the plasma velocity occurs due to the effect of finite plasma resistivity.

  15. Interpreting the behavior of a quarter-wave transmission line resonator in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogna, G. S. Turner, M. M.; Karkari, S. K.

    2014-12-15

    The quarter wave resonator immersed in a strongly magnetized plasma displays two possible resonances occurring either below or above its resonance frequency in vacuum, f{sub o}. This fact was demonstrated in our recent articles [G. S. Gogna and S. K. Karkari, Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 151503 (2010); S. K. Karkari, G. S. Gogna, D. Boilson, M. M. Turner, and A. Simonin, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 50(9), 903 (2010)], where the experiments were carried out over a limited range of magnetic fields at a constant electron density, n{sub e}. In this paper, we present the observation of dual resonances occurring over the frequency scan and find that n{sub e} calculated by considering the lower resonance frequency is 25%–30% smaller than that calculated using the upper resonance frequency with respect to f{sub o}. At a given magnetic field strength, the resonances tend to shift away from f{sub o} as the background density is increased. The lower resonance tends to saturate when its value approaches electron cyclotron frequency, f{sub ce}. Interpretation of these resonance conditions are revisited by examining the behavior of the resonance frequency response as a function of n{sub e}. A qualitative discussion is presented which highlights the practical application of the hairpin resonator for interpreting n{sub e} in a strongly magnetized plasma.

  16. Antiferromagnetic spin correlations and pseudogaplike behavior in Ca(Fe1-xCox)2As2 studied by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance and anisotropic resistivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, J.; Roy, B.; Tanatar, M. A.; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Prozorov, R.; Canfield, P. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2015-11-06

    We report 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of single-crystalline Ca(Fe1–xCox)2As2 (x=0.023, 0.028, 0.033, and 0.059) annealed at 350°C for 7 days. From the observation of a characteristic shape of 75As NMR spectra in the stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, as in the case of x=0 (TN=170 K), clear evidence for the commensurate AFM phase transition with the concomitant structural phase transition is observed in x=0.023 (TN=106 K) and x=0.028 (TN=53 K). Through the temperature dependence of the Knight shifts and the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1), although stripe-type AFM spin fluctuations are realized in the paramagnetic state as in the case of other iron pnictide superconductors, we found a gradual decrease of the AFM spin fluctuations below a crossover temperature T* that was nearly independent of Co-substitution concentration, and it is attributed to a pseudogaplike behavior in the spin excitation spectra of these systems. The T* feature finds correlation with features in the temperature-dependent interplane resistivity, ρc(T), but not with the in-plane resistivity ρa(T). The temperature evolution of anisotropic stripe-type AFM spin fluctuations is tracked in the paramagnetic and pseudogap phases by the 1/T1 data measured under magnetic fields parallel and perpendicular to the c axis. As a result, based on our NMR data, we have added a pseudogaplike phase to the magnetic and electronic phase diagram of Ca(Fe1–xCox)2As2.

  17. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence at MIT | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Resonance Fluorescence at MIT Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation Research / Small Business Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301)

  18. Optically detected magnetic resonance studies on {pi}-conjugate polymers and novel carbon allotropes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partee, J.

    1999-02-12

    This report describes the following: introduction to photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance (PLDMR); introduction to {pi}-conjugated systems; PLDMR measurements on poly(p-phenylene)-type ladder polymers; PLMDR measurements on poly(p-phenylene ethylene); and PLDMR measurements on C{sub 70}, polythiophene, poly(p-phenylene vinylene) and Dan-40. Appendices to this report describe: Operation of ODMR (optically detected magnetic resonance) spectrometer; ODMR system parameters; and Special purpose circuitry.

  19. Ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate and identify materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matlashov, Andrei Nikolaevich; Urbaitis, Algis V.; Savukov, Igor Mykhaylovich; Espy, Michelle A.; Volegov, Petr Lvovich; Kraus, Jr., Robert Henry

    2013-03-05

    Method comprising obtaining an NMR measurement from a sample wherein an ultra-low field NMR system probes the sample and produces the NMR measurement and wherein a sampling temperature, prepolarizing field, and measurement field are known; detecting the NMR measurement by means of inductive coils; analyzing the NMR measurement to obtain at least one measurement feature wherein the measurement feature comprises T1, T2, T1.rho., or the frequency dependence thereof; and, searching for the at least one measurement feature within a database comprising NMR reference data for at least one material to determine if the sample comprises a material of interest.

  20. Magnet design considerations for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhai, Yuhu; Kessel, Chuck; El-guebaly, Laila; Titus, Peter

    2016-02-25

    The Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is a nuclear confinement facility to provide a fusion environment with components of the reactor integrated together to bridge the technical gaps of burning plasma and nuclear science between ITER and the demonstration power plant (DEMO). Compared to ITER, the FNSF is smaller in size but generates much higher magnetic field, 30 times higher neutron fluence with 3 orders of magnitude longer plasma operation at higher operating temperatures for structures surrounding the plasma. Input parameters to the magnet design from system code analysis include magnetic field of 7.5 T at the plasma center withmore » plasma major radius of 4.8 m and minor radius of 1.2 m, and a peak field of 15.5 T on the TF coils for FNSF. Both low temperature superconductor (LTS) and high temperature superconductor (HTS) are considered for the FNSF magnet design based on the state-of-the-art fusion magnet technology. The higher magnetic field can be achieved by using the high performance ternary Restack Rod Process (RRP) Nb3Sn strands for toroidal field (TF) magnets. The circular cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to ITER magnets and a high aspect ratio rectangular CICC design are evaluated for FNSF magnets but low activation jacket materials may need to be selected. The conductor design concept and TF coil winding pack composition and dimension based on the horizontal maintenance schemes are discussed. Neutron radiation limits for the LTS and HTS superconductors and electrical insulation materials are also reviewed based on the available materials previously tested. As a result, the material radiation limits for FNSF magnets are defined as part of the conceptual design studies for FNSF magnets.« less

  1. Magnetic field amplification in nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration including resonant and non-resonant cosmic-ray driven instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bykov, Andrei M.; Osipov, Sergei M.; Ellison, Donald C.; Vladimirov, Andrey E. E-mail: osm2004@mail.ru E-mail: avenovo@gmail.com

    2014-07-10

    We present a nonlinear Monte Carlo model of efficient diffusive shock acceleration where the magnetic turbulence responsible for particle diffusion is calculated self-consistently from the resonant cosmic-ray (CR) streaming instability, together with non-resonant short- and long-wavelength CR-current-driven instabilities. We include the backpressure from CRs interacting with the strongly amplified magnetic turbulence which decelerates and heats the super-Alfvénic flow in the extended shock precursor. Uniquely, in our plane-parallel, steady-state, multi-scale model, the full range of particles, from thermal (∼eV) injected at the viscous subshock to the escape of the highest energy CRs (∼PeV) from the shock precursor, are calculated consistently with the shock structure, precursor heating, magnetic field amplification, and scattering center drift relative to the background plasma. In addition, we show how the cascade of turbulence to shorter wavelengths influences the total shock compression, the downstream proton temperature, the magnetic fluctuation spectra, and accelerated particle spectra. A parameter survey is included where we vary shock parameters, the mode of magnetic turbulence generation, and turbulence cascading. From our survey results, we obtain scaling relations for the maximum particle momentum and amplified magnetic field as functions of shock speed, ambient density, and shock size.

  2. EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON THE PROPAGATION OF NUCLEAR FLAMES IN MAGNETIC WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kutsuna, Masamichi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu [Research Center for the Early Universe, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-04-10

    We investigate the effects of the magnetic field on the propagation of laminar flames of nuclear reactions taking place in white dwarfs with masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit. We calculate the velocities of laminar flames parallel and perpendicular to uniform magnetic fields as eigenvalues of steady solutions for magnetic hydrodynamical equations. As a result, we find that even when the magnetic pressure does not dominate the entire pressure it is possible for the magnetic field to suppress the flame propagation through the thermal conduction. Above the critical magnetic field, the flame velocity decreases with increasing magnetic field strength as v {approx} B{sup -1}. In media with densities of 10{sup 7}, 10{sup 8}, and 10{sup 9} g cm{sup -3}, the critical magnetic fields are orders of {approx}10{sup 10}, 10{sup 11}, and 10{sup 12} G, respectively.

  3. Vortices at the magnetic equator generated by hybrid Alfvn resonant waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiraki, Yasutaka

    2015-01-15

    We performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of shear Alfvn waves in a full field line system with magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and plasma non-uniformities. Feedback instability of the Alfvn resonant modes showed various nonlinear features under the field line cavities: (i) a secondary flow shear instability occurs at the magnetic equator, (ii) trapping of the ionospheric Alfvn resonant modes facilitates deformation of field-aligned current structures, and (iii) hybrid Alfvn resonant modes grow to cause vortices and magnetic oscillations around the magnetic equator. Essential features in the initial brightening of auroral arc at substorm onsets could be explained by the dynamics of Alfvn resonant modes, which are the nature of the field line system responding to a background rapid change.

  4. Magnetically tunable resonance frequency beam utilizing a stress-sensitive film

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, J. Kenneth; Thundat, Thomas G.; Wachter, Eric A.

    2001-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for detecting particular frequencies of vibration utilize a magnetically-tunable beam element having a stress-sensitive coating and means for providing magnetic force to controllably deflect the beam element thereby changing its stiffness and its resonance frequency. It is then determined from the response of the magnetically-tunable beam element to the vibration to which the beam is exposed whether or not a particular frequency or frequencies of vibration are detected.

  5. Isotropic proton-detected local-field nuclear magnetic resonancein solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havlin, Robert H.; Walls, Jamie D.; Pines, Alexander

    2004-08-04

    A new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method is presented which produces linear, isotropic proton-detected local-field spectra for InS spin systems in powdered samples. The method, HETeronuclear Isotropic Evolution (HETIE), refocuses the anisotropic portion of the heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies by evolving the system under a series of specially designed Hamiltonians and evolution pathways. The theory behind HETIE is represented along with experimental studies conducted on a powdered sample of ferrocene, demonstrating the methodology outlined in this paper. Applications of HETIE for structural determination in solid-state NMR are discussed.

  6. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2004-12-28

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  7. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-12-30

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  8. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J.; Ambers, Scott D.

    2011-01-14

    The Next Generation Safeguard Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S Department of Energy is supporting a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies and to detect the diversion of pins with non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. The following 14 NDA techniques are being studied: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation, Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer, Neutron Multiplicity, Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity, Total Neutron (Gross Neutron), X-Ray Fluorescence, {sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron Detection, Delayed Gamma, Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, Passive Prompt Gamma, Self-integration Neutron Resonance Densitometry, and Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis. Understanding and maturity of the techniques vary greatly, ranging from decades old, well-understood methods to new approaches. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) is a technique that had not previously been studied for SNF assay or similar applications. Since NRF generates isotope-specific signals, the promise and appeal of the technique lies in its potential to directly measure the amount of a specific isotope in an SNF assay target. The objectives of this study were to design and model suitable NRF measurement methods, to quantify capabilities and corresponding instrumentation requirements, and to evaluate prospects and the potential of NRF for SNF assay. The main challenge of the technique is to achieve the sensitivity and precision, i.e., to accumulate sufficient counting statistics, required for quantifying the mass of Pu isotopes in SNF assemblies. Systematic errors, considered a lesser problem for a direct measurement and only briefly discussed in this report, need to be evaluated for specific instrument designs in the future. Also, since the technical capability of using NRF to measure Pu in SNF has not been established, this report does not directly address issues such as cost, size

  9. Detection of magnetic resonance signals using a magnetoresistive sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander; Xu, Shoujun; Hilty, Christian; Ledbetter, Micah P; Bouchard, Louis S

    2013-10-01

    A method and apparatus are described wherein a micro sample of a fluidic material may be assayed without sample contamination using NMR techniques, in combination with magnetoresistive sensors. The fluidic material to be assayed is first subject to pre-polarization, in one embodiment, by passage through a magnetic field. The magnetization of the fluidic material is then subject to an encoding process, in one embodiment an rf-induced inversion by passage through an adiabatic fast-passage module. Thereafter, the changes in magnetization are detected by a pair of solid-state magnetoresistive sensors arranged in gradiometer mode. Miniaturization is afforded by the close spacing of the various modules.

  10. I. I. Rabi, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), and Radar

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    at Columbia, won the 1934 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discovery of deuterium, he also received 'an award from the Carnegie Foundation of about 8,000 to assist his research. ...

  11. Temperature-controlled molecular depolarization gates in nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroder, Leif; Schroder, Leif; Chavez, Lana; Meldrum, Tyler; Smith, Monica; Lowery, Thomas J.; E. Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander

    2008-02-27

    Down the drain: Cryptophane cages in combination with selective radiofrequency spin labeling can be used as molecular 'transpletor' units for transferring depletion of spin polarization from a hyperpolarized 'source' spin ensemble to a 'drain' ensemble. The flow of nuclei through the gate is adjustable by the ambient temperature, thereby enabling controlled consumption of hyperpolarization.

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moudrakovski, Igor L.; Ratcliffe, C I.; Ripmeester, J A.; Wang, Li Q.; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Baumann, T; Satcher, J H.

    2005-06-09

    In this article we report a detailed study of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels prepared under different processing conditions, [resorcinol]/[catalyst] (R/C) ratios in the starting sol-gel solutions, using continuous flow hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR in combination with solid-state 13C and two-dimensional wide-line separation (2D-WISE) NMR techniques. The degree of polymerization and the mobility of the cross-linking functional groups in RF aerogels are examined and correlated with the R/C ratios. The origin of different adsorption regions is evaluated using both co-adsorption of chloroform and 2D EXSY 129Xe NMR. A hierarchical set of Xe exchange processes in RF aerogels is found using 2D EXSY 129Xe NMR. The exchange of Xe gas follows the sequence (from fastest to slowest): mesopores with free gas, gas in meso- and micro-pores, free gas with micropores, and, finally, among micropore sites. The volume-to-surface-area (Vg/S) ratios for aerogels are measured for the first time without the use of geometric models. The Vg/S parameter, which is related both to the geometry and the interconnectivity of the pore space, has been found to correlate strongly with the R/C ratio and exhibits an unusually large span: an increase in the R/C ratio from 50 to 500 results in about a 5-fold rise in Vg/S.

  13. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of network systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mertzel, E.A.; Perchak, D.R.; Ritchey, W.M.; Koenig, J.L.

    1988-04-01

    Solid-state C-13 NMR measurements are utilized to characterize the tetrafunctional epoxy, tetraglycidyl (diaminodiphenyl) methane, and the tetrafunctional amine, diaminodiphenyl sulfone. Intermolecular effective ether cross-links, amine junction points, and extent of reaction of the amine and epoxy are measured for the polymerization. Chemical reactions in the epoxy-amine system are discussed, and the reactivity ratio of the epoxy-amine system is calculated. Junction point measurements are made by the use of the dipolar dephasing relaxation experiment. The experimental data collected with C-13 NMR are then compared with the calculated data from a model developed in this laboratory. The information obtained in this study is sufficient to calculate the molecular weight between cross-links.

  14. Raman spectroscopy of graphite in high magnetic fields: Electron-phonon coupling and magnetophonon resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Younghee; Smirnov, Dmitry; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Lombardo, Antonio; Ferrari, Andrea C.

    2013-12-04

    The magneto-Raman measurements of graphite were performed in a back-scattering Faraday geometry at temperature 10 K in magnetic fields up to 45 T. The experimental data reveal the rich structure of Raman-active excitations dominated by K-point massive electrons. At high magnetic fields the graphite E{sub 2g} Raman line shows complex multi- component behavior interpreted as magnetophonon resonance coupled electron-phonon modes at graphite’s K-point. Also we found the clear signature of the fundamental, strongly dumped, n=0 magnetophonon resonance associated with H point massless holes.

  15. Effects of diffusion and surface interactions on the line shape of electron paramagnetic resonances in the presence of a magnetic field gradient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaden, M.; Zhao, K. F.; Wu, Z.

    2007-12-15

    In an evanescent wave magnetometer the Zeeman polarization is probed at micrometer to submicrometer distances from the cell surface. The electron paramagnetic resonance lines of an evanescent wave magnetometer in the presence of a magnetic field gradient exhibit edge enhancement seen previously in nuclear magnetic resonance lines. We present a theoretical model that describes quantitatively the shape of the magnetic resonance lines of an evanescent wave magnetometer under a wide range of experimental conditions. It accounts for diffusion broadening in the presence of a magnetic field gradient as well as interactions of spin polarized Rb atoms with the coated Pyrex glass surfaces. Depending on the field gradient, cell thickness, and buffer gas pressure, the resonance line may have the form of a single asymmetric peak or two peaks localized near the front and back surfaces in frequency space. The double-peaked response depends on average characteristics of the surface interactions. Its shape is sensitive to the dwell time, relaxation probability, and average phase shift of adsorbed spin polarized Rb atoms.

  16. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results on resonance reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S.; Gulino, M.; Tumino, A.; Lamia, L.

    2014-05-09

    Nuclear astrophysics aims to measure nuclear-reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest to be included into models to study stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Low energies, < 1 MeV or even < 10 keV, are requested for this is the window where these processes are more effective. Two effects have prevented to achieve a satisfactory knowledge of the relevant nuclear processes, namely, the Coulomb barrier exponentially suppressing the cross section and the presence of atomic electrons. These difficulties have triggered theoretical and experimental investigations to extend our knowledge down to astrophysical energies. For instance, indirect techniques such as the Trojan Horse Method have been devised yielding new cutting-edge results. In particular, I will focus on the application of this indirect method to resonance reactions. Resonances might dramatically enhance the astrophysical S(E)-factor so, when they occur right at astrophysical energies, their measurement is crucial to pin down the astrophysical scenario. Unknown or unpredicted resonances might introduce large systematic errors in nucleosynthesis models. These considerations apply to low-energy resonances and to sub-threshold resonances as well, as they may produce sizable modifications of the S-factor due to, for instance, destructive interference with another resonance.

  17. Investigation of ELM [edge localized mode] Dynamics with the Resonant Magnetic Perturbation Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pankin, Alexei Y.; Kritz, Arnold H.

    2011-07-19

    Topics covered are: anomalous transport and E x B flow shear effects in the H-mode pedestal; RMP (resonant magnetic perturbation) effects in NSTX discharges; development of a scaling of H-mode pedestal in tokamak plasmas with type I ELMs (edge localized modes); and divertor heat load studies.

  18. Prototype explosives-detection system based on nuclear-resonance absorption in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgado, R.E.; Arnone, G.; Cappiello, C.C.; Gardner, S.D.; Hollas, C.L.; Ussery, L.E.; White, J.M.; Zahrt, J.D.; Krauss, R.A.

    1994-06-01

    A prototype explosives-detection system (EDS) that was developed for experimental evaluation of a nuclear-resonance absorption technique is described. The major subsystems are a proton accelerator and beam transport, high-temperature proton target, an airline-luggage tomographic inspection station, and an image-processing/detection-alarm subsystem. The detection system performance, based on a limited experimental test, is reported.

  19. The Isoscalar Giant Dipole Resonance in {sup 20}Pb, {sup 90}Zr and the Nuclear Compressibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yildirim, Serbulent; Koeroglu, Ulas

    2008-11-11

    The isoscalar giant dipol resonance (ISGDR) in finite nuclei is studied within the framework of a relativistic transport approach. The excitation energies of spherical {sup 90}Zr and {sup 208}Pb nuclei are obtained for different quantum hydrodynamical Lagrangian parametrization. The sensitivity of ISGDR excitation energy on the nuclear bulk to surface properties are also investigated.

  20. Helical modulation of the electrostatic plasma potential due to edge magnetic islands induced by resonant magnetic perturbation fields at TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciaccio, G. Spizzo, G.; Schmitz, O. Frerichs, H.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Evans, T. E.; White, R. B.

    2015-10-15

    The electrostatic response of the edge plasma to a magnetic island induced by resonant magnetic perturbations to the plasma edge of the circular limiter tokamak TEXTOR is analyzed. Measurements of plasma potential are interpreted by simulations with the Hamiltonian guiding center code ORBIT. We find a strong correlation between the magnetic field topology and the poloidal modulation of the measured plasma potential. The ion and electron drifts yield a predominantly electron driven radial diffusion when approaching the island X-point while ion diffusivities are generally an order of magnitude smaller. This causes a strong radial electric field structure pointing outward from the island O-point. The good agreement found between measured and modeled plasma potential connected to the enhanced radial particle diffusivities supports that a magnetic island in the edge of a tokamak plasma can act as convective cell. We show in detail that the particular, non-ambipolar drifts of electrons and ions in a 3D magnetic topology account for these effects. An analytical model for the plasma potential is implemented in the code ORBIT, and analyses of ion and electron radial diffusion show that both ion- and electron-dominated transport regimes can exist, which are known as ion and electron root solutions in stellarators. This finding and comparison with reversed field pinch studies and stellarator literature suggest that the role of magnetic islands as convective cells and hence as major radial particle transport drivers could be a generic mechanism in 3D plasma boundary layers.

  1. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-11-25

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the biological object in a main magnetic field and in a radio frequency field, the main magnetic field having a static field direction; rotating the biological object at a rotational frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. According to another embodiment, the radio frequency is pulsed to provide a sequence capable of producing a spectrum that is substantially free of spinning sideband peaks.

  2. A METHODOLOGY TO INTEGRATE MAGNETIC RESONANCE AND ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENTS FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorge O. Parra; Chris L. Hackert; Lorna L. Wilson

    2002-09-20

    The work reported herein represents the third year of development efforts on a methodology to interpret magnetic resonance and acoustic measurements for reservoir characterization. In this last phase of the project we characterize a vuggy carbonate aquifer in the Hillsboro Basin, Palm Beach County, South Florida, using two data sets--the first generated by velocity tomography and the second generated by reflection tomography. First, we integrate optical macroscopic (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray computed tomography (CT) images, as well as petrography, as a first step in characterizing the aquifer pore system. This pore scale integration provides information with which to evaluate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log signatures for NMR well log calibration, interpret ultrasonic data, and characterize flow units at the field scale between two wells in the aquifer. Saturated and desaturated NMR core measurements estimate the irreducible water in the rock and the variable T{sub 2} cut-offs for the NMR well log calibration. These measurements establish empirical equations to extract permeability from NMR well logs. Velocity and NMR-derived permeability and porosity relationships integrated with velocity tomography (based on crosswell seismic measurements recorded between two wells 100 m apart) capture two flow units that are supported with pore scale integration results. Next, we establish a more detailed picture of the complex aquifer pore structures and the critical role they play in water movement, which aids in our ability to characterize not only carbonate aquifers, but reservoirs in general. We analyze petrography and cores to reveal relationships between the rock physical properties that control the compressional and shear wave velocities of the formation. A digital thin section analysis provides the pore size distributions of the rock matrix, which allows us to relate pore structure to permeability and to characterize flow units at the

  3. Development of Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bates, Cameron Russell

    2015-03-11

    Many nuclear safeguards applications could benefit from high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy achievable with metallic magnetic calorimeters. This dissertation covers the development of a system for these applications based on gamma-ray detectors developed at the University of Heidelberg. It demonstrates new calorimeters of this type, which achieved an energy resolution of 45.5 eV full-width at half-maximum at 59.54 keV, roughly ten times better than current state of the art high purity germanium detectors. This is the best energy resolution achieved with a gamma-ray metallic magnetic calorimeter at this energy to date. In addition to demonstrating a new benchmark in energy resolution, an experimental system for measuring samples with metallic magnetic calorimeters was constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This system achieved an energy resolution of 91.3 eV full-width at half-maximum at 59.54 keV under optimal conditions. Using this system it was possible to characterize the linearity of the response, the count-rate limitations, and the energy resolution as a function of temperature of the new calorimeter. With this characterization it was determined that it would be feasible to measure 242Pu in a mixed isotope plutonium sample. A measurement of a mixed isotope plutonium sample was performed over the course of 12 days with a single two-pixel metallic magnetic calorimeter. The relative concentration of 242Pu in comparison to other plutonium isotopes was determined by direct measurement to less than half a percent accuracy. This is comparable with the accuracy of the best-case scenario using traditional indirect methods. The ability to directly measure the relative concentration of 242Pu in a sample could enable more accurate accounting and detection of indications of undeclared activities in nuclear safeguards, a better constraint on source material in forensic samples containing plutonium, and improvements in verification in a future plutonium

  4. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang-Hwan Kim

    2003-12-12

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms.

  5. Direct imaging of neural currents using ultra-low field magnetic resonance techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Volegov, Petr L.; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Mosher, John C.; Espy, Michelle A.; Kraus, Jr., Robert H.

    2009-08-11

    Using resonant interactions to directly and tomographically image neural activity in the human brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques at ultra-low field (ULF), the present inventors have established an approach that is sensitive to magnetic field distributions local to the spin population in cortex at the Larmor frequency of the measurement field. Because the Larmor frequency can be readily manipulated (through varying B.sub.m), one can also envision using ULF-DNI to image the frequency distribution of the local fields in cortex. Such information, taken together with simultaneous acquisition of MEG and ULF-NMR signals, enables non-invasive exploration of the correlation between local fields induced by neural activity in cortex and more `distant` measures of brain activity such as MEG and EEG.

  6. Shapiro-like resonance in ultracold molecule production via an oscillating magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Bin; Fu Libin; Liu Jie

    2010-01-15

    We study the process of the production of ultracold molecules from ultracold atoms using a sinusoidally oscillating magnetic-field modulation. Our study is based on a two-mode mean-field treatment of the problem. When the magnetic field is resonant roughly with the molecular binding energy, Shapiro-like resonances are observed. Their resonance profiles are well fitted by the Lorentzian functions. The linewidths depend on both the amplitude and the duration of the applied modulations and are found to be dramatically broadened by the thermal dephasing effect. The resonance centers shift due to both the many-body effect and the finite temperature effect. Our theory is consistent with a recent experiment [S. T. Thompson, E. Hodby, and C. E. Wieman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 190404 (2005)]. Our model predicts a 1/3 ceiling for the molecular production yield in uncondensed ultracold atomic clouds for a long coupling time, while for condensed atoms the optimal conversion yield could be beyond the limit.

  7. New Resolved Resonance Region Evaluation for 63Cu and 65Cu for Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz C; Guber, Klaus H; Forget, Benoit; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Siegler, P.

    2014-01-01

    A new resolved resonance region evaluation of 63Cu and 65Cu was done in the energy region from 10-5 eV to 99.5 keV. The R-Matrix SAMMY method using the Reich-Moore approximation was used to create a new set of consistent resonance parameters. The new evaluation was based on three experimental transmission data sets; two measured at ORELA and one from MITR, and two radiative capture experimental data sets from GELINA. A total of 141 new resonances were identied for 63Cu and 117 for 65Cu. The corresponding set of external resonances for each isotope was based on the identied resonances above 99.5 keV from the ORELA transmission data. The negative external levels (bound levels) were determined to match the dierential thermal cross section measured at the MITR. Double dierential elastic scattering cross sections were calculated from the new set of resonance parameters. Benchmarking calculations were carried out on a set of ICSBEP benchmarks. This work is in support of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program.

  8. Electronic and magnetic properties of manganite thin films with different compositions and its correlation with transport properties: An X-ray resonant magnetic scattering study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Surendra; Freeland, J. W.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Jeen, H.; Biswas, A.

    2014-12-14

    Here, we present x-ray resonant magnetic dichroism and x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements of the temperature dependence of magnetism in Pr-doped La-Ca-Mn-O films grown on (110) NdGaO{sub 3} substrates. We observed thermal hysteresis of the ferromagnetism in one film that also showed large thermal hysteresis of ?18?K in transport measurements. While in a second film of a different nominal chemistry, which showed very small thermal hysteresis ?3?K in transport measurements, no thermal hysteresis of the ferromagnetism was observed. These macroscopic properties are correlated with evolution of surface magnetization across metal insulator transition for these films as observed by soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements.

  9. Electronic and magnetic properties of manganite thin films with different compositions and its correlation with transport properties: An X-ray resonant magnetic scattering study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Surendra; Freeland, J. W.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Jeen, H.; Biswas, A.

    2014-12-08

    Here, we present x-ray resonant magnetic dichroism and x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements of the temperature dependence of magnetism in Pr-doped La-Ca-Mn-O films grown on (110) NdGaO3 substrates. We observed thermal hysteresis of the ferromagnetism in one film that also showed large thermal hysteresis of ~18K in transport measurements. While in a second film of a different nominal chemistry, which showed very small thermal hysteresis ~3K in transport measurements, no thermal hysteresis of the ferromagnetism was observed. As a result, these macroscopic properties are correlated with evolution of surface magnetization across metal insulator transition for these films as observed by soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements.

  10. Electronic and magnetic properties of manganite thin films with different compositions and its correlation with transport properties: An X-ray resonant magnetic scattering study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Singh, Surendra; Freeland, J. W.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Jeen, H.; Biswas, A.

    2014-12-08

    Here, we present x-ray resonant magnetic dichroism and x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements of the temperature dependence of magnetism in Pr-doped La-Ca-Mn-O films grown on (110) NdGaO3 substrates. We observed thermal hysteresis of the ferromagnetism in one film that also showed large thermal hysteresis of ~18K in transport measurements. While in a second film of a different nominal chemistry, which showed very small thermal hysteresis ~3K in transport measurements, no thermal hysteresis of the ferromagnetism was observed. As a result, these macroscopic properties are correlated with evolution of surface magnetization across metal insulator transition for these films as observed bymore » soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements.« less

  11. Observations of thermally excited ferromagnetic resonance on spin torque oscillators having a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamaru, S. Kubota, H.; Yakushiji, K.; Konoto, M.; Nozaki, T.; Fukushima, A.; Imamura, H.; Taniguchi, T.; Arai, H.; Tsunegi, S.; Yuasa, S.; Suzuki, Y.

    2014-05-07

    Measurements of thermally excited ferromagnetic resonance were performed on spin torque oscillators having a perpendicularly magnetized free layer and in-plane magnetized reference layer (abbreviated as PMF-STO in the following) for the purpose of obtaining magnetic properties in the PMF-STO structure. The measured spectra clearly showed a large main peak and multiple smaller peaks on the high frequency side. A Lorentzian fit on the main peak yielded Gilbert damping factor of 0.0041. The observed peaks moved in proportion to the out-of-plane bias field. From the slope of the main peak frequency as a function of the bias field, Lande g factor was estimated to be about 2.13. The mode intervals showed a clear dependence on the diameter of the PMF-STOs, i.e., intervals are larger for a smaller diameter. These results suggest that the observed peaks should correspond to eigenmodes of lateral spin wave resonance in the perpendicularly magnetized free layer.

  12. Reconstruction of apparent orthotropic conductivity tensor image using magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Ji Eun; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kim, Hyung Joong; Woo, Eung Je; Kwon, Oh In

    2015-03-14

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography visualizes current density and/or conductivity distributions inside an electrically conductive object. Injecting currents into the imaging object along at least two different directions, induced magnetic flux density data can be measured using a magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Without rotating the object inside the scanner, we can measure only one component of the magnetic flux density denoted as B{sub z}. Since the biological tissues such as skeletal muscle and brain white matter show strong anisotropic properties, the reconstruction of anisotropic conductivity tensor is indispensable for the accurate observations in the biological systems. In this paper, we propose a direct method to reconstruct an axial apparent orthotropic conductivity tensor by using multiple B{sub z} data subject to multiple injection currents. To investigate the anisotropic conductivity properties, we first recover the internal current density from the measured B{sub z} data. From the recovered internal current density and the curl-free condition of the electric field, we derive an over-determined matrix system for determining the internal absolute orthotropic conductivity tensor. The over-determined matrix system is designed to use a combination of two loops around each pixel. Numerical simulations and phantom experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm stably determines the orthotropic conductivity tensor.

  13. Superconducting magnet performance for 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source developed at the Korea Basic Science Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jin Yong; Pusan National University, Busan ; Choi, Seyong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Ok, Jung-Woo; Shin, Chang Seouk; Won, Mi-Sook; Kim, Byoung Chul; Ahn, Jung Keun

    2014-02-15

    A superconducting magnet for use in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source was developed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The superconducting magnet is comprised of three solenoids and a hexapole magnet. According to the design value, the solenoid magnets can generate a mirror field, resulting in axial magnetic fields of 3.6 T at the injection area and 2.2 T at the extraction region. A radial field strength of 2.1 T can also be achieved by hexapole magnet on the plasma chamber wall. NbTi superconducting wire was used in the winding process following appropriate techniques for magnet structure. The final assembly of the each magnet involved it being vertically inserted into the cryostat to cool down the temperature using liquid helium. The performance of each solenoid and hexapole magnet was separately verified experimentally. The construction of the superconducting coil, the entire magnet assembly for performance testing and experimental results are reported herein.

  14. Development of techniques in magnetic resonance and structural studies of the prion protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, Hans-Marcus L.

    2000-07-01

    Magnetic resonance is the most powerful analytical tool used by chemists today. Its applications range from determining structures of large biomolecules to imaging of human brains. Nevertheless, magnetic resonance remains a relatively young field, in which many techniques are currently being developed that have broad applications. In this dissertation, two new techniques are presented, one that enables the determination of torsion angles in solid-state peptides and proteins, and another that involves imaging of heterogenous materials at ultra-low magnetic fields. In addition, structural studies of the prion protein via solid-state NMR are described. More specifically, work is presented in which the dependence of chemical shifts on local molecular structure is used to predict chemical shift tensors in solid-state peptides with theoretical ab initio surfaces. These predictions are then used to determine the backbone dihedral angles in peptides. This method utilizes the theoretical chemicalshift tensors and experimentally determined chemical-shift anisotropies (CSAs) to predict the backbone and side chain torsion angles in alanine, leucine, and valine residues. Additionally, structural studies of prion protein fragments are described in which conformationally-dependent chemical-shift measurements were made to gain insight into the structural differences between the various conformational states of the prion protein. These studies are of biological and pathological interest since conformational changes in the prion protein are believed to cause prion diseases. Finally, an ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging technique is described that enables imaging and characterization of heterogeneous and porous media. The notion of imaging gases at ultra-low fields would appear to be very difficult due to the prohibitively low polarization and spin densities as well as the low sensitivities of conventional Faraday coil detectors. However, Chapter 5 describes how gas imaging

  15. Electron and nuclear magnetic relaxation in La sub 2 CuO sub 4 and related cuprates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakravarty, S.; Orbach, R. )

    1990-01-08

    The nuclear-magnetic-resonance spin-lattice relaxation time ({ital T}{sub 1}) and electron-paramagnetic-resonance (EPR) linewidth ({Gamma}{sub {perpendicular}}{sup {ital s}}) are calculated for La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. The large broadening of the EPR at room temperature is shown to narrow with increasing temperature as ({xi}/{ital a}){sup 3}, where {xi} is the two-dimensional spin-correlation length and {ital a} is the lattice constant. The NMR {ital T}{sub 1} at first lengthens with increasing temperature as ({xi}/{ital a}){sup {minus}1}, then shortens above {ital T}{similar to}{ital J}/2, where {ital J} is the in-plane exchange coupling. Explicit values are calculated for {ital T}{sub 1} and {Gamma}{sub {perpendicular}}{sup 2}.

  16. Development of advanced magnetic resonance sensor for industrial applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Los Santos, A.

    1997-06-01

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and various subcontractors, in a cooperative agreement with the DOE, have developed and tested an advanced magnetic resonance (MR) sensor for several industrial applications and made various market surveys. The original goal of the program was to develop an advanced moisture sensor to allow more precise and rapid control of drying processes so that energy and/or product would not be wasted. Over the course of the program, it was shown that energy savings were achievable but in many processes the return in investment did not justify the cost of a magnetic resonance sensor. However, in many processes, particularly chemical, petrochemical, paper and others, the return in investment can be very high as to easily justify the cost of a magnetic resonance sensor. In these industries, substantial improvements in product yield, quality, and efficiency in production can cause substantial energy savings and reductions in product wastage with substantial environmental effects. The initial applications selected for this program included measurement of corn gluten at three different points and corn germ at one point in an American Maize corn processing plant. During the initial phases (I and II) of this program, SwRI developed a prototype advanced moisture sensor utilizing NMR technology capable of accurately and reliably measuring moisture in industrial applications and tested the sensor in the laboratory under conditions simulating on-line products in the corn wet milling industry. The objective of Phase III was to test the prototype sensor in the plant environment to determine robustness, reliability and long term stability. Meeting these objectives would permit extended field testing to improve the statistical database used to calibrate the sensor and subject the sensor to true variations in operating conditions encountered in the process rather than those which could only be simulated in the laboratory.

  17. Interference of spin states in resonant photoemission induced by circularly polarized light from magnetized Gd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, N.; Khalil, T.; Pohl, M.; Uphues, T.; Heinzmann, U.; Polcik, M.; Rader, O.; Heigl, F.; Starke, K.; Fritzsche, S.; Kabachnik, N. M.

    2006-10-15

    We have observed the spin-state interference by measuring the photoelectron spin polarization in the resonant preedge 4d{yields}4f photoemission from magnetized Gd. The photoemission is induced by circularly polarized light which determines one preferential direction of electron spin orientation due to polarization transfer and spin-orbit interaction. Another direction perpendicular to the first one is determined by the target electron spin orientation connected with the target magnetization. We have measured the component of spin polarization perpendicular to those two directions which can only appear due to spin-state interference which implies coherence of the spin states produced by the two mechanisms of the photoelectron spin polarization.

  18. Spin disorder in maghemite nanoparticles investigated using polarized neutrons and nuclear resonant scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herlitschke, Marcus; Disch, Sabrina; Sergueev, I.; Schlage, Kai; Wetterskog, Erik; Bergstrom, Lennart; Hermann, Raphael P.

    2016-01-01

    The manuscript reports the investigation of spin disorder in maghemite nanoparticles of different shape by a combination of polarized small-angle neutron scattering (SANSPOL) and nuclear forward scattering (NFS) techniques. Both methods are sensitive to magnetization on the nanoscale. SANSPOL allows for investigation of the particle morphology and spatial magnetization distribution and NFS extends this nanoscale information to the atomic scale, namely the orientation of the hyperfine field experienced by the iron nuclei. The studied nanospheres and nanocubes with diameters of 7.4nm and 10.6 nm, respectively, exhibit a significant spin disorder. This effect leads to a reduction of the magnetization to 44% and 58% of the theoretical maghemite bulk value, observed consistently by both techniques.

  19. Spin disorder in maghemite nanoparticles investigated using polarized neutrons and nuclear resonant scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Herlitschke, Marcus; Disch, Sabrina; Sergueev, I.; Schlage, Kai; Wetterskog, Erik; Bergstrom, Lennart; Hermann, Raphael P.

    2016-01-01

    The manuscript reports the investigation of spin disorder in maghemite nanoparticles of different shape by a combination of polarized small-angle neutron scattering (SANSPOL) and nuclear forward scattering (NFS) techniques. Both methods are sensitive to magnetization on the nanoscale. SANSPOL allows for investigation of the particle morphology and spatial magnetization distribution and NFS extends this nanoscale information to the atomic scale, namely the orientation of the hyperfine field experienced by the iron nuclei. The studied nanospheres and nanocubes with diameters of 7.4nm and 10.6 nm, respectively, exhibit a significant spin disorder. This effect leads to a reduction of the magnetization tomore » 44% and 58% of the theoretical maghemite bulk value, observed consistently by both techniques.« less

  20. Gaussian approximation and single-spin measurement in magnetic resonance force microscopy with spin noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raghunathan, Shesha; Brun, Todd A.; Goan, Hsi-Sheng

    2010-11-15

    A promising technique for measuring single electron spins is magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), in which a microcantilever with a permanent magnetic tip is resonantly driven by a single oscillating spin. The most effective experimental technique is the oscillating cantilever-driven adiabatic reversals (OSCAR) protocol, in which the signal takes the form of a frequency shift. If the quality factor of the cantilever is high enough, this signal will be amplified over time to the point where it can be detected by optical or other techniques. An important requirement, however, is that this measurement process occurs on a time scale that is short compared to any noise which disturbs the orientation of the measured spin. We describe a model of spin noise for the MRFM system and show how this noise is transformed to become time dependent in going to the usual rotating frame. We simplify the description of the cantilever-spin system by approximating the cantilever wave function as a Gaussian wave packet and show that the resulting approximation closely matches the full quantum behavior. We then examine the problem of detecting the signal for a cantilever with thermal noise and spin with spin noise, deriving a condition for this to be a useful measurement.

  1. Electrically detected magnetic resonance modeling and fitting: An equivalent circuit approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leite, D. M. G.; Batagin-Neto, A.; Nunes-Neto, O.; Gmez, J. A.; Graeff, C. F. O.

    2014-01-21

    The physics of electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) quadrature spectra is investigated. An equivalent circuit model is proposed in order to retrieve crucial information in a variety of different situations. This model allows the discrimination and determination of spectroscopic parameters associated to distinct resonant spin lines responsible for the total signal. The model considers not just the electrical response of the sample but also features of the measuring circuit and their influence on the resulting spectral lines. As a consequence, from our model, it is possible to separate different regimes, which depend basically on the modulation frequency and the RC constant of the circuit. In what is called the high frequency regime, it is shown that the sign of the signal can be determined. Recent EDMR spectra from Alq{sub 3} based organic light emitting diodes, as well as from a-Si:H reported in the literature, were successfully fitted by the model. Accurate values of g-factor and linewidth of the resonant lines were obtained.

  2. Doubly-magic nature of {sup 56}Ni: Measurement of the ground state nuclear magnetic dipole moment of {sup 55}Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J. S.; Crawford, H. L.; Mantica, P. F.; Stoker, J. B.; Minamisono, K.; Grinyer, G. F.; Rogers, W. F.; Brown, B. A.; Towner, I. S.

    2009-06-15

    The nuclear magnetic moment of the ground state of {sup 55}Ni (I{sup {pi}}=3/2{sup -}, T{sub 1/2}=204 ms) has been deduced to be |{mu}({sup 55}Ni)|=(0.976{+-}0.026) {mu}{sub N} using the {beta}-ray detecting nuclear magnetic resonance technique. Results of a shell model calculation in the full fp shell model space with the GXPF1 interaction reproduce the experimental value. Together with the known magnetic moment of the mirror partner {sup 55}Co, the isoscalar spin expectation value was extracted as <{sigma}{sigma}{sub z}>=0.91{+-}0.07. The <{sigma}{sigma}{sub z}> shows a trend similar to that established in the sd shell. The present theoretical interpretations of both {mu}({sup 55}Ni) and <{sigma}{sigma}{sub z}> for the T=1/2, A=55 mirror partners support the softness of the {sup 56}Ni core.

  3. Method and apparatus for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy using microstrip transmission line coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Ugurbil, Kamil; Chen, Wei

    2006-04-04

    Apparatus and method for MRI imaging using a coil constructed of microstrip transmission line (MTL coil) are disclosed. In one method, a target is positioned to be imaged within the field of a main magnetic field of a magnet resonance imaging (MRI) system, a MTL coil is positioned proximate the target, and a MRI image is obtained using the main magnet and the MTL coil. In another embodiment, the MRI coil is used for spectroscopy. MRI imaging and spectroscopy coils are formed using microstrip transmission line. These MTL coils have the advantageous property of good performance while occupying a relatively small space, thus allowing MTL coils to be used inside restricted areas more easily than some other prior art coils. In addition, the MTL coils are relatively simple to construct of inexpensive components and thus relatively inexpensive compared to other designs. Further, the MTL coils of the present invention can be readily formed in a wide variety of coil configurations, and used in a wide variety of ways. Further, while the MTL coils of the present invention work well at high field strengths and frequencies, they also work at low frequencies and in low field strengths as well.

  4. Cyclotron resonance in InAs/AlSb quantum wells in magnetic fields up to 45 T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spirin, K. E. Krishtopenko, S. S.; Sadofyev, Yu. G.; Drachenko, O.; Helm, M.; Teppe, F.; Knap, W.; Gavrilenko, V. I.

    2015-12-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance in InAs/AlSb heterostructures with quantum wells of various widths in pulsed magnetic fields up to 45 T are investigated. Our experimental cyclotron energies are in satisfactory agreement with the results of theoretical calculations performed using the eight-band kp Hamiltonian. The shift of the cyclotron resonance (CR) line, which corresponds to the transition from the lowest Landau level to the low magnetic-field region, is found upon varying the electron concentration due to the negative persistent photoconductivity effect. It is shown that the observed shift of the CR lines is associated with the finite width of the density of states at the Landau levels.

  5. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Monitoring Rectal Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbaro, Brunella; Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia; Vecchio, Fabio M.; Rizzo, Gianluca; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. Methods and Materials: The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T{sub 2}- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm{sup 2}/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Results: Low pretreatment ADCs (<1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s) were correlated with TRG 4 scores (p = .0011) and associated to extramural vascular invasion with ypN+ (85.7% positive predictive value for ypN+). During treatment, the mean percentage of increase in tumor ADC was significantly greater in the responders than in the nonresponders (p < .0001) and a >23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC {>=}1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising

  6. Temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility of nuclear matter: Lowest order constrained variational calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigdeli, M.; Bordbar, G. H.; Rezaei, Z.

    2009-09-15

    In this paper we study the magnetic susceptibility and other thermodynamic properties of the polarized nuclear matter at finite temperature using the lowest order constrained variational (LOCV) method employing the AV{sub 18} potential. Our results show a monotonic behavior for the magnetic susceptibility which indicates that the spontaneous transition to the ferromagnetic phase does not occur for this system.

  7. Simulation of magnetic island dynamics under resonant magnetic perturbation with the TEAR code and validation of the results on T-10 tokamak data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, N. V.; Kakurin, A. M.

    2014-10-15

    Simulation of the magnetic island evolution under Resonant Magnetic Perturbation (RMP) in rotating T-10 tokamak plasma is presented with intent of TEAR code experimental validation. In the T-10 experiment chosen for simulation, the RMP consists of a stationary error field, a magnetic field of the eddy current in the resistive vacuum vessel and magnetic field of the externally applied controlled halo current in the plasma scrape-off layer (SOL). The halo-current loop consists of a rail limiter, plasma SOL, vacuum vessel, and external part of the circuit. Effects of plasma resistivity, viscosity, and RMP are taken into account in the TEAR code based on the two-fluid MHD approximation. Radial distribution of the magnetic flux perturbation is calculated with account of the externally applied RMP. A good agreement is obtained between the simulation results and experimental data for the cases of preprogrammed and feedback-controlled halo current in the plasma SOL.

  8. Magnetic defects in chemically converted graphene nanoribbons: electron spin resonance investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singamaneni, Srinivasa Rao; Stesmans, Andre; Tol, Johan van; Kosynkin, D. V.; Tour, James M.; Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University, MS-222, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005; Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University, MS-222, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005, USA.

    2014-04-15

    Electronic spin transport properties of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are influenced by the presence of adatoms, adsorbates and edge functionalization. To improve the understanding of the factors that influence the spin properties of GNRs, local (element) spin-sensitive techniques such as electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy are important for spintronics applications. Here, we present results of multi-frequency continuous wave (CW), pulse and hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) ESR spectroscopy measurements performed on oxidatively unzipped graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), which were subsequently chemically converted (CCGNRs) with hydrazine. ESR spectra at 336 GHz reveal an isotropic ESR signal from the CCGNRs, of which the temperature dependence of its line width indicates the presence of localized unpaired electronic states. Upon functionalization of CCGNRs with 4-nitrobenzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate, the ESR signal is found to be 2 times narrower than that of pristine ribbons. NH{sub 3} adsorption/desorption on CCGNRs is shown to narrow the signal, while retaining the signal intensity and g value. The electron spin-spin relaxation process at 10 K is found to be characterized by slow (163 ns) and fast (39 ns) components. HYSCORE ESR data demonstrate the explicit presence of protons and {sup 13}C atoms. With the provided identification of intrinsic point magnetic defects such as proton and {sup 13}C has been reported, which are roadblocks to spin travel in graphene-based materials, this work could help in advancing the present fundamental understanding on the edge-spin (or magnetic)-based transport properties of CCGNRs.

  9. Nb3Sn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferracin, P.; Caspi, S.; Felice, H.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Prestemon, S.; Sabbi, G. L.; Todd, D. S.

    2009-05-04

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are an essential component of heavy-ion accelerators. Over the past few decades advances in magnet technology and an improved understanding of the ECR ion source plasma physics have led to remarkable performance improvements of ECR ion sources. Currently third generation high field superconducting ECR ion sources operating at frequencies around 28 GHz are the state of the art ion injectors and several devices are either under commissioning or under design around the world. At the same time, the demand for increased intensities of highly charged heavy ions continues to grow, which makes the development of even higher performance ECR ion sources a necessity. To extend ECR ion sources to frequencies well above 28 GHz, new magnet technology will be needed in order to operate at higher field and force levels. The superconducting magnet program at LBNL has been developing high field superconducting magnets for particle accelerators based on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting technology for several years. At the moment, Nb{sub 3}Sn is the only practical conductor capable of operating at the 15 T field level in the relevant configurations. Recent design studies have been focused on the possibility of using Nb{sub 3}Sn in the next generation of ECR ion sources. In the past, LBNL has worked on the VENUS ECR, a 28 GHz source with solenoids and a sextupole made with NbTi operating at fields of 6-7 T. VENUS has now been operating since 2004. We present in this paper the design of a Nb{sub 3}Sn ECR ion source optimized to operate at an rf frequency of 56 GHz with conductor peak fields of 13-15 T. Because of the brittleness and strain sensitivity of Nb{sub 3}Sn- , particular care is required in the design of the magnet support structure, which must be capable of providing support to the coils without overstressing the conductor. In this paper, we present the main features of the support structure, featuring an external aluminum shell

  10. Isotopic imaging via nuclear resonance fluorescence with laser-based Thomson radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barty, Christopher P. J.; Hartemann, Frederic V.; McNabb, Dennis P.; Pruet, Jason A.

    2009-07-21

    The present invention utilizes novel laser-based, high-brightness, high-spatial-resolution, pencil-beam sources of spectrally pure hard x-ray and gamma-ray radiation to induce resonant scattering in specific nuclei, i.e., nuclear resonance fluorescence. By monitoring such fluorescence as a function of beam position, it is possible to image in either two dimensions or three dimensions, the position and concentration of individual isotopes in a specific material configuration. Such methods of the present invention material identification, spatial resolution of material location and ability to locate and identify materials shielded by other materials, such as, for example, behind a lead wall. The foundation of the present invention is the generation of quasimonochromatic high-energy x-ray (100's of keV) and gamma-ray (greater than about 1 MeV) radiation via the collision of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons. Such a process as utilized herein, i.e., Thomson scattering or inverse-Compton scattering, produces beams having diameters from about 1 micron to about 100 microns of high-energy photons with a bandwidth of .DELTA.E/E of approximately 10E.sup.-3.

  11. An analytical study on excitation of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability due to seismically induced resonance in BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirano, Masashi

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a scoping study on seismically induced resonance of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability in BWRs, which was conducted by using TRAC-BF1 within a framework of a point kinetics model. As a result of the analysis, it is shown that a reactivity insertion could occur accompanied by in-surge of coolant into the core resulted from the excitation of the nuclear-coupled instability by the external acceleration. In order to analyze this phenomenon more in detail, it is necessary to couple a thermal-hydraulic code with a three-dimensional nuclear kinetics code.

  12. Hyperfine field and magnetic structure in the B phase of CeCoIn5...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We re-analyze Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectra observed at low temperatures and high magnetic fields in the field-induced B-phase of CeCoInsub 5. The NMR spectra are ...

  13. Characterization of a genuin iron(V) - nitrido species by nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy coupled to density functional calculations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrenko, T.; George, S. D.; Aliaga-Alcalde, N.; Bill, E.; Mienert, B.; Xiao, Y.; Guo, Y.; Sturhahn, W.; Cramer, S.P.; Wieghardt, K.; Neese, F.; X-Ray Science Division; Institut of Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie; SSRL; Standford Univ.; Max-Planck Institut fur Bioanogranische Chemie; Univ. of California at Davis; LBNL

    2007-01-01

    The characterization of high-valent iron species is of interest due to their relevance to biological reaction mechanisms. Recently, we have synthesized and characterized an [Fe(V)-nitrido-cyclam-acetato]{sup +} complex, which has been characterized by M{umlt o}ssbauer, magnetic susceptibility data, and XAS spectroscopies combined with DFT calculations . The results of this study indicated that the [Fe(V)-nitrido-cyclam-acetato]+ complex is an unusual d{sup 3} system with a nearly orbitally degenerate S = 1/2 ground state. Although the calculations predicted fairly different Fe-N stretching frequencies for the S = 1/2 and the competing S = 3/2 ground states, a direct experimental determination of this important fingerprint quantity was missing. Here we apply synchrotron-based nuclear resonance vibrational scattering (NRVS) to characterize the Fe-N stretching frequency of an Fe(V)-nitrido complex and its Fe(III)-azide precursor. The NRVS data show a new isolated band at 864 cm{sup -1} in the Fe(V)-nitrido complex that is absent in the precursor. The NRVS spectra are fit and simulated using a DFT approach, and the new feature is unambiguously assigned to a Fe(V)-N stretch. The calculated Fe-N stretching frequency is too high by {approx}75 cm{sup -1}. Anharmonic contributions to the Fe-N stretching frequency have been evaluated and have been found to be small (-5.5 cm{sup -1}). The NRVS data provided a unique opportunity to obtain this vibrational information, which had eluded characterization by more traditional vibrational spectroscopies.

  14. Characterization of a Genuine Lron(V)-Nitrido Species By Nuclear Resonant Vibrational Spectroscopy Coupled to Density Functional Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrenko, T.; George, S.D.; Aliaga-Alcalde, N.; Bill, E.; Mienert, B.; Xiao, Y.; Guo, Y.; Sturhahn, W.; Cramer, S.P.; Wieghardt, K.; Neese, F.; /Bonn U., LTC /SLAC, SSRL /Max Planck Inst., Mulheim /UC, Davis /Argonne /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-10-19

    The characterization of high-valent iron species is of interest due to their relevance to biological reaction mechanisms. Recently, we have synthesized and characterized an [Fe(V)-nitrido-cyclam-acetato]+ complex, which has been characterized by M{umlt o}ssbauer, magnetic susceptibility data, and XAS spectroscopies combined with DFT calculations. The results of this study indicated that the [Fe(V)-nitrido-cyclam-acetato]+ complex is an unusual d3 system with a nearly orbitally degenerate S = 1/2 ground state. Although the calculations predicted fairly different Fe-N stretching frequencies for the S = 1/2 and the competing S = 3/2 ground states, a direct experimental determination of this important fingerprint quantity was missing. Here we apply synchrotron-based nuclear resonance vibrational scattering (NRVS) to characterize the Fe-N stretching frequency of an Fe(V)-nitrido complex and its Fe(III)-azide precursor. The NRVS data show a new isolated band at 864 cm-1 in the Fe(V)-nitrido complex that is absent in the precursor. The NRVS spectra are fit and simulated using a DFT approach, and the new feature is unambiguously assigned to a Fe(V)-N stretch. The calculated Fe-N stretching frequency is too high by {approx}75 cm-1. Anharmonic contributions to the Fe-N stretching frequency have been evaluated and have been found to be small (-5.5 cm-1). The NRVS data provided a unique opportunity to obtain this vibrational information, which had eluded characterization by more traditional vibrational spectroscopies.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Image Phantom Code System to Calibrate in vivo Measurement Systems.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-07-17

    Version 00 MRIPP provides relative calibration factors for the in vivo measurement of internally deposited photon emitting radionuclides within the human body. The code includes a database of human anthropometric structures (phantoms) that were constructed from whole body Magnetic Resonance Images. The database contains a large variety of human images with varying anatomical structure. Correction factors are obtained using Monte Carlo transport of photons through the voxel geometry of the phantom. Correction factors provided bymore » MRIPP allow users of in vivo measurement systems (e.g., whole body counters) to calibrate these systems with simple sources and obtain subject specific calibrations. Note that the capability to format MRI data for use with this system is not included; therefore, one must use the phantom data included in this package. MRIPP provides a simple interface to perform Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport through the human body. MRIPP also provides anthropometric information (e.g., height, weight, etc.) for individuals used to generate the phantom database. A modified Voxel version of the Los Alamos National Laboratory MCNP4A code is used for the Monte Carlo simulation. The Voxel version Fortran patch to MCNP4 and MCNP4A (Monte Carlo N-Particle transport simulation) and the MCNP executable are included in this distribution, but the MCNP Fortran source is not included. It was distributed by RSICC as CCC-200 but is now obsoleted by the current release MCNP4B.« less

  16. Discrete magic angle turning system, apparatus, and process for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Hoyt, David W.; Wind, Robert A.

    2009-05-19

    Described are a "Discrete Magic Angle Turning" (DMAT) system, devices, and processes that combine advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) suitable, e.g., for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and/or imaging. In an exemplary system, device, and process, samples are rotated in a clockwise direction followed by an anticlockwise direction of exactly the same amount. Rotation proceeds through an angle that is typically greater than about 240 degrees but less than or equal to about 360 degrees at constant speed for a time applicable to the evolution dimension. Back and forth rotation can be synchronized and repeated with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. The design permits tubes to be inserted into the sample container without introducing plumbing interferences, further allowing control over such conditions as temperature, pressure, flow conditions, and feed compositions, thus permitting true in-situ investigations to be carried out.

  17. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle; Lu, Fred G.; Lerch, Jason P.; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto ; Wong, C. Shun; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto ; Nieman, Brian J.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  18. Advanced slow-magic angle spinning probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi; Minard, Kevin R.; Rommereim, Donald N.

    2006-01-24

    The present invention relates to a probe and processes useful for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy instruments. More particularly, the invention relates to a MR probe and processes for obtaining resolution enhancements of fluid objects, including live specimens, using an ultra-slow (magic angle) spinning (MAS) of the specimen combined with a modified phase-corrected magic angle turning (PHORMAT) pulse sequence. Proton NMR spectra were measured of the torso and the top part of the belly of a female BALBc mouse in a 2T field, while spinning the animal at a speed of 1.5 Hz. Results show that even in this relatively low field with PHORMAT, an isotropic spectrum is obtained with line widths that are a factor 4.6 smaller than those obtained in a stationary mouse. Resolution of 1H NMR metabolite spectra are thus significantly enhanced. Results indicate that PHORMAT has the potential to significantly increase the utility of 1H NMR spectroscopy for in vivo biochemical, biomedical and/or medical applications involving large-sized biological objects such as mice, rats and even humans within a hospital setting. For small-sized objects, including biological objects, such as excised tissues, organs, live bacterial cells, and biofilms, use of PASS at a spinning rate of 30 Hz and above is preferred.

  19. Origin of the positive spin-12 photoluminescence-detected magnetic resonance in π-conjugated materials and devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Ying; Cai, Min; Hellerich, Emily; Shinar, Ruth; Shinar, Joseph

    2015-09-02

    The spin-1/2 single-modulation (SM) and double-modulation (DM) photoluminescence (PL) detected magnetic resonance (PLDMR) in poly(2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl)–hexoxy-1,4- phenylene vinylene) (MEH-PPV) films and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films is described, analyzed, and discussed. In particular, the models based on spin-dependent recombination of charge pairs (SDR) and triplet-polaron quenching (TPQ) are evaluated. By analyzing the dependence of the resonance amplitude on the microwave chopping (modulation) frequency using rate equations, it is demonstrated that the TPQ model can well explain the observed resonance behavior, while SDR model cannot reproduce the results of the observed DM-PLDMR. As a result, the observed spin-1/2 PLDMR is assigned to TPQ rathermore » than SDR, even though the latter may also be present.« less

  20. Hydride bridge in [NiFe]-hydrogenase observed by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ogata, Hideaki; Krämer, Tobias; Wang, Hongxin; Schilter, David; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; van Gastel, Maurice; Neese, Frank; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.; Gee, Leland B.; Scott, Aubrey D.; et al

    2015-08-10

    The metabolism of many anaerobes relies on [NiFe]-hydrogenases, whose characterization when bound to substrates has proven non-trivial. Presented here is direct evidence for a hydride bridge in the active site of the 57Fe-labelled fully reduced Ni-R form of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F [NiFe]-hydrogenase. A unique ‘wagging’ mode involving H- motion perpendicular to the Ni(μ-H)57Fe plane was studied using 57Fe-specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On Ni(μ-D)57Fe deuteride substitution, this wagging causes a characteristic perturbation of Fe–CO/CN bands. Spectra have been interpreted by comparison with Ni(μ-H/D)57Fe enzyme mimics [(dppe)Ni(μ-pdt)(μ-H/D)57Fe(CO)3]+ and DFT calculations, which collectively indicate amore » low-spin Ni(II)(μ-H)Fe(II) core for Ni-R, with H- binding Ni more tightly than Fe. Lastly, the present methodology is also relevant to characterizing Fe–H moieties in other important natural and synthetic catalysts.« less

  1. Impact of the nuclear symmetry energy on the pygmy dipole resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daoutidis, I.; Goriely, S.

    2011-08-15

    The correlation between the pygmy dipole strength and the symmetry energy of nuclear matter is reanalyzed. While previous calculations [A. Klimkiewicz et al., Phys. Rev. C 76, 051603(R) (2007); A. Carbone, G. Colo, A. Bracco, L.-G. Cao, P. F. Bortignon, F. Camera, and O. Wieland, Phys. Rev. C 81, 041301 (2010).] have clearly shown a direct correlation between both quantities, it remains unclear to what extent experimental as well as theoretical uncertainties can allow for an accurate determination of the symmetry energy. For this reason, we have recalculated the low-lying strength distributions of the giant dipole resonances for {sup 130}Sn and {sup 132}Sn that have been recently measured, taking into account the above uncertainties. The calculations are performed within two microscopic models, namely, the discrete quasiparticle random phase approximation (DRPA) and the quasiparticle continuum RPA, which is an extension of the DRPA that takes the coupling to the single-particle continuum into account in an exact way.

  2. Extreme nuclear shapes examined via giant dipole resonance lineshapes in hot light-mass systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandit, Deepak; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pal, Surajit; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Dey, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T.; Banerjee, S. R.; De, A.; Gupta, D.

    2010-06-15

    The influence of alpha clustering on nuclear reaction dynamics is investigated using the giant dipole resonance (GDR) lineshape studies in the reactions {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=145,160 MeV) + {sup 12}C and {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=160 MeV) + {sup 27}Al, populating {sup 32}S and {sup 47}V, respectively. The GDR lineshapes from the two systems are remarkably different from each other. Whereas, the non-alpha-like {sup 47}V undergoes Jacobi shape transition and matches exceptionally well with the theoretical GDR lineshape estimated under the framework rotating liquid drop model (RLDM) and thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) signifying shape equilibration, for the alpha cluster {sup 32}S an extended prolate kind of shape is observed. This unusual deformation, seen directly via gamma decay for the first time, is predicted to be due to the formation of orbiting dinuclear configuration or molecular structure of {sup 16}O + {sup 16}O in the {sup 32}S superdeformed band.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Therapy-Induced Necrosis Using Gadolinium-Chelated Polyglutamic Acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Edward F.; Esparza-Coss, Emilio; Wen Xiaoxia; Ng, Chaan S.; Daniel, Sherita L.; Price, Roger E.; Rivera, Belinda; Charnsangavej, Chusilp; Gelovani, Juri G.; Li Chun . E-mail: cli@di.mdacc.tmc.edu

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Necrosis is the most common morphologic alteration found in tumors and surrounding normal tissues after radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Accurate measurement of necrosis may provide an early indication of treatment efficacy or associated toxicity. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the selective accumulation of polymeric paramagnetic magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents-gadolinium p-aminobenzyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-poly(glutamic acid) (L-PG-DTPA-Gd and D-PG-DTPA-Gd)-in necrotic tissue. Methods and Materials: Two different solid tumor models, human Colo-205 xenograft and syngeneic murine OCA-1 ovarian tumors, were used in this study. Necrotic response was induced by treatment with poly(L-glutamic acid)-paclitaxel conjugate (PG-TXL). T{sub 1}-weighted spin-echo images were obtained immediately and up to 4 days after contrast injection and compared with corresponding histologic specimens. Two low-molecular-weight contrast agents, DTPA-Gd and oligomeric(L-glutamic acid)-DTPA-Gd, were used as nonspecific controls. Results: Initially, there was minimal tumor enhancement after injection of either L-PG-DTPA-Gd or D-PG-DTPA-Gd, but rapid enhancement after injection of low-molecular-weight agents. However, polymeric contrast agents, but not low-molecular-weight contrast agents, caused sustained enhancement in regions of tumor necrosis in both tumors treated with PG-TXL and untreated tumors. These data indicate that high molecular weight, rather than in vivo biodegradation, is necessary for the specific localization of polymeric MR contrast agents to necrotic tissue. Moreover, biotinylated L-PG-DTPA-Gd colocalized with macrophages in the tumor necrotic areas, suggesting that selective accumulation of L- and D-PG-DTPA-Gd in necrotic tissue was mediated through residing macrophages. Conclusions: Our data suggest that MR imaging with PG-DTPA-Gd may be a useful technique for noninvasive characterization of treatment-induced necrosis.

  4. Radiation-Induced Liver Damage: Correlation of Histopathology with Hepatobiliary Magnetic Resonance Imaging, a Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seidensticker, Max; Burak, Miroslaw; Kalinski, Thomas; Garlipp, Benjamin; Koelble, Konrad; Wust, Peter; Antweiler, Kai; Seidensticker, Ricarda; Mohnike, Konrad; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens

    2015-02-15

    PurposeRadiotherapy of liver malignancies shows promising results (radioembolization, stereotactic irradiation, interstitial brachytherapy). Regardless of the route of application, a certain amount of nontumorous liver parenchyma will be collaterally damaged by radiation. The functional reserve may be significantly reduced with an impact on further treatment planning. Monitoring of radiation-induced liver damage by imaging is neither established nor validated. We performed an analysis to correlate the histopathological presence of radiation-induced liver damage with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizing hepatobiliary contrast media (Gd-BOPTA).MethodsPatients undergoing local high-dose-rate brachytherapy for whom a follow-up hepatobiliary MRI within 120 days after radiotherapy as well as an evaluable liver biopsy from radiation-exposed liver tissue within 7 days before MRI were retrospectively identified. Planning computed tomography (CT)/dosimetry was merged to the CT-documentation of the liver biopsy and to the MRI. Presence/absence of radiation-induced liver damage (histopathology) and Gd-BOPTA uptake (MRI) as well as the dose applied during brachytherapy at the site of tissue sampling was determined.ResultsFourteen biopsies from eight patients were evaluated. In all cases with histopathological evidence of radiation-induced liver damage (n = 11), no uptake of Gd-BOPTA was seen. In the remaining three, cases no radiation-induced liver damage but Gd-BOPTA uptake was seen. Presence of radiation-induced liver damage and absence of Gd-BOPTA uptake was correlated with a former high-dose exposition.ConclusionsAbsence of hepatobiliary MRI contrast media uptake in radiation-exposed liver parenchyma may indicate radiation-induced liver damage. Confirmatory studies are warranted.

  5. Prediction of Liver Function by Using Magnetic Resonance-based Portal Venous Perfusion Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao Yue; Wang Hesheng; Johnson, Timothy D.; Pan, Charlie; Hussain, Hero; Balter, James M.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether liver function can be assessed globally and spatially by using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging MRI (DCE-MRI) to potentially aid in adaptive treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing focal radiation therapy (RT) were enrolled in institution review board-approved prospective studies to obtain DCE-MRI (to measure regional perfusion) and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance rates (to measure overall liver function) prior to, during, and at 1 and 2 months after treatment. The volumetric distribution of portal venous perfusion in the whole liver was estimated for each scan. We assessed the correlation between mean portal venous perfusion in the nontumor volume of the liver and overall liver function measured by ICG before, during, and after RT. The dose response for regional portal venous perfusion to RT was determined using a linear mixed effects model. Results: There was a significant correlation between the ICG clearance rate and mean portal venous perfusion in the functioning liver parenchyma, suggesting that portal venous perfusion could be used as a surrogate for function. Reduction in regional venous perfusion 1 month after RT was predicted by the locally accumulated biologically corrected dose at the end of RT (P<.0007). Regional portal venous perfusion measured during RT was a significant predictor for regional venous perfusion assessed 1 month after RT (P<.00001). Global hypovenous perfusion pre-RT was observed in 4 patients (3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis), 3 of whom had recovered from hypoperfusion, except in the highest dose regions, post-RT. In addition, 3 patients who had normal perfusion pre-RT had marked hypervenous perfusion or reperfusion in low-dose regions post-RT. Conclusions: This study suggests that MR-based volumetric hepatic perfusion imaging may be a biomarker for spatial distribution of liver function, which

  6. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cho, Herman

    2016-02-28

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3/2,5/2,7/2, and 9/2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Furthermore, applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  7. Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Monitor Prostate Response to Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentini, Anna Lia; Gui, Benedetta; D'Agostino, Giuseppe Roberto; Mattiucci, Giancarlo; Clementi, Valeria; Di Molfetta, Ippolita Valentina; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Mantini, Giovanna

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To correlate results of three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and time since external beam irradiation (EBRT) in patients treated with long-term hormone therapy (HT) and EBRT for locally advanced disease to verify successful treatment by documenting the achievement of metabolic atrophy (MA). Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2008, 109 patients were consecutively enrolled. MA was assessed by choline and citrate peak area-to-noise-ratio <5:1. Cancerous metabolism (CM) was defined by choline-to-creatine ratio >1.5:1 or choline signal-to-noise-ratio >5:1. To test the strength of association between MRSI results and the time elapsed since EBRT (TEFRT), PSA levels, Gleason score (GS), and stage, logistic regression (LR) was performed. p value <0.05 was statistically significant. The patients' outcomes were verified in 2011. Results: MRSI documented MA in 84 of 109 and CM in 25 of 109 cases. LR showed that age, GS, stage, and initial and recent PSA had no significant impact on MRSI results which were significantly related to PSA values at the time of MRSI and to TEFRT. Patients were divided into three groups according to TEFRT: <1 year, 1-2 years, and >2 years. MA was detected in 54.1% of patients of group 1, 88.9% of group 2, and in 94.5% of group 3 (100% when PSA nadir was reached). CM was detected in 50% of patients with reached PSA nadir in group 1. Local relapse was found in 3 patients previously showing CM at long TEFRT. Conclusion: MA detection, indicative of successful treatment because growth of normal or abnormal cells cannot occur without metabolism, increases with decreasing PSA levels and increasing time on HT after EBRT. This supports long-term HT in advanced prostate cancer. Larger study series are needed to assess whether MRSI could predict local relapse by detecting CM at long TEFRT.

  8. Multiattribute probabilistic prostate elastic registration (MAPPER): Application to fusion of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparks, Rachel Barratt, Dean; Nicolas Bloch, B.; Feleppa, Ernest; Moses, Daniel; Ponsky, Lee; Madabhushi, Anant

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided needle biopsy is the current gold standard for prostate cancer diagnosis. However, up to 40% of prostate cancer lesions appears isoechoic on TRUS. Hence, TRUS-guided biopsy has a high false negative rate for prostate cancer diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is better able to distinguish prostate cancer from benign tissue. However, MRI-guided biopsy requires special equipment and training and a longer procedure time. MRI-TRUS fusion, where MRI is acquired preoperatively and then aligned to TRUS, allows for advantages of both modalities to be leveraged during biopsy. MRI-TRUS-guided biopsy increases the yield of cancer positive biopsies. In this work, the authors present multiattribute probabilistic postate elastic registration (MAPPER) to align prostate MRI and TRUS imagery. Methods: MAPPER involves (1) segmenting the prostate on MRI, (2) calculating a multiattribute probabilistic map of prostate location on TRUS, and (3) maximizing overlap between the prostate segmentation on MRI and the multiattribute probabilistic map on TRUS, thereby driving registration of MRI onto TRUS. MAPPER represents a significant advancement over the current state-of-the-art as it requires no user interaction during the biopsy procedure by leveraging texture and spatial information to determine the prostate location on TRUS. Although MAPPER requires manual interaction to segment the prostate on MRI, this step is performed prior to biopsy and will not substantially increase biopsy procedure time. Results: MAPPER was evaluated on 13 patient studies from two independent datasets—Dataset 1 has 6 studies acquired with a side-firing TRUS probe and a 1.5 T pelvic phased-array coil MRI; Dataset 2 has 7 studies acquired with a volumetric end-firing TRUS probe and a 3.0 T endorectal coil MRI. MAPPER has a root-mean-square error (RMSE) for expert selected fiducials of 3.36 ± 1.10 mm for Dataset 1 and 3.14 ± 0.75 mm for Dataset 2. State

  9. Simulation of High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Images on the IBM Blue Gene/L Supercomputer Using SIMRI

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baum, K. G.; Menezes, G.; Helguera, M.

    2011-01-01

    Medical imaging system simulators are tools that provide a means to evaluate system architecture and create artificial image sets that are appropriate for specific applications. We have modified SIMRI, a Bloch equation-based magnetic resonance image simulator, in order to successfully generate high-resolution 3D MR images of the Montreal brain phantom using Blue Gene/L systems. Results show that redistribution of the workload allows an anatomically accurate 256 3 voxel spin-echo simulation in less than 5 hours when executed on an 8192-node partition of a Blue Gene/L system.

  10. Recursive polarization of nuclear spins in diamond at arbitrary magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pagliero, Daniela; Laraoui, Abdelghani; Henshaw, Jacob D.; Meriles, Carlos A.

    2014-12-15

    We introduce an alternate route to dynamically polarize the nuclear spin host of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. Our approach articulates optical, microwave, and radio-frequency pulses to recursively transfer spin polarization from the NV electronic spin. Using two complementary variants of the same underlying principle, we demonstrate nitrogen nuclear spin initialization approaching 80% at room temperature both in ensemble and single NV centers. Unlike existing schemes, our approach does not rely on level anti-crossings and is thus applicable at arbitrary magnetic fields. This versatility should prove useful in applications ranging from nanoscale metrology to sensitivity-enhanced NMR.

  11. Using magnetic moments to study the nuclear structure of I{>=} 2 states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, D. A.

    2013-05-06

    The experimental study of magnetic moments for nuclear states near the ground state, I{>=} 2, provides a powerful tool to test nuclear structure models. Traditionally, the use of Coulomb excitation reactions have been utilized to study low spin states, mostly I= 2. The use of alternative reaction channels, such as {alpha} transfer, for the production of radioactive species that, otherwise, will be only produced in future radioactive beam facilities has proved to be an alternative to measure not only excited states with I > 2, but to populate and study long-live radioactive nuclei. This contribution will present the experimental tools and challenges for the use of the transient field technique for the measurement of g factors in nuclear states with I{>=} 2, using Coulomb excitation and {alpha}-transfer reactions. Recent examples of experimental results near the N= 50 shell closure, and the experimental challenges for future implementations with radioactive beams, will be discussed.

  12. Dynamical cancellation of pulse-induced transients in a metallic shielded room for ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zevenhoven, Koos C. J. Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Dong, Hui; Clarke, John

    2015-01-19

    Pulse-induced transients such as eddy currents can cause problems in measurement techniques where a signal is acquired after an applied preparatory pulse. In ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging, performed in magnetic fields typically of the order of 100 μT, the signal-to-noise ratio is enhanced in part by prepolarizing the proton spins with a pulse of much larger magnetic field and in part by detecting the signal with a Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID). The pulse turn-off, however, can induce large eddy currents in the shielded room, producing an inhomogeneous magnetic-field transient that both seriously distorts the spin dynamics and exceeds the range of the SQUID readout. It is essential to reduce this transient substantially before image acquisition. We introduce dynamical cancellation (DynaCan), a technique in which a precisely designed current waveform is applied to a separate coil during the later part and turn off of the polarizing pulse. This waveform, which bears no resemblance to the polarizing pulse, is designed to drive the eddy currents to zero at the precise moment that the polarizing field becomes zero. We present the theory used to optimize the waveform using a detailed computational model with corrections from measured magnetic-field transients. SQUID-based measurements with DynaCan demonstrate a cancellation of 99%. Dynamical cancellation has the great advantage that, for a given system, the cancellation accuracy can be optimized in software. This technique can be applied to both metal and high-permeability alloy shielded rooms, and even to transients other than eddy currents.

  13. Long-lived frequency shifts observed in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment following microwave irradiation of a nitroxide spin probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Lei; Longenecker, Jonilyn G.; Moore, Eric W.; Marohn, John A.

    2013-04-01

    We introduce a spin-modulation protocol for force-gradient detection of magnetic resonance that enables the real-time readout of longitudinal magnetization in an electron spin resonance experiment involving fast-relaxing spins. We applied this method to observe a prompt change in longitudinal magnetization following the microwave irradiation of a nitroxide-doped perdeuterated polystyrene film having an electron spin-lattice relaxation time of T{sub 1}{approx}1ms. The protocol allowed us to discover a large, long-lived cantilever frequency shift. Based on its magnitude, lifetime, and field dependence, we tentatively attribute this persistent signal to deuteron spin magnetization created via transfer of polarization from nitroxide spins.

  14. Two-dimensional resonant magnetic excitation in BaFe1.84Co0.16As2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumsden, Mark D; Christianson, Andrew D; Parshall, Daniel; Stone, Matthew B; Nagler, Stephen E; Mook Jr, Herbert A; Lokshin, Konstantin A; Egami, Takeshi; Abernathy, Douglas L; Goremychkin, E. A.; Osborn, R.; McGuire, Michael A; Safa-Sefat, Athena; Jin, Rongying; Sales, Brian C; Mandrus, David

    2009-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on single crystals of superconducting BaFe1.84Co0.16As2 clearly reveal a magnetic excitation located at wavevectors (1/2 1/2 L) in tetragonal notation. The scattering is much broader in L than are spin waves observed in the parent compound BaFe2As2 indicating that the excitations in the superconducting material are more two-dimensional in nature. The excitation appears gapless for T > TC and becomes gapped on cooling below TC. The observed gap energy is approximately 9.6 meV corresponding to 5 kBTC which is remarkably similar to the canonical value for the resonance energy in the cuprates.

  15. Quantitative prediction of radio frequency induced local heating derived from measured magnetic field maps in magnetic resonance imaging: A phantom validation at 7 T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Liu, Jiaen; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Schmitter, Sebastian; He, Bin

    2014-12-15

    Electrical Properties Tomography (EPT) technique utilizes measurable radio frequency (RF) coil induced magnetic fields (B1 fields) in a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system to quantitatively reconstruct the local electrical properties (EP) of biological tissues. Information derived from the same data set, e.g., complex numbers of B1 distribution towards electric field calculation, can be used to estimate, on a subject-specific basis, local Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). SAR plays a significant role in RF pulse design for high-field MRI applications, where maximum local tissue heating remains one of the most constraining limits. The purpose of the present work is to investigate the feasibility of such B1-based local SAR estimation, expanding on previously proposed EPT approaches. To this end, B1 calibration was obtained in a gelatin phantom at 7 T with a multi-channel transmit coil, under a particular multi-channel B1-shim setting (B1-shim I). Using this unique set of B1 calibration, local SAR distribution was subsequently predicted for B1-shim I, as well as for another B1-shim setting (B1-shim II), considering a specific set of parameter for a heating MRI protocol consisting of RF pulses plaid at 1% duty cycle. Local SAR results, which could not be directly measured with MRI, were subsequently converted into temperature change which in turn were validated against temperature changes measured by MRI Thermometry based on the proton chemical shift.

  16. Classification System for Identifying Women at Risk for Altered Partial Breast Irradiation Recommendations After Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalchik, Kristin V.; Vallow, Laura A.; McDonough, Michelle; Thomas, Colleen S.; Heckman, Michael G.; Peterson, Jennifer L.; Adkisson, Cameron D.; Serago, Christopher; McLaughlin, Sarah A.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To study the utility of preoperative breast MRI for partial breast irradiation (PBI) patient selection, using multivariable analysis of significant risk factors to create a classification rule. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2009, 712 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent preoperative bilateral breast MRI at Mayo Clinic Florida. Of this cohort, 566 were retrospectively deemed eligible for PBI according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-39 inclusion criteria using physical examination, mammogram, and/or ultrasound. Magnetic resonance images were then reviewed to determine their impact on patient eligibility. The patient and tumor characteristics were evaluated to determine risk factors for altered PBI eligibility after MRI and to create a classification rule. Results: Of the 566 patients initially eligible for PBI, 141 (25%) were found ineligible because of pathologically proven MRI findings. Magnetic resonance imaging detected additional ipsilateral breast cancer in 118 (21%). Of these, 62 (11%) had more extensive disease than originally noted before MRI, and 64 (11%) had multicentric disease. Contralateral breast cancer was detected in 28 (5%). Four characteristics were found to be significantly associated with PBI ineligibility after MRI on multivariable analysis: premenopausal status (P=.021), detection by palpation (P<.001), first-degree relative with a history of breast cancer (P=.033), and lobular histology (P=.002). Risk factors were assigned a score of 0-2. The risk of altered PBI eligibility from MRI based on number of risk factors was 0:18%; 1:22%; 2:42%; 3:65%. Conclusions: Preoperative bilateral breast MRI altered the PBI recommendations for 25% of women. Women who may undergo PBI should be considered for breast MRI, especially those with lobular histology or with 2 or more of the following risk factors: premenopausal, detection by palpation, and first-degree relative with a history of

  17. Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping during magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation of bone marrow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waspe, Adam C.; Looi, Thomas; Mougenot, Charles; Amaral, Joao; Temple, Michael; Sivaloganathan, Siv; Drake, James M.

    2012-11-28

    Focal bone tumor treatments include amputation, limb-sparing surgical excision with bone reconstruction, and high-dose external-beam radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is an effective non-invasive thermotherapy for palliative management of bone metastases pain. MR thermometry (MRT) measures the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) of water molecules and produces accurate (<1 Degree-Sign C) and dynamic (<5s) thermal maps in soft tissues. PRFS-MRT is ineffective in fatty tissues such as yellow bone marrow and, since accurate temperature measurements are required in the bone to ensure adequate thermal dose, MR-HIFU is not indicated for primary bone tumor treatments. Magnetic relaxation times are sensitive to lipid temperature and we hypothesize that bone marrow temperature can be determined accurately by measuring changes in T{sub 2}, since T{sub 2} increases linearly in fat during heating. T{sub 2}-mapping using dual echo times during a dynamic turbo spin-echo pulse sequence enabled rapid measurement of T{sub 2}. Calibration of T{sub 2}-based thermal maps involved heating the marrow in a bovine femur and simultaneously measuring T{sub 2} and temperature with a thermocouple. A positive T{sub 2} temperature dependence in bone marrow of 20 ms/ Degree-Sign C was observed. Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping should enable accurate temperature monitoring during MR-HIFU treatment of bone marrow and shows promise for improving the safety and reducing the invasiveness of pediatric bone tumor treatments.

  18. 3H nuclear magnetic resonance study of anaerobic glycolysis in packed erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R.D.; Un, S.; Williams, P.G.; Carson, P.J.; Morimoto, H.; Klein, M.P. )

    1990-01-01

    The utility and power of 3H NMR spectroscopy as a technique for monitoring biological systems in vivo is illustrated with glucose metabolism in erythrocytes. Use of C-1-tritiated glucose allowed us to monitor the disappearance of the alpha and beta tritons, with the production of lactate and 1H3HO (HTO), as well as some intermediates. Spin lattice relaxation times (T1) were measured to avoid T1 distortion of the spectral intensities. Detection of the formation of 1 mM tritiated water in the presence of 110 M H2O protons and deuterons allows the eventual fate of the label in the pentose shunt to be observed in vivo.

  19. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus and process for high-resolution in situ investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Hoyt, David W.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2015-11-24

    A continuous-flow (CF) magic angle sample spinning (CF-MAS) NMR rotor and probe are described for investigating reaction dynamics, stable intermediates/transition states, and mechanisms of catalytic reactions in situ. The rotor includes a sample chamber of a flow-through design with a large sample volume that delivers a flow of reactants through a catalyst bed contained within the sample cell allowing in-situ investigations of reactants and products. Flow through the sample chamber improves diffusion of reactants and products through the catalyst. The large volume of the sample chamber enhances sensitivity permitting in situ .sup.13C CF-MAS studies at natural abundance.

  20. Two-photon Lee-Goldburg nuclear magnetic resonance: Simultaneous homonuclear decoupling and signal acquisition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michal, Carl A.; Hastings, Simon P.; Lee, Lik Hang

    2008-02-07

    We present NMR signals from a strongly coupled homonuclear spin system, {sup 1}H nuclei in adamantane, acquired with simultaneous two-photon excitation under conditions of the Lee-Goldburg experiment. Small coils, having inside diameters of 0.36 mm, are used to achieve two-photon nutation frequencies of {approx}20 kHz. The very large rf field strengths required give rise to large Bloch-Siegert shifts that cannot be neglected. These experiments are found to be extremely sensitive to inhomogeneity of the applied rf field, and due to the Bloch-Siegert shift, exhibit a large asymmetry in response between the upper and lower Lee-Goldburg offsets. Two-photon excitation has the potential to enhance both the sensitivity and performance of homonuclear dipolar decoupling, but is made challenging by the high rf power required and the difficulties introduced by the inhomogeneous Bloch-Siegert shift. We briefly discuss a variation of the frequency-switched Lee-Goldburg technique, called four-quadrant Lee-Goldburg (4QLG) that produces net precession in the x-y plane, with a reduced chemical shift scaling factor of 1/3.

  1. Natural Abundance 17O Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Computational Modeling Studies of Lithium Based Liquid Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Xuchu; Hu, Mary Y.; Wei, Xiaoliang; Wang, Wei; Chen, Zhong; Liu, Jun; Hu, Jian Z.

    2015-07-01

    Natural abundance 17O NMR measurements were conducted on electrolyte solutions consisting of Li[CF3SO2NSO2CF3] (LiTFSI) dissolved in the solvents of ethylene carbonate (EC), propylene carbonate (PC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and their mixtures at various concentrations. It was observed that 17O chemical shifts of solvent molecules change with the concentration of LiTFSI. The chemical shift displacements of carbonyl oxygen are evidently greater than those of ethereal oxygen, strongly indicating that Li+ ion is coordinated with carbonyl oxygen rather than ethereal oxygen. To understand the detailed molecular interaction, computational modeling of 17O chemical shifts was carried out on proposed solvation structures. By comparing the predicted chemical shifts with the experimental values, it is found that a Li+ ion is coordinated with four double bond oxygen atoms from EC, PC, EMC and TFSI- anion. In the case of excessive amount of solvents of EC, PC and EMC the Li+ coordinated solvent molecules are undergoing quick exchange with bulk solvent molecules, resulting in average 17O chemical shifts. Several kinds of solvation structures are identified, where the proportion of each structure in the liquid electrolytes investigated depends on the concentration of LiTFSI.

  2. Devices and process for high-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoyt, David W; Sears, Jr., Jesse A; Turcu, Romulus V.F.; Rosso, Kevin M; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2014-04-08

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) rotor is detailed that includes a high-pressure sample cell that maintains high pressures exceeding 150 bar. The sample cell design minimizes pressure losses due to penetration over an extended period of time.

  3. Difference between healthy children and ADHD based on wavelet spectral analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    González Gómez Dulce, I. E-mail: emoreno@fcfm.buap.mx E-mail: joserm84@gmail.com; Moreno Barbosa, E. E-mail: emoreno@fcfm.buap.mx E-mail: joserm84@gmail.com; Hernández, Mario Iván Martínez E-mail: emoreno@fcfm.buap.mx E-mail: joserm84@gmail.com; Méndez, José Ramos E-mail: emoreno@fcfm.buap.mx E-mail: joserm84@gmail.com; Silvia, Hidalgo Tobón; Pilar, Dies Suarez E-mail: neurodoc@prodigy.net.mx; Eduardo, Barragán Pérez E-mail: neurodoc@prodigy.net.mx; Benito, De Celis Alonso

    2014-11-07

    The main goal of this project was to create a computer algorithm based on wavelet analysis of region of homogeneity images obtained during resting state studies. Ideally it would automatically diagnose ADHD. Because the cerebellum is an area known to be affected by ADHD, this study specifically analysed this region. Male right handed volunteers (infants with ages between 7 and 11 years old) were studied and compared with age matched controls. Statistical differences between the values of the absolute integrated wavelet spectrum were found and showed significant differences (p<0.0015) between groups. This difference might help in the future to distinguish healthy from ADHD patients and therefore diagnose ADHD. Even if results were statistically significant, the small size of the sample limits the applicability of this methods as it is presented here, and further work with larger samples and using freely available datasets must be done.

  4. Method for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging using deuterum as a contrast agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kehayias, Joseph J.; Joel, Darrel D.; Adams, William H.; Stein, Harry L.

    1990-01-01

    A method for in vivo NMR imaging of the blood vessels and organs of a patient characterized by using a dark dye-like imaging substance consisting essentially of a stable, high-purity concentration of D.sub.2 O in a solution with water.

  5. Sub-millimeter resolution electrical conductivity images of brain tissues using magnetic resonance-based electrical impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oh, Tong In; Jeong, Woo Chul; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Hyung Joong Woo, Eung Je; Kim, Hyun Bum; Kyung, Eun Jung; Kwon, Oh In

    2015-07-13

    Recent magnetic resonance (MR)-based electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) of in vivo animal and human subjects enabled the imaging of electromagnetic properties, such as conductivity and permittivity, on tissue structure and function with a few millimeter pixel size. At those resolutions, the conductivity contrast might be sufficient to distinguish different tissue type for certain applications. Since the precise measurement of electrical conductivity under the tissue levels can provide alternative information in a wide range of biomedical applications, it is necessary to develop high-resolution MREIT technique to enhance its availability. In this study, we provide the experimental evaluation of sub-millimeter resolution conductivity imaging method using a 3T MR scanner combined with a multi-echo MR pulse sequence, multi-channel RF coil, and phase optimization method. From the phantom and animal imaging results, sub-millimeter resolution exhibited similar signal-to-noise ratio of MR magnitude and noise levels in magnetic flux density comparing to the existing millimeter resolution. The reconstructed conductivity images at sub-millimeter resolution can distinguish different brain tissues with a pixel size as small as 350 μm.

  6. Using nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance and electric field gradient information for the study of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iselin, L.H.

    1995-12-01

    Nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) was used in an attempt to detect the effects of ionizing radiation on organic material. Previously reported resonances for urea were detected at 2,913.32 {+-} 0.01 kHz and 2,347.88 {+-} 0.08 kHz with associated T{sub 2}* values 780 {+-} 20 {micro}s and 523 {+-} 24 {micro}s, respectively. The previously unreported {nu}{sub {minus}} line for urea-d{sup 4} was detected at 2,381 {+-} 0.04 Khz and used to determine accurately for the first time the values for the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant {chi} (3,548.74 {+-} 0.03 kHz) and the asymmetry parameter {eta} (0.31571 {+-} 0.00007) for urea-d{sup 4}. The inverse linewidth parameter T{sub 2}* for {nu}{sub +} was measured at 928 {+-} 23 {micro}s and for {nu}{sub {minus}} at 721 {+-} 12 {micro}s. Townes and Dailey analysis was performed and urea-d{sup 4} exhibits a 0.004 increase in lone pair electronic density and a slight decrease in N-H bond electronic density, as compared to urea, probably due to the mass difference. A relationship is proposed, referred to as NQR linewidth analysis, between the dynamic spin relaxation times T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* and the widths of the distributions of the NQR parameters. Linewidth analysis is presented as a tool for possible use in future NQR work in all area, not just radiation effects. This relationship is tested using sodium nitrite T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* values for {nu}{sub {minus}} and {nu}{sub {minus}} as a function of temperature.

  7. Preliminary Study of the Efficacy of Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence with Quasi-Monoenergetic Gamma-Ray Sources for Nuclear Safeguards Assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M S; McNabb, D P; Hall, J M; Gonzalez, J J

    2011-02-17

    We have studied the efficacy of using nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF)-based techniques to assay spent nuclear fuel for Pu content using quasi-monoenergetic sources. We have developed two techniques to precisely determine the Pu content in a fuel rod/pin. One of our approaches is virtually free of systematic uncertainties. Using analytical models, we have determined the amount of time required to measure the Pu content in spent nuclear fuel rods and spent fuel assemblies to within 1% precision. We note that Pu content can be determined in a fuel assembly about as fast as in a single fuel pin. The performance of NRF-based assay techniques with improved photon sources, which are currently under development, will also estimated. For follow-on research we propose to: (1) Construct research prototype detection systems for both of the NRF-based assay systems proposed in this paper and measure their calibration curves; (2) Determine the systematic errors associated with both assay methods, explore ways to reduce the errors and fold the results into future performance calculations; (3) Develop an algorithm to assay a fuel assembly; (4) Perform validation measurements using a single pin and scaled assemblies; (5) Research and develop current-mode detection and/or threshold detection techniques to improve assay times; (6) Characterize the flux of newly constructed sources and fold the results into the calculations presented here to determine the feasibility of a variety of proposed sources; and (7) Collaborate with others in the safeguards community to build a prototype system and perform an NRF-based assay demonstration on spent fuel.

  8. Characterization of the onboard imaging unit for the first clinical magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Yanle; Rankine, Leith; Green, Olga L.; Kashani, Rojano; Li, H. Harold; Li, Hua; Rodriguez, Vivian; Santanam, Lakshmi; Wooten, H. Omar; Mutic, Sasa; Nana, Roger; Shvartsman, Shmaryu; Victoria, James; Dempsey, James F.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To characterize the performance of the onboard imaging unit for the first clinical magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. Methods: The imaging performance characterization included four components: ACR (the American College of Radiology) phantom test, spatial integrity, coil signal to noise ratio (SNR) and uniformity, and magnetic field homogeneity. The ACR phantom test was performed in accordance with the ACR phantom test guidance. The spatial integrity test was evaluated using a 40.8 × 40.8 × 40.8 cm{sup 3} spatial integrity phantom. MR and computed tomography (CT) images of the phantom were acquired and coregistered. Objects were identified around the surfaces of 20 and 35 cm diameters of spherical volume (DSVs) on both the MR and CT images. Geometric distortion was quantified using deviation in object location between the MR and CT images. The coil SNR test was performed according to the national electrical manufacturers association (NEMA) standards MS-1 and MS-9. The magnetic field homogeneity test was measured using field camera and spectral peak methods. Results: For the ACR tests, the slice position error was less than 0.10 cm, the slice thickness error was less than 0.05 cm, the resolved high-contrast spatial resolution was 0.09 cm, the resolved low-contrast spokes were more than 25, the image intensity uniformity was above 93%, and the percentage ghosting was less than 0.22%. All were within the ACR recommended specifications. The maximum geometric distortions within the 20 and 35 cm DSVs were 0.10 and 0.18 cm for high spatial resolution three-dimensional images and 0.08 and 0.20 cm for high temporal resolution two dimensional cine images based on the distance-to-phantom-center method. The average SNR was 12.0 for the body coil, 42.9 for the combined torso coil, and 44.0 for the combined head and neck coil. Magnetic field homogeneities at gantry angles of 0°, 30°, 60°, 90°, and 120° were 23.55, 20.43, 18.76, 19

  9. An all permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source for heavy ion therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Yun Li, Jia Qing; Sun, Liang Ting; Zhang, Xue Zhen; Feng, Yu Cheng; Wang, Hui; Ma, Bao Hua; Li, Xi Xia

    2014-02-15

    A high charge state all permanent Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source, Lanzhou All Permanent ECR ion source no. 3-LAPECR3, has been successfully built at IMP in 2012, which will serve as the ion injector of the Heavy Ion Medical Machine (HIMM) project. As a commercial device, LAPECR3 features a compact structure, small size, and low cost. According to HIMM scenario more than 100 e?A of C{sup 5+} ion beam should be extracted from the ion source, and the beam emittance better than 75 ?*mm*mrad. In recent commissioning, about 120 e?A of C{sup 5+} ion beam was got when work gas was CH{sub 4} while about 262 e?A of C{sup 5+} ion beam was obtained when work gas was C{sub 2}H{sub 2} gas. The design and construction of the ion source and its low-energy transportation beam line, and the preliminary commissioning results will be presented in detail in this paper.

  10. US-Japan seminar on magnetic multilayered structures held in Kauai, Hawaii on 15-17 May 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-17

    This seminar included the following topics: Advancement in soft magnetic materials by means of multilayering, Elastic moduli of metallic multilayered films measured by Brillouin Scattering method, Structural aspects of the superlattices under high pressure, Structural influence on the magnetic anisotropy of Co/Pd superlattices, Low dimensional magnetic and structural effects in single crystals grown by molecular beam epitaxy, Polarized neutron reflection and diffraction from magnetic superlattices, and Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of magnetic multilayers.