Sample records for nuclear interaction length

  1. Condensated fermion system in the model of four-quark interaction with large correlation length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Molodtsov; G. M. Zinovjev

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Studying a model of four-quark interaction with large correlation length we find out both the features peculiar an unitary fermi gas and the specific anomalous properties of the fermi systems with a fermion condensate. It is argued that a possibility of phase transition originated by interface between the Fermi sphere and fermion condensate appears in such quark systems. The results obtained could be instrumental for phenomenological applications in view of our conclusion about approximately the same behavior of the dynamical characteristics of quark ensembles with different four-quark interaction forms in a practical interval of coupling constant.

  2. From the NN Interaction to Nuclear Structure and Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Thomas

    21st Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics Breckenridge, Colorado February 5 - 12, 2005 -5 0 5 x [fm-Nucleon Interaction 21st Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics, February 6, 2 Realistic Interactions ½ reproduce;Central and Tensor Correlations 21st Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics, February 6, 2 C = C C r p = pr

  3. Nuclear Constraints on the Weak Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. C. Haxton

    2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss the current status of efforts to constrain the strangeness-conserving weak hadronic interaction, which can be isolated in nuclear systems because of the associated parity violation.

  4. Nuclear binding energies and empirical proton-neutron interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, G. J. [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Jiang Hui [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); School of Arts and Science, Shanghai Maritime University, Shanghai 200135 (China); Zhao, Y. M. [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator, Lanzhou 730000 (China); CCAST, World Laboratory, Post Office Box 8730, Beijing 100080 (China); Pittel, S. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Arima, A. [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Science Museum, Japan Science Foundation, 2-1 Kitanomaru-koen, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0091 (Japan)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By using an exponential function to simulate the residual proton-neutron interaction between valence nucleons, we derive a new set of local mass formulas that are competitive with the Garvey-Kelson mass relations for relating neighboring nuclear masses.

  5. Neutrino Interactions Importance for Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Amaro; C. Maieron; M. Valverde; J. Nieves; M. B. Barbaro; J. A. Caballero; T. W. Donnelly; J. M. Udias

    2009-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the general interplay between Nuclear Physics and neutrino-nucleus cross sections at intermediate and high energies. The effects of different reaction mechanisms over the neutrino observables are illustrated with examples in calculations using several nuclear models and ingredients.

  6. On the nuclear interaction. Potential, binding energy and fusion reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Casinos

    2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear interaction is responsible for keeping neutrons and protons joined in an atomic nucleus. Phenomenological nuclear potentials, fitted to experimental data, allow one to know about the nuclear behaviour with more or less success where quantum mechanics is hard to be used. A nuclear potential is suggested and an expression for the potential energy of two nuclear entities, either nuclei or nucleons, is developed. In order to estimate parameters in this expression, some nucleon additions to nuclei are considered and a model is suggested as a guide of the addition process. Coulomb barrier and energy for the addition of a proton to each one of several nuclei are estimated by taking into account both the nuclear and electrostatic components of energy. Studies on the binding energies of several nuclei and on the fusion reaction of two nuclei are carried out.

  7. Nuclear thermodynamics from chiral low-momentum interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbinian Wellenhofer; Jeremy W. Holt; Norbert Kaiser; Wolfram Weise

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the thermodynamic equation of state of isospin-symmetric nuclear matter with microscopic nuclear forces derived within the framework of chiral effective field theory. Two- and three-body nuclear interactions constructed at low resolution scales form the basis for a perturbative calculation of the finite-temperature equation of state. The nuclear force models and many-body methods are benchmarked against bulk properties of isospin-symmetric nuclear matter at zero temperature, which are found to be well reproduced when chiral nuclear interactions constructed at the lowest resolution scales are employed. The calculations are then extended to finite temperatures, where we focus on the liquid-gas phase transition and the associated critical point. The Maxwell construction is applied to construct the physical equation of state, and the value of the critical temperature is determined to be T_c =17.2-19.1 MeV, in good agreement with the value extracted from multifragmentation reactions of heavy ions.

  8. Nuclear thermodynamics from chiral low-momentum interactions Corbinian Wellenhofer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weise, Wolfram

    Nuclear thermodynamics from chiral low-momentum interactions Corbinian Wellenhofer1 , Jeremy W the thermodynamic equation of state of isospin-symmetric nuclear matter with mi- croscopic nuclear forces derived within the framework of chiral effective field theory. Two- and three-body nuclear interactions

  9. Accurate nuclear radii and binding energies from a chiral interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekstrom, A; Wendt, K A; Hagen, G; Papenbrock, T; Carlsson, B D; Forssen, C; Hjorth-Jensen, M; Navratil, P; Nazarewicz, W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accurate reproduction of nuclear radii and binding energies is a long-standing challenge in nuclear theory. To address this problem two-nucleon and three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory are optimized simultaneously to low-energy nucleon-nucleon scattering data, as well as binding energies and radii of few-nucleon systems and selected isotopes of carbon and oxygen. Coupled-cluster calculations based on this interaction, named NNLOsat, yield accurate binding energies and radii of nuclei up to 40Ca, and are consistent with the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter. In addition, the low-lying collective 3- states in 16O and 40Ca are described accurately, while spectra for selected p- and sd-shell nuclei are in reasonable agreement with experiment.

  10. Error analysis of nuclear forces and effective interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Navarro Perez; J. E. Amaro; E. Ruiz Arriola

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nucleon-Nucleon interaction is the starting point for ab initio Nuclear Structure and Nuclear reactions calculations. Those are effectively carried out via effective interactions fitting scattering data up to a maximal center of mass momentum. However, NN interactions are subjected to statistical and systematic uncertainties which are expected to propagate and have some impact on the predictive power and accuracy of theoretical calculations, regardless on the numerical accuracy of the method used to solve the many body problem. We stress the necessary conditions required for a correct and self-consistent statistical interpretation of the discrepancies between theory and experiment which enable a subsequent statistical error propagation and correlation analysis. We comprehensively discuss an stringent and recently proposed tail-sensitive normality test and provide a simple recipe to implement it. As an application, we analyze the deduced uncertainties and correlations of effective interactions in terms of Moshinsky-Skyrme parameters and effective field theory counterterms as derived from the bare NN potential containing One-Pion-Exchange and Chiral Two-Pion-Exchange interactions inferred from scattering data.

  11. Interactive image quantification tools in nuclear material forensics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, Reid B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruggiero, Christy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hush, Don [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harvey, Neal [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelly, Pat [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scoggins, Wayne [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Morphological and microstructural features visible in microscopy images of nuclear materials can give information about the processing history of a nuclear material. Extraction of these attributes currently requires a subject matter expert in both microscopy and nuclear material production processes, and is a time consuming, and at least partially manual task, often involving multiple software applications. One of the primary goals of computer vision is to find ways to extract and encode domain knowledge associated with imagery so that parts of this process can be automated. In this paper we describe a user-in-the-loop approach to the problem which attempts to both improve the efficiency of domain experts during image quantification as well as capture their domain knowledge over time. This is accomplished through a sophisticated user-monitoring system that accumulates user-computer interactions as users exploit their imagery. We provide a detailed discussion of the interactive feature extraction and segmentation tools we have developed and describe our initial results in exploiting the recorded user-computer interactions to improve user productivity over time.

  12. Development of Commercial-Length Nuclear Fuel Post-Irradiation Examination Capabilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Spellman, Donald J [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL; Chesser, Joel B [ORNL; Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Fissile Materials Disposition Program is pursuing disposal of surplus weapons-usable plutonium by reactor irradiation as the fissile constituent of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. Lead test assemblies (LTAs) have been irradiated for approximately 36 months in Duke Energy s Catawba-1 nuclear power plant. Per the MOX fuel qualification plan, destructive post-irradiation examinations (PIEs) are to be performed on second-cycle rods (irradiated to an average burnup of approximately 42 GWd/MTHM). These LTA bundles are planned to be returned to the reactor and further irradiated to approximately 52 GWd/MTHM. Nondestructive and destructive PIEs of these commercially irradiated weapons-derived MOX fuel rods will be conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL). PIE began in early 2009. In order to support the examination of the irradiated full-length (~3.66 m) MOX fuel rods, ORNL in 2004 began to develop the necessary infrastructure and equipment for the needed full-scope PIE capabilities. The preparations included modifying the IFEL building to handle a commercial spent-fuel shipping cask; procurement of cask-handling equipment and a skid to move the cask inside the building; development of in-cell handling equipment for cask unloading; and design, fabrication, and testing of the automated, state-of-the-art PIE examination equipment. This paper describes these activities and the full-scope PIE capabilities available at ORNL for commercial full-length fuel rods.

  13. Molecular Cell Interaction of a DNA Zip Code with the Nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brickner, Jason

    Molecular Cell Article Interaction of a DNA Zip Code with the Nuclear Pore Complex Promotes H2A codes'' in the promoters of yeast genes confer interaction with the NPC and localization at the nuclear, they remain at the nuclear periphery for several generations, primed for reactivation. Tran- scriptional

  14. “Zero-length” Cross-linking in Solid State as an Approach for Analysis of Protein -Protein Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elshafey, Ahmed; Tolic, Nikola; Young, Malin M.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Smith, Richard D.; Kery, Vladimir

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyzing the architecture of protein complexes is a difficult task. Chemical cross-linking is often used in combination with mass spectrometric analysis to elucidate the interaction interfaces between proteins. We have developed a new approach for the analysis of interacting interfaces in protein complexes based on cross-linking in the solid state. Protein complexes are freeze-dried under vacuum and cross-links are introduced in the solid phase by dehydrating the protein in a non-water solvent, thus, creating peptide bonds between amino and carboxyl groups of the interacting peptides. Cross-linked proteins are digested into peptides with trypsin in both H216O and H218O and then readily distinguished in mass spectra by characteristic 8 atomic mass unit (amu) shifts reflecting incorporation of two 18O atoms into each C-terminus of proteolytic peptides. Computer analysis of mass spectrometry (MS) and MS/MS data is used to identify the cross-linked peptides.We demonstrated our method by cross-linking homooligomeric protein complexes alone or in a mixture of many other proteins. Cross-linking in the solid state was shown to be specific and reproducible. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) from Schistosoma japonicum was studied in more detail. Twenty-seven unique intra-molecular and two inter-molecular cross-linked peptides were identified using tryptic mapping followed by LTQ-MS analysis. Identified cross-links were predominantly of amide origin, but six esters and thioesters were also found. Identified cross-linked peptides were validated by computational (visualization of cross-links in the three-dimensional [3D] structure of GST) and experimental (MS/MS) analyses. Most of the identified cross-links matched interacting peptides in the native 3D structure of GST indicating that the structure of GST and its oligomeric complex remained primarily intact after freeze drying. The pattern of oligomeric GST obtained in solid state was the same as that obtained in solution by Ru(II)Bpy32+ catalyzed, oxidative ?zero-length? cross-linking, confirming that it is feasible to use our strategy for analyzing the molecular interfaces of interacting proteins or peptides.

  15. Measurement of Untruncated Nuclear Spin Interactions via Zero- to Ultra-Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John W. Blanchard; Tobias F. Sjolander; Jonathan P. King; Micah P. Ledbetter; Emma H. Levine; Vikram S. Bajaj; Dmitry Budker; Alexander Pines

    2015-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Zero- to ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ZULF NMR) provides a new regime for the measurement of nuclear spin-spin interactions free from effects of large magnetic fields, such as truncation of terms that do not commute with the Zeeman Hamiltonian. One such interaction, the magnetic dipole-dipole coupling, is a valuable source of spatial information in NMR, though many terms are unobservable in high-field NMR, and the coupling averages to zero under isotropic molecular tumbling. Under partial alignment, this information is retained in the form of so-called residual dipolar couplings. We report zero- to ultra-low-field NMR measurements of residual dipolar couplings in acetonitrile-2-$^{13}$C aligned in stretched polyvinyl acetate gels. This represents the first investigation of dipolar couplings as a perturbation on the indirect spin-spin $J$-coupling in the absence of an applied magnetic field. As a consequence of working at zero magnetic field, we observe terms of the dipole-dipole coupling Hamiltonian that are invisible in conventional high-field NMR. This technique expands the capabilities of zero- to ultra-low-field NMR and may have applications in precision measurement of subtle physical interactions, chemical analysis, and characterization of local mesoscale structure in materials.

  16. Constraints on the Path-Length Dependence of Jet Quenching in Nuclear Collisions at RHIC and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara Betz; Miklos Gyulassy

    2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent data on the high-pT pion nuclear modification factor, $R_{AA}(p_T)$, and its elliptic azimuthal asymmetry, $v_2(p_T)$, from RHIC/BNL and LHC/CERN are analyzed in terms of a wide class of jet-energy loss models coupled to different (2+1)d transverse plus Bjorken expanding hydrodynamic fields. We test the consistency of each model by demanding a simultaneous account of the azimuthal, the transverse momentum, and the centrality dependence of the data at both 0.2 and 2.76 ATeV energies. We find a rather broad class of jet-energy independent energy-loss models $dE/dx= \\kappa(T) x^z T^{2+z} \\zeta_q$ that, when coupled to bulk constrained temperature fields T(x,t), can account for the current data at the $\\chi^2energy-loss fluctuations via a convenient scaling factor distributed in a finite range $0energy loss model with a temperature-independent jet-medium coupling as well as a near-$T_c$ dominated, pQCD-inspired energy-loss scenario are shown to be inconsistent with the LHC data, once the parameters are constrained by fitting to RHIC results, we find several new solutions with a temperature-dependent jet-medium coupling. We conclude that the current level of statistical and systematic uncertainties of the measured data does not allow a constraint on the path-length exponent z to a range narrower than [0-2].

  17. Separable Nuclear Multipole Interaction P. Stevenson, J. Rikovska, M.R. Strayer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    Separable Nuclear Multipole Interaction P. Stevenson, J. Rikovska, M.R. Strayer Currently of the interaction so far considered with multipole forces, perhaps similar to those of the pairing plus multipole

  18. Chiral SU(3) dynamics, KN interactions and the quest for antikaon-nuclear clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfram Weise

    2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation reviews recent developments in the understanding of low-energy kaon-nucleon interactions as they relate to the possible existence of antikaon-nuclear quasibound states. A state-of-the-art discussion of low-energy \\bar{K}N interactions is given, with special emphasis on the subthreshold region relevant to the proposed kaon-nuclear systems.

  19. Interaction and dynamics of (alkylamide + electrolyte) deep eutectics: Dependence on alkyl chain-length, temperature, and anion identity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guchhait, Biswajit; Das, Suman; Daschakraborty, Snehasis; Biswas, Ranjit, E-mail: ranjit@bose.res.in [Department of Chemical, Biological and Macromolecular Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India)] [Department of Chemical, Biological and Macromolecular Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India)

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we investigate the solute-medium interaction and solute-centered dynamics in (RCONH{sub 2} + LiX) deep eutectics (DEs) via carrying out time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations at various temperatures. Alkylamides (RCONH{sub 2}) considered are acetamide (CH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2}), propionamide (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}), and butyramide (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}); the electrolytes (LiX) are lithium perchlorate (LiClO{sub 4}), lithium bromide (LiBr), and lithium nitrate (LiNO{sub 3}). Differential scanning calorimetric measurements reveal glass transition temperatures (T{sub g}) of these DEs are ?195 K and show a very weak dependence on alkyl chain-length and electrolyte identity. Time-resolved and steady state fluorescence measurements with these DEs have been carried out at six-to-nine different temperatures that are ?100–150 K above their individual T{sub g}s. Four different solute probes providing a good spread of fluorescence lifetimes have been employed in steady state measurements, revealing strong excitation wavelength dependence of probe fluorescence emission peak frequencies. Extent of this dependence, which shows sensitivity to anion identity, has been found to increase with increase of amide chain-length and decrease of probe lifetime. Time-resolved measurements reveal strong fractional power dependence of average rates for solute solvation and rotation with fraction power being relatively smaller (stronger viscosity decoupling) for DEs containing longer amide and larger (weaker decoupling) for DEs containing perchlorate anion. Representative all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of (CH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2} + LiX) DEs at different temperatures reveal strongly stretched exponential relaxation of wavevector dependent acetamide self dynamic structure factor with time constants dependent both on ion identity and temperature, providing justification for explaining the fluorescence results in terms of temporal heterogeneity and amide clustering in these multi-component melts.

  20. Interaction of electromagnetic pulse with commercial nuclear-power-plant systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Strawe, D.F.; Sandberg, S.J.; Jones, V.K.; Rensner, G.D.; Shoup, R.W.; Hanson, R.J.; Williams, C.B.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the interaction of the electromagnetic pulse from a high altitude nuclear burst with commercial nuclear power plant systems. The potential vulnerability of systems required for safe shutdown of a specific nuclear power plant are explored. EMP signal coupling, induced plant response and component damage thresholds are established using techniques developed over several decades under Defense Nuclear Agency sponsorship. A limited test program was conducted to verify the coupling analysis technique as applied to a nuclear power plant. The results are extended, insofar as possible, to other nuclear plants.

  1. Sensitivity of Pion versus Parton-Jet Nuclear Modification Factors to the Path-Length Dependence of Jet-Energy Loss at RHIC and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betz, Barbara

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare the jet-path length and beam-energy dependence of the pion nuclear modification factor and a parton-jet nuclear modification factor at RHIC and LHC. We contrast predictions based on a linear pQCD and a highly non-linear hybrid-AdS holographic model of jet-energy loss. We find that both models require a reduction of the jet-medium coupling from RHIC to LHC to account for the measured pion nuclear modification factor. In case of the parton-jet nuclear modification factor, however, which serves as a lower bound for the LO jet nuclear modification factor of reconstructed jets, the extracted data can be characterized without a reduced jet-medium coupling at LHC energies. We conclude that while reconstructed jets are sensitive to both quarks and gluons and thus provide more information than the pion nuclear modification factor, their information regarding the jet-medium coupling is limited due to the superimposition with NLO and medium effects. Hence, a detailed description of the underlying physics requ...

  2. The study of skin permeation mechanism and terpene-skin lipid interaction via nuclear magnetic resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, P. F. C.; Liu, Xiang Yang; Huang, Meng; Ho, P. C. L.; Chan, S. Y.

    2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    , lipid extraction, etc. In our case, the interaction between a terpene and a lipid was examinedwith nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), which aims to provide some insight to enhancement in skin permeation. Palmitic acid (Fig 1), a 16-carbon fatty acid... and oxides were able to producea greater ??. National University of Singapore, 2006 PS77 -The Study of Skin Permeation Mechanism and Terpene-Lipid Interaction via Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Perry Fung Chye Lim a, Xiang Yang Liu b, Meng Huang a, Paul Chi...

  3. Hyperfine Interactions 125 (2000) 328 3 Monochromatization of synchrotron radiation for nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Jennifer M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hyperfine Interactions 125 (2000) 3­28 3 Monochromatization of synchrotron radiation for nuclear for a variety of nuclear resonances in this energy range. 1. Introduction Synchrotron radiation sources have, IL 60439, USA An introduction to monochromatization of synchrotron radiation in the energy range of 5

  4. FRMAC Interactions During a Radiological or Nuclear Event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, C T

    2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    During a radiological or nuclear event of national significance the Federal Radiological Emergency Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) assists federal, state, tribal, and local authorities by providing timely, high-quality predictions, measurements, analyses and assessments to promote efficient and effective emergency response for protection of the public and the environment from the consequences of such an event.

  5. Search for a signal on intermediate baryon systems formation in hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. H. Huseynaliyev; M. K. Suleymanov; E. U. Khan; A. Kravchakova; S. Vokal

    2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed the behavior of different characteristics of hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions as a function of centrality to get a signal on the formation of intermediate baryon systems. We observed that the data demonstrate the regime change and saturation. The angular distributions of slow particles exhibit some structure in the above mentioned reactions at low energy. We believe that the structure could be connected with the formation and decay of the percolation cluster. With increasing the mass of colliding nuclei, the structure starts to become weak and almost disappears ultimately. This shows that the number of secondary internuclear interactions increases with increasing the mass of the colliding nuclei. The latter could be a reason of the disintegration of any intermediate formations as well as clusters, which decrease their influence on the angular distribution of the emitted particles.

  6. Study of spin polarized nuclear matter and finite nuclei with finite range simple effective interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behera, B; Routray, T R; Centelles, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of spin polarized pure neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter are studied using the finite range simple effective interaction, upon its parametrization revisited. Out of the total twelve parameters involved, we now determine ten of them from nuclear matter, against the nine parameters in our earlier calculation, as required in order to have predictions in both spin polarized nuclear matter and finite nuclei in unique manner being free from uncertainty found using the earlier parametrization. The information on the effective mass splitting in polarized neutron matter of the microscopic calculations is used to constrain the one more parameter, that was earlier determined from finite nucleus, and in doing so the quality of the description of finite nuclei is not compromised. The interaction with the new set of parameters is used to study the possibilities of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic transitions in completely polarized symmetric nuclear matter. Emphasis is given to analyze the resul...

  7. CONSTRAINING THE SYMMETRY PARAMETERS OF THE NUCLEAR INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lattimer, James M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Lim, Yeunhwan, E-mail: james.lattimer@stonybrook.edu, E-mail: yeunhwan.lim@gmail.com [Department of Physics Education, Daegu University, Gyeongsan 712-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the major uncertainties in the dense matter equation of state has been the nuclear symmetry energy. The density dependence of the symmetry energy is important in nuclear astrophysics, as it controls the neutronization of matter in core-collapse supernovae, the radii of neutron stars and the thicknesses of their crusts, the rate of cooling of neutron stars, and the properties of nuclei involved in r-process nucleosynthesis. We show that fits of nuclear masses to experimental masses, combined with other experimental information from neutron skins, heavy ion collisions, giant dipole resonances, and dipole polarizabilities, lead to stringent constraints on parameters that describe the symmetry energy near the nuclear saturation density. These constraints are remarkably consistent with inferences from theoretical calculations of pure neutron matter, and, furthermore, with astrophysical observations of neutron stars. The concordance of experimental, theoretical, and observational analyses suggests that the symmetry parameters S{sub v} and L are in the range 29.0-32.7 MeV and 40.5-61.9 MeV, respectively, and that the neutron star radius, for a 1.4 M{sub Sun} star, is in the narrow window 10.7 km

  8. Optically detected nuclear quadrupolar interaction of 14N in nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang S. Shin; Mark C. Butler; Hai-Jing Wang; Claudia E. Avalos; Scott J. Seltzer; Ren-Bao Liu; Alexander Pines; Vikram S. Bajaj

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report sensitive detection of the nuclear quadrupolar interaction of the 14N nuclear spin of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center using the electron spin echo envelope modulation technique. We applied a weak transverse magnetic field to the spin system so that certain forbidden transitions became weakly allowed due to second-order effects involving the nonsecular terms of the hyperfine interaction. The weak transitions cause modulation of the electron spin-echo signal, and a theoretical analysis suggests that the modulation frequency is primarily determined by the nuclear quadrupolar frequency; numerical simulations confirm the analytical results and show excellent quantitative agreement with experiments. This is an experimentally simple method of detecting quadrupolar interactions, and it can be used to study spin systems with an energy structure similar to that of the nitrogen vacancy center.

  9. Modeling nuclear weak-interaction processes with relativistic energy density functionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paar, N; Vale, D; Vretenar, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic energy density functionals have become a standard framework for nuclear structure studies of ground-state properties and collective excitations over the entire nuclide chart. We review recent developments in modeling nuclear weak-interaction processes: charge-exchange excitations and the role of isoscalar proton-neutron pairing, charged-current neutrino-nucleus reactions relevant for supernova evolution and neutrino detectors, and calculation of beta-decay rates for r-process nucleosynthesis.

  10. Neutrino Physics and Nuclear Axial Two-Body Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Balantekin; H. Yuksel

    2004-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the counter-term describing isoscalar axial two-body currents in the nucleon-nucleon interaction, L1A, in the effective field theory approach. We determine this quantity using the solar neutrino data. We investigate the variation of L1A when different sets of data are used.

  11. Future prospects in n-nuclear interactions. [Polarization observables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, J.M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I examine in detail two research areas, polarization observables and antiproton-nucleus reactions, which should have near-term future impact on our understanding of the interaction of medium-energy nucleons in nuclei. More speculative future experiments employing cooled beams, double spectrometer systems, and large Q-valure low momentum-transfer reactions are also discussed.

  12. DNA-nuclear matrix interactions and ionizing radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, J.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States) Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology); Vaughan, A.T.M. (Loyola Univ., Hines, IL (United States). Dept. of Radiotherapy)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The association between inherent ionizing radiation sensitivity and DNA supercoil unwinding in mammalian cells suggests that the DNA-nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) plays an important role in radiation response. In radioresistant cells, the MAR structure may exist in a more stable, open configuration, limiting DNA unwinding following strand break induction and maintaining DNA ends in close proximity for more rapid and accurate rejoining. In addition, the open configuration at these matrix attachment sites may serve to facilitate rapid DNA processing of breaks by providing (1) sites for repair proteins to collect and (2) energy to drive enzymatic reactions.

  13. DNA-nuclear matrix interactions and ionizing radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology; Vaughan, A.T.M. [Loyola Univ., Hines, IL (United States). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The association between inherent ionizing radiation sensitivity and DNA supercoil unwinding in mammalian cells suggests that the DNA-nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) plays an important role in radiation response. In radioresistant cells, the MAR structure may exist in a more stable, open configuration, limiting DNA unwinding following strand break induction and maintaining DNA ends in close proximity for more rapid and accurate rejoining. In addition, the open configuration at these matrix attachment sites may serve to facilitate rapid DNA processing of breaks by providing (1) sites for repair proteins to collect and (2) energy to drive enzymatic reactions.

  14. SECTION I: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND ASTROPHYSICS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release PrintedDEVIATIONS F O INTERACTIONS AND

  15. SECTION I: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND ASTROPHYSICS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release PrintedDEVIATIONS F O INTERACTIONS ANDI:

  16. SECTION I: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND ASTROPHYSICS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release PrintedDEVIATIONS F O INTERACTIONS

  17. SECTION I: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND ASTROPHYSICS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release PrintedDEVIATIONS F O INTERACTIONS ANDI:Giant

  18. Nuclear thermal rocket plume interactions with spacecraft. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mauk, B.H. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States); Gatsonis, N.A.; Buzby, J.; Yin, X. [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., MA (United States). Mechanical Engineering Department

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first study that has treated the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) effluent problem in its entirety, beginning with the reactor core, through the nozzle flow, to the plume backflow. The summary of major accomplishments is given below: (1) Determined the NTR effluents that include neutral, ionized and radioactive species, under typical NTR chamber conditions. Applied an NTR chamber chemistry model that includes conditions and used nozzle geometries and chamber conditions typical of NTR configurations. (2) Performed NTR nozzle flow simulations using a Navier-Stokes solver. We assumed frozen chemistry at the chamber conditions and used nozzle geometries and chamber conditions typical of NTR configurations. (3) Performed plume simulations using a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code with chemistry. In order to account for radioactive trace species that may be important for contamination purposes we developed a multi-weighted DSMC methodology. The domain in our simulations included large regions downstream and upstream of the exit. Inputs were taken from the Navier-Stokes solutions.

  19. Study of spin polarized nuclear matter and finite nuclei with finite range simple effective interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Behera; X. Viñas; T. R. Routray; M. Centelles

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of spin polarized pure neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter are studied using the finite range simple effective interaction, upon its parametrization revisited. Out of the total twelve parameters involved, we now determine ten of them from nuclear matter, against the nine parameters in our earlier calculation, as required in order to have predictions in both spin polarized nuclear matter and finite nuclei in unique manner being free from uncertainty found using the earlier parametrization. The information on the effective mass splitting in polarized neutron matter of the microscopic calculations is used to constrain the one more parameter, that was earlier determined from finite nucleus, and in doing so the quality of the description of finite nuclei is not compromised. The interaction with the new set of parameters is used to study the possibilities of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic transitions in completely polarized symmetric nuclear matter. Emphasis is given to analyze the results analytically, as far as possible, to elucidate the role of the interaction parameters involved in the predictions.

  20. Two-Photon Interactions with Nuclear Breakup in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltz, Anthony J.; Gorbunov, Yuri; R Klein, Spencer; Nystrand, Joakim

    2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly charged relativistic heavy ions have high cross-sections for two-photon interactions. The photon flux is high enough that two-photon interactions may be accompanied by additional photonuclear interactions. Except for the shared impact parameter, these interactions are independent. Additional interactions like mutual Coulomb excitation are of experimental interest, since the neutrons from the nuclear dissociation provide a simple, relatively unbiased trigger. We calculate the cross sections, rapidity, mass and transverse momentum (p{sub T}) distributions for exclusive {gamma}{gamma} production of mesons and lepton pairs, and for {gamma}{gamma} reactions accompanied by mutual Coulomb dissociation. The cross-sections for {gamma}{gamma} interactions accompanied by multiple neutron emission (XnXn) and single neutron emission (1n1n) are about 1/10 and 1/100 of that for the unaccompanied {gamma}{gamma} interactions. We discuss the accuracy with which these cross-sections may be calculated. The typical p{sub T} of {gamma}{gamma} final states is several times smaller than for comparable coherent photonuclear interactions, so p{sub T} may be an effective tool for separating the two classes of interactions.

  1. Nuclear pairing from bare interaction: Two and three-body chiral forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finelli, Paolo [Physics Department, University of Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Section of Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent paper the {sup 1}S{sub 0} pairing gap in isospin-symmetric nuclear matter and finite nuclei has been investigated starting from the chiral nucleon-nucleon potential at the N{sup 3}LO order in the two-body sector and the N{sup 2}LO order in the three-body sector. To include realistic nuclear forces in RHB (Relativistic Hartree Bolgoliubov) calculations we relied on a separable representation of the pairing interaction. In this paper we would like to show recent results concerning isotonic chains with N= 28,50,82.

  2. Temperature dependence of nuclear matter generalized isovector symmetry energy with Skyrme-type interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. L. Braghin

    2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The temperature dependence of the nuclear matter isovector symmetry energy coefficient ($\\cA_{0,1}$) is investigated in the framework of the generalized nuclear polarizability with Skyrme interactions, as worked out in Refs. \\cite{npa,prc}. The variation of $\\cA_{0,1}(T)$ is very small (of the order of 1 MeV) for temperatures (T) in the range of 0 and 18 MeV. Different behaviors with temperature are found strongly depending on the Skyrme parameterization, in particular at densities lower than the saturation density $\\rho_0$.

  3. New parametrization for the nuclear covariant energy density functional with point-coupling interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. W. Zhao; Z. P. Li; J. M. Yao; J. Meng

    2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A new parametrization PC-PK1 for the nuclear covariant energy density functional with nonlinear point-coupling interaction is proposed by fitting to observables for 60 selected spherical nuclei, including the binding energies, charge radii and empirical pairing gaps. The success of PC-PK1 is illustrated in its description for infinite nuclear matter and finite nuclei including the ground-state and low-lying excited states. Particularly, PC-PK1 improves the description for isospin dependence of binding energy along either the isotopic or the isotonic chains, which makes it more reliable for application in exotic nuclei. The predictive power of PC-PK1 is also illustrated for the nuclear low-lying excitation states in a five-dimensional collective Hamiltonian in which the parameters are determined by constrained calculations for triaxial shapes.

  4. Nuclear relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations including pions interacting with a scalar field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcos, S.; Lopez-Quelle, M.; Niembro, R.; Savushkin, L. N. [Departamento de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Department of Physics, St. Petersburg University for Telecommunications, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of pions on the nuclear shell structure is analyzed in a relativistic Hartree-Fock approximation (RHFA). The Lagrangian includes, in particular, a mixture of {pi}N pseudoscalar (PS) and pseudovector (PV) couplings, self-interactions of the scalar field {sigma} and a {sigma} - {pi} interaction that dresses pions with an effective mass (m*{sub {pi}}). It is found that an increase of m*{sub {pi}} strongly reduces the unrealistic effect of pions, keeping roughly unchanged their contribution to the total binding energy.

  5. Unprecedented studies of the low-energy negatively charged kaons interactions in nuclear matter by AMADEUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Curceanu; K. Piscicchia; M. Bazzi; C. Berucci; D. Bosnar; A. M. Bragadireanu; A. Clozza; M. Cargnelli; A. D'uffizi; L. Fabbietti; C. Fiorini; F. Ghio; C. Guaraldo; M. Iliescu; P. Levi Sandri; J. Marton; D. Pietreanu; M. Poli Lener; R. Quaglia; A. Romero Vidal; E. Sbardella; A. Scordo; H. Shi; D. Sirghi; F. Sirghi; M. Skurzok; I. Tucakovic; O. Vazquez Doce; E. Widmann; J. Zmeskal

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The AMADEUS experiment aims to provide unique quality data of $K^-$ hadronic interactions in light nuclear targets, in order to solve fundamental open questions in the non-perturbative strangeness QCD sector, like the controversial nature of the $\\Lambda(1405)$ state, the yield of hyperon formation below threshold, the yield and shape of multi-nucleon $K^-$ absorption, processes which are intimately connected to the possible existence of exotic antikaon multi-nucleon clusters. AMADEUS takes advantage of the DA$\\Phi$NE collider, which provides a unique source of monochromatic low-momentum kaons and exploits the KLOE detector as an active target, in order to obtain excellent acceptance and resolution data for $K^-$ nuclear capture on H, ${}^4$He, ${}^{9}$Be and ${}^{12}$C, both at-rest and in-flight. During the second half of 2012 a successful data taking was performed with a dedicated pure carbon target implemented in the central region of KLOE, providing a high statistic sample of pure at-rest $K^-$ nuclear interactions. For the future dedicated setups involving cryogenic gaseous targets are under preparation.

  6. Thermal effects on nuclear symmetry energy with a momentum-dependent effective interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ch. C. Moustakidis

    2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The knowledge of the nuclear symmetry energy of hot neutron-rich matter is important for understanding the dynamical evolution of massive stars and the supernova explosion mechanisms. In particular, the electron capture rate on nuclei and/or free protons in presupernova explosions is especially sensitive to the symmetry energy at finite temperature. In view of the above, in the present work we calculate the symmetry energy as a function of the temperature for various values of the baryon density, by applying a momentum-dependent effective interaction. In addition to a previous work, the thermal effects are studied separately both in the kinetic part and the interaction part of the symmetry energy. We focus also on the calculations of the mean field potential, employed extensively in heavy ion reaction research, both for nuclear and pure neutron matter. The proton fraction and the electron chemical potential, which are crucial quantities for representing the thermal evolution of supernova and neutron stars, are calculated for various values of the temperature. Finally, we construct a temperature dependent equation of state of $\\beta$-stable nuclear matter, the basic ingredient for the evaluation of the neutron star properties.

  7. Water-Steel Canister Interaction and H2 Gas Pressure Buildup in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu; Senger, Rainer; Finstele, Stefan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Waste Repository T. Xu & S. Finsteiie Earth Sciencesdeep lying repositories for nuclear waste. Nagra Techni­ calthe system state in a nuclear waste re­ pository. 2 PROCESS

  8. Hyperon-Nucleon Interactions and the Composition of Dense Nuclear Matter from Quantum Chromodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Beane; E. Chang; S. D. Cohen; W. Detmold; H. -W. Lin; T. C. Luu; K. Orginos; A. Parreno; M. J. Savage; A. Walker-Loud

    2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The low-energy neutron-Sigma^- interactions determine, in part, the role of the strange quark in dense matter, such as that found in astrophysical environments. The scattering phase shifts for this system are obtained from a numerical evaluation of the QCD path integral using the technique of Lattice QCD. Our calculations, performed at a pion mass of m_pi ~ 389 MeV in two large lattice volumes, and at one lattice spacing, are extrapolated to the physical pion mass using effective field theory. The interactions determined from QCD are consistent with those extracted from hyperon-nucleon experimental data within uncertainties, and strengthen theoretical arguments that the strange quark is a crucial component of dense nuclear matter.

  9. Unprecedented studies of the low-energy negatively charged kaons interactions in nuclear matter by AMADEUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curceanu, C; Bazzi, M; Berucci, C; Bosnar, D; Bragadireanu, A M; Clozza, A; Cargnelli, M; D'uffizi, A; Fabbietti, L; Fiorini, C; Ghio, F; Guaraldo, C; Iliescu, M; Sandri, P Levi; Marton, J; Pietreanu, D; Lener, M Poli; Quaglia, R; Vidal, A Romero; Sbardella, E; Scordo, A; Shi, H; Sirghi, D; Sirghi, F; Skurzok, M; Tucakovic, I; Doce, O Vazquez; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AMADEUS experiment aims to provide unique quality data of $K^-$ hadronic interactions in light nuclear targets, in order to solve fundamental open questions in the non-perturbative strangeness QCD sector, like the controversial nature of the $\\Lambda(1405)$ state, the yield of hyperon formation below threshold, the yield and shape of multi-nucleon $K^-$ absorption, processes which are intimately connected to the possible existence of exotic antikaon multi-nucleon clusters. AMADEUS takes advantage of the DA$\\Phi$NE collider, which provides a unique source of monochromatic low-momentum kaons and exploits the KLOE detector as an active target, in order to obtain excellent acceptance and resolution data for $K^-$ nuclear capture on H, ${}^4$He, ${}^{9}$Be and ${}^{12}$C, both at-rest and in-flight. During the second half of 2012 a successful data taking was performed with a dedicated pure carbon target implemented in the central region of KLOE, providing a high statistic sample of pure at-rest $K^-$ nuclear i...

  10. The Effects of Variations in Nuclear Interactions on Nucleosynthesis in Thermonuclear Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anuj Parikh; Jordi Jose; Ivo R. Seitenzahl; Friedrich K. Roepke

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of nuclear physics uncertainties on nucleosynthesis in thermonuclear supernovae has not been fully explored using comprehensive and systematic studies with multiple models. To better constrain predictions of yields from these phenomena, we have performed a sensitivity study by post-processing thermodynamic histories from two different hydrodynamic, Chandrasekhar-mass explosion models. We have individually varied all input reaction and, for the first time, weak interaction rates by a factor of ten and compared the yields in each case to yields using standard rates. Of the 2305 nuclear reactions in our network, we find that the rates of only 53 reactions affect the yield of any species with an abundance of at least 10^-8 M_sun by at least a factor of two, in either model. The rates of the 12C(a,g), 12C+12C, 20Ne(a,p), 20Ne(a,g) and 30Si(p,g) reactions are among those that modify the most yields when varied by a factor of ten. From the individual variation of 658 weak interaction rates in our network by a factor of ten, only the stellar 28Si(b+)28Al, 32S(b+)32P and 36Ar(b+)36Cl rates significantly affect the yields of species in a model. Additional tests reveal that reaction rate changes over temperatures T > 1.5 GK have the greatest impact, and that ratios of radionuclides that may be used as explosion diagnostics change by a factor of less than two from the variation of individual rates by a factor of 10. Nucleosynthesis in the two adopted models is relatively robust to variations in individual nuclear reaction and weak interaction rates. Laboratory measurements of a limited number of reactions would help to further constrain predictions. As well, we confirm the need for a consistent treatment for relevant stellar weak interaction rates since simultaneous variation of these rates (as opposed to individual variation) has a significant effect on yields in our models.

  11. PHENIX (Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment): Data Tables and Figures from Published Papers

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The PHENIX Experiment is the largest of the four experiments currently taking data at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. PHENIX, the Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment, is an exploratory experiment for the investigation of high energy collisions of heavy ions and protons. PHENIX is designed specifically to measure direct probes of the collisions such as electrons, muons, and photons. The primary goal of PHENIX is to discover and study a new state of matter called the Quark-Gluon Plasma. More than 60 published papers and preprints are listed here with links to the full text and separate links to the supporting PHENIX data in plain text tables and to EPS and GIF figures from the papers.

  12. Hydrodynamic Scaling Analysis of Nuclear Fusion driven by ultra-intense laser-plasma interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachie Kimura; Aldo Bonasera

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss scaling laws of fusion yields generated by laser-plasma interactions. The yields are found to scale as a function of the laser power. The origin of the scaling law in the laser driven fusion yield is derived in terms of hydrodynamic scaling. We point out that the scaling properties can be attributed to the laser power dependence of three terms: the reaction rate, the density of the plasma and the projected range of the plasma particle in the target medium. The resulting scaling relations have a predictive power that enables estimating the fusion yield for a nuclear reaction which has not been investigated by means of the laser accelerated ion beams.

  13. Physical and functional interactions of human papillomavirus E2 protein with nuclear receptor coactivators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.-H. [Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei City 114, Taiwan (China); Huang, C.-J. [Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry Laboratory, Cathay Medical Research Institute, Cathay General Hospital, Taipei County 221, Taiwan (China); Department of Biochemistry, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei City 114, Taiwan (China); Liu, S.-T. [Department of Biochemistry, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei City 114, Taiwan (China); Liu, P.-Y. [Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei City 114, Taiwan (China); Ho, C.-L. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei City 114, Taiwan (China); Huang, S.-M. [Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei City 114, Taiwan (China) and Department of Biochemistry, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei City 114, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: shihming@ndmctsgh.edu.tw

    2007-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to the human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced immortalization of epithelial cells, which usually requires integration of the viral DNA into the host cell genome, steroid hormone-activated nuclear receptors (NRs) are thought to bind to specific DNA sequences within transcriptional regulatory regions on the long control region to either increase or suppress transcription of dependent genes. In this study, our data suggest that the NR coactivator function of HPV E2 proteins might be mediated through physical and functional interactions with not only NRs but also the NR coactivators GRIP1 (glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein 1) and Zac1 (zinc-finger protein which regulates apoptosis and cell cycle arrest 1), reciprocally regulating their transactivation activities. GRIP1 and Zac1 both were able to act synergistically with HPV E2 proteins on the E2-, androgen receptor-, and estrogen receptor-dependent transcriptional activation systems. GRIP1 and Zac1 might selectively function with HPV E2 proteins on thyroid receptor- and p53-dependent transcriptional activation, respectively. Hence, the transcriptional function of E2 might be mediated through NRs and NR coactivators to regulate E2-, NR-, and p53-dependent transcriptional activations.

  14. Anti-strange meson-baryon interaction in hot and dense nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Cabrera; Laura Tolos; Jörg Aichelin; Elena Bratkovskaya

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of in-medium cross sections and (off-shell) transition rates for the most relevant binary reactions for strange pseudoscalar meson production close to threshold in heavy-ion collisions at FAIR energies. Our results rely on a chiral unitary approach in coupled channels which incorporates the $s$- and $p$-waves of the kaon-nucleon interaction. The formalism, which is modified in the hot and dense medium to account for Pauli blocking effects, mean-field binding on baryons, and pion and kaon self-energies, has been improved to implement full unitarization and self-consistency for both the $s$- and $p$-wave interactions at finite temperature and density. This gives access to in-medium amplitudes in several elastic and inelastic coupled channels with strangeness content $S=-1$. The obtained total cross sections mostly reflect the fate of the $\\Lambda(1405)$ resonance, which melts in the nuclear environment, whereas the off-shell transition probabilities are also sensitive to the in-medium properties of the hyperons excited in the $p$-wave amplitudes [$\\Lambda$, $\\Sigma$ and $\\Sigma^*(1385)$]. The single-particle potentials of these hyperons at finite momentum, density and temperature are also discussed in connection with the pertinent scattering amplitudes. Our results are the basis for future implementations in microscopic transport approaches accounting for off-shell dynamics of strangeness production in nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  15. Nuclear magnetism and electron order in interacting one-dimensional conductors Bernd Braunecker,1 Pascal Simon,2 and Daniel Loss1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braunecker, Bernd

    Nuclear magnetism and electron order in interacting one-dimensional conductors Bernd Braunecker,1 to each other. We show here that this occurs when a lattice of nuclear spins is embedded in a Luttinger the nuclear spin and the conduction electron spin is very weak; yet it triggers a strong feedback reaction

  16. Physical Consequences of a Momenta-Transfering Particle Theory of Induced Gravity and New Measurements Indicating Variation from Inverse Square Law at Length Scale of .1 mm: Statistical Time Properties of Gravitational Interaction and Analysis Thereof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gary Christopher Vezzoli

    2001-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents physical consequences of our theory of induced gravity (Ref.1) regarding: 1) the requirement to consider shape and materials properties when calculating graviton cross section collision area; 2) use of Special Relativity; 3) implications regarding the shape of cosmos; 4) comparison to explanations using General Relativity; 5) properties of black holes; 6) relationship to the strong force and the theorized Higgs boson; 7) the possible origin of magnetic attraction; 8) new measurements showing variation from gravitational inverse square behavior at length scales of 0.1 mm and relationship to the Cosmological constant, and proof of the statistical time properties of the gravitational interaction.

  17. NUCLEAR PROXIMITY FORCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randrup, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One might summarize of nuclear potential energy has beendegree of freedom) for the nuclear interaction between anyUniversity of California. Nuclear Proximity Forces 'I< at

  18. Nuclear quadrupole resonances in compact vapor cells: the crossover from the NMR to the NQR interaction regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. A. Donley; J. L. Long; T. C. Liebisch; E. R. Hodby; T. A. Fisher; J. Kitching

    2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first experimental study that maps the transformation of nuclear quadrupole resonances from the pure nuclear quadrupole regime to the quadrupole-perturbed Zeeman regime. The transformation presents an interesting quantum-mechanical problem, since the quantization axis changes from being aligned along the axis of the electric-field gradient tensor to being aligned along the magnetic field. We achieve large nuclear quadrupole shifts for I = 3/2 131-Xe by using a 1 mm^3 cubic cell with walls of different materials. When the magnetic and quadrupolar interactions are of comparable size, perturbation theory is not suitable for calculating the transition energies. Rather than use perturbation theory, we compare our data to theoretical calculations using a Liouvillian approach and find excellent agreement.

  19. Constraints on [ital T]-odd and [ital P]-even hadronic interactions from nucleon, nuclear, and atomic electric dipole moments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haxton, W.C.; Hoeing, A. (Institute for Nuclear Theory, NK-12 and Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)); Musolf, M.J. (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility Theory Group, MS 12H, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States) Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virigina 23529 (United States))

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We deduce constraints on time-reversal-noninvariant (TRNI), parity-conserving (PC) hadronic interactions from nucleon, nuclear, and atomic electric dipole moment (EDM) limits. Such interactions generate EDM's through weak radiative corrections. We consider long-range mechanisms, i.e., those mediated by meson exchanges in contrast with short-range two-loop mechanisms. We find that the ratio of typical TRNI, PC nuclear matrix elements to those of the strong interaction are [approx lt]10[sup [minus]5], a limit about 2 orders of magntiude more stringent than those from direct detailed balance studies of such interactions. This corresponds to a bound of [vert bar][ital [bar g

  20. The nuclear and extended infrared emission of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 2992 and the interacting system Arp 245

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García-Bernete, I; Acosta-Pulido, J A; Alonso-Herrero, A; Sánchez-Portal, M; Castillo, M; Pereira-Santaella, M; Esquej, P; González-Martín, O; Díaz-Santos, T; Roche, P; Fisher, S; Povi?, M; García, A M Pérez; Valtchanov, I; Packham, C; Levenson, N A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present subarcsecond resolution infrared (IR) imaging and mid-IR spectroscopic observations of the Seyfert 1.9 galaxy NGC 2992, obtained with the Gemini North Telescope and the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC). The N-band image reveals faint extended emission out to ~3 kpc, and the PAH features detected in the GTC/CanariCam 7.5-13 micron spectrum indicate that the bulk of this extended emission is dust heated by star formation. We also report arcsecond resolution MIR and far-IR imaging of the interacting system Arp 245, taken with the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Herschel Space Observatory. Using these data, we obtain nuclear fluxes using different methods and find that we can only recover the nuclear fluxes obtained from the subarcsecond data at 20-25 micron, where the AGN emission dominates. We fitted the nuclear IR spectral energy distribution of NGC 2992, including the GTC/CanariCam nuclear spectrum (~50 pc), with clumpy torus models. We then used the best-fitting torus model to decompose the Spitzer/...

  1. Surface studies on aluminized and thermally oxidized superalloy 690 substrates interacted with simulated nuclear waste and sodium borosilicate melt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yusufali, C., E-mail: yusuf@barc.gov.in; Sengupta, P.; Dutta, R. S.; Dey, G. K. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India); Kshirsagar, R. J. [High Pressure and Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India); Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P. [Waste Management Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminized and thermally oxidized Ni-Cr-Fe based superalloy 690 substrates with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer on top have been exposed in nitrate based environment (simulated high level nuclear liquid waste) at 373 K for 216 hours and sodium borosilicate melt at 1248 K for 192 hours. The surfaces of exposed samples have been characterized by using Electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA). Elemental X-ray mapping on coated specimen that exposed in simulated nuclear waste solution revealed that the surface is enriched with Ni, Cr and Al. X-ray mapping on surface of the specimen that interacted with sodium borosilicate melt indicated that the surface is composed of Al, Fe, Ni and Cr.

  2. The role of the Pairing Center and its interaction with the nuclear envelope during meiosis in C. elegans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sato, Aya

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1998). Oscillatory nuclear movement in fission yeast meiotic1998). Oscillatory nuclear movement in fission yeast meioticdependent nuclear migrations of meiotic prophase in fission

  3. Interaction of electromagnetic pulse with commercial nuclear-power-plant systems. Volume I. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Strawe, D.F.; Sandberg, S.J.; Jones, V.K.; Rensner, G.D.; Shoup, R.W.; Hanson, R.J.; Williams, C.B.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been recognized for many years that the detonation of a nuclear weapon at high altitude leads to the creation of an intense electromagnetic field of very short duration, the electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The EMP from a single burst at the proper altitude could induce large currents and voltages in electrical equipment over the entire continental United States. Commercial nuclear power plants are not required to have protection against EMP. Therefore, the study has the following objectives: determine the vulnerability of systems required for safe shutdown of a specific nuclear plant to the effects of EMP; establish how any safe shutdown systems vulnerable to EMP may best be hardened against it; and characterize to the extent possible, the effects of EMP on nuclear plants in general based upon the results for systems in the example plant. The systems of concern in an example plant were identified and defined. Then, estimates were made of the currents and voltages which might exist at key points if the plant were subjected to EMP. Concurrently, component damage thresholds were estimated. These two sets of estimates were combined to assess the vulnerability of selected components. Because nuclear plants are complex, a modest experimental program was conducted to verify (or reject) conclusions reached about signal distribution and attenuation in the plant electrical systems.

  4. Energy dependence of $\\bar{K}N$ interaction in nuclear medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Cieply

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    When the $\\bar{K}N$ system is submerged in nuclear medium the $\\bar{K}N$ scattering amplitude and the final state branching ratios exhibit a strong energy dependence when going to energies below the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold. A sharp increase of $\\bar{K}N$ attraction below the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold provides a link between shallow $\\bar{K}$-nuclear potentials based on the chiral $\\bar{K}N$ amplitude evaluated at threshold and the deep phenomenological optical potentials obtained in fits to kaonic atoms data. We show the energy dependence of the in-medium $K^{-}p$ amplitude and demonstrate the impact of energy dependent branching ratios on the $\\Lambda$-hypernuclear production rates. \\keywords{kaon-nucleon amplitude \\and nuclear medium \\and hypernuclei

  5. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 483 (2002) 482487 Anomalous free electron laser interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerby, Eli

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Road, Ramat Aviv 69978, Israel Abstract Free electron lasers (FELs) are considered, typically, as fast: 41.60 Cr Keywords: Free electron laser 1. Introduction Free electron lasers (FELs) and cyclotronNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 483 (2002) 482­487 Anomalous free electron

  6. Editorial: Redefining Length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprouse, Gene D. [American Physical Society (United States)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Technological changes have moved publishing to electronic-first publication where the print version has been relegated to simply another display mode. Distribution in HTML and EPUB formats, for example, changes the reading environment and reduces the need for strict pagination. Therefore, in an effort to streamline the calculation of length, the APS journals will no longer use the printed page as the determining factor for length. Instead the journals will now use word counts (or word equivalents for tables, figures, and equations) to establish length; for details please see http://publish.aps.org/authors/length-guide. The title, byline, abstract, acknowledgment, and references will not be included in these counts allowing authors the freedom to appropriately credit coworkers, funding sources, and the previous literature, bringing all relevant references to the attention of readers. This new method for determining length will be easier for authors to calculate in advance, and lead to fewer length-associated revisions in proof, yet still retain the quality of concise communication that is a virtue of short papers.

  7. Nuclear winter: Three-dimensional simulations including interactive transport, scavenging, and solar heating of smoke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, R.C.; Auer, L.H.; Glatzmaier, G.A.; Wood, M.C.; Toon, O.B.

    1986-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We reexamine the ''nuclear winter'' hypothesis with a three-dimensional global model modified to allow for localized injection of smoke, its transport by the simulated winds, its absorption of sunlight, and its removal by model-simulated precipitation. Smoke injected into the troposphere is driven upward by solar heating. The tropopause, initially above the smoke, reforms below the heated smoke layer and separates it from precipitation below. Although much smoke is scavenged while the thermal structure is being altered, the residence time of the remaining smoke is greatly increased. We find, particularly for July conditions, a longer-lasting ''nuclear winter'' effect than was found in earlier modeling studies in which normal tropospheric residence times were assumed. In January the smaller solar flux in the northern hemisphere allows faster removal of smoke than in July. Significant cooling of the northern hemisphere continents is predicted; its dependence on season and injected smoke mass is described.

  8. Safety and Nonsafety Communications and Interactions in International Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Mullens, James Allen [ORNL; Wilson, Thomas L [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL; Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Loebl, Andy [ORNL

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current industry and NRC guidance documents such as IEEE 7-4.3.2, Reg. Guide 1.152, and IEEE 603 do not sufficiently define a level of detail for evaluating interdivisional communications independence. The NRC seeks to establish criteria for safety systems communications that can be uniformly applied in evaluation of a variety of safety system designs. This report focuses strictly on communication issues related to data sent between safety systems and between safety and nonsafety systems. Further, the report does not provide design guidance for communication systems nor present detailed failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) results for existing designs. This letter report describes communications between safety and nonsafety systems in nuclear power plants outside the United States. A limited study of international nuclear power plants was conducted to ascertain important communication implementations that might have bearing on systems proposed for licensing in the United States. This report provides that following information: 1.communications types and structures used in a representative set of international nuclear power reactors, and 2.communications issues derived from standards and other source documents relevant to safety and nonsafety communications. Topics that are discussed include the following: communication among redundant safety divisions, communications between safety divisions and nonsafety systems, control of safety equipment from a nonsafety workstation, and connection of nonsafety programming, maintenance, and test equipment to redundant safety divisions during operation. Information for this report was obtained through publicly available sources such as published papers and presentations. No proprietary information is represented.

  9. Nuclear spin-orbit interaction and T-odd angular correlations in ternary fission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barabanov, A L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T-odd angular correlations in ternary fission of 233-U and 235-U nuclei by slow polarized neutrons are not related to TRI (time reversal invariance) violation, but are caused by an effective spin-orbit interaction in the final state.

  10. Nuclear spin-orbit interaction and T-odd angular correlations in ternary fission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. L. Barabanov

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    T-odd angular correlations in ternary fission of 233-U and 235-U nuclei by slow polarized neutrons are not related to TRI (time reversal invariance) violation, but are caused by an effective spin-orbit interaction in the final state.

  11. Analysis and Optimization of "Full-Length" Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred

    2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analyzing the axial variation of the heat generation rate, temperature, voltage, current density and emitter heat flux in a thermionic converter is described. The method is particularly useful for the case of "long" diodes, each extending over the full length of the reactor core. For a given diode geometry and fuel distribution, the analysis combines a nuclear solution of the axial fission density profile with the iterative solution of four differential equations representing the thermal, electrical, and thermionic interactions within the diode. The digital computer program developed to solve these equations can also perform a design optimization with respect to lead resistance, load voltage, and emitter thickness, for a specified maximum emitter temperature. Typical results are presented, and the use of this analysis for predicting the diode operating characteristics is illustrated.

  12. Energy and Atomic Mass Dependence of Nuclear Stopping Power in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions in Interacting Gluon Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q. J. Liu; W. Q. Chao; G. Wilk

    1995-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a Monte-Carlo simulation of energy deposition process in relativistic heavy-ion collisions based on a new realization of the Interacting-Gluon-Model (IGM) for high energy $N-N$ collisions. In particular we show results for proton spectra from collisions of $E_{lab}=200 \\ GeV/N$ $^{32}$S beam incident on $^{32}$S target and analyze the energy and mass dependence of nuclear stopping power predicted by our model. Theoretical predictions for proton rapidity distributions of both $^{208}$Pb + $^{208}$Pb collisions at $E_{lab}=160 \\ GeV/N$ CERN SPS and $^{197}$Au + $^{197}$Au at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200 \\ GeV$ BNL RHIC are given.

  13. Interaction of loading pattern and nuclear data uncertainties in reactor core calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, M.; Gallner, L.; Krzykacz-Hausmann, B.; Pautz, A.; Velkov, K.; Zwermann, W. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit GRS MbH, Boltzmannstr. 14, D- 85748 Garching b. Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Along with best-estimate calculations for design and safety analysis, understanding uncertainties is important to determine appropriate design margins. In this framework, nuclear data uncertainties and their propagation to full core calculations are a critical issue. To deal with this task, different error propagation techniques, deterministic and stochastic are currently developed to evaluate the uncertainties in the output quantities. Among these is the sampling based uncertainty and sensitivity software XSUSA which is able to quantify the influence of nuclear data covariance on reactor core calculations. In the present work, this software is used to investigate systematically the uncertainties in the power distributions of two PWR core loadings specified in the OECD UAM-Benchmark suite. With help of a statistical sensitivity analysis, the main contributors to the uncertainty are determined. Using this information a method is studied with which loading patterns of reactor cores can be optimized with regard to minimizing power distribution uncertainties. It is shown that this technique is able to halve the calculation uncertainties of a MOX/UOX core configuration. (authors)

  14. atomic scattering length: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Atomic-Molecular Condensates with Large Positive Scattering Length Nuclear Theory (arXiv) Summary: We show that...

  15. Improvement of low energy atmospheric neutrino flux calculation using the JAM nuclear interaction model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honda, M.; Kajita, T.; Kasahara, K.; Midorikawa, S. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, and Institute for the Physics and Mathematical of the Universe, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 169-8555 (Japan); Faculty of Software and Information Technology, Aomori University, Aomori, 030-0943 Japan (Japan)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes with an interaction model named JAM, which is used in PHITS (Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System) [K. Niita et al., Radiation Measurements 41, 1080 (2006).]. The JAM interaction model agrees with the HARP experiment [H. Collaboration, Astropart. Phys. 30, 124 (2008).] a little better than DPMJET-III[S. Roesler, R. Engel, and J. Ranft, arXiv:hep-ph/0012252.]. After some modifications, it reproduces the muon flux below 1 GeV/c at balloon altitudes better than the modified DPMJET-III, which we used for the calculation of atmospheric neutrino flux in previous works [T. Sanuki, M. Honda, T. Kajita, K. Kasahara, and S. Midorikawa, Phys. Rev. D 75, 043005 (2007).][M. Honda, T. Kajita, K. Kasahara, S. Midorikawa, and T. Sanuki, Phys. Rev. D 75, 043006 (2007).]. Some improvements in the calculation of atmospheric neutrino flux are also reported.

  16. The translation initiation factor 3 subunit eIF3K interacts with PML and associates with PML nuclear bodies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salsman, Jayme; Pinder, Jordan; Tse, Brenda [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, P.O. Box 15000, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4R2 (Canada); Corkery, Dale [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Dellaire, Graham, E-mail: dellaire@dal.ca [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, P.O. Box 15000, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4R2 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) is a tumor suppressor protein that regulates a variety of important cellular processes, including gene expression, DNA repair and cell fate decisions. Integral to its function is the ability of PML to form nuclear bodies (NBs) that serve as hubs for the interaction and modification of over 90 cellular proteins. There are seven canonical isoforms of PML, which encode diverse C-termini generated by alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Recruitment of specific cellular proteins to PML NBs is mediated by protein–protein interactions with individual PML isoforms. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen employing peptide sequences unique to PML isoform I (PML-I), we identified an interaction with the eukaryotic initiation factor 3 subunit K (eIF3K), and in the process identified a novel eIF3K isoform, which we term eIF3K-2. We further demonstrate that eIF3K and PML interact both in vitro via pull-down assays, as well as in vivo within human cells by co-immunoprecipitation and co-immunofluorescence. In addition, eIF3K isoform 2 (eIF3K-2) colocalizes to PML bodies, particularly those enriched in PML-I, while eIF3K isoform 1 associates poorly with PML NBs. Thus, we report eIF3K as the first known subunit of the eIF3 translation pre-initiation complex to interact directly with the PML protein, and provide data implicating alternative splicing of both PML and eIF3K as a possible regulatory mechanism for eIF3K localization at PML NBs. - Highlights: • The PML-I C-terminus, encoded by exon 9, interacts with translation factor eIF3K. • We identify a novel eIF3K isoform that excludes exon 2 (eIF3K-2). • eIF3K-2 preferentially associates with PML bodies enriched in PML-I vs. PML-IV. • Alternative splicing of eIF3K regulates association with PML bodies.

  17. Ab initio coupled-cluster approach to nuclear structure with modern nucleon-nucleon interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Hagen; T. Papenbrock; D. J. Dean; M. Hjorth-Jensen

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform coupled-cluster calculations for the doubly magic nuclei 4He, 16O, 40Ca and 48Ca, for neutron-rich isotopes of oxygen and fluorine, and employ "bare" and secondary renormalized nucleon-nucleon interactions. For the nucleon-nucleon interaction from chiral effective field theory at order next-to-next-to-next-to leading order, we find that the coupled-cluster approximation including triples corrections binds nuclei within 0.4 MeV per nucleon compared to data. We employ interactions from a resolution-scale dependent similarity renormalization group transformations and assess the validity of power counting estimates in medium-mass nuclei. We find that the missing contributions due to three-nucleon forces are consistent with these estimates. For the unitary correlator model potential, we find a slow convergence with respect to increasing the size of the model space. For the G-matrix approach, we find a weak dependence of ground-state energies on the starting energy combined with a rather slow convergence with respect to increasing model spaces. We also analyze the center-of-mass problem and present a practical and efficient solution.

  18. Measurement of the neutrino-oxygen neutral-current interaction cross section by observing nuclear deexcitation $?$ rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Abe; J. Adam; H. Aihara; T. Akiri; C. Andreopoulos; S. Aoki; A. Ariga; T. Ariga; S. Assylbekov; D. Autiero; M. Barbi; G. J. Barker; G. Barr; M. Bass; M. Batkiewicz; F. Bay; S. W. Bentham; V. Berardi; B. E. Berger; S. Berkman; I. Bertram; S. Bhadra; F. d. M. Blaszczyk; A. Blondel; C. Bojechko; S. Bordoni; S. B. Boyd; D. Brailsford; A. Bravar; C. Bronner; N. Buchanan; R. G. Calland; J. Caravaca Rodríguez; S. L. Cartwright; R. Castillo; M. G. Catanesi; A. Cervera; D. Cherdack; G. Christodoulou; A. Clifton; J. Coleman; S. J. Coleman; G. Collazuol; K. Connolly; L. Cremonesi; A. Dabrowska; I. Danko; R. Das; S. Davis; P. de Perio; G. De Rosa; T. Dealtry; S. R. Dennis; C. Densham; D. Dewhurst; F. Di Lodovico; S. Di Luise; O. Drapier; T. Duboyski; K. Duffy; F. Dufour; J. Dumarchez; S. Dytman; M. Dziewiecki; S. Emery-Schrenk; A. Ereditato; L. Escudero; A. J. Finch; G. A. Fiorentini Aguirre; M. Friend; Y. Fujii; Y. Fukuda; A. P. Furmanski; V. Galymov; A. Gaudin; S. Giffin; C. Giganti; K. Gilje; D. Goeldi; T. Golan; J. J. Gomez-Cadenas; M. Gonin; N. Grant; D. Gudin; D. R. Hadley; L. Haegel; A. Haesler; M. D. Haigh; P. Hamilton; D. Hansen; T. Hara; M. Hartz; T. Hasegawa; N. C. Hastings; Y. Hayato; C. Hearty; R. L. Helmer; M. Hierholzer; J. Hignight; A. Hillairet; A. Himmel; T. Hiraki; S. Hirota; J. Holeczek; S. Horikawa; K. Huang; A. K. Ichikawa; K. Ieki; M. Ieva; M. Ikeda; J. Imber; J. Insler; T. J. Irvine; T. Ishida; T. Ishii; S. J. Ives; E. Iwai; K. Iwamoto; K. Iyogi; A. Izmaylov; A. Jacob; B. Jamieson; R. A. Johnson; S. Johnson; J. H. Jo; P. Jonsson; C. K. Jung; M. Kabirnezhad; A. C. Kaboth; T. Kajita; H. Kakuno; J. Kameda; Y. Kanazawa; D. Karlen; I. Karpikov; T. Katori; E. Kearns; M. Khabibullin; A. Khotjantsev; D. Kielczewska; T. Kikawa; A. Kilinski; J. Kim; S. King; J. Kisiel; P. Kitching; T. Kobayashi; L. Koch; A. Kolaceke; A. Konaka; L. L. Kormos; A. Korzenev; K. Koseki; Y. Koshio; I. Kreslo; W. Kropp; H. Kubo; Y. Kudenko; S. Kumaratunga; R. Kurjata; T. Kutter; J. Lagoda; K. Laihem; I. Lamont; E. Larkin; M. Laveder; M. Lawe; M. Lazos; K. P. Lee; C. Licciardi; T. Lindner; C. Lister; R. P. Litchfield; A. Longhin; L. Ludovici; M. Macaire; L. Magaletti; K. Mahn; M. Malek; S. Manly; A. D. Marino; J. Marteau; J. F. Martin; S. Martynenko; T. Maruyama; J. Marzec; E. L. Mathie; V. Matveev; K. Mavrokoridis; E. Mazzucato; M. McCarthy; N. McCauley; K. S. McFarland; C. McGrew; A. Mefodiev; C. Metelko; M. Mezzetto; P. Mijakowski; C. A. Miller; A. Minamino; O. Mineev; S. Mine; A. Missert; M. Miura; L. Monfregola; S. Moriyama; Th. A. Mueller; A. Murakami; M. Murdoch; S. Murphy; J. Myslik; T. Nagasaki; T. Nakadaira; M. Nakahata; T. Nakai; K. Nakamura; S. Nakayama; T. Nakaya; K. Nakayoshi; C. Nantais; D. Naples; C. Nielsen; M. Nirkko; K. Nishikawa; Y. Nishimura; J. Nowak; H. M. O'Keeffe; R. Ohta; K. Okumura; T. Okusawa; W. Oryszczak; S. M. Oser; T. Ovsyannikova; R. A. Owen; Y. Oyama; V. Palladino; J. L. Palomino; V. Paolone; D. Payne; G. F. Pearce; O. Perevozchikov; J. D. Perkin; Y. Petrov; L. Pickard; E. S. Pinzon Guerra; C. Pistillo; P. Plonski; E. Poplawska; B. Popov; M. Posiadala-Zezula; J. -M. Poutissou; R. Poutissou; P. Przewlocki; B. Quilain; E. Radicioni; P. N. Ratoff; M. Ravonel; M. A. M. Rayner; A. Redij; M. Reeves; E. Reinherz-Aronis; C. Riccio; F. Retiere; A. Robert; P. A. Rodrigues; P. Rojas; E. Rondio; S. Roth; A. Rubbia; D. Ruterbories; R. Sacco; K. Sakashita; F. Sánchez; F. Sato; E. Scantamburlo; K. Scholberg; S. Schoppmann; J. Schwehr; M. Scott; Y. Seiya; T. Sekiguchi; H. Sekiya; D. Sgalaberna; F. Shaker; M. Shiozawa; S. Short; Y. Shustrov; P. Sinclair; B. Smith; R. J. Smith; M. Smy; J. T. Sobczyk; H. Sobel; M. Sorel; L. Southwell; P. Stamoulis; J. Steinmann; B. Still; Y. Suda; A. Suzuki; K. Suzuki; S. Y. Suzuki; Y. Suzuki; T. Szeglowski; R. Tacik; M. Tada; S. Takahashi; A. Takeda; Y. Takeuchi; H. K. Tanaka; H. A. Tanaka; M. M. Tanaka; I. J. Taylor; D. Terhorst; R. Terri; L. F. Thompson; A. Thorley; S. Tobayama; W. Toki; T. Tomura; Y. Totsuka; C. Touramanis; T. Tsukamoto; M. Tzanov; Y. Uchida; K. Ueno; A. Vacheret; M. Vagins; G. Vasseur; T. Wachala; A. V. Waldron; C. W. Walter; D. Wark; M. O. Wascko; A. Weber; R. Wendell; R. J. Wilkes; M. J. Wilking; C. Wilkinson; Z. Williamson; J. R. Wilson; R. J. Wilson; T. Wongjirad; Y. Yamada; K. Yamamoto; C. Yanagisawa; T. Yano; S. Yen; N. Yershov; M. Yokoyama; T. Yuan; M. Yu; A. Zalewska; J. Zalipska; L. Zambelli; K. Zaremba; M. Ziembicki; E. D. Zimmerman; M. Zito; J. ?muda

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first measurement of the neutrino-oxygen neutral-current quasielastic (NCQE) cross section. It is obtained by observing nuclear deexcitation $\\gamma$-rays which follow neutrino-oxygen interactions at the Super-Kamiokande water Cherenkov detector. We use T2K data corresponding to $3.01 \\times 10^{20}$ protons on target. By selecting only events during the T2K beam window and with well-reconstructed vertices in the fiducial volume, the large background rate from natural radioactivity is dramatically reduced. We observe 43 events in the $4-30$ MeV reconstructed energy window, compared with an expectation of 51.0, which includes an estimated 16.2 background events. The background is primarily nonquasielastic neutral-current interactions and has only 1.2 events from natural radioactivity. The flux-averaged NCQE cross section we measure is $1.55 \\times 10^{-38}$ cm$^2$ with a 68\\% confidence interval of $(1.22, 2.20) \\times 10^{-38}$ cm$^2$ at a median neutrino energy of 630 MeV, compared with the theoretical prediction of $2.01 \\times 10^{-38}$ cm$^2$.

  19. Preliminary systems-interaction results from the Digraph Matrix Analysis of the Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant safety-injection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacks, I.J.; Ashmore, B.C.; Champney, J.M.; Alesso, H.P.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides preliminary results generated by a Digraph Matrix Analysis (DMA) for a Systems Interaction analysis performed on the Safety Injection System of the Tennessee Valley Authority Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant. An overview of DMA is provided along with a brief description of the computer codes used in DMA.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of phenylalanine analog interactions with normal and sicklen hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y.H.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several phenylalanine derivatives have been found to inhibit the gelation of deoxygenated sickle hemoglobin (deoxy HbS). Proton and /sup 19/F-NMR techniques were used to monitor the interaction of selected phenylalanine derivatives with the Hb molecule by using fluorine containing phenylalanine derivatives, Hb labeled at the ..beta..93 position with N-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) iodoacetamide (IA-F/sub 3/), and by monitoring the relaxation rates of the C2 and C4 histidine protons. The results show that the /sup 19/F spin-spin relaxation times of L-phenylalanin-4-fluorobenzylamide (PheNBz1-F), which has a deoxy HbS antigelling activity comparable to that of the amino acid, tryptophan, are affected much more strongly by interaction with Hb than are those of glycin-4-fluorobenzylamide (GlyNBz1-F). In contrast, it is shown that N-(2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidin-1-oxy-3-carboxyl)-L-phenylalanine t-butyl ester (SL-Phe) exhibits specific binding to Hb, and an antigelling activity more than two orders of magnitude greater than that of phenylalanine. These results indicate that the fluorine nuclei strongly influenced by the presence of spin label nitroxide are located in a conformation within a few angstroms of the SL-Phe binding site. Proton NMR relaxation measurements of the C2 and C4 proton resonances from the ..beta..2, 4b143 and ..beta..146 histidine residues show significant and selective effects from the binding of SL-Phe to Hb, indicating that the SL-Phe binding site must be close to the side chains of these three residues. The strong antigelation activity of SL-Phe suggests that this binding site may be one of the intermolecular contact sites of importance to the deoxy HbS aggregation process.

  1. Systems interaction results from the digraph matrix analysis of the Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant high pressure safety injection systems. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacks, I.J.; Ashmore, B.C.; Alesso, H.P.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial and functional coupling of nuclear power plant systems that lead to interdependencies are called Systems Interactions. At present, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is investigating ways of integrating a systems interactions study with existing Probabilistic Risk Assessment efforts. One approach is based on graph-theoretic methods utilizing matrix representations of logic diagrams called Digraph Matrix Analysis (DMA). The objective in this report is to demonstrate the capabilities of Digraph Matrix Analysis to model an accident sequence (including front line systems, support systems and human actions) as a continuous, well-integrated logic model in order to identify and evaluate functional systems interactions. The selected accident sequence, loss of high pressure safety injection during an S1 LOCA, was modeled and qualitative and quantitative comparisons were made to WASH 1400 aand other studies.

  2. Interaction Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hehner, Eric C.R.

    Interaction 1/54 #12;Interaction shared variables 2/54 #12;Interaction shared variables can be read and written by any process (most interaction) 3/54 #12;Interaction shared variables can be read and written by any process (most interaction) difficult to implement 4/54 #12;Interaction shared variables can

  3. Nuclear spin-dependent interactions: Searches for WIMP, Axion and Topological Defect Dark Matter, and Tests of Fundamental Symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. V. Stadnik; V. V. Flambaum

    2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the proton and neutron spin contributions for nuclei using semi-empirical methods, as well as a novel hybrid \\emph{ab initio}/semi-empirical method, for interpretation of experimental data. We demonstrate that core-polarisation corrections to \\emph{ab initio} nuclear shell model calculations generally reduce discrepancies in proton and neutron spin expectation values from different calculations. We derive constraints on the spin-dependent P,T-violating interaction of a bound proton with nucleons, which for certain ranges of exchanged pseudoscalar boson masses improve on the most stringent laboratory limits by several orders of magnitude. We derive a limit on the CPT and Lorentz-invariance-violating parameter $|\\tilde{b}_{\\perp}^p| < 7.6 \\times 10^{-33}$ GeV, which improves on the most stringent existing limit by a factor of 8, and demonstrate sensitivities to the parameters $\\tilde{d}_{\\perp}^p$ and $\\tilde{g}_{ D\\perp}^p$ at the level $\\sim 10^{-29} - 10^{-28}$ GeV, which is a one order of magnitude improvement compared to the corresponding existing sensitivities. We extend previous analysis of nuclear anapole moment data for Cs to obtain new limits on several other CPT and Lorentz-invariance-violating parameters: $\\left|b_0^p \\right| < 7 \\times 10^{-8}$ GeV, $\\left|d_{00}^p \\right| < 8 \\times 10^{-8}$, $\\left|b_0^n \\right| < 3 \\times 10^{-7}$ GeV and $\\left|d_{00}^n \\right| < 3 \\times 10^{-7}$.

  4. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains brief papers that discusses the following topics: Fundamental Symmetries in the Nucleus; Internucleon Interactions; Dynamics of Very Light Nuclei; Facets of the Nuclear Many-Body Problem; and Nuclear Instruments and Methods.

  5. Exploiting Universality in Atoms with Large Scattering Lengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braaten, Eric

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this research project was atoms with scattering lengths that are large compared to the range of their interactions and which therefore exhibit universal behavior at sufficiently low energies. Recent dramatic advances in cooling atoms and in manipulating their scattering lengths have made this phenomenon of practical importance for controlling ultracold atoms and molecules. This research project was aimed at developing a systematically improvable method for calculating few-body observables for atoms with large scattering lengths starting from the universal results as a first approximation. Significant progress towards this goal was made during the five years of the project.

  6. Measurements of nuclear $?$-ray line emission in interactions of protons and $?$ particles with N, O, Ne and Si

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Benhabiles-Mezhoud; J. Kiener; J. -P. Thibaud; V. Tatischeff; I. Deloncle; A. Coc; J. Duprat; C. Hamadache; A. Lefebvre-Schuhl; J. -C. Dalouzy; F. De Grancey; F. De Oliveira; F. Dayras; N. De Séréville; M. -G. Pellegriti; L. Lamia; S. Ouichaoui

    2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    $\\gamma$-ray production cross sections have been measured in proton irradiations of N, Ne and Si and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of N and Ne. In the same experiment we extracted also line shapes for strong $\\gamma$-ray lines of $^{16}$O produced in proton and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of O. For the measurements gas targets were used for N, O and Ne and a thick foil was used for Si. All targets were of natural isotopic composition. Beams in the energy range up to 26 MeV for protons and 39 MeV for $\\alpha$-particles have been delivered by the IPN-Orsay tandem accelerator. The $\\gamma$ rays have been detected with four HP-Ge detectors in the angular range 30$^{\\circ}$ to 135$^{\\circ}$. We extracted 36 cross section excitation functions for proton reactions and 14 for $\\alpha$-particle reactions. For the majority of the excitation functions no other data exist to our knowledge. Where comparison with existing data was possible usually a very good agreement was found. It is shown that these data are very interesting for constraining nuclear reaction models. In particular the agreement of cross section calculations in the nuclear reaction code TALYS with the measured data could be improved by adjusting the coupling schemes of collective levels in the target nuclei $^{14}$N, $^{20,22}$Ne and $^{28}$Si. The importance of these results for the modeling of nuclear $\\gamma$-ray line emission in astrophysical sites is discussed.

  7. Continuously variable focal length lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  8. Continuous lengths of oxide superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN); List, III, Frederick A. (Andersonville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A layered oxide superconductor prepared by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon. A continuous length of a second substrate ribbon is overlaid on the first substrate ribbon. Sufficient pressure is applied to form a bound layered superconductor precursor powder between the first substrate ribbon and the second substrate ribbon. The layered superconductor precursor is then heat treated to establish the oxide superconducting phase. The layered oxide superconductor has a smooth interface between the substrate and the oxide superconductor.

  9. Neutron interferometric measurement of the scattering length difference between the triplet and singlet states of n-$^3$He

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. G. Huber; M. Arif; W. C. Chen; T. R. Gentile; D. S. Hussey; T. C. Black; D. A. Pushin; C. B. Shahi; F. E. Wietfeldt; L. Yang

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a determination of the n-$^3$He scattering length difference $\\Delta b^{\\prime} = b_{1}^{\\prime}-b_{0}^{\\prime} = $ ($-5.411$ $\\pm$ $0.031$ (statistical) $\\pm$ $0.039$ (systematic)) fm between the triplet and singlet states using a neutron interferometer. This revises our previous result $\\Delta b^{\\prime} = $ (-5.610 $\\pm$ $0.027$ (statistical) $\\pm$ $0.032$ (systematic) fm obtained using the same technique in 2008. This revision is due to a re-analysis of the 2008 experiment that includes a more robust treatment of the phase shift caused by magnetic field gradients near the $^3$He cell. Furthermore, we more than doubled our original data set from 2008 by acquiring six months of additional data in 2013. Both the new data set and a re-analysis of the older data are in good agreement. Scattering lengths of low Z isotopes are valued for use in few-body nuclear effective field theories, provide important tests of modern nuclear potential models and in the case of $^3$He aid in the interpretation of neutron scattering from quantum liquids. The difference $\\Delta b^{\\prime}$ was determined by measuring the relative phase shift between two incident neutron polarizations caused by the spin-dependent interaction with a polarized $^3$He target. The target $^3$He gas was sealed inside a small, flat windowed glass cell that was placed in one beam path of the interferometer. The relaxation of $^3$He polarization was monitored continuously with neutron transmission measurements. The neutron polarization and spin flipper efficiency were determined separately using $^3$He analyzers and two different polarimetry analysis methods. A summary of the measured scattering lengths for n-$^3$He with a comparison to nucleon interaction models is given.

  10. Nuclear interactions with modern three-body forces lead to the instability of neutron matter and neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry K. Gridnev; Stefan Schramm; Walter Greiner; Konstantin Gridnev

    2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the neutron matter interacting through Argonne V18 pair-potential plus modern variants of Urbana or Illinois three-body forces is unstable. For the energy of $N$ neutrons $E(N)$, which interact through these forces, we prove mathematically that $E(N) = -cN^3 + \\mathcal{O}(N^{8/3})$, where $c>0$ is a constant. This means that: (i) the energy per particle and neutron density diverge rapidly for large neutron numbers; (ii) bound states of $N$ neutrons exist for $N$ large enough. The neutron matter collapse is possible due to the form of the repulsive core in three-body forces, which vanishes when three nucleons occupy the same site in space. The old variant of the forces Urbana VI, where the phenomenological repulsive core does not vanish at the origin, resolves this problem. We prove that to prevent the collapse one should add a repulsive term to the Urbana IX potential, which should be larger than 50 MeV when 3 nucleons occupy the same spatial position.

  11. Precision Measurement of the n-3He Incoherent Scattering Length Using Neutron Interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. G. Huber; M. Arif; T. C. Black; W. C. Chen; T. R. Gentile; D. S. Hussey; D. Pushin; F. E. Wietfeldt; L. Yang

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first measurement of the low-energy neutron-$^3$He incoherent scattering length using neutron interferometry: $b_i' = (-2.512\\pm 0.012{statistical}\\pm0.014{systematic})$ fm. This is in good agreement with a recent calculation using the AV18+3N potential. The neutron-$^3$He scattering lengths are important for testing and developing nuclear potential models that include three nucleon forces, effective field theories for few-body nuclear systems, and neutron scattering measurements of quantum excitations in liquid helium. This work demonstrates the first use of a polarized nuclear target in a neutron interferometer.

  12. Four-boson system with short-range interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platter, L.; Hammer, H.-W.; Meissner, Ulf-G. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen-und Kernphysik (Theorie), Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Institute for Nuclear Theory, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen-und Kernphysik (Theorie), Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn, Germany and Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the nonrelativistic four-boson system with short-range forces and large scattering length in an effective quantum mechanics approach. We construct the effective interaction potential at leading order in the large scattering length and compute the four-body binding energies using the Yakubovsky equations. Cutoff independence of the four-body binding energies does not require the introduction of a four-body force. This suggests that two- and three-body interactions are sufficient to renormalize the four-body system. We apply the equations to {sup 4}He atoms and calculate the binding energy of the {sup 4}He tetramer. We observe a correlation between the trimer and tetramer binding energies similar to the Tjon line in nuclear physics. Over the range of binding energies relevant to {sup 4}He atoms, the correlation is approximately linear.

  13. Nuclear scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friar, J.L.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

  14. Kaonic hydrogen atom and kaon-proton scattering length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Yan

    2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Kaonic hydrogen is studied with various realistic potentials in an accurate numerical approach based on Sturmian functions. The kaon-proton scattering length extracted from the 1s energy shift of the kaonic hydrogen by applying the Deser-Trueman formula is severely inconsistent with the one derived by directly solving the scattering Schoedinger equation. We pay special attention to the recent measurement of the energy shift and decay width of the 1s kaonic hydrogen state by the DEAR Collaboration. After taking into account the large discrepancy between the extracted and directly-evaluated scattering lengths, we found theoretical predictions of most chiral SU(3) based models for the kaonic hydrogen decay width are consistent with the DEAR data. We warn the SIDDHARTA collaboration that it may not be reasonable to extract kaon-nucleon scattering lengths, by using the Coulomb-interaction corrected Deser-Truemab formula, from the planned measurement of kaonic hydrogen.

  15. Pumping current of a Luttinger liquid with finite length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastián Franchino Viñas; Pablo Pisani; Mariano Salvay

    2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study transport properties in a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid in the presence of two time-dependent point like weak impurities, taking into account finite-length effects. By employing analytical methods and performing a perturbation theory, we compute the backscattering pumping current (I_bs) in different regimes which can be established in relation to the oscillatory frequency of the impurities and to the frequency related to the length and the renormalized velocity (by the electron-electron interactions) of the charge density modes. We investigate the role played by the spatial position of the impurity potentials. We also show how the previous infinite length results for I_bs are modified by the finite size of the system.

  16. Coulomb interactions within Halo Effective Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renato Higa

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    I present preliminary results of effective field theory applied to nuclear cluster systems, where Coulomb interactions play a significant role.

  17. GEOTECHNICAL ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION IN CRYSTALLINE AND ARGILLACEOUS ROCKS SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions between nuclear waste and surrounding rock.AND INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION INwill provide Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation and the

  18. Relativistic Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinhard Stock

    2009-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive introduction is given to the field of relativistic nuclear collisions, and the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter. The content of this complex of reviews is shown.

  19. Cross-Sections of Large-Angle Hadron Production in Proton- and Pion-Nucleus Interactions I: Beryllium Nuclei and Beam Momenta of +8.9 Gev/c and -8.0 Gev/c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HARP-CDP group; :; A. Bolshakova; I. Boyko; G. Chelkov; D. Dedovitch; A. Elagin; M. Gostkin; S. Grishin; A. Guskov; Z. Kroumchtein; Yu. Nefedov; K. Nikolaev; A. Zhemchugov; F. Dydak; J. Wotschack A. De Min; V. Ammosov; V. Gapienko; V. Koreshev; A. Semak; Yu. Sviridov; E. Usenko; V. Zaets

    2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on double-differential inclusive cross-sections of the production of secondary protons, deuterons, and charged pions and kaons, in the interactions with a 5% nuclear interaction length thick stationary beryllium target, of a +8.9 GeV/c proton and pion beam, and a -8.0 GeV/c pion beam. Results are given for secondary particles with production angles between 20 and 125 degrees.

  20. Neutrino Nuclear Responses For Neutrino Studies In Nuclear Femto Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ejiri, H. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047, Japan and Nuclear Science, Czech Technical University, Brehova, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinos are key particles for particle and astro-nuclear physics. Majorana neutrino masses and phases, solar and supernova neutrino productions and oscillations, and neutrino nuclear synthesis and fundamental weak interactions are well studied in nuclei as femto laboratories. Here neutrino nuclear responses are crucial for the neutrino studies. This reports briefly experimental studies of neutrino nuclear responses, charge exchange reactions on Ga to study nuclear responses for solar and {sup 51}Cr neutrinos, and {beta}{sup +} neutrino responses for {beta}{beta}-{nu} matrix elements and astro {nu} interactions by photon and muon probes.

  1. Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    development, Nuclear Operations Division (NOD) waste management and storage activities and other laboratoryNuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety The Nuclear Engineering Division (NE) of Argonne National Laboratory is experienced in performing criticality safety and shielding evaluations for nuclear

  2. Nuclear Organization and Genome Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corces, Victor G.

    Nuclear Organization and Genome Function Kevin Van Bortle and Victor G. Corces Department-range interactions and have proposed roles in nuclear organization. In this review, we explore recent findings for the roles of insulators in nuclear organization. 163 Annu.Rev.CellDev.Biol.2012.28:163-187.Downloadedfromwww

  3. Nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomson, Wallace B. (Severna Park, MD)

    2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

  4. Study of hadron interactions in a lead-emulsion target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirokazu Ishida; Tsutomu Fukuda; Takafumi Kajiwara; Koichi Kodama; Masahiro Komatsu; Tomokazu Matsuo; Shoji Mikado; Mitsuhiro Nakamura; Satoru Ogawa; Andrey Sheshukov; Hiroshi Shibuya; Jun Sudou; Taira Suzuki; Yusuke Tsuchida

    2014-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological and kinematical characteristics of hadron interactions have been studied using a lead-emulsion target exposed to 2, 4 and 10 GeV/c hadron beams. A total length of 60 m $\\pi^-$ tracks was followed using a high speed automated emulsion scanning system. A total of 318 hadron interaction vertices and their secondary charged particle tracks were reconstructed. Measurement results of interaction lengths, charged particle multiplicity, emission angles and momenta of secondary charged particles are compared with a Monte Carlo simulation and appear to be consistent. Nuclear fragments emitted from interaction vertices were also detected by a newly developed emulsion scanning system with wide-angle acceptance. Their emission angle distributions are in good agreement with the simulated distributions. Probabilities of an event being associated with at least one fragment track are found to be greater than 50% for beam momentum $P > 4$ GeV/c and are well reproduced by the simulation. These experimental results validate estimation of the background due to hadron interactions in the sample of $\\tau$ decay candidates in the OPERA $\

  5. Environmental Stresses Disrupt Telomere Length Homeostasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamir, Ron

    Environmental Stresses Disrupt Telomere Length Homeostasis Gal Hagit Romano1,2,3. , Yaniv Harari1 and Biotechnology, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel, 2 Blavatnik School of Computer Science, Tel Aviv response to environmental signals. These results demonstrate that telomere length can be manipulated

  6. Variable Length Path Coupling Thomas P. Hayes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Thomas

    length path coupling theorem, we im- prove the upper bound on the mixing time of the Glauber dynamics . By a "coupling" for this chain, we will mean a joint stochastic process (Xt, Yt) on × such that eachVariable Length Path Coupling Thomas P. Hayes Eric Vigoda July 17, 2006 Abstract We present a new

  7. Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Spackman, M. A.

    2014-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A power law regression equation, = 1.46(/r)-0.19, connecting the average experimental bond lengths, , with the average accumulation of the electron density at the bond critical point, , between bonded metal M and oxygen atoms, determined at ambient conditions for oxide crystals, where r is the row number of the M atom, is similar to the regression equation R(M-O) = 1.39(?(rc)/r)-0.21 determined for three perovskite crystals for pressures as high as 80 GPa. The two equations are also comparable with those, = 1.43(/r)-0.21, determined for a large number of oxide crystals at ambient conditions and = 1.39(/r)-0.22, determined for geometry optimized hydroxyacid molecules, that connect the bond lengths to the average Pauling electrostatic bond strength, , for the M-O bonded interactions. On the basis of the correspondence between the two sets of equations connecting ?(rc) and the Pauling bond strength s with bond length, it appears that Pauling’s simple definition of bond strength closely mimics the accumulation of the electron density between bonded pairs of atoms. The similarity of the expressions for the crystals and molecules is compelling evidence that the M-O bonded interactions for the crystals and molecules 2 containing the same bonded interactions are comparable. Similar expressions, connecting bond lengths and bond strength, have also been found to hold for fluoride, nitride and sulfide molecules and crystals. The Brown-Shannon bond valence, ?, power law expression ? = [R1/(R(M-O)]N that has found wide use in crystal chemistry, is shown to be connected to a more universal expression determined for oxides and the perovskites, = r[(1.41)/]4.76, demonstrating that the bond valence for a bonded interaction is likewise closely connected to the accumulation of the electron density between the bonded atoms. Unlike the Brown-Shannon expression, it is universal in that it holds for the M-O bonded interactions for a relatively wide range of M atoms of the periodic table. The power law equation determined for the oxide crystals at ambient conditions is similar to the power law expression = r[1.46/]5.26 determined for the perovskites at pressures as high as 80 GPa, indicating that the intrinsic connection between R(M-O) and ?(rc) that holds at ambient conditions also holds, to a first approximation, at high pressures.

  8. Coherent Nuclear Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Yukalov; E. P. Yukalova

    2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The main part of this review is devoted to the comprehensive description of coherent radiation by nuclear spins. The theory of nuclear spin superradiance is developed and the experimental observations of this phenomenon are considered. The intriguing problem of how coherence develops from initially incoherent quantum fluctuations is analysed. All main types of coherent radiation by nuclear spins are discussed, which are: free nuclear induction, collective induction, maser generation, pure superradiance, triggered superradiance, pulsing superradiance, punctuated superradiance, and induced emission. The influence of electron-nuclear hyperfine interactions and the role of magnetic anisotropy are studied. Conditions for realizing spin superradiance by magnetic molecules are investigated. The possibility of nuclear matter lasing, accompanied by pion or dibaryon radiation, is briefly touched.

  9. Effect of Minimal lengths on Electron Magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khireddine Nouicer

    2007-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the magnetic properties of electron in a constant magnetic field and confined by a isotropic two dimensional harmonic oscillator on a space where the coordinates and momenta operators obey generalized commutation relations leading to the appearance of a minimal length. Using the momentum space representation we determine exactly the energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. We prove that the usual degeneracy of Landau levels is removed by the presence of the minimal length in the limits of weak and strong magnetic field.The thermodynamical properties of the system, at high temperature, are also investigated showing a new magnetic behavior in terms of the minimal length.

  10. Water-Protein Interactions of an Arginine-Rich Membrane Peptide in Lipid Bilayers Investigated by Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Mei

    Water-Protein Interactions of an Arginine-Rich Membrane Peptide in Lipid Bilayers InvestigatedVised Manuscript ReceiVed: February 16, 2010 The interaction of an arginine (Arg) residue with water HETCOR experiments, we unambiguously assigned a water-guanidinium cross-peak that is distinct from

  11. Inheritance of Cotton Fiber Length and Strength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joy, Kolbyn Seth

    2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    hybrids. General combining ability (GCA) and specific combining ability (SCA) were estimated according to Griffing’s diallel Model I, Method 4 for lint percent, high volume instrument (HVI) upper half mean length (UHML), fiber bundle strength (Str...

  12. Carbon Nanotubes: Measuring Dispersion and Length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fagan, Jeffrey A.; Bauer, Barry J.; Hobbie, Erik K.; Becker, Matthew L.; Hight-Walker, Angela; Simpson, Jeffrey R.; Chun, Jaehun; Obrzut, Jan; Bajpai, Vardhan; Phelan, Fred R.; Simien, Daneesh; Yeon Huh, Ji; Migler, Kalman B.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced technological uses of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) rely on the production of single length and chirality populations that are currently only available through liquid phase post processing. The foundation of all of these processing steps is the attainment of individualized nanotube dispersion in solution; an understanding of the collodial properties of the dispersed SWCNTs can then be used to designed appropriate conditions for separations. In many instances nanotube size, particularly length, is especially active in determining the achievable properties from a given population, and thus there is a critical need for measurement technologies for both length distribution and effective separation techniques. In this Progress Report, we document the current state of the art for measuring dispersion and length populations, including separations, and use examples to demonstrate the desirability of addressing these parameters.

  13. A length operator for canonical quantum gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Thiemann

    1996-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct an operator that measures the length of a curve in four-dimensional Lorentzian vacuum quantum gravity. We work in a representation in which a $SU(2)$ connection is diagonal and it is therefore surprising that the operator obtained after regularization is densely defined, does not suffer from factor ordering singularities and does not require any renormalization. We show that the length operator admits self-adjoint extensions and compute part of its spectrum which like its companions, the volume and area operators already constructed in the literature, is purely discrete and roughly is quantized in units of the Planck length. The length operator contains full and direct information about all the components of the metric tensor which faciliates the construction of a new type of weave states which approximate a given classical 3-geometry.

  14. Contracting in the national interest: Establishing the legal framework for the interaction of science, government, and industry at a nuclear weapons laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, N.S.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, the nation's nuclear ordnance laboratory, is operated on a no-profit, no-fee basis by ATandT Technologies, Inc., as a prime contractor for the Department of Energy. This unique arrangement began in 1949 when President Harry Truman personally requested that ATandT assume management of the nuclear weapons laboratory as a service in the national interest. The story of how this unusual relationship came about makes for an interesting chapter in the annals of US legal and institutional history. This report describes the historical background, political negotiations, and prime contract provisos that established the legal framework for the Labs.

  15. Proc. 21st Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2005) 000000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Robert

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proc. 21st Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics (2005) 000­000 21st Winter Workshop on Nuclear Dynamics Breckenridge, Colorado, USA February 5­12, 2005 From the NN Interaction to Nuclear Structure present a novel approach for the treatment of realistic nucleon- nucleon interactions in nuclear many

  16. Interactive Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes | National Nuclear SecurityIntellectual PropertyIntensityInteractive

  17. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian Joseph

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

  18. Nuclear forces on the lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silas Beane

    2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies by the NPLQCD collaboration of hadronic interactions using lattice QCD are reviewed, with an emphasis on a recent calculation of meson-baryon scattering lengths. Ongoing high-statistics calculations of baryon interactions are also reviewed. In particular, new insights into the signal/noise problems that plague correlation functions involving baryons are discussed.

  19. Lattice QCD calculations for nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parreño, A. [Dept. d'Estructura i Constituents de la Matèria. Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, E08028 (Spain)

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    I present some recent results regarding the use of numerical Lattice QCD techniques to describe light nuclear systems from the underlying theory of the strong interaction, QCD.

  20. Interaction of Radiation with Matter Electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, Thomas N.

    . #12;Module 3 Current Issues in Radiation Biophysics · The biological effect of nuclear accidents of nuclear accidents. · Chernobyl · Three Mile Island · Dirty bombs · Japanese criticality accident #12;Charged Particle Track #12;Neutron Interactions · Energy loss by elastic scattering from

  1. VII. Nuclear Chemistry (Chapter 17) A. Modes of radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, fission, fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    40 VII. Nuclear Chemistry (Chapter 17) A. Modes of radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, fission #12;41 These masses are not exactly integer multiples due to nuclear interactions between the protons differences via the famous formula E = mc2 . Nuclear Fusion! For example, if you combine 2 protons and two

  2. Sighting optics including an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crandall, David Lynn (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One embodiment of sighting optics according to the teachings provided herein may include a front sight and a rear sight positioned in spaced-apart relation. The rear sight includes an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length. The first focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a distance separating the optical element and the front sight and the second focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a target distance. The optical element thus brings into simultaneous focus, for a user, images of the front sight and the target.

  3. Absorption Lengths in the Holographic Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irene Amado; Carlos Hoyos; Karl Landsteiner; Sergio Montero

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the effect of a periodic perturbation with frequency $\\omega$ on the holographic N=4 plasma represented by the planar AdS black hole. The response of the system is given by exponentially decaying waves. The corresponding complex wave numbers can be found by solving wave equations in the AdS black hole background with infalling boundary conditions on the horizon in an analogous way as in the calculation of quasinormal modes. The complex momentum eigenvalues have an interpretation as poles of the retarded Green's functions, where the inverse of the imaginary part gives an absorption length $\\lambda$. At zero frequency we obtain the screening length for a static field. These are directly related to the glueball masses in the dimensionally reduced theory. We also point out that the longest screening length corresponds to an operator with non-vanishing R-charge and thus does not have an interpretation as a QCD3 glueball.

  4. Crystal diffraction lens with variable focal length

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smither, R.K.

    1991-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for altering the focal length of a focusing element of one of a plurality of pre-determined focal lengths by changing heat transfer within selected portions of the element by controlled quantities is disclosed. Control over heat transfer is accomplished by manipulating one or more of a number of variables, including: the amount of heat or cold applied to surfaces; type of fluids pumped through channels for heating and cooling; temperatures, directions of flow and rates of flow of fluids; and placement of channels. 19 figures.

  5. Apparatus for fabricating continuous lengths of superconductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN); List, III, Frederick A. (Andersonville, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus for manufacturing a superconductor. The process is accomplished by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon, overlaying a continuous length of a second substrate ribbon on said first substrate ribbon, and applying sufficient pressure to form a bound layered superconductor comprising a layer of said superconducting precursor powder between said first substrate ribbon and said second substrates ribbon. The layered superconductor is then heat treated to establish the superconducting phase of said superconductor precursor powder.

  6. Apparatus for fabricating continuous lengths of superconductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN); List, III, Frederick A. (Andersonville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus for manufacturing a superconductor. The process is accomplished by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon, overlaying a continuous length of a second substrate ribbon on said first substrate ribbon, and applying sufficient pressure to form a bound layered superconductor comprising a layer of said superconducting precursor powder between said first substrate ribbon and said second substrates ribbon. The layered superconductor is then heat treated to establish the superconducting phase of said superconductor precursor powder.

  7. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, which will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay. Strong Los Alamos programs in nuclear data and nuclear theory supports...

  8. EA Systems Examples Induction and Recursion Length Measuring the Universe Analysis Number systems of different lengths,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forster, T.E.

    EA Systems Examples Induction and Recursion Length Measuring the Universe Analysis Number systems of Mathematics University of Bristol April 21, 2008 Richard.Pettigrew@bris.ac.uk Natural number systems and infinitesimal analysis #12;EA Systems Examples Induction and Recursion Length Measuring the Universe Analysis

  9. materialsELSEVIER Journal of Nuclear Materials 233-237 (1996) 1547-1551 Deuteron beam interaction with lithium jet in a neutron source test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    -speed flowing jet of liquid Li, as shown in Fig. 1. This system must also be capable of operating under the high tank where complete mixing occurs with the large volume of Li in the tank. Some of the concerns beam interaction with lithium jet in a neutron source test facility I A. Hassanein Argonne National

  10. Symmetry Energy in Nuclear Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawel Danielewicz; Jenny Lee

    2008-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Interplay between the dependence of symmetry energy on density and the variation of nucleonic densities across nuclear surface is discussed. That interplay gives rise to the mass dependence of the symmetry coefficient in an energy formula. Charge symmetry of the nuclear interactions allows to introduce isoscalar and isovector densities that are approximately independent of the magnitude of neutron-proton asymmetry.

  11. Nuclear weapons and nuclear war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassel, C.; McCally, M.; Abraham, H.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book examines the potential radiation hazards and environmental impacts of nuclear weapons. Topics considered include medical responsibility and thermonuclear war, the threat of nuclear war, nuclear weaponry, biological effects, radiation injury, decontamination, long-term effects, ecological effects, psychological aspects, the economic implications of nuclear weapons and war, ethics, civil defense, arms control, nuclear winter, and long-term biological consequences of nuclear war.

  12. Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Colonna

    2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights on the recent research activity, carried out by the Italian Community involved in the "Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics" field, will be presented.

  13. Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution. Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution. Abstract: A power law regression...

  14. New hydrocracking catalysts increase throughput, run length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huizinga, T. [Shell Internationale Petroleum Mij., The Hague (Netherlands); Theunissen, J.M.H. [Rayong Refinery Co. Ltd., Rayong (Thailand); Minderhoud, H.; Veen, R. van [Koninklijke/Shell-Lab., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved, second-stage hydrocracking catalyst has been developed by combining stabilized Y zeolites with amorphous silica alumina cracking components. A commercial application of this catalyst, along with a new, first-stage zeolitic hydrocracking catalyst, resulted in increased unit throughput and cycle length. The paper discusses the hydrocracking process, first-stage catalysts, second-stage catalysts, hydrogenation process, commercial results, and product properties.

  15. Theories of Low Energy Nuclear Transmutations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. N. Srivastava; A. Widom; J. Swain

    2012-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing concrete examples from nuclear physics it is shown that low energy nuclear reactions can and have been induced by all of the four fundamental interactions (i) (stellar) gravitational, (ii) strong, (iii) electromagnetic and (iv) weak. Differences are highlighted through the great diversity in the rates and similarity through the nature of the nuclear reactions initiated by each.

  16. Neutrinoless double-{beta} decay of deformed nuclei within quasiparticle random-phase approximation with a realistic interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang Dongliang; Faessler, Amand; Rodin, Vadim; Simkovic, Fedor [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Tuebingen, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); BLTP, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation) and Department of Nuclear Physics, Comenius University, SK-842 15 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a microscopic approach to calculation of the nuclear matrix element M{sup 0{nu}} for neutrinoless double-{beta} decay with an account for nuclear deformation is presented in length and applied for {sup 76}Ge, {sup 150}Nd, and {sup 160}Gd. The proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation with a realistic residual interaction (the Brueckner G matrix derived from the charge-depending Bonn nucleon-nucleon potential) is used as the underlying nuclear structure model. The effects of the short-range correlations and the quenching of the axial vector coupling constant g{sub A} are analyzed. The results suggest that neutrinoless double-{beta} decay of {sup 150}Nd, to be measured soon by the SNO+ Collaboration, may provide one of the best probes of the Majorana neutrino mass. This confirms our preliminary conclusion in Fang et al. [Phys. Rev. C 82, 051301(R) (2010)].

  17. Length and Energy of Quadratic Bezier Curves and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, Christoph M.

    Length and Energy of Quadratic B´ezier Curves and Applications Young Joon Ahn a , Christoph for the arc length and the bending energy of quadratic B´ezier curves. The formulae are in terms control point is analyzed for curves of fixed arc length or bending energy. In the case of arc length

  18. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian Joseph

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Journal of Nuclear Technology. [46] C.J. Hagmann and J.Library for Nuclear Science and Technology,” Nuclear Dataof Standards and Technology daughter nuclear data processing

  19. Nuclear reactor safety device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, E.

    1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A safety device is described for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of a thermal excursion. It comprises a laminated strip helically configured to form a tube, said tube being in operative relation to said control rod. The laminated strip is formed of at least two materials having different thermal coefficients of expansion, and is helically configured such that the material forming the outer lamina of the tube has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material forming the inner lamina of said tube. In the event of a thermal excursion the laminated strip will tend to curl inwardly so that said tube will increase in length, whereby as said tube increases in length it exerts a force on said control rod to axially reposition said control rod with respect to said core.

  20. {sup 33}S hyperfine interactions in H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} and revision of the sulfur nuclear magnetic shielding scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helgaker, Trygve, E-mail: t.u.helgaker@kjemi.uio.no [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)] [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Gauss, Jürgen, E-mail: gauss@uni-mainz.de [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)] [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Cazzoli, Gabriele, E-mail: gabriele.cazzoli@unibo.it; Puzzarini, Cristina, E-mail: cristina.puzzarini@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Chimica “Giacomo Ciamician,” Università di Bologna, Via Selmi 2, I-40126 Bologna (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Chimica “Giacomo Ciamician,” Università di Bologna, Via Selmi 2, I-40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the Lamb-dip technique, the hyperfine structure in the rotational spectra of H{sub 2}{sup 33}S and {sup 33}SO{sub 2} has been resolved and the corresponding parameters—that is, the sulfur quadrupole-coupling and spin–rotation tensors—were determined. The experimental parameters are in good agreement with results from high-level coupled-cluster calculations, provided that up to quadruple excitations are considered in the cluster operator, sufficiently large basis sets are used, and vibrational corrections are accounted for. The {sup 33}S spin-rotation tensor for H{sub 2}S has been used to establish a new sulfur nuclear magnetic shielding scale, combining the paramagnetic part of the shielding as obtained from the spin–rotation tensor with a calculated value for the diamagnetic part as well as computed vibrational and temperature corrections. The value of 716(5) ppm obtained in this way for the sulfur shielding of H{sub 2}S is in good agreement with results from high-accuracy quantum-chemical calculations but leads to a shielding scale that is about 28 ppm lower than the one suggested previously in the literature, based on the {sup 33}S spin-rotation constant of OCS.

  1. Bunch length effects in the beam-beam compensation with an electron lens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Montag, C.

    2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron lenses for the head-on beam-beam compensation are under construction at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The bunch length is of the same order as the {beta}-function at the interaction point, and a proton passing through another proton bunch experiences a substantial phase shift which modifies the beam-beam interaction. We review the effect of the bunch length in the single pass beam-beam interaction, apply the same analysis to a proton passing through a long electron lens, and study the single pass beam-beam compensation with long bunches. We also discuss the beam-beam compensation of the electron beam in an electron-ion collider ring.

  2. TREKisM At Length Issue 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . "Triskelian Fledgeling" — by Vel Jaeger "Kelvan Exile" — by Vel Jaeger 111. Romulan Astronomy — by Robert S. Sayes 113c Trek-M's Speak their Minds on ST:TMP 121. A Glance Backwards - reactions to TaL I (first issue of TREKisM at Length) 122. Trivia Quizes #3...\\un Speck run. "fynjrur^run. -Storu Ipu1- 'The^dds" UYena T^fc* Ink.nc l'*- bjj rafrick La\\fena ^aq Kidd LuckICKU ©/980' -14- 0N CONVENTIONAL OCCASIONS The following Is a conglomeration of reports, Interviews, and reminiscences from TREKisM members...

  3. TREKiSM At Length Issue 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trek IV! SHALOM PAX PEACE to us all in 1986 Table of Contents TITLE AUTHOR ARTIST PAGE I. DATA ENTRIES FROST ON THE TYPEWRITER V.L. Thorn LaVena Kay Kldd 2 "Trek Omen" V.L. Thorn 6 (originally appeared In TREKisM #26) JAMES T. KIRK vs THE COMPUTER... appeared in TREKisM at Length III) TALES FROM THE VULCAN HEARTH Karen C. Hunter 53 HOW THE VULCANS LOST THEIR WINGS 54 THE SKY GOD'S DAUGHTER 56 THE GIFT OF THE GODS LaVena Kay Kldd 57 "Sul Generis" V.L. Thorn 58 "Cat-Kin" Emily Ross 60 (originally appeared...

  4. Property:Length (m) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid JumpEligSysSize JumpTechDsc JumpAlpha3 JumpLabLength (m)

  5. Exploring medium effects on the nuclear force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Sammarruca

    2004-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This STI product contains a description of results from theoretical studies in nuclear physics. The goal is a systematic investigation of the nuclear force in the nuclear medium. The problems addressed are: density-dependent effective interactions as seen through proton-nucleus reactions, nuclear matter with unequal densities of protons and neutrons, applications to asymmetric nuclei through predictions of neutron radii and neutron skins.

  6. Molecular Mechanisms for Microtubule Length Regulation by Kinesin-8 and XMAP215 Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis Reese; Anna Melbinger; Erwin Frey

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The cytoskeleton is regulated by a plethora of enzymes that influence the stability and dynamics of cytoskeletal filaments. Molecular motors of the kinesin-8 protein family depolymerise microtubules in a length-dependent manner, and experimental and theoretical evidence suggest a role for kinesin-8 in the dynamic regulation of microtubules. However, so far the detailed molecular mechanisms how these molecular motors interact with the growing microtubule tip remain elusive. Here we investigate two interaction scenarios for kinesin-8 and the microtubule tip. We give a comprehensive analysis of regimes where length-regulation is possible and characterise how the stationary length depends on the biochemical rates and the bulk concentrations of the various proteins. For a neutral scenario, where microtubules grow irrespective of whether the microtubule tip is occupied by a molecular motor, length regulation is possible only for a narrow range of biochemical rates and limited to small polymerisation rates. In contrast, for an inhibition scenario, where the presence of a motor at the microtubule tip inhibits microtubule growth, the regime of length regulation is extremely broad and includes high growth rates. These results also apply to situations where polymerising enzymes, like XMAP215, and kinesin-8 mutually exclude each other from the microtubule tip. We also investigate the stochastic dynamics of the two scenarios. While for the neutral scenario length is tightly controlled, length dynamics is intermittent for the inhibition scenario and exhibits extended periods of microtubule growth and shrinkage, reminiscent of microtubule dynamic instability. On a broader perspective, the set of models established in this work quite generally suggests that mutual exclusion of molecules at the ends of cytoskeletal filaments is an important factor for filament dynamics and regulation.

  7. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Ronald J. (Pensacola, FL); Land, John T. (Pensacola, FL); Misvel, Michael C. (Pensacola, FL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

  8. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.; Misvel, M.C.

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled. 12 figs.

  9. Nuclear Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Nuclear Safety Division which has specific responsibility for managing the development, analysis, review, and approval of non-reactor nuclear facility safety bases...

  10. Nuclear Navy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This video tells the story of the Navy's development of nuclear power and its application in long-range submarines and the growing nuclear surface force. Narrated by Frank Blair.

  11. Nuclear Navy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This video tells the story of the Navy`s development of nuclear power and its application in long-range submarines and the growing nuclear surface force. Narrated by Frank Blair.

  12. Nuclear Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Nuclear Safety Division (NSD) which has specific responsibility for managing the development, analysis, review, and approval of non-reactor nuclear facility safety...

  13. Investigating Biological Matter with Theoretical Nuclear Physics Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietro Faccioli

    2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The internal dynamics of strongly interacting systems and that of biomolecules such as proteins display several important analogies, despite the huge difference in their characteristic energy and length scales. For example, in all such systems, collective excitations, cooperative transitions and phase transitions emerge as the result of the interplay of strong correlations with quantum or thermal fluctuations. In view of such an observation, some theoretical methods initially developed in the context of theoretical nuclear physics have been adapted to investigate the dynamics of biomolecules. In this talk, we review some of our recent studies performed along this direction. In particular, we discuss how the path integral formulation of the molecular dynamics allows to overcome some of the long-standing problems and limitations which emerge when simulating the protein folding dynamics at the atomistic level of detail.

  14. Investigating Biological Matter with Theoretical Nuclear Physics Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faccioli, Pietro

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The internal dynamics of strongly interacting systems and that of biomolecules such as proteins display several important analogies, despite the huge difference in their characteristic energy and length scales. For example, in all such systems, collective excitations, cooperative transitions and phase transitions emerge as the result of the interplay of strong correlations with quantum or thermal fluctuations. In view of such an observation, some theoretical methods initially developed in the context of theoretical nuclear physics have been adapted to investigate the dynamics of biomolecules. In this talk, we review some of our recent studies performed along this direction. In particular, we discuss how the path integral formulation of the molecular dynamics allows to overcome some of the long-standing problems and limitations which emerge when simulating the protein folding dynamics at the atomistic level of detail.

  15. Studies of nuclear processes; Progress report, 1 September 1992--31 August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results for the period 1 Sep 92 through 31 Aug 93 are presented in nearly a hundred brief papers, some of which present new but preliminary data. Activities reported may be grouped as follows: Fundamental symmetries in the nucleus (parity-mixing measurements, time reversal invariance measurements, signatures of quantum chaos in nuclei), Internucleon reactions (neutron -- proton interactions, the neutron -- neutron scattering length, reactions between deuterons and very light nuclei), Dynamics of very light nuclei (measurements of D states of very light nuclei by transfer reactions, nuclear reactions between very light nuclei, radiative capture reactions with polarized sources), The many-nucleon problem (nuclear astrophysics, high-spin spectroscopy and superdeformation, the nuclear mean field: Dispersive relations and nucleon scattering, configuration mixing in {sup 56}Co and {sup 46}Sc using (d,{alpha}) reactions, radiative capture studies, high energy resolution resonance studies at 100--400 keV, nuclear data evaluation for A=3--20), Nuclear instruments and methods (FN tandem accelerator operation, KN accelerator operation and maintenance, atomic beam polarized ion source, development of techniques for determining the concentration of SF{sub 6} in the accelerator insulating gas mixture, production of beams and targets, detector systems, updating of TeX, Psprint, and associated programs on the VAX cluster), and Educational Activities.

  16. Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. D. McKeown

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

  17. Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKeown, R D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

  18. Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bing, G.F.

    1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

  19. Nuclear Fusion: A Solution to the GlobalNuclear Fusion: A Solution to the Global Energy CrisisEnergy Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    Nuclear Fusion: A Solution to the GlobalNuclear Fusion: A Solution to the Global Energy Crisis.maclellan@strath.ac.uk Introduction and Motivation What is Nuclear Fusion? Laser Plasma Interactions The world, and particularly is harnessing the power of nuclear fusion. It is however, extremely difficult to sustain a fusion reaction

  20. Long range interactions in nanoscale science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajter, Richard F.

    Our understanding of the “long range” electrodynamic, electrostatic, and polar interactions that dominate the organization of small objects at separations beyond an interatomic bond length is reviewed. From this basic-forces ...

  1. Stellar mixing length theory with entropy rain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandenburg, Axel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stellar mixing length theory is modified to include the effects of a nongradient term that originates from the motion of convective elements with entropy perturbations of either sign. It is argued that such a term, first studied by Deardorff in the meteorological context, represents the effects of thin intense downdrafts caused by the rapid cooling in the granulation layer at the top of the convection zone. They transport heat nonlocally, as originally anticipated by Spruit in the 1990s, who describes the convection in the strongly stratified simulations of Stein & Nordlund as entropy rain. Although our model has ill-determined free parameters, it demonstrates that solutions can be found that look similar to the original ones, except that the deeper layers are now Schwarzschild stable, so no giant cells are produced and the typical convective scale is that of granules even at larger depth. Consequences for modeling solar differential, the global dynamo, and sunspots are briefly discussed.

  2. Precision neutron interferometric measurement of the nd coherent neutron scattering length and consequences for models of three-nucleon forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. C. Black; P. R. Huffman; D. L. Jacobson; W. M. Snow; K. Schoen; M. Arif; H. Kaiser; S. K. Lamoreaux; S. A. Werner

    2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed the first high precision measurement of the coherent neutron scattering length of deuterium in a pure sample using neutron interferometry. We find b_nd = (6.665 +/- 0.004) fm in agreement with the world average of previous measurements using different techniques, b_nd = (6.6730 +/- 0.0045) fm. We compare the new world average for the nd coherent scattering length b_nd = (6.669 +/- 0.003) fm to calculations of the doublet and quartet scattering lengths from several modern nucleon-nucleon potential models with three-nucleon force (3NF) additions and show that almost all theories are in serious disagreement with experiment. This comparison is a more stringent test of the models than past comparisons with the less precisely-determined nuclear doublet scattering length of a_nd = (0.65 +/- 0.04) fm.

  3. Infrared length scale and extrapolations for the no-core shell model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wendt, K A; Papenbrock, T; Sääf, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We precisely determine the infrared (IR) length scale of the no-core shell model (NCSM). In the NCSM, the $A$-body Hilbert space is truncated by the total energy, and the IR length can be determined by equating the intrinsic kinetic energy of $A$ nucleons in the NCSM space to that of $A$ nucleons in a $3(A-1)$-dimensional hyper-radial well with a Dirichlet boundary condition for the hyper radius. We demonstrate that this procedure indeed yields a very precise IR length by performing large-scale NCSM calculations for $^{6}$Li. We apply our result and perform accurate IR extrapolations for bound states of $^{4}$He, $^{6}$He, $^{6}$Li, $^{7}$Li. We also attempt to extrapolate NCSM results for $^{10}$B and $^{16}$O with bare interactions from chiral effective field theory over tens of MeV.

  4. Geometric Solutions for the Neutrino Oscillation Length Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jason Pruet; George M. Fuller

    1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a geometric interpretation of the neutrino 'oscillation length resonance' recently discovered by Petcov. We use this picture to identify two new solutions for oscillation length resonances in a 3-layer earth model.

  5. Low-coherent WDM reflectometry for accurate fiber length monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hui, Rongqing; Thomas, J.; Allen, Christopher Thomas; Fu, B.; Gao, S.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber-optic low-coherent reflectometer was developed to accurately monitor fiber length variation. A large length-coverage range was obtained by using a fiber Bragg grating array in a wavelength-division-multiplexing ...

  6. Dictionaries Using Variable-Length Keys and Data, with Applications *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blelloch, Guy E.

    (Isil- logn, 1) + Itil) and Isil is the length of bit string si. We assume a word length w > log m. We present string Isil > 1, Itil > 1 for all bit-strings si and ti. Fox' fixed-length keys the dictionary problem

  7. Nuclear Physics Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker-Loud, Andre

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anchoring low-energy nuclear physics to the fundamental theory of strong interactions remains an outstanding challenge. I review the current progress and challenges of the endeavor to use lattice QCD to bridge this connection. This is a particularly exciting time for this line of research as demonstrated by the spike in the number of different collaborative efforts focussed on this problem and presented at this conference. I first digress and discuss the 2013 Ken Wilson Award.

  8. Cold nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsyganov, E. N., E-mail: edward.tsyganov@utsouthwestern.edu [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent accelerator experiments on fusion of various elements have clearly demonstrated that the effective cross-sections of these reactions depend on what material the target particle is placed in. In these experiments, there was a significant increase in the probability of interaction when target nuclei are imbedded in a conducting crystal or are a part of it. These experiments open a new perspective on the problem of so-called cold nuclear fusion.

  9. Nuclear spin circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaara, Juha, E-mail: juha.vaara@iki.fi [NMR Research Group, Department of Physics, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland)] [NMR Research Group, Department of Physics, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Rizzo, Antonio [Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IPCF-CNR), Area della Ricerca, via G. Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa (Italy)] [Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IPCF-CNR), Area della Ricerca, via G. Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa (Italy); Kauczor, Joanna; Norman, Patrick [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, S-58183 Linköping (Sweden)] [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, S-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Coriani, Sonia, E-mail: coriani@units.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 1, I-34127 Trieste (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 1, I-34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent years have witnessed a growing interest in magneto-optic spectroscopy techniques that use nuclear magnetization as the source of the magnetic field. Here we present a formulation of magnetic circular dichroism (CD) due to magnetically polarized nuclei, nuclear spin-induced CD (NSCD), in molecules. The NSCD ellipticity and nuclear spin-induced optical rotation (NSOR) angle correspond to the real and imaginary parts, respectively, of (complex) quadratic response functions involving the dynamic second-order interaction of the electron system with the linearly polarized light beam, as well as the static magnetic hyperfine interaction. Using the complex polarization propagator framework, NSCD and NSOR signals are obtained at frequencies in the vicinity of optical excitations. Hartree-Fock and density-functional theory calculations on relatively small model systems, ethene, benzene, and 1,4-benzoquinone, demonstrate the feasibility of the method for obtaining relatively strong nuclear spin-induced ellipticity and optical rotation signals. Comparison of the proton and carbon-13 signals of ethanol reveals that these resonant phenomena facilitate chemical resolution between non-equivalent nuclei in magneto-optic spectra.

  10. Shear viscosity of nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Xu

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk I report my recent study on the shear viscosity of neutron-rich nuclear matter from a relaxation time approach. An isospin- and momentum-dependent interaction is used in the study. Effects of density, temperature, and isospin asymmetry of nuclear matter on its shear viscosity have been discussed. Similar to the symmetry energy, the symmetry shear viscosity is defined and its density and temperature dependence are studied.

  11. 2013 Nuclear Workforce Development ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Workforce Development Day Tuesday, October 22, 2013 Nuclear Medicine Topics: Pathways of Practice in Nuclear Medicine Radiopharmacy Patient Care ...

  12. Nuclear Counterterrorism

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order defines requirements for the protection of sensitive improvised nuclear device information and provides a framework to support DOE activities related to nuclear counterterrorism. (A supplemental DOE Manual, Control of and Access to Improvised Nuclear Device Information, provides requirements and procedures for protecting Sigma 20 information.) Appendices A and B are Official Use Only. Point of contact is Adam Boyd (NA-82), 202-586-0010. Cancels DOE O 457.1 and DOE M 457.1-1.

  13. Nuclear Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilhena and Bardo E.J. Bodmann Carbon-#1;? in Terrestrial and Aquatic Environment of Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant: Sources of Production, Releases and Dose Estimates #3;?? Jonas Mazeika Impact of radionuclide discharges from Temel?n Nuclear Power... (chapter 5), ? Instrumentation and control (chapter 6), ? Diagnostics (chapter 7), ? Safety evaluation methods (chapters 6, 8, 9 and 10), ? Environment and nuclear power plants (chapters 11 - 15), ? Human factors (chapter 16), ? Software development...

  14. Compact noninvasive electron bunch-length monitor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Roberts, B.; Mammei, R. R.; Poelker, M.; McCarter, J. L.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact rf cavity was constructed that simultaneously resonates at many harmonic modes when excited by a repetitive bunched electron beam passing through its bore. The excitation of these modes provides a Fourier description of the temporal characteristics of the bunch train. The cavity was used to noninvasively characterize electron bunches produced from thin and thick GaAs photocathodes inside a DC high voltage photogun illuminated with 37 ps (full width half maximum, FWHM) laser pulses at repetition rates near 1500 MHz, at average beam current from 5 to 500????A , and at beam energy from 75 to 195 keV. The cavity bunch-length monitor could detect electron bunches as short as 57 ps (FWHM) when connected directly to a sampling oscilloscope, and could clearly distinguish bunches with varying degrees of space-charge induced growth and with different tail signatures. Efforts are under way to detect shorter bunches by designing cavities with increased bandwidth. This demonstration lends credibility to the idea that these cavities could also be used for other applications, including bunching and shaping, when driven with external rf.

  15. DHS Internship Summary-Crystal Assembly at Different Length Scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishchenko, L

    2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    I was part of a project in which in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to monitor growth and dissolution of atomic and colloidal crystals. At both length scales, the chemical environment of the system greatly altered crystal growth and dissolution. Calcium phosphate was used as a model system for atomic crystals. A dissolution-reprecipitation reaction was observed in this first system, involving the conversion of brushite (DCPD) to octacalcium phosphate (OCP). In the second system, polymeric colloidal crystals were dissolved in an ionic solvent, revealing the underlying structure of the crystal. The dissolved crystal was then regrown through an evaporative step method. Recently, we have also found that colloids can be reversibly deposited in situ onto an ITO (indium tin oxide) substrate via an electrochemistry setup. The overall goal of this project was to develop an understanding of the mechanisms that control crystallization and order, so that these might be controlled during material synthesis. Controlled assembly of materials over a range of length scales from molecules to nanoparticles to colloids is critical for designing new materials. In particular, developing materials for sensor applications with tailorable properties and long range order is important. In this work, we examine two of these length scales: small molecule crystallization of calcium phosphate (whose crystal phases include DCPD, OCP, and HAP) and colloidal crystallization of Poly(methyl methacrylate) beads. Atomic Force Microscopy is ideal for this line of work because it allows for the possibility of observing non-conducting samples in fluid during growth with high resolution ({approx} 10 nm). In fact, during atomic crystal growth one can observe changes in atomic steps, and with colloidal crystals, one can monitor the individual building blocks of the crystal. Colloids and atoms crystallize under the influence of different forces acting at different length scales as seen in Table 1. In particular, molecular crystals, which are typically dominated by ionic and covalent bonding, are an order of magnitude more strongly bonded than colloidal crystals. In molecular crystals, ordering is driven by the interaction potentials between molecules. By contrast, colloidal assembly is a competition between the repulsive electrostatic forces that prevent aggregation in solution (due to surface charge), and short-range van der Waals and entropic forces that leads to ordering. Understanding atomic crystallization is fundamentally important for fabrication of tailorable crystalline materials, for example for biological or chemical sensors. The transformation of brushite to OCP not only serves as a model system for atomic crystal growth (applicable to many other crystal growth processes), but is also important in bone cements. Colloidal crystals have unique optical properties which respond to chemical and mechanical stimuli, making them very important for sensing applications. The mechanism of colloidal crystal assembly is thus fundamentally important. Our in situ dissolution and regrowth experiments are one good method of analyzing how these crystals pack under different conditions and how defect sites are formed and filled. In these experiments, a silica additive was used to strengthen the colloidal crystal during initial assembly (ex situ) and to increase domain size and long range order. Reversible electrodeposition of colloids onto a conductive substrate (ITO in our case) is another system which can further our knowledge of colloidal assembly. This experiment holds promise of allowing in situ observation of colloidal crystal growth and the influence of certain additives on crystal order. The ultimate goal would be to achieve long range order in these crystals by changing the surface charge or the growth environment.

  16. Lattice QCD and Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A steady stream of developments in Lattice QCD have made it possible today to begin to address the question of how nuclear physics emerges from the underlying theory of strong interactions. Central role in this understanding play both the effective field theory description of nuclear forces and the ability to perform accurate non-perturbative calculations in lo w energy QCD. Here I present some recent results that attempt to extract important low energy constants of the effective field theory of nuclear forces from lattice QCD.

  17. ME 337C Introduction to Nuclear Power Systems ABET EC2000 syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Yakar, Adela

    ME 337C ­ Introduction to Nuclear Power Systems Page 1 ABET EC2000 syllabus ME 337C ­ Introduction to Nuclear Power Systems Fall 2009 Required or Elective: Elective 2008-2010 Catalog Data: Radioactivity, nuclear interactions: fission and fusion, fission reactors, nuclear power systems, nuclear power safety

  18. PROBING DENSE NUCLEAR MATTER VIA NUCLEAR COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University of California. LBL-12095 Probing Dense NuclearMatter Nuclear Collisions* v~a H. Stocker, M.Gyulassy and J. Boguta Nuclear Science Division Lawrence

  19. Panel report: nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Joseph A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hartouni, Edward P [LLNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear science is at the very heart of the NNSA program. The energy produced by nuclear processes is central to the NNSA mission, and nuclear reactions are critical in many applications, including National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsules, energy production, weapons, and in global threat reduction. Nuclear reactions are the source of energy in all these applications, and they can also be crucial in understanding and diagnosing the complex high-energy environments integral to the work of the NNSA. Nuclear processes are complex quantum many-body problems. Modeling and simulation of nuclear reactions and their role in applications, coupled tightly with experiments, have played a key role in NNSA's mission. The science input to NNSA program applications has been heavily reliant on experiment combined with extrapolations and physical models 'just good enough' to provide a starting point to extensive engineering that generated a body of empirical information. This body of information lacks the basic science underpinnings necessary to provide reliable extrapolations beyond the domain in which it was produced and for providing quantifiable error bars. Further, the ability to perform additional engineering tests is no longer possible, especially those tests that produce data in the extreme environments that uniquely characterize these applications. The end of testing has required improvements to the predictive capabilities of codes simulating the reactions and associated applications for both well known and well characterized cases as well as incompletely known cases. Developments in high performance computing, computational physics, applied mathematics and nuclear theory have combined to make spectacular advances in the theory of fission, fusion and nuclear reactions. Current research exploits these developments in a number of Office of Science and NNSA programs, and in joint programs such as the SciDAC (Science Discovery through Advanced Computing) that supports the project Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Fuctional whose goals are to provide the unified approach to calculating the properties of nuclei. The successful outcome of this, and similar projects is a first steps toward a predictive nuclear theory based on fundamental interactions between constituent nucleons. The application of this theory to the domain of nuclei important for national security missions will require computational resources at the extreme scale, beyond what will be available in the near term future.

  20. The stimulus-dependent co-localization of serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated protein kinase (Sgk) and Erk/MAPK in mammary tumor cells involves the mutual interaction with the importin-alpha nuclear import protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buse, Patricia; Maiyar, Anita C.; Failor, Kim L.; Tran, Susan; Leong, Meredith L.L. [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and The Cancer Research Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3200 (United States); Firestone, Gary L. [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and The Cancer Research Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3200 (United States)], E-mail: glfire@berkeley.edu

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In Con8 rat mammary epithelial tumor cells, indirect immunofluorescence revealed that Sgk (serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase) and Erk/MAPK (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase/mitogen activated protein kinase) co-localized to the nucleus in serum-treated cells and to the cytoplasmic compartment in cells treated with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. Moreover, the subcellular distribution of the importin-alpha nuclear transport protein was similarly regulated in a signal-dependent manner. In vitro GST-pull down assays revealed the direct interaction of importin-alpha with either Sgk or Erk/MAPK, while RNA interference knockdown of importin-alpha expression disrupted the localization of both Sgk and Erk into the nucleus of serum-treated cells. Wild type or kinase dead forms of Sgk co-immunoprecipitated with Erk/MAPK from either serum- or dexamethasone-treated mammary tumor cells, suggesting the existence of a protein complex containing both kinases. In serum-treated cells, nucleus residing Sgk and Erk/MAPK were both hyperphosphorylated, indicative of their active states, whereas, in dexamethasone-treated cells Erk/MAPK, but not Sgk, was in its inactive hypophosphorylated state. Treatment with a MEK inhibitor, which inactivates Erk/MAPK, caused the relocalization of both Sgk and ERK to the cytoplasm. We therefore propose that the signal-dependent co-localization of Sgk and Erk/MAPK mediated by importin-alpha represents a new pathway of signal integration between steroid and serum/growth factor-regulated pathways.

  1. Nuclear clusters with Halo Effective Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renato Higa

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    After a brief discussion of effective field theory applied to nuclear clusters, I present the aspect of Coulomb interactions, with applications to low-energy alpha-alpha and nucleon-alpha scattering.

  2. Nudat: Nuclear Structure and Decay Data from the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    NuDat allows users to search and plot nuclear structure and decay data interactively. NuDat was developed by the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC)but utilizes contributions from physicists around the world. It provides an interface between web users and several databases containing nuclear structure, nuclear decay and some neutron-induced nuclear reaction information. Users can search for nuclear level properties (energy, half-life, spinparity), gamma-ray information (energy, intensity, multipolarity, coincidences), radiation information following nuclear decay (energy, intensity, dose), and neutron-induced reaction data from the BNL-325 book (thermal cross section and resonance integral). The information provided by NuDat 2 can be viewed in tables, level schemes and an interactive chart of nuclides.

  3. Jefferson Lab - Final State Nucleons for Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LBNF) could not succeed without better understanding of neutrino-nucleus interactions. Neutrino physics requires nuclear physics input in order to properly constrain its leading...

  4. National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  5. Nuclear war, nuclear proliferation, and their consequences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aga Khan, S.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents papers on nuclear weapons proliferation. Topics considered include the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and its future, the spread of nuclear weapons among nations, the link between horizontal and vertical proliferation, national security, nuclear disarmament, the impact of nuclear weapons on Third World regional conflicts, the global effects of a nuclear war, medical effects on human populations, the nuclear winter, the nuclear arms race, and arms control.

  6. EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CERNEP/2000121

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CERN­EP/2000­121 31 March 2000 The Data Acquisition) Fonds pour la Formation `a la Recherche dans l'Industrie et dans l'Agriculture. n) Supported by a grant current (CC) interactions, in a 770 kg nuclear emulsion target located in the experimental setup

  7. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics: Swedish Nuclear Powe

  8. Parallel interacting edge cracks under pure bending

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moran, Ivan

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    specimens. . . 66 Table 6. 4 a SIFs for interactive cracks. Position 14. . 73 Table 6. 4 b SIFs for interactive cracks. Position 24 . . 79 Table 6. 4 c SIFs for interactive cracks. Position 13. . 83 Table 6. 5 a K~ff for position 14 Table 6. 5 b K... Table 5. 3 Models Dimensions SPECIMEN MODEL 1 MODEL 2 Length L (inches) Dimension m (in) 6. 50 6. 50 1. 25 1. 25 Spec. Width H (in) 1. 100 1. 276 Thickness t (in) 0. 238 0. 238 Crack Angle p (o) 90 54 Crack Width c (in) Crack Length a (in) 0...

  9. Nuclear Counterterrorism

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order defines requirements for the protection of sensitive improvised nuclear device information and provides a framework to support DOE activities related to nuclear counterterrorism. (A supplemental DOE Manual, Control of and Access to Improvised Nuclear Device Information, provides requirements and procedures for protecting Sigma 20 information. The Manual is Official Use Only, and is not available on the Directives Portal. The point of contact for the Manual is Randall Weidman, NA-121.2, 202-586-4582.) Canceled by DOE O 457.1A

  10. Structuring Materials on Multiple Length Scales for Energy Application...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structuring Materials on Multiple Length Scales for Energy Applications October 25, 2012 at 3pm36-428 Adreas Stein Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota astein...

  11. Ultra-low-loss tapered optical fibers with minimal lengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryutaro Nagai; Takao Aoki

    2014-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We design and fabricate ultra-low-loss tapered optical fibers (TOFs) with minimal lengths. We first optimize variations of the torch scan length using the flame-brush method for fabricating TOFs with taper angles that satisfy the adiabaticity criteria. We accordingly fabricate TOFs with optimal shapes and compare their transmission to TOFs with a constant taper angle and TOFs with an exponential shape. The highest transmission measured for TOFs with an optimal shape is in excess of 99.7 % with a total TOF length of only 23 mm, whereas TOFs with a constant taper angle of 2 mrad reach 99.6 % transmission for a 63 mm TOF length.

  12. Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raúl A. Briceño; Zohreh Davoudi; Thomas C. Luu

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low- energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.

  13. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some ofmore »the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.« less

  14. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Briceno, Raul A. [JLAB; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low- energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.

  15. Nuclear Celebrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: The North Korean situation is frightening for many reasons but none, perhaps, more eerily disturbing than images of North Koreans celebrating in brightly colored costumes just days after the nation's underground nuclear test...

  16. Infrared Spectroscope for Electron Bunch-length Measurement: Heat Sensor Parameters Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Domgmo-Momo, Gilles; /Towson U. /SLAC

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is used for many experiments. Taking advantage of the free electron laser (FEL) process, scientists of various fields perform experiments of all kind. Some for example study protein folding; other experiments are more interested in the way electrons interact with the molecules before they are destroyed. These experiments among many others have very little information about the electrons x-ray produced by the FEL, except that the FEL is using bunches less than 10 femtoseconds long. To be able to interpret the data collected from those experiments, more accurate information is needed about the electron's bunch-length. Existing bunch length measurement techniques are not suitable for the measurement of such small time scales. Hence the need to design a device that will provide more precise information about the electron bunch length. This paper investigates the use of a pyreoelectric heat sensor that has a sensitivity of about 1.34 micro amps per watt for the single cell detector. Such sensitivity, added to the fact that the detector is an array sensor, makes the detector studied the primary candidate to be integrated to an infrared spectrometer designed to better measure the LCLS electron bunch length.

  17. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  18. Nuclear reactor safety device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, Ernest (Wilmette, IL)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A safety device is disclosed for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of an upward thermal excursion. Such safety device comprises a laminated helical ribbon configured as a tube-like helical coil having contiguous helical turns with slidably abutting edges. The helical coil is disclosed as a portion of a drive member connected axially to the control rod. The laminated ribbon is formed of outer and inner laminae. The material of the outer lamina has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material of the inner lamina. In the event of an upward thermal excursion, the laminated helical coil curls inwardly to a smaller diameter. Such inward curling causes the total length of the helical coil to increase by a substantial increment, so that the control rod is axially repositioned by a corresponding amount to reduce the power output of the reactor.

  19. Sighting optics including an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length and methods for sighting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crandall, David Lynn

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Sighting optics include a front sight and a rear sight positioned in a spaced-apart relation. The rear sight includes an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length. The first focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a distance separating the optical element and the front sight and the second focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a target distance. The optical element thus brings into simultaneous focus for a user images of the front sight and the target.

  20. Nuclear Science/Nuclear Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One of the greatNuclear Science/Nuclear

  1. A Study of Query Length Avi Arampatzis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arampatzis, Avi

    length, and fit power-law and Poisson distribu- tions to four different query sets. We provide and a power-law distribution for longer queries, that better fits real query length distributions than earlier proposals. Categories and Subject Descriptors: H.3 [Information Storage and Re- trieval]: H.3.3 Information

  2. On Termination and Derivation Lengths for Ground Rewrite Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesl, Juergen

    On Termination and Derivation Lengths for Ground Rewrite Systems Dieter Hofbauer 1 Universit¨at GH@theory.informatik.uni­kassel.de Abstract. It is shown that for terminating ground term rewrite systems the length of derivations a suitable interpretation into the natural numbers. Terminating ground systems are not necessarily

  3. Scaling Behavior and Equilibrium Lengths of Knotted Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    Scaling Behavior and Equilibrium Lengths of Knotted Polymers Eric Rawdon Akos Dobay John C. Kern numerical simulations to investigate how the chain length and topology of freely fluctuating knotted polymer of a characteristic changes with the chain size and how this change depends on the topology of the modeled polymers

  4. Nuclear Proliferation Technology Trends Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Talbert, Robert J.

    2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is underway to develop mature, integrated methodologies to address nonproliferation issues. A variety of methodologies (both qualitative and quantitative) are being considered. All have one thing in common, a need for a consistent set of proliferation related data that can be used as a basis for application. One approach to providing a basis for predicting and evaluating future proliferation events is to understand past proliferation events, that is, the different paths that have actually been taken to acquire or attempt to acquire special nuclear material. In order to provide this information, this report describing previous material acquisition activities (obtained from open source material) has been prepared. This report describes how, based on an evaluation of historical trends in nuclear technology development, conclusions can be reached concerning: (1) The length of time it takes to acquire a technology; (2) The length of time it takes for production of special nuclear material to begin; and (3) The type of approaches taken for acquiring the technology. In addition to examining time constants, the report is intended to provide information that could be used to support the use of the different non-proliferation analysis methodologies. Accordingly, each section includes: (1) Technology description; (2) Technology origin; (3) Basic theory; (4) Important components/materials; (5) Technology development; (6) Technological difficulties involved in use; (7) Changes/improvements in technology; (8) Countries that have used/attempted to use the technology; (9) Technology Information; (10) Acquisition approaches; (11) Time constants for technology development; and (12) Required Concurrent Technologies.

  5. Portable 543 nm length standard and magnetic-induced zero-crossing shift on length standard transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shy,Jow-Tsong

    a convenient and objective length standard for use in both academic and industrial applications. Ever since the ve- locity of light in a vacuum was defined as 299 792 458 m/s in 1983,1 atom or molecule of the primary length-standard lasers,16 and some inter- comparisons were held thereafter.11,14 Therefore

  6. Chart of Nuclides from the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Chart of Nuclides is a software product that allows users to search and plot nuclear structure and nuclear decay data interactively. The Chart of Nuclides was developed by the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). It provides an interface between web users and several databases containing nuclear structure, nuclear decay and some neutron-induced nuclear reaction information. Using the Chart of Nuclides, it is possible to search for nuclear level properties (energy, half-life, spin-parity), gamma-ray information (energy, intensity, multipolarity, coincidences),radiation information following nuclear decay (energy, intensity, dose), and neutron-induced reaction data from the BNL-325 book (thermal cross section and resonance integral). The information provided by the Chart of Nuclides can be seen in tables, level schemes and an interactive chart of nuclides. (From the Chart of Nuclides Description at http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/chart/help/index.jsp?product=chart)

  7. Nuclear winter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehrlich, A.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 13 speakers at the October 1983 Conference on the World After Nuclear War each contributed specialized knowledge to the climatic and biological effects of nuclear war. The author highlights the findings of the TTAPS (named for its authors) study and confirmation by Soviet scientists on the nuclear winter. Atmospheric consequences would come from debris blocking sunlight and creating conditions of cold and darkness that could preclude the continued existence of life. The biological consequences of cold and darkness would be reduced photosynthesis, devastating losses of food, damage and death from ionizing radiation, and a breakdown of ecosystems. Impacts on the human population would be intensified by a breakdown in social services. The author summarizes points of discussion during the conference. 4 references.

  8. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project TapsDOERecovery NuclearSensor NodesNuclear

  9. Hydrogen atom in momentum space with a minimal length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djamil Bouaziz; Nourredine Ferkous

    2010-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A momentum representation treatment of the hydrogen atom problem with a generalized uncertainty relation,which leads to a minimal length ({\\Delta}X_{i})_{min}= \\hbar \\sqrt(3{\\beta}+{\\beta}'), is presented. We show that the distance squared operator can be factorized in the case {\\beta}'=2{\\beta}. We analytically solve the s-wave bound-state equation. The leading correction to the energy spectrum caused by the minimal length depends on \\sqrt{\\beta}. An upper bound for the minimal length is found to be about 10^{-9} fm.

  10. Inflationary universe in the presence of a minimal measurable length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mohammadi; Ahmed Farag Ali; T. Golanbari; A. Aghamohammadi; Kh. Saaidi; Mir Faizal

    2015-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we will study the effect of having a minimum measurable length on inflationary cosmology. We will analyse the inflationary cosmology in the Jacobson approach. In this approach, gravity is viewed as an emergent thermodynamical phenomena. We will demonstrate that the existence of a minimum measurable length will modify the Friedmann equations in the Jacobson approach. We will use this modified Friedmann equation to analyse the effect of minimum measurable length scale on inflationary cosmology. This analysis will be performed using the Hamiltonian-Jacobi approach. We compare our results to recent data, and find that our model may agree with the recent data.

  11. Inflationary universe in the presence of a minimal measurable length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammadi, A; Golanbari, T; Aghamohammadi, A; Saaidi, Kh; Faizal, Mir

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we will study the effect of having a minimum measurable length on inflationary cosmology. We will analyse the inflationary cosmology in the Jacobson approach. In this approach, gravity is viewed as an emergent thermodynamical phenomena. We will demonstrate that the existence of a minimum measurable length will modify the Friedmann equations in the Jacobson approach. We will use this modified Friedmann equation to analyse the effect of minimum measurable length scale on inflationary cosmology. This analysis will be performed using the Hamiltonian-Jacobi approach. We compare our results to recent data, and find that our model may agree with the recent data.

  12. A coarse entropy-rigidity theorem and discrete length-volume inequalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinneberg, Kyle Edward

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A discrete length-volume inequality . . . . . . . .v 3 Length-volume inequalities revisitedlength-volume inequality for cubes . . . . . . . . . . . .

  13. Length Scale Analysis of Surface Energy Fluxes Derived from Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Gillies, Robert R.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the variability across different spatial res- olutions in input data translates into variation across scales in modeled output. This issue is of prime im- portance to the remote sensing community involved in the modeling of land–atmosphere interactions...1212 VOLUME 4J O U R N A L O F H Y D R O M E T E O R O L O G Y q 2003 American Meteorological Society Length Scale Analysis of Surface Energy Fluxes Derived from Remote Sensing NATHANIEL A. BRUNSELL* Department of Plants, Soils, and Biometeorology...

  14. Correlation length of the two-dimensional Ising spin glass with bimodal interactions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katzgraber, Helmut G.; Lee, LW.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A DIGITAL LIBRARY APPROACH TO THE RECONSTRUCTION OF ANCIENT SUNKEN SHIPS A Dissertation by CARLOS A. MONROY COBAR Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2010 Major Subject: Computer Science A DIGITAL LIBRARY APPROACH TO THE RECONSTRUCTION OF ANCIENT SUNKEN SHIPS A Dissertation by CARLOS A. MONROY COBAR Submitted to the Office...

  15. Manipulating surface diffusion and elastic interactions to obtain quantum dot multilayer arrangements over different length scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Placidi, E., E-mail: ernesto.placidi@ism.cnr.it; Arciprete, F. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, CNR, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dipartimento di Fisica, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Latini, V.; Latini, S.; Patella, F. [Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dipartimento di Fisica, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Magri, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Informatiche e Matematiche (FIM), Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, and Centro S3 CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Via Campi 213/A, 4100 Modena (Italy); Scuderi, M.; Nicotra, G. [CNR-IMM, Strada VIII, 5, 95121 Catania (Italy)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative multilayer growth of InAs quantum dots on GaAs(100) is demonstrated to lead to self-aggregation of correlated quantum dot chains over mesoscopic distances. The fundamental idea is that at critical growth conditions is possible to drive the dot nucleation only at precise locations corresponding to the local minima of the Indium chemical potential. Differently from the known dot multilayers, where nucleation of new dots on top of the buried ones is driven by the surface strain originating from the dots below, here the spatial correlations and nucleation of additional dots are mostly dictated by a self-engineering of the surface occurring during the growth, close to the critical conditions for dot formation under the fixed oblique direction of the incoming As flux, that drives the In surface diffusion.

  16. Nuclear Golf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Pay no attention to that nuclear warhead behind the 18th hole; just shout "Fore!" and drive your Titleist down the fairway. In a development that is bizarre even by North Korean standards, the country is making a move to sell...

  17. FEL GAIN LENGTH AND TAPER MEASUREMENTS AT LCLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratner, D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    taper mea- surements from LCLS. We ?nd gain lengths of ? 2.9AND TAPER MEASUREMENTS AT LCLS ? D. Ratner † , A. Brachmann,et al. , First Results of the LCLS Laser-Heater Sys- tem,

  18. amyloid fibril length: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Intrinsic Linear Heterogeneity of Amyloid Beta Protein Fibrils Revealed by Higher Resolution Mass-per-length Determinations* Chemistry...

  19. Formation lengths of hadrons in lepto-production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levon Grigoryan

    2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The average formation lengths of the hadrons produced during the deep inelastic scattering (DIS) of leptons on protons are studied in the framework of the symmetric Lund model. It is shown that these formation lengths essentially depend on the electric charges of the hadron. For electro-production and charged current (CC) neutrino-production, the average formation lengths of positively charged particles are larger than those of negatively charged antiparticles. This situation is reversed for CC antineutrino-production. In all the mentioned cases, the main mechanism is the direct production of hadrons. The additional mechanism of hadron production, through the decay of resonances, is essential only for pions and leads to a decrease in the average formation lengths.

  20. Applying Vocal Tract Length Normalization to Meeting Recordings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garau, Giulia; Renals, Steve; Hain, Thomas

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vocal Tract Length Normalisation (VTLN) is a commonly used technique to normalise for inter-speaker variability. It is based on the speaker-specific warping of the frequency axis, parameterised by a scalar warp factor. ...

  1. Inferring the Rate-Length Law of Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, Thomas J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the rate-length scaling law of protein folding, a key undetermined scaling law in the analytical theory of protein folding. We demonstrate that chain length is a dominant factor determining folding times, and that the unambiguous determination of the way chain length corre- lates with folding times could provide key mechanistic insight into the folding process. Four specific proposed laws (power law, exponential, and two stretched exponentials) are tested against one an- other, and it is found that the power law best explains the data. At the same time, the fit power law results in rates that are very fast, nearly unreasonably so in a biological context. We show that any of the proposed forms are viable, conclude that more data is necessary to unequivocally infer the rate-length law, and that such data could be obtained through a small number of protein folding experiments on large protein domains.

  2. FEL GAIN LENGTH AND TAPER MEASUREMENTS AT LCLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratner, D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    more than double the coherent, FEL power over the satura-FEL GAIN LENGTH AND TAPER MEASUREMENTS AT LCLS ? D.Figure 11: Post-saturation FEL pulse energy for a taper with

  3. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington on work supported in part by US Department of Energy contract DE-AC06-81ER40048. It contains chapters on giant dipole resonances in excited nuclei, nucleus-nucleus reactions, astrophysics, polarization in nuclear reactions, fundamental symmetries and interactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), ultra-relativistic heavy ions, medium energy reactions, work by external users, instrumentation, accelerators and ion sources, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, a Ph. D. degree granted in the 1990-1991 academic year, and publications. Refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Nuclear Physics A 611 ( 1996) 484-513 Mesonic and binding contributions to the EMC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández de Córdoba, Pedro

    NUCLEAR PHYSICS A Nuclear Physics A 611 ( 1996) 484-513 Mesonic and binding contributions November 1995; revised 30 July 1996 Abstract We revise the conventional nuclear effects of Fermi motion for an interacting Fermi sea and the local density approximation to translate results from nuclear matter to finite

  5. Hydrogen-atom spectrum under a minimal-length hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandor Benczik; Lay Nam Chang; Djordje Minic; Tatsu Takeuchi

    2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy spectrum of the Coulomb potential with minimal length commutation relations $[X_i, P_j] = i\\hbar\\{\\delta_{ij}(1+\\beta P^2) + \\beta'P_iP_j\\}$ is determined both numerically and perturbatively for arbitrary values of $\\beta'/\\beta$ and angular momenta $\\ell$. The constraint on the minimal length scale from precision hydrogen spectroscopy data is of order of a few GeV$\

  6. Nuclear Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forensics | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  7. Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

  8. Curved and diffuse interface effects on the nuclear surface tension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. M. Kolomietz; S. V. Lukyanov; A. I. Sanzhur

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We redefine the surface tension coefficient for a nuclear Fermi-liquid drop with a finite diffuse layer. Following Gibbs-Tolman concept, we introduce the equimolar radius R_e of sharp surface droplet at which the surface tension is applied and the radius of tension surface R_s which provides the minimum of the surface tension coefficient \\sigma. This procedure allows us to derive both the surface tension and the corresponding curvature correction (Tolman length) correctly for the curved and diffuse interface. We point out that the curvature correction depends significantly on the finite diffuse interface. This fact is missed in traditional nuclear considerations of curvature correction to the surface tension. We show that Tolman's length \\xi is negative for nuclear Fermi-liquid drop. The value of the Tolman length is only slightly sensitive to the Skyrme force parametrization and equals \\xi=-0.36 fm.

  9. Antenna mechanism of length control of actin cables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lishibanya Mohapatra; Bruce L. Goode; Jane Kondev

    2015-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Actin cables are linear cytoskeletal structures that serve as tracks for myosin-based intracellular transport of vesicles and organelles in both yeast and mammalian cells. In a yeast cell undergoing budding, cables are in constant dynamic turnover yet some cables grow from the bud neck toward the back of the mother cell until their length roughly equals the diameter of the mother cell. This raises the question: how is the length of these cables controlled? Here we describe a novel molecular mechanism for cable length control inspired by recent experimental observations in cells. This antenna mechanism involves three key proteins: formins, which polymerize actin, Smy1 proteins, which bind formins and inhibit actin polymerization, and myosin motors, which deliver Smy1 to formins, leading to a length-dependent actin polymerization rate. We compute the probability distribution of cable lengths as a function of several experimentally tuneable parameters such as the formin-binding affinity of Smy1 and the concentration of myosin motors delivering Smy1. These results provide testable predictions of the antenna mechanism of actin-cable length control.

  10. WORKSHOP ON NUCLEAR DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, W.D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L. Wilets, "Theories of Nuclear Fission", Clarendon Press,of the nuclear force, result in lower calculated fission

  11. National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FROM: SUBJECT: USIUK Memorandum of Understanding between National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security (AADNS)...

  12. Dynamic nuclear polarization in biomolecular solid state NMR : methods and applications in peptides and membrane proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bajaj, Vikram Singh

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state NMR can probe structure and dynamics on length scales from the atomic to the supramolecular. However, low sensitivity limits its application in macromolecules. NMR sensitivity can be improved by dynamic nuclear ...

  13. INSTRUCTIONS FOR SUBMITTING NUCLEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waste management proceedings. Keywords Nuclear, nuclear power plant, spent fuel, nuclear waste, data of Submitted Data 3 NUCLEAR POWER PLANT DATA REQUESTS 6 A. Environmental Impacts 6 B. Spent Fuel Generation 8 C. Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage 9 D. Spent Nuclear Fuel Transport and Disposal Issues 10 E. Interim Spent

  14. Proton radioactivity half lives with Skyrme interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. R. Routray; Abhishek Mishra; S. K. Tripathy; B. Behera; D. N. Basu

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential barrier impeding the spontaneous emission of protons in the proton radioactive nuclei is calculated as the sum of nuclear, Coulomb and centrifugal contributions. The nuclear part of the proton-nucleus interaction potential is obtained in the energy density formalism using Skyrme effective interaction that results into a simple algebraic expression. The half-lives of the proton emitters are calculated for the different Skyrme sets within the improved WKB framework. The results are found to be in reasonable agreement with the earlier results obtained for more complicated calculations involving finite range interactions.

  15. Institute for Nuclear Theory annual report No. 2, 1 March 1991--29 February 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haxton, W.; Henley, E.M. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses research on the following topics in Nuclear physics: electromagnetic interactions and few-nucleon systems; N*'s and nucleon structure; mesons and fields in nuclei; and nuclear astrophysics of type II supernovae. (LSP).

  16. Future directions in particle and nuclear physics at multi-GeV hadron beam facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geesaman, D.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [ed.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers on the following topics in particle and nuclear physics: hadron dynamics; lepton physics; spin physics; hadron and nuclear spectroscopy; hadronic weak interactions; and Eta physics. These papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  17. The AMEDEE Nuclear Structure Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilaire, S.; Girod, M. [CEA/DAM Ile-de-France, Service de Physique Nucleaire, BP 12, F-91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France)

    2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing need for nuclear data far from the valley of stability requires information on nuclei which cannot be accessed experimentally or for which almost no experimental data is known. Consequently, the use of microscopic approaches to predict properties of such poorly known nuclei is necessary as a first step to improve our understanding of nuclear reaction on exotic nuclei. Within this context, large scale axial mean field calculations from proton to neutron drip-lines have been performed using the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method based on the DIS Gogny nucleon-nucleon effective interaction. Nearly 7000 nuclei have been studied under the axial symmetry hypothesis and several properties are now available for the nuclear scientific community on an Internet web site for every individual nucleus.

  18. Nuclear force in Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. T. Takahashi; T. Doi; H. Suganuma

    2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform the quenched lattice QCD analysis on the nuclear force (baryon-baryon interactions). We employ $20^3\\times 24$ lattice at $\\beta=5.7$ ($a\\simeq 0.19$ fm) with the standard gauge action and the Wilson quark action with the hopping parameters $\\kappa=0.1600, 0.1625, 0.1650$, and generate about 200 gauge configurations. We measure the temporal correlators of the two-baryon system which consists of heavy-light-light quarks. We extract the inter-baryon force as a function of the relative distance $r$. We also evaluate the contribution to the nuclear force from each ``Feynman diagram'' such as the quark-exchange diagram individually, and single out the roles of Pauli-blocking effects or quark exchanges in the inter-baryon interactions.

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-binding protein (PBP) but not PPAR-interacting protein (PRIP) is required for nuclear translocation of constitutive androstane receptor in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Dongsheng [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Sarkar, Joy [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Ahmed, Mohamed R. [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Viswakarma, Navin [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Jia Yuzhi [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Yu Songtao [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Sambasiva Rao, M. [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Reddy, Janardan K. [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States)]. E-mail: jkreddy@northwestern.edu

    2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates transcription of phenobarbital-inducible genes that encode xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in liver. CAR is localized to the hepatocyte cytoplasm but to be functional, it translocates into the nucleus in the presence of phenobarbital-like CAR ligands. We now demonstrate that adenovirally driven EGFP-CAR, as expected, translocates into the nucleus of normal wild-type hepatocytes following phenobarbital treatment under both in vivo and in vitro conditions. Using this approach we investigated the role of transcription coactivators PBP and PRIP in the translocation of EGFP-CAR into the nucleus of PBP and PRIP liver conditional null mouse hepatocytes. We show that coactivator PBP is essential for nuclear translocation of CAR but not PRIP. Adenoviral expression of both PBP and EGFP-CAR restored phenobarbital-mediated nuclear translocation of exogenously expressed CAR in PBP null livers in vivo and in PBP null primary hepatocytes in vitro. CAR translocation into the nucleus of PRIP null livers resulted in the induction of CAR target genes such as CYP2B10, necessary for the conversion of acetaminophen to its hepatotoxic intermediate metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. As a consequence, PRIP-deficiency in liver did not protect from acetaminophen-induced hepatic necrosis, unlike that exerted by PBP deficiency. These results establish that transcription coactivator PBP plays a pivotal role in nuclear localization of CAR, that it is likely that PBP either enhances nuclear import or nuclear retention of CAR in hepatocytes, and that PRIP is redundant for CAR function.

  20. Feedback Mechanism for Microtubule Length Regulation by Stathmin Gradients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maria Zeitz; Jan Kierfeld

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate and analyze a theoretical model for the regulation of microtubule (MT) polymerization dynamics by the signaling proteins Rac1 and stathmin. In cells, the MT growth rate is inhibited by cytosolic stathmin, which, in turn, is inactivated by Rac1. Growing MTs activate Rac1 at the cell edge, which closes a positive feedback loop. We investigate both tubulin sequestering and catastrophe promotion as mechanisms for MT growth inhibition by stathmin. For a homogeneous stathmin concentration in the absence of Rac1, we find a switch-like regulation of the MT mean length by stathmin. For constitutively active Rac1 at the cell edge, stathmin is deactivated locally, which establishes a spatial gradient of active stathmin. In this gradient, we find a stationary bimodal MT length distributions for both mechanisms of MT growth inhibition by stathmin. One subpopulation of the bimodal length distribution can be identified with fast growing and long pioneering MTs in the region near the cell edge, which have been observed experimentally. The feedback loop is closed through Rac1 activation by MTs. For tubulin sequestering by stathmin, this establishes a bistable switch with two stable states: one stable state corresponds to upregulated MT mean length and bimodal MT length distributions, i.e., pioneering MTs; the other stable state corresponds to an interrupted feedback with short MTs. Stochastic effects as well as external perturbations can trigger switching events. For catastrophe promoting stathmin we do not find bistability.

  1. Nuclear photonics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  2. Nuclear physics from strong coupling QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Fromm; Philippe de Forcrand

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The strong coupling limit (beta_gauge = 0) of QCD offers a number of remarkable research possibilities, of course at the price of large lattice artifacts. Here, we determine the complete phase diagram as a function of temperature T and baryon chemical potential mu_B, for one flavor of staggered fermions in the chiral limit, with emphasis on the determination of a tricritical point and on the T ~ 0 transition to nuclear matter. The latter is known to happen for mu_B substantially below the baryon mass, indicating strong nuclear interactions in QCD at infinite gauge coupling. This leads us to studying the properties of nuclear matter from first principles. We determine the nucleon-nucleon potential in the strong coupling limit, as well as masses m_A of nuclei as a function of their atomic number A. Finally, we clarify the origin of nuclear interactions at strong coupling, which turns out to be a steric effect.

  3. Nuclear Fusion in Dense Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawyer, R. F. [Department of Physics, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard theory of nuclear fusion rates in strongly interacting plasmas can be (correctly) derived only when the energy release Q is large compared to other energies in the problem. We exhibit a result for rates that provides a basis for calculating the finite Q corrections. Crude estimates indicate a significant defect in the conventional results for some regions of high density and strong plasma coupling. We also lay some groundwork for a path integral calculation of the new effects.

  4. Critical Waves and the Length Problem of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, R B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is pointed out that the mystery of how biological systems measure their lengths vanishes away if one premises that they have discovered a way to generate linear waves analogous to compressional sound. These can be used to detect length at either large or small scales using echo timing and fringe counting. It is shown that suitable linear chemical potential waves can, in fact, be manufactured by tuning to criticality conventional reaction-diffusion with a small number substances. Min oscillations in E. coli are cited as precedent resonant length measurement using chemical potential waves analogous to laser detection. Mitotic structures in eucaryotes are identified as candidates for such an effect at higher frequency. The engineering principle is shown to be very general and functionally the same as that used by hearing organs. PNAS Significance Statement: This paper invokes physical principles to address the question of how living things might use reaction-diffusion to measure out and regulate the many thou...

  5. Interactive Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    project assignment of an interactive social space, built up from autonomously operating smart building, interactive spaces in which people and buildings engage in a mutual relationship with one other. By connecting the data and experiences that develop though this relationship between buildings and their inhabitants

  6. Fundamental processes in the interacting boson model: 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iachello, F. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8120 (United States); Barea, J. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A program to calculate nuclear matrix elements for fundamental processes in the interacting boson model has been initiated. Results for the nuclear matrix elements in neutrinoless double beta decay 0{nu}{beta}{beta} are presented.

  7. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4C, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons by LtCol Karl Basham Functional areas: Nuclear Explosives, Nuclear Weapons, Security The Order establishes...

  8. FEL GAIN LENGTH AND TAPER MEASUREMENTS AT LCLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratner, D.; Fawley, W. M.; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F.J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, P.; Huang, Z.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Nuhn, H.D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; Xiang, D.; Yocky, G.; Fawley, W. M.

    2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present experimental studies of the gain length and saturation power level from 1.5 nm to 1.5 Angstroms at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). By disrupting theFEL process with an orbit kick, we are able to measure the X-ray intensity as a function of undulator length. This kick method is cross-checked with the method of removing undulator sections. We also study the FEL-induced electron energy loss after saturation to determine the optimal taper of the undulator K values. The experimental results are compared to theory and simulations.

  9. Nuclear Astrophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One of the great scientific challenges is

  10. Nuclear Forensics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One of the great scientific

  11. Nuclear Energy!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project TapsDOE Directives,838Nuclear Detectionmore

  12. Nuclear Nonproliferation,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project TapsDOERecovery NuclearSensor Nodes for

  13. NUCLEAR ENERGY

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartment of Energyof Energy NREL:Education &NTSF NUCLEAR

  14. Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclear physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carlson, Joseph A.; Gandolfi, Stefano; Pederiva, Francesco; Pieper, Steven C.; Schiavilla, Rocco; Schmidt, K. E,; Wiringa, Robert B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proved very valuable to study the structure and reactions of light nuclei and nucleonic matter starting from realistic nuclear interactions and currents. These ab-initio calculations reproduce many low-lying states, moments and transitions in light nuclei, and simultaneously predict many properties of light nuclei and neutron matter over a rather wide range of energy and momenta. We review the nuclear interactions and currents, and describe the continuum Quantum Monte Carlo methods used in nuclear physics. These methods are similar to those used in condensed matter and electronic structure but naturally include spin-isospin, tensor, spin-orbit, and three-bodymore »interactions. We present a variety of results including the low-lying spectra of light nuclei, nuclear form factors, and transition matrix elements. We also describe low-energy scattering techniques, studies of the electroweak response of nuclei relevant in electron and neutrino scattering, and the properties of dense nucleonic matter as found in neutron stars. A coherent picture of nuclear structure and dynamics emerges based upon rather simple but realistic interactions and currents.« less

  15. Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclear physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Carlson; S. Gandolfi; F. Pederiva; Steven C. Pieper; R. Schiavilla; K. E. Schmidt; R. B. Wiringa

    2015-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proved very valuable to study the structure and reactions of light nuclei and nucleonic matter starting from realistic nuclear interactions and currents. These ab-initio calculations reproduce many low-lying states, moments and transitions in light nuclei, and simultaneously predict many properties of light nuclei and neutron matter over a rather wide range of energy and momenta. We review the nuclear interactions and currents, and describe the continuum Quantum Monte Carlo methods used in nuclear physics. These methods are similar to those used in condensed matter and electronic structure but naturally include spin-isospin, tensor, spin-orbit, and three-body interactions. We present a variety of results including the low-lying spectra of light nuclei, nuclear form factors, and transition matrix elements. We also describe low-energy scattering techniques, studies of the electroweak response of nuclei relevant in electron and neutrino scattering, and the properties of dense nucleonic matter as found in neutron stars. A coherent picture of nuclear structure and dynamics emerges based upon rather simple but realistic interactions and currents.

  16. Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclear physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carlson, Joseph A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gandolfi, Stefano [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pederiva, Francesco [Univ. of Trento (Italy); Pieper, Steven C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schiavilla, Rocco [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Schmidt, K. E, [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Wiringa, Robert B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proved very valuable to study the structure and reactions of light nuclei and nucleonic matter starting from realistic nuclear interactions and currents. These ab-initio calculations reproduce many low-lying states, moments and transitions in light nuclei, and simultaneously predict many properties of light nuclei and neutron matter over a rather wide range of energy and momenta. We review the nuclear interactions and currents, and describe the continuum Quantum Monte Carlo methods used in nuclear physics. These methods are similar to those used in condensed matter and electronic structure but naturally include spin-isospin, tensor, spin-orbit, and three-body interactions. We present a variety of results including the low-lying spectra of light nuclei, nuclear form factors, and transition matrix elements. We also describe low-energy scattering techniques, studies of the electroweak response of nuclei relevant in electron and neutrino scattering, and the properties of dense nucleonic matter as found in neutron stars. A coherent picture of nuclear structure and dynamics emerges based upon rather simple but realistic interactions and currents.

  17. Nuclear reactor engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapters are presented concerning energy from nuclear fission; nuclear reactions and radiations; diffusion and slowing-down of neutrons; principles of reactor analysis; nuclear reactor kinetics and control; energy removal; non-fuel reactor materials; the reactor fuel system; radiation protection and environmental effects; nuclear reactor shielding; nuclear reactor safety; and power reactor systems.

  18. Solution of A Class of Finite-Range Potentials with Large Scattering Length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bimalendu Deb

    2015-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that there exists a class of finite-range model potentials that may be useful for describing resonant interactions with large scattering length at low energy. They are expressed in terms of the effective range $r_0$ and the $s$-wave scattering length $a_s$. The mathematical expression of the potential $V_+(r)$ with positive $a_s$ is different from that of the potential $V_{-}(r)$ with negative $a_s$. However, both reduce to the same form $V_{\\infty}$ in the unitarity limits $a_s \\rightarrow \\pm \\infty$. We derive scattering and bound-sate solutions of these potentials. By writing $V_{\\pm}(r) = V^{{\\rm PT}}(r) + V_{\\pm}^{\\epsilon}(r)$, where $ V^{{\\rm PT}}(r)$ is of the form of P\\"{o}schl-Teller potential and $V_{\\pm}^{\\epsilon}$ is expressed as a power series of the small parameter $\\epsilon = (\\sqrt{1 - 2 r_0/a_s})^{-1} - 1 $ when $a_s$ is large, we derive Green function of $V^{{\\rm PT}}(r)$ and thereby develop a perturbative method to obtain scattering solution of $V_{\\pm}(r)$ as a power series in $\\epsilon$. We describe the threshold behavior of scattering phase shift $\\delta_0$ in the unitarity limits and establish the connection of $\\delta_0$ with the strength of the P\\"{o}schl-Teller potential. This study may be important for developing an accurate description or better understanding of physics of strongly interacting ultracold atomic gases with tunable interactions.

  19. Holographic Nucleons in the Nuclear Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bum-Hoon Lee; Chanyong Park

    2015-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the nucleon's rest mass and dispersion relation in the nuclear medium which is holographically described by the thermal charged AdS geometry. On this background, the chiral condensate plays an important role to determine the nucleon's mass in both the vacuum and the nuclear medium. It also significantly modifies the nucleon's dispersion relation. The nucleon's mass in the high density regime increases with density as expected, while in the low density regime it slightly decreases. We further study the splitting of the nucleon's masses caused by the isospin interaction with the nuclear medium.

  20. Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities.

  1. Managing nuclear predominant generating capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouget, Y.H.; Herbin, H.C.; Carbonnier, D.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most common belief, associated with nuclear power plant, leads to the conclusion that it can only operate, as a base load plant. This observation can be reversed, by just looking at large generating capacity, using an important nuclear generation mix. Nuclear plants may certainly load follow and contribute to the grid frequency control. The French example illustrates these possibilities. The reactor control of French units has been customized to accommodate the grid requests. Managing such a large nuclear plant fleet requires various actions be taken, ranging from a daily to a multi-annual perspective. The paper describes the various contributions leading to safe, reliable, well accepted and cost competitive nuclear plants in France. The combination of all aspects related to operations, maintenance scheduling, nuclear safety management, are presented. The use of PWR units carries considerable weight in economic terms, with several hundred million francs tied in with outage scheduling every year. This necessitates a global view of the entire generating system which can be mobilized to meet demand. There is considerable interaction between units as, on the one hand, they are competing to satisfy the same need, and, on the other hand, reducing maintenance costs means sharing the necessary resources, and thus a coordinated staggering of outages. In addition, nuclear fuel is an energy reserve which remains in the reactor for 3 or 4 years, with some of the fuel renewed each year. Due to the memory effect, the fuel retains a memory of past use, so that today's choices impact upon the future. A medium-term view of fuel management is also necessary.

  2. High density behaviour of nuclear symmetry energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. N. Basu; Tapan Mukhopadhyay

    2006-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Role of the isospin asymmetry in nuclei and neutron stars, with an emphasis on the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy, is discussed. The symmetry energy is obtained using the isoscalar as well as isovector components of the density dependent M3Y effective interaction. The constants of density dependence of the effective interaction are obtained by reproducing the saturation energy per nucleon and the saturation density of spin and isospin symmetric cold infinite nuclear matter. Implications for the density dependence of the symmetry energy in case of a neutron star are discussed, and also possible constraints on the density dependence obtained from finite nuclei are compared.

  3. Length control of microtubules by depolymerizing motor proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bindu S. Govindan; Manoj Gopalakrishnan; Debashish Chowdhury

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In many intracellular processes, the length distribution of microtubules is controlled by depolymerizing motor proteins. Experiments have shown that, following non-specific binding to the surface of a microtubule, depolymerizers are transported to the microtubule tip(s) by diffusion or directed walk and, then, depolymerize the microtubule from the tip(s) after accumulating there. We develop a quantitative model to study the depolymerizing action of such a generic motor protein, and its possible effects on the length distribution of microtubules. We show that, when the motor protein concentration in solution exceeds a critical value, a steady state is reached where the length distribution is, in general, non-monotonic with a single peak. However, for highly processive motors and large motor densities, this distribution effectively becomes an exponential decay. Our findings suggest that such motor proteins may be selectively used by the cell to ensure precise control of MT lengths. The model is also used to analyze experimental observations of motor-induced depolymerization.

  4. Performing local similarity searches with variable length seeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csürös, Miklós

    Performing local similarity searches with variable length seeds Mikl´os Csur¨os D´epartement d manner. The algorithm uses a single parameter to control the speed of the similarity search there are many inventions that improve the speed of a full sensitivity search (e.g., [3]), a full-scale search

  5. Reinforcement Learning for Active Length Control of Shape Memory Alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    Reinforcement Learning for Active Length Control of Shape Memory Alloys Kenton Kirkpatrick John Valasek Aerospace Engineering Department Texas A&M University AIAA GNC Conference 21 August 2008 Honolulu;Kirkpatrick & Valasek - 5 Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) Metallic Alloys used as actuators Shape Memory Effect

  6. Multi-length Scale Modeling of CVD of Diamond Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    ) of single-- crystalline and polycrystalline diamond films in acrystalline and polycrystalline diamond filmsMulti-length Scale Modeling of CVD of Diamond Films M. Grujicic and S. G. LaiM. Grujicic and S. G-scale Modeling of CVD Deposition of Diamond Films RotatingRotating--disk Hotdisk Hot--filament CVD

  7. On Postnikov's Hook Length Formula for Binary Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Bill

    note that Seo [7] also found combinatorial proof of the identity (1). Further studies related to Postnikov's hook length formula (1) have been carried out by Du and Liu [1], Gessel and Seo [2], Liu [4., 28 (2007), 1312-1321. [2] I. M. Gessel and S. Seo, A refinement of Cayley's formula for trees

  8. Long-length contaminated equipment burial containers fabrication process procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, W.A., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    These special process procedures cover the detailed step-by-step procedures required by the supplier who will manufacture the Long-Length Contaminated Equipment (LLCE) Burial Container design. Also included are detailed step-by-step procedures required by the disposal process for completion of the LLCE Burial Containers at Hanford.

  9. www.physicstoday.org November 2012 Physics Today 59 Nuclear energy can provide great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    www.physicstoday.org November 2012 Physics Today 59 Nuclear energy can provide great The Nuclear on keeping costs and book length in check. For example, most of the graphics use gray- scale, with only a few pages in the cen- ter providing color plates. In addition, in many places additional graphics could have

  10. Evaluation of the relationship between fracture conductivity, fracture fluid production, and effective fracture length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lolon, Elyezer P.

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-permeability gas wells often produce less than predicted after a fracture treatment. One of the reasons for this is that fracture lengths calculated after stimulation are often less than designed lengths. While actual fracture lengths may...

  11. Evaluation of the relationship between fracture conductivity, fracture fluid production, and effective fracture length 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lolon, Elyezer P.

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-permeability gas wells often produce less than predicted after a fracture treatment. One of the reasons for this is that fracture lengths calculated after stimulation are often less than designed lengths. While actual fracture lengths may...

  12. Association of length-slow silica with evaporites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heaney, P.J. (Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States). Dept. of Geology); Sheppard, R.A. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Denver Federal Center); Post, J.E. (Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC (United States). Dept. of Mineral Sciences)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1971, Folk and Pittman described the common occurrence of length-slow quartz (or lutecite) with evaporitic minerals, and they suggested that lutecite might be a useful indicator for vanished evaporites. However, the subsequent discoveries of length-slow silica in carbonate turbidites and in abyssal Pacific cherts revealed that lutecite is not restricted to near-surface deposits. Moreover, Kastner found that length-slow quartz could be crystallized in slightly alkaline solutions enriched in Mg[sup 2+], Na[sup +], and SO[sub 4][sup [minus]2]. Following these studies, researchers have cited the presence of lutecite in rock samples as suggestive but not compelling evidence for an evaporitic origin, and the precise nature of this form of silica has remained somewhat enigmatic. Investigations of chert nodules from evaporitic and non-evaporitic regimes support an identification of length-slow quartz'' with the mineral moganite, a polymorph of silica that is fibrous and optically length slow. Results are based upon X-ray powder diffraction of the chert, followed by Rietveld refinement of the X-ray patterns to quantify the weight fraction of quartz and moganite in each specimen. Most non-evaporitic chert appears to contain between 5 and 15 wt. % moganite, but evaporitic cherts often contain more than 20 wt. %. Cherts that have transformed from precursor magadiite can be particularly rich in moganite; samples from Lake Magadi, Kenya and from Harney Lake, Oregon revealed about equal parts moganite and quartz. However, the observation of decreasing abundances of moganite in rocks of increasing age indicates that moganite is metastable relative to quartz.

  13. developments. interactive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaun, André

    interactive course: ffl web­pages for hyper­linked lecture notes, student exercises and projects, ffl java teachers: ffl public on the web y : lecture notes including the JBONE applet, ffl on demand: source Java

  14. Global versus Nuclear Starbursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francoise Combes

    2001-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The strongest starbursts are observed towards galaxy nuclei, or circumnuclear regions. However in interacting galaxies, star formation is also triggered in overlap regions far from nuclei, in spiral arms and sometimes in tidal tails. What is the relative importance of these starbursts? What kind of starformation is dominating, as a function of redshift? These different starbursts occur in different dynamical conditions (global and local): gravitational instabilities, density waves, radial flows, shear, cloud collisions, density accumulations, and they have been investigated with the help of numerical simulations. Gravitational instabilities are necessary to initiate star formation, but they are not sufficient; galactic disks are self-regulated through these instabilities to have their Toomre Q parameter of the order of 1, and thus this criterium is in practice unable to predict the onset of intense star formation. Super star clusters are a characteristic SF mode in starbursts, and might be due to the rapid formation of large gas complexes. Star formation can propagate radially inwards, due to gravity torques and gas inflow, but also outwards, due to superwinds, and energy outflows: both expanding or collapsing waves are observed in circumnuclear regions. Mergers are more efficient in forming stars at high redshift, because of larger gas content, and shorter dynamical times. The relation between nuclear starbursts and nuclear activity is based on the same fueling mechanisms, but also on reciprocal triggering and regulations.

  15. NUCLEAR DEFORMATION ENERGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blocki, J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J.R. Nix, Theory of Nuclear Fission and Superheavy Nuclei,energy maps relevant for nuclear fission and nucleus-nucleusin connection with nuclear fission. The need for a better

  16. Office of Nuclear Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Nuclear Safety establishes nuclear safety requirements and expectations for the Department to ensure protection of workers and the public from the hazards associated with nuclear operations with all Department operations.

  17. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, or successor directive, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

  18. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

  19. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, R.B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALIFORNIA NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE R. B. Firestone and E.11089 NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE by R.B. Firestone and E.iii- NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATABASE R.B Firestone and E. Browne

  20. RELATIVISTIC NUCLEAR COLLISIONS: THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gyulassy, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions", Preprint LBL-Pion Interferometry of Nuclear Collisions. 18.1 M.Gyulassy,was supported by the Office of Nuclear Physics of the U.S.

  1. Nuclear Safety (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nuclear Safety Division conducts a comprehensive nuclear power plant oversight review program of the nine reactors at the five nuclear power sites in Pennsylvania. It also monitors the...

  2. Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards system should be designed to provide credible assurances that there has been no diversion of declared nuclear material and no undeclared nuclear material and activities.

  3. Inequalities for low-energy symmetric nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee

    2004-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Using effective field theory we prove inequalities for the correlations of two-nucleon operators in low-energy symmetric nuclear matter. For physical values of operator coefficients in the effective Lagrangian, the S = 1, I = 0 channel correlations must have the lowest energy and longest correlation length in the two-nucleon sector. This result is valid at nonzero density and temperature.

  4. Nuclear Physics: Campaigns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns The Structure of the Nuclear Building Blocks The Structure of Nuclei Symmetry Tests in Nuclear Physics Meetings...

  5. Nuclear Power Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Bob Ashe-Everest Southern California Edison 10 Incoming New Fuel Inspecting New Fuel SONGS Unit 1 Fuel...

  6. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristensen, Hans M. [Federation of American Scientists, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  7. Advancing Global Nuclear Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today world leaders gathered at The Hague for the Nuclear Security Summit, a meeting to measure progress and take action to secure sensitive nuclear materials.

  8. Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

  9. Nuclear Security Summit | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

  10. Nuclear Safeguards | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

  11. Theoretical Electron Density Distributions for Fe-and Cu-Sulfide Earth Materials: A Connection between Bond Length, Bond Critical Point Properties, Local Energy Densities,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    , Biomolecular and Chemical Sciences, UniVersity of Western Australia, Australia ReceiVed: August 7, 2006 between Bond Length, Bond Critical Point Properties, Local Energy Densities, and Bonded Interactions G. V; In Final Form: December 6, 2006 Bond critical point and local energy density properties together with net

  12. Nuclear science. Annual report, July 1, 1980-June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedlander, E.M. (ed.)

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report describes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division between July 1, 1980 and June 30, 1981. The principal activity of the division continues to be the experimental and theoretical investigation of the interaction of heavy ions with target nuclei. Complementary research programs in light-ion nuclear science, in nuclear data evaluations, and in the development of advanced instrumentation are also carried out.

  13. Hyperfine-Enhanced Gyromagnetic Ratio of a Nuclear Spin in Diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Sangtawesin; J. R. Petta

    2015-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear spins in the solid state environment of diamond are highly coherent, but difficult to rapidly control due to the small nuclear gyromagnetic ratio. Here we demonstrate a more than 50-fold enhancement of the effective nuclear gyromagnetic ratio by coupling the nuclear spin to an electronic spin of a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond. The enhancement allows for faster nuclear spin rotations and is in good agreement with second-order perturbation theory. The method may be applied to other systems with similar electron-nuclear spin interactions, such as phosphorous donors in silicon, opening up the possibility of fast and direct nuclear spin control in coupled spin systems.

  14. Nuclear matter equation of state and three-body forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansour, H. M. M.; Algamoudi, A. M. A. [Cairo University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science (Egypt)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy per particle, symmetry energy, pressure, and free energy are calculated for symmetric nuclear matter using BHF approach with modern nucleon-nucleon CD-Bonn, Nijm1, Argonne v{sub 18}, and Reid 93 potentials. To obtain saturation in nuclear matter we add three-body interaction terms which are equivalent to a density-dependent two-nucleon interaction a la Skyrme force. Good agreement is obtained in comparison with previous theoretical estimates and experimental data.

  15. Solving the Nose-Hoover thermostat for Nuclear Pasta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Angeles Perez Garcia

    2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we present a calculation of the hamiltonian variables solving the molecular dynamics equations of motion for a system of nuclear matter relevant to the description of nuclear pasta. The temperature is kept fixed by using the Nos\\'{e}-Hoover Thermostat and the interaction is modelled via a semiclassical potential depending on both positions and momenta.

  16. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of symmetric nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Gandolfi; Francesco Pederiva; Stefano Fantoni; Kevin E. Schmidt

    2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an accurate numerical study of the equation of state of nuclear matter based on realistic nucleon--nucleon interactions by means of Auxiliary Field Diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) calculations. The AFDMC method samples the spin and isospin degrees of freedom allowing for quantum simulations of large nucleonic systems and can provide quantitative understanding of problems in nuclear structure and astrophysics.

  17. The Joys of Nuclear Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Carmack

    2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear fuels researcher Jon Carmack talks about the satisfactions of a career in nuclear engineering.

  18. The Joys of Nuclear Engineering

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jon Carmack

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear fuels researcher Jon Carmack talks about the satisfactions of a career in nuclear engineering.

  19. Dangerous implications of a minimum length in quantum gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosimo Bambi; Katherine Freese

    2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of a minimum length and a generalization of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle seem to be two fundamental ingredients required in any consistent theory of quantum gravity. In this letter we show that they would predict dangerous processes which are phenomenologically unacceptable. For example, long--lived virtual super--Planck mass black holes may lead to rapid proton decay. Possible solutions of this puzzle are briefly discussed.

  20. Critical Waves and the Length Problem of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Laughlin

    2015-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    It is pointed out that the mystery of how biological systems measure their lengths vanishes away if one premises that they have discovered a way to generate linear waves analogous to compressional sound. These can be used to detect length at either large or small scales using echo timing and fringe counting. It is shown that suitable linear chemical potential waves can, in fact, be manufactured by tuning to criticality conventional reaction-diffusion with a small number substances. Min oscillations in E. coli are cited as precedent resonant length measurement using chemical potential waves analogous to laser detection. Mitotic structures in eucaryotes are identified as candidates for such an effect at higher frequency. The engineering principle is shown to be very general and functionally the same as that used by hearing organs. PNAS Significance Statement: This paper invokes physical principles to address the question of how living things might use reaction-diffusion to measure out and regulate the many thousands of lengths required to make their body parts and internal organs. It argues that two ideas have been missing. One is that oscillation is necessary to achieve the necessary design stability and plasticity. The other is that the system must be tuned to criticality to stabilize the propagation velocity, thus enabling clocks to function as meter sticks. The broader significance is twofold: First, a fundamental piece of the machinery of life is probably invisible to present-day biochemical methods because they are too slow. Second, the simplicity of growth and form identified a century ago by D'Arcy Thompson is probably a symptom of biological engineering strategies, not primitive law.

  1. Multi-length Scale Modeling of Titanium Nitride Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Multi-length Scale Modeling of Titanium Nitride Coatings M. Grujicic and S. G. LaiM. Grujicic and S Conservation Circumferential Momentum Conservation Thermal Energy Balance Species Continuity Dependent of Titanium Nitride Surface Species TiCl4(S): NH2(S): TiCl2(S): NH(S): TiCl(S): N(S): Ti (S): N*(S): Ti*(S): N

  2. Magnetic field-line lengths inside interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Qiang; Krucker, Sam

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the detailed and systematic study of field-line twist and length distributions within magnetic flux ropes embedded in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). The Grad-Shafranov reconstruction method is utilized together with a constant-twist nonlinear force-free (Gold-Hoyle) flux rope model to reveal the close relation between the field-line twist and length in cylindrical flux ropes, based on in-situ Wind spacecraft measurements. We show that the field-line twist distributions within interplanetary flux ropes are inconsistent with the Lundquist model. In particular we utilize the unique measurements of magnetic field-line lengths within selected ICME events as provided by Kahler et al. (2011) based on energetic electron burst observations at 1 AU and the associated type III radio emissions detected by the Wind spacecraft. These direct measurements are compared with our model calculations to help assess the flux-rope interpretation of the embedded magnetic structures. By using the differen...

  3. Nuclear Data Verification and Standardization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karam, Lisa R.; Arif, Muhammad; Thompson, Alan K.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this interagency program is to provide accurate neutron interaction verification and standardization data for the U.S. Department of Energy Division of Nuclear Physics programs which include astrophysics, radioactive beam studies, and heavy-ion reactions. The measurements made in this program are also useful to other programs that indirectly use the unique properties of the neutron for diagnostic and analytical purposes. These include homeland security, personnel health and safety, nuclear waste disposal, treaty verification, national defense, and nuclear based energy production. The work includes the verification of reference standard cross sections and related neutron data employing the unique facilities and capabilities at NIST and other laboratories as required; leadership and participation in international intercomparisons and collaborations; and the preservation of standard reference deposits. An essential element of the program is critical evaluation of neutron interaction data standards including international coordinations. Data testing of critical data for important applications is included. The program is jointly supported by the Department of Energy and the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  4. ANNOUNCEMENT NUCLEAR ENGINEERING FACULTY POSITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    ANNOUNCEMENT NUCLEAR ENGINEERING FACULTY POSITION The Department of Nuclear Engineering at the Assistant or Associate Professor level. These areas include, but are not limited to, nuclear system instrumentation & controls, monitoring and diagnostics, reactor dynamics, nuclear security, nuclear materials

  5. Optical on line techniques for nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doizi, D. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Div. DEN, DANS/DPC/SECR/LSRM (France); Pailloux, A.; Maury, C.; Sirven, J. B.; Dauvois, V.; Roujou, J. L.; Rosset, C. D. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Div. DEN, DANS/DPC (France); Hartmann, J. M. [CNRS., UMR 7583, LISA, Creteil (France)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical on line techniques enable non intrusive physical measurements in harsh environments (high temperature, high pressure, radioactivity, ...). Optical absorption spectrometries such as UV-Visible, FTIR, CRDS have been successfully used to study gas phase speciation in different nuclear applications. LIBS which relies on laser matter interactions is a on line optical technique for solids and liquids elementary analysis. (authors)

  6. Advanced nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrani, Kurt

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Kurt Terrani uses his expertise in materials science to develop safer fuel for nuclear power plants.

  7. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Catalysinganenergyrevolution Nuclear Failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    extraction, fuel manufacture and management of spent fuel and waste. Currently, CEA is a large FrenchCatalysinganenergyrevolution France's Nuclear Failures The great illusion of nuclear energy greenpeace.org #12;Contents 2 Greenpeace International France's Nuclear Failures The French nuclear industry

  9. Advanced nuclear fuel

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Terrani, Kurt

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Kurt Terrani uses his expertise in materials science to develop safer fuel for nuclear power plants.

  10. Focus Article Nuclear winter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    the climatic effects of nuclear war. Smoke from the fires started by nuclear weapons, especially the black in recorded human history. Although the number of nuclear weapons in the world has fallen from 70,000 at its and Russia could still produce nuclear winter. This theory cannot be tested in the real world. However

  11. 22.106 Neutron Interactions and Applications, Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yip, Sidney

    This course is a foundational study of the effects of single and multiple interactions on neutron distributions and their applications to problems across the Nuclear Engineering department - fission, fusion, and RST. ...

  12. 22.106 Neutron Interactions and Applications, Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yip, Sidney

    Foundational study of the effects of single and multiple interactions on neutron distributions and their applications to problems across the Nuclear Engineering department - fission, fusion, and RST. Particle simulation ...

  13. Proton radioactivity with a Yukawa effective interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. R. Routray; S. K. Tripathy; B. B. Dash; B. Behera; D. N. Basu

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The half lives of proton radioactivity of proton emitters are investigated theoretically. Proton-nucleus interaction potentials are obtained by folding the densities of the daughter nuclei with a finite range effective nucleon-nucleon interaction having Yukawa form. The Wood-Saxon density distributions for the nuclei used in calculating the nuclear as well as the Coulomb interaction potentials are predictions of the interaction. The quantum mechanical tunneling probability is calculated within the WKB framework. These calculations provide reasonable estimates for the observed proton radioactivity lifetimes. The effects of neutron-proton effective mass splitting in neutron rich asymmetric matter as well as the nuclear matter incompressibility on the decay probability are investigated.

  14. Constraining the nuclear pairing gap with pairing vibrations M. Grasso,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Constraining the nuclear pairing gap with pairing vibrations E. Khan,1 M. Grasso,1 and J. Margueron. Using the same pairing interaction in nuclear matter and in Tin nuclei, the range of densities where I. INTRODUCTION Studies on pairing effects in both nuclear matter and fi- nite nuclei have known

  15. Empirical relations for nuclear stopping power F. S. Garnir-Monjoie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    31 Empirical relations for nuclear stopping power F. S. Garnir-Monjoie Institut de Mathématiques, D, due to inelastic interaction with the target electrons, and the nuclear stopping power induced. The Lindhard, Scharff and Schiott theory (LSS theory) [1] shows that the nuclear stopping power is the same

  16. Nuclear spin dynamics in parabolic quantum wells Ionel Tifrea* and Michael E. Flatte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flatte, Michael E.

    Nuclear spin dynamics in parabolic quantum wells Ionel T¸ifrea* and Michael E. Flatte´ Department March 2004 We present a detailed analytical and numerical analysis of the nuclear spin dynamics of the electronic wave function in small electric fields. The nuclear spin relaxation via the hyperfine interaction

  17. Nuclear Physics A531 (1991) 253-284 North-Holland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seevinck, Michiel

    Nuclear Physics A531 (1991) 253-284 North-Holland F E ATIO SINGLE-PARTICLE STRENGTH A E VA SHELL with what is expected from depletions calculated in infinite nuclear matter. Inclusion of higher order terms interacting Fermi systems. The interest in nuclear spectral functions has been revived by recent accurate (,e

  18. Probing anharmonic properties of nuclear surface vibration by heavy-ion fusion reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Takigawa; K. Hagino; S. Kuyucak

    1997-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Describing fusion reactions between ^{16}O and ^{154}Dy and, between ^{16}O and ^{144}Sm by the $sd-$ and $sdf-$ interacting boson model, we show that heavy-ion fusion reactions are strongly affected by anharmonic properties of nuclear surface vibrations and nuclear shape, and thus provide a powerful method to study details of nuclear structure and dynamics.

  19. Institute for Nuclear Theory. Annual report No. 3, 1 March 1992--28 February 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haxton, W.; Bertsch, G.; Henley, E.M.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report briefly discussion the following programs of the Institute for Nuclear Theory: fundamental interactions in nuclei; strangeness in hadrons and nuclei; microscopic nuclear structure theory; nuclear physics in atoms and molecules; phenomenology and lattice QCD; and large amplitude collective motion.

  20. Reconciling Nuclear and Astrophysical Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dexheimer, V; Schramm, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In view of new constraints put forth by recent observations and measurements in the realm of astrophysics and nuclear physics, we update the non-linear realization of the sigma model as to reflect such constraints. By doing this, we obtain new equations of state that may be used to describe neutron stars. Such equations of state are obtained by investigating different ways by which the vector mesons self-interact. Furthermore, we also investigate the role played by the delta mesons in the model. As a result, we are able to develop equations of state that are in better agreement with data, such as nuclear compressibility and slope of the symmetry energy at saturation, star masses, radii, and cooling profiles.

  1. Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Joseph; Furnstahl, Richard; Horoi, Mihai; Lusk, Rusty; Nazarewicz, Witold; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An understanding of the properties of atomic nuclei is crucial for a complete nuclear theory, for element formation, for properties of stars, and for present and future energy and defense applications. During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. Until recently such an undertaking was hard to imagine, and even at the present time such an ambitious endeavor would be far beyond what a single researcher or a traditional research group could carry out.

  2. Isospin dependent properties of asymmetric nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, P. Roy [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Basu, D. N. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Samanta, C. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Physics Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 232840 (United States); Physics Department, University of Richmond, Virginia 23173 (United States)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy is determined from a systematic study of the isospin dependent bulk properties of asymmetric nuclear matter using the isoscalar and isovector components of the density dependent M3Y interaction. The incompressibility K{sub {infinity}} for the symmetric nuclear matter, the isospin dependent part K{sub asy} of the isobaric incompressibility, and the slope L are all in excellent agreement with the constraints recently extracted from measured isotopic dependence of the giant monopole resonances in even-A Sn isotopes, from the neutron skin thickness of nuclei, and from analyses of experimental data on isospin diffusion and isotopic scaling in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions. This work provides a fundamental basis for the understanding of nuclear matter under extreme conditions and validates the important empirical constraints obtained from recent experimental data.

  3. Isospin dependent properties of asymmetric nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Roy Chowdhury; D. N. Basu; C. Samanta

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy is determined from a systematic study of the isospin dependent bulk properties of asymmetric nuclear matter using the isoscalar and the isovector components of density dependent M3Y interaction. The incompressibility $K_\\infty$ for the symmetric nuclear matter, the isospin dependent part $K_{asy}$ of the isobaric incompressibility and the slope $L$ are all in excellent agreement with the constraints recently extracted from measured isotopic dependence of the giant monopole resonances in even-A Sn isotopes, from the neutron skin thickness of nuclei and from analyses of experimental data on isospin diffusion and isotopic scaling in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions. This work provides a fundamental basis for the understanding of nuclear matter under extreme conditions, and validates the important empirical constraints obtained from recent experimental data.

  4. Technology development for gene discovery and full-length sequencing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcelo Bento Soares

    2004-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous years, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, we developed methods for construction of normalized and subtracted cDNA libraries, and constructed hundreds of high-quality libraries for production of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs). Our clones were made widely available to the scientific community through the IMAGE Consortium, and millions of ESTs were produced from our libraries either by collaborators or by our own sequencing laboratory at the University of Iowa. During this grant period, we focused on (1) the development of a method for preferential cloning of tissue-specific and/or rare transcripts, (2) its utilization to expedite EST-based gene discovery for the NIH Mouse Brain Molecular Anatomy Project, (3) further development and optimization of a method for construction of full-length-enriched cDNA libraries, and (4) modification of a plasmid vector to maximize efficiency of full-length cDNA sequencing by the transposon-mediated approach. It is noteworthy that the technology developed for preferential cloning of rare mRNAs enabled identification of over 2,000 mouse transcripts differentially expressed in the hippocampus. In addition, the method that we optimized for construction of full-length-enriched cDNA libraries was successfully utilized for the production of approximately fifty libraries from the developing mouse nervous system, from which over 2,500 full-ORF-containing cDNAs have been identified and accurately sequenced in their entirety either by our group or by the NIH-Mammalian Gene Collection Program Sequencing Team.

  5. Dynamics and length distribution of microtubules under force and confinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Björn Zelinski; Nina Müller; Jan Kierfeld

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the microtubule polymerization dynamics with catastrophe and rescue events for three different confinement scenarios, which mimic typical cellular environments: (i) The microtubule is confined by rigid and fixed walls, (ii) it grows under constant force, and (iii) it grows against an elastic obstacle with a linearly increasing force. We use realistic catastrophe models and analyze the microtubule dynamics, the resulting microtubule length distributions, and force generation by stochastic and mean field calculations; in addition, we perform stochastic simulations. We also investigate the force dynamics if growth parameters are perturbed in dilution experiments. Finally, we show the robustness of our results against changes of catastrophe models and load distribution factors.

  6. Optical Scattering Lengths in Large Liquid-Scintillator Neutrino Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Wurm; Franz von Feilitzsch; Marianne Goeger-Neff; Martin Hofmann; Tobias Lachenmaier; Timo Lewke; Teresa Marrodan Undagoitita; Quirin Meindl; Randoplh Moellenberg; Lothar Oberauer; Walter Potzel; Marc Tippmann; Sebastian Todor; Christoph Traunsteiner; Juergen Winter

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    For liquid-scintillator neutrino detectors of kiloton scale, the transparency of the organic solvent is of central importance. The present paper reports on laboratory measurements of the optical scattering lengths of the organic solvents PXE, LAB, and Dodecane which are under discussion for next-generation experiments like SNO+, Hanohano, or LENA. Results comprise the wavelength range from 415 to 440nm. The contributions from Rayleigh and Mie scattering as well as from absorption/re-emission processes are discussed. Based on the present results, LAB seems to be the preferred solvent for a large-volume detector.

  7. Static Length Scales of N=6 Chern-Simons Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dongsu Bak; Kazem Bitaghsir Fadafan; Hyunsoo Min

    2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Using gravity description, we compute various static length scales of N=6 Chern Simons plasma in a strongly coupled regime. For this, we consider the CP3 compactification of the type IIA supergravity down to four dimensions, and identify all the low-lying bosonic modes up to masses corresponding to the operator dimension 3 together with all the remaining CP3 invariant modes. We find the true mass gap, the Debye screening mass and the corresponding dual operators to be probed in the field theory side.

  8. Varying properties along lengths of temperature limited heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Xie, Xueying (Houston, TX); Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX); Ginestra, Jean Charles (Richmond, TX)

    2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes an elongated heater in an opening in the formation. The elongated heater includes two or more portions along the length of the heater that have different power outputs. At least one portion of the elongated heater includes at least one temperature limited portion with at least one selected temperature at which the portion provides a reduced heat output. The heater is configured to provide heat to the formation with the different power outputs. The heater is configured so that the heater heats one or more portions of the formation at one or more selected heating rates.

  9. The K+ K+ scattering length from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silas Beane; Thomas Luu; Konstantinos Orginos; Assumpta Parreno; Martin Savage; Aaron Torok; Andre Walker-Loud

    2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The K+K+ scattering length is calculated in fully-dynamical lattice QCD with domain-wall valence quarks on the MILC asqtad-improved gauge configurations with fourth-rooted staggered sea quarks. Three-flavor mixed-action chiral perturbation theory at next-to-leading order, which includes the leading effects of the finite lattice spacing, is used to extrapolate the results of the lattice calculation to the physical value of mK + /fK + . We find mK^+ aK^+ K^+ = â~0.352 ± 0.016, where the statistical and systematic errors have been combined in quadrature.

  10. Self-aligned submicron gate length gallium arsenide MESFET 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Hsien-Ching

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    38 21. Proximity cap annealing . 22. Temperature profile of post implant anneal 46 47 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. "Pits" or holes in GaAs post implant anneal without sacrificial cap Silicon monoxide source (bafile box) used.... 16(b)). The bottom resist layer is then further etched in the oxygen plasma to produce undercutting for the desire gate structure. The amount of undercut is determined by the desired length of the gate and is the width of the remaining resist...

  11. A Strategy for Resolving the Problems of Plasma-Material Interaction for FNSF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Neutrons and PMI can First be Studied in Parallel · Mean-free path for neutrons ~ 10cm PMI interactions mainly in first 1 µm · 10-5 of neutron interactions in PMI zone · Ions recycle > 10x, nuclear burn-up /10 · Ion interactions in PMI zone > 107 x neutron interactions · Neutrons do affect bulk material

  12. The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroenig, Matthew

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    it would transfer nuclear technology. Washington Post. 26preferences: the export of sensitive nuclear technology.export of sensitive nuclear technology presents a kind of

  13. Dynamics of nuclear envelope and nuclear pore complex formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Limited expression of nuclear pore membrane glycoprotein 210suggests cell-type specific nuclear pores in metazoans. Expand Dultz, E. (2008). Nuclear pore complex assembly through

  14. A New Measurement of the 1S0 Neutron-Neutron Scattering Length using the Neutron-Proton Scattering Length as a Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. E. Gonzalez Trotter; F. Salinas; Q. Chen; A. S. Crowell; W. Gloeckle; C. R. Howell; C. D. Roper; D. Schmidt; I. Slaus; H. Tang; W. Tornow; R. L. Walter; H. Witala; Z. Zhou

    1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper reports high-accuracy cross-section data for the 2H(n,nnp) reaction in the neutron-proton (np) and neutron-neutron (nn) final-state-interaction (FSI) regions at an incident mean neutron energy of 13.0 MeV. These data were analyzed with rigorous three-nucleon calculations to determine the 1S0 np and nn scattering lengths, a_np and a_nn. Our results are a_nn = -18.7 +/- 0.6 fm and a_np = -23.5 +/- 0.8 fm. Since our value for a_np obtained from neutron-deuteron (nd) breakup agrees with that from free np scattering, we conclude that our investigation of the nn FSI done simultaneously and under identical conditions gives the correct value for a_nn. Our value for a_nn is in agreement with that obtained in pion-deuteron capture measurements but disagrees with values obtained from earlier nd breakup studies.

  15. Nuclear fuel elements having a composite cladding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, Gerald M. (Fremont, CA); Cowan, II, Robert L. (Fremont, CA); Davies, John H. (San Jose, CA)

    1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved nuclear fuel element is disclosed for use in the core of nuclear reactors. The improved nuclear fuel element has a composite cladding of an outer portion forming a substrate having on the inside surface a metal layer selected from the group consisting of copper, nickel, iron and alloys of the foregoing with a gap between the composite cladding and the core of nuclear fuel. The nuclear fuel element comprises a container of the elongated composite cladding, a central core of a body of nuclear fuel material disposed in and partially filling the container and forming an internal cavity in the container, an enclosure integrally secured and sealed at each end of said container and a nuclear fuel material retaining means positioned in the cavity. The metal layer of the composite cladding prevents perforations or failures in the cladding substrate from stress corrosion cracking or from fuel pellet-cladding interaction or both. The substrate of the composite cladding is selected from conventional cladding materials and preferably is a zirconium alloy.

  16. Laser-assisted nuclear photoeffect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anis Dadi; Carsten Müller

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton emission from nuclei via the nuclear photoeffect in the combined electromagnetic fields of a gamma-ray photon and an intense laser wave is studied. An S-matrix approach to the process is developed by utilizing methods known from the theory of nonperturbative laser-atom interactions. As a specific example, photo-proton ejection from halo nuclei is considered. We show that, due to the presence of the laser field, rich sideband structures arise in the photo-proton energy spectra. Their dependence on the parameters and relative orientation of the photon fields is discussed.

  17. Change of Primary Cosmic Radiation Nuclear Conposition in the Energy Range $10^{15} - 10^{17}$ eV as a Result of the Interaction with the Interstellar Cold Background of Light Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. T. Barnaveli; T. T. Barnaveli Jr; N. A. Eristavi; I. V. Khaldeeva

    2003-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the updated arguments in favor of a simple model, explaining from the united positions all peculiarities of the Extensive Air Shower (EAS) hadron E_h(E_0) (and muon E_mu(E_0)) component energy fluxes dependence on the primary particle energy E_0 in the primary energy region 10^{15} - 10^{17} eV are represented. These peculiarities have shapes of consequent distinct deeps of a widths dE_h/E_h of the order of 0.2 and of relative amplitudes dL/L of the order of {0.1 - 1.0}, and are difficult to be explained via known astrophysical mechanisms of particle generation and acceleration. In the basis of the model lies the destruction of the Primary Cosmic Radiation (PCR) nuclei on some monochromatic background of interstellar space, consisting of the light particles of the mass in the area of 36 eV (maybe the component of a dark matter). The destruction thresholds of PCR different nuclear components correspond to the peculiarities of E_h(E_0). In this work the results of the recent treatment of large statistical material are analyzed. The experimental results are in good agreement with the Monte-Carlo calculations carried out in the frames of the proposed model.

  18. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  19. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

  20. Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer cpacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  1. Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Arkansas Nuclear One

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nuclear One" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  2. Probing the Conformational Distributions of Sub-Persistence Length DNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastroianni, Alexander; Sivak, David; Geissler, Phillip; Alivisatos, Paul

    2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the bending elasticity of short double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) chains through small-angle X-ray scattering from solutions of dsDNA-linked dimers of gold nanoparticles. This method, which does not require exertion of external forces or binding to a substrate, reports on the equilibrium distribution of bending fluctuations, not just an average value (as in ensemble FRET) or an extreme value (as in cyclization), and in principle provides a more robust data set for assessing the suitability of theoretical models. Our experimental results for dsDNA comprising 42-94 basepairs (bp) are consistent with a simple worm-like chain model of dsDNA elasticity, whose behavior we have determined from Monte Carlo simulations that explicitly represent nanoparticles and their alkane tethers. A persistence length of 50 nm (150 bp) gave a favorable comparison, consistent with the results of single-molecule force-extension experiments on much longer dsDNA chains, but in contrast to recent suggestions of enhanced flexibility at these length scales.

  3. The bound coherent neutron scattering length of the oxygen isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Henry E [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Simonson, J Michael {Mike} [ORNL; Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL; Lemmel, Hartmut [Technical University Vienna; Rauch, Helmut [E141 Atominstitut der Österreichischen Universitäten,; Zeidler, Anita [University of Bath; Salmon, Phil [University of Bath

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technique of neutron interferometry was used to measure the bound coherent neutron scattering length bcoh of the oxygen isotopes 17O and 18O. From the measured difference in optical path between two water samples, either H2 17O or H2 18O versus H2 natO, where nat denotes the natural isotopic composition, we obtain bcoh , 17O = 5.867(4) fm and bcoh , 18O = 6.009(5) fm, based on the accurately known value of bcoh , natO = 5.805(4) fm which is equal to bcoh , 16O within the experimental uncertainty. Our results for bcoh , 17O and bcoh , 18O differ appreciably from the standard tabulated values of 5.6(5) fm and 5.84(7) fm, respectively. In particular, our measured scattering length contrast of 0.204(3) fm between 18O and natO is nearly a factor of 6 greater than the tabulated value, which renders feasible neutron diffraction experiments using 18O isotope substitution and thereby offers new possibilites for measuring the partial structure factors of oxygen-containing compounds, such as water.

  4. Beyond Mixing-length Theory: a step toward 321D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnett, W David; Viallet, Maxime; Campbell, Simon W; Lattanzio, John; Mo?ak, Miroslav

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a physical basis for algorithms to replace mixing-length theory (MLT) in stellar evolutionary computations. The 321D procedure is based on three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, including the Kolmogorov cascade as a sub-grid model of dissipation (implicit large eddy simulations; ILES). We use Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) averaging to make 3D simulation data concise, and use 3D simulations to give RANS closure. We sketch a simple algorithm, which is non-local and time-dependent, with both MLT and the Lorenz convective roll as particular subsets of solutions. The damping length is determined from a balance between the large-scale driving and damping at the Kolmogorov scale. We find that (1) braking regions (boundary layers in which mixing occurs) automatically appear {\\it beyond} the edges of convection as defined by the Schwarzschild criterion, (2) dynamic (non-local) terms imply a non-zero turbulent kinetic energy flux (unlike MLT), (3) the effects...

  5. Cooling Configuration Design Considerations for Long-Length HTS Cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL; Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent successes in demonstrating high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable systems hundreds of meters in length have inspired even longer length projects. A compact and energy efficient cooling configuration can be achieved using a counterflow-cooling arrangement. This is particularly attractive when all three phases are contained in a single cryostat because of the elimination of the space and thermal requirements of a separate liquid nitrogen return line. Future cable projects will utilize second generation (2G) wire which is expected to become lower in cost but may have different thermal requirements than first generation (1G) BSCCO wire due to the lower critical temperature and to a lesser extent, the lower thermal conductivity of the wire. HTS cable configurations will be studied with a numerical model to assess thermal hydraulic performance with AC and thermal losses; a summary of the results from the analysis will be presented. An analysis of the cable thermal- hydraulic response to over-current faults will be presented.

  6. The Chain-Length Distribution in Subcritical Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Douglas Nolen

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The individual fission chains that appear in any neutron multiplying system provide a means, via neutron noise analysis, to unlock a wealth of information regarding the nature of the system. This work begins by determining the probability density distributions for fission chain lengths in zero-dimensional systems over a range of prompt neutron multiplication constant (K) values. This section is followed by showing how the integral representation of the chain-length distribution can be used to obtain an estimate of the system's subcritical prompt multiplication (MP). The lifetime of the chains is then used to provide a basis for determining whether a neutron noise analysis will be successful in assessing the neutron multiplication constant, k, of the system in the presence of a strong intrinsic source. A Monte Carlo transport code, MC++, is used to model the evolution of the individual fission chains and to determine how they are influenced by spatial effects. The dissertation concludes by demonstrating how experimental validation of certain global system parameters by neutron noise analysis may be precluded in situations in which the system K is relatively low and in which realistic detector efficiencies are simulated.

  7. Simulated nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berta, Victor T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for electrically simulating a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It includes a heater assembly having a top end and a bottom end and a plurality of concentric heater tubes having electrical circuitry connected to a power source, and radially spaced from each other. An outer target tube and an inner target tube is concentric with the heater tubes and with each other, and the outer target tube surrounds and is radially spaced from the heater tubes. The inner target tube is surrounded by and radially spaced from the heater tubes and outer target tube. The top of the assembly is generally open to allow for the electrical power connection to the heater tubes, and the bottom of the assembly includes means for completing the electrical circuitry in the heater tubes to provide electrical resistance heating to simulate the power profile in a nuclear reactor. The embedded conductor elements in each heater tube is split into two halves for a substantial portion of its length and provided with electrical isolation such that each half of the conductor is joined at one end and is not joined at the other end.

  8. Simulated nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berta, V.T.

    1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for electrically simulating a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It includes a heater assembly having a top end and a bottom end and a plurality of concentric heater tubes having electrical circuitry connected to a power source, and radially spaced from each other. An outer target tube and an inner target tube is concentric with the heater tubes and with each other, and the outer target tube surrounds and is radially spaced from the heater tubes. The inner target tube is surrounded by and radially spaced from the heater tubes and outer target tube. The top of the assembly is generally open to allow for the electrical power connection to the heater tubes, and the bottom of the assembly includes means for completing the electrical circuitry in the heater tubes to provide electrical resistance heating to simulate the power profile in a nuclear reactor. The embedded conductor elements in each heater tube is split into two halves for a substantial portion of its length and provided with electrical isolation such that each half of the conductor is joined at one end and is not joined at the other end.

  9. 22.101 Applied Nuclear Physics (Fall 2006) Lecture 8 (10/4/06) Neutron-Proton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    We continue the study of the neutron-proton system by taking up the well-known problem of neutron scattering in hydrogen. The scattering cross section has been carefully measured to be 20.4 barns over a wide energy range. Our intent is to apply the method of phase shifts summarized in the preceding lecture to this problem. We see very quickly that the s-wave approximation (the condition of interaction at low energy) is very well justified in the neutron energy range of 1- 1000 eV. The scattering-state solution, with E> 0, gives us the phase shift or equivalently the scattering length. This calculation yields a cross section of 2.3 barns which is considerably different from the experimental value. The reason for the discrepancy lies in the fact that we have not taken into account the spin-dependent nature of the n-p interaction. The neutron and proton spins can form two distinct spin configurations, the two spins being parallel (triplet state) or anti-parallel (singlet), each giving rise to a scattering length. When this is taken into account, the new estimate is quite close to the experimental value. The conclusion is therefore that n-p interaction is spin-dependent and that the anomalously large value of the hydrogen scattering cross section for neutrons is really due to this aspect of the nuclear force. For the scattering problem our task is to solve the radial wave equation for s-wave for solutions with E> 0. The interior and exterior solutions have the form ur () = Bsin ( Kr ' ) , r < ro (8.1) and ur () = C sin(

  10. Method of manufacturing nuclear fuel bundle spacers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.W.; Muncy, D.G.; Schoenig, F.C. Jr.

    1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method of manufacturing nuclear fuel bundle spacers on an automated production line basis. It comprises: cutting elongated tubing stock into shorter tubular ferrules; checking the length of each ferrule and rejecting those ferrules of unacceptable lengths; cutting predetermined features in the sidewall of each ferrule; forming the sidewall of each ferrule to impart predetermined surface formations thereto; checking a critical dimension of each sidewall surface formation of each ferrule and rejecting those of unacceptable dimensions; assembling successive pairs of ferrules into subassemblies; assembling successive subassemblies into a spacer assembly fixture; assembling a peripheral band in the spacer assembly fixture; conjoining the ferrules to each other and to the peripheral band to create a structurally rigid, finished spacer; and providing a separate controller for automatically controlling and monitoring the performances of these steps.

  11. Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    009-0270-y Is Nuclear Energy the Solution? Milton H. Saier &in the last 50 years, nuclear energy subsidies have totaledadministration, the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP)

  12. Nuclear Safety Research and Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Safety Research and Development Proposal Review and Prioritization Process and Criteria Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Office of Nuclear Safety Office of...

  13. NUCLEAR SCIENCE ANNUAL REPORT 1975

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gove and A. H. Wapstra, Nuclear Data Tables 11, 127 (1972).P. Jackson, Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories Report (1975)national Conference on Nuclear Structure and Spec­ troscopy,

  14. China's Nuclear Industry After Fukushima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YUAN, Jingdong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the previous year. NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY AND FUEL CYCLES China’third-generation nuclear technology and reactor design, withs own third-generation nuclear technology. Westing- house,

  15. NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY ANNUAL REPORT 1970

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Laboratories, AECL, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada.Nuclear Laboratories, AECL, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. 1.Nuclear Laboratories, AECL, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. 1.

  16. Reactor & Nuclear Systems Publications | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Publications and Reports | Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications SHARE Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications The...

  17. Measurement of the yields of positively charged particles at an angle of 35 Degree-Sign in proton interactions with nuclear targets at an energy of 50 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammosov, V. V.; Antonov, N. N. [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation)] [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation); Baldin, A. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)] [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Viktorov, V. A.; Gapienko, V. A.; Gapienko, G. S.; Golovin, A. A.; Gres, V. N.; Ivanilov, A. A.; Koreshev, V. I.; Korotkov, V. A.; Mysnik, A. I.; Prudkoglyad, A. F.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Semak, A. A., E-mail: Artem.Semak@ihep.ru; Terekhov, V. I.; Uglekov, V. Ya.; Ukhanov, M. N.; Chujko, B. V. [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation)] [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation); Shimanskii, S. S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)] [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Momentum spectra of cumulative particles in the region of high transverse momenta (P{sub T}) in pA {yields} h{sup +} + X reactions were obtained for the first time. The experiment in which this was done was performed at the SPIN setup (Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino) in a beam of 50-GeV protons interacting with C, Al, Cu, and W nuclei. Positively charged particles were detected at a laboratory angle of 35 Degree-Sign and in the transverse-momentum range between 0.6 and 3.7 GeV/c. A strong dependence of the particle-production cross section on the atomic number was observed. A comparison with the results of calculations based on the HIJING and UrQMD models was performed in the subcumulative region.

  18. Nuclear Structure Aspects of the Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Caurier; F. Nowacki; A. Poves

    2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we analyze some nuclear structure aspects of the neutrinoless double beta decay nuclear matrix elements (NME), in the framework of the Interacting Shell Model. We give results for the decays of 48Ca, 76Ge, 82Se, 124Sn, 128Te, 130Te, and 136Xe, using improved effective interactions and valence spaces. We examine the dependence of the NME's on the effective interaction and the valence space, and analyze the effects of the short range correlations and the finite size of the nucleon. Finally we study the influence of the deformation on the values of the NME's.

  19. Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D Working Group Report on - Space Nuclear Power Systems and Nuclear Waste Technology R&D "Even...

  20. Simulations of The Dalles Dam Proposed Full Length Spillwall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling study to evaluatethe impacts of a full-length spillwall at The Dalles Dam. The full-length spillwall is being designed and evaluated as a structural means to improve tailrace egress and thus survival of juvenile fish passing through the spillway. During the course of this study, a full-length spillwall at Bays 6/7 and 8/9 were considered. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has proposed extending the spillwall constructed in the stilling basin between spillway Bays 6 and 7 about 590 ft farther downstream. It is believed that the extension of the spillwall will improve egress conditions for downstream juvenile salmonids by moving them more rapidly into the thalweg of the river hence reducing their exposure to predators. A numerical model was created, validated, and applied the The Dalles Dam tailrace. The models were designed to assess impacts to flow, tailrace egress, navigation, and adult salmon passage of a proposed spill wall extension. The more extensive model validation undertaken in this study greatly improved our confidence in the numerical model to represent the flow conditions in The Dalles tailrace. This study used these validated CFD models to simulate the potential impacts of a spillwall extension for The Dalles Dam tailrace for two locations. We determined the following: (1)The construction of an extended wall (between Bays 6/7) will not adversely impact entering or exiting the navigation lock. Impact should be less if a wall were constructed between Bays 8/9. (2)The construction of a wall between Bays 6/7 will increase the water surface elevation between the wall and the Washington shore. Although the increased water surface elevation would be beneficial to adult upstream migrants in that it decreases velocities on the approach to the adult ladder, the increased flow depth would enhance dissolved gas production, impacting potential operations of the project because of water quality. A wall between Bays 8/9 should have a lesser impact as the confined spill would be across more bays and the relative flow constriction less. (3) The 405 kcfs case was used for the rapid assessment of flow conditions and hydraulic mechanisms that might be responsible for the unexpected erosion at the end of the shelf downstream of Bay 7.

  1. The harmony between nuclear reactions and nuclear reactor structures and systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popa-Simil, L. [LAVM LLC, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced nuclear energy is one extremely viable approach for achieving the required goals. With its extraordinarily high energy density (both, per unit mass and per unit volume), it produces over seven orders of magnitude less waste than fossil fuels per unit of energy generated. Applying nano-technologies to nuclear reactors could potentially produce the extraordinary performance required. The actual nuclear reactors lack of performances, the complexity and hazard of the fuel cycle are in part due to the lack of understanding of the nature's laws related to energy distribution applied to fission products, and in part to the current technologic capabilities that make the economical optimum. In order to produce the desired increase of performances a novel multi-scale multi-physics and engineering approach have been developed, starting from the nuclear reactions involved, analyzing in detail the key features and requirements of the 'key players' in the process (neutrons, compound nucleus, fission products, transmutation products, decay radiation), the consequences of their interaction with matter. That complex interaction generates new reactions and new key-players (knock-on electrons, photons, phonons) that further interact with the matter represented by the nuclear fuel, cladding, cooling agents, structural materials and control systems. The understanding of this complexity of problems from fm-ps scale up to macro-system and mitigating all the requirements drives to that desired harmony that provides a safe energy delivery. (authors)

  2. B53 Nuclear Bomb Dismantlement | National Nuclear Security Administrat...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Dismantlement | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

  3. Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent Fuel Assay Using Nuclear Resonance Fluo- rescence,” Annual Meeting of the Institute of Nuclear Material Management,

  4. Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Institute of Nuclear Material Management, Tucson, AZ,Assay, Institute of Nuclear Materials Management 51st Annual

  5. Interaction between Injection Points during Hydraulic Fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hals, Kjetil M D

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model of the hydraulic fracturing of heterogeneous poroelastic media. The formalism is an effective continuum model that captures the coupled dynamics of the fluid pressure and the fractured rock matrix and models both the tensile and shear failure of the rock. As an application of the formalism, we study the geomechanical stress interaction between two injection points during hydraulic fracturing (hydrofracking) and how this interaction influences the fracturing process. For injection points that are separated by less than a critical correlation length, we find that the fracturing process around each point is strongly correlated with the position of the neighboring point. The magnitude of the correlation length depends on the degree of heterogeneity of the rock and is on the order of 30-45 m for rocks with low permeabilities. In the strongly correlated regime, we predict a novel effective fracture-force that attracts the fractures toward the neighboring injection point.

  6. Nuclear disarmament verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVolpi, A.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Arms control treaties, unilateral actions, and cooperative activities -- reflecting the defusing of East-West tensions -- are causing nuclear weapons to be disarmed and dismantled worldwide. In order to provide for future reductions and to build confidence in the permanency of this disarmament, verification procedures and technologies would play an important role. This paper outlines arms-control objectives, treaty organization, and actions that could be undertaken. For the purposes of this Workshop on Verification, nuclear disarmament has been divided into five topical subareas: Converting nuclear-weapons production complexes, Eliminating and monitoring nuclear-weapons delivery systems, Disabling and destroying nuclear warheads, Demilitarizing or non-military utilization of special nuclear materials, and Inhibiting nuclear arms in non-nuclear-weapons states. This paper concludes with an overview of potential methods for verification.

  7. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  8. Promulgating Nuclear Safety Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Applies to all Nuclear Safety Requirements Adopted by the Department to Govern the Conduct of its Nuclear Activities. Cancels DOE P 410.1. Canceled by DOE N 251.85.

  9. NUCLEAR PLANT AND CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: software require- ments, safety analysis, formal, the missiles, and the digital protection systems embed- ded in nuclear power plants. Obviously, safety method SOFTWARE SAFETY ANALYSIS OF DIGITAL PROTECTION SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS USING A QUALITATIVE FORMAL

  10. Hegemony and nuclear proliferation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Nicholas L. (Nicholas LeSuer)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contrary to longstanding of predictions of nuclear tipping points, the number of states interested in nuclear weapons has sharply declined in recent decades. In contrast to existing explanations, this dissertation argues ...

  11. Long-length contaminated equipment disposal process path document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, W.A.

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The first objective of the LLCE Process Path Document is to guide future users of this system on how to accomplish the cradle-to-grave process for the disposal of long-length equipment. Information will be provided describing the function and approach to each step in the process. Pertinent documentation, prerequisites, drawings, procedures, hardware, software, and key interfacing organizations will be identified. The second objective is related to the decision to lay up the program until funding is made available to complete it or until a need arises due to failure of an important component in a waste tank. To this end, the document will identify work remaining to be completed for each step of the process and open items or issues that remain to be resolved.

  12. Light absorption cell combining variable path and length pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prather, William S. (2419 Dickey Rd., Augusta, GA 30906)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for use in making spectrophotometric measurements of fluid samples. In particular, the device is a measurement cell containing a movable and a fixed lens with a sample of the fluid therebetween and through which light shines. The cell is connected to a source of light and a spectrophotometer via optic fibers. Movement of the lens varies the path length and also pumps the fluid into and out of the cell. Unidirectional inlet and exit valves cooperate with the movable lens to assure a one-way flow of fluid through the cell. A linear stepper motor controls the movement of the lens and cycles it from a first position closer to the fixed lens and a second position farther from the fixed lens, preferably at least 10 times per minute for a nearly continuous stream of absorption spectrum data.

  13. Analyzing gigahertz bunch length instabilities with a digital signal processor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stege, R.E. Jr.; Krejcik, P.; Minty, M.G.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bunch length instability, nicknamed the ``sawtooth``, because of its transient behavior, has been observed at high current running in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) electron damping ring. The incompatibility of this instability with successful SLC naming prompted its study using a high bandwidth real-time spectrum analyzer, the Tektronix 3052 digital signal processor (DSP) system. This device has been used to study energy ramping in storage rings but this is the first time it has been used to study transient instability phenomena. It is a particularly valuable tool for use in understanding non-linear, multiple frequency phenomena. The frequency range of this device has been extended through the use of radio frequency (RF) down converters. This paper describes the measurement setup and presents some of the results.

  14. Analyzing gigahertz bunch length instabilities with a digital signal processor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stege, R.E. Jr.; Krejcik, P.; Minty, M.G.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bunch length instability, nicknamed the sawtooth'', because of its transient behavior, has been observed at high current running in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) electron damping ring. The incompatibility of this instability with successful SLC naming prompted its study using a high bandwidth real-time spectrum analyzer, the Tektronix 3052 digital signal processor (DSP) system. This device has been used to study energy ramping in storage rings but this is the first time it has been used to study transient instability phenomena. It is a particularly valuable tool for use in understanding non-linear, multiple frequency phenomena. The frequency range of this device has been extended through the use of radio frequency (RF) down converters. This paper describes the measurement setup and presents some of the results.

  15. Light absorption cell combining variable path and length pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prather, W.S.

    1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A device is described for use in making spectrophotometric measurements of fluid samples. In particular, the device is a measurement cell containing a movable and a fixed lens with a sample of the fluid there between and through which light shines. The cell is connected to a source of light and a spectrophotometer via optic fibers. Movement of the lens varies the path length and also pumps the fluid into and out of the cell. Unidirectional inlet and exit valves cooperate with the movable lens to assure a one-way flow of fluid through the cell. A linear stepper motor controls the movement of the lens and cycles it from a first position closer to the fixed lens and a second position farther from the fixed lens, preferably at least 10 times per minute for a nearly continuous stream of absorption spectrum data. 2 figures.

  16. Query-Efficient Locally Decodable Codes of Subexponential Length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chee, Yeow Meng; Ling, San; Wang, Huaxiong; Zhang, Liang Feng

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop the algebraic theory behind the constructions of Yekhanin (2008) and Efremenko (2009), in an attempt to understand the ``algebraic niceness'' phenomenon in $\\mathbb{Z}_m$. We show that every integer $m = pq = 2^t -1$, where $p$, $q$ and $t$ are prime, possesses the same good algebraic property as $m=511$ that allows savings in query complexity. We identify 50 numbers of this form by computer search, which together with 511, are then applied to gain improvements on query complexity via Itoh and Suzuki's composition method. More precisely, we construct a $3^{\\lceil r/2\\rceil}$-query LDC for every positive integer $rLDC for every integer $r\\geq 104$, both of length $N_{r}$, improving the $2^r$ queries used by Efremenko (2009) and $3\\cdot 2^{r-2}$ queries used by Itoh and Suzuki (2010). We also obtain new efficient private information retrieval (PIR) schemes from the new query-efficient LDCs.

  17. Characteristic length of an AdS/CFT superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kengo Maeda; Takashi Okamura

    2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate in more detail the holographic model of a superconductor recently found by Hartnoll, Herzog, and Horowitz [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 031601], which is constructed from a condensate of a charged scalar field in AdS_4-Schwarzschild background. By analytically studying the perturbation of the gravitational system near the critical temperature T_c, we obtain the superconducting coherence length proportional to 1/\\sqrt{1-T/T_c} via AdS/CFT correspondence. By adding a small external homogeneous magnetic field to the system, we find that a stationary diamagnetic current proportional to the square of the order parameter is induced by the magnetic field. These results agree with Ginzburg-Landau theory and strongly support the idea that a superconductor can be described by a charged scalar field on a black hole via AdS/CFT duality.

  18. Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides supplemental details to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety.

  19. 3D NUCLEAR SEGMENTAT

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003029WKSTN00 Delineation of nuclear structures in 3D multicellular systems  https://vision.lbl.gov/Software/3DMorphometry/ 

  20. Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Initiatives Nonproliferation Technology Nonproliferation Systems Safeguards and Security Technology International Safeguards Nuclear Material Detection and Characterization For...

  1. Nuclear Multifragmentation Critical Exponents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Bauer; William Friedman

    1994-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the critical exponents of nuclear multi-fragmentation have not been determined conclusively yet.

  2. Virtual environments for nuclear power plant design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.; Singleterry, R.C. Jr.; King, R.W. [and others

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the design and operation of nuclear power plants, the visualization process inherent in virtual environments (VE) allows for abstract design concepts to be made concrete and simulated without using a physical mock-up. This helps reduce the time and effort required to design and understand the system, thus providing the design team with a less complicated arrangement. Also, the outcome of human interactions with the components and system can be minimized through various testing of scenarios in real-time without the threat of injury to the user or damage to the equipment. If implemented, this will lead to a minimal total design and construction effort for nuclear power plants (NPP).

  3. Clusters in nuclear matter and Mott points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Röpke

    2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Light clusters (mass number $A \\leq 4$) in nuclear matter at subsaturation densities are described using a quantum statistical approach. In addition to self-energy and Pauli-blocking, effects of continuum correlations are taken into account to calculate the quasiparticle properties and abundances of light elements. Medium-modified quasiparticle properties are important ingredients to derive a nuclear matter equation of state applicable in the entire region of warm dense matter below saturation density. The influence of the nucleon-nucleon interaction on the quasiparticle shift is discussed.

  4. Light-front nuclear shell-model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.B.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I examine the effects of nuclear structure on high-energy, high-momentum transfer processes, specifically the EMC effect. For pedagogical reasons, a fictitious but simple two-body system consisting of two equal-mass particles interacting in a harmonic oscillator potential has been chosen. For this toy nucleus, I utilize a widely-used link between instant-form and light-front dynamics, formulating nuclear structure and deep-inelastic scattering consistently in the laboratory system. Binding effects are compared within conventional instant-form and light-front dynamical frameworks, with appreciable differences being found in the two cases. 20 refs.

  5. Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven National Laboratory William C. Horak, Chair Nuclear Science and Technology Department #12;BNL Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor - 1948 National Nuclear Data Center - 1952* High Flux Beam Reactor - 1964 Technical Support for NRC - 1974

  6. Interactive Topic Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pleple, Quentin

    26 Interactive LDA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .and B. Satinoff (2011). Interactive topic modeling. InOF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Interactive Topic Modeling A thesis

  7. The displacement field characterization of two interacting parallel edge cracks in a finite body

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keener, Todd Whitney

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of this research were to: (1) develop a model to represent the displacement field surrounding two interacting, parallel edge cracks; and (2) use this model to investigate the influence of crack separation and relative crack length...

  8. Determination of critical length scales for corrosion processes using microelectroanalytical techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Wall, Frederick Douglas

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key factor in our ability to produce and predict the stability of metal-based macro- to nano-scale structures and devices is a fundamental understanding of the localized nature of corrosion. Corrosion processes where physical dimensions become critical in the degradation process include localized corrosion initiation in passivated metals, microgalvanic interactions in metal alloys, and localized corrosion in structurally complex materials like nanocrystalline metal films under atmospheric and inundated conditions. This project focuses on two areas of corrosion science where a fundamental understanding of processes occurring at critical dimensions is not currently available. Sandia will study the critical length scales necessary for passive film breakdown in the inundated aluminum (Al) system and the chemical processes and transport in ultra-thin water films relevant to the atmospheric corrosion of nanocrystalline tungsten (W) films. Techniques are required that provide spatial information without significantly perturbing or masking the underlying relationships. Al passive film breakdown is governed by the relationship between area of the film sampled and its defect structure. We will combine low current measurements with microelectrodes to study the size scale required to observe a single initiation event and record electrochemical breakdown events. The resulting quantitative measure of stability will be correlated with metal grain size, secondary phase size and distribution to understand which metal properties control stability at the macro- and nano-scale. Mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion on W are dependent on the physical dimensions and continuity of adsorbed water layers as well as the chemical reactions that take place in this layer. We will combine electrochemical and scanning probe microscopic techniques to monitor the chemistry and resulting material transport in these thin surface layers. A description of the length scales responsible for driving the corrosion of the nanocrystalline metal films will be developed. The techniques developed and information derived from this work will be used to understand and predict degradation processes in microelectronic and microsystem devices critical to Sandia's mission.

  9. Review of Indirect Methods Used to Determine the $^1S_0$ Neutron-Neutron Scattering Length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. R. Howell

    2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have determined a value for the $^1S_0$ neutron-neutron scattering length ($a_{nn}$) from high-precision measurements of time-of-flight spectra of neutrons from the $^2H(\\pi^-,n \\gamma)n$ capture reaction. The measurements were done at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility by the E1286 collaboration. The high spatial resolution of our gamma-ray detector enabled us to make a detailed assessment of the systematic uncertainties in our techniques. The value obtained in the present work is $a_{nn} = -18$.63 $\\pm $0.10 (statistical) $\\pm$ 0.44 (systematic) $\\pm$ 0.30 (theoretical) fm. This result is consistent with previous determinations of $a_{nn}$ from the $\\pi^-d$ capture reaction. We found that the analysis of the data with calculations that use a relativistic phase-space factor gives a more negative value for $a_{nn}$ by 0.33 fm over the analysis done using a nonrelativistic phase-space factor. Combining the present result with the previous ones from $\\pi^-d$ capture gives: $a_{nn} = - 18$.63 $\\pm$ 0.27 (expt) $\\pm$ 0.30 fm (theory). For the first time the combined statistical and systematic experimental uncertainty in $a_{nn}$ is smaller than the theoretical uncertainty and comparable to the uncertainty in the proton-proton $^1S_0$ scattering length ($a_{pp}$). This average value of $a_{nn}$ when corrected for the magnetic-moment interaction of the two neutrons becomes -18.9 $\\pm$ 0.4 fm which is 1.6 $\\pm$ 0.5 fm different from the recommended value of $a_{pp}$, thereby confirming charge symmetry breaking at the 1% confidence level.

  10. Probing effective nucleon-nucleon interaction at band termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojciech Satula

    2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-energy nuclear structure is not sensitive enough to resolve fine details of nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction. Insensitivity of infrared physics to the details of short-range strong interaction allows for consistent, free of ultraviolet divergences, formulation of local theory at the level of local energy density functional (LEDF) including, on the same footing, both particle-hole as well as particle-particle channels. Major difficulty is related to parameterization of the nuclear LEDF and its density dependence. It is argued that structural simplicity of terminating or isomeric states offers invaluable source of informations that can be used for fine-tuning of the NN interaction in general and the nuclear LEDF parameters in particular. Practical applications of terminating states at the level of LEDF and nuclear shell-model are discussed.

  11. Uranium immobilization and nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, C.J.; Ogard, A.E.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable information useful in nuclear waste storage can be gained by studying the conditions of uranium ore deposit formation. Further information can be gained by comparing the chemistry of uranium to nuclear fission products and other radionuclides of concern to nuclear waste disposal. Redox state appears to be the most important variable in controlling uranium solubility, especially at near neutral pH, which is characteristic of most ground water. This is probably also true of neptunium, plutonium, and technetium. Further, redox conditions that immobilize uranium should immobilize these elements. The mechanisms that have produced uranium ore bodies in the Earth's crust are somewhat less clear. At the temperatures of hydrothermal uranium deposits, equilibrium models are probably adequate, aqueous uranium (VI) being reduced and precipitated by interaction with ferrous-iron-bearing oxides and silicates. In lower temperature roll-type uranium deposits, overall equilibrium may not have been achieved. The involvement of sulfate-reducing bacteria in ore-body formation has been postulated, but is uncertain. Reduced sulfur species do, however, appear to be involved in much of the low temperature uranium precipitation. Assessment of the possibility of uranium transport in natural ground water is complicated because the system is generally not in overall equilibrium. For this reason, Eh measurements are of limited value. If a ground water is to be capable of reducing uranium, it must contain ions capable of reducing uranium both thermodynamically and kinetically. At present, the best candidates are reduced sulfur species.

  12. NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA: 2007 STATUS REPORT CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION October 2007 CEC-100, California Contract No. 700-05-002 Prepared For: California Energy Commission Barbara Byron, Senior Nuclear public workshops on nuclear power. The Integrated Energy Policy Report Committee, led by Commissioners

  13. Nuclear fact book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, O.F.; Platt, A.M.; Robinson, J.V.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This reference provides significant highlights and summary facts in the following areas: general energy; nuclear energy; nuclear fuel cycle; uranium supply and enrichment; nuclear reactors; spent fuel and advanced repacking concepts; reprocessing; high-level waste; gaseous waste; transuranic waste; low-level waste; remedial action; transportation; disposal; radiation information; environment; legislation; socio-political aspects; conversion factors; and a glossary. (GHT)

  14. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed absorption cross-section behavior. Consequently, if NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;Demazière

  15. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper- ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed. Consequently, if*E-mail: demaz@nephy.chalmers.se NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;high-burnup fuel

  16. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, 7-10-13

  17. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs). Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.2D.

  18. Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear & Particle Physics science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology National security depends on science and...

  19. Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the potential of nuclear power to combat global warming havecompetitive today, and for nuclear power to succeed, it must

  20. Sewing on the Frame: Medieval Iberian Frametale Collections as Book-length Narratives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Karla Ann Merino

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Novella: The European Tale Collection from Boccaccio andIberian Frametale Collections as Book-length Narratives byIberian Frametale Collections as Book-length Narratives by

  1. Lambda-Neutron Scattering Lengths from Radiative K-minus Capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. R. Gibbs; S. A. Coon; H. K. Han; B. F. Gibson

    2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative capture of the K-minus by the deuteron as a reaction for measurement of the Lambda-neutron scattering lengths. The use of spin information to separate the singlet and triplet scattering lengths is treated.

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - active recombinant full-length Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the locus of integration... ), recombination between the 5 eyfp cassette and this down- stream 3 eyfp fragment cannot give rise to full-length... by restoration of full-length...

  3. Fuzzy Partitioning Using Real Coded Variable Length Genetic Algorithm for Pixel Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    , fuzzy clustering, pattern recognition, remote sensing imagery, Department of Computer Science, KalyaniFuzzy Partitioning Using Real Coded Variable Length Genetic Algorithm for Pixel Classification space. Real-coded variable string length genetic fuzzy clustering with automatic evolution of clusters

  4. An electrical resistance method for determining the fiber length distribution of cotton lint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartstack, Albert W

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . ~. . . o ~ o . i e ~ e Specimen Clamp Vise ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Page ~ ~ ~ 14 5 16 Instrumentation for %ms u'ing and Recotrd&g the Length of Cotton Fibers. . . . ~ IB 5. Ezpcrimsntal Setup for Nsasuring the Length Distribution... the difference 'n fiber length was cl earil reer, o?sibbs for inferior processing arid yarn quality, Abided et al (5) nake this statement conci ming length: A review of the previous work done on the relationship between the fiber-properties and the spinrdng...

  5. Nuclear spirals in galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witold Maciejewski

    2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent high-resolution observations indicate that nuclear spirals are often present in the innermost few hundred parsecs of disc galaxies. My models show that nuclear spirals form naturally as a gas response to non-axisymmetry in the gravitational potential. Some nuclear spirals take the form of spiral shocks, resulting in streaming motions in the gas, and in inflow comparable to the accretion rates needed to power local Active Galactic Nuclei. Recently streaming motions of amplitude expected from the models have been observed in nuclear spirals, confirming the role of nuclear spirals in feeding of the central massive black holes.

  6. Software-only Multiple Variable Length Decoding for Real-Time Video on MDSP*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhary, Vipin

    3.44 Software-only Multiple Variable Length Decoding for Real- Time Video on MDSP* Ganesh Yadav', R Inc. Abstract-We present the multiple variable length decode algorithm implemented in most video mechanism. I. INTRODUCTION Variable Length Decoding (VLD) is the most important part of the video standards

  7. QueueTrak: Automated Line Length Detection using a Wireless Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    , it uses a series of custom active infrared sensors to detect the length of a line in a store or restaurant the design, implementation, and evaluation of QueueTrak, a sensor network that measures the length of linesQueueTrak: Automated Line Length Detection using a Wireless Sensor Network Jared Alexander, Matthew

  8. A New Technique To Determine The Upper Threshold for Finite Length Turbo Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaturvedi, A K

    A New Technique To Determine The Upper Threshold for Finite Length Turbo Codes A.Rajeshand A in finite frame length turbo codes. These thresholds depend on the component encoder as well as the frame to indecisive and unequivocal fixed points respectively, for finiteframe length turbo codes. Concurrently, Gamal

  9. Nuclear matter properties, phenomenological theory of clustering at the nuclear surface, and symmetry energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q. N. Usmani; Nooraihan Abdullah; K. Anwar; Zaliman Sauli

    2011-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a phenomenological theory of nuclei that incorporates clustering at the nuclear surface in a general form. The theory explains the recently extracted large symmetry energy by Natowitz et al. at low densities of nuclear matter and is fully consistent with the static properties of nuclei. In phenomenological way clusters of all sizes, shapes along with medium modifications are included. Symmetric nuclear matter properties are discussed in detail. Arguments are given that lead to an equation of state of nuclear matter consistent with clustering in the low density region. We also discuss properties of asymmetric nuclear matter. Because of clustering, an interesting interpretation of the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter emerges. As a framework, an extended version of Thomas Fermi theory is adopted for nuclei which also contain phenomenological pairing and Wigner contributions. This theory connects the nuclear matter equation of state, which incorporate clustering at low densities, with clustering in nuclei at the nuclear surface. Calculations are performed for various equation of state of nuclear matter. We consider measured binding energies of 2149 nuclei for N, Z \\geq 8. The importance of quartic term in symmetry energy is demonstrated at and below the saturation density of nuclear matter. It is shown that it is largely related to the use of, ab initio, realistic equation of state of neutron matter, particularly the contribution arising from the three neutron interaction and somewhat to clustering. Reasons for these are discussed. Because of clustering the neutron skin thickness in nuclei is found to reduce significantly. Theory predicts new situations and regimes to be explored both theoretically and experimentally.

  10. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  11. Summaries of FY 1992 research in nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the research projects supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics in the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics during FY 1992. This Division is a component of the Office of Energy Research and provides about 85% of the funding for nuclear physics research in the United States. The objectives of the Nuclear Physics Program are two-fold: (1) to understand the interactions and structures of atomic nuclei and nuclear matter and the fundamental forces of nature as manifested in nuclear matter and (2) to foster application of this knowledge to other sciences and technical disciplines. These summaries are intended to provide a convenient guide for those interested in the research supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics. We remind the readers that this compilation is just an overview of the Nuclear Physics Program. What we attempt to portray correctly is the breadth of the program and level of activity in the field of nuclear physics research as well as the new capabilities and directions that continually alter the public face of the nuclear sciences. We hope that the limitations of space, constraints of fon-nat, and rigors of editing have not extinguished the excitement of the science as it was originally portrayed.

  12. On the Lengths, Colours and Ages of Bars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Combes; J. Palous; Dimitri A. Gadotti; Ronaldo E. De Souza

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. In an effort to obtain further observational evidences for secular evolution processes in galaxies, as well as observational constraints to current theoretical models of secular evolution, we have used BVRI and Ks images of a sample of 18 barred galaxies to measure the lengths and colours of bars, create colour maps and estimate global colour gradients. In addition, applying a method we developed in a previous article, we could distinguish for 7 galaxies in our sample those whose bars have been recently formed from the ones with already evolved bars. We estimated an average difference in the optical colours between young and evolved bars that may be translated to an age difference of the order of 10 Gyr, meaning that bars may be long standing structures. Moreover, our results show that, on average, evolved bars are longer than young bars. This seems to indicate that, during its evolution, a bar grows longer by capturing stars from the disk, in agreement with recent numerical and analytical results.

  13. Thermal management of long-length HTS cable systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL; Hassenzahl, William V [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Projections of electric power production suggest a major shift to renewables, such as wind and solar, which will be in remote locations where massive quantities of power are available. One solution for transmitting this power over long distances to load centers is direct current (dc), high temperature superconducting (HTS) cables. Electric transmission via dc cables promises to be effective because of the low-loss, highcurrent- carrying capability of HTS wire at cryogenic temperatures. However, the thermal management system for the cable must be carefully designed to achieve reliable and energyefficient operation. Here we extend the analysis of a superconducting dc cable concept proposed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), which has one stream of liquid nitrogen flowing in a cryogenic enclosure that includes the power cable, and a separate return tube for the nitrogen. Refrigeration stations positioned every 10 to 20 km cool both nitrogen streams. Both go and return lines are contained in a single vacuum/cryogenic envelope. Other coolants, including gaseous helium and gaseous hydrogen, could provide potential advantages, though they bring some technical challenges to the operation of long-length HTS dc cable systems. A discussion of the heat produced in superconducting cables and a system to remove the heat are discussed. Also, an analysis of the use of various cryogenic fluids in long-distance HTS power cables is presented.

  14. Statistical approach to nuclear level density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen'kov, R. A.; Horoi, M. [Department of Physics, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Zelevinsky, V. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the level density in a finite many-body system with strong interaction between the constituents. Our primary object of applications is the atomic nucleus but the same techniques can be applied to other mesoscopic systems. We calculate and compare nuclear level densities for given quantum numbers obtained by different methods, such as nuclear shell model (the most successful microscopic approach), our main instrument - moments method (statistical approach), and Fermi-gas model; the calculation with the moments method can use any shell-model Hamiltonian excluding the spurious states of the center-of-mass motion. Our goal is to investigate statistical properties of nuclear level density, define its phenomenological parameters, and offer an affordable and reliable way of calculation.

  15. Nuclear force and the EMC effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rong Wang; Xurong Chen

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A linear correlation is shown quantitatively between the magnitude of the EMC effect measured in electron deep inelastic scattering (DIS) and the nuclear residual strong interaction energy (RSIE) obtained from nuclear binding energy subtracting the Coulomb energy contribution. This phenomenological relationship is used to extract the size of in-medium correction (IMC) effect on deuteron and to predict the EMC slopes $|dR_{EMC}/dx|$ of various nuclei. We further investigate the correlations between RSIE and other quantities which are related to the EMC effect. The observed correlations among RSIE, EMC slope and SRC ratio $R_{2N}N_{total}/N_{np(^3S_1)}$ imply that the local nuclear environment drives the modification of quark distributions.

  16. Double hadron leptoproduction in the nuclear medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Belostotskii, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Borysenko, A; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; Demey, M; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Devitsin, E G; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Dreschler, J; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Funel, A; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Garrow, K; Gavrilov, G; Karibian, V; Giordano, F; Grebenyuk, O; Gregor, I M; Griffioen, K; Guler, H; Hadjidakis, C; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hasegawa, T; Hesselink, W H A; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Hristova, I; Iarygin, G; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kiselev, A; Kobayashi, T; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhizhin, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikas, L; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Lorenzon, W; Lü, J; Lu, S; Ma, B Q; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H; Masoli, F; Mexner, V; Meyners, N; Michler, T; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Negodaev, M; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Ohsuga, H; Osborne, A; Perez-Benito, R; Pickert, N; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanjiev, I; Savin, I; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seitz, B; Shearer, C; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V; Sinram, K; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Streit, J; Tait, P; Tanaka, H; Taroian, S P; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A R; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van der Nat, P B; van der Steenhoven, G; Van Haarlem, Y; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Vogel, C; Wang, S; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First measurement of double-hadron production in deep-inelastic scattering has been measured with the HERMES spectrometer at HERA using a 27.6 GeV positron beam with deuterium, nitrogen, krypton and xenon targets. The influence of the nuclear medium on the ratio of double-hadron to single-hadron yields has been investigated. Nuclear effects are clearly observed but with substantially smaller magnitude and reduced $A$-dependence compared to previously measured single-hadron multiplicity ratios. The data are in fair agreement with models based on partonic or pre-hadronic energy loss, while they seem to rule out a pure absorptive treatment of the final state interactions. Thus, the double-hadron ratio provides an additional tool for studying modifications of hadronization in nuclear matter.

  17. RNA matrix models with external interactions and their asymptotic behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garg, I.; Deo, N. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a matrix model of RNA in which an external perturbation on n nucleotides is introduced in the action of the partition function of the polymer chain. The effect of the perturbation appears in the exponential generating function of the partition function as a factor exp(1-n{alpha}/L) (where {alpha} is the ratio of strengths of the original to the perturbed term and L is the length of the chain). The asymptotic behavior of the genus distribution functions as a function of length for the matrix model with interaction is analyzed numerically for all n{<=}L. It is found that as n{alpha}/L is increased from 0 to 1, the term 3{sup L} in the number of diagrams a{sub L,g,{alpha}}{sup '} at a fixed length L, genus g and {alpha}, goes to 2{sup L}[(3-(n{alpha}/L)){sup L} for any n{alpha}/L] and the total number of diagrams N{sub {alpha}}{sup '} at a fixed length L and {alpha} but independent of genus g, undergoes a change in the factor exp({radical}(L)) to 1 (exp[(1-n{alpha}/L){radical}(L)] for any n{alpha}/L). However the exponent L of the dominant length dependent term in a{sub L,g,{alpha}}{sup '} stays unchanged. Hence the universality is robust to changes in the interaction ({alpha}). The distribution functions also exhibit unusual behavior at small lengths.

  18. democrite-00025179,version2-16Mar2006 Role of isospin in the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    democrite-00025179,version2-16Mar2006 Role of isospin in the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition C the thermodynamics of asymmetric nuclear matter using a mean-field approximation with a Skyrme effective interaction der Waals fluid [1]. As a matter of fact, it is recognized that symmetric nuclear matter should un

  19. Method for compression of data using single pass LZSS and run-length encoding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berlin, G.J.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method used preferably with LZSS-based compression methods for compressing a stream of digital data. The method uses a run-length encoding scheme especially suited for data strings of identical data bytes having large run-lengths, such as data representing scanned images. The method reads an input data stream to determine the length of the data strings. Longer data strings are then encoded in one of two ways depending on the length of the string. For data strings having run-lengths less than 18 bytes, a cleared offset and the actual run-length are written to an output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. For data strings of 18 bytes or longer, a set offset and an encoded run-length are written to the output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. The encoded run-length is written in two parts obtained by dividing the run length by a factor of 255. The first of two parts of the encoded run-length is the quotient; the second part is the remainder. Data bytes that are not part of data strings of sufficient length are written directly to the output buffer.

  20. Nuclear facilities: criteria for the design and operation of ventilation systems for nuclear installations other than nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear facilities: criteria for the design and operation of ventilation systems for nuclear installations other than nuclear reactors

  1. Electromagnetic radiation from relativistic nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles Gale; Kevin L. Haglin

    2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some of the results obtained in the study of the production of electromagnetic radiation in relativistic nuclear collisions. We concentrate on the emission of real photons and dileptons from the hot and dense strongly interacting phases of the reaction. We examine the contributions from the partonic sector, as well as those from the nonperturbative hadronic sector. We examine the current data, some of the predictions for future measurements, and comment on what has been learnt so far.

  2. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Joe A. [Michigan State University; Furnstahl, Dick; Horoi, Mihai; Lust, Rusty; Nazaewicc, Witek; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: ? First, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties; ? Second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data; ? Third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory.

  3. Determination of leakage areas in nuclear piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keim, E. [Siemens/KWU, Erlangen (Germany)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the design and operation of nuclear power plants the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) behavior of a piping component has to be shown. This means that the length of a crack resulting in a leak is smaller than the critical crack length and that the leak is safely detectable by a suitable monitoring system. The LBB-concept of Siemens/KWU is based on computer codes for the evaluation of critical crack lengths, crack openings, leakage areas and leakage rates, developed by Siemens/KWU. In the experience with the leak rate program is described while this paper deals with the computation of crack openings and leakage areas of longitudinal and circumferential cracks by means of fracture mechanics. The leakage areas are determined by the integration of the crack openings along the crack front, considering plasticity and geometrical effects. They are evaluated with respect to minimum values for the design of leak detection systems, and maximum values for controlling jet and reaction forces. By means of fracture mechanics LBB for subcritical cracks has to be shown and the calculation of leakage areas is the basis for quantitatively determining the discharge rate of leaking subcritical through-wall cracks. The analytical approach and its validation will be presented for two examples of complex structures. The first one is a pipe branch containing a circumferential crack and the second one is a pipe bend with a longitudinal crack.

  4. Temperature-dependent errors in nuclear lattice simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee; Richard Thomson

    2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the temperature dependence of discretization errors in nuclear lattice simulations. We find that for systems with strong attractive interactions the predominant error arises from the breaking of Galilean invariance. We propose a local "well-tempered" lattice action which eliminates much of this error. The well-tempered action can be readily implemented in lattice simulations for nuclear systems as well as cold atomic Fermi systems.

  5. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Symmetric Nuclear Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gandolfi, Stefano [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Pederiva, Francesco [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); CNR-DEMOCRITOS National Supercomputing Center, Trieste (Italy); Fantoni, Stefano [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati and INFN via Beirut 2/4, 34014 Trieste (Italy); CNR-DEMOCRITOS National Supercomputing Center, Trieste (Italy); Schmidt, Kevin E. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona (United States)

    2007-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an accurate numerical study of the equation of state of nuclear matter based on realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions by means of auxiliary field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) calculations. The AFDMC method samples the spin and isospin degrees of freedom allowing for quantum simulations of large nucleonic systems and represents an important step forward towards a quantitative understanding of problems in nuclear structure and astrophysics.

  6. Instrumentation for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to develop and coordinate nuclear instrumentation standards with resulting economies for the nuclear and radiation fields. There was particular emphasis on coordination and management of the Nuclear Instrument Module (NIM) System, U.S. activity involving the CAMAC international standard dataway system, the FASTBUS modular high-speed data acquisition and control system and processing and management of national nuclear instrumentation and detector standards, as well as a modest amount of assistance and consultation services to the Pollutant Characterization and Safety Research Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The principal accomplishments were the development and maintenance of the NIM instrumentation system that is the predominant instrumentation system in the nuclear and radiation fields worldwide, the CAMAC digital interface system in coordination with the ESONE Committee of European Laboratories, the FASTBUS high-speed system and numerous national and international nuclear instrumentation standards.

  7. Nuclear Science References Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Pritychenko; E. B?ták; B. Singh; J. Totans

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr and the International Atomic Energy Agency http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr.

  8. INDEPENDENT PARTICLE ASPECTS OF NUCLEAR DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robel, M.C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    situations: nuclear vibrations, fission, collisions, theformulae to nuclear vibrations, fission, collisions, thenuclear phenomena: nuclear vibrations, fission, collisions,

  9. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  10. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  11. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levesque, Stephen

    2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) � Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : � Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. � Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. � Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. � Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. � Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. � Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. � Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. � Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium projects. Full technical reports for each of the projects have been submitted as well.

  12. Assessing the nuclear age

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackland, L.; McGuire, S.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents papers on nuclear weapons and arms control. Topics considered include historical aspects, the arms race, nuclear power, flaws in the non-proliferation treaty, North-South issues, East-West confrontation, Soviet decision making with regard to national defense, US and Soviet perspectives on national security, ballistic missile defense (''Star Wars''), political aspects, nuclear winter, stockpiles, US foreign policy, and military strategy.

  13. Nuclear Spectra from Skyrmions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manton, N. S. [DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The structures of Skyrmions, especially for baryon numbers 4, 8 and 12, are reviewed. The quantized Skyrmion states are compared with nuclear spectra.

  14. Nuclear Physics from QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. van Kolck

    2008-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective field theories provide a bridge between QCD and nuclear physics. I discuss light nuclei from this perspective, emphasizing the role of fine-tuning.

  15. Tag: nuclear deterrence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    class"field-item even" property"content:encoded">

    The National Nuclear Security Administration has completed a major capital improvement project that has...

  16. Reference handbook: Nuclear criticality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose for this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with the information necessary to understand the basic principles underlying a nuclear criticality.

  17. Nuclear Physics: Experiment Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UserResearcher Information print version Research Highlights Public Interest Nuclear Physics Accelerator Free Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns...

  18. Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    overall Nuclear Safety Policy & ESH Goals Safety Basis Review and Approval In the DOE governance model, contractors responsible for the facility develop the safety basis and...

  19. Nuclear power attitude trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nealey, S.M.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing vulnerability of nuclear power to political pressures fueled by public concerns, particularly about nuclear plant safety and radioactive waste disposal, has become obvious. Since Eisenhower's Atoms-for-Peace program, utility and government plans have centered on expansion of nuclear power generating capability. While supporters have outnumbered opponents of nuclear power expansion for many years, in the wake of the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident the margin of support has narrowed. The purpose of this paper is to report and put in perspective these long-term attitude trends.

  20. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 5660.1B.

  1. Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    To prevent unauthorized dissemination of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI). Cancels DOE 5635.4 and DOE 5650.3A

  2. National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Related Structures within TA-3 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico U. S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Area...

  3. Nuclear | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One of the greatNuclearNuclear Nuclear An error

  4. DNA Translocation Governed by Interactions with Solid-State Nanopores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meller, Amit

    DNA Translocation Governed by Interactions with Solid-State Nanopores Meni Wanunu, Jason Sutin, Ben dynamics of individual DNA molecules through solid-state nanopores in the diameter range 2.7­5 nm. Our with DNA length by two power laws: for short DNA molecules, in the range 150­3500 bp, we find an exponent

  5. National Nuclear Science Week 2012 - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Know Nuclear National Nuclear Science Week January 23 - 27, 2012 Fostering a deeper public understanding Logos for: National Nuclear Science Week, Nuclear Workforce Initiative,...

  6. Nuclear Reactions and Reactor Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onuchic, José

    Nuclear Reactions and Reactor Safety DO NOT LICK We haven't entirely nailed down what element nuclear chain reaction, 1938 #12;Nuclear Chain Reactions Do nuclear chain reactions lead to runaway explosions? or ? -Controlled nuclear chain reactions possible: control energy release/sec -> More

  7. Nuclear fuel cycle information workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This overview of the nuclear fuel cycle is divided into three parts. First, is a brief discussion of the basic principles of how nuclear reactors work; second, is a look at the major types of nuclear reactors being used and world-wide nuclear capacity; and third, is an overview of the nuclear fuel cycle and the present industrial capability in the US.

  8. Interactive portraiture : designing intimate interactive experiences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuckerman, Orit

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis I present a set of interactive portrait experiences that strive to create an intimate connection between the viewer and the portrayed subject; an emotional experience, one of personal reflection. My interactive ...

  9. Competing interactions in semiconductor quantum dots

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    van den Berg, R.; Brandino, G. P.; El Araby, O.; Konik, R. M.; Gritsev, V.; Caux, J. -S.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce an integrability-based method enabling the study of semiconductor quantum dot models incorporating both the full hyperfine interaction as well as a mean-field treatment of dipole-dipole interactions in the nuclear spin bath. By performing free induction decay and spin echo simulations we characterize the combined effect of both types of interactions on the decoherence of the electron spin, for external fields ranging from low to high values. We show that for spin echo simulations the hyperfine interaction is the dominant source of decoherence at short times for low fields, and competes with the dipole-dipole interactions at longer times. Onmore »the contrary, at high fields the main source of decay is due to the dipole-dipole interactions. In the latter regime an asymmetry in the echo is observed. Furthermore, the non-decaying fraction previously observed for zero field free induction decay simulations in quantum dots with only hyperfine interactions, is destroyed for longer times by the mean-field treatment of the dipolar interactions.« less

  10. Competing interactions in semiconductor quantum dots

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    van den Berg, R. [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Brandino, G. P. [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; El Araby, O. [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Konik, R. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gritsev, V. [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Caux, J. -S. [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands). Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce an integrability-based method enabling the study of semiconductor quantum dot models incorporating both the full hyperfine interaction as well as a mean-field treatment of dipole-dipole interactions in the nuclear spin bath. By performing free induction decay and spin echo simulations we characterize the combined effect of both types of interactions on the decoherence of the electron spin, for external fields ranging from low to high values. We show that for spin echo simulations the hyperfine interaction is the dominant source of decoherence at short times for low fields, and competes with the dipole-dipole interactions at longer times. On the contrary, at high fields the main source of decay is due to the dipole-dipole interactions. In the latter regime an asymmetry in the echo is observed. Furthermore, the non-decaying fraction previously observed for zero field free induction decay simulations in quantum dots with only hyperfine interactions, is destroyed for longer times by the mean-field treatment of the dipolar interactions.

  11. NUCLEAR ENERGY PERGAMON Annals of Nuclear Energy 27 (2000) 138551398

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    annafs of NUCLEAR ENERGY PERGAMON Annals of Nuclear Energy 27 (2000) 138551398 www-4549(00)00033-5 #12;1386 I. Phi!, V. Arzhanov. /Annals qf Nuclear Energy 27 (2000) 1385-1398 subcritical systems (ADS

  12. Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. Bertozzi and R.J. Ledoux, “Nuclear resonance ?uorescenceUrakawa, “Compton ring for nuclear waste management,” Nucl.and B.J. Quiter, “Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorscence for

  13. The Nuclear Revolution, Relative Gains, and International Nuclear Assistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroenig, Matthew

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    204. Bhatia, Shyam. 1988. Nuclear rivals in the Middle East.of the merits of selective nuclear proliferation. Journal ofThe Case for a Ukranian nuclear deterrent. Foreign Affairs.

  14. Automatic scanning of nuclear emulsions with wide-angle acceptance for nuclear fragment detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Fukuda; S. Fukunaga; H. Ishida; K. Kodama; T. Matsuo; S. Mikado; S. Ogawa; H. Shibuya; J. Sudo

    2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear emulsion, a tracking detector with sub-micron position resolution, has played a successful role in the field of particle physics and the analysis speed has been substantially improved by the development of automated scanning systems. This paper describes a newly developed automated scanning system and its application to the analysis of nuclear fragments emitted almost isotropically in nuclear evaporation. This system is able to recognize tracks of nuclear fragments up to |tan{\\theta}|nuclear emulsion is the first trial. Furthermore the track recognition algorithm is performed by a powerful Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) for the first time. This GPU has a sufficient computing power to process large area scanning data with a wide angular acceptance and enough flexibility to allow the tuning of the recognition algorithm. This new system will in particular be applied in the framework of the OPERA experiment : the background in the sample of tau decay candidates due to hadronic interactions will be reduced by a better detection of the emitted nuclear fragments.

  15. Configuration Interactions Constrained by Energy Density Functionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Alex Brown; Angelo Signoracci; Morten Hjorth-Jensen

    2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for constructing a Hamiltonian for configuration interaction calculations with constraints to energies of spherical configurations obtained with energy-density-functional (EDF) methods is presented. This results in a unified model that reproduced the EDF binding-energy in the limit of single-Slater determinants, but can also be used for obtaining energy spectra and correlation energies with renormalized nucleon-nucleon interactions. The three-body and/or density-dependent terms that are necessary for good nuclear saturation properties are contained in the EDF. Applications to binding energies and spectra of nuclei in the region above 208Pb are given.

  16. International Nuclear Safeguards | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes | National NuclearInterlibrary LoanSafeguards | National Nuclear

  17. Nuclear Safety Information Agreement Between the U.S. Nuclear...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Information Agreement Between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environment,...

  18. Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    111989 Mr. John Kinneman, Chief Nuclear Materfals Branch Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region I 475 Allendale Road King of Prussia. Pennsylvania 19406 Dear Mr. Kinneman: -;' .-. 'W...

  19. Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Legislation authorizes states' entrance into the Western Interstate Nuclear Compact, which aims to undertake the cooperation of participating states in deriving the optimum benefit from nuclear and...

  20. PDSF Interactive Nodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive (login) Nodes Interactive (login) Nodes There are 3 interactive nodes at PDSF, pdsf6-8.nersc.gov, that should be accessed via ssh to pdsf.nersc.gov. These are the...

  1. Interactivity and Emotion Cinematography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomlinson, Bill

    Interactivity and Emotion through Cinematography by William Michael Tomlinson, Jr. M #12;Interactivity and Emotion through Cinematography by William Michael Tomlinson, Jr. Submitted cinematography system for an interactive virtual environment. This system controls a virtual camera and several

  2. PDSF Interactive Batch Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive Batch Jobs Running Interactive Batch Jobs You cannot login to the PDSF batch nodes directly but you can run an interactive session on a batch node using either qlogin...

  3. Establishing nuclear facility drill programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of DOE Handbook, Establishing Nuclear Facility Drill Programs, is to provide DOE contractor organizations with guidance for development or modification of drill programs that both train on and evaluate facility training and procedures dealing with a variety of abnormal and emergency operating situations likely to occur at a facility. The handbook focuses on conducting drills as part of a training and qualification program (typically within a single facility), and is not intended to included responses of personnel beyond the site boundary, e.g. Local or State Emergency Management, Law Enforcement, etc. Each facility is expected to develop its own facility specific scenarios, and should not limit them to equipment failures but should include personnel injuries and other likely events. A well-developed and consistently administered drill program can effectively provide training and evaluation of facility operating personnel in controlling abnormal and emergency operating situations. To ensure the drills are meeting their intended purpose they should have evaluation criteria for evaluating the knowledge and skills of the facility operating personnel. Training and evaluation of staff skills and knowledge such as component and system interrelationship, reasoning and judgment, team interactions, and communications can be accomplished with drills. The appendices to this Handbook contain both models and additional guidance for establishing drill programs at the Department`s nuclear facilities.

  4. (U) Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Morgan C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear data comes from a variety of sources and in many flavors. Understanding where the data you use comes from and what flavor it is can be essential to understand and interpret your results. This talk will discuss the nuclear data pipeline with particular emphasis on providing links to additional resources that can be used to explore the issues you will encounter.

  5. Nuclear Explosive Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The directive establishes specific nuclear explosive safety (NES) program requirements to implement the DOE NES standards and other NES criteria for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2B. Canceled by DOE O 452.2D.

  6. Nuclear physics and cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coc, Alain [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris Sud 11, UMR 8609, Bâtiment 104, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    There are important aspects of Cosmology, the scientific study of the large scale properties of the universe as a whole, for which nuclear physics can provide insights. Here, we will focus on Standard Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis and we refer to the previous edition of the School [1] for the aspects concerning the variations of constants in nuclear cosmo-physics.

  7. Nuclear Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .90 76 Nuclear 19.9 1.68 25 Natural Gas 17.7 5.87 91 Hydroelectricity 6.6 Petroleum 3.0 5.39 88 Non Nuclear Science & Engineering Natural Gas Source: Sproule Associates Ltd. Generating costs are high. Gas shutdown: · Pickering 1 (515 MW(e), PHWR, Canada) reconnected 26 Sep 05 Final shutdowns: 3 reactors, Sweden

  8. Persistence-Length Renormalization of Polymers in a Crowded Environment of Hard Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian Schöbl; Sebastian Sturm; Wolfhard Janke; Klaus Kroy

    2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The most conspicuous property of a semiflexible polymer is its persistence length, defined as the decay length of tangent correlations along its contour. Using an efficient stochastic growth algorithm to sample polymers embedded in a quenched two-dimensional hard-disk fluid, we find apparent wormlike chain statistics with a renormalized persistence length. We identify a universal form of the disorder renormalization that suggests itself as a quantitative measure of molecular crowding.

  9. Perturbation hydrogen-atom spectrum in deformed space with minimal length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Stetsko; V. M. Tkachuk

    2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study energy spectrum for hydrogen atom with deformed Heisenberg algebra leading to minimal length. We develop correct perturbation theory free of divergences. It gives a possibility to calculate analytically in the 3D case the corrections to $s$-levels of hydrogen atom caused by the minimal length. Comparing our result with experimental data from precision hydrogen spectroscopy an upper bound for the minimal length is obtained.

  10. China's Nuclear Industry After Fukushima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YUAN, Jingdong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief 2013-9 January 2013 China’s Nuclear Industry Aftera significant impact on the future of China’s nuclear power.the importance of safety as China builds more nuclear power

  11. NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY ANNUAL REPORT 1970

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Letters 24, 1507 (1970); Nuclear Data B4, 663 (1970). 5. R.S. Hager and E. C. Seltzer, Nuclear Data A4, 1 (1968). 6. H.J. Nijgh, and R. Van Lieshout, Nuclear Spectroscopy Tables (

  12. Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10.1007/s11270-009-0270-y Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?MHS) attended a lecture on “Nuclear Responsibility” on theof the Alliance for Nuclear Responsibility. The information

  13. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanni, Emilio Alessandro

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The ...

  14. Supporting Our Nation's Nuclear Industry

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lyons, Peter

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    On the 60th anniversary of the world's first nuclear power plant to produce electricity, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Peter Lyons discusses the Energy Department's and the Administration's commitment to promoting a nuclear renaissance in the United States.

  15. China's Nuclear Industry After Fukushima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YUAN, Jingdong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2013-9 January 2013 China’s Nuclear Industry After FukushimaMarch 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident has had a significanton the future of China’s nuclear power. First, it highlights

  16. Lifetime of the Bose Gas with Resonant Interactions B. S. Rem,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lifetime of the Bose Gas with Resonant Interactions B. S. Rem,1 A. T. Grier,1 I. Ferrier-Barbut,1 U at and around unitarity using a Feshbach resonance in lithium 7. At unitarity, we measure the temperature length a describing two-body interactions becomes infinite. It has been demonstrated both experimentally

  17. World nuclear outlook 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  18. World nuclear outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2010 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  19. Dark energy and extending the geodesic equations of motion: connecting the galactic and cosmological length scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speliotopoulos, A. D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    z RESEARCH ARTICLE Dark energy and extending the geodesicof motion using the Dark Energy length scale was proposed.observations. Keywords Dark energy · Galactic density pro?le

  20. Time and length scales within a fire and implications for numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TIESZEN,SHELDON R.

    2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A partial non-dimensionalization of the Navier-Stokes equations is used to obtain order of magnitude estimates of the rate-controlling transport processes in the reacting portion of a fire plume as a function of length scale. Over continuum length scales, buoyant times scales vary as the square root of the length scale; advection time scales vary as the length scale, and diffusion time scales vary as the square of the length scale. Due to the variation with length scale, each process is dominant over a given range. The relationship of buoyancy and baroclinc vorticity generation is highlighted. For numerical simulation, first principles solution for fire problems is not possible with foreseeable computational hardware in the near future. Filtered transport equations with subgrid modeling will be required as two to three decades of length scale are captured by solution of discretized conservation equations. By whatever filtering process one employs, one must have humble expectations for the accuracy obtainable by numerical simulation for practical fire problems that contain important multi-physics/multi-length-scale coupling with up to 10 orders of magnitude in length scale.

  1. amplified-fragment length polymorphism: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NOTE Shannon L. Datwyler,1,2 Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: in Hemp and Marijuana (Cannabis sativa L.) According to Amplified Fragment Length...

  2. US nuclear weapons policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, M.

    1990-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We are closing chapter one'' of the nuclear age. Whatever happens to the Soviet Union and to Europe, some of the major determinants of nuclear policy will not be what they have been for the last forty-five years. Part of the task for US nuclear weapons policy is to adapt its nuclear forces and the oganizations managing them to the present, highly uncertain, but not urgently competitive situation between the US and the Soviet Union. Containment is no longer the appropriate watchword. Stabilization in the face of uncertainty, a more complicated and politically less readily communicable goal, may come closer. A second and more difficult part of the task is to deal with what may be the greatest potential source of danger to come out of the end of the cold war: the breakup of some of the cooperative institutions that managed the nuclear threat and were created by the cold war. These cooperative institutions, principally the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the Warsaw Pact, the US-Japan alliance, were not created specifically to manage the nuclear threat, but manage it they did. A third task for nuclear weapons policy is that of dealing with nuclear proliferation under modern conditions when the technologies needed to field effective nuclear weapons systems and their command and control apparatus are ever more widely available, and the leverage over some potential proliferators, which stemmed from superpower military support, is likely to be on the wane. This paper will make some suggestions regarding these tasks, bearing in mind that the unsettled nature of that part of the world most likely to become involved in nuclear weapons decisions today must make any suggestions tentative and the allowance for surprise more than usually important.

  3. An improved structural mechanics model for the FRAPCON nuclear fuel performance code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mieloszyk, Alexander James

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to provide improved predictions of Pellet Cladding Mechanical Interaction (PCMI) for the FRAPCON nuclear fuel performance code, a new model, the FRAPCON Radial-Axial Soft Pellet (FRASP) model, was developed. This ...

  4. Measurement of nuclear transparency from A(e,e'[pi]?) reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clasie, Benjamin Michael Patrick

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The color transparency phenomenon refers to the suppression of final-state interactions of a hadron propagating through the nuclear medium at large momentum transfer when the hadron is produced with small transverse size. ...

  5. Experiments on the nuclear interactions of pions and electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minehart, R. C.; Ziock, K. O.H.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses: {pi}{sup +} + d {yields} 2p; Pion Absorption in {sup 3}He; Pion Absorption in {sup 4}He; Evidence for narrow structure in the analyzing power of the {sup 3}He ({rvec p}, d)X reaction; Coherent {eta}-Meson Production in the Reaction {pi}{minus} + {sup 3}He {yields} {eta} + t; Search for heavy neutrinos; The search for fractionally charged particles; Search for the rare decay, {mu} {sup +} {yields} e{sup +} + {gamma}; A Precise Measurement of the {pi}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} e{sup +}{nu} Decay Rate; Transverse and Longitudinal Response Functions for Several Nuclei near Q{sup 2} = 1 (GeV/c){sup 2}; The Q{sup 2}-dependence of the {sup 4}He (e, e'p) coincidence cross section at the quasielastic peak; The Response Function R{sub LT} in the reaction {sup 16}O(e, e' p); and Absorption of anti-protons in heavy nuclei.

  6. SciTech Connect: High energy nuclear interactions with matter...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    31-DEC-73 Research Org: State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (USA). Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: *PROTON...

  7. SECTION I. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND ASTROPHYSICS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release PrintedDEVIATIONS F O

  8. 2009 SECTION I: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruary 2004 Tue,March8 Tue,September09 Wed,2009

  9. 2010 SECTION I: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruary 2004 Tue,March8Energy Scope 20100

  10. 2010-2011 SECTION I: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruary 2004 Tue,March8Energy Scope

  11. 2011-2012 SECTION I: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruary 2004August 2011 Wed,2011 Cost1

  12. 2011-2012 SECTION I: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruary 2004August 2011 Wed,2011 Cost1ASTROPHYSICS H.

  13. 2013-2014 SECTION I: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruary 2004AugustApril 20133TotalASTROPHYSICS

  14. 2014-2015 SECTION I: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, 2014 2014 U.S.10 NERSC's4

  15. Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first subchapter of the statute concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities provides for direct citizen participation in the decision to construct any nuclear power generating facility in...

  16. Pollux | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Pollux | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

  17. Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  18. Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  19. Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  20. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...